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Sample records for mads-box protein positively

  1. SVP-like MADS-box protein from Carya cathayensis forms higher-order complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Hou, Chuanming; Huang, Jianqin; Wang, Zhengjia; Xu, Yingwu

    2015-03-01

    To properly regulate plant flowering time and construct floral pattern, MADS-domain containing transcription factors must form multimers including homo- and hetero-dimers. They are also active in forming hetero-higher-order complexes with three to five different molecules. However, it is not well known if a MADS-box protein can also form homo-higher-order complex. In this study a biochemical approach is utilized to provide insight into the complex formation for an SVP-like MADS-box protein cloned from hickory. The results indicated that the protein is a heterogeneous higher-order complex with the peak population containing over 20 monomers. Y2H verified the protein to form homo-complex in yeast cells. Western blot of the hickory floral bud sample revealed that the protein exists in higher-order polymers in native. Deletion assays indicated that the flexible C-terminal residues are mainly responsible for the higher-order polymer formation and the heterogeneity. Current results provide direct biochemical evidences for an active MADS-box protein to be a high order complex, much higher than a quartermeric polymer. Analysis suggests that a MADS-box subset may be able to self-assemble into large complexes, and thereby differentiate one subfamily from the other in a higher-order structural manner. Present result is a valuable supplement to the action of mechanism for MADS-box proteins in plant development.

  2. Characterization of an AGAMOUS-like MADS box protein, a probable constituent of flowering and fruit ripening regulatory system in banana.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Roy, Sujit; Nag, Anish; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2012-01-01

    The MADS-box family of genes has been shown to play a significant role in the development of reproductive organs, including dry and fleshy fruits. In this study, the molecular properties of an AGAMOUS like MADS box transcription factor in banana cultivar Giant governor (Musa sp, AAA group, subgroup Cavendish) has been elucidated. We have detected a CArG-box sequence binding AGAMOUS MADS-box protein in banana flower and fruit nuclear extracts in DNA-protein interaction assays. The protein fraction in the DNA-protein complex was analyzed by mass spectrometry and using this information we have obtained the full length cDNA of the corresponding protein. The deduced protein sequence showed ~95% amino acid sequence homology with MA-MADS5, a MADS-box protein described previously from banana. We have characterized the domains of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein involved in DNA binding and homodimer formation in vitro using full-length and truncated versions of affinity purified recombinant proteins. Furthermore, in order to gain insight about how DNA bending is achieved by this MADS-box factor, we performed circular permutation and phasing analysis using the wild type recombinant protein. The AGAMOUS MADS-box protein identified in this study has been found to predominantly accumulate in the climacteric fruit pulp and also in female flower ovary. In vivo and in vitro assays have revealed specific binding of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein to CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes in banana fruit. Overall, the expression patterns of this MADS-box protein in banana female flower ovary and during various phases of fruit ripening along with the interaction of the protein to the CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes lead to interesting assumption about the possible involvement of this AGAMOUS MADS-box factor in banana fruit ripening and floral reproductive organ development.

  3. Characterization of an AGAMOUS-like MADS Box Protein, a Probable Constituent of Flowering and Fruit Ripening Regulatory System in Banana

    PubMed Central

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Roy, Sujit; Nag, Anish; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Sengupta, Dibyendu N.

    2012-01-01

    The MADS-box family of genes has been shown to play a significant role in the development of reproductive organs, including dry and fleshy fruits. In this study, the molecular properties of an AGAMOUS like MADS box transcription factor in banana cultivar Giant governor (Musa sp, AAA group, subgroup Cavendish) has been elucidated. We have detected a CArG-box sequence binding AGAMOUS MADS-box protein in banana flower and fruit nuclear extracts in DNA-protein interaction assays. The protein fraction in the DNA-protein complex was analyzed by mass spectrometry and using this information we have obtained the full length cDNA of the corresponding protein. The deduced protein sequence showed ∼95% amino acid sequence homology with MA-MADS5, a MADS-box protein described previously from banana. We have characterized the domains of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein involved in DNA binding and homodimer formation in vitro using full-length and truncated versions of affinity purified recombinant proteins. Furthermore, in order to gain insight about how DNA bending is achieved by this MADS-box factor, we performed circular permutation and phasing analysis using the wild type recombinant protein. The AGAMOUS MADS-box protein identified in this study has been found to predominantly accumulate in the climacteric fruit pulp and also in female flower ovary. In vivo and in vitro assays have revealed specific binding of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein to CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes in banana fruit. Overall, the expression patterns of this MADS-box protein in banana female flower ovary and during various phases of fruit ripening along with the interaction of the protein to the CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes lead to interesting assumption about the possible involvement of this AGAMOUS MADS-box factor in banana fruit ripening and floral reproductive organ development. PMID:22984496

  4. CHIMERIC FLORAL ORGANS1, encoding a monocot-specific MADS box protein, regulates floral organ identity in rice.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xianchun; Li, Yunfeng; Luo, Zengke; Ren, Deyong; Fang, Likui; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Fangming; Ling, Yinghua; Yang, Zhenglin; Liu, Yongsheng; He, Guanghua

    2012-10-01

    The control of floral organ identity by homeotic MADS box genes is well established in eudicots. However, grasses have highly specialized outer floral organs, and the identities of the genes that regulate the highly specialized outer floral organs of grasses remain unclear. In this study, we characterized a MIKC-type MADS box gene, CHIMERIC FLORAL ORGANS (CFO1), which plays a key role in the regulation of floral organ identity in rice (Oryza sativa). The cfo1 mutant displayed defective marginal regions of the palea, chimeric floral organs, and ectopic floral organs. Map-based cloning demonstrated that CFO1 encoded the OsMADS32 protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CFO1/OsMADS32 belonged to a monocot-specific clade in the MIKC-type MADS box gene family. The expression domains of CFO1 were mainly restricted to the marginal region of the palea and inner floral organs. The floral organ identity gene DROOPING LEAF (DL) was expressed ectopically in all defective organs of cfo1 flowers. Double mutant analysis revealed that loss of DL function mitigated some of the defects of floral organs in cfo1 flowers. We propose that the CFO1 gene plays a pivotal role in maintaining floral organ identity through negative regulation of DL expression.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Zhang, Rong-Zhi; Guo, Juan-Juan; Liu, Dan-Mei; Li, Ai-Li; Fan, Ren-Chun; Mao, Long; Zhang, Xiang-Qi

    2014-01-01

    MADS-box genes are important transcription factors for plant development, especially floral organogenesis. Brachypodium distachyon is a model for biofuel plants and temperate grasses such as wheat and barley, but a comprehensive analysis of MADS-box family proteins in Brachypodium is still missing. We report here a genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in Brachypodium distachyon. We identified 57 MADS-box genes and classified them into 32 MIKC(c)-type, 7 MIKC*-type, 9 Mα, 7 Mβ and 2 Mγ MADS-box genes according to their phylogenetic relationships to the Arabidopsis and rice MADS-box genes. Detailed gene structure and motif distribution were then studied. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that Brachypodium MADS-box genes distributed evenly across five chromosomes. In addition, five pairs of type II MADS-box genes were found on synteny blocks derived from whole genome duplication blocks. We then performed a systematic expression analysis of Brachypodium MADS-box genes in various tissues, particular floral organs. Further detection under salt, drought, and low-temperature conditions showed that some MADS-box genes may also be involved in abiotic stress responses, including type I genes. Comparative studies of MADS-box genes among Brachypodium, rice and Arabidopsis showed that Brachypodium had fewer gene duplication events. Taken together, this work provides useful data for further functional studies of MADS-box genes in Brachypodium distachyon.

  6. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the MADS-box gene family in sesame.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-09-10

    MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that play crucial roles in plant growth and development. Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an oil crop that contributes to the daily oil and protein requirements of almost half of the world's population; therefore, a genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family is needed. Fifty-seven MADS-box genes were identified from 14 linkage groups of the sesame genome. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships with Arabidopsis thaliana, Utricularia gibba and Solanum lycopersicum MADS-box genes was performed. Sesame MADS-box genes were clustered into four groups: 28 MIKC(c)-type, 5 MIKC(⁎)-type, 14 Mα-type and 10 Mγ-type. Gene structure analysis revealed from 1 to 22 exons of sesame MADS-box genes. The number of exons in type II MADS-box genes greatly exceeded the number in type I genes. Motif distribution analysis of sesame MADS-box genes also indicated that type II MADS-box genes contained more motifs than type I genes. These results suggested that type II sesame MADS-box genes had more complex structures. By analyzing expression profiles of MADS-box genes in seven sesame transcriptomes, we determined that MIKC(C)-type MADS-box genes played significant roles in sesame flower and seed development. Although most MADS-box genes in the same clade showed similar expression features, some gene functions were diversified from the orthologous Arabidopsis genes. This research will contribute to uncovering the role of MADS-box genes in sesame development.

  7. Banana Ovate Family Protein MaOFP1 and MADS-Box Protein MuMADS1 Antagonistically Regulated Banana Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Miao, Hongxia; Zhang, Jianbin; Jia, Caihong; Wang, Zhuo; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The ovate family protein named MaOFP1 was identified in banana (Musa acuminata L.AAA) fruit by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method using the banana MADS-box gene MuMADS1 as bait and a 2 day postharvest (DPH) banana fruit cDNA library as prey. The interaction between MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 was further confirmed by Y2H and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) methods, which showed that the MuMADS1 K domain interacted with MaOFP1. Real-time quantitative PCR evaluation of MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression patterns in banana showed that they are highly expressed in 0 DPH fruit, but present in low levels in the stem, which suggests that simultaneous but different expression patterns exist for both MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 in different tissues and developing fruits. Meanwhile, MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated and greatly suppressed, respectively, by exogenous ethylene. In contrast, MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated while MuMADS1 was greatly suppressed by the ethylene competitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP). These results indicate that MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 are antagonistically regulated by ethylene and might play important roles in postharvest banana fruit ripening. PMID:25886169

  8. The interaction of banana MADS-box protein MuMADS1 and ubiquitin-activating enzyme E-MuUBA in post-harvest banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Hua; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Cai-Hong; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Jia-Shui; Yang, Zi-Xian; Xu, Bi-Yu; Jin, Zhi-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : The interaction of MuMADS1 and MuUBA in banana was reported, which will help us to understand the mechanism of the MADS-box gene in regulating banana fruit development and ripening. The ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 gene fragment MuUBA was obtained from banana (Musa acuminata L.AAA) fruit by the yeast two-hybrid method using the banana MADS-box gene MuMADS1 as bait and 2-day post-harvest banana fruit cDNA library as prey. MuMADS1 interacted with MuUBA. The interaction of MuMADS1 and MuUBA in vivo was further proved by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Real-time quantitative PCR evaluation of MuMADS1 and MuUBA expression patterns in banana showed that they are highly expressed in the ovule 4 stage, but present in low levels in the stem, which suggests a simultaneously differential expression action exists for both MuMADS1 and MuUBA in different tissues and developmental fruits. MuMADS1 and MuUBA expression was highly stimulated by exogenous ethylene and suppressed by 1-methylcyclopropene. These results indicated that MuMADS1 and MuUBA were co-regulated by ethylene and might play an important role in post-harvest banana fruit ripening.

  9. Computational identification and analysis of MADS box genes in Camellia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Madhurjya; Borchetia, Sangeeta; Bandyopadhyay, Tanoy

    2015-01-01

    MADS (Minichromosome Maintenance1 Agamous Deficiens Serum response factor) box genes encode transcription factors and they play a key role in growth and development of flowering plants. There are two types of MADS box genes- Type I (serum response factor (SRF)-like) and Type II (myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-like). Type II MADS box genes have a conserved MIKC domain (MADS DNA-binding domain, intervening domain, keratin-like domain, and c-terminal domain) and these were extensively studied in plants. Compared to other plants very little is known about MADS box genes in Camellia sinensis. The present study aims at identifying and analyzing the MADS-box genes present in Camellia sinensis. A comparative bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis of the Camellia sinensis sequences along with Arabidopsis thaliana MADS box sequences available in the public domain databases led to the identification of 16 genes which were orthologous to Type II MADS box gene family members. The protein sequences were classified into distinct clades which are associated with the conserved function of flower and seed development. The identified genes may be used for gene expression and gene manipulation studies to elucidate their role in the development and flowering of tea which may pave the way to improve the crop productivity.

  10. Computational identification and analysis of MADS box genes in Camellia sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Madhurjya; Borchetia, Sangeeta; Bandyopadhyay, Tanoy

    2015-01-01

    MADS (Minichromosome Maintenance1 Agamous Deficiens Serum response factor) box genes encode transcription factors and they play a key role in growth and development of flowering plants. There are two types of MADS box genes- Type I (serum response factor (SRF)-like) and Type II (myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-like). Type II MADS box genes have a conserved MIKC domain (MADS DNA-binding domain, intervening domain, keratin-like domain, and c-terminal domain) and these were extensively studied in plants. Compared to other plants very little is known about MADS box genes in Camellia sinensis. The present study aims at identifying and analyzing the MADS-box genes present in Camellia sinensis. A comparative bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis of the Camellia sinensis sequences along with Arabidopsis thaliana MADS box sequences available in the public domain databases led to the identification of 16 genes which were orthologous to Type II MADS box gene family members. The protein sequences were classified into distinct clades which are associated with the conserved function of flower and seed development. The identified genes may be used for gene expression and gene manipulation studies to elucidate their role in the development and flowering of tea which may pave the way to improve the crop productivity. PMID:25914445

  11. Adaptive evolution in the Arabidopsis MADS-box gene family inferred from its complete resolved phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Castilla, León Patricio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2003-01-01

    Gene duplication is a substrate of evolution. However, the relative importance of positive selection versus relaxation of constraints in the functional divergence of gene copies is still under debate. Plant MADS-box genes encode transcriptional regulators key in various aspects of development and have undergone extensive duplications to form a large family. We recovered 104 MADS sequences from the Arabidopsis genome. Bayesian phylogenetic trees recover type II lineage as a monophyletic group and resolve a branching sequence of monophyletic groups within this lineage. The type I lineage is comprised of several divergent groups. However, contrasting gene structure and patterns of chromosomal distribution between type I and II sequences suggest that they had different evolutionary histories and support the placement of the root of the gene family between these two groups. Site-specific and site-branch analyses of positive Darwinian selection (PDS) suggest that different selection regimes could have affected the evolution of these lineages. We found evidence for PDS along the branch leading to flowering time genes that have a direct impact on plant fitness. Sites with high probabilities of having been under PDS were found in the MADS and K domains, suggesting that these played important roles in the acquisition of novel functions during MADS-box diversification. Detected sites are targets for further experimental analyses. We argue that adaptive changes in MADS-domain protein sequences have been important for their functional divergence, suggesting that changes within coding regions of transcriptional regulators have influenced phenotypic evolution of plants. PMID:14597714

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage).

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2015-02-01

    The MADS-box gene family is an ancient and well-studied transcription factor family that functions in almost every developmental process in plants. There are a number of reports about the MADS-box family in different plant species, but systematic analysis of the MADS-box transcription factor family in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage) is still lacking. In this study, 160 MADS-box transcription factors were identified from the entire Chinese cabbage genome and compared with the MADS-box factors from 21 other representative plant species. A detailed list of MADS proteins from these 22 species was sorted. Phylogenetic analysis of the BrMADS genes, together with their Arabidopsis and rice counterparts, showed that the BrMADS genes were categorised into type I (Mα, Mβ, Mγ) and type II (MIKC(C), MIKC*) groups, and the MIKC(C) proteins were further divided into 13 subfamilies. The Chinese cabbage type II group has 95 members, which is twice as much as the Arabidopsis type II group, indicating that the Chinese cabbage type II genes have been retained more frequently than the type I genes. Finally, RNA-seq transcriptome data and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that BrMADS genes are expressed in a tissue-specific manner similar to Arabidopsis. Interestingly, a number of BrMIKC genes showed responses to different abiotic stress treatments, suggesting a function for some of the genes in these processes as well. Taken together, the characterization of the B. rapa MADS-box family presented here, will certainly help in the selection of appropriate candidate genes and further facilitate functional studies in Chinese cabbage.

  13. The petunia MADS box gene FBP11 determines ovule identity.

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, L; Franken, J; Koetje, E; van Went, J; Dons, H J; Angenent, G C; van Tunen, A J

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the wealth of information relating to genes regulating floral meristem and floral organ identity, only limited data are available concerning genes that are involved in determining and regulating the identity and development of an ovule. We have recently isolated the floral binding protein 11 (FBP11) MADS box gene from petunia and found that it is expressed exclusively in ovule primordia and subsequently in the ovules, suggesting a role for this gene in ovule formation. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a recombinant gene in which the full-size FBP11 cDNA was placed under the control of a strong cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Transgenic petunia plants expressing this chimeric gene have ovulelike structures on the adaxial side of the sepals and the abaxial side of the petals. Detailed morphological studies showed that these ovulelike structures are true ovules. RNA gel blot analysis was performed to investigate ectopic FBP11 expression in relation to the expression of the closely related FBP7 gene and the putative petunia class C-type homeotic genes FBP6 and pMADS3. Our results indicate that FBP11 represents an ovule identity gene. A new model describing the mode of action of FBP11 as an additional class D MADS box gene is presented. PMID:8535139

  14. SEPALLATA3: the 'glue' for MADS box transcription factor complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Immink, Richard GH; Tonaco, Isabella AN; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna; van Dijk, Aalt DJ; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Borst, Jan W; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant MADS box proteins play important roles in a plethora of developmental processes. In order to regulate specific sets of target genes, MADS box proteins dimerize and are thought to assemble into multimeric complexes. In this study a large-scale yeast three-hybrid screen is utilized to provide insight into the higher-order complex formation capacity of the Arabidopsis MADS box family. SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) has been shown to mediate complex formation and, therefore, special attention is paid to this factor in this study. Results In total, 106 multimeric complexes were identified; in more than half of these at least one SEP protein was present. Besides the known complexes involved in determining floral organ identity, various complexes consisting of combinations of proteins known to play a role in floral organ identity specification, and flowering time determination were discovered. The capacity to form this latter type of complex suggests that homeotic factors play essential roles in down-regulation of the MADS box genes involved in floral timing in the flower via negative auto-regulatory loops. Furthermore, various novel complexes were identified that may be important for the direct regulation of the floral transition process. A subsequent detailed analysis of the APETALA3, PISTILLATA, and SEP3 proteins in living plant cells suggests the formation of a multimeric complex in vivo. Conclusions Overall, these results provide strong indications that higher-order complex formation is a general and essential molecular mechanism for plant MADS box protein functioning and attribute a pivotal role to the SEP3 'glue' protein in mediating multimerization. PMID:19243611

  15. Transcriptome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in the orchid Erycina pusilla.

    PubMed

    Lin, Choun-Sea; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Liao, De-Chih; Chang, Wan-Jung; Chou, Ming-Lun; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chen, Jeremy J W; Ko, Swee-Suak; Chan, Ming-Tsair; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Orchids exhibit a range of unique flower shapes and are a valuable ornamental crop. MADS-box transcription factors are key regulatory components in flower initiation and development. Changing the flower shape and flowering time can increase the value of the orchid in the ornamental horticulture industry. In this study, 28 MADS-box genes were identified from the transcriptome database of the model orchid Erycina pusilla. The full-length genomic sequences of these MADS-box genes were obtained from BAC clones. Of these, 27 were MIKC-type EpMADS (two truncated forms) and one was a type I EpMADS. Eleven EpMADS genes contained introns longer than 10 kb. Phylogenetic analysis classified the 24 MIKC(c) genes into nine subfamilies. Three specific protein motifs, AG, FUL and SVP, were identified and used to classify three subfamilies. The expression profile of each EpMADS gene correlated with its putative function. The phylogenetic analysis was highly correlated with the protein domain identification and gene expression results. Spatial expression of EpMADS6, EpMADS12 and EpMADS15 was strongly detected in the inflorescence meristem, floral bud and seed via in situ hybridization. The subcellular localization of the 28 EpMADS proteins was also investigated. Although EpMADS27 lacks a complete MADS-box domain, EpMADS27-YFP was localized in the nucleus. This characterization of the orchid MADS-box family genes provides useful information for both orchid breeding and studies of flowering and evolution.

  16. Conserved homeodomain proteins interact with MADS box protein Mcm1 to restrict ECB-dependent transcription to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Pramila, Tata; Miles, Shawna; GuhaThakurta, Debraj; Jemiolo, Dave; Breeden, Linda L.

    2002-01-01

    Two homeodomain proteins, Yox1 and Yhp1, act as repressors at early cell cycle boxes (ECBs) to restrict their activity to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle in budding yeast. These proteins bind to Mcm1 and to a typical homeodomain binding site. The expression of Yox1 is periodic and directly correlated with its binding to, and repression of, ECB activity. The absence of Yox1 and Yhp1 or the constitutive expression of Yox1 leads to the loss of cell-cycle regulation of ECB activity. Therefore, the cell-cycle-regulated expression of these repressors defines the interval of ECB-dependent transcription. Twenty-eight genes, including MCM2-7, CDC6, SWI4, CLN3, and a number of genes required during late M phase have been identified that are coordinately regulated by this pathway. PMID:12464633

  17. Phytoplasma Effector SAP54 Hijacks Plant Reproduction by Degrading MADS-box Proteins and Promotes Insect Colonization in a RAD23-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Allyson M.; Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Zdziarska, Anna M.; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens that rely upon multiple hosts to complete their life cycles often modify behavior and development of these hosts to coerce them into improving pathogen fitness. However, few studies describe mechanisms underlying host coercion. In this study, we elucidate the mechanism by which an insect-transmitted pathogen of plants alters floral development to convert flowers into vegetative tissues. We find that phytoplasma produce a novel effector protein (SAP54) that interacts with members of the MADS-domain transcription factor (MTF) family, including key regulators SEPALLATA3 and APETALA1, that occupy central positions in the regulation of floral development. SAP54 mediates degradation of MTFs by interacting with proteins of the RADIATION SENSITIVE23 (RAD23) family, eukaryotic proteins that shuttle substrates to the proteasome. Arabidopsis rad23 mutants do not show conversion of flowers into leaf-like tissues in the presence of SAP54 and during phytoplasma infection, emphasizing the importance of RAD23 to the activity of SAP54. Remarkably, plants with SAP54-induced leaf-like flowers are more attractive for colonization by phytoplasma leafhopper vectors and this colonization preference is dependent on RAD23. An effector that targets and suppresses flowering while simultaneously promoting insect herbivore colonization is unprecedented. Moreover, RAD23 proteins have, to our knowledge, no known roles in flower development, nor plant defence mechanisms against insects. Thus SAP54 generates a short circuit between two key pathways of the host to alter development, resulting in sterile plants, and promotes attractiveness of these plants to leafhopper vectors helping the obligate phytoplasmas reproduce and propagate (zombie plants). PMID:24714165

  18. Phytoplasma effector SAP54 hijacks plant reproduction by degrading MADS-box proteins and promotes insect colonization in a RAD23-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Allyson M; Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Zdziarska, Anna M; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2014-04-01

    Pathogens that rely upon multiple hosts to complete their life cycles often modify behavior and development of these hosts to coerce them into improving pathogen fitness. However, few studies describe mechanisms underlying host coercion. In this study, we elucidate the mechanism by which an insect-transmitted pathogen of plants alters floral development to convert flowers into vegetative tissues. We find that phytoplasma produce a novel effector protein (SAP54) that interacts with members of the MADS-domain transcription factor (MTF) family, including key regulators SEPALLATA3 and APETALA1, that occupy central positions in the regulation of floral development. SAP54 mediates degradation of MTFs by interacting with proteins of the RADIATION SENSITIVE23 (RAD23) family, eukaryotic proteins that shuttle substrates to the proteasome. Arabidopsis rad23 mutants do not show conversion of flowers into leaf-like tissues in the presence of SAP54 and during phytoplasma infection, emphasizing the importance of RAD23 to the activity of SAP54. Remarkably, plants with SAP54-induced leaf-like flowers are more attractive for colonization by phytoplasma leafhopper vectors and this colonization preference is dependent on RAD23. An effector that targets and suppresses flowering while simultaneously promoting insect herbivore colonization is unprecedented. Moreover, RAD23 proteins have, to our knowledge, no known roles in flower development, nor plant defence mechanisms against insects. Thus SAP54 generates a short circuit between two key pathways of the host to alter development, resulting in sterile plants, and promotes attractiveness of these plants to leafhopper vectors helping the obligate phytoplasmas reproduce and propagate (zombie plants).

  19. Molecular modeling and expression analysis of a MADS-box cDNA from mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Sánchez, Magda A; Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A; Hernandez-Navarro, Eduardo; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria; Martínez-Téllez, Miguel A; Casas-Flores, Sergio; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Islas-Osuna, Maria A

    2014-08-01

    MADS-box genes are a large family of transcription factors initially discovered for their role during development of flowers and fruits. The MADS-box transcription factors from animals have been studied by X-ray protein crystallography but those from plants remain to be studied. In this work, a MADS-box cDNA from mango encoding a protein of 254 residues was obtained and compared. Based on phylogenetic analysis, it is proposed that the MADS-box transcription factor expressed in mango fruit (MiMADS1) belongs to the SEP clade of MADS-box proteins. MiMADS1 mRNA steady-state levels did not changed during mango fruit development and were up-regulated, when mango fruits reached physiological maturity as assessed by qRT-PCR. Thus, MiMADS1 could have a role during development and ripening of this fruit. The theoretical structural model of MiMADS1 showed the DNA-binding domain folding bound to a double-stranded DNA. Therefore, MiMADS1 is an interesting model for understanding DNA-binding for transcriptional regulation.

  20. Characterization and expression analysis of six MADS-box genes in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongbao; Li, Huiyong; Zhang, Dengfeng; Liu, Yinghui; Fu, Jing; Shi, Yunsu; Song, Yanchun; Wang, Tianyu; Li, Yu

    2012-05-15

    MADS-box genes encode a family of transcription factors, which control diverse developmental processes in flowering plants, with organs ranging from roots, flowers and fruits. In this study, six maize cDNAs encoding MADS-box proteins were isolated. BLASTX searches and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the six MADS-box genes belonging to the AGL2-like clade. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that these genes had differential expression patterns in different organs in maize. The results of yeast one-hybrid system indicated that the protein ZMM3-1, ZMM3-2, ZMM6, ZMM7-L, ZMM8-L and ZMM14-L had transcriptional activation activity. Subcellular localization of ZMM7-L demonstrated that the fluorescence of ZMM7-L-GFP was mainly detected in the nuclei of onion epidermal cells. qRT-PCR analysis for expression pattern of ZMM7-L showed that the gene was up-regulated by abiotic stresses and down-regulated by exogenous ABA. The germination rates of over-expression transgenic lines were lower than that of the wild type on medium with 150 mM NaCl, 350 mM mannitol. These results indicated that ZMM7-L might be a negative transcription factor responsive to abiotic stresses.

  1. HbMADS4, a MADS-box Transcription Factor from Hevea brasiliensis, Negatively Regulates HbSRPP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Liang; Wei, Li-Ran; Guo, Dong; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Jia-Hong; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In plants MADS-box transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in growth and development. However, no plant MADS-box gene has been identified to have a function related to secondary metabolites regulation. Here, a MADS-box TF gene, designated as HbMADS4, was isolated from Hevea brasiliensis by the yeast one-hybrid experiment to screen the latex cDNA library using the promoter of the gene encoding H. brasiliensis small rubber particle protein (HbSRPP) as bait. HbMADS4 was 984-bp containing 633-bp open reading frame encoding a deduced protein of 230 amino acid residues with a typical conserved MADS-box motif at the N terminus. HbMADS4 was preferentially expressed in the latex, but little expression was detected in the leaves, flowers, and roots. Its expression was inducible by methyl jasmonate and ethylene. Furthermore, transient over-expression and over-expression of HbMADS4 in transgenic tobacco plants significantly suppressed the activity of the HbSRP promoter. Altogether, it is proposed that HbMADS4 is a negative regulator of HbSRPP which participates in the biosynthesis of natural rubber. PMID:27895659

  2. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the MADS-box gene family in apple.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yi; Dong, Qinglong; Ji, Zhirui; Chi, Fumei; Cong, Peihua; Zhou, Zongshan

    2015-01-25

    The MADS-box gene family is one of the most widely studied families in plants and has diverse developmental roles in flower pattern formation, gametophyte cell division and fruit differentiation. Although the genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in some species, little is known regarding MADS-box genes in apple (Malus domestica). In this study, 146 MADS-box genes were identified in the apple genome and were phylogenetically clustered into six subgroups (MIKC(c), MIKC*, Mα, Mβ, Mγ and Mδ) with the MADS-box genes from Arabidopsis and rice. The predicted apple MADS-box genes were distributed across all 17 chromosomes at different densities. Additionally, the MADS-box domain, exon length, gene structure and motif compositions of the apple MADS-box genes were analysed. Moreover, the expression of all of the apple MADS-box genes was analysed in the root, stem, leaf, flower tissues and five stages of fruit development. All of the apple MADS-box genes, with the exception of some genes in each group, were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, which indicates that the MADS-box genes are involved in various aspects of the physiological and developmental processes of the apple. To the best of our knowledge, this report describes the first genome-wide analysis of the apple MADS-box gene family, and the results should provide valuable information for understanding the classification, cloning and putative functions of this family.

  3. Molecular cloning, identification, and chromosomal localization of two MADS box genes in peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2008-06-01

    MADS box proteins play an important role in floral development. To find genes involved in the floral transition of Prunus species, cDNAs for two MADS box genes, PpMADS1 and PpMADS10, were cloned using degenerate primers and 5'- and 3'-RACE based on the sequence database of P. persica and P. dulcis. The full length of PpMADS1 cDNA is 1,071 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 717 bp and coding for a polypeptide of 238 amino acid residues. The full length of PpMADS10 cDNA is 937 bp containing an ORF of 633 bp and coding for a polypeptide of 210 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison revealed that PpMADS1 and PpMADS10 were highly homologous to genes AP1 and PI in Arabidopsis, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PpMADS1 belongs to the euAP1 clade of class A, and PpMADS10 is a member of GLO/PI clade of class B. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpMADS1 was expressed in sepal, petal, carpel, and fruit, which was slightly different from the expression pattern of AP1; PpMADS10 was expressed in petal and stamen, which shared the same expression pattern as PI. Using selective mapping strategy, PpMADS1 was assigned onto the Bin1:50 on the G1 linkage group between the markers MCO44 and TSA2, and PpMADS10 onto the Bin1:73 on the same linkage group between the markers Lap-1 and FGA8. Our results provided the basis for further dissection of the two MADS box gene function.

  4. The MADS-Box transcription factor Bcmads1 is required for growth, sclerotia production and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanquan; Li, Hua; Qin, Guozheng; He, Chang; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors are highly conserved in eukaryotic species and involved in a variety of biological processes. Little is known, however, regarding the function of MADS-box genes in Botrytis cinerea, a fungal pathogen with a wide host range. Here, the functional role of the B. cinerea MADS-box gene, Bcmads1, was characterized in relation to the development, pathogenicity and production of sclerotia. The latter are formed upon incubation in darkness and serve as survival structures during winter and as the female parent in sexual reproduction. Bcmads1 is indispensable for sclerotia production. RT-qPCR analysis suggested that Bcmads1 modulated sclerotia formation by regulating the expression of light-responsive genes. Bcmads1 is required for the full virulence potential of B. cinerea on apple fruit. A comparative proteomic analysis identified 63 proteins, representing 55 individual genes that are potential targets of Bcmads1. Among them, Bcsec14 and Bcsec31 are associated with vesicle transport. Deletion of Bcsec14 and Bcsec31 resulted in a reduction in the virulence and protein secretion of B. cinerea. These results suggest that Bcmads1 may influence sclerotia formation by modulating light responsive gene expression and regulate pathogenicity by its effect on the protein secretion process. PMID:27658442

  5. MADS-Box Genes and Gibberellins Regulate Bolting in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Han, Yingyan; Chen, Zijing; Lv, Shanshan; Ning, Kang; Ji, Xueliang; Liu, Xueying; Wang, Qian; Liu, Renyi; Fan, Shuangxi; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Bolting in lettuce is promoted by high temperature and bolting resistance is of great economic importance for lettuce production. But how bolting is regulated at the molecular level remains elusive. Here, a bolting resistant line S24 and a bolting sensitive line S39 were selected for morphological, physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic comparisons. A total of 12204 genes were differentially expressed in S39 vs. S24. Line S39 was featured with larger leaves, higher levels of chlorophyll, soluble sugar, anthocyanin and auxin, consistent with its up-regulation of genes implicated in photosynthesis, oxidation-reduction and auxin actions. Proteomic analysis identified 30 differentially accumulated proteins in lines S39 and S24 upon heat treatment, and 19 out of the 30 genes showed differential expression in the RNA-Seq data. Exogenous gibberellins (GA) treatment promoted bolting in both S39 and S24, while 12 flowering promoting MADS-box genes were specifically induced in line S39, suggesting that although GA regulates bolting in lettuce, it may be the MADS-box genes, not GA, that plays a major role in differing the bolting resistance between these two lettuce lines.

  6. MADS-Box Genes and Gibberellins Regulate Bolting in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yingyan; Chen, Zijing; Lv, Shanshan; Ning, Kang; Ji, Xueliang; Liu, Xueying; Wang, Qian; Liu, Renyi; Fan, Shuangxi; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Bolting in lettuce is promoted by high temperature and bolting resistance is of great economic importance for lettuce production. But how bolting is regulated at the molecular level remains elusive. Here, a bolting resistant line S24 and a bolting sensitive line S39 were selected for morphological, physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic comparisons. A total of 12204 genes were differentially expressed in S39 vs. S24. Line S39 was featured with larger leaves, higher levels of chlorophyll, soluble sugar, anthocyanin and auxin, consistent with its up-regulation of genes implicated in photosynthesis, oxidation-reduction and auxin actions. Proteomic analysis identified 30 differentially accumulated proteins in lines S39 and S24 upon heat treatment, and 19 out of the 30 genes showed differential expression in the RNA-Seq data. Exogenous gibberellins (GA) treatment promoted bolting in both S39 and S24, while 12 flowering promoting MADS-box genes were specifically induced in line S39, suggesting that although GA regulates bolting in lettuce, it may be the MADS-box genes, not GA, that plays a major role in differing the bolting resistance between these two lettuce lines. PMID:28018414

  7. The Evolution of the SEPALLATA Subfamily of MADS-Box Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Laura M.; Kong, Hongzhi; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Kim, Sangtae; Soltis, Pamela S.; Landherr, Lena L.; Soltis, Douglas E.; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Ma, Hong

    2005-01-01

    Members of the SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box subfamily are required for specifying the “floral state” by contributing to floral organ and meristem identity. SEP genes have not been detected in gymnosperms and seem to have originated since the lineage leading to extant angiosperms diverged from extant gymnosperms. Therefore, both functional and evolutionary studies suggest that SEP genes may have been critical for the origin of the flower. To gain insights into the evolution of SEP genes, we isolated nine genes from plants that occupy phylogenetically important positions. Phylogenetic analyses of SEP sequences show that several gene duplications occurred during the evolution of this subfamily, providing potential opportunities for functional divergence. The first duplication occurred prior to the origin of the extant angiosperms, resulting in the AGL2/3/4 and AGL9 clades. Subsequent duplications occurred within these clades in the eudicots and monocots. The timing of the first SEP duplication approximately coincides with duplications in the DEFICIENS/GLOBOSA and AGAMOUS MADS-box subfamilies, which may have resulted from either a proposed genome-wide duplication in the ancestor of extant angiosperms or multiple independent duplication events. Regardless of the mechanism of gene duplication, these pairs of duplicate transcription factors provided new possibilities of genetic interactions that may have been important in the origin of the flower. PMID:15687268

  8. MADS-box genes in maize: Frequent targets of selection during domestication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that are key regulators of plant inflorescence and flower development. We examined DNA sequence variation in 32 maize MADS-box genes and 32 random loci from the maize genome and investigated their involvement in maize domestication and improvement. Using n...

  9. Expression of paralogous SEP-, FUL-, AG- and STK-like MADS-box genes in wild-type and peloric Phalaenopsis flowers.

    PubMed

    Acri-Nunes-Miranda, Roberta; Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The diverse flowers of Orchidaceae are the result of several major morphological transitions, among them the most studied is the differentiation of the inner median tepal into the labellum, a perianth organ key in pollinator attraction. Type A peloria lacking stamens and with ectopic labella in place of inner lateral tepals are useful for testing models on the genes specifying these organs by comparing their patterns of expression between wild-type and peloric flowers. Previous studies focused on DEFICIENS- and GLOBOSA-like MADS-box genes because of their conserved role in perianth and stamen development. The "orchid code" model summarizes this work and shows in Orchidaceae there are four paralogous lineages of DEFICIENS/AP3-like genes differentially expressed in each floral whorl. Experimental tests of this model showed the conserved, higher expression of genes from two specific DEF-like gene lineages is associated with labellum development. The present study tests whether eight MADS-box candidate SEP-, FUL-, AG-, and STK-like genes have been specifically duplicated in the Orchidaceae and are also differentially expressed in association with the distinct flower organs of Phalaenopsis hyb. "Athens." The gene trees indicate orchid-specific duplications. In a way analogous to what is observed in labellum-specific DEF-like genes, a two-fold increase in the expression of SEP3-like gene PhaMADS7 was measured in the labellum-like inner lateral tepals of peloric flowers. The overlap between SEP3-like and DEF-like genes suggests both are associated with labellum specification and similar positional cues determine their domains of expression. In contrast, the uniform messenger levels of FUL-like genes suggest they are involved in the development of all organs and their expression in the ovary suggests cell differentiation starts before pollination. As previously reported AG-like and STK-like genes are exclusively expressed in gynostemium and ovary, however no evidence for

  10. Expression of paralogous SEP-, FUL-, AG- and STK-like MADS-box genes in wild-type and peloric Phalaenopsis flowers

    PubMed Central

    Acri-Nunes-Miranda, Roberta; Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The diverse flowers of Orchidaceae are the result of several major morphological transitions, among them the most studied is the differentiation of the inner median tepal into the labellum, a perianth organ key in pollinator attraction. Type A peloria lacking stamens and with ectopic labella in place of inner lateral tepals are useful for testing models on the genes specifying these organs by comparing their patterns of expression between wild-type and peloric flowers. Previous studies focused on DEFICIENS- and GLOBOSA-like MADS-box genes because of their conserved role in perianth and stamen development. The “orchid code” model summarizes this work and shows in Orchidaceae there are four paralogous lineages of DEFICIENS/AP3-like genes differentially expressed in each floral whorl. Experimental tests of this model showed the conserved, higher expression of genes from two specific DEF-like gene lineages is associated with labellum development. The present study tests whether eight MADS-box candidate SEP-, FUL-, AG-, and STK-like genes have been specifically duplicated in the Orchidaceae and are also differentially expressed in association with the distinct flower organs of Phalaenopsis hyb. “Athens.” The gene trees indicate orchid-specific duplications. In a way analogous to what is observed in labellum-specific DEF-like genes, a two-fold increase in the expression of SEP3-like gene PhaMADS7 was measured in the labellum-like inner lateral tepals of peloric flowers. The overlap between SEP3-like and DEF-like genes suggests both are associated with labellum specification and similar positional cues determine their domains of expression. In contrast, the uniform messenger levels of FUL-like genes suggest they are involved in the development of all organs and their expression in the ovary suggests cell differentiation starts before pollination. As previously reported AG-like and STK-like genes are exclusively expressed in gynostemium and ovary, however no

  11. Cloning and characterization of a PI-like MADS-box gene in Phalaenopsis orchid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Hexige, Saiyin; Zhang, Tian; Pittman, Jon K; Chen, Donghong; Ming, Feng

    2007-11-30

    The highly evolved flowers of orchids have colorful sepals and fused columns that offer an opportunity to discover new genes involved in floral development in monocotyledon species. In this investigation, we cloned and characterized the homologous PISTALLATA-like (PI-like) gene PhPI15 (Phalaenopsis PI STILLATA # 15), from the Phalaenopsis hybrid cultivar. The protein sequence encoded by PhPI15 contains a typical PI-motif. Its sequence also formed a subclade with other monocot PI-type genes in phylogenetic analysis. Southern analysis showed that PhPI15 was present in the Phalaenopsis orchid genome as a single copy. Furthermore, it was expressed in all the whorls of the Phalaenopsis flower, while no expression was detected in vegetative organs. The flowers of transgenic tobacco plants ectopically expressing PhPI15 showed male-sterile phenotypes. Thus, as a Class-B MADS-box gene, PhPI15 specifies floral organ identity in orchids.

  12. MADS-box transcription factor OsMADS25 regulates root development through affection of nitrate accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunyan; Liu, Yihua; Zhang, Aidong; Su, Sha; Yan, An; Huang, Linli; Ali, Imran; Liu, Yu; Forde, Brian G; Gan, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors are vital regulators participating in plant growth and development process and the functions of most of them are still unknown. ANR1 was reported to play a key role in controlling lateral root development through nitrate signal in Arabidopsis. OsMADS25 is one of five ANR1-like genes in Oryza Sativa and belongs to the ANR1 clade. Here we have investigated the role of OsMADS25 in the plant's responses to external nitrate in Oryza Sativa. Our results showed that OsMADS25 protein was found in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm. Over-expression of OsMADS25 significantly promoted lateral and primary root growth as well as shoot growth in a nitrate-dependent manner in Arabidopsis. OsMADS25 overexpression in transgenic rice resulted in significantly increased primary root length, lateral root number, lateral root length and shoot fresh weight in the presence of nitrate. Down-regulation of OsMADS25 in transgenic rice exhibited significantly reduced shoot and root growth in the presence of nitrate. Furthermore, over-expression of OsMADS25 in transgenic rice promoted nitrate accumulation and significantly increased the expressions of nitrate transporter genes at high rates of nitrate supply while down-regulation of OsMADS25 produced the opposite effect. Taken together, our findings suggest that OsMADS25 is a positive regulator control lateral and primary root development in rice.

  13. MADS goes genomic in conifers: towards determining the ancestral set of MADS-box genes in seed plants

    PubMed Central

    Gramzow, Lydia; Weilandt, Lisa; Theißen, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims MADS-box genes comprise a gene family coding for transcription factors. This gene family expanded greatly during land plant evolution such that the number of MADS-box genes ranges from one or two in green algae to around 100 in angiosperms. Given the crucial functions of MADS-box genes for nearly all aspects of plant development, the expansion of this gene family probably contributed to the increasing complexity of plants. However, the expansion of MADS-box genes during one important step of land plant evolution, namely the origin of seed plants, remains poorly understood due to the previous lack of whole-genome data for gymnosperms. Methods The newly available genome sequences of Picea abies, Picea glauca and Pinus taeda were used to identify the complete set of MADS-box genes in these conifers. In addition, MADS-box genes were identified in the growing number of transcriptomes available for gymnosperms. With these datasets, phylogenies were constructed to determine the ancestral set of MADS-box genes of seed plants and to infer the ancestral functions of these genes. Key Results Type I MADS-box genes are under-represented in gymnosperms and only a minimum of two Type I MADS-box genes have been present in the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of seed plants. In contrast, a large number of Type II MADS-box genes were found in gymnosperms. The MRCA of extant seed plants probably possessed at least 11–14 Type II MADS-box genes. In gymnosperms two duplications of Type II MADS-box genes were found, such that the MRCA of extant gymnosperms had at least 14–16 Type II MADS-box genes. Conclusions The implied ancestral set of MADS-box genes for seed plants shows simplicity for Type I MADS-box genes and remarkable complexity for Type II MADS-box genes in terms of phylogeny and putative functions. The analysis of transcriptome data reveals that gymnosperm MADS-box genes are expressed in a great variety of tissues, indicating diverse roles of MADS-box

  14. Functional Characterization of OsMADS18, a Member of the AP1/SQUA Subfamily of MADS Box Genes1[w

    PubMed Central

    Fornara, Fabio; Pařenicová, Lucie; Falasca, Giuseppina; Pelucchi, Nilla; Masiero, Simona; Ciannamea, Stefano; Lopez-Dee, Zenaida; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Colombo, Lucia; Kater, Martin M.

    2004-01-01

    MADS box transcription factors controlling flower development have been isolated and studied in a wide variety of organisms. These studies have shown that homologous MADS box genes from different species often have similar functions. OsMADS18 from rice (Oryza sativa) belongs to the phylogenetically defined AP1/SQUA group. The MADS box genes of this group have functions in plant development, like controlling the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth, determination of floral organ identity, and regulation of fruit maturation. In this paper we report the functional analysis of OsMADS18. This rice MADS box gene is widely expressed in rice with its transcripts accumulated to higher levels in meristems. Overexpression of OsMADS18 in rice induced early flowering, and detailed histological analysis revealed that the formation of axillary shoot meristems was accelerated. Silencing of OsMADS18 using an RNA interference approach did not result in any visible phenotypic alteration, indicating that OsMADS18 is probably redundant with other MADS box transcription factors. Surprisingly, overexpression of OsMADS18 in Arabidopsis caused a phenotype closely resembling the ap1 mutant. We show that the ap1 phenotype is not caused by down-regulation of AP1 expression. Yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that some of the natural partners of AP1 interact with OsMADS18, suggesting that the OsMADS18 overexpression phenotype in Arabidopsis is likely to be due to the subtraction of AP1 partners from active transcription complexes. Thus, when compared to AP1, OsMADS18 during evolution seems to have conserved the mechanistic properties of protein-protein interactions, although it cannot complement the AP1 function. PMID:15299121

  15. The emerging importance of type I MADS box transcription factors for plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Simona; Colombo, Lucia; Grini, Paul E; Schnittger, Arp; Kater, Martin M

    2011-03-01

    Based on their evolutionary origin, MADS box transcription factor genes have been divided into two classes, namely, type I and II. The plant-specific type II MIKC MADS box genes have been most intensively studied and shown to be key regulators of developmental processes, such as meristem identity, flowering time, and fruit and seed development. By contrast, very little is known about type I MADS domain transcription factors, and they have not attracted interest for a long time. A number of recent studies have now indicated a key regulatory role for type I MADS box factors in plant reproduction, in particular in specifying female gametophyte, embryo, and endosperm development. These analyses have also suggested that type I MADS box factors are decisive for setting reproductive boundaries between species.

  16. Two ancient classes of MIKC-type MADS-box genes are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Henschel, Katrin; Kofuji, Rumiko; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Saedler, Heinz; Münster, Thomas; Theissen, Günter

    2002-06-01

    Characterization of seven MADS-box genes, termed PPM1-PPM4 and PpMADS1-PpMADS3, from the moss model species Physcomitrella patens is reported. Phylogeny reconstructions and comparison of exon-intron structures revealed that the genes described here represent two different classes of homologous, yet distinct, MIKC-type MADS-box genes, termed MIKC(c)-type genes-"(c)" stands for "classic"-(PPM1, PPM2, PpMADS1) and MIKC(*)-type genes (PPM3, PPM4, PpMADS2, PpMADS3). The two gene classes deviate from each other in a characteristic way, especially in a sequence stretch termed intervening region. MIKC(c)-type genes are abundantly present in all land plants which have been investigated in this respect, and give rise to well-known gene types such as floral meristem and organ identity genes. In contrast, LAMB1 from the clubmoss Lycopodium annotinum was identified as the only other MIKC(*)-type gene published so far. Our findings strongly suggest that the most recent common ancestor of mosses and vascular plants contained at least one MIKC(c)-type and one MIKC(*)-type gene. Our studies thus reveal an ancient duplication of an MIKC-type gene that occurred before the separation of the lineages that led to extant mosses and vascular plants more than about 450 MYA. The identification of bona fide K-domains in both MIKC(*)-type and MIKC(c)-type proteins suggests that the K-domain is more ancient than is suggested by a recent alternative hypothesis. MIKC(*)-type genes may have escaped identification in ferns and seed plants so far. It seems more likely, however, that they represent a class of genes which has been lost in the lineage which led to extant ferns and seed plants. The high number of P. patens MADS-box genes and the presence of a K-box in the coding region and of some potential binding sites for MADS-domain proteins and other transcription factors in the putative promoter regions of these genes suggest that MADS-box genes in mosses are involved in complex gene regulatory

  17. MADS box genes control vernalization-induced flowering in cereals

    PubMed Central

    Trevaskis, Ben; Bagnall, David J.; Ellis, Marc H.; Peacock, W. James; Dennis, Elizabeth S.

    2003-01-01

    By comparing expression levels of MADS box transcription factor genes between near-isogenic winter and spring lines of bread wheat, Triticum aestivum, we have identified WAP1 as the probable candidate for the Vrn-1 gene, the major locus controlling the vernalization flowering response in wheat. WAP1 is strongly expressed in spring wheats and moderately expressed in semispring wheats, but is not expressed in winter wheat plants that have not been exposed to vernalization treatment. Vernalization promotes flowering in winter wheats and strongly induces expression of WAP1. WAP1 is located on chromosome 5 in wheat and, by synteny with other cereal genomes, is likely to be collocated with Vrn-1. These results in hexaploid bread wheat cultivars extend the conclusion made by Yan et al. [Yan, L., Loukoianov, A., Tranquilli, G., Helguera, M., Fahima, T. & Dubcovsky, J. (2003) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 100, 6263–6268] in the diploid wheat progenitor Triticum monococcum that WAP1 (TmAP1) corresponds to the Vrn-1 gene. The barley homologue of WAP1, BM5, shows a similar pattern of expression to WAP1 and TmAP1. BM5 is not expressed in winter barleys that have not been vernalized, but as with WAP1, expression of BM5 is strongly induced by vernalization treatment. In spring barleys, the level of BM5 expression is determined by interactions between the Vrn-H1 locus and a second locus for spring habit, Vrn-H2. There is now evidence that AP1-like genes determine the time of flowering in a range of cereal and grass species. PMID:14557548

  18. Overexpression of a novel MADS-box gene SlFYFL delays senescence, fruit ripening and abscission in tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiaoli; Hu, Zongli; Zhu, Zhiguo; Dong, Tingting; Zhao, Zhiping; Cui, Baolu; Chen, Guoping

    2014-03-01

    MADS-domain proteins are important transcription factors involved in many biological processes of plants. In our study, a tomato MADS-box gene, SlFYFL, was isolated. SlFYFL is expressed in all tissues of tomato and significantly higher in mature leave, fruit of different stages, AZ (abscission zone) and sepal. Delayed leaf senescence and fruit ripening, increased storability and longer sepals were observed in 35S:FYFL tomato. The accumulation of carotenoid was reduced, and ethylene content, ethylene biosynthetic and responsive genes were down-regulated in 35S:FYFL fruits. Abscission zone (AZ) did not form normally and abscission zone development related genes were declined in AZs of 35S:FYFL plants. Yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that SlFYFL protein could interact with SlMADS-RIN, SlMADS1 and SlJOINTLESS, respectively. These results suggest that overexpression of SlFYFL regulate fruit ripening and development of AZ via interactions with the ripening and abscission zone-related MADS box proteins.

  19. Members of the tomato FRUITFULL MADS-box family regulate style abscission and fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shufen; Lu, Gang; Hou, Zheng; Luo, Zhidan; Wang, Taotao; Li, Hanxia; Zhang, Junhong; Ye, Zhibiao

    2014-01-01

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) protein MADS-RIN plays important roles in fruit ripening. In this study, the functions of two homologous tomato proteins, FUL1 and FUL2, which contain conserved MIKC domains that typify plant MADS-box proteins, and which interact with MADS-RIN, were analysed. Transgenic functional analysis showed that FUL1 and FUL2 function redundantly in fruit ripening regulation, but exhibit distinct roles in the regulation of cellular differentiation and expansion. Over-expression of FUL2 in tomato resulted in a pointed tip at the blossom end of the fruit, together with a thinner pericarp, reduced stem diameter, and smaller leaves, but no obvious phenotypes resulted from FUL1 over-expression. Dual suppression of FUL1 and FUL2 substantially inhibited fruit ripening by blocking ethylene biosynthesis and decreasing carotenoid accumulation. In addition, the levels of transcript corresponding to ACC SYNTHASE2 (ACS2), which plays a key role in ethylene biosynthesis, were significantly decreased in the FUL1/FUL2 knock-down tomato fruits. Overall, our results suggest that FUL proteins can regulate tomato fruit ripening through fine-tuning ethylene biosynthesis and the expression of ripening-related genes. PMID:24723399

  20. MADS-box transcription factor AGL21 regulates lateral root development and responds to multiple external and physiological signals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Miao, Zi-Qing; Qi, Guo-Feng; Wu, Jie; Cai, Xiao-Teng; Mao, Jie-Li; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2014-11-01

    Plant root system morphology is dramatically influenced by various environmental cues. The adaptation of root system architecture to environmental constraints, which mostly depends on the formation and growth of lateral roots, is an important agronomic trait. Lateral root development is regulated by the external signals coordinating closely with intrinsic signaling pathways. MADS-box transcription factors are known key regulators of the transition to flowering and flower development. However, their functions in root development are still poorly understood. Here we report that AGL21, an AGL17-clade MADS-box gene, plays a crucial role in lateral root development. AGL21 was highly expressed in root, particularly in the root central cylinder and lateral root primordia. AGL21 overexpression plants produced more and longer lateral roots while agl21 mutants showed impaired lateral root development, especially under nitrogen-deficient conditions. AGL21 was induced by many plant hormones and environmental stresses, suggesting a function of this gene in root system plasticity in response to various signals. Furthermore, AGL21 was found positively regulating auxin accumulation in lateral root primordia and lateral roots by enhancing local auxin biosynthesis, thus stimulating lateral root initiation and growth. We propose that AGL21 may be involved in various environmental and physiological signals-mediated lateral root development and growth.

  1. Functional conservation of MIKC*-Type MADS box genes in Arabidopsis and rice pollen maturation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Shaojie; Wu, Feng; Yan, Shuo; Lin, Xuelei; Du, Xiaoqiu; Chong, Kang; Schilling, Susanne; Theißen, Günter; Meng, Zheng

    2013-04-01

    There are two groups of MADS intervening keratin-like and C-terminal (MIKC)-type MADS box genes, MIKC(C) type and MIKC* type. In seed plants, the MIKC(C) type shows considerable diversity, but the MIKC* type has only two subgroups, P- and S-clade, which show conserved expression in the gametophyte. To examine the functional conservation of MIKC*-type genes, we characterized all three rice (Oryza sativa) MIKC*-type genes. All three genes are specifically expressed late in pollen development. The single knockdown or knockout lines, respectively, of the S-clade MADS62 and MADS63 did not show a mutant phenotype, but lines in which both S-clade genes were affected showed severe defects in pollen maturation and germination, as did knockdown lines of MADS68, the only P-clade gene in rice. The rice MIKC*-type proteins form strong heterodimeric complexes solely with partners from the other subclade; these complexes specifically bind to N10-type C-A-rich-G-boxes in vitro and regulate downstream gene expression by binding to N10-type promoter motifs. The rice MIKC* genes have a much lower degree of functional redundancy than the Arabidopsis thaliana MIKC* genes. Nevertheless, our data indicate that the function of heterodimeric MIKC*-type protein complexes in pollen development has been conserved since the divergence of monocots and eudicots, roughly 150 million years ago.

  2. An atlas of type I MADS box gene expression during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-09-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and beta-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis.

  3. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:20631316

  4. Evolutionary and expression analysis of a MADS-box gene superfamily involved in ovule development of seeded and seedless grapevines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yin, Xiangjing; Cheng, Chenxia; Wang, Hao; Guo, Rongrong; Xu, Xiaozhao; Zhao, Jiao; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Xiping

    2015-06-01

    MADS-box transcription factors are involved in many aspects of plant growth and development, such as floral organ determination, fruit ripening, and embryonic development. Yet not much is known about grape (Vitis vinifera) MADS-box genes in a relatively comprehensive genomic and functional way during ovule development. Accordingly, we identified 54 grape MADS-box genes, aiming to enhance our understanding of grape MADS-box genes from both evolutionary and functional perspectives. Synteny analysis indicated that both segmental and tandem duplication events contributed to the expansion of the grape MADS-box family. Furthermore, synteny analysis between the grape and Arabidopsis genomes suggested that several grape MADS-box genes arose before divergence of the two species. Phylogenetic analysis and comparisons of exon-intron structures provided further insight into the evolutionary relationships between the genes, as well as their putative functions. Based on phylogenetic tree analysis, grape MADS-box genes were divided into type I and type II subgroups. Tissue-specific expression analysis suggested roles in both vegetative and reproductive tissue development. Expression analysis of the MADS-box genes following gibberellic acid (GA3) treatment revealed their response to GA3 treatment and that seedlessness caused by GA3 treatment underwent a different mechanism from that of normal ovule abortion. Expression profiling of MADS-box genes from six cultivars suggests their function in ovule development and may represent potential ovule identity genes involved in parthenocarpy. The results presented provide a few candidate genes involved in ovule development for future study, which may be useful in seedlessness-related molecular breeding programs.

  5. Cloning and characterization of a novel PI-like MADS-box gene in Phalaenopsis orchid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Zhang, Tian; Shi, Jinlei; Chen, Donghong; Shen, Daleng; Ming, Feng

    2008-06-01

    The specification of floral organ identity during development depends on the function of a limited number of homeotic genes, which are grouped into three classes. Most of these genes belong to the MADS-box gene family. The PISTILLATA (PI) family of MADS-box genes plays important roles in controlling the development of the petal and stamen of flowering plants. In an attempt to understand the molecular mechanisms behind floral development in the orchid, a MADS-box gene, PhPI10 was cloned from Phalaenopsis orchid. We provide phylogenetic evidence that PhPI10 is closely related to PI-like genes of angiosperms, which are required for establishing petal and stamen identity. In addition, there is a PI-motif in the C-terminal of the putative amino acid sequence of PhPI10. Southern analysis showed that a single copy of PhPI10 was present in the Phalaenopsis orchid genome. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that its transcription was only detectable in the top of the floral bud and undetectable in other vegetative organs. In the floral organs its expression was limited to the lip of the Phalaenopsis flower.

  6. Involvement of a banana MADS-box transcription factor gene in ethylene-induced fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhua; Xu, Biyu; Hu, Lifang; Li, Meiying; Su, Wei; Wu, Jing; Yang, Jinghao; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of MADS-box genes in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group cv. Brazilian) fruit development and postharvest ripening, we isolated from banana fruit a MADS-box gene designated MuMADS1. Amino acid alignment indicated MuMADS1 belongs to the AGAMOUS subfamily, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this gene is most similar to class D MADS-box genes. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that MuMADS1 is expressed in the stamen and pistil of male and female flowers and in the rhizome, the vegetative reproductive organ of the banana plant. In preharvest banana fruit, MuMADS1 is likely expressed throughout banana fruit development. In postharvest banana ripening, MuMADS1 is associated with ethylene biosynthesis. Expression patterns of MuMADS1 during postharvest ripening as determined by real-time RT-PCR suggest that differential expression of MuMADS1 may not only be induced by ethylene biosynthesis associated with postharvest banana ripening, but also may be induced by exogenous ethylene.

  7. C- and D-class MADS-box genes from Phalaenopsis equestris (Orchidaceae) display functions in gynostemium and ovule development.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Yi; Lee, Pei-Fang; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Wu, Wan-Lin; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lee, Yung-I; Liu, Ke-Wei; Chen, Li-Jun; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Tsai, Wen-Chieh

    2012-06-01

    Gynostemium and ovule development in orchid are unique developmental processes in the plant kingdom. Characterization of C- and D-class MADS-box genes could help reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying gynostemium and ovule development in orchids. In this study, we isolated and characterized a C- and a D-class gene, PeMADS1 and PeMADS7, respectively, from Phalaenopsis equestris. These two genes showed parallel spatial and temporal expression profiles, which suggests their cooperation in gynostemium and ovule development. Furthermore, only PeMADS1 was ectopically expressed in the petals of the gylp (gynostemium-like petal) mutant, whose petals were transformed into gynostemium-like structures. Protein-protein interaction analyses revealed that neither PeMADS1 and PeMADS7 could form a homodimer or a heterodimer. An E-class protein was needed to bridge the interaction between these two proteins. A complementation test revealed that PeMADS1 could rescue the phenotype of the AG mutant. Overexpression of PeMADS7 in Arabidopsis caused typical phenotypes of the D-class gene family. Together, these results indicated that both C-class PeMADS1 and D-class PeMADS7 play important roles in orchid gynostemium and ovule development.

  8. Divergence of recently duplicated M{gamma}-type MADS-box genes in Petunia.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Gordon, Jonathan; Weterings, Koen; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-02-01

    The MADS-box transcription factor family has expanded considerably in plants via gene and genome duplications and can be subdivided into type I and MIKC-type genes. The two gene classes show a different evolutionary history. Whereas the MIKC-type genes originated during ancient genome duplications, as well as during more recent events, the type I loci appear to experience high turnover with many recent duplications. This different mode of origin also suggests a different fate for the type I duplicates, which are thought to have a higher chance to become silenced or lost from the genome. To get more insight into the evolution of the type I MADS-box genes, we isolated nine type I genes from Petunia, which belong to the Mgamma subclass, and investigated the divergence of their coding and regulatory regions. The isolated genes could be subdivided into two categories: two genes were highly similar to Arabidopsis Mgamma-type genes, whereas the other seven genes showed less similarity to Arabidopsis genes and originated more recently. Two of the recently duplicated genes were found to contain deleterious mutations in their coding regions, and expression analysis revealed that a third paralog was silenced by mutations in its regulatory region. However, in addition to the three genes that were subjected to nonfunctionalization, we also found evidence for neofunctionalization of one of the Petunia Mgamma-type genes. Our study shows a rapid divergence of recently duplicated Mgamma-type MADS-box genes and suggests that redundancy among type I paralogs may be less common than expected.

  9. Histone modification and signalling cascade of the dormancy-associated MADS-box gene, PpMADS13-1, in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) during endodormancy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takanori; Bai, Songling; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Akiko; Nakajima, Ikuko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2015-06-01

    Dormancy-associated MADS-box (DAM) genes play an important role in endodormancy phase transition. We investigated histone modification in the DAM homolog (PpMADS13-1) from Japanese pear, via chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR, to understand the mechanism behind the reduced expression of the PpMADS13-1 gene towards endodormancy release. Our results indicated that the reduction in the active histone mark by trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at lysine 4 contributed to the reduction of PpMADS13-1 expression towards endodormancy release. In contrast, the inactive histone mark by trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at lysine 27 in PpMADS13-1 locus was quite low, and these levels were more similar to a negative control [normal mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG)] than to a positive control (AGAMOUS) in endodormancy phase transition. The loss of histone variant H2A.Z also coincided with the down-regulation of PpMADS13-1. Subsequently, we investigated the PpMADS13-1 signalling cascade and found that PpCBF2, a pear C-repeated binding factor, regulated PpMADS13-1 expression via interaction of PpCBF2 with the 5'-upstream region of PpMADS13-1 by transient reporter assay. Furthermore, transient reporter assay confirmed no interaction between the PpMADS13-1 protein and the pear FLOWERING LOCUS T genes. Taken together, our results enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying endodormancy phase transition in Japanese pear.

  10. GmAGL1, a MADS-Box Gene from Soybean, Is Involved in Floral Organ Identity and Fruit Dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yingjun; Wang, Tingting; Xu, Guangli; Yang, Hui; Zeng, Xuanrui; Shen, Yixin; Yu, Deyue; Huang, Fang

    2017-01-01

    MADS-domain proteins are important transcription factors involved in many aspects of plant reproductive development. In this study, a MADS-box gene, Glycine max AGAMOUS-LIKE1 (GmAGL1), was isolated from soybean flower. The transcript of GmAGL1 was expressed in flowers and pods of different stages in soybean and was highly expressed in carpels. GmAGL1 is a nucleus-localized transcription factor and can interact directly with SEP-like proteins in soybean flowers. Ectopic overexpression of GmAGL1 resulted in the absence of petals in Arabidopsis. Moreover, morphological changes in the valves were observed in 35S:GmAGL1 Arabidopsis fruits that dehisced before the seeds reached full maturity. GmAGL1 was found to be sufficient to activate the expression of Arabidopsis ALC, IND, STK, SEP1, and SEP3. Therefore, our data suggest that GmAGL1 may play important roles in both floral organ identity and fruit dehiscence. PMID:28232846

  11. The LAMB1 gene from the clubmoss, Lycopodium annotinum, is a divergent MADS-box gene, expressed specifically in sporogenic structures.

    PubMed

    Svensson, M E; Johannesson, H; Engström, P

    2000-07-25

    Transcription factors encoded by the large MADS-box gene family have important developmental functions in angiosperms, the flowering plants. Mutations in certain MADS-box genes are known to cause homeotic alterations in floral organ identity, and the establishment of floral organ identity is the most well-studied developmental process in which MADS-box genes are known to function. Our interest is in the potential connection between the duplication history of this gene family and the evolutionary origin of the structures that the different MADS-box genes developmentally regulate in plants. Previous studies have demonstrated that the origin of the MADS-box genes that control floral organ identity predate the evolutionary origin of the flower itself, since gymnosperms have genes that are orthologous to angiosperm floral homeotic MADS-box genes, whereas ferns appear to lack such genes. Here we report on the isolation of a MADS-box gene from Lycopodium annotinum, which belongs to the clubmosses, the phylogenetic sister group to other vascular plants. The gene, LAMB1, in the sporophyte is expressed exclusively in the reproductive structure, the strobilus, during sporogenesis. LAMB1 is similar to other plant MADS-box genes in that it contains a MADS-box as well as a second conserved element, a K-box. However, it differs in length and in exon/intron structure in the region between the MADS- and K-box, and also in the length and structure of the C-terminal region. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that LAMB1 is not closely related to other plant-type MADS-box genes, and may represent one of the basal branches in the phylogenetic tree of plant MADS-box genes.

  12. Phenotypic alterations of petal and sepal by ectopic expression of a rice MADS box gene in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kang, H G; Noh, Y S; Chung, Y Y; Costa, M A; An, K; An, G

    1995-10-01

    Floral organ development is controlled by a group of regulatory factors containing the MADS domain. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a cDNA clone from rice, OsMADS3, which encodes a MADS-domain containing protein. The OsMADS3 amino acid sequence shows over 60% identity to AG of Arabidopsis, PLE of Antirrhinum majus, and AG/PLE homologues of petunia, tobacco, tomato, Brassica napus, and maize. Homology in the MADS box region is most conserved. RNA blot analysis indicated that the rice MADS gene was preferentially expressed in reproductive organs, especially in stamen and carpel. In situ localization studies showed that the transcript was present primarily in stamen and carpel. The function of the rice OsMADS3 was elucidated by ectopic expression of the gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in a heterologous tobacco plant system. Transgenic plants exhibited an altered morphology and coloration of the perianth organs. Sepals were pale green and elongated. Limbs of the corolla were split into sections which in some plants became antheroid structures attached to tubes that resembled filaments. The phenotypes mimic the results of ectopic expression of dicot AG gene or AG homologues. These results indicate that the OsMADS3 gene is possibly an AG homologue and that the AG genes appear to be structurally and functionally conserved between dicot and monocot.

  13. A SQUAMOSA MADS Box Gene Involved in the Regulation of Anthocyanin Accumulation in Bilberry Fruits1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Jaakola, Laura; Poole, Mervin; Jones, Matthew O.; Kämäräinen-Karppinen, Terttu; Koskimäki, Janne J.; Hohtola, Anja; Häggman, Hely; Fraser, Paul D.; Manning, Kenneth; King, Graham J.; Thomson, Helen; Seymour, Graham B.

    2010-01-01

    Anthocyanins are important health-promoting phytochemicals that are abundant in many fleshy fruits. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) is one of the best sources of these compounds. Here, we report on the expression pattern and functional analysis of a SQUAMOSA-class MADS box transcription factor, VmTDR4, associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis in bilberry. Levels of VmTDR4 expression were spatially and temporally linked with color development and anthocyanin-related gene expression. Virus-induced gene silencing was used to suppress VmTDR4 expression in bilberry, resulting in substantial reduction in anthocyanin levels in fully ripe fruits. Chalcone synthase was used as a positive control in the virus-induced gene silencing experiments. Additionally, in sectors of fruit tissue in which the expression of the VmTDR4 gene was silenced, the expression of R2R3 MYB family transcription factors related to the biosynthesis of flavonoids was also altered. We conclude that VmTDR4 plays an important role in the accumulation of anthocyanins during normal ripening in bilberry, probably through direct or indirect control of transcription factors belonging to the R2R3 MYB family. PMID:20566708

  14. The regulation of MADS-box gene expression during ripening of banana and their regulatory interation with ethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MADS-box genes (MaMADS1-6), potential components of the developmental control of ripening have been cloned from Grand Nain banana cultivar. Similarity of these genes to tomato LeRIN is very low and neither MaMADS2 nor MaMADS1 complement the tomato rin mutation. Nevertheless, the expression patterns...

  15. Coordinating expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T by DORMANCY ASSOCIATED MADS-BOX-like genes in leafy spurge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafy spurge is a noxious perennial weed that produces underground adventitious buds, which are crucial for generating new vegetative shoots following periods of freezing temperatures or exposure to various control measures. DORMANCY ASSOCIATED MADS-BOX (DAM) genes have been proposed to play a direc...

  16. Three MADS-box genes similar to APETALA1 and FRUITFULL from silver birch (Betula pendula).

    PubMed

    Elo, Annakaisa; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Turunen, Marja-Leena; Tikka, Liisa; Sopanen, Tuomas

    2001-05-01

    Despite intensive research on genetic regulation of flower development there are still only a few studies on the early phases of this process in perennial plants like trees. The aim of this study has been to identify genes that regulate early stages of inflorescence development in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and to follow the expression of these genes during development of the unisexual birch inflorescences. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of 3 cDNAs representing MADS-box genes designated BpMADS3, BpMADS4 and BpMADS5, all belonging to the AP1/SQUA group of plant MADS-box genes. According to RNA blot analysis, all 3 genes are active during the development of both male and female inflorescences. However, differences in patterns of expression suggest that they play different roles. BpMADS3 is most similar in sequence to AP1 and SQUA, but it seems to have the highest expression at late developmental stages. BpMADS4 is most similar in sequence to the Arabidopsis gene FRUITFULL, but is expressed, in addition to developing inflorescences, in shoots and roots. BpMADS5 is also similar to FRUITFULL; its expression seems to be inflorescence-specific and continues during fruit development. Ectopic expression of either BpMADS3, BpMADS4 or BpMADS5 with the CaMV 35S promoter in tobacco results in extremely early flowering. All of these birch genes seem to act early during the transition to reproductive phase and might be involved in the determination of the identity of the inflorescence or flower meristem. They could apparently be used to accelerate flowering in various plant species.

  17. Characterization and Functional Analysis of Five MADS-Box B Class Genes Related to Floral Organ Identification in Tagetes erecta

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Ye; Zhang, Chunling; Sun, Yalin; Wang, Weining; Bao, Manzhu

    2017-01-01

    According to the floral organ development ABC model, B class genes specify petal and stamen identification. In order to study the function of B class genes in flower development of Tagetes erecta, five MADS-box B class genes were identified and their expression and putative functions were studied. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses indicated that there were one PI-like gene—TePI, two euAP3-like genes—TeAP3-1 and TeAP3-2, and two TM6-like genes—TeTM6-1 and TeTM6-2 in T. erecta. Strong expression levels of these genes were detected in stamens of the disk florets, but little or no expression was detected in bracts, receptacles or vegetative organs. Yeast hybrid experiments of the B class proteins showed that TePI protein could form a homodimer and heterodimers with all the other four B class proteins TeAP3-1, TeAP3-2, TeTM6-1 and TeTM6-2. No homodimer or interaction was observed between the euAP3 and TM6 clade members. Over-expression of five B class genes of T. erecta in Nicotiana rotundifolia showed that only the transgenic plants of 35S::TePI showed altered floral morphology compared with the non-transgenic line. This study could contribute to the understanding of the function of B class genes in flower development of T. erecta, and provide a theoretical basis for further research to change floral organ structures and create new materials for plant breeding. PMID:28081202

  18. A conserved MADS-box phosphorylation motif regulates differentiation and mitochondrial function in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mughal, W; Nguyen, L; Pustylnik, S; da Silva Rosa, S C; Piotrowski, S; Chapman, D; Du, M; Alli, N S; Grigull, J; Halayko, A J; Aliani, M; Topham, M K; Epand, R M; Hatch, G M; Pereira, T J; Kereliuk, S; McDermott, J C; Rampitsch, C; Dolinsky, V W; Gordon, J W

    2015-10-29

    Exposure to metabolic disease during fetal development alters cellular differentiation and perturbs metabolic homeostasis, but the underlying molecular regulators of this phenomenon in muscle cells are not completely understood. To address this, we undertook a computational approach to identify cooperating partners of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors, known regulators of muscle differentiation and metabolic function. We demonstrate that MEF2 and the serum response factor (SRF) collaboratively regulate the expression of numerous muscle-specific genes, including microRNA-133a (miR-133a). Using tandem mass spectrometry techniques, we identify a conserved phosphorylation motif within the MEF2 and SRF Mcm1 Agamous Deficiens SRF (MADS)-box that regulates miR-133a expression and mitochondrial function in response to a lipotoxic signal. Furthermore, reconstitution of MEF2 function by expression of a neutralizing mutation in this identified phosphorylation motif restores miR-133a expression and mitochondrial membrane potential during lipotoxicity. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that miR-133a regulates mitochondrial function through translational inhibition of a mitophagy and cell death modulating protein, called Nix. Finally, we show that rodents exposed to gestational diabetes during fetal development display muscle diacylglycerol accumulation, concurrent with insulin resistance, reduced miR-133a, and elevated Nix expression, as young adult rats. Given the diverse roles of miR-133a and Nix in regulating mitochondrial function, and proliferation in certain cancers, dysregulation of this genetic pathway may have broad implications involving insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and cancer biology.

  19. Phylogeny and diversification of B-function MADS-box genes in angiosperms: evolutionary and functional implications of a 260-million-year-old duplication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtae; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Albert, Victor A; Farris, James S; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2004-12-01

    B-function MADS-box genes play crucial roles in floral development in model angiosperms. We reconstructed the structural and functional implications of B-function gene phylogeny in the earliest extant flowering plants based on analyses that include 25 new AP3 and PI sequences representing critical lineages of the basalmost angiosperms: Amborella, Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae), and Illicium (Austrobaileyales). The ancestral size of exon 5 in PI-homologues is 42 bp, typical of exon 5 in other plant MADS-box genes. This 42-bp length is found in PI-homologues from Amborella and Nymphaeaceae, successive sisters to all other angiosperms. Following these basalmost branches, a deletion occurred in exon 5, yielding a length of 30 bp, a condition that unites all other angiosperms. Several shared amino acid strings, including a prominent "DEAER" motif, are present in the AP3- and PI-homologues of Amborella. These may be ancestral motifs that were present before the duplication that yielded the AP3 and PI lineages and subsequently were modified after the divergence of Amborella. Other structural features were identified, including a motif that unites the previously described TM6 clade and a deletion in AP3-homologues that unites all Magnoliales. Phylogenetic analyses of AP3- and PI-homologues yielded gene trees that generally track organismal phylogeny as inferred by multigene data sets. With both AP3 and PI amino acid sequences, Amborella and Nymphaeaceae are sister to all other angiosperms. Using nonparametric rate smoothing (NPRS), we estimated that the duplication that produced the AP3 and PI lineages occurred approximately 260 mya (231-290). This places the duplication after the split between extant gymnosperms and angiosperms, but well before the oldest angiosperm fossils. A striking similarity in the multimer-signalling C domains of the Amborella proteins suggests the potential for the formation of unique transcription-factor complexes. The earliest angiosperms may have been

  20. A root chicory MADS box sequence and the Arabidopsis flowering repressor FLC share common features that suggest conserved function in vernalization and de-vernalization responses.

    PubMed

    Périlleux, Claire; Pieltain, Alexandra; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Bouché, Frédéric; Detry, Nathalie; D'Aloia, Maria; Thiry, Laura; Aljochim, Pierre; Delansnay, Martin; Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Tocquin, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a biennial crop, but is harvested to obtain root inulin at the end of the first growing season before flowering. However, cold temperatures may vernalize seeds or plantlets, leading to incidental early flowering, and hence understanding the molecular basis of vernalization is important. A MADS box sequence was isolated by RT-PCR and named FLC-LIKE1 (CiFL1) because of its phylogenetic positioning within the same clade as the floral repressor Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (AtFLC). Moreover, over-expression of CiFL1 in Arabidopsis caused late flowering and prevented up-regulation of the AtFLC target FLOWERING LOCUS T by photoperiod, suggesting functional conservation between root chicory and Arabidopsis. Like AtFLC in Arabidopsis, CiFL1 was repressed during vernalization of seeds or plantlets of chicory, but repression of CiFL1 was unstable when the post-vernalization temperature was favorable to flowering and when it de-vernalized the plants. This instability of CiFL1 repression may be linked to the bienniality of root chicory compared with the annual lifecycle of Arabidopsis. However, re-activation of AtFLC was also observed in Arabidopsis when a high temperature treatment was used straight after seed vernalization, eliminating the promotive effect of cold on flowering. Cold-induced down-regulation of a MADS box floral repressor and its re-activation by high temperature thus appear to be conserved features of the vernalization and de-vernalization responses in distant species.

  1. Expression of floral MADS-box genes in basal angiosperms: implications for the evolution of floral regulators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtae; Koh, Jin; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Kong, Hongzhi; Hu, Yi; Ma, Hong; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2005-09-01

    The ABC model of floral organ identity is based on studies of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, both of which are highly derived eudicots. Most of the genes required for the ABC functions in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum are members of the MADS-box gene family, and their orthologs are present in all major angiosperm lineages. Although the eudicots comprise 75% of all angiosperms, most of the diversity in arrangement and number of floral parts is actually found among basal angiosperm lineages, for which little is known about the genes that control floral development. To investigate the conservation and divergence of expression patterns of floral MADS-box genes in basal angiosperms relative to eudicot model systems, we isolated several floral MADS-box genes and examined their expression patterns in representative species, including Amborella (Amborellaceae), Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae) and Illicium (Austrobaileyales), the successive sister groups to all other extant angiosperms, plus Magnolia and Asimina, members of the large magnoliid clade. Our results from multiple methods (relative-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time PCR and RNA in situ hybridization) revealed that expression patterns of floral MADS-box genes in basal angiosperms are broader than those of their counterparts in eudicots and monocots. In particular, (i) AP1 homologs are generally expressed in all floral organs and leaves, (ii) AP3/PI homologs are generally expressed in all floral organs and (iii) AG homologs are expressed in stamens and carpels of most basal angiosperms, in agreement with the expectations of the ABC model; however, an AG homolog is also expressed in the tepals of Illicium. The broader range of strong expression of AP3/PI homologs is inferred to be the ancestral pattern for all angiosperms and is also consistent with the gradual morphological intergradations often observed between adjacent floral organs in basal angiosperms.

  2. Perspectives on MADS-box expression during orchid flower evolution and development.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    The diverse morphology of orchid flowers and their complex, often deceptive strategies to become pollinated have fascinated researchers for a long time. However, it was not until the 20th century that the ontogeny of orchid flowers, the genetic basis of their morphology and the complex phylogeny of Orchidaceae were investigated. In parallel, the improvement of techniques for in vitro seed germination and tissue culture, together with studies on biochemistry, physiology, and cytology supported the progress of what is now a highly productive industry of orchid breeding and propagation. In the present century both basic research in orchid flower evo-devo and the interest for generating novel horticultural varieties have driven the characterization of many members of the MADS-box family encoding key regulators of flower development. This perspective summarizes the picture emerging from these studies and discusses the advantages and limitations of the comparative strategy employed so far. I address the growing role of natural and horticultural mutants in these studies and the emergence of several model species in orchid evo-devo and genomics. In this context, I make a plea for an increasingly integrative approach.

  3. The FLF MADS box gene: a repressor of flowering in Arabidopsis regulated by vernalization and methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, C C; Burn, J E; Perez, P P; Metzger, J; Edwards, J A; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1999-01-01

    A MADS box gene, FLF (for FLOWERING LOCUS F ), isolated from a late-flowering, T-DNA-tagged Arabidopsis mutant, is a semidominant gene encoding a repressor of flowering. The FLF gene appears to integrate the vernalization-dependent and autonomous flowering pathways because its expression is regulated by genes in both pathways. The level of FLF mRNA is downregulated by vernalization and by a decrease in genomic DNA methylation, which is consistent with our previous suggestion that vernalization acts to induce flowering through changes in gene activity that are mediated through a reduction in DNA methylation. The flf-1 mutant requires a greater than normal amount of an exogenous gibberellin (GA3) to decrease flowering time compared with the wild type or with vernalization-responsive late-flowering mutants, suggesting that the FLF gene product may block the promotion of flowering by GAs. FLF maps to a region on chromosome 5 near the FLOWERING LOCUS C gene, which is a semidominant repressor of flowering in late-flowering ecotypes of Arabidopsis. PMID:10072403

  4. Characterization and Expression Analysis of PtAGL24, a SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE/AGAMOUS-LIKE 24 (SVP/AGL24)-Type MADS-Box Gene from Trifoliate Orange (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei-Ming; Zhang, Jin-Zhi; Hu, Chun-Gen

    2016-01-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive growth in perennial woody plants does not occur until after several years of repeated seasonal changes and alternative growth. To better understand the molecular basis of flowering regulation in citrus, a MADS-box gene was isolated from trifoliate orange (precocious trifoliate orange, Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.). Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that the MADS-box gene is more closely related to the homologs of the AGAMOUS-LIKE 24 (AGL24) lineage than to any of the other MADS-box lineages known from Arabidopsis; it is named PtAGL24. Expression analysis indicated that PtAGL24 was widely expressed in the most organs of trifoliate orange, with the higher expression in mature flowers discovered by real-time PCR. Ectopic expression of PtAGL24 in wild-type Arabidopsis promoted early flowering and caused morphological changes in class I transgenic Arabidopsis. Yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that PtAGL24 interacted with Arabidopsis AtAGL24 and other partners of AtAGL24, suggesting that the abnormal morphology of PtAGL24 overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis was likely due to the inappropriate interactions between exogenous and endogenous proteins. Also, PtAGL24 interacted with SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (PtSOC1) and APETALA1 (PtAP1) of citrus. These results suggest that PtAGL24 may play an important role in the process of floral transition but may have diverse functions in citrus development. PMID:27375669

  5. The MADS-box gene Agamous-like 11 is essential for seed morphogenesis in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Malabarba, Jaiana; Buffon, Vanessa; Mariath, Jorge E A; Gaeta, Marcos L; Dornelas, Marcelo C; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Revers, Luís F

    2017-03-28

    Despite the wide appreciation of seedless grapes, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that drive the stenospermocarpic seedless-type phenotype in grapevine. In order to address the molecular mechanisms that control seedlessness in grapevine, our study aimed to characterize VviAGL11, a class D MADS-box transcription factor gene that has been proposed as the major candidate gene involved in Vitis vinifera seed morphogenesis. VviAGL11 allelic variations in seeded and seedless grapevine cultivars were determined, and its correlations with allele-specific steady-state mRNA levels were investigated. VviAGL11 relative expression was significantly higher in seeds at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after fruit set, whereas in the seedless grape its transcript levels were extremely low in all stages analyzed. In situ hybridization revealed transcript accumulation specifically in the dual endotesta layer of the seeds, which is responsible for elongation and an increase of cell number, a necessary step to determine the lignification and the final seed size. No hybridization signals were visible in the seedless grapevine tissues, and a morphoanatomical analysis showed an apparent loss of identity of the endotesta layer of the seed traces. Ectopic expression of VviAGL11 in the Arabidopsis SEEDSTICK mutant background restored the wild-type phenotype and confirmed the direct role of VviAGL11 in seed morphogenesis, suggesting that depletion of its expression is responsible for the erroneous development of a highly essential seed layer, therefore culminating in the typical apirenic phenotype.

  6. Genome-Wide Characterization of the MADS-Box Gene Family in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and Assessment of Its Roles in Flowering and Floral Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Yan; Xu, Liang; Nie, Shanshan; Chen, Yinglong; Liang, Dongyi; Sun, Xiaochuan; Karanja, Benard K; Luo, Xiaobo; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    The MADS-box gene family is an important transcription factor (TF) family that is involved in various aspects of plant growth and development, especially flowering time and floral organogenesis. Although it has been reported in many plant species, the systematic identification and characterization of MADS-box TF family is still limited in radish (Raphanus sativus L.). In the present study, a comprehensive analysis of MADS-box genes was performed, and a total of 144 MADS-box family members were identified from the whole radish genome. Meanwhile, a detailed list of MADS-box genes from other 28 plant species was also investigated. Through the phylogenetic analysis between radish and Arabidopsis thaliana, all the RsMADS genes were classified into two groups including 68 type I (31 Mα, 12 Mβ and 25Mγ) and 76 type II (70 MIKC(C) and 6 MIKC(∗)). Among them, 41 (28.47%) RsMADS genes were located in nine linkage groups of radish from R1 to R9. Moreover, the homologous MADS-box gene pairs were identified among radish, A. thaliana, Chinese cabbage and rice. Additionally, the expression profiles of RsMADS genes were systematically investigated in different tissues and growth stages. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was employed to validate expression patterns of some crucial RsMADS genes. These results could provide a valuable resource to explore the potential functions of RsMADS genes in radish, and facilitate dissecting MADS-box gene-mediated molecular mechanisms underlying flowering and floral organogenesis in root vegetable crops.

  7. Genome-Wide Characterization of the MADS-Box Gene Family in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and Assessment of Its Roles in Flowering and Floral Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Wang, Yan; Xu, Liang; Nie, Shanshan; Chen, Yinglong; Liang, Dongyi; Sun, Xiaochuan; Karanja, Benard K.; Luo, Xiaobo; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    The MADS-box gene family is an important transcription factor (TF) family that is involved in various aspects of plant growth and development, especially flowering time and floral organogenesis. Although it has been reported in many plant species, the systematic identification and characterization of MADS-box TF family is still limited in radish (Raphanus sativus L.). In the present study, a comprehensive analysis of MADS-box genes was performed, and a total of 144 MADS-box family members were identified from the whole radish genome. Meanwhile, a detailed list of MADS-box genes from other 28 plant species was also investigated. Through the phylogenetic analysis between radish and Arabidopsis thaliana, all the RsMADS genes were classified into two groups including 68 type I (31 Mα, 12 Mβ and 25Mγ) and 76 type II (70 MIKCC and 6 MIKC∗). Among them, 41 (28.47%) RsMADS genes were located in nine linkage groups of radish from R1 to R9. Moreover, the homologous MADS-box gene pairs were identified among radish, A. thaliana, Chinese cabbage and rice. Additionally, the expression profiles of RsMADS genes were systematically investigated in different tissues and growth stages. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was employed to validate expression patterns of some crucial RsMADS genes. These results could provide a valuable resource to explore the potential functions of RsMADS genes in radish, and facilitate dissecting MADS-box gene-mediated molecular mechanisms underlying flowering and floral organogenesis in root vegetable crops. PMID:27703461

  8. Expression of floral MADS-box genes in Sinofranchetia chinensis (Lardizabalaceae): implications for the nature of the nectar leaves

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jin; Zhang, Jian; Shan, Hongyan; Chen, Zhiduan

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The perianths of the Lardizabalaceae are diverse. The second-whorl floral organs of Sinofranchetia chinensis (Lardizabalaceae) are nectar leaves. The aim of this study was to explore the nature of this type of floral organ, and to determine its relationship to nectar leaves in other Ranunculales species, and to other floral organs in Sinofranchetia chinensis. Methods Approaches of evolutionary developmental biology were used, including 3′ RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) for isolating floral MADS-box genes, phylogenetic analysis for reconstructing gene evolutionary history, in situ hybridization and tissue-specific RT-PCR for identifying gene expression patterns and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) for observing the epidermal cell morphology of floral organs. Key Results Fourteen new floral MADS-box genes were isolated from Sinofranchetia chinensis and from two other species of Lardizabalaceae, Holboellia grandiflora and Decaisnea insignis. The phylogenetic analysis of AP3-like genes in Ranunculales showed that three AP3 paralogues from Sinofranchetia chinensis belong to the AP3-I, -II and -III lineages. In situ hybridization results showed that SIchAP3-3 is significantly expressed only in nectar leaves at the late stages of floral development, and SIchAG, a C-class MADS-box gene, is expressed not only in stamens and carpels, but also in nectar leaves. SEM observation revealed that the adaxial surface of nectar leaves is covered with conical epidermal cells, a hallmark of petaloidy. Conclusions The gene expression data imply that the nectar leaves in S. chinensis might share a similar genetic regulatory code with other nectar leaves in Ranunculales species. Based on gene expression and morphological evidence, it is considered that the nectar leaves in S. chinensis could be referred to as petals. Furthermore, the study supports the hypothesis that the nectar leaves in some Ranunculales species might be derived from stamens. PMID

  9. A MADS-box gene is specifically expressed in fibers of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and influences plant growth of transgenic Arabidopsis in a GA-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Bing-Ying; Li, Mo; Li, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Ze-Ting; Li, Yang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a cDNA, GhMADS14, encoding a typical MADS-box protein with 223 amino acids was isolated from a cotton cDNA library. Fluorescent microscopy indicated that the GhMADS14 protein was localized in the cell nucleus. GhMADS14 was specifically expressed in the elongating fibers, and its expression was gradually enhanced at early stages of fiber elongation and reached its peak in 9-10 DPA fibers. Overexpression of GhMADS14 in Arabidopsis hindered plant growth. Measurement and statistical analysis revealed that hypocotyl length of GhMADS14 transgenic seedlings was significantly reduced, and the height of the mature transgenic plants was remarkably less than that of the wild type. Furthermore, expression of GA 20-oxidase (AtGA20ox1 and AtGA20ox2) and GA 3-oxidase (AtGA3ox1 and AtGA3ox2) genes was remarkably reduced, whereas AtGA2ox1 and AtGA2ox8 were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic plants, compared with the wild type. These results suggested that overexpression of GhMADS14 in Arabidopsis may alter expression levels of the genes related to GA biosynthetic and metabolic pathways, resulting in the reduction of endogenous GA amounts in cells. As a result, the transgenic plants grew slowly and display a GA-deficient phenotype.

  10. Functional and evolutionary analysis of the AP1/SEP/AGL6 superclade of MADS-box genes in the basal eudicot Epimedium sagittatum

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Huang, Wenjun; Li, Zhineng; Song, Chi; Liu, Di; Liu, Yongliang; Hayward, Alice; Liu, Yifei; Huang, Hongwen; Wang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims MADS-box transcriptional regulators play important roles during plant development. Based on phylogenetic reconstruction, the AP1/SEP/AGL6 superclade of floral MADS-box genes underwent one or two duplication events in the common ancestor of the core eudicots. However, the functional evolution of the AP1/SEP/AGL6 superclade in basal eudicots remains uncharacterized. Epimedium sagittatum is a basal eudicot species valued for its medicinal properties and showing unique floral morphology. In this study, structural and functional variation of FUL-like (AP1 subfamily), SEP-like and AGL6-like genes in this species was investigated to further our understanding of flower evolution in angiosperms. Detailed investigations into the microsynteny and evolutionary history of the floral A and E class MADS-box genes in eudicots were undertaken and used to trace their genomic rearrangements. Methods One AP1-like gene, two SEP-like genes and one AGL6-like gene were cloned from E. sagittatum. Their expression patterns were examined using quantitative RT-PCR in different vegetative and reproductive organs at two developmental stages. Yeast two-hybrid assays were carried out among AP1/SEP/AGL6 superclade, AP3/PI and AGAMOUS subfamily members for elucidation of dimerization patterns. In addition, possible formation of a ternary complex involving B class proteins with the A class protein EsFUL-like, the E class SEP-like protein EsAGL2-1 or the AGL6-class protein EsAGL6 were detected using yeast three-hybrid assays. Transgenic Arabidopsis or tobacco plants expressing EsFUL-like, EsAGL2-1 and EsAGL6-like under the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter were generated and analysed. Genomic studies of AP1 syntenic regions in arabidopsis, columbine, strawberry, papaya, peach, grapevine and tomato were conducted for microsyntenic analyses. Key Results Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that EsFUL-like is a member of the AP1 (A class) subfamily, EsAGL2-1 and Es

  11. Phylogeny and divergence of basal angiosperms inferred from APETALA3- and PISTILLATA-like MADS-box genes.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Seishiro; Uehara, Koichi; Imafuku, Masao; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Ito, Motomi

    2004-06-01

    The B-class MADS-box genes composed of APETALA3 ( AP3) and PISTILLATA ( PI) lineages play an important role in petal and stamen identity in previously studied flowering plants. We investigated the diversification of the AP3-like and PI-like MADS-box genes of eight species in five basal angiosperm families: Amborella trichopoda (Amborellaceae); Brasenia schreberi and Cabomba caroliniana (Cabombaceae); Euryale ferox, Nuphar japonicum, and Nymphaea tetragona (Nymphaeaceae); Illicium anisatum (Illiciaceae); and Kadsura japonica (Schisandraceae). Sequence analysis showed that a four amino acid deletion in the K domain, which was found in all previously reported angiosperm PI genes, exists in a PI homologue of Schisandraceae, but not in six PI homologues of the Amborellaceae, Cabombaceae, and Nymphaeaceae, suggesting that the Amborellaceae, Cabombaceae, and Nymphaeaceae are basalmost lineages in angiosperms. The results of molecular phylogenetic analyses were not inconsistent with this hypothesis. The AP3 and PI homologues from Amborella share a sequence of five amino acids in the 5' region of exon 7. Using the linearized tree and likelihood methods, the divergence time between the AP3 and PI lineages was estimated as somewhere between immediately after to several tens of millions of years after the split between angiosperms and extant gymnosperms. Estimates of the age of the most recent common ancestor of all extant angiosperms range from approximately 140-210 Ma, depending on the trees used and assumptions made.

  12. The MADS-box transcription factor FgMcm1 regulates cell identity and fungal development in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Liu, Huiquan; Li, Guotian; Liu, Meigang; Yun, Yingzi; Wang, Chenfang; Ma, Zhonghua; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2015-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, MADS-box genes are known to play major regulatory roles in various biological processes by combinatorial interactions with other transcription factors. In this study, we functionally characterized the FgMCM1 MADS-box gene in Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of wheat and barley head blight. Deletion of FgMCM1 resulted in the loss of perithecium production and phialide formation. The Fgmcm1 mutant was significantly reduced in virulence, deoxynivalenol biosynthesis and conidiation. In yeast two-hybrid assays, FgMcm1 interacted with Mat1-1-1 and Fst12, two transcription factors important for sexual reproduction. Whereas Fgmcm1 mutants were unstable and produced stunted subcultures, Fgmcm1 mat1-1-1 but not Fgmcm1 fst12 double mutants were stable. Furthermore, spontaneous suppressor mutations occurred frequently in stunted subcultures to recover growth rate. Ribonucleic acid sequencing analysis indicated that a number of sexual reproduction-related genes were upregulated in stunted subcultures compared with the Fgmcm1 mutant, which was downregulated in the expression of genes involved in pathogenesis, secondary metabolism and conidiation. We also showed that culture instability was not observed in the Fvmcm1 mutants of the heterothallic Fusarium verticillioides. Overall, our data indicate that FgMcm1 plays a critical role in the regulation of cell identity, sexual and asexual reproduction, secondary metabolism and pathogenesis in F. graminearum.

  13. Identification of a sugar beet BvM14-MADS box gene through differential gene expression analysis of monosomic addition line M14.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunquan; Wang, Yuguang; Wang, Yuting; Wang, Lifa; Chen, Sixue; Li, Haiying

    2011-11-01

    Monosomic addition line M14 carrying an additional chromosome 9 from Beta corolliflora Zosimovic ex Buttler was obtained through hybridization between the wild species B. corolliflora and a cultivated species Beta vulgaris L. var Saccharifera Alef. The M14 line showed diplosporic reproduction and stress tolerance. To identify differentially expressed genes in M14, a subtractive cDNA library was prepared by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between M14 (2n=18+1) and B. vulgaris (2n=18). A total of 190 unique sequences were identified in the library and their putative functions were analyzed using Gene Ontology (GO). One of the genes, designated as BvM14-MADS box, encodes a MADS box transcription factor. It was cloned from M14 and over-expressed in transgenic tobacco plants. Interestingly, this gene was located on chromosome 2 of B. vulgaris, not on the additional chromosome 9. Overexpression of BvM14-MADS box led to significant phenotypic changes in tobacco. The differential expression of BvM14-MADS box gene in M14 may be caused by the interaction between the additional chromosome 9 from B. corolliflora and the B. vulgaris chromosomes in M14.

  14. Characterization and expression analysis of AGAMOUS-like, SEEDSTICK-like, and SEPALLATA-like MADS-box genes in peach (Prunus persica) fruit.

    PubMed

    Tani, Eleni; Polidoros, Alexios N; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Stedel, Catalina; Kalloniati, Chrissanthi; Demetriou, Kyproula; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios S

    2009-08-01

    MADS-box genes encode transcriptional regulators that are critical for flowering, flower organogenesis and plant development. Although there are extensive reports on genes involved in flower organogenesis in model and economically important plant species, there are few reports on MADS-box genes in woody plants. In this study, we have cloned and characterized AGAMOUS (AG), SEEDSTICK (STK) and SEPALLATA (SEP) homologs from peach tree (Prunus persica L. Batsch) and studied their expression patterns in different tissues as well as in fruit pericarp during pit hardening. AG- STK- and SEP-like homologs, representative of the C-, D-, E-like MADS-box gene lineages, respectively, play key roles in stamen, carpel, ovule and fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence similarities, phylogenetic analysis and structural characteristics were used to provide classification of the isolated genes in type C (PPERAG), type D (PPERSTK) and type E (PPERSEP1, PPERSEP3, PPERFB9) organ identity genes. Expression patterns were determined and in combination with phylogenetic data provided useful indications on the function of these genes. These data suggest the involvement of MADS-box genes in peach flower and fruit development and provide further evidence for the role of these genes in woody perennial trees that is compatible with their function in model plant species.

  15. MADS-Box Transcription Factor VdMcm1 Regulates Conidiation, Microsclerotia Formation, Pathogenicity, and Secondary Metabolism of Verticillium dahliae

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dianguang; Wang, Yonglin; Tian, Longyan; Tian, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae, a notorious phytopathogenic fungus, causes vascular wilt diseases in many plant species resulting in devastating yield losses worldwide. Due to its ability to colonize plant xylem and form microsclerotia, V. dahliae is highly persistent and difficult to control. In this study, we show that the MADS-box transcription factor VdMcm1 is a key regulator of conidiation, microsclerotia formation, virulence, and secondary metabolism of V. dahliae. In addition, our findings suggest that VdMcm1 is involved in cell wall integrity. Finally, comparative RNA-Seq analysis reveals 823 significantly downregulated genes in the VdMcm1 deletion mutant, with diverse biological functions in transcriptional regulation, plant infection, cell adhesion, secondary metabolism, transmembrane transport activity, and cell secretion. When taken together, these data suggest that VdMcm1 performs pleiotropic functions in V. dahliae. PMID:27536281

  16. Overexpression of a MADS-Box Gene from Birch (Betula platyphylla) Promotes Flowering and Enhances Chloroplast Development in Transgenic Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Guan-Zheng; Zheng, Tangchun; Liu, Guifeng; Wang, Wenjie; Zang, Lina; Liu, Huanzhen; Yang, Chuanping

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a MADS-box gene (BpMADS), which is an ortholog of AP1 from Arabidopsis, was isolated from birch (Betula platyphylla). Transgenic Arabidopsis containing a BpMADS promoter::GUS construct was produced, which exhibited strong GUS staining in sepal tissues. Ectopic expression of BpMADS significantly enhanced the flowering of tobacco (35S::BpMADS). In addition, the chloroplasts of transgenic tobacco exhibited much higher growth and division rates, as well rates of photosynthesis, than wild-type. A grafting experiment demonstrated that the flowering time of the scion was not affected by stock that overexpressed BpMADS. In addition, the overexpression of BpMADS resulted in the upregulation of some flowering-related genes in tobacco. PMID:23691043

  17. Morphological "primary homology" and expression of AG-subfamily MADS-box genes in pines, podocarps, and yews.

    PubMed

    Englund, Marie; Carlsbecker, Annelie; Engström, Peter; Vergara-Silva, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The morphological variation among reproductive organs of extant gymnosperms is remarkable, especially among conifers. Several hypotheses concerning morphological homology between various conifer reproductive organs have been put forward, in particular in relation to the pine ovuliferous scale. Here, we use the expression patterns of orthologs of the ABC-model MADS-box gene AGAMOUS (AG) for testing morphological homology hypotheses related to organs of the conifer female cone. To this end, we first developed a tailored 3'RACE procedure that allows reliable amplification of partial sequences highly similar to gymnosperm-derived members of the AG-subfamily of MADS-box genes. Expression patterns of two novel conifer AG orthologs cloned with this procedure-namely PodAG and TgAG, obtained from the podocarp Podocarpus reichei and the yew Taxus globosa, respectively-are then further characterized in the morphologically divergent female cones of these species. The expression patterns of PodAG and TgAG are compared with those of DAL2, a previously discovered Picea abies (Pinaceae) AG ortholog. By treating the expression patterns of DAL2, PodAG, and TgAG as character states mapped onto currently accepted cladogram topologies, we suggest that the epimatium-that is, the podocarp female cone organ previously postulated as a "modified" ovuliferous scale-and the canonical Pinaceae ovuliferous scale can be legitimally conceptualized as "primary homologs." Character state mapping for TgAG suggests in turn that the aril of Taxaceae should be considered as a different type of organ. This work demonstrates how the interaction between developmental-genetic data and formal cladistic theory could fruitfully contribute to gymnosperm systematics.

  18. A tomato MADS-box transcription factor, SlMADS1, acts as a negative regulator of fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tingting; Hu, Zongli; Deng, Lei; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Mingku; Zhang, Jianling; Chen, Guoping

    2013-10-01

    MADS-box genes encode a highly conserved gene family of transcriptional factors that regulate numerous developmental processes in plants. In this study, a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS-box gene, SlMADS1, was cloned and its tissue-specific expression profile was analyzed. The real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed that SlMADS1 was highly expressed in sepals and fruits; its expression level was increased with the development of sepals, while the transcript of SlMADS1 decreased significantly in accordance with fruit ripening. To further explore the function of SlMADS1, an RNA interference (RNAi) expression vector targeting SlMADS1 was constructed and transformed into tomato plants. Shorter ripening time of fruit was observed in SlMADS1-silenced tomatoes. The accumulation of carotenoid and the expression of PHYTOENE SYNTHETASE1 were enhanced in RNAi fruits. Besides, ethylene biosynthetic genes, including 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLATE SYNTHASE1A, 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLATE SYNTHASE6, 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLATE OXIDASE1, and 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLATE OXIDASE3, and the ethylene-responsive genes E4 and E8, which were involved in fruit ripening, were also up-regulated in silenced plants. SlMADS1 RNAi fruits showed approximately 2- to 4-fold increases in ethylene production compared with the wild type. Furthermore, SlMADS1-silenced seedlings displayed shorter hypocotyls and were more sensitive to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate than the wild type. Additionally, a yeast two-hybrid assay revealed a clear interaction between SlMADS1 and SlMADS-RIN. These results suggest that SlMADS1 plays an important role in fruit ripening as a repressive modulator.

  19. GRCD1, an AGL2-like MADS Box Gene, Participates in the C Function during Stamen Development in Gerbera hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Kotilainen, Mika; Elomaa, Paula; Uimari, Anne; Albert, Victor A.; Yu, Deyue; Teeri, Teemu H.

    2000-01-01

    Despite the differences in flower form, the underlying mechanism in determining the identity of floral organs is largely conserved among different angiosperms, but the details of how the functions of A, B, and C are specified varies greatly among plant species. Here, we report functional analysis of a Gerbera MADS box gene, GRCD1, which is orthologous to AGL2-like MADS box genes. Members of this group of genes are being reported in various species in growing numbers, but their functions remained largely unsettled. GRCD1 expression is detected in all four whorls, but the strongest signal is seen in the developing stamen and carpel. Downregulating GRCD1 expression by antisense transformation revealed that lack of GRCD1 caused homeotic changes in one whorl only: sterile staminodes, which normally develop in whorl 3 of marginal female florets, were changed into petals. This indicates that the GRCD1 gene product is active in determining stamen identity. Transgenic downregulation of GRCD1 causes a homeotic change similar to that in the downregulation of the Gerbera C function genes GAGA1 and GAGA2, but one that is limited to whorl 3. Downregulation of GRCD1 expression does not reduce expression of GAGA1 or GAGA2, or vice versa; and in yeast two-hybrid analysis, GRCD1 is able to interact with GAGA1 and GAGA2. We propose that a heterodimer between the GRCD1 and GAGA1/2 gene products is needed to fulfill the C function in whorl 3 in Gerbera. PMID:11041884

  20. Overexpressing the ANR1 MADS-box gene in transgenic plants provides new insights into its role in the nitrate regulation of root development.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yinbo; Bernreiter, Andreas; Filleur, Sophie; Abram, Beverley; Forde, Brian G

    2012-06-01

    The expression of the ANR1 MADS-box gene was manipulated in transgenic plants to investigate its role in the NO(3)(-)-dependent regulation of root development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Constitutive overexpression of ANR1 in roots, achieved using GAL4 enhancer trap lines, resulted in more rapid early seedling development, increased lengths and numbers of lateral roots and increased shoot fresh weight. Based on results obtained with five different enhancer trap lines, the overexpression of ANR1 in the lateral root tips appears to be more important for this phenotype than its level of expression in the developing lateral root primordia. Dexamethasone-mediated induction of ANR1 in lines expressing an ANR1-GR (glucocorticoid receptor) fusion protein stimulated lateral root growth but not primary root growth. Short-term (24 h) dexamethasone treatments led to prolonged stimulation of lateral root growth, whether the lateral roots were already mature or still unemerged at the time of treatment. In split-root experiments, localized application of dexamethasone to half of the root system of an ANR1-GR line elicited a localized increase in both the length and numbers of lateral roots, mimicking the effect of a localized NO(3)(-) treatment. In both types of transgenic line, the root phenotype was strongly dependent on the presence of NO(3)(-), indicating that there are additional components involved in ANR1 function that are NO(3)(-) regulated. The implications of these results for our understanding of ANR1's mode of action in the root response to localized NO(3)(-) are discussed.

  1. Digital gene expression analysis of male and female bud transition in Metasequoia reveals high activity of MADS-box transcription factors and hormone-mediated sugar pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Liang, Haiying; Li, Lan; Tang, Sha; Han, Xiao; Wang, Congpeng; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2015-01-01

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides is a famous redwood tree of ecological and economic importance, and requires more than 20 years of juvenile-to-adult transition before producing female and male cones. Previously, we induced reproductive buds using a hormone solution in juvenile Metasequoia trees as young as 5-to-7 years old. In the current study, hormone-treated shoots found in female and male buds were used to identify candidate genes involved in reproductive bud transition in Metasequoia. Samples from hormone-treated cone reproductive shoots and naturally occurring non-cone setting shoots were analyzed using 24 digital gene expression (DGE) tag profiles using Illumina, generating a total of 69,520 putative transcripts. Next, 32 differentially and specifically expressed transcripts were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, including the upregulation of MADS-box transcription factors involved in male bud transition and flowering time control proteins involved in female bud transition. These differentially expressed transcripts were associated with 243 KEGG pathways. Among the significantly changed pathways, sugar pathways were mediated by hormone signals during the vegetative-to-reproductive phase transition, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Key enzymes were identified in these pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase (NAD) and glutathione dehydrogenase for the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway, and glucanphosphorylase for sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Our results increase our understanding of the reproductive bud transition in gymnosperms. In addition, these studies on hormone-mediated sugar pathways increase our understanding of the relationship between sugar and hormone signaling during female and male bud initiation in Metasequoia.

  2. Dormancy-associated MADS-box genes and microRNAs jointly control dormancy transition in pear (Pyrus pyrifolia white pear group) flower bud.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingfeng; Li, Jianzhao; Cai, Danying; Qian, Minjie; Jia, Huimin; Bai, Songling; Hussain, Sayed; Liu, Guoqin; Teng, Yuanwen; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Bud dormancy in perennial plants is indispensable to survival over winter and to regrowth and development in the following year. However, the molecular pathways of endo-dormancy induction, maintenance, and release are still unclear, especially in fruit crops. To identify genes with roles in regulating endo-dormancy, 30 MIKC(C)-type MADS-box genes were identified in the pear genome and characterized. The 30 genes were analysed to determine their phylogenetic relationships with homologous genes, genome locations, gene structure, tissue-specific transcript profiles, and transcriptional patterns during flower bud dormancy in 'Suli' pear (Pyrus pyrifolia white pear group). The roles in regulating bud dormancy varied among the MIKC gene family members. Yeast one-hybrid and transient assays showed that PpCBF enhanced PpDAM1 and PpDAM3 transcriptional activity during the induction of dormancy, probably by binding to the C-repeat/DRE binding site, while DAM proteins inhibited the transcriptional activity of PpFT2 during dormancy release. In the small RNA-seq analysis, 185 conserved, 24 less-conserved, and 32 pear-specific miRNAs with distinct expression patterns during bud dormancy were identified. Joint analyses of miRNAs and MIKC genes together with degradome data showed that miR6390 targeted PpDAM transcripts and degraded them to release PpFT2. Our data show that cross-talk among PpCBF, PpDAM, PpFT2, and miR6390 played important roles in regulating endo-dormancy. A model for the molecular mechanism of dormancy transition is proposed: short-term chilling in autumn activates the accumulation of CBF, which directly promotes DAM expression; DAM subsequently inhibits FT expression to induce endo-dormancy, and miR6390 degrades DAM genes to release endo-dormancy.

  3. The regulation of MADS-box gene expression during ripening of banana and their regulatory interaction with ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Elitzur, Tomer; Vrebalov, Julia; Giovannoni, James J.; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E.; Friedman, Haya

    2010-01-01

    Six MaMADS-box genes have been cloned from the banana fruit cultivar Grand Nain. The similarity of these genes to tomato LeRIN is low and neither MaMADS2 nor MaMADS1 complement the tomato rin mutation. Nevertheless, the expression patterns, specifically in fruit and the induction during ripening and in response to ethylene and 1-MCP, suggest that some of these genes may participate in ripening. MaMADS1, 2, and 3, are highly expressed in fruit only, while the others are expressed in fruit as well as in other organs. Moreover, the suites of MaMADS-box genes and their temporal expression differ in peel and pulp during ripening. In the pulp, the increase in MaMADS2, 3, 4, and 5 expression preceded an increase in ethylene production, but coincides with the CO2 peak. However, MaMADS1 expression in pulp coincided with ethylene production, but a massive increase in its expression occurred late during ripening, together with a second wave in the expression of MaMADS2, 3, and 4. In the peel, on the other hand, an increase in expression of MaMADS1, 3, and to a lesser degree also of MaMADS4 and 2 coincided with an increase in ethylene production. Except MaMADS3, which was induced by ethylene in pulp and peel, only MaMADS4, and 5 in pulp and MaMADS1 in peel were induced by ethylene. 1-MCP applied at the onset of the increase in ethylene production, increased the levels of MaMADS4 and MaMADS1 in pulp, while it decreased MaMADS1, 3, 4, and 5 in peel, suggesting that MaMADS4 and MaMADS1 are negatively controlled by ethylene at the onset of ethylene production only in pulp. Only MaMADS2 is neither induced by ethylene nor by 1-MCP, and it is expressed mainly in pulp. Our results suggest that two independent ripening programs are employed in pulp and peel which involve the activation of mainly MaMADS2, 4, and 5 and later on also MaMADS1 in pulp, and mainly MaMADS1, and 3 in peel. Hence, our results are consistent with MaMADS2, a SEP3 homologue, acting in the pulp upstream of the

  4. Evolution of AGL6-like MADS box genes in grasses (Poaceae): ovule expression is ancient and palea expression is new.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, Renata; Kellogg, Elizabeth A

    2009-09-01

    AGAMOUS-like6 (AGL6) genes encode MIKC-type MADS box transcription factors and are closely related to SEPALLATA and AP1/FUL-like genes. Here, we focus on the molecular evolution and expression of the AGL6-like genes in grasses. We have found that AGL6-like genes are expressed in ovules, lodicules (second whorl floral organs), paleas (putative first whorl floral organs), and floral meristems. Each of these expression domains was acquired at a different time in evolution, indicating that each represents a distinct function of the gene product and that the AGL6-like genes are pleiotropic. Expression in the inner integument of the ovule appears to be an ancient expression pattern corresponding to the expression of the gene in the megasporangium and integument in gymnosperms. Expression in floral meristems appears to have been acquired in the angiosperms and expression in second whorl organs in monocots. Early in grass evolution, AGL6-like orthologs acquired a new expression domain in the palea. Stamen expression is variable. Most grasses have a single AGL6-like gene (orthologous to the rice [Oryza sativa] gene MADS6). However, rice and other species of Oryza have a second copy (orthologous to rice MADS17) that appears to be the result of an ancient duplication.

  5. Patterns of gene duplication and functional evolution during the diversification of the AGAMOUS subfamily of MADS box genes in angiosperms.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Elena M; Jaramillo, M Alejandra; Di Stilio, Verónica S

    2004-01-01

    Members of the AGAMOUS (AG) subfamily of MIKC-type MADS-box genes appear to control the development of reproductive organs in both gymnosperms and angiosperms. To understand the evolution of this subfamily in the flowering plants, we have identified 26 new AG-like genes from 15 diverse angiosperm species. Phylogenetic analyses of these genes within a large data set of AG-like sequences show that ancient gene duplications were critical in shaping the evolution of the subfamily. Before the radiation of extant angiosperms, one event produced the ovule-specific D lineage and the well-characterized C lineage, whose members typically promote stamen and carpel identity as well as floral meristem determinacy. Subsequent duplications in the C lineage resulted in independent instances of paralog subfunctionalization and maintained functional redundancy. Most notably, the functional homologs AG from Arabidopsis and PLENA (PLE) from Antirrhinum are shown to be representatives of separate paralogous lineages rather than simple genetic orthologs. The multiple subfunctionalization events that have occurred in this subfamily highlight the potential for gene duplication to lead to dissociation among genetic modules, thereby allowing an increase in morphological diversity. PMID:15020484

  6. Characterization of the Possible Roles for B Class MADS Box Genes in Regulation of Perianth Formation in Orchid1[C

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Yun; Kao, Nai-Hsuan; Li, Jen-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Han; Liang, Yu-Ling; Wu, Jia-Wei; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2010-01-01

    To investigate sepal/petal/lip formation in Oncidium Gower Ramsey, three paleoAPETALA3 genes, O. Gower Ramsey MADS box gene5 (OMADS5; clade 1), OMADS3 (clade 2), and OMADS9 (clade 3), and one PISTILLATA gene, OMADS8, were characterized. The OMADS8 and OMADS3 mRNAs were expressed in all four floral organs as well as in vegetative leaves. The OMADS9 mRNA was only strongly detected in petals and lips. The mRNA for OMADS5 was only strongly detected in sepals and petals and was significantly down-regulated in lip-like petals and lip-like sepals of peloric mutant flowers. This result revealed a possible negative role for OMADS5 in regulating lip formation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis indicated that OMADS5 formed homodimers and heterodimers with OMADS3 and OMADS9. OMADS8 only formed heterodimers with OMADS3, whereas OMADS3 and OMADS9 formed homodimers and heterodimers with each other. We proposed that sepal/petal/lip formation needs the presence of OMADS3/8 and/or OMADS9. The determination of the final organ identity for the sepal/petal/lip likely depended on the presence or absence of OMADS5. The presence of OMADS5 caused short sepal/petal formation. When OMADS5 was absent, cells could proliferate, resulting in the possible formation of large lips and the conversion of the sepal/petal into lips in peloric mutants. Further analysis indicated that only ectopic expression of OMADS8 but not OMADS5/9 caused the conversion of the sepal into an expanded petal-like structure in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. PMID:20018605

  7. TrMADS3, a new MADS-box gene, from a perennial species Taihangia rupestris (Rosaceae) is upregulated by cold and experiences seasonal fluctuation in expression level.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoqiu; Xiao, Qiying; Zhao, Ran; Wu, Feng; Xu, Qijiang; Chong, Kang; Meng, Zheng

    2008-06-01

    In many temperate perennial plants, floral transition is initiated in the first growth season but the development of flower is arrested during the winter to ensure production of mature flowers in the next spring. The molecular mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood with few well-characterized regulatory genes. Here, a MADS-box gene, named as TrMADS3, was isolated from the overwintering inflorescences of Taihangia rupestris, a temperate perennial in the rose family. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that TrMADS3 is more closely related to the homologs of the FLOWERING LOCUS C lineage than to any of the other MIKC-type MADS-box lineages known from Arabidopsis. The TrMADS3 transcripts are extensively distributed in inflorescences, roots, and leaves during the winter. In controlled conditions, the TrMADS3 expression level is upregulated by a chilling exposure for 1 to 2 weeks and remains high for a longer period of time in warm conditions after cold treatment. In situ hybridization reveals that TrMADS3 is predominantly expressed in the vegetative and reproductive meristems. Ectopic expression of TrMADS3 in Arabidopsis promotes seed germination on the media containing relatively high NaCl or mannitol concentrations. These data indicate that TrMADS3 in a perennial species might have its role in both vegetative and reproductive meristems in response to cold.

  8. Fleshy seeds form in the basal Angiosperm Magnolia grandiflora and several MADS-box genes are expressed as fleshy seed tissues develop.

    PubMed

    Lovisetto, Alessandro; Masiero, Simona; Rahim, Md Abdur; Mendes, Marta Adelina Miranda; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    One successful mechanism of seed dispersal in plants involves production of edible fleshy structures which attract frugivorous animals and transfer this task to them. Not only Angiosperms but also Gymnosperms may use the fleshy fruit habit for seed dispersal, and a similar suite of MADS-box genes may be expressed as these structures form. Magnolia grandiflora produces dry follicles which, at maturity, open to reveal brightly colored fleshy seeds. This species thus also employs endozoochory for seed dispersal, although it produces dry fruits. Molecular analysis reveals that genes involved in softening and color changes are expressed at late stages of seed development, when the fleshy seed sarcotesta softens and accumulates carotenoids. Several MADS-box genes have also been studied and results highlight the existence of a basic genetic toolkit which may be common to all fleshy fruit-like structures, independently of their anatomic origin. According to their expression patterns, one of two AGAMOUS genes and the three SEPALLATA genes known so far in Magnolia are of particular interest. Duplication of AGAMOUS already occurs in both Nymphaeales and Magnoliids, although the lack of functional gene analysis prevents comparisons with known duplications in the AGAMOUS lineage of core Eudicots.

  9. A new MADS-box gene (IbMADS10) from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) is involved in the accumulation of anthocyanin.

    PubMed

    Lalusin, Antonio G; Nishita, Koichi; Kim, Sung-Hyung; Ohta, Masaru; Fujimura, Tatsuhito

    2006-01-01

    A new MADS-box gene designated as IbMADS10 was cloned and its expression was characterized from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) cv. Beniazuma. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene indicated high homology with members of the MADS-box family of transcription factors. IbMADS10 shares high amino acid sequence similarity with the DEFH28 of Antirrhinum majus (64%) and with BpMADS4 of Betula pendula (61%) of the SQUA subfamily. Southern blot analysis revealed that the IbMADS10 is present in one or low copy number in the sweet potato genome. The gene is specifically expressed in the pigmented tissues such as in the flower bud, in the pink and in red roots, and hence, it was speculated that the IbMADS10 gene might be correlated with anthocyanin biosynthesis in sweet potato. RNA blot expression of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding for CHS, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS and UFTG carried out in the tissues where the IbMADS10 gene was expressed revealed similar transcript levels in all tissues where the IbMADS10 gene is highly expressed, indicating that the IbMADS10 gene is highly correlated with the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. Another important aspect is the pigmented phenotypes of transgenic calli that ectopically express the IbMADS10 gene, thereby supporting its involvement in the developmental regulation of pigment formation. Tissue printing result further strengthens the hypothesis that the IbMADS10 gene is indeed involved in anthocyanin pigmentation in sweet potato. As the purpose of the IbMADS10 gene is pigmentation, its function, therefore, resembles that of the transparent testa (tt) genes of Arabidopsis.

  10. Transcriptional Activity of the MADS Box ARLEQUIN/TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 Gene Is Required for Cuticle Development of Tomato Fruit1

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, Estela; Dominguez, Eva; Pineda, Benito; Heredia, Antonio; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad

    2015-01-01

    Fruit development and ripening entail key biological and agronomic events, which ensure the appropriate formation and dispersal of seeds and determine productivity and yield quality traits. The MADS box gene ARLEQUIN/TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 (hereafter referred to as TAGL1) was reported as a key regulator of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) reproductive development, mainly involved in flower development, early fruit development, and ripening. It is shown here that silencing of the TAGL1 gene (RNA interference lines) promotes significant changes affecting cuticle development, mainly a reduction of thickness and stiffness, as well as a significant decrease in the content of cuticle components (cutin, waxes, polysaccharides, and phenolic compounds). Accordingly, overexpression of TAGL1 significantly increased the amount of cuticle and most of its components while rendering a mechanically weak cuticle. Expression of the genes involved in cuticle biosynthesis agreed with the biochemical and biomechanical features of cuticles isolated from transgenic fruits; it also indicated that TAGL1 participates in the transcriptional control of cuticle development mediating the biosynthesis of cuticle components. Furthermore, cell morphology and the arrangement of epidermal cell layers, on whose activity cuticle formation depends, were altered when TAGL1 was either silenced or constitutively expressed, indicating that this transcription factor regulates cuticle development, probably through the biosynthetic activity of epidermal cells. Our results also support cuticle development as an integrated event in the fruit expansion and ripening processes that characterize fleshy-fruited species such as tomato. PMID:26019301

  11. X Linkage of AP3A, a Homolog of the Y-Linked MADS-Box Gene AP3Y in Silene latifolia and S. dioica

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Rebecca H.; Montgomery, Benjamin R.; Delph, Lynda F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The duplication of autosomal genes onto the Y chromosome may be an important element in the evolution of sexual dimorphism.A previous cytological study reported on a putative example of such a duplication event in a dioecious tribe of Silene (Caryophyllaceae): it was inferred that the Y-linked MADS-box gene AP3Y originated from a duplication of the reportedly autosomal orthologAP3A. However, a recent study, also using cytological methods, indicated that AP3A is X-linked in Silenelatifolia. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we hybridized S. latifolia and S. dioicato investigate whether the pattern of X linkage is consistent among distinct populations, occurs in both species, and is robust to genetic methods. We found inheritance patterns indicative of X linkage of AP3A in widely distributed populations of both species. Conclusions/Significance X linkage ofAP3A and Y linkage of AP3Yin both species indicates that the genes' ancestral progenitor resided on the autosomes that gave rise to the sex chromosomesand that neither gene has moved between chromosomes since species divergence.Consequently, our results do not support the contention that inter-chromosomal gene transfer occurred in the evolution of SlAP3Y from SlAP3A. PMID:21533056

  12. Importance of gene duplication in the evolution of genomic imprinting revealed by molecular evolutionary analysis of the type I MADS-box gene family in Arabidopsis species.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takanori; Kawabe, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The pattern of molecular evolution of imprinted genes is controversial and the entire picture is still to be unveiled. Recently, a relationship between the formation of imprinted genes and gene duplication was reported in genome-wide survey of imprinted genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Because gene duplications influence the molecular evolution of the duplicated gene family, it is necessary to investigate both the pattern of molecular evolution and the possible relationship between gene duplication and genomic imprinting for a better understanding of evolutionary aspects of imprinted genes. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary changes of type I MADS-box genes that include imprinted genes by using relative species of Arabidopsis thaliana (two subspecies of A. lyrata and three subspecies of A. halleri). A duplicated gene family enables us to compare DNA sequences between imprinted genes and its homologs. We found an increased number of gene duplications within species in clades containing the imprinted genes, further supporting the hypothesis that local gene duplication is one of the driving forces for the formation of imprinted genes. Moreover, data obtained by phylogenetic analysis suggested "rapid evolution" of not only imprinted genes but also its closely related orthologous genes, which implies the effect of gene duplication on molecular evolution of imprinted genes.

  13. Expression of AODEF, a B-functional MADS-box gene, in stamens and inner tepals of the dioecious species Asparagus officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Ishikawa, Y; Yoshida, R; Kanno, A; Kameya, T

    2003-04-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a dioecious species with male and female flowers on separate unisexual individuals. Since B- and C-functional MADS-box genes specify male and female reproductive organs, it is important to characterize these genes to clarify the mechanism of sex determination in monoecious and dioecious species. In this study, we isolated and characterized AODEF gene, a B-functional gene in the development of male and female flowers of A. officinalis. Southern hybridization identified a single copy of AODEF gene in asparagus genome. Northern blot analysis showed that this gene was specifically expressed in flower buds and not in vegetative tissues. In situ hybridization showed that during early hermaphrodite stages, AODEF gene was expressed in the inner tepal and stamen whorls (whorls 2 and 3, respectively), but not in the outer tepals (whorl 1), in both male and female flowers. In late unisexual developmental stages, the expression of AODEF gene was still detected in the inner tepals and stamens of male flowers, but the expression was reduced in whorls 2 and 3 of female flowers. Our results suggest that AODEF gene is probably not involved in tepal development in asparagus and that the expression of AODEF gene is probably controlled directly or indirectly by sex determination gene in the late developmental stages.

  14. Transcriptional Activity of the MADS Box ARLEQUIN/TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 Gene Is Required for Cuticle Development of Tomato Fruit.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Dominguez, Eva; Pineda, Benito; Heredia, Antonio; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael; Angosto, Trinidad

    2015-07-01

    Fruit development and ripening entail key biological and agronomic events, which ensure the appropriate formation and dispersal of seeds and determine productivity and yield quality traits. The MADS box gene Arlequin/tomato Agamous-like1 (hereafter referred to as TAGL1) was reported as a key regulator of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) reproductive development, mainly involved in flower development, early fruit development, and ripening. It is shown here that silencing of the TAGL1 gene (RNA interference lines) promotes significant changes affecting cuticle development, mainly a reduction of thickness and stiffness, as well as a significant decrease in the content of cuticle components (cutin, waxes, polysaccharides, and phenolic compounds). Accordingly, overexpression of TAGL1 significantly increased the amount of cuticle and most of its components while rendering a mechanically weak cuticle. Expression of the genes involved in cuticle biosynthesis agreed with the biochemical and biomechanical features of cuticles isolated from transgenic fruits; it also indicated that TAGL1 participates in the transcriptional control of cuticle development mediating the biosynthesis of cuticle components. Furthermore, cell morphology and the arrangement of epidermal cell layers, on whose activity cuticle formation depends, were altered when TAGL1 was either silenced or constitutively expressed, indicating that this transcription factor regulates cuticle development, probably through the biosynthetic activity of epidermal cells. Our results also support cuticle development as an integrated event in the fruit expansion and ripening processes that characterize fleshy-fruited species such as tomato.

  15. The study of the E-class SEPALLATA3-like MADS-box genes in wild-type and mutant flowers of cultivated saffron crocus (Crocus sativus L.) and its putative progenitors.

    PubMed

    Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Pasentsis, Konstantinos; Makris, Antonios; Darzentas, Nikos; Polidoros, Alexios; Kalivas, Apostolos; Argiriou, Anagnostis

    2011-09-15

    To further understand flowering and flower organ formation in the monocot crop saffron crocus (Crocus sativus L.), we cloned four MIKC(c) type II MADS-box cDNA sequences of the E-class SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) subfamily designated CsatSEP3a/b/c/c_as as well as the three respective genomic sequences. Sequence analysis showed that cDNA sequences of CsatSEP3 c and c_as are the products of alternative splicing of the CsatSEP3c gene. Bioinformatics analysis with putative orthologous sequences from various plant species suggested that all four cDNA sequences encode for SEP3-like proteins with characteristic motifs and amino acids, and highlighted intriguing sequence features. Phylogenetically, the isolated sequences were closest to the SEP3-like genes from monocots such as Asparagus virgatus, Oryza sativa, Zea mays, and the dicot Arabidopsis SEP3 gene. All four isolated C. sativus sequences were strongly expressed in flowers and in all flower organs: whorl1 tepals, whorl2 tepals, stamens and carpels, but not in leaves. Expression of CsatSEP3a/b/c/c_as cDNAs was compared in wild-type and mutant flowers. Expression of the isolatedCsatSEP3-like genes in whorl1 tepals together with E-class CsatAP1/FUL subfamily and B-class CsatAP3 and CsatPI subfamilies of genes, fits the ABCE "quartet model," an extended form of the original ABC model proposed to explain the homeotic transformation of whorl1 sepals into whorl1 tepals in Liliales and Asparagales plants such as C. sativus. This conclusion was also supported by the interaction of the CsatSEP3b protein with CsatAP1/FUL and CsatAP3 proteins. In contrast, expression of both B-class CsatAP3 and CsatPI genes and the C-class CsatAGAMOUS genes together with E-class CsatSEP3-like genes in carpels, without any phenotypic effects on carpels, raises questions about the role of these gene classes in carpel formation in this non-grass monocot and requires further experimentation. Finally, taking advantage of the size and sequence differences in

  16. The double-corolla phenotype in the Hawaiian lobelioid genus Clermontia involves ectopic expression of PISTILLATA B-function MADS box gene homologs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Hawaiian endemic genus Clermontia (Campanulaceae) includes 22 species, 15 of which, the double-corolla species, are characterized by an extra whorl of organs that appear to be true petals occupying what is normally the sepal whorl. Previous research has shown that the presence of homeotic petaloid organs in some other plant groups correlates with ectopic expression of B-function MADS box genes, but similar core eudicot examples of apparent groundplan divergence remain unstudied. B-function genes, which are not normally expressed in the sepal whorl, are required for determination and maintenance of petal identity. Here, we investigate the potential role of altered B-function gene expression contributing to the morphological diversity of this island genus. Results We examined the morphology and developmental genetics of two different species of Clermontia, one of which, C. arborescens, has normal sepals while the other, C. parviflora, has two whorls of petal-like organs. Scanning electron microscopy of cell surface morphologies of first and second whorl organs in the double-corolla species C. parviflora revealed conical epidermal cells on the adaxial surfaces of both first and second whorl petaloid organs, strongly suggesting a homeotic conversion in the former. Phylogenetic analysis of Clermontia species based on 5S ribosomal DNA non-transcribed spacer sequences indicated a probable single and geologically recent origin of the double-corolla trait within the genus, with numerous potential reversals to the standard sepal-petal format. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of homologs of the B-function genes PISTILLATA (PI), APETALA3 and TOMATO MADS 6 indicated ectopic expression of two PI paralogs in the first whorl of C. parviflora; no such homeotic expression was observed for the other two genes, nor for several other MADS box genes involved in various floral and non-floral functions. In the standard sepal-petal species C

  17. Genome-Wide Identification of the MIKC-Type MADS-Box Gene Family in Gossypium hirsutum L. Unravels Their Roles in Flowering.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongying; Yu, Daoqian; Yang, Zhaoen; Li, Changfeng; Qanmber, Ghulam; Li, Yi; Li, Jie; Liu, Zhao; Lu, Lili; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Quanjia; Li, Fuguang; Yang, Zuoren

    2017-01-01

    Cotton is one of the major world oil crops. Cottonseed oil meets the increasing demand of fried food, ruminant feed, and renewable bio-fuels. MADS intervening keratin-like and C-terminal (MIKC)-type MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that have crucial roles in various plant developmental processes. Nevertheless, this gene family has not been characterized, nor its functions investigated, in cotton. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of MIKC-type MADS genes in the tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., which is the most widely cultivated cotton species. In total, 110 GhMIKC genes were identified and phylogenetically classified into 13 subfamilies. The Flowering locus C (FLC) subfamily was absent in the Gossypium hirsutum L. genome but is found in Arabidopsis and Vitis vinifera L. Among the genes, 108 were distributed across the 13 A and 12 of the D genome's chromosomes, while two were located in scaffolds. GhMIKCs within subfamilies displayed similar exon/intron characteristics and conserved motif compositions. According to RNA-sequencing, most MIKC genes exhibited high flowering-associated expression profiles. A quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that some crucial MIKC genes determined the identities of the five flower organs. Furthermore, the overexpression of GhAGL17.9 in Arabidopsis caused an early flowering phenotype. Meanwhile, the expression levels of the flowering-related genes CONSTANS (CO), LEAFY (LFY) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) were significantly increased in these lines. These results provide useful information for future studies of GhMIKCs' regulation of cotton flowering.

  18. Histone acetylation accompanied with promoter sequences displaying differential expression profiles of B-class MADS-box genes for phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Pei-Shan; Chen, Tien-Chih; Yu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Keqiang; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Five B-class MADS-box genes, including four APETALA3 (AP3)-like PeMADS2∼5 and one PISTILLATA (PI)-like PeMADS6, specify the spectacular flower morphology in orchids. The PI-like PeMADS6 ubiquitously expresses in all floral organs. The four AP3-like genes, resulted from two duplication events, express ubiquitously at floral primordia and early floral organ stages, but show distinct expression profiles at late floral organ primordia and floral bud stages. Here, we isolated the upstream sequences of PeMADS2∼6 and studied the regulatory mechanism for their distinct gene expression. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 1.3-kb upstream sequences of AP3-like PeMADS2∼5 showed that their promoter regions have sufficiently diverged and contributed to their subfunctionalization. The amplified promoter sequences of PeMADS2∼6 could drive beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene expression in all floral organs, similar to their expression at the floral primordia stage. The promoter sequence of PeMADS4, exclusively expressed in lip and column, showed a 1.6∼3-fold higher expression in lip/column than in sepal/petal. Furthermore, we noted a 4.9-fold increase in histone acetylation (H3K9K14ac) in the translation start region of PeMADS4 in lip as compared in petal. All these results suggest that the regulation via the upstream sequences and increased H3K9K14ac level may act synergistically to display distinct expression profiles of the AP3-like genes at late floral organ primordia stage for Phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis.

  19. ODDSOC2 Is a MADS Box Floral Repressor That Is Down-Regulated by Vernalization in Temperate Cereals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Greenup, Aaron G.; Sasani, Shahryar; Oliver, Sandra N.; Talbot, Mark J.; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Hemming, Megan N.; Trevaskis, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In temperate cereals, such as wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), the transition to reproductive development can be accelerated by prolonged exposure to cold (vernalization). We examined the role of the grass-specific MADS box gene ODDSOC2 (OS2) in the vernalization response in cereals. The barley OS2 gene (HvOS2) is expressed in leaves and shoot apices but is repressed by vernalization. Vernalization represses OS2 independently of VERNALIZATION1 (VRN1) in a VRN1 deletion mutant of einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum), but VRN1 is required to maintain down-regulation of OS2 in vernalized plants. Furthermore, barleys that carry active alleles of the VRN1 gene (HvVRN1) have reduced expression of HvOS2, suggesting that HvVRN1 down-regulates HvOS2 during development. Overexpression of HvOS2 delayed flowering and reduced spike, stem, and leaf length in transgenic barley plants. Plants overexpressing HvOS2 showed reduced expression of barley homologs of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene FLOWERING PROMOTING FACTOR1 (FPF1) and increased expression of RNase-S-like genes. FPF1 promotes floral development and enhances cell elongation, so down-regulation of FPF1-like genes might explain the phenotypes of HvOS2 overexpression lines. We present an extended model of the genetic pathways controlling vernalization-induced flowering in cereals, which describes the regulatory relationships between VRN1, OS2, and FPF1-like genes. Overall, these findings highlight differences and similarities between the vernalization responses of temperate cereals and the model plant Arabidopsis. PMID:20431086

  20. Genome-Wide Identification of the MIKC-Type MADS-Box Gene Family in Gossypium hirsutum L. Unravels Their Roles in Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhongying; Yu, Daoqian; Yang, Zhaoen; Li, Changfeng; Qanmber, Ghulam; Li, Yi; Li, Jie; Liu, Zhao; Lu, Lili; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Quanjia; Li, Fuguang; Yang, Zuoren

    2017-01-01

    Cotton is one of the major world oil crops. Cottonseed oil meets the increasing demand of fried food, ruminant feed, and renewable bio-fuels. MADS intervening keratin-like and C-terminal (MIKC)-type MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that have crucial roles in various plant developmental processes. Nevertheless, this gene family has not been characterized, nor its functions investigated, in cotton. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of MIKC-type MADS genes in the tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., which is the most widely cultivated cotton species. In total, 110 GhMIKC genes were identified and phylogenetically classified into 13 subfamilies. The Flowering locus C (FLC) subfamily was absent in the Gossypium hirsutum L. genome but is found in Arabidopsis and Vitis vinifera L. Among the genes, 108 were distributed across the 13 A and 12 of the D genome's chromosomes, while two were located in scaffolds. GhMIKCs within subfamilies displayed similar exon/intron characteristics and conserved motif compositions. According to RNA-sequencing, most MIKC genes exhibited high flowering-associated expression profiles. A quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that some crucial MIKC genes determined the identities of the five flower organs. Furthermore, the overexpression of GhAGL17.9 in Arabidopsis caused an early flowering phenotype. Meanwhile, the expression levels of the flowering-related genes CONSTANS (CO), LEAFY (LFY) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) were significantly increased in these lines. These results provide useful information for future studies of GhMIKCs' regulation of cotton flowering. PMID:28382045

  1. Phylogenomics reveals surprising sets of essential and dispensable clades of MIKC(c)-group MADS-box genes in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Gramzow, Lydia; Theißen, Günter

    2015-06-01

    MIKC(C)-group MADS-box genes are involved in the control of many developmental processes in flowering plants. All of these genes are members of one of 17 clades that had already been established in the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of extant angiosperms. These clades trace back to 11 seed plant-specific superclades that were present in the MRCA of extant seed plants. Due to their important role in plant development and evolution, the origin of the clades of MIKC(C)-group genes has been studied in great detail. In contrast, whether any of these ancestral clades has ever been lost completely in any species has not been investigated so far. Here, we determined the presence of these clades by BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and Hidden Markov Model searches and by phylogenetic methods in the whole genomes of 27 flowering plants. Our data suggest that there are only three superclades of which all members have been lost in at least one of the investigated flowering plant species, and only few additional losses of angiosperm-specific MIKC(C)-group gene clades could be identified. Remarkably, for one seed plant superclade (TM8-like genes) and one angiosperm clade (FLC-like genes), multiple losses were identified, suggesting that the function of these genes is dispensable or that gene loss might have even been adaptive. The clades of MIKC(C)-group genes that have never been wiped out in any of the investigated species comprises, in addition to the expected floral organ identity genes, also TM3-like (SOC1-like), StMADS11-like (SVP-like), AGL17-like and GGM13-like (Bsister) genes, suggesting that these genes are more important for angiosperm development and evolution than has previously been appreciated.

  2. ZmSOC1, a MADS-box transcription factor from Zea mays, promotes flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suzhou; Luo, Yanzhong; Zhang, Zhanlu; Xu, Miaoyun; Wang, Weibu; Zhao, Yangmin; Zhang, Lan; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2014-11-03

    Zea mays is an economically important crop, but its molecular mechanism of flowering remains largely uncharacterized. The gene, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), integrates multiple flowering signals to regulate floral transition in Arabidopsis. In this study, ZmSOC1 was isolated from Zea mays. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the ZmSOC1 protein contained a highly conserved MADS domain and a typical SOC1 motif. ZmSOC1 protein was localized in the nucleus in protoplasts and showed no transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells. ZmSOC1 was highly expressed in maize reproductive organs, including filaments, ear and endosperm, but expression was very low in embryos; on the other hand, the abiotic stresses could repress ZmSOC1 expression. Overexpression of ZmSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis through increasing the expression of AtLFY and AtAP1. Overall, these results suggest that ZmSOC1 is a flowering promoter in Arabidopsis.

  3. ZmSOC1, an MADS-Box Transcription Factor from Zea mays, Promotes Flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Suzhou; Luo, Yanzhong; Zhang, Zhanlu; Xu, Miaoyun; Wang, Weibu; Zhao, Yangmin; Zhang, Lan; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Zea mays is an economically important crop, but its molecular mechanism of flowering remains largely uncharacterized. The gene, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), integrates multiple flowering signals to regulate floral transition in Arabidopsis. In this study, ZmSOC1 was isolated from Zea mays. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the ZmSOC1 protein contained a highly conserved MADS domain and a typical SOC1 motif. ZmSOC1 protein was localized in the nucleus in protoplasts and showed no transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells. ZmSOC1 was highly expressed in maize reproductive organs, including filaments, ear and endosperm, but expression was very low in embryos; on the other hand, the abiotic stresses could repress ZmSOC1 expression. Overexpression of ZmSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis through increasing the expression of AtLFY and AtAP1. Overall, these results suggest that ZmSOC1 is a flowering promoter in Arabidopsis. PMID:25372944

  4. Reciprocal Loss of CArG-Boxes and Auxin Response Elements Drives Expression Divergence of MPF2-Like MADS-Box Genes Controlling Calyx Inflation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Ramzan; Hu, Jinyong; Ali, Ghulam Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Expression divergence is thought to be a hallmark of functional diversification between homologs post duplication. Modification in regulatory elements has been invoked to explain expression divergence after duplication for several MADS-box genes, however, verification of reciprocal loss of cis-regulatory elements is lacking in plants. Here, we report that the evolution of MPF2-like genes has entailed degenerative mutations in a core promoter CArG-box and an auxin response factor (ARF) binding element in the large 1st intron in the coding region. Previously, MPF2-like genes were duplicated into MPF2-like-A and -B through genome duplication in Withania and Tubocapsicum (Withaninae). The calyx of Withania grows exorbitantly after pollination unlike Tubocapsicum, where it degenerates. Besides inflated calyx syndrome formation, MPF2-like transcription factors are implicated in functions both during the vegetative and reproductive development as well as in phase transition. MPF2-like-A of Withania (WSA206) is strongly expressed in sepals, while MPF2-like-B (WSB206) is not. Interestingly, their combined expression patterns seem to replicate the pattern of their closely related hypothetical progenitors from Vassobia and Physalis. Using phylogenetic shadowing, site-directed mutagenesis and motif swapping, we could show that the loss of a conserved CArG-box in MPF2-like-B of Withania is responsible for impeding its expression in sepals. Conversely, loss of an ARE in MPF2-like-A relaxed the constraint on expression in sepals. Thus, the ARE is an active suppressor of MPF2-like gene expression in sepals, which in contrast is activated via the CArG-box. The observed expression divergence in MPF2-like genes due to reciprocal loss of cis-regulatory elements has added to genetic and phenotypic variations in the Withaninae and enhanced the potential of natural selection for the adaptive evolution of ICS. Moreover, these results provide insight into the interplay of floral

  5. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tekleyohans, Dawit G.; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J.

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner. PMID:27776173

  6. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Katrin; Bhide, Amey S; Tekleyohans, Dawit G; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J; Becker, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner.

  7. Evolutionary Dynamics of Floral Homeotic Transcription Factor Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Madelaine; Thompson, Beth; Brabazon, Holly; Del Gizzi, Robert; Zhang, Thompson; Whipple, Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have widely acknowledged roles in the regulation of development, but few studies have addressed the timing and mechanism of shifting PPIs over evolutionary history. The B-class MADS-box transcription factors, PISTILLATA (PI) and APETALA3 (AP3) are key regulators of floral development. PI-like (PIL) and AP3-like (AP3L) proteins from a number of plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and the grass Zea mays (maize), bind DNA as obligate heterodimers. However, a PIL protein from the grass relative Joinvillea can bind DNA as a homodimer. To ascertain whether Joinvillea PIL homodimerization is an anomaly or indicative of broader trends, we characterized PIL dimerization across the Poales and uncovered unexpected evolutionary lability. Both obligate B-class heterodimerization and PIL homodimerization have evolved multiple times in the order, by distinct molecular mechanisms. For example, obligate B-class heterodimerization in maize evolved very recently from PIL homodimerization. A single amino acid change, fixed during domestication, is sufficient to toggle one maize PIL protein between homodimerization and obligate heterodimerization. We detected a signature of positive selection acting on residues preferentially clustered in predicted sites of contact between MADS-box monomers and dimers, and in motifs that mediate MADS PPI specificity in Arabidopsis. Changing one positively selected residue can alter PIL dimerization activity. Furthermore, ectopic expression of a Joinvillea PIL homodimer in Arabidopsis can homeotically transform sepals into petals. Our results provide a window into the evolutionary remodeling of PPIs, and show that novel interactions have the potential to alter plant form in a context-dependent manner. PMID:26908583

  8. Aspergillus fumigatus MADS-Box Transcription Factor rlmA Is Required for Regulation of the Cell Wall Integrity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marina Campos; Fabri, João Henrique Tadini Marilhano; Franco de Godoy, Krissia; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hori, Juliana Issa; Ferreira da Cunha, Anderson; Arentshorst, Mark; Ram, Arthur F. J.; van den Hondel, Cees A. M. J. J.; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Malavazi, Iran

    2016-01-01

    The Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) pathway is the primary signaling cascade that controls the de novo synthesis of the fungal cell wall, and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae this event is highly dependent on the RLM1 transcription factor. Here, we investigated the function of RlmA in the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We show that the ΔrlmA strain exhibits an altered cell wall organization in addition to defects related to vegetative growth and tolerance to cell wall-perturbing agents. A genetic analysis indicated that rlmA is positioned downstream of the pkcA and mpkA genes in the CWI pathway. As a consequence, rlmA loss-of-function leads to the altered expression of genes encoding cell wall-related proteins. RlmA positively regulates the phosphorylation of MpkA and is induced at both protein and transcriptional levels during cell wall stress. The rlmA was also involved in tolerance to oxidative damage and transcriptional regulation of genes related to oxidative stress adaptation. Moreover, the ΔrlmA strain had attenuated virulence in a neutropenic murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Our results suggest that RlmA functions as a transcription factor in the A. fumigatus CWI pathway, acting downstream of PkcA-MpkA signaling and contributing to the virulence of this fungus. PMID:27473315

  9. Proteomics and SSH Analyses of ALA-Promoted Fruit Coloration and Evidence for the Involvement of a MADS-Box Gene, MdMADS1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinxin; An, Yuyan; Zheng, Jie; Sun, Miao; Wang, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    Skin color is a key quality attribute of fruits and how to improve fruit coloration has long been a major concern. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a natural plant growth regulator, can significantly increase anthocyanin accumulation in fruit skin and therefore effectively improve coloration of many fruits, including apple. However, the molecular mechanism how ALA stimulates anthocyanin accumulation in fruit skin remains unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of ALA on apple skin at the protein and mRNA levels. A total of 85 differentially expressed proteins in apple skins between ALA and water treatment (control) were identified by complementary gel-based and gel-free separation techniques. Most of these differentially expressed proteins were up-regulated by ALA. Function analysis suggested that 87.06% of the ALA-responsive proteins were associated with fruit ripening. To further screen ALA-responsive regulators, we constructed a subtracted cDNA library (tester: ALA treatment; driver: control) and obtained 104 differentially expressed unigenes, of which 38 unigenes were indicators for the fruit ripening-related genes. The differentially changed proteins and transcripts did not correspond well at an individual level, but showed similar regulated direction in function at the pathway level. Among the identified fruit ripening-related genes, the expression of MdMADS1, a developmental transcription regulator of fruit ripening, was positively correlated with expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes (MdCHS, MdDFR, MdLDOX, and MdUFGT) in apple skin under ALA treatment. Moreover, overexpression of MdMADS1 enhanced anthocyanin content in transformed apple calli, which was further enhanced by ALA. The anthocyanin content in MdMADS1-silenced calli was less than that in the control with ALA treatment, but higher than that without ALA treatment. These results indicated that MdMADS1 is involved in ALA-induced anthocyanin accumulation. In addition, anthocyanin

  10. Proteomics and SSH Analyses of ALA-Promoted Fruit Coloration and Evidence for the Involvement of a MADS-Box Gene, MdMADS1

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinxin; An, Yuyan; Zheng, Jie; Sun, Miao; Wang, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    Skin color is a key quality attribute of fruits and how to improve fruit coloration has long been a major concern. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a natural plant growth regulator, can significantly increase anthocyanin accumulation in fruit skin and therefore effectively improve coloration of many fruits, including apple. However, the molecular mechanism how ALA stimulates anthocyanin accumulation in fruit skin remains unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of ALA on apple skin at the protein and mRNA levels. A total of 85 differentially expressed proteins in apple skins between ALA and water treatment (control) were identified by complementary gel-based and gel-free separation techniques. Most of these differentially expressed proteins were up-regulated by ALA. Function analysis suggested that 87.06% of the ALA-responsive proteins were associated with fruit ripening. To further screen ALA-responsive regulators, we constructed a subtracted cDNA library (tester: ALA treatment; driver: control) and obtained 104 differentially expressed unigenes, of which 38 unigenes were indicators for the fruit ripening-related genes. The differentially changed proteins and transcripts did not correspond well at an individual level, but showed similar regulated direction in function at the pathway level. Among the identified fruit ripening-related genes, the expression of MdMADS1, a developmental transcription regulator of fruit ripening, was positively correlated with expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes (MdCHS, MdDFR, MdLDOX, and MdUFGT) in apple skin under ALA treatment. Moreover, overexpression of MdMADS1 enhanced anthocyanin content in transformed apple calli, which was further enhanced by ALA. The anthocyanin content in MdMADS1-silenced calli was less than that in the control with ALA treatment, but higher than that without ALA treatment. These results indicated that MdMADS1 is involved in ALA-induced anthocyanin accumulation. In addition, anthocyanin

  11. Expression and genomic structure of the dormancy-associated MADS box genes MADS13 in Japanese pears (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) that differ in their chilling requirement for endodormancy release.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takanori; Bai, Songling; Ito, Akiko; Sakamoto, Daisuke; Saito, Toshihiro; Ubi, Banjamin Ewa; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2013-06-01

    We isolated three dormancy-associated MADS-box (DAM) genes (MADS13-1, MADS13-2 and MADS13-3) and showed regulated expression concomitant with endodormancy establishment and release in the leaf buds of Japanese pear 'Kosui'. Comparative analysis between 'Kosui' and Taiwanese pear TP-85-119 ('Hengshanli'), a less dormant pear cultivar, showed reduction of MADS13-1 expression level in 'Hengshanli' earlier than in 'Kosui' towards endodormancy release, suggesting the possible relationship between chilling requirement and MADS13-1 expression. Application of hydrogen cyanamide accelerated endodormancy release with a reduction in MADS13 expression, whereas heat treatment in autumn inhibited endodormancy establishment without induction of MADS13 expression, indicating a close relationship between the MADS13 expression pattern and endodormancy phase transitions. Moreover, both the cis-acting regulatory elements and the methylation status in the 5' upstream region of the MADS13-1 gene were not largely different between 'Kosui' and 'Hengshanli'. Genomic structures of MADS13-1 from 'Kosui' and 'Hengshanli' revealed a 3218 bp insertion in the first intron of 'Hengshanli' that might be ascribed to the lower expression of MADS13-1tw; however, this insertion was also found in pear genotypes with a high chilling requirement. These results indicated that the low expression of MADS13-1 in 'Hengshanli' towards endodormancy release could not be explained by the identified cis-acting regulatory elements, the methylation status of the putative promoter or by intron insertion.

  12. Characterization of the Antirrhinum floral homeotic MADS-box gene deficiens: evidence for DNA binding and autoregulation of its persistent expression throughout flower development.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz-Sommer, Z; Hue, I; Huijser, P; Flor, P J; Hansen, R; Tetens, F; Lönnig, W E; Saedler, H; Sommer, H

    1992-01-01

    We have determined the structure of the floral homeotic deficiens (defA) gene whose mutants display sepaloid petals and carpelloid stamens, and have analysed its spatial and temporal expression pattern. In addition, several mutant alleles (morphoalleles) were studied. The results of these analyses define three functional domains of the DEF A protein and identify in the deficiens promoter a possible cis-acting binding site for a transcription factor which specifically upregulates expression of deficiens in petals and stamens. In vitro DNA binding studies show that DEF A binds to specific DNA motifs as a heterodimer, together with the protein product of the floral homeotic globosa gene, thus demonstrating that the protein encoded by deficiens is a DNA binding protein. Furthermore, Northern analysis of a temperature sensitive allele at permissive and non-permissive temperatures provides evidence for autoregulation of the persistent expression of deficiens throughout flower development. A possible mechanism of autoregulation is discussed. Images PMID:1346760

  13. Expressional regulation of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6, peach (Prunus persica) dormancy-associated MADS-box genes, by low temperature and dormancy-breaking reagent treatment.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Hisayo; Ooka, Tomomi; Jotatsu, Hiroaki; Hosaka, Yukari; Sasaki, Ryuta; Tao, Ryutaro

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated the expressional regulation of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6, two of the six peach (Prunus persica) dormancy-associated MADS-box genes, in relation to lateral bud endodormancy. PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 were originally identified as homologues of Arabidopsis SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE/AGAMOUS-LIKE 24 identified in the EVERGROWING locus of peach. Furthermore, PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 have recently been suggested to be involved in terminal bud dormancy. In this study, seasonal expression analyses using leaves, stems, and lateral buds of high-chill and low-chill peaches in field conditions indicated that both genes were up-regulated during the endodormancy period and down-regulated with endodormancy release. Controlled environment experiments showed that the expression of both PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 were up-regulated by ambient cool temperatures in autumn, while they were down-regulated by the prolonged period of cold temperatures in winter. A negative correlation between expression levels of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 and bud burst percentage was found in the prolonged cold temperature treatment. Application of the dormancy-breaking reagent cyanamide to endo/ecodormant lateral buds induced early bud break and down-regulation of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 expression at the same time. These results collectively suggest that PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 may function in the chilling requirement of peach lateral buds through growth-inhibiting functions for bud break.

  14. The Analysis of the Inflorescence miRNome of the Orchid Orchis italica Reveals a DEF-Like MADS-Box Gene as a New miRNA Target

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, Serena; Sica, Maria; De Paolo, Sofia; D'Argenio, Valeria; Cantiello, Piergiuseppe; Salvatore, Francesco; Gaudio, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, regulatory non-coding RNAs involved in a wide range of biological processes, from organ development to response to stimuli. In recent years, an increasing number of studies on model plant species have highlighted the evolutionary conservation of a high number of miRNA families and the existence of taxon-specific ones. However, few studies have examined miRNAs in non-model species such as orchids, which are characterized by highly diversified floral structures and pollination strategies. Therefore, we analysed a small RNA library of inflorescence tissue of the Mediterranean orchid Orchis italica to increase the knowledge on miRNAs in a non-model plant species. The high-throughput sequencing and analysis of a small RNA library of inflorescence of O. italica revealed 23 conserved and 161 putative novel miRNA families. Among the putative miRNA targets, experimental validation demonstrated that a DEF-like MADS-box transcript is cleaved by the homolog of miR5179 of O. italica. The presence of conserved miRNA families in the inflorescence of O. italica indicates that the basic developmental flower regulatory mechanisms mediated by miRNAs are maintained through evolution. Because, according to the “orchid code” theory, DEF-like genes exert a key function in the diversification of tepals and lip, the cleavage-mediated inhibitory activity of miR5179 on a OitaDEF-like transcript suggests that, in orchids, miRNAs play an important role in the diversification of the perianth organs. PMID:24832004

  15. The analysis of the inflorescence miRNome of the orchid Orchis italica reveals a DEF-like MADS-box gene as a new miRNA target.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Serena; Sica, Maria; De Paolo, Sofia; D'Argenio, Valeria; Cantiello, Piergiuseppe; Salvatore, Francesco; Gaudio, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, regulatory non-coding RNAs involved in a wide range of biological processes, from organ development to response to stimuli. In recent years, an increasing number of studies on model plant species have highlighted the evolutionary conservation of a high number of miRNA families and the existence of taxon-specific ones. However, few studies have examined miRNAs in non-model species such as orchids, which are characterized by highly diversified floral structures and pollination strategies. Therefore, we analysed a small RNA library of inflorescence tissue of the Mediterranean orchid Orchis italica to increase the knowledge on miRNAs in a non-model plant species. The high-throughput sequencing and analysis of a small RNA library of inflorescence of O. italica revealed 23 conserved and 161 putative novel miRNA families. Among the putative miRNA targets, experimental validation demonstrated that a DEF-like MADS-box transcript is cleaved by the homolog of miR5179 of O. italica. The presence of conserved miRNA families in the inflorescence of O. italica indicates that the basic developmental flower regulatory mechanisms mediated by miRNAs are maintained through evolution. Because, according to the "orchid code" theory, DEF-like genes exert a key function in the diversification of tepals and lip, the cleavage-mediated inhibitory activity of miR5179 on a OitaDEF-like transcript suggests that, in orchids, miRNAs play an important role in the diversification of the perianth organs.

  16. GORDITA (AGL63) is a young paralog of the Arabidopsis thaliana B(sister) MADS box gene ABS (TT16) that has undergone neofunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Robert; Gramzow, Lydia; Melzer, Rainer; Theissen, Günter; Becker, Annette

    2010-09-01

    MIKC-type MADS domain proteins are key regulators of flower development in angiosperms. B(sister) genes constitute a clade with a close relationship to class B floral homeotic genes, and have been conserved for more than 300 million years. The loss-of-function phenotype of the A. thaliana B(sister) gene ABS is mild: mutants show reduced seed coloration and defects in endothelium development. This study focuses on GORDITA (GOA, formerly known as AGL63), the most closely related paralog of ABS in A. thaliana, which is thought to act redundantly with ABS. Phylogenetic trees reveal that the duplication leading to ABS and GOA occurred during diversification of the Brassicaceae, and further analyses show that GOA has evolved under relaxed selection pressure. The knockdown phenotype of GOA suggests a role for this gene in fruit longitudinal growth, while over-expression of GOA results in disorganized floral structure and addition of carpel-like features to sepals. Given the phylogeny and function of other B(sister) genes, our data suggest that GOA has evolved a new function as compared to ABS. Protein analysis reveals that the GOA-specific 'deviant' domain is required for protein dimerization, in contrast to other MIKC-type proteins that require the K domain for dimerization. Moreover, no shared protein interaction partners for ABS and GOA could be identified. Our experiments indicate that modification of a protein domain and a shift in expression pattern can lead to a novel gene function in a relatively short time, and highlight the molecular mechanism by which neofunctionalization following gene duplication can be achieved.

  17. Leaf-Like Sepals Induced by Ectopic Expression of a SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP)-Like MADS-Box Gene from the Basal Eudicot Epimedium sagittatum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhineng; Zeng, Shaohua; Li, Yanbang; Li, Mingyang; Souer, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Epimedium L. (Berberidaceae, Ranales), a perennial traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has become a new popular landscape plant for ground cover and pot culture in many countries based on its excellent ornamental characteristics and, distinctive and diverse floral morphology. However, little is known about the molecular genetics of flower development in Epimedium sagittatum. Here, we describe the characterization of EsSVP that encodes a protein sharing 68, 54, and 35% similarity with SVP, AGAMOUS-like 24 (AGL24) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) in Arabidopsis, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated that EsSVP transcripts were principally found in petiole and leaf tissues, with little expression in roots and flowers and no in fruits. The highest EsSVP expression was observed in leaves. The flowering time of 35S::EsSVP in most Arabidopsis thaliana and in all petunia plants was not affected in both photoperiod conditions, but 35S::EsSVP 5# and 35S::EsSVP 1# Arabidopsis lines induced late and early flowering under long day (LD, 14 h light/10 h dark) and short day (SD, 10 h light/14 h dark) conditions, respectively. The 35S::EsSVP Arabidopsis produced extra secondary inflorescence or floral meristems in the axils of the leaf-like sepals with excrescent trichomes, and leaf-like sepals not able to enclose the inner three whorls completely. Moreover, almost all transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed persistent sepals around the completely matured fruits. Upon ectopic expression of 35S::EsSVP in Petunia W115, sepals were enlarged, sometimes to the size of leaves; corollas were greenish and did not fully open. These results suggest that EsSVP is involved in inflorescence meristem identity and flowering time regulation in some conditions. Although, the SVP homologs might have suffered functional diversification among diverse species between core and basal eudicots, the protein functions are conserved between Arabidopsis/Petunia and Epimedium

  18. Positive selection and ancient duplications in the evolution of class B floral homeotic genes of orchids and grasses

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Hiese, Luisa; Härter, Andrea; Koch, Marcus A; Theißen, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Background Positive selection is recognized as the prevalence of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions in a gene. Models of the functional evolution of duplicated genes consider neofunctionalization as key to the retention of paralogues. For instance, duplicate transcription factors are specifically retained in plant and animal genomes and both positive selection and transcriptional divergence appear to have played a role in their diversification. However, the relative impact of these two factors has not been systematically evaluated. Class B MADS-box genes, comprising DEF-like and GLO-like genes, encode developmental transcription factors essential for establishment of perianth and male organ identity in the flowers of angiosperms. Here, we contrast the role of positive selection and the known divergence in expression patterns of genes encoding class B-like MADS-box transcription factors from monocots, with emphasis on the family Orchidaceae and the order Poales. Although in the monocots these two groups are highly diverse and have a strongly canalized floral morphology, there is no information on the role of positive selection in the evolution of their distinctive flower morphologies. Published research shows that in Poales, class B-like genes are expressed in stamens and in lodicules, the perianth organs whose identity might also be specified by class B-like genes, like the identity of the inner tepals of their lily-like relatives. In orchids, however, the number and pattern of expression of class B-like genes have greatly diverged. Results The DEF-like genes from Orchidaceae form four well-supported, ancient clades of orthologues. In contrast, orchid GLO-like genes form a single clade of ancient orthologues and recent paralogues. DEF-like genes from orchid clade 2 (OMADS3-like genes) are under less stringent purifying selection than the other orchid DEF-like and GLO-like genes. In comparison with orchids, purifying selection was less stringent in DEF

  19. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  20. Post-translational regulation of rice MADS29 function: homodimerization or binary interactions with other seed-expressed MADS proteins modulate its translocation into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Saraswati; Kapoor, Meenu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    OsMADS29 is a seed-specific MADS-box transcription factor that affects embryo development and grain filling by maintaining hormone homeostasis and degradation of cells in the nucellus and nucellar projection. Although it has a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, the transiently expressed OsMADS29 monomer does not localize specifically in the nucleus. Dimerization of the monomers alters the intracellular localization fate of the resulting OsMADS29 homodimer, which then translocates into the nucleus. By generating domain-specific deletions/mutations, we show that two conserved amino acids (lysine(23) and arginine(24)) in the NLS are important for nuclear localization of the OsMADS29 homodimer. Furthermore, the analyses involving interaction of OsMADS29 with 30 seed-expressed rice MADS proteins revealed 19 more MADS-box proteins, including five E-class proteins, which interacted with OsMADS29. Eleven of these complexes were observed to be localized in the nucleus. Deletion analysis revealed that the KC region (K-box and C-terminal domain) plays a pivotal role in homodimerization. These data suggest that the biological function of OsMADS29 may not only be regulated at the level of transcription and translation as reported earlier, but also at the post-translational level by way of the interaction between OsMADS29 monomers, and between OsMADS29 and other MADS-box proteins.

  1. Post-translational regulation of rice MADS29 function: homodimerization or binary interactions with other seed-expressed MADS proteins modulate its translocation into the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Saraswati; Kapoor, Meenu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    OsMADS29 is a seed-specific MADS-box transcription factor that affects embryo development and grain filling by maintaining hormone homeostasis and degradation of cells in the nucellus and nucellar projection. Although it has a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, the transiently expressed OsMADS29 monomer does not localize specifically in the nucleus. Dimerization of the monomers alters the intracellular localization fate of the resulting OsMADS29 homodimer, which then translocates into the nucleus. By generating domain-specific deletions/mutations, we show that two conserved amino acids (lysine23 and arginine24) in the NLS are important for nuclear localization of the OsMADS29 homodimer. Furthermore, the analyses involving interaction of OsMADS29 with 30 seed-expressed rice MADS proteins revealed 19 more MADS-box proteins, including five E-class proteins, which interacted with OsMADS29. Eleven of these complexes were observed to be localized in the nucleus. Deletion analysis revealed that the KC region (K-box and C-terminal domain) plays a pivotal role in homodimerization. These data suggest that the biological function of OsMADS29 may not only be regulated at the level of transcription and translation as reported earlier, but also at the post-translational level by way of the interaction between OsMADS29 monomers, and between OsMADS29 and other MADS-box proteins. PMID:25096923

  2. The MADS domain protein DIANA acts together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to specify the central cell in Arabidopsis ovules.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C

    2008-08-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein-beta-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt.

  3. The MADS Domain Protein DIANA Acts Together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to Specify the Central Cell in Arabidopsis Ovules[W

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2008-01-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein–β-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt. PMID:18713950

  4. Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2009-01-27

    Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

  5. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-02-23

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  6. The class III peroxidase PRX17 is a direct target of the MADS-box transcription factor AGAMOUS-LIKE15 (AGL15) and participates in lignified tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Cosio, Claudia; Ranocha, Philippe; Francoz, Edith; Burlat, Vincent; Zheng, Yumei; Perry, Sharyn E; Ripoll, Juan-Jose; Yanofsky, Martin; Dunand, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Several physiological functions have been attributed to class III peroxidases (PRXs) in plants, but the in planta role of most members of this family still remains undetermined. Here, we report the first functional characterization of PRX17 (At2g22420), one of the 73 members of this family in Arabidopsis thaliana. Localization of PRX17 was examined by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Loss- and gain-of-function mutants in A. thaliana were studied. Regulation at the gene and protein levels was analyzed using β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity, quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT)-PCR, zymography, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Phenotypes were characterized including lignin and xylan contents. PRX17 was expressed in various tissues, including vascular tissues, and PRX17 was localized to the cell wall. In prx17, the lignin content was reduced in the stem and siliques and bolting was delayed, while the opposite phenotype was observed in 35S:PRX17 plants, together with a significant increase of lignin and xylan immunofluorescence signal. Finally, we demonstrated that the transcription factor AGAMOUS-LIKE15 (AGL15) binds to the PRX17 promoter and regulates PRX17 expression level. This converging set of structural, transcriptomic and physiological data suggests that PRX17, under the control of AGL15, contributes to developmental programs by playing an essential role in regulating age-dependent lignified tissue formation, including changes in cell wall properties.

  7. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: protein and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Bill; Kreider, Richard B; Ziegenfuss, Tim; La Bounty, Paul; Roberts, Mike; Burke, Darren; Landis, Jamie; Lopez, Hector; Antonio, Jose

    2007-01-01

    Position Statement The following seven points related to the intake of protein for healthy, exercising individuals constitute the position stand of the Society. They have been approved by the Research Committee of the Society. 1) Vast research supports the contention that individuals engaged in regular exercise training require more dietary protein than sedentary individuals. 2) Protein intakes of 1.4 – 2.0 g/kg/day for physically active individuals is not only safe, but may improve the training adaptations to exercise training. 3) When part of a balanced, nutrient-dense diet, protein intakes at this level are not detrimental to kidney function or bone metabolism in healthy, active persons. 4) While it is possible for physically active individuals to obtain their daily protein requirements through a varied, regular diet, supplemental protein in various forms are a practical way of ensuring adequate and quality protein intake for athletes. 5) Different types and quality of protein can affect amino acid bioavailability following protein supplementation. The superiority of one protein type over another in terms of optimizing recovery and/or training adaptations remains to be convincingly demonstrated. 6) Appropriately timed protein intake is an important component of an overall exercise training program, essential for proper recovery, immune function, and the growth and maintenance of lean body mass. 7) Under certain circumstances, specific amino acid supplements, such as branched-chain amino acids (BCAA's), may improve exercise performance and recovery from exercise. PMID:17908291

  8. S-100 protein-positive cells in hidrocystomas.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Y; Takigawa, M; Inoue, K; Matsumoto, K; Yamada, M

    1986-04-01

    The histogenesis of hidrocystomas was examined by the use of immunostaining for S-100 protein. In normal sweat glands, S-100 protein was found exclusively in the secretory cells of eccrine glands, whereas this protein was not present in the other parts of eccrine glands or at any levels of the structure of apocrine glands. On the bases of this immunostaining pattern in normal sweat glands, we attempted to correlate the origin of 8 cases of hidrocystoma to the presence of S-100 protein-positive cells. S-100 protein was detected in the cells of one solitary eccrine hidrocystoma, but not in those of 2 cases of "classic", multiple-lesion type of eccrine hidrocystoma. This indicated that the former arose from the secretory portion of the eccrine gland and the latter from the eccrine ductal cells. Two of the 5 cases of apocrine hidrocystoma showed positive staining in a part of the lining cells of the cyst wall, while the other 3 cases were negative to this protein. This finding suggests that some of the tumors diagnosed morphologically as apocrine hidrocystoma differentiate in the direction of eccrine secretory cells. In addition to S-100 protein, we also surveyed for the presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and all cases examined were consistently positive to this substance. The detection of S-100 protein was considered to be more helpful in classifying hidrocystomas than that of CEA.

  9. Protein secretion and surface display in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria functions as a surface organelle for the transport and assembly of proteins that interact with the environment, in particular, the tissues of an infected host. Signal peptide-bearing precursor proteins are secreted across the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. Some precursors carry C-terminal sorting signals with unique sequence motifs that are cleaved by sortase enzymes and linked to the cell wall peptidoglycan of vegetative forms or spores. The sorting signals of pilin precursors are cleaved by pilus-specific sortases, which generate covalent bonds between proteins leading to the assembly of fimbrial structures. Other precursors harbour surface (S)-layer homology domains (SLH), which fold into a three-pronged spindle structure and bind secondary cell wall polysaccharides, thereby associating with the surface of specific Gram-positive microbes. Type VII secretion is a non-canonical secretion pathway for WXG100 family proteins in mycobacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also secrete WXG100 proteins and carry unique genes that either contribute to discrete steps in secretion or represent distinctive substrates for protein transport reactions. PMID:22411983

  10. Position-dependent effects of polylysine on Sec protein transport.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Bageshwar, Umesh K; Musser, Siegfried M

    2012-04-13

    The bacterial Sec protein translocation system catalyzes the transport of unfolded precursor proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using a recently developed real time fluorescence-based transport assay, the effects of the number and distribution of positive charges on the transport time and transport efficiency of proOmpA were examined. As expected, an increase in the number of lysine residues generally increased transport time and decreased transport efficiency. However, the observed effects were highly dependent on the polylysine position in the mature domain. In addition, a string of consecutive positive charges generally had a more significant effect on transport time and efficiency than separating the charges into two or more charged segments. Thirty positive charges distributed throughout the mature domain resulted in effects similar to 10 consecutive charges near the N terminus of the mature domain. These data support a model in which the local effects of positive charge on the translocation kinetics dominate over total thermodynamic constraints. The rapid translocation kinetics of some highly charged proOmpA mutants suggest that the charge is partially shielded from the electric field gradient during transport, possibly by the co-migration of counter ions. The transport times of precursors with multiple positively charged sequences, or "pause sites," were fairly well predicted by a local effect model. However, the kinetic profile predicted by this local effect model was not observed. Instead, the transport kinetics observed for precursors with multiple polylysine segments support a model in which translocation through the SecYEG pore is not the rate-limiting step of transport.

  11. Large scale interaction analysis predicts that the Gerbera hybrida floral E function is provided both by general and specialized proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ornamental plant Gerbera hybrida bears complex inflorescences with morphologically distinct floral morphs that are specific to the sunflower family Asteraceae. We have previously characterized several MADS box genes that regulate floral development in Gerbera. To study further their behavior in higher order complex formation according to the quartet model, we performed yeast two- and three-hybrid analysis with fourteen Gerbera MADS domain proteins to analyze their protein-protein interaction potential. Results The exhaustive pairwise interaction analysis showed significant differences in the interaction capacity of different Gerbera MADS domain proteins compared to other model plants. Of particular interest in these assays was the behavior of SEP-like proteins, known as GRCDs in Gerbera. The previously described GRCD1 and GRCD2 proteins, which are specific regulators involved in stamen and carpel development, respectively, showed very limited pairwise interactions, whereas the related GRCD4 and GRCD5 factors displayed hub-like positions in the interaction map. We propose GRCD4 and GRCD5 to provide a redundant and general E function in Gerbera, comparable to the SEP proteins in Arabidopsis. Based on the pairwise interaction data, combinations of MADS domain proteins were further subjected to yeast three-hybrid assays. Gerbera B function proteins showed active behavior in ternary complexes. All Gerbera SEP-like proteins with the exception of GRCD1 were excellent partners for B function proteins, further implicating the unique role of GRCD1 as a whorl- and flower-type specific C function partner. Conclusions Gerbera MADS domain proteins exhibit both conserved and derived behavior in higher order protein complex formation. This protein-protein interaction data can be used to classify and compare Gerbera MADS domain proteins to those of Arabidopsis and Petunia. Combined with our reverse genetic studies of Gerbera, these results reinforce the roles of

  12. Merlin/ERM proteins establish cortical asymmetry and centrosome position

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alan M.; DuBoff, Brian; Casaletto, Jessica B.; Gladden, Andrew B.; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate asymmetry at the cell cortex underlies cell polarization and asymmetric cell division. Here we demonstrate a novel role for the tumor suppressor Merlin and closely related ERM proteins (Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin) in generating cortical asymmetry in the absence of external cues. Our data reveal that Merlin functions to restrict the cortical distribution of the actin regulator Ezrin, which in turn positions the interphase centrosome in single epithelial cells and three-dimensional organotypic cultures. In the absence of Merlin, ectopic cortical Ezrin yields mispositioned centrosomes, misoriented spindles, and aberrant epithelial architecture. Furthermore, in tumor cells with centrosome amplification, the failure to restrict cortical Ezrin abolishes centrosome clustering, yielding multipolar mitoses. These data uncover fundamental roles for Merlin/ERM proteins in spatiotemporally organizing the cell cortex and suggest that Merlin's role in restricting cortical Ezrin may contribute to tumorigenesis by disrupting cell polarity, spindle orientation, and, potentially, genome stability. PMID:23249734

  13. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected sites that occur later act against other destabilizing mutations to maintain stability across the clade, except for the shallow divers, where late stability relaxation occurs, probably due to the shorter aerobic dive limits of these species. The three main positively selected sites 66, 5, and 35 undergo changes that favor hydrophobic folding, structural integrity, and intra-helical hydrogen bonds.

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana vernalization response requires a polycomb-like protein complex that also includes VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3.

    PubMed

    Wood, Craig C; Robertson, Masumi; Tanner, Greg; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Helliwell, Chris A

    2006-09-26

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the promotion of flowering by cold temperatures, vernalization, is regulated via a floral-repressive MADS box transcription factor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Vernalization leads to the epigenetic repression of FLC expression, a process that requires the polycomb group (PcG) protein VERNALIZATION 2 (VRN2) and the plant homeodomain protein VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3). We demonstrate that the repression of FLC by vernalization requires homologues of other Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 proteins and VRN2. We show in planta that VRN2 and VIN3 are part of a large protein complex that can include the PcG proteins FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM, CURLY LEAF, and SWINGER. These findings suggest a single protein complex is responsible for histone deacetylation at FLC and histone methylation at FLC in vernalized plants. The abundance of the complex increases during vernalization and declines after plants are returned to higher temperatures, consistent with the complex having a role in establishing FLC repression.

  15. The tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene, SlGLO1, plays key roles in petal and stamen development

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuhu; Hu, Zongli; Yin, Wencheng; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Jianling; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors play important role in plant growth and development, especially floral organ identities. In our study, a MADS-box gene SlGLO1- tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene was isolated. Its tissue-specific expression profile analysis showed that SlGLO1 was highly expressed in petals and stamens. RNAi (RNA interference) repression of SlGLO1 resulted in floral organ abnormal phenotypes, including green petals with shorter size, and aberrant carpelloid stamens. SlGLO1-silenced lines are male sterile. Total chlorophyll content was increased and chlorophyll biosynthetic genes were significantly up-regulated in SlGLO1-silenced petals and stamens. Furthermore, B-class genes expression analysis indicated that the repressed function of SlGLO1 led to the enhanced expression of TAP3 and the down-regulation of TPI in the petals and stamens, while the expression of TM6 was reduced in petals and increased in stamens and carpels of SlGLO1-RNAi plants. Additionally, pollen grains of transgenic lines were aberrant and failed to germinate and tomato pollen-specific genes were down-regulated by more than 90% in SlGLO1-silenced lines. These results suggest that SlGLO1 plays important role in regulating plant floral organ and pollen development in tomato. PMID:26842499

  16. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Nicole M; Godaliyadda, G M Dilshan P; Ye, Dong Hye; Kissick, David J; Zhang, Shijie; Newman, Justin A; Sheedlo, Michael J; Chowdhury, Azhad U; Fischetti, Robert F; Das, Chittaranjan; Buzzard, Gregery T; Bouman, Charles A; Simpson, Garth J

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction, significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Using in situ two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure on the crystal by

  17. Getting into position: the catalytic mechanisms of protein ubiquitylation.

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Lori A; Barford, David

    2004-01-01

    The role of protein ubiquitylation in the control of diverse cellular pathways has recently gained widespread attention. Ubiquitylation not only directs the targeted destruction of tagged proteins by the 26 S proteasome, but it also modulates protein activities, protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization. An understanding of the components involved in protein ubiquitylation (E1s, E2s and E3s) is essential to understand how specificity and regulation are conferred upon these pathways. Much of what we know about the catalytic mechanisms of protein ubiquitylation comes from structural studies of the proteins involved in this process. Indeed, structures of ubiquitin-activating enzymes (E1s) and ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) have provided insight into their mechanistic details. E3s (ubiquitin ligases) contain most of the substrate specificity and regulatory elements required for protein ubiquitylation. Although several E3 structures are available, the specific mechanistic role of E3s is still unclear. This review will discuss the different types of ubiquitin signals and how they are generated. Recent advances in the field of protein ubiquitylation will be examined, including the mechanisms of E1, E2 and E3. In particular, we discuss the complexity of molecular recognition required to impose selectivity on substrate selection and topology of poly-ubiquitin chains. PMID:14998368

  18. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation.

  19. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation. PMID:27515418

  20. Rapid visualization of hydrogen positions in neutron protein crystallography structures

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeley, Matthew P.; Meilleur, Flora; Myles, Dean A A; Weiss, Kevin L; Munshi, Parthapratim; Shang-Lin, Chung

    2012-01-01

    Neutron crystallography is a powerful technique to visualize experimentally the position of light atoms, including hydrogen and its isotope deuterium. Over the last several years, structural biologists have shown an increasing interest for the technique as it uniquely complements X-ray crystallographic data by revealing the position of hydrogen/deuterium atoms in macromolecules. With this regained interest, access to macromolecule neutron crystallography beam lines is becoming a limiting step. In this report we show that rapid data collection could be a valuable alternative to long data collection time when appropriate. Comparison of perdeuterated Rubredoxin structures refined against neutron data sets collected over hours and up to five days shows that rapid neutron data collection in just 14 hours is sufficient to provide the position of 262 hydrogen positions atoms without ambiguity.

  1. Rapid visualization of hydrogen positions in protein neutron crystallographic structures.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Parthapratim; Chung, Shang-Lin; Blakeley, Matthew P; Weiss, Kevin L; Myles, Dean A A; Meilleur, Flora

    2012-01-01

    Neutron crystallography is a powerful technique for experimental visualization of the positions of light atoms, including hydrogen and its isotope deuterium. In recent years, structural biologists have shown increasing interest in the technique as it uniquely complements X-ray crystallographic data by revealing the positions of D atoms in macromolecules. With this regained interest, access to macromolecular neutron crystallography beamlines is becoming a limiting step. In this report, it is shown that a rapid data-collection strategy can be a valuable alternative to longer data-collection times in appropriate cases. Comparison of perdeuterated rubredoxin structures refined against neutron data sets collected over hours and up to 5 d shows that rapid neutron data collection in just 14 h is sufficient to provide the positions of 269 D atoms without ambiguity.

  2. Positive feedback of protein kinase C proteolytic activation during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leverrier, Sabrina; Vallentin, Alice; Joubert, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and PKCepsilon, which are better known for promoting cell survival, PKCdelta is known for its pro-apoptotic function, which is exerted mainly through a caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation pathway. In the present study, we used the rat GH3B6 pituitary adenoma cell line to show that PKCalpha and PKCepsilon are activated and relocalized together with PKCdelta when apoptosis is induced by a genotoxic stress. Proteolytic activation is a crucial step used by the three isoforms since: (1) the catalytic domains of the PKCalpha, PKCepsilon or PKCdelta isoforms (CDalpha, CDepsilon and CDdelta respectively) accumulated, and this accumulation was dependent on the activity of both calpain and caspase; and (2) transient expression of CDalpha, CDepsilon or CDdelta sufficed to induce apoptosis. However, following this initial step of proteolytic activation, the pathways diverge; cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation are induced by CDepsilon and CDdelta, but not by CDalpha. Another interesting finding of the present study is the proteolysis of PKCdelta induced by CDepsilon expression that revealed the existence of a cross-talk between PKC isoforms during apoptosis. Hence the PKC family may participate in the apoptotic process of pituitary adenoma cells at two levels: downstream of caspase and calpain, and via retro-activation of caspase-3, resulting in the amplification of its own proteolytic activation. PMID:12238950

  3. Positive modulation of RNA polymerase III transcription by ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dieci, Giorgio; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Ottonello, Simone

    2009-02-06

    A yeast nuclear fraction of unknown composition, named TFIIIE, was reported previously to enhance transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes in vitro. We show that TFIIIE activity co-purifies with a specific subset of ribosomal proteins (RPs) which, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, generally interact with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, but not with a Pol II-specific promoter. Only Rpl6Ap and Rpl6Bp, among the tested RPs, were found associated to a TATA-containing tRNA{sup Ile}(TAT) gene. The RPL6A gene also emerged as a strong multicopy suppressor of a conditional mutation in the basal transcription factor TFIIIC, while RPL26A and RPL14A behaved as weak suppressors. The data delineate a novel extra-ribosomal role for one or a few RPs which, by influencing 5S rRNA and tRNA synthesis, could play a key role in the coordinate regulation of the different sub-pathways required for ribosome biogenesis and functionality.

  4. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  5. Protein Secretion in Gram-Positive Bacteria: From Multiple Pathways to Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jozef; Economou, Anastassios; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2016-11-25

    A number of Gram-positive bacteria are important players in industry as producers of a diverse array of economically interesting metabolites and proteins. As discussed in this overview, several Gram-positive bacteria are valuable hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In contrast to Gram-negative bacteria, proteins secreted by Gram-positive bacteria are released into the culture medium where conditions for correct folding are more appropriate, thus facilitating the isolation and purification of active proteins. Although seven different protein secretion pathways have been identified in Gram-positive bacteria, the majority of heterologous proteins are produced via the general secretion or Sec pathway. Not all proteins are equally well secreted, because heterologous protein production often faces bottlenecks including hampered secretion, susceptibility to proteases, secretion stress, and metabolic burden. These bottlenecks are associated with reduced yields leading to non-marketable products. In this chapter, besides a general overview of the different protein secretion pathways, possible hurdles that may hinder efficient protein secretion are described and attempts to improve yield are discussed including modification of components of the Sec pathway. Attention is also paid to omics-based approaches that may offer a more rational approach to optimize production of heterologous proteins.

  6. Dynamical view of the positions of key side chains in protein-protein recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, S R; Brower, R C; Vajda, S; Camacho, C J

    2001-01-01

    When a complex is constructed from the separately determined rigid structures of a receptor and its ligand, some key side chains are usually in wrong positions. These distortions of the interface yield an apparent loss in affinity and would unfavorably affect the kinetics of association. It is generally assumed that the interacting proteins should drive the appropriate conformational changes, leading to their complementarity, but this hypothesis does not explain their fast association rates. However, nanosecond explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of misfolded surface side chains from the independently solved structures of barstar, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, and lysozyme show that even before any receptor-ligand interaction, key side chains frequently visit the rotamer conformations seen in the complex. We show that these simple structural motifs can reconcile most of the binding affinity required for a rapid and highly specific association process. Side chains amenable to induced fit are also identified. These results corroborate that solvent-side chain interactions play a critical role in the recognition process. Our findings are also supported by crystallographic data. PMID:11159432

  7. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Andrei L; Pogozheva, Irina D; Lomize, Mikhail A; Mosberg, Henry I

    2007-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM) database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our results demonstrate that

  8. Positive Darwinian selection drives the evolution of several female reproductive proteins in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Willie J.; Yang, Ziheng; Wolfner, Mariana F.; Aquadro, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    Rapid evolution driven by positive Darwinian selection is a recurrent theme in male reproductive protein evolution. In contrast, positive selection has never been demonstrated for female reproductive proteins. Here, we perform phylogeny-based tests on three female mammalian fertilization proteins and demonstrate positive selection promoting their divergence. Two of these female fertilization proteins, the zona pellucida glycoproteins ZP2 and ZP3, are part of the mammalian egg coat. Several sites identified in ZP3 as likely to be under positive selection are located in a region previously demonstrated to be involved in species-specific sperm-egg interaction, suggesting the selective pressure is related to male-female interaction. The results provide long-sought evidence for two evolutionary hypotheses: sperm competition and sexual conflict. PMID:11226269

  9. OPM database and PPM web server: resources for positioning of proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Mikhail A.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Joo, Hyeon; Mosberg, Henry I.; Lomize, Andrei L.

    2012-01-01

    The Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM) database is a curated web resource that provides spatial positions of membrane-bound peptides and proteins of known three-dimensional structure in the lipid bilayer, together with their structural classification, topology and intracellular localization. OPM currently contains more than 1200 transmembrane and peripheral proteins and peptides from approximately 350 organisms that represent approximately 3800 Protein Data Bank entries. Proteins are classified into classes, superfamilies and families and assigned to 21 distinct membrane types. Spatial positions of proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer are optimized by the PPM 2.0 method that accounts for the hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions of the proteins with the anisotropic water-lipid environment described by the dielectric constant and hydrogen-bonding profiles. The OPM database is freely accessible at http://opm.phar.umich.edu. Data can be sorted, searched or retrieved using the hierarchical classification, source organism, localization in different types of membranes. The database offers downloadable coordinates of proteins and peptides with membrane boundaries. A gallery of protein images and several visualization tools are provided. The database is supplemented by the PPM server (http://opm.phar.umich.edu/server.php) which can be used for calculating spatial positions in membranes of newly determined proteins structures or theoretical models. PMID:21890895

  10. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is −6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il). PMID:27562165

  11. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-09-13

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is -6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il).

  12. Predicting gram-positive bacterial protein subcellular localization based on localization motifs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinxia; Li, Tonghua; Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Li, Dapeng; Chen, Guanyan; Cong, Peisheng

    2012-09-07

    The subcellular localization of proteins is closely related to their functions. In this work, we propose a novel approach based on localization motifs to improve the accuracy of predicting subcellular localization of Gram-positive bacterial proteins. Our approach performed well on a five-fold cross validation with an overall success rate of 89.5%. Besides, the overall success rate of an independent testing dataset was 97.7%. Moreover, our approach was tested using a new experimentally-determined set of Gram-positive bacteria proteins and achieved an overall success rate of 96.3%.

  13. Positive selection neighboring functionally essential sites and disease-implicated regions of mammalian reproductive proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reproductive proteins are central to the continuation of all mammalian species. The evolution of these proteins has been greatly influenced by environmental pressures induced by pathogens, rival sperm, sexual selection and sexual conflict. Positive selection has been demonstrated in many of these proteins with particular focus on primate lineages. However, the mammalia are a diverse group in terms of mating habits, population sizes and germ line generation times. We have examined the selective pressures at work on a number of novel reproductive proteins across a wide variety of mammalia. Results We show that selective pressures on reproductive proteins are highly varied. Of the 10 genes analyzed in detail, all contain signatures of positive selection either across specific sites or in specific lineages or a combination of both. Our analysis of SP56 and Col1a1 are entirely novel and the results show positively selected sites present in each gene. Our findings for the Col1a1 gene are suggestive of a link between positive selection and severe disease type. We find evidence in our dataset to suggest that interacting proteins are evolving in symphony: most likely to maintain interacting functionality. Conclusion Our in silico analyses show positively selected sites are occurring near catalytically important regions suggesting selective pressure to maximize efficient fertilization. In those cases where a mechanism of protein function is not fully understood, the sites presented here represent ideal candidates for mutational study. This work has highlighted the widespread rate heterogeneity in mutational rates across the mammalia and specifically has shown that the evolution of reproductive proteins is highly varied depending on the species and interacting partners. We have shown that positive selection and disease are closely linked in the Col1a1 gene. PMID:20149245

  14. Curved chimeric palea 1 encoding an EMF1-like protein maintains epigenetic repression of OsMADS58 in rice palea development.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dawei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Lin; Ye, Shenghai; Zeng, Longjun; Liu, Jiyun; Li, Qun; He, Zuhua

    2015-04-01

    Floral organ specification is controlled by various MADS-box genes in both dicots and monocots, whose expression is often subjected to both genetic and epigenetic regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, little information is known about the role of epigenetic modification of MADS-box genes during rice flower development. Here, we report the characterization of a rice gene, curved chimeric palea 1 (CCP1) that functions in palea development. Mutation in CCP1 resulted in abnormal palea with ectopic stigmatic tissues and other pleiotropic phenotypes. We found that OsMADS58, a C-class gene responsible for carpel morphogenesis, was ectopically expressed in the ccp1 palea, indicating that the ccp1 palea was misspecified and partially acquired carpel-like identity. Constitutive expression of OsMADS58 in the wild-type rice plants caused morphological abnormality of palea similar to that of ccp1, whereas OsMADS58 knockdown by RNAi in ccp1 could rescue the abnormal phenotype of mutant palea, suggesting that the repression of OsMADS58 expression by CCP1 is critical for palea development. Map-based cloning revealed that CCP1 encodes a putative plant-specific emBRYONIC flower1 (EMF1)-like protein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that the level of the H3K27me3 at the OsMADS58 locus was greatly reduced in ccp1 compared with that in the wild-type. Taken together, our results show that CCP1 plays an important role in palea development through maintaining H3K27me3-mediated epigenetic silence of the carpel identity-specifying gene OsMADS58, shedding light on the epigenetic mechanism in floral organ development.

  15. Protein domain networks: Scale-free mixing of positive and negative exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, J. C.; Hayashida, M.; Akutsu, T.

    2006-07-01

    Many biological studies have been focused on the study of proteins, since proteins are essential for most cell functions. Although proteins are unique, they share certain common properties. For example, well-defined regions within a protein can fold independently from the rest of the protein and have their own function. They are called protein domains, and served as protein building blocks. In this article, we present a theoretical model for studying the protein domain networks, where one node of the network corresponds to one protein and two proteins are connected if they contain the same domain. The resulting distribution of nodes with a given degree, k, shows not only a power-law with negative exponent γ=-1, but it resembles the superposition of two power-law functions, one with a negative exponent and another with a positive exponent β=1. We call this distribution pattern “ scale-free mixing”. To explain the emergence of this superposition of power-laws, we propose a basic model with two main components: (1) mutation and (2) duplication of domains. Precisely, duplication gives rise to complete subgraphs (i.e., cliques) on the network, thus for several values of k a large number of nodes with degree k is produced, which explains the positive power-law branch of the degree distribution. In order to compare our model with experimental data, we generate protein domain networks with data from the UniProt Knowledgebase-Swissprot database for protein sequences and using InterPro, Pfam and Smart for domain databases. Our results indicate that the signal of this scale-free mixing pattern is also observed in the experimental data and it is conserved among organisms as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens.

  16. Backbone dipoles generate positive potentials in all proteins: origins and implications of the effect.

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M R; Saleh, M A; Cross, E; ud-Doula, A; Wise, M

    2000-01-01

    Asymmetry in packing the peptide amide dipole results in larger positive than negative regions in proteins of all folding motifs. The average side chain potential in 305 proteins is 109 +/- 30 mV (2. 5 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol/e). Because the backbone has zero net charge, the non-zero potential is unexpected. The larger oxygen at the negative and smaller proton at the positive end of the amide dipole yield positive potentials because: 1) at allowed phi and psi angles residues come off the backbone into the positive end of their own amide dipole, avoiding the large oxygen; and 2) amide dipoles with their carbonyl oxygen surface exposed and amine proton buried make the protein interior more positive. Twice as many amides have their oxygens exposed than their amine protons. The distribution of acidic and basic residues shows the importance of the bias toward positive backbone potentials. Thirty percent of the Asp, Glu, Lys, and Arg are buried. Sixty percent of buried residues are acids, only 40% bases. The positive backbone potential stabilizes ionization of 20% of the acids by >3 pH units (-4.1 kcal/mol). Only 6.5% of the bases are equivalently stabilized by negative regions. The backbone stabilizes bound anions such as phosphates and rarely stabilizes bound cations. PMID:10692303

  17. Effectively identifying compound-protein interactions by learning from positive and unlabeled examples.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Shuigeng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2016-05-18

    Prediction of compound-protein interactions (CPIs) is to find new compound-protein pairs where a protein is targeted by at least a compound, which is a crucial step in new drug design. Currently, a number of machine learning based methods have been developed to predict new CPIs in the literature. However, as there is not yet any publicly available set of validated negative CPIs, most existing machine learning based approaches use the unknown interactions (not validated CPIs) selected randomly as the negative examples to train classifiers for predicting new CPIs. Obviously, this is not quite reasonable and unavoidably impacts the CPI prediction performance. In this paper, we simply take the unknown CPIs as unlabeled examples, and propose a new method called PUCPI (the abbreviation of PU learning for Compound-Protein Interaction identification) that employs biased-SVM (Support Vector Machine) to predict CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. PU learning is a class of learning methods that leans from positive and unlabeled (PU) samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that identifies CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. We first collect known CPIs as positive examples and then randomly select compound-protein pairs not in the positive set as unlabeled examples. For each CPI/compound-protein pair, we extract protein domains as protein features and compound substructures as chemical features, then take the tensor product of the corresponding compound features and protein features as the feature vector of the CPI/compound-protein pair. After that, biased-SVM is employed to train classifiers on different datasets of CPIs and compound-protein pairs. Experiments over various datasets show that our method outperforms six typical classifiers, including random forest, L1- and L2-regularized logistic regression, naive Bayes, SVM and k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and three types of existing CPI prediction models. Source code, datasets and

  18. Interaction with the Yes-associated protein (YAP) allows TEAD1 to positively regulate NAIP expression.

    PubMed

    Landin Malt, André; Georges, Adrien; Silber, Joël; Zider, Alain; Flagiello, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Although the expression of the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered involved in apoptosis suppression as well as in inflammatory response, the molecular basis of the NAIP gene expression is poorly understood. Here we show that the TEA domain protein 1 (TEAD1) is able to positively activate the transcription of NAIP. We further demonstrate that this regulation is mediated by the presence of the endogenous Yes associated protein (YAP) cofactor, and requires the interaction with YAP. We finally identified an intronic region of the NAIP gene responding to TEAD1/YAP activity, suggesting that regulation of NAIP by TEAD1/YAP is at the transcriptional level.

  19. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Emily A.; Llopart, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment. PMID:26603658

  20. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed

    Beck, Emily A; Llopart, Ana

    2015-11-25

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment.

  1. Computing Highly Correlated Positions Using Mutual Information and Graph Theory for G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fatakia, Sarosh N.; Costanzi, Stefano; Chow, Carson C.

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a superfamily of seven transmembrane-spanning proteins involved in a wide array of physiological functions and are the most common targets of pharmaceuticals. This study aims to identify a cohort or clique of positions that share high mutual information. Using a multiple sequence alignment of the transmembrane (TM) domains, we calculated the mutual information between all inter-TM pairs of aligned positions and ranked the pairs by mutual information. A mutual information graph was constructed with vertices that corresponded to TM positions and edges between vertices were drawn if the mutual information exceeded a threshold of statistical significance. Positions with high degree (i.e. had significant mutual information with a large number of other positions) were found to line a well defined inter-TM ligand binding cavity for class A as well as class C GPCRs. Although the natural ligands of class C receptors bind to their extracellular N-terminal domains, the possibility of modulating their activity through ligands that bind to their helical bundle has been reported. Such positions were not found for class B GPCRs, in agreement with the observation that there are not known ligands that bind within their TM helical bundle. All identified key positions formed a clique within the MI graph of interest. For a subset of class A receptors we also considered the alignment of a portion of the second extracellular loop, and found that the two positions adjacent to the conserved Cys that bridges the loop with the TM3 qualified as key positions. Our algorithm may be useful for localizing topologically conserved regions in other protein families. PMID:19262747

  2. Quantitative model for the heterogeneity of atomic position fluctuations in proteins: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, Gerald R.; Hinsen, Konrad

    2009-07-28

    We propose a simple analytical model for the elastic incoherent structure factor of proteins measured by neutron scattering, which allows extracting the distribution of atomic position fluctuations from a fit of the model to the experimental data. The method is validated by applying it to elastic incoherent structure factors of lysozyme which have been obtained by molecular dynamics simulation and by normal mode analysis, respectively, and for which distributions of the atomic position fluctuations can be generated numerically for direct comparison with the predictions of the model. The comparison shows a remarkable agreement, in particular, concerning the lower limit for the position fluctuations, which is pronounced in the numerical data.

  3. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection

  4. Patch Finder Plus (PFplus): a web server for extracting and displaying positive electrostatic patches on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Celniker, Gershon; Haber, Omer; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2007-07-01

    Positively charged electrostatic patches on protein surfaces are usually indicative of nucleic acid binding interfaces. Interestingly, many proteins which are not involved in nucleic acid binding possess large positive patches on their surface as well. In some cases, the positive patches on the protein are related to other functional properties of the protein family. PatchFinderPlus (PFplus) http://pfp.technion.ac.il is a web-based tool for extracting and displaying continuous electrostatic positive patches on protein surfaces. The input required for PFplus is either a four letter PDB code or a protein coordinate file in PDB format, provided by the user. PFplus computes the continuum electrostatics potential and extracts the largest positive patch for each protein chain in the PDB file. The server provides an output file in PDB format including a list of the patch residues. In addition, the largest positive patch is displayed on the server by a graphical viewer (Jmol), using a simple color coding.

  5. Developmental Genetics of the Perianthless Flowers and Bracts of a Paleoherb Species, Saururus chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yin-He; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wang, Guo-Ying; Möller, Michael; Li, Cheng-Yun; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Li, Hong-Tao; Li, De-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Saururus chinensis is a core member of Saururaceae, a perianthless (lacking petals or sepals) family. Due to its basal phylogenetic position and unusual floral composition, study of this plant family is important for understanding the origin and evolution of perianthless flowers and petaloid bracts among angiosperm species. To isolate genes involved in S. chinensis flower development, subtracted floral cDNA libraries were constructed by using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) on transcripts isolated from developing inflorescences and seedling leaves. The subtracted cDNA libraries contained a total of 1,141 ESTs and were used to create cDNA microarrays to analyze transcript profiles of developing inflorescence tissues. Subsequently, qRT-PCR analyses of eight MADS-box transcription factors and in situ hybridizations of two B-class MADS-box transcription factors were performed to verify and extend the cDNA microarray results. Finally, putative phylogenetic relationships within the B-class MADS-box gene family were determined using the discovered S. chinensis B-class genes to compare K-domain sequences with B genes from other basal angiosperms. Two hundred seventy-seven of the 1,141 genes were found to be expressed differentially between S. chinensis inflorescence tissues and seedling leaves, 176 of which were grouped into at least one functional category, including transcription (14.75%), energy (12.59%), metabolism (9.12%), protein-related function (8.99%), and cellular transport (5.76%). qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization of selected MADS-box genes supported our microarray data. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that a total of six B-class MADS-box genes were isolated from S. chinensis. The differential regulation of S. chinensis B-class MADS-box transcription factors likely plays a role during the development of subtending bracts and perianthless flowers. This study contributes to our understanding of inflorescence development in Saururus, and represents an

  6. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  7. Support vector machines for learning to identify the critical positions of a protein.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Anshul; Realff, Matthew J; Lee, Jay H; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2005-06-07

    A method for identifying the positions in the amino acid sequence, which are critical for the catalytic activity of a protein using support vector machines (SVMs) is introduced and analysed. SVMs are supported by an efficient learning algorithm and can utilize some prior knowledge about the structure of the problem. The amino acid sequences of the variants of a protein, created by inducing mutations, along with their fitness are required as input data by the method to predict its critical positions. To investigate the performance of this algorithm, variants of the beta-lactamase enzyme were created in silico using simulations of both mutagenesis and recombination protocols. Results from literature on beta-lactamase were used to test the accuracy of this method. It was also compared with the results from a simple search algorithm. The algorithm was also shown to be able to predict critical positions that can tolerate two different amino acids and retain function.

  8. Protein kinase D regulates positive selection of CD4+ thymocytes through phosphorylation of SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Eri; Kosako, Hidetaka; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Araki, Kimi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Saito, Takashi; Yamasaki, Sho

    2016-01-01

    Thymic selection shapes an appropriate T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire during T cell development. Here, we show that a serine/threonine kinase, protein kinase D (PKD), is crucial for thymocyte positive selection. In T cell-specific PKD-deficient (PKD2/PKD3 double-deficient) mice, the generation of CD4 single positive thymocytes is abrogated. This defect is likely caused by attenuated TCR signalling during positive selection and incomplete CD4 lineage specification in PKD-deficient thymocytes; however, TCR-proximal tyrosine phosphorylation is not affected. PKD is activated in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes on stimulation with positively selecting peptides. By phosphoproteomic analysis, we identify SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) as a direct substrate of PKD. Substitution of wild-type SHP-1 by phosphorylation-defective mutant (SHP-1S557A) impairs generation of CD4+ thymocytes. These results suggest that the PKD–SHP-1 axis positively regulates TCR signalling to promote CD4+ T cell development. PMID:27670070

  9. Comparison of positional surfactant isomers for displacement of rubisco protein from the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    He, Lizhong; Onaizi, Sagheer A; Dimitrijev-Dwyer, Mirjana; Malcolm, Andrew S; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Dong, Chuchuan; Holt, Stephen A; Thomas, Robert K; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2011-08-15

    Protein-surfactant interaction, which is a function of the protein and surfactant characteristics, is a common phenomenon in a wide range of industrial applications. In this work, we used rubisco, the most abundant protein in nature, as a model protein and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDOBS), one of the most widely used commercial surfactants, with two positional isomers (SDOBS-2 and SDOBS-6), as a model surfactant. We first examined the surface tension and the mechanical properties of interfacial mixed rubisco-SDOBS films adsorbed at the air-water interface. The concentration of rubisco in solution was fixed at 0.1 mg mL(-1) while the SDOBS concentration varied from 0 to 150 μM. Both the surface tension and the mechanical strength of the interfacial film decreased with increasing SDOBS concentration. Overall, the surface tension of a rubisco-SDOBS-6 mixture is lower than that of rubisco-SDOBS-2, while the mechanical strength of both systems is similar. Neutron reflection data suggest that rubisco protein is likely denatured at the interface. The populations of rubisco and SDOBS of the mixed systems at the interface were determined by combining non-deuterated and deuterated SDOBS to provide contrast variation. At a low surfactant concentration, SDOBS-6 has a stronger ability to displace rubisco from the air-water interface than SDOBS-2. However, when surfactant concentration reaches 50 μM, SDOBS-2 has a higher population than SDOBS-6, with more rubisco displaced from the interface. The results presented in this work suggest that the extent of protein displacement from the air-water interface, and hence the nature of the protein-surfactant interactions at the interface, are strongly affected by the position of surfactant isomerisation, which might allow the design of formulations for efficient removal of protein stains.

  10. Determining protein biomarkers for DLBCL using FFPE tissues from HIV negative and HIV positive patients.

    PubMed

    Magangane, Pumza; Sookhayi, Raveendra; Govender, Dhirendra; Naidoo, Richard

    2016-12-01

    DLBCL is the most common lymphoma subtype occurring in older populations as well as in younger HIV infected patients. The current treatment options for DLBCL are effective for most patients yet the relapse rate is high. While many biomarkers for DLBCL exist, they are not in clinical use due to low sensitivity and specificity. In addition, these biomarkers have not been studied in the HIV context. Therefore, the identification of new biomarkers for HIV negative and HIV positive DLBCL, may lead to a better understanding of the disease pathology and better therapeutic design. Protein biomarkers for DLBCL were determined using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and characterised using LC-MS. The expression of one of the biomarkers, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70, was confirmed on a separate cohort of samples using immunohistochemistry. The biomarkers identified in the study consisted of four protein clusters including glycolytic enzymes, ribosomal proteins, histones and collagen. These proteins could differentiate between control and tumour tissue, and the DLBCL immunohistochemical subtypes in both cohorts. The majority (41/52) of samples in the confirmation cohort were negative for Hsp70 expression. The HIV positive DLBCL cases had a higher percentage of cases expressing Hsp70 than their HIV negative counterparts. The non-GC subtype also frequently overexpressed Hsp70, confirming MALDI IMS data. The expression of Hsp70 did not correlate with survival in both the HIV negative and HIV positive cohort. This study identified potential biomarkers for HIV negative and HIV positive DLBCL from FFPE tissue sections. These may be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers complementary to current clinical management programmes for DLBCL.

  11. Gasp, a Grb2-associating protein, is critical for positive selection of thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Michael S.; Oda, Hiroyo; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Eshima, Koji; Kirikae, Teruo; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Shirai, Mutsunori; Abe, Takaya; Natsume, Tohru; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Suzuki, Harumi

    2009-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus through positive and negative selection, which are responsible for shaping the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in selection remains an area of intense interest. Here, we identified and characterized a gene product Gasp (Grb2-associating protein, also called Themis) that is critically required for positive selection. Gasp is a cytosolic protein with no known functional motifs that is expressed only in T cells, especially immature CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) thymocytes. In the absence of Gasp, differentiation of both CD4 and CD8 single positive cells in the thymus was severely inhibited, whereas all other TCR-induced events such as β-selection, negative selection, peripheral activation, and homeostatic proliferation were unaffected. We found that Gasp constitutively associates with Grb2 via its N-terminal Src homology 3 domain, suggesting that Gasp acts as a thymocyte-specific adaptor for Grb2 or regulates Ras signaling in DP thymocytes. Collectively, we have described a gene called Gasp that is critical for positive selection. PMID:19805304

  12. Positive and strongly relaxed purifying selection drive the evolution of repeats in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Persi, Erez; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V

    2016-01-01

    Protein repeats are considered hotspots of protein evolution, associated with acquisition of new functions and novel phenotypic traits, including disease. Paradoxically, however, repeats are often strongly conserved through long spans of evolution. To resolve this conundrum, it is necessary to directly compare paralogous (horizontal) evolution of repeats within proteins with their orthologous (vertical) evolution through speciation. Here we develop a rigorous methodology to identify highly periodic repeats with significant sequence similarity, for which evolutionary rates and selection (dN/dS) can be estimated, and systematically characterize their evolution. We show that horizontal evolution of repeats is markedly accelerated compared with their divergence from orthologues in closely related species. This observation is universal across the diversity of life forms and implies a biphasic evolutionary regime whereby new copies experience rapid functional divergence under combined effects of strongly relaxed purifying selection and positive selection, followed by fixation and conservation of each individual repeat. PMID:27857066

  13. Mutual positional preference of IPMDH proteins for binding studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, T.; Yamada, H.; Miyakawa, T.; Morikawa, R.; Akanuma, S.; Yamagishi, A.; Takasu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Proteins, which incorporate charged and hydrophobic amino acid residues, are useful as a material of nanotechnology. Among these proteins, IPMDH (3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase), which has thermal stability, has potential as a material of nanofiber. In this study, we performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of IPMDH using MARTINI force fields, and we investigated the orientation for the binding of IPMDH. In simulation, we analyzed wild type of IPMDH and the mutated IPMDH proteins, where 13, 20, 27, 332, 335 and 338th amino acid residues are replaced by lysine residues which have positive charge and by glutamic acid residues which have negative charge. Since the binding of mutated IPMDH is advantageous compared with the binding of wild type for one orientation, we suggest that the Coulomb interaction for the binding of IPMDH is important.

  14. Positive and negative regulation of a SNARE protein by control of intracellular localization.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hideki; de los Santos, Pablo; Neiman, Aaron M

    2004-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the developmentally regulated Soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein Spo20p mediates the fusion of vesicles with the prospore membrane, which is required for the formation of spores. Spo20p is subject to both positive and negative regulation by separate sequences in its aminoterminal domain. We report that the positive activity is conferred by a short, amphipathic helix that is sufficient to confer plasma membrane or prospore membrane localization to green fluorescent protein. In vitro, this helix binds to acidic phospholipids, and mutations that reduce or eliminate phospholipid binding in vitro inactivate Spo20p in vivo. Genetic manipulation of phospholipid pools indicates that the likely in vivo ligand of this domain is phosphatidic acid. The inhibitory activity is a nuclear targeting signal, which confers nuclear localization in vegetative cells and in cells entering meiosis. However, as cells initiate spore formation, fusions containing the inhibitory domain exit the nucleus and localize to the nascent prospore membrane. Thus, the SNARE Spo20p is both positively and negatively regulated by control of its intracellular localization.

  15. A New Distributed Algorithm for Side-Chain Positioning in the Process of Protein Docking*

    PubMed Central

    Moghadasi, Mohammad; Kozakov, Dima; Vakili, Pirooz; Vajda, Sandor; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Side-chain positioning (SCP) is an important component of computational protein docking methods. Existing SCP methods and available software have been designed for protein folding applications where side-chain positioning is also important. As a result they do not take into account significant special structure that SCP for docking exhibits. We propose a new algorithm which poses SCP as a Maximum Weighted Independent Set (MWIS) problem on an appropriately constructed graph. We develop an approximate algorithm which solves a relaxation of the MWIS and then rounds the solution to obtain a high-quality feasible solution to the problem. The algorithm is fully distributed and can be executed on a large network of processing nodes requiring only local information and message-passing between neighboring nodes. Motivated by the special structure in docking, we establish optimality guarantees for a certain class of graphs. Our results on a benchmark set of enzyme-inhibitor protein complexes show that our predictions are close to the native structure and are comparable to the ones obtained by a state-of-the-art method. The results are substantially improved if rotamers from unbound protein structures are included in the search. We also establish that the use of our SCP algorithm substantially improves docking results. PMID:24844567

  16. Monolith disk chromatography separates PEGylated protein positional isoforms within minutes at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Isakari, Yu; Podgornik, Ales; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Although PEGylation makes proteins drugs more effective, the PEGylation reaction must be controlled carefully in order to obtain a desired PEGylated protein form since various different PEGylated forms may be produced during the reaction. For monitoring the PEGylation reaction, a method with monolith disk ion exchange chromatography, which can separate positional isomers as well as PEGmers, has been developed as a process analytical tool (PAT). The method was optimized for separation of randomly PEGylated protein (lysozyme) isoforms based on the number of resolved peaks, peak resolution, analysis time and pressure drop. In order to increase the retention of mono- and di-PEGylated protein isomers the mobile phase was decreased to pH 4.5, where a large number of mono- and di-PEGylated isomers were resolved within a few minutes. Based on the linear gradient elution optimization model, the following values were determined: gradient slope 0.016 M/mL, disk thickness 3 mm (single disk) and flow rate 10 mL/min. Under these optimal conditions, the analysis was completed within ca. 4 min while the pressure drop was below 1 MPa. As the method was successfully applied to monitoring mono and di-PEGylated positional isoforms in the reaction mixture of random PEGylation of lysozyme, it is expected to be an efficient PAT tool.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva in HIV-positive Heroin Addicts Reveals Proteins Correlated with Cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Dominy, Stephen; Brown, Joseph N.; Ryder, Mark I.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high despite effective antiretroviral therapies. Multiple etiologies have been proposed over the last few years to account for this phenomenon, including the neurotoxic effects of antiretrovirals and co-morbid substance abuse. However, no underlying molecular mechanism has been identified. Emerging evidence in several fields has linked the gut to brain diseases, but the effect of the gut on the brain during HIV infection has not been explored. Saliva is the most accessible gut biofluid, and is therefore of great scientific interest for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This study presents a longitudinal, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics study investigating saliva samples taken from 8 HIV-positive (HIV+) and 11 -negative (HIV-) heroin addicts. In the HIV+ group, 58 proteins were identified that show significant correlations with cognitive scores and that implicate disruption of protein quality control pathways by HIV. Notably, no proteins from the HIV- heroin addict cohort showed significant correlations with cognitive scores. In addition, the majority of correlated proteins have been shown to be associated with exosomes, allowing us to propose that the salivary glands and/or oral epithelium may modulate brain function during HIV infection through the release of discrete packets of proteins in the form of exosomes.

  18. Positive Lysosomal Modulation As a Unique Strategy to Treat Age-Related Protein Accumulation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Butler, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lysosomes are involved in degrading and recycling cellular ingredients, and their disruption with age may contribute to amyloidogenesis, paired helical filaments (PHFs), and α-synuclein and mutant huntingtin aggregation. Lysosomal cathepsins are upregulated by accumulating proteins and more so by the modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK). Such positive modulators of the lysosomal system have been studied in the well-characterized hippocampal slice model of protein accumulation that exhibits the pathogenic cascade of tau aggregation, tubulin breakdown, microtubule destabilization, transport failure, and synaptic decline. Active cathepsins were upregulated by PADK; Rab proteins were modified as well, indicating enhanced trafficking, whereas lysosome-associated membrane protein and proteasome markers were unchanged. Lysosomal modulation reduced the pre-existing PHF deposits, restored tubulin structure and transport, and recovered synaptic components. Further proof-of-principle studies used Alzheimer disease mouse models. It was recently reported that systemic PADK administration caused dramatic increases in cathepsin B protein and activity levels, whereas neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, α-secretase, and β-secretase were unaffected by PADK. In the transgenic models, PADK treatment resulted in clearance of intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and concomitant reduction of extracellular deposits. Production of the less pathogenic Aβ1–38 peptide corresponded with decreased levels of Aβ1–42, supporting the lysosome's antiamyloidogenic role through intracellular truncation. Amelioration of synaptic and behavioral deficits also indicates a neuroprotective function of the lysosomal system, identifying lysosomal modulation as an avenue for disease-modifying therapies. From the in vitro and in vivo findings, unique lysosomal modulators represent a minimally invasive, pharmacologically controlled strategy against protein accumulation disorders

  19. Trace adsorption of positively charged proteins onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Ling; Sun, Yan

    2012-08-31

    Agarose-based matrices have been widely used in ion exchange chromatography (IEC). We have herein observed that positively charged proteins (lysozyme and cytochrome c) are adsorbed on the agarose-based anion-exchangers (Q and DEAE Sepharose FF gels) in a capacity of 10-40 μg/mL. In contrast, negatively charged protein (bovine serum albumin) is not adsorbed to Sepharose FF and SP Sepharose FF gels. Elemental analysis of the gel indicated that the residual anionic sulfate groups in agarose would have worked as the cation exchange groups for the positively charged proteins. The trace adsorption behavior of lysozyme onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers was studied and the effects of NaCl concentration and cation group density on the adsorption were examined for better understanding of the trace adsorption in chromatographic processes. At NaCl concentrations less than 0.05 mol/L, which is the normal adsorption condition in IEC, the trace adsorption kept at a high level, so this trace adsorption cannot be avoided in the ionic strength range of routine IEC operations. Grafting poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) chain of 60 kDa to a cation group density of 700 mmol/L could reduce the adsorption capacity to about 20 μg/mL, but further reduction was not possible by increasing the cation group density to 1200 mmol/L. Therefore, attentions need to be paid to the phenomenon in protein purification practice using agarose-based matrices. The research is expected to call attentions to the trace adsorption on agarose-based matrices and to the importance in the selection of the suitable solid matrices in the production of high-purity protein products in large-scale bioprocesses.

  20. Position of helical kinks in membrane protein crystal structures and the accuracy of computational prediction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Spencer E; Roberts, Kyle; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2009-01-01

    The structural features of helical transmembrane (TM) proteins, such as helical kinks, tilts, and rotational orientations are important in modulation of their function and these structural features give rise to functional diversity in membrane proteins with similar topology. In particular, the helical kinks caused by breaking of the backbone hydrogen bonds lead to hinge bending flexibility in these helices. Therefore it is important to understand the nature of the helical kinks and to be able to reproduce these kinks in structural models of membrane proteins. We have analyzed the position and extent of helical kinks in the transmembrane helices of all the crystal structures of membrane proteins taken from the MPtopo database, which are about 405 individual helices of length between 19 and 35 residues. 44% of the crystal structures of TM helices showed a significant helical kink, and 35% of these kinks are caused by prolines. Many of the non-proline helical kinks are caused by other residues like Ser and Gly that are located at the center of helical kinks. The side chain of Ser makes a hydrogen bond with the main chain carbonyl of the i - 4th or i + 4th residue thus making a kink. We have also studied how well molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on isolated helices can reproduce the position of the helical kinks in TM helices. Such a method is useful for structure prediction of membrane proteins. We performed MD simulations, starting from a canonical helix for the 405 TM helices. 1 ns of MD simulation results show that we can reproduce about 79% of the proline kinks, only 59% of the vestigial proline kinks and 18% of the non-proline helical kinks. We found that similar results can be obtained from choosing the lowest potential energy structure from the MD simulation. 4-14% more of the vestigial prolines were reproduced by replacing them with prolines before performing MD simulations, and changing the amino acid back to proline after the MD simulations. From these

  1. DNA structure directs positioning of the mitochondrial genome packaging protein Abf2p

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arka; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Battistini, Federica; Hospital, Adam; Medici, Giorgio; Prohens, Rafel; Orozco, Modesto; Vilardell, Josep; Solà, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is assembled into nucleo-protein structures termed nucleoids and maintained differently compared to nuclear DNA, the involved molecular basis remaining poorly understood. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), mtDNA is a ∼80 kbp linear molecule and Abf2p, a double HMG-box protein, packages and maintains it. The protein binds DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner, but displays a distinct ‘phased-binding’ at specific DNA sequences containing poly-adenine tracts (A-tracts). We present here two crystal structures of Abf2p in complex with mtDNA-derived fragments bearing A-tracts. Each HMG-box of Abf2p induces a 90° bend in the contacted DNA, causing an overall U-turn. Together with previous data, this suggests that U-turn formation is the universal mechanism underlying mtDNA compaction induced by HMG-box proteins. Combining this structural information with mutational, biophysical and computational analyses, we reveal a unique DNA binding mechanism for Abf2p where a characteristic N-terminal flag and helix are crucial for mtDNA maintenance. Additionally, we provide the molecular basis for A-tract mediated exclusion of Abf2p binding. Due to high prevalence of A-tracts in yeast mtDNA, this has critical relevance for nucleoid architecture. Therefore, an unprecedented A-tract mediated protein positioning mechanism regulates DNA packaging proteins in the mitochondria, and in combination with DNA-bending and U-turn formation, governs mtDNA compaction. PMID:27899643

  2. Detection of protein-protein interactions in plants using the transrepressive activity of the EAR motif repression domain.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kyoko; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2010-02-01

    The activities of many regulatory factors involve interactions with other proteins. We demonstrate here that the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif repression domain (SRDX) can convert a transcriptional complex into a repressor via transrepression that is mediated by protein-protein interactions and show that transrepressive activity of SRDX can be used to detect such protein-protein interactions. When we fused a protein that interacts with a transcription factor with SRDX and co-expressed the product with the transcription factor in plant cells, the expression of genes that are targets of the transcription factor was suppressed by transrepression. We demonstrated the transrepressive activity of SRDX using FOS and JUN as a model system and used two MADS box plant proteins, PISTILLATA and APETALA3, which are known to form heterodimers. Furthermore, the transgenic plants that expressed TTG1, which is a WD40 protein and interacts with bHLH transcription factors, fused to SRDX exhibited a phenotype similar to ttg1 mutants by transrepression and the regions of TTG1 required for interaction to the bHLH protein were detected using our system. We also used this system to analyse a protein factor that might be incorporated into a transcriptional complex and identified an Arabidopsis WD40 protein PWP2 (AtPWP2) interacting with AtTBP1 through comparison of phenotypes induced by 35S:AtPWP2-SRDX with that induced by the chimeric repressor. Our results indicate that the transrepression mediated by SRDX can be used to detect and confirm protein-protein interactions in plants and should be useful in identifying factors that form transcriptional protein complexes.

  3. Heterochromatin protein 1, a known suppressor of position-effect variegation, is highly conserved in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R F; Elgin, S C

    1992-01-01

    The Su(var)205 gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), a protein located preferentially within beta-heterochromatin. Mutation of this gene has been associated with dominant suppression of position-effect variegation. We have cloned and sequenced the gene encoding HP1 from Drosophila virilis, a distantly related species. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence with Drosophila melanogaster HP1 shows two regions of strong homology, one near the N-terminus (57/61 amino acids identical) and the other near the C-terminus (62/68 amino acids identical) of the protein. Little homology is seen in the 5' and 3' untranslated portions of the gene, as well as in the intronic sequences, although intron/exon boundaries are generally conserved. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of HP1-like proteins from other species shows that the cores of the N-terminal and C-terminal domains have been conserved from insects to mammals. The high degree of conservation suggests that these N- and C-terminal domains could interact with other macromolecules in the formation of the condensed structure of heterochromatin. Images PMID:1461737

  4. Alteration of cardiac glycoside positive inotropic action by modulators of protein synthesis and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Nosek, T.M.; Adams, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    Numerous membrane bound and cytoplasmic proteins participate in the cardiac expression of the positive inotropic action (PIA) of digitalis glycosides including the Na,K-ATPase (NKA). Exposure of the myocardium to an inhibitor of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, CYC) or of protein degradation (leupeptin, LEU) alters the PIA of ouabain in isolated, paced guinea pig papillary muscles (PM) in opposite ways. In vivo exposure to CYC for 3 hr resulted in a 30% depression of the in vitro PIA of ouabain at 1.7..mu..M compared to control. In vivo exposure to LEU for 1 hr resulted in a 47% enhancement of the in vitro PIA of 1.7..mu..M ouabain. Neither drug had an apparent effect on the ouabain PIA ED50. Neither CYC nor LEU exposure to PM in vitro affect resting or developed tension or the response of skinned PM to calcium. The mechanisms of the PIA alterations by CYC or LEU do not involve a direct effect on the digitalis receptor. Exposure of isolated cardiac sarcolemma enriched in NKA to 10-100..mu..M CYC or LEU did not affect NKA activity or /sup 3/H-ouabain binding. Although direct physicochemical effects of CYC or LEU may be involved in the alterations of the ouabain PIA, it is possible that modulation of the cellular levels or turnover rate of short-lived proteins may affect cardiac regulation of the digitalis PIA.

  5. Positioning atypical protein kinase C isoforms in the UV-induced apoptotic signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Berra, E; Municio, M M; Sanz, L; Frutos, S; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have documented the involvement of the atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms in important cellular functions such as cell proliferation and survival. Exposure of cells to a genotoxic stimulus that induces apoptosis, such as UV irradiation, leads to a profound inhibition of the atypical PKC activity in vivo. In this study, we addressed the relationship between this phenomenon and different proteins involved in the apoptotic response. We show that (i) the inhibition of the aPKC activity precedes UV-induced apoptosis; (ii) UV-induced aPKC inhibition and apoptosis are independent of p53; (iii) Bcl-2 proteins are potent modulators of aPKC activity; and (iv) the aPKCs are located upstream of the interleukin-converting enzyme-like protease system, which is required for the induction of apoptosis by both Par-4 (a selective aPKC inhibitor) and UV irradiation. We also demonstrate here that inhibition of aPKC activity leads to a decrease in mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity and simultaneously an increase in p38 activity. Both effects are critical for the induction of apoptosis in response to Par-4 expression and UV irradiation. Collectively, these results clarify the position of the aPKCs in the UV-induced apoptotic pathway and strongly suggest that MAP kinases play a role in this signaling cascade. PMID:9234692

  6. Size controlled protein nanoemulsions for active targeting of folate receptor positive cells.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Ana; Nogueira, Eugénia; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Abreu, Ana S; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Guebitz, Georg; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Preto, Ana; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-11-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization with a tri-block copolymer (Poloxamer 407), which presents a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene (PPO) and two identical lateral hydrophilic chains of polyethylene glycol (PEG). We observed a linear correlation between tri-block copolymer concentration and size - the use of 5mg/mL of Poloxamer 407 yields nanoemulsions smaller than 100nm. Molecular dynamics and fluorescent tagging of the tri-block copolymer highlight their mechanistic role on the size of emulsions. This novel method enables the fabrication of highly stable albumin emulsions in the nano-size range, highly desirable for controlled drug delivery. Folic Acid (FA)-tagged protein nanoemulsions were shown to promote specific folate receptor (FR)-mediated targeting in FR positive cells. The novel strategy presented here enables the construction of size controlled, functionalized protein-based nanoemulsions with excellent characteristics for active targeting in cancer therapy.

  7. Protein Sequence Comparison Based on Physicochemical Properties and the Position-Feature Energy Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lulu; Zhang, Yusen; Gutman, Ivan; Shi, Yongtang; Dehmer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We develop a novel position-feature-based model for protein sequences by employing physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids and the measure of graph energy. The method puts the emphasis on sequence order information and describes local dynamic distributions of sequences, from which one can get a characteristic B-vector. Afterwards, we apply the relative entropy to the sequences representing B-vectors to measure their similarity/dissimilarity. The numerical results obtained in this study show that the proposed methods leads to meaningful results compared with competitors such as Clustal W. PMID:28393857

  8. TBCCD1, a new centrosomal protein, is required for centrosome and Golgi apparatus positioning.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, João; Nolasco, Sofia; Nascimento, Rute; Lopez Fanarraga, Mónica; Zabala, Juan Carlos; Soares, Helena

    2010-03-01

    In animal cells the centrosome is positioned at the cell centre in close association with the nucleus. The mechanisms responsible for this are not completely understood. Here, we report the first characterization of human TBCC-domain containing 1 (TBCCD1), a protein related to tubulin cofactor C. TBCCD1 localizes at the centrosome and at the spindle midzone, midbody and basal bodies of primary and motile cilia. Knockdown of TBCCD1 in RPE-1 cells caused the dissociation of the centrosome from the nucleus and disorganization of the Golgi apparatus. TBCCD1-depleted cells are larger, less efficient in primary cilia assembly and their migration is slower in wound-healing assays. However, the major microtubule-nucleating activity of the centrosome is not affected by TBCCD1 silencing. We propose that TBCCD1 is a key regulator of centrosome positioning and consequently of internal cell organization.

  9. TBCCD1, a new centrosomal protein, is required for centrosome and Golgi apparatus positioning

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, João; Nolasco, Sofia; Nascimento, Rute; Fanarraga, Mónica Lopez; Zabala, Juan Carlos; Soares, Helena

    2010-01-01

    In animal cells the centrosome is positioned at the cell centre in close association with the nucleus. The mechanisms responsible for this are not completely understood. Here, we report the first characterization of human TBCC-domain containing 1 (TBCCD1), a protein related to tubulin cofactor C. TBCCD1 localizes at the centrosome and at the spindle midzone, midbody and basal bodies of primary and motile cilia. Knockdown of TBCCD1 in RPE-1 cells caused the dissociation of the centrosome from the nucleus and disorganization of the Golgi apparatus. TBCCD1-depleted cells are larger, less efficient in primary cilia assembly and their migration is slower in wound-healing assays. However, the major microtubule-nucleating activity of the centrosome is not affected by TBCCD1 silencing. We propose that TBCCD1 is a key regulator of centrosome positioning and consequently of internal cell organization. PMID:20168327

  10. Zika virus causes supernumerary foci with centriolar proteins and impaired spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Benita; Diop, Fodé; Ferraris, Pauline; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Busso, Coralie; Missé, Dorothée

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) causes congenital microcephaly. Although ZIKV can impair cell cycle progression and provoke apoptosis, which probably contributes to disease aetiology through depletion of neural progenitor cells, additional cellular mechanisms may be important. Here, we investigated whether ZIKV infection alters centrosome number and spindle positioning, because such defects are thought to be at the root of inherited primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH). In addition to HeLa cells, in which centrosome number and spindle positioning can be well monitored, we analysed retinal epithelial cells (RPE-1), as well as brain-derived microglial (CHME-5) and neural progenitor (ReN) cells, using immunofluorescence. We established that ZIKV infection leads to supernumerary foci containing centriolar proteins that in some cases drive multipolar spindle assembly, as well as spindle positioning defects in HeLa, RPE-1 and CHME-5 cells, but not in ReN cells. We uncovered similar phenotypes in HeLa cells upon infection with dengue virus (DENV-2), another flavivirus that does not target brain cells and does not cause microcephaly. We conclude that infection with Flaviviridae can increase centrosome numbers and impair spindle positioning, thus potentially contributing to microcephaly in the case of Zika. PMID:28100662

  11. Robust, tunable genetic memory from protein sequestration combined with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Shopera, Tatenda; Henson, William R; Ng, Andrew; Lee, Young Je; Ng, Kenneth; Moon, Tae Seok

    2015-10-15

    Natural regulatory networks contain many interacting components that allow for fine-tuning of switching and memory properties. Building simple bistable switches, synthetic biologists have learned the design principles of complex natural regulatory networks. However, most switches constructed so far are so simple (e.g. comprising two regulators) that they are functional only within a limited parameter range. Here, we report the construction of robust, tunable bistable switches in Escherichia coli using three heterologous protein regulators (ExsADC) that are sequestered into an inactive complex through a partner swapping mechanism. On the basis of mathematical modeling, we accurately predict and experimentally verify that the hysteretic region can be fine-tuned by controlling the interactions of the ExsADC regulatory cascade using the third member ExsC as a tuning knob. Additionally, we confirm that a dual-positive feedback switch can markedly increase the hysteretic region, compared to its single-positive feedback counterpart. The dual-positive feedback switch displays bistability over a 10(6)-fold range of inducer concentrations, to our knowledge, the largest range reported so far. This work demonstrates the successful interlocking of sequestration-based ultrasensitivity and positive feedback, a design principle that can be applied to the construction of robust, tunable, and predictable genetic programs to achieve increasingly sophisticated biological behaviors.

  12. Direct correlation of the crystal structure of proteins with the maximum positive and negative charge states of gaseous protein ions produced by electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Halan; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2005-09-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometric studies in native folded forms of several proteins in aqueous solution have been performed in the positive and negative ion modes. The mass spectra of the proteins show peaks corresponding to multiple charge states of the gaseous protein ions. The results have been analyzed using the known crystal structures of these proteins. Crystal structure analysis shows that among the surface exposed residues some are involved in hydrogen-bonding or salt-bridge interactions while some are free. The maximum positive charge state of the gaseous protein ions was directly related to the number of free surface exposed basic groups whereas the maximum negative charge state was related to the number of free surface exposed acidic groups of the proteins. The surface exposed basic groups, which are involved in hydrogen bonding, have lower propensity to contribute to the positive charge of the protein. Similarly, the surface exposed acidic groups involved in salt bridges have lower propensity to contribute to the negative charge of the protein. Analysis of the crystal structure to determine the maximum charge state of protein in the electrospray mass spectrum was also used to interpret the reported mass spectra of several proteins. The results show that both the positive and the negative ion mass spectra of the proteins could be interpreted by simple consideration of the crystal structure of the folded proteins. Moreover, unfolding of the protein was shown to increase the positive charge-state because of the availability of larger number of free basic groups at the surface of the unfolded protein.

  13. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations Using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (Reeve et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112(3):749-754, 2015), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned continuous rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme's catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor.

  14. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M.; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (1), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme’s catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor. PMID:27914058

  15. Positive Selection Pressure Drives Variation on the Surface-Exposed Variable Proteins of the Pathogenic Neisseria

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Neisseria utilize variable outer membrane proteins to facilitate infection and proliferation within the human host. However, the mechanisms behind the evolution of these variable alleles remain largely unknown due to analysis of previously limited datasets. In this study, we have expanded upon the previous analyses to substantially increase the number of analyzed sequences by including multiple diverse strains, from various geographic locations, to determine whether positive selective pressure is exerted on the evolution of these variable genes. Although Neisseria are naturally competent, this analysis indicates that only intrastrain horizontal gene transfer among the pathogenic Neisseria principally account for these genes exhibiting linkage equilibrium which drives the polymorphisms evidenced within these alleles. As the majority of polymorphisms occur across species, the divergence of these variable genes is dependent upon the species and is independent of geographical location, disease severity, or serogroup. Tests of neutrality were able to detect strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families, and were able to locate the majority of these sites within the exposed variable regions of the encoded proteins. Evidence of positive selection acting upon the hypervariable domains of Opa contradicts previous beliefs and provides evidence for selection of receptor binding. As the pathogenic Neisseria reside exclusively within the human host, the strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families provide support for host immune system pressure driving sequence polymorphisms within these variable genes. PMID:27532335

  16. Positive Selection Pressure Drives Variation on the Surface-Exposed Variable Proteins of the Pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Neisseria utilize variable outer membrane proteins to facilitate infection and proliferation within the human host. However, the mechanisms behind the evolution of these variable alleles remain largely unknown due to analysis of previously limited datasets. In this study, we have expanded upon the previous analyses to substantially increase the number of analyzed sequences by including multiple diverse strains, from various geographic locations, to determine whether positive selective pressure is exerted on the evolution of these variable genes. Although Neisseria are naturally competent, this analysis indicates that only intrastrain horizontal gene transfer among the pathogenic Neisseria principally account for these genes exhibiting linkage equilibrium which drives the polymorphisms evidenced within these alleles. As the majority of polymorphisms occur across species, the divergence of these variable genes is dependent upon the species and is independent of geographical location, disease severity, or serogroup. Tests of neutrality were able to detect strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families, and were able to locate the majority of these sites within the exposed variable regions of the encoded proteins. Evidence of positive selection acting upon the hypervariable domains of Opa contradicts previous beliefs and provides evidence for selection of receptor binding. As the pathogenic Neisseria reside exclusively within the human host, the strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families provide support for host immune system pressure driving sequence polymorphisms within these variable genes.

  17. Anchoring of LPXTG-Like Proteins to the Gram-Positive Cell Wall Envelope.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Sara D; Reardon, Melissa E; Ton-That, Hung

    2016-04-21

    In Gram-positive bacteria, protein precursors with a signal peptide and a cell wall sorting signal (CWSS)-which begins with an LPXTG motif, followed by a hydrophobic domain and a tail of positively charged residues-are targeted to the cell envelope by a transpeptidase enzyme call sortase. Evolution and selective pressure gave rise to six classes of sortase, i.e., SrtA-F. Only class C sortases are capable of polymerizing substrates harboring the pilin motif and CWSS into protein polymers known as pili or fimbriae, whereas the others perform cell wall anchoring functions. Regardless of the products generated from these sortases, the basic principle of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation is the same. It begins with the cleavage of the LPXTG motif, followed by the cross-linking of this cleaved product at the threonine residue to a nucleophile, i.e., an active amino group of the peptidoglycan stem peptide or the lysine residue of the pilin motif. This chapter will summarize the efforts to identify and characterize sortases and their associated pathways with emphasis on the cell wall anchoring function.

  18. The polarity protein Pard3 is required for centrosome positioning during neurulation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Elim; Jayachandran, Pradeepa; Brewster, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Microtubules are essential regulators of cell polarity, architecture and motility. The organization of the microtubule network is context-specific. In non-polarized cells, microtubules are anchored to the centrosome and form radial arrays. In most epithelial cells, microtubules are noncentrosomal, align along the apico-basal axis and the centrosome templates a cilium. It follows that cells undergoing mesenchyme-to-epithelium transitions must reorganize their microtubule network extensively, yet little is understood about how this process is orchestrated. In particular, the pathways regulating the apical positioning of the centrosome are unknown, a central question given the role of cilia in fluid propulsion, sensation and signaling. In zebrafish, neural progenitors undergo progressive epithelialization during neurulation, and thus provide a convenient in vivo cellular context in which to address this question. We demonstrate here that the microtubule cytoskeleton gradually transitions from a radial to linear organization during neurulation and that microtubules function in conjunction with the polarity protein Pard3 to mediate centrosome positioning. Pard3 depletion results in hydrocephalus, a defect often associated with abnormal cerebrospinal fluid flow that has been linked to cilia defects. These findings thus bring to focus cellular events occurring during neurulation and reveal novel molecular mechanisms implicated in centrosome positioning. PMID:20138861

  19. Extensive Positive Selection Drives the Evolution of Nonstructural Proteins in Lineage C Betacoronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cagliani, Rachele; Mozzi, Alessandra; Pozzoli, Uberto; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV) spreads to humans via zoonotic transmission from camels. MERS-CoV belongs to lineage C of betacoronaviruses (betaCoVs), which also includes viruses isolated from bats and hedgehogs. A large portion of the betaCoV genome consists of two open reading frames (ORF1a and ORF1b) that are translated into polyproteins. These are cleaved by viral proteases to generate 16 nonstructural proteins (nsp1 to nsp16) which compose the viral replication-transcription complex. We investigated the evolution of ORF1a and ORF1b in lineage C betaCoVs. Results indicated widespread positive selection, acting mostly on ORF1a. The proportion of positively selected sites in ORF1a was much higher than that previously reported for the surface-exposed spike protein. Selected sites were unevenly distributed, with nsp3 representing the preferential target. Several pairs of coevolving sites were also detected, possibly indicating epistatic interactions; most of these were located in nsp3. Adaptive evolution at nsp3 is ongoing in MERS-CoV strains, and two selected sites (G720 and R911) were detected in the protease domain. While position 720 is variable in camel-derived viruses, suggesting that the selective event does not represent a specific adaptation to humans, the R911C substitution was observed only in human-derived MERS-CoV isolates, including the viral strain responsible for the recent South Korean outbreak. It will be extremely important to assess whether these changes affect host range or other viral phenotypes. More generally, data herein indicate that CoV nsp3 represents a major selection target and that nsp3 sequencing should be envisaged in monitoring programs and field surveys. IMPORTANCE Both severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and MERS-CoV originated in bats and spread to humans via an intermediate host. This clearly highlights the potential for coronavirus host shifting and the relevance

  20. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and <0.8 % are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false-positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  1. False-positive rate determination of protein target discovery using a covalent modification- and mass spectrometry-based proteomics platform.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Erin C; Geer, M Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2% and <0.8% are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false-positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  2. False Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. The Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX) technique is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False positive rates of 1.2–2.2% and <0.8% are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed. PMID:24114261

  3. Atrophin Protein RERE Positively Regulates Notch Targets in the Developing Vertebrate Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Gui, Hongxing; Rallo, Michael S; Xu, Zhiyan; Matise, Michael P

    2017-01-31

    The Notch signaling pathway controls cell fate decision, proliferation and other biological functions in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Precise regulation of the canonical Notch pathway ensures robustness of the signal throughout development and adult tissue homeostasis. Aberrant Notch signaling results in profound developmental defects and is linked to many human diseases. In this study, we identified the Atrophin family protein RERE (also called Atro2) as a positive regulator of Notch target Hes genes in the developing vertebrate spinal cord. Prior studies have shown that during early embryogenesis in mouse and zebrafish, deficit of RERE causes various patterning defects in multiple organs including the neural tube. Here, we detected the expression of RERE in the developing chick spinal cord, and found that normal RERE activity is needed for proper neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation possibly by affecting Notch mediated Hes expression. In mammalian cells, RERE co-immunoprecipitates with CBF1 and Notch intracellular domain (NICD), and is recruited to nuclear foci formed by overexpressed NICD1. RERE is also necessary for NICD to activate the expression of Notch target genes. Our findings suggest that RERE stimulates Notch target gene expression by preventing degradation of NICD protein, thereby facilitating the assembly of a transcriptional activating complex containing NICD, CSL and other coactivators. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-01-01

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box–like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression. PMID:28167764

  5. Changes in Morphology, Gene Expression and Protein Content in Chondrocytes Cultured on a Random Positioning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Sahana, Jayashree; Ma, Xiao; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering of chondrocytes on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional RPM, a device designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of RPM exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of RPM exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis (TGF-β1, osteopontin); and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours of RPM exposure disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours on the RPM, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced during RPM culture for 24 h. Taking these results together, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to the RPM seem to change their extracellular matrix production behaviour while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates. PMID:24244418

  6. Changes in morphology, gene expression and protein content in chondrocytes cultured on a random positioning machine.

    PubMed

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Sahana, Jayashree; Ma, Xiao; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering of chondrocytes on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional RPM, a device designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of RPM exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of RPM exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis (TGF-β1, osteopontin); and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours of RPM exposure disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours on the RPM, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced during RPM culture for 24 h. Taking these results together, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to the RPM seem to change their extracellular matrix production behaviour while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates.

  7. Positioning protein molecules on surfaces: A nanoengineering approach to supramolecular chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang-Yu; Amro, Nabil A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss a nanoengineering approach for supramolecular chemistry and self assembly. The collective properties and biofunctionalities of molecular ensembles depend not only on individual molecular building blocks but also on organization at the molecular or nanoscopic level. Complementary to “bottom-up” approaches, which construct supramolecular ensembles by the design and synthesis of functionalized small molecular units or large molecular motifs, nanofabrication explores whether individual units, such as small molecular ligands, or large molecules, such as proteins, can be positioned with nanometer precision. The separation and local environment can be engineered to control subsequent intermolecular interactions. Feature sizes as small as 2 × 4 nm2 (32 alkanethiol molecules) are produced. Proteins may be aligned along a 10-nm-wide line or within two-dimensional islands of desired geometry. These high-resolution engineering and imaging studies provide new and molecular-level insight into supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly processes in bioscience that are otherwise unobtainable, e.g., the influence of size, separation, orientation, and local environment of reaction sites. This nanofabrication methodology also offers a new strategy in construction of two- and three-dimensional supramolecular structures for cell, virus, and bacterial adhesion, as well as biomaterial and biodevice engineering. PMID:11959965

  8. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-02-21

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box-like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression.

  9. Toutatis, a TIP5-related protein, positively regulates Pannier function during Drosophila neural development.

    PubMed

    Vanolst, Luc; Fromental-Ramain, Catherine; Ramain, Philippe

    2005-10-01

    The GATA factor Pannier (Pnr) activates proneural expression through binding to a remote enhancer of the achaete-scute (ac-sc) complex. Chip associates both with Pnr and with the (Ac-Sc)-Daughterless heterodimer bound to the ac-sc promoters to give a proneural complex that facilitates enhancer-promoter communication during development. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we have identified Toutatis (Tou), which physically interacts with both Pnr and Chip. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments indicate that Tou cooperates with Pnr and Chip during neural development. Tou shares functional domains with chromatin remodelling proteins, including TIP5 (termination factor TTFI-interacting protein 5) of NoRC (nucleolar remodelling complex), which mediates repression of RNA polymerase 1 transcription. In contrast, Tou acts positively to activate proneural gene expression. Moreover, we show that Iswi associates with Tou, Pnr and Chip, and is also required during Pnr-driven neural development. The results suggest that Tou and Iswi may belong to a complex that directly regulates the activity of Pnr and Chip during enhancer-promoter communication, possibly through chromatin remodelling.

  10. The F-box protein MAX2 functions as a positive regulator of photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Luong, Phi; Huq, Enamul

    2007-12-01

    Light is vital for plant growth and development. To respond to ambient light signals, plants are equipped with an array of photoreceptors, including phytochromes that sense red (R)/far-R (FR) regions and cryptochromes and phototropins that respond to the ultraviolet-A/blue (B) region of the light spectrum, respectively. Several positively and negatively acting components in light-signaling pathways have been identified using genetic approaches; however, the pathways are not saturated. Here, we characterize a new mutant named pleiotropic photosignaling (pps), isolated from a genetic screen under continuous R light. pps has longer hypocotyls and slightly smaller cotyledons under continuous R, FR, and B light compared to that of the wild type. pps is also hyposensitive to both R and FR light-induced seed germination. Although photosynthetic marker genes are constitutively expressed in pps in the dark at high levels, the expression of early light-regulated genes is reduced in the pps seedlings compared to wild-type seedlings under R light. PPS encodes MAX2/ORE9 (for MORE AXILLARY BRANCHES2/ORESARA9), an F-box protein involved in inflorescence architecture and senescence. MAX2 is expressed ubiquitously in the seedling stage. However, its expression is restricted to vascular tissues and meristems at adult stages. MAX2 is also localized to the nucleus. As an F-box protein, MAX2 is predicted to be a component of the SCF (for SKP, Cullin, and F-box protein) complex involved in regulated proteolysis. These results suggest that SCF(MAX2) plays critical roles in R, FR, and B light-signaling pathways. In addition, MAX2 might regulate multiple targets at different developmental stages to optimize plant growth and development.

  11. TcpP protein is a positive regulator of virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Häse, C C; Mekalanos, J J

    1998-01-20

    The production of several virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae O1, including cholera toxin and the pilus colonization factor TCP (toxin-coregulated pilus), is strongly influenced by environmental conditions. To specifically identify membrane proteins involved in these signal transduction events, we examined a transposon library of V. cholerae generated by Tnbla mutagenesis for cells that produce TCP when grown under various nonpermissive conditions. To select for TCP-producing cells we used the recently described bacteriophage CTX phi-Kan, which uses TCP as its receptor and carries a gene encoding resistance to kanamycin. Among the isolated mutants was a transposon insertion in a gene homologous to nqrB from Vibrio alginolyticus, which encodes a subunit of a Na(+)-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, and tcpI, encoding a chemo-receptor previously implicated in the negative regulation of TCP production. A third transposon mutant had an insertion in tcpP, which is in an operon with tcpH, a known positive regulator of TCP production. However, TcpP was shown to be essential for TCP production in V. cholerae, as a tcpP-deletion strain was deficient in pili production. The amino-terminal region of TcpP shows sequence homology to the DNA-binding domains of several regulatory proteins, including ToxR from V. cholerae and PsaE from Yersinia pestis. Like ToxR, TcpP activates transcription of the toxT gene, an essential activator of tcp operon transcription. Furthermore, TcpH, with its large periplasmic domain and inner membrane anchor, has a structure similar to that of ToxS and was shown to enhance the activity of TcpP. We propose that TcpP/TcpH constitute a pair of regulatory proteins functionally similar to ToxR/ToxS and PsaE/PsaF that are required for toxT transcription in V. cholerae.

  12. NHERF1, a novel GPER associated protein, increases stability and activation of GPER in ER-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ying; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Junfang; Zhao, Yuan; Tao, Tao; Wang, Qiqi; Liu, Hua; Wang, Songlin; Jiang, Wen G.; He, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) plays an important role in mediating the effects of estradiol. High levels of GPER have been implicated to associate with the malignant progress of invasive breast cancer (IBC). However, the mechanisms by which GPER protein levels were regulated remain unclear. In this study, PDZ protein Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) was found to interact with GPER in breast cancer cells. This interaction was mediated by the PDZ2 domain of NHERF1 and the carboxyl terminal PDZ binding motif of GPER. NHERF1 was demonstrated to facilitate GPER expression at post-transcriptional level and improve GPER protein stability by inhibiting the receptor degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a GPER/NHERF1 interaction-dependent manner. In addition, GPER protein levels are positively associated with NHERF1 protein levels in a panel of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells. Furthermore, analysis of clinical IBC data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed no significant difference in GPER mRNA levels between ER-positive IBC and normal breast tissues. However, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that GPER signaling is ultra-activated in ER-positive IBC when compared with normal and its activation is positively associated with NHERF1 mRNA levels. Taken together, our findings identify NHERF1 as a new binding partner for GPER and its overexpression promotes protein stability and activation of GPER in ER-positive IBC. Our data indicate that regulation of GPER stability by NHERF1 may contribute to GPER-mediated carcinogenesis in ER-positive IBC. PMID:27448983

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of anterior pituitary hormones in S-100 protein-positive cells in the rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yatabe, Megumi; Tando, Yukiko; Yashiro, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In the anterior and intermediate lobes of the rat pituitary gland, non-hormone-producing cells that express S-100 protein coexist with various types of hormone-producing cells and are believed to function as phagocytes, supporting and paracrine-controlling cells of hormone-producing cells and stem cells, among other functions; however, their cytological characteristics are not yet fully understood. Using a transgenic rat that expresses green fluorescent protein under the promoter of the S100β protein gene, we immunohistochemically detected expression of the luteinizing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone and proopiomelanocortin by S-100 protein-positive cells located between clusters of hormone-producing cells in the intermediate lobe. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that S-100 protein-positive cells are capable of differentiating into hormone-producing cells in the adult rat pituitary gland.

  14. Functional analysis of a RING domain ankyrin repeat protein that is highly expressed during flower senescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinjia; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Donnelly, Linda; Reid, Michael S

    2007-01-01

    A gene encoding a RING zinc finger ankyrin repeat protein (MjXB3), a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, is highly expressed in petals of senescing four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) flowers, increasing >40,000-fold during the onset of visible senescence. The gene has homologues in many other species, and the Petunia homologue is strongly up-regulated in senescing Petunia corollas. Silencing the expression of this gene in Petunia, using virus-induced gene silencing, resulted in a 2 d extension in flower life. In Mirabilis, a 2 kb promoter region, 5' upstream of the MjXB3 gene, was isolated. The promoter sequence included putative binding sites for many DNA-binding proteins, including the bZIP, Myb, homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip), MADS-box, and WRKY transcription factors. The construct containing a 1 kb promoter region immediately upstream of the MjXB3 gene drove the strongest expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in a transient expression assay. In Petunia, GUS expression under the control of this heterologous promoter fragment was specific to senescing flowers. The Mirabilis promoter GUS construct was tested in other flower species; while GUS activity in carnation petals was high during senescence, no expression was detected in three monocotyledonous flowers--daylily (Hemerocallis 'Stella d'Oro'), daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus 'King Alfred'), and orchid (Dendrobium 'Emma White').

  15. Human Dermal Fibroblasts Demonstrate Positive Immunostaining for Neuron- and Glia- Specific Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Janmaat, C. J.; de Rooij, K. E; Locher, H; de Groot, S. C.; de Groot, J. C. M. J.; Frijns, J. H. M.; Huisman, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    In stem cell cultures from adult human tissue, undesirable contamination with fibroblasts is frequently present. The presence of fibroblasts obscures the actual number of stem cells and may result in extracellular matrix production after transplantation. Identification of fibroblasts is difficult because of the lack of specific fibroblast markers. In our laboratory, we isolate and expand neural-crest-derived stem cells from human hair follicle bulges and investigate their potential to differentiate into neural cells. To establish cellular identities, we perform immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for glial and neuronal markers, and use fibroblasts as negative control. We frequently observe that human adult dermal fibroblasts also express some glial and neuronal markers. In this study, we have sought to determine whether our observations represent actual expression of these markers or result from cross-reactivity. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human adult dermal fibroblasts using acknowledged glial and neuronal antibodies followed by verification of the data using RT-qPCR. Human adult dermal fibroblasts showed expression of the glia-specific markers SOX9, glial fibrillary acidic protein and EGR2 (KROX20) as well as for the neuron-specific marker class III β-tubulin, both at the protein and mRNA level. Furthermore, human adult dermal fibroblasts showed false-positive immunostaining for S100β and GAP43 and to a lower extent for OCT6. Our results indicate that immunophenotyping as a tool to determine cellular identity is not as reliable as generally assumed, especially since human adult dermal fibroblasts may be mistaken for neural cells, indicating that the ultimate proof of glial or neuronal identity can only be provided by their functionality. PMID:26678612

  16. Three-dimensional window analysis for detecting positive selection at structural regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2004-12-01

    Detection of natural selection operating at the amino acid sequence level is important in the study of molecular evolution. Single-site analysis and one-dimensional window analysis can be used to detect selection when the biological functions of amino acid sites are unknown. Single-site analysis is useful when selection operates more or less constantly over evolutionary time, but less so when selection operates temporarily. One-dimensional window analysis is more sensitive than single-site analysis when the functions of amino acid sites in close proximity in the linear sequence are similar, although this is not always the case. Here I present a three-dimensional window analysis method for detecting selection given the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. In the three-dimensional structure, the window is defined as the sphere centered on the alpha-carbon of an amino acid site. The window size is the radius of the sphere. The sites whose alpha-carbons are included in the window are grouped for the neutrality test. The window is moved within the three-dimensional structure by sequentially moving the central site along the primary amino acid sequence. To detect positive selection, it may also be useful to group the surface-exposed sites in the window separately. Three-dimensional window analysis appears not only to be more sensitive than single-site analysis and one-dimensional window analysis but also to provide similar specificity for inferring positive selection in the analyses of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of human influenza A viruses. This method, however, may fail to detect selection when it operates only on a particular site, in which case single-site analysis may be preferred, although a large number of sequences is required.

  17. Alternative application of Tau protein in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis: Improvement for weakly positive 14-3-3 protein in the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hyeon, Jae Wook; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Jeongmin; Park, Jun Sun; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Lee, Sol Moe; An, SeongSoo A.; Lee, Myung Koo; Ju, Young Ran

    2015-01-01

    The 14-3-3 protein has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). However, weakly positive 14-3-3 leads to false positive results and an incorrect diagnosis. We attempted to use quantitative data for tau protein to provide an accurate diagnosis based on weak 14-3-3 protein. Sixty-two patients with sCJD, including pathologically confirmed, clinically definite, and probable cases, and 89 non-CJD patients were investigated based on a Korean population. Among them, 20 sCJD and 14 non-CJD showed weakly positive 14-3-3. The total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein levels were measured by ELISA, and the p-tau to t-tau ratio (p/t ratio) was calculated. The combined use of the 14-3-3 protein assay, t-tau levels, and p/t ratio improved the specificity of diagnosis compared with the use of the 14-3-3 protein assay alone (47% for 14-3-3 alone; 85.94% for 14-3-3 combined with t-tau; 90.62% for 14-3-3 combined with the p/t ratio). In addition, 18 of 20 sCJD and 12 of 14 non-CJD who were weakly positive for 14-3-3 were positive for the p/t ratio and negative for the p/t ratio, respectively. When used in combination with the 14-3-3 protein, the tau protein is useful as a biomarker for the precise diagnosis of sCJD. PMID:26507666

  18. Alternative application of Tau protein in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis: Improvement for weakly positive 14-3-3 protein in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Jae Wook; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Jeongmin; Park, Jun Sun; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Lee, Sol Moe; An, SeongSoo A; Lee, Myung Koo; Ju, Young Ran

    2015-10-28

    The 14-3-3 protein has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). However, weakly positive 14-3-3 leads to false positive results and an incorrect diagnosis. We attempted to use quantitative data for tau protein to provide an accurate diagnosis based on weak 14-3-3 protein. Sixty-two patients with sCJD, including pathologically confirmed, clinically definite, and probable cases, and 89 non-CJD patients were investigated based on a Korean population. Among them, 20 sCJD and 14 non-CJD showed weakly positive 14-3-3. The total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein levels were measured by ELISA, and the p-tau to t-tau ratio (p/t ratio) was calculated. The combined use of the 14-3-3 protein assay, t-tau levels, and p/t ratio improved the specificity of diagnosis compared with the use of the 14-3-3 protein assay alone (47% for 14-3-3 alone; 85.94% for 14-3-3 combined with t-tau; 90.62% for 14-3-3 combined with the p/t ratio). In addition, 18 of 20 sCJD and 12 of 14 non-CJD who were weakly positive for 14-3-3 were positive for the p/t ratio and negative for the p/t ratio, respectively. When used in combination with the 14-3-3 protein, the tau protein is useful as a biomarker for the precise diagnosis of sCJD.

  19. Surface Proteins of Gram-Positive Bacteria and Mechanisms of Their Targeting to the Cell Wall Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Navarre, William Wiley; Schneewind, Olaf

    1999-01-01

    The cell wall envelope of gram-positive bacteria is a macromolecular, exoskeletal organelle that is assembled and turned over at designated sites. The cell wall also functions as a surface organelle that allows gram-positive pathogens to interact with their environment, in particular the tissues of the infected host. All of these functions require that surface proteins and enzymes be properly targeted to the cell wall envelope. Two basic mechanisms, cell wall sorting and targeting, have been identified. Cell well sorting is the covalent attachment of surface proteins to the peptidoglycan via a C-terminal sorting signal that contains a consensus LPXTG sequence. More than 100 proteins that possess cell wall-sorting signals, including the M proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes, protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and several internalins of Listeria monocytogenes, have been identified. Cell wall targeting involves the noncovalent attachment of proteins to the cell surface via specialized binding domains. Several of these wall-binding domains appear to interact with secondary wall polymers that are associated with the peptidoglycan, for example teichoic acids and polysaccharides. Proteins that are targeted to the cell surface include muralytic enzymes such as autolysins, lysostaphin, and phage lytic enzymes. Other examples for targeted proteins are the surface S-layer proteins of bacilli and clostridia, as well as virulence factors required for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes (internalin B) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PspA) infections. In this review we describe the mechanisms for both sorting and targeting of proteins to the envelope of gram-positive bacteria and review the functions of known surface proteins. PMID:10066836

  20. Quantitative evaluation of positive ϕ angle propensity in flexible regions of proteins from three-bond J couplings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ho; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2016-02-17

    (3)JHNHα and (3)JC'C' couplings can be readily measured in isotopically enriched proteins and were shown to contain precise information on the backbone torsion angles, ϕ, sampled in disordered regions of proteins. However, quantitative interpretation of these couplings required the population of conformers with positive ϕ angles to be very small. Here, we demonstrate that this restriction can be removed by measurement of (3)JC'Hα values. Even though the functional forms of the (3)JC'Hα and (3)JHNHα Karplus equations are the same, large differences in their coefficients enable accurate determination of the fraction of time that positive ϕ angles are sampled. A four-dimensional triple resonance HACANH[C'] E.COSY experiment is introduced to simultaneously measure (3)JC'Hα and (3)JHNC' in the typically very congested spectra of disordered proteins. High resolution in these spectra is obtained by non-uniform sampling (in the 0.1-0.5% range). Application to the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein shows that while most residues have close-to-zero positive ϕ angle populations, up to 16% positive ϕ population is observed for Asn residues. Positive ϕ angle populations determined with the new approach agree closely with consensus values from protein coil libraries and prior analysis of a large set of other NMR parameters. The combination of (3)JHNC' and (3)JC'C' provides information about the amplitude of ϕ angle dynamics.

  1. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil Lee, Zang Hee

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  2. Planes formed with four intron-positions in tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Michiko; Hirata, Katsuki; Tsuji, Ryotarou; Sunaba, Syunya

    2014-01-07

    Eukaryotic genes have intervening sequences, introns, in their coding regions. Since introns are spliced out from m-RNA before translation, they are considered to have no effect on the protein structure. Here, we report a novel relationship between introns and the tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI. We identified "intron-positions" as amino acid residues on which or just after which introns are found in their corresponding nucleotide sequences, and then found that four intron-positions form a plane. We also found that the four intron-positions of retinol-binding protein encloses its ligand retinol. The tertiary structure of calpain domain VI changes after Ca(2+) binding, and the four intron-positions form a plane that includes its ligand calpastatin. To evaluate the statistical significance of the planarity, we calculated the mean distance of each intron-position from the plane defined by the other three intron-positions, and showed that it is significantly smaller than the one calculated for randomly generated locations based on exon size distribution. On the basis of this finding, we discuss the evolution of retinol binding protein and the origin of introns.

  3. Physical activity, sleep, and C-reactive protein as markers of positive health in resilient older men.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alison J; Hoyt, Robert E; Linnville, Steven E; Moore, Jeffery L

    2016-09-01

    This study explored whether physical activity and sleep, combined with the biomarker C-reactive protein, indexed positive health in older men. Many were former prisoners of war, with most remaining psychologically resilient and free of any psychiatric diagnoses. Activity and sleep were recorded through actigraphy in 120 veterans (86 resilient and 34 nonresilient) for 7 days. Resilient men had higher physical activity, significantly lower C-reactive protein levels, and 53 percent had lower cardiac-disease risk compared to nonresilient men. Sleep was adequate and not associated with C-reactive protein. Results suggest continued study is needed in actigraphy and C-reactive protein as means to index positive health.

  4. Attenuating HIV Tat/TAR-mediated protein expression by exploring the side chain length of positively charged residues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Yi-Ping; Liu, Shing-Lung; Chien, Fan-Ching; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Cheng, Richard P

    2015-12-07

    RNA is a drug target involved in diverse cellular functions and viral processes. Molecules that inhibit the HIV TAR RNA-Tat protein interaction may attenuate Tat/TAR-dependent protein expression and potentially serve as anti-HIV therapeutics. By incorporating positively charged residues with mixed side chain lengths, we designed peptides that bind TAR RNA with enhanced intracellular activity. Tat-derived peptides that were individually substituted with positively charged residues with varying side chain lengths were evaluated for TAR RNA binding. Positively charged residues with different side chain lengths were incorporated at each Arg and Lys position in the Tat-derived peptide to enhance TAR RNA binding. The resulting peptides showed enhanced TAR RNA binding affinity, cellular uptake, nuclear localization, proteolytic resistance, and inhibition of intracellular Tat/TAR-dependent protein expression compared to the parent Tat-derived peptide with no cytotoxicity. Apparently, the enhanced inhibition of protein expression by these peptides was not determined by RNA binding affinity, but by proteolytic resistance. Despite the high TAR binding affinity, a higher binding specificity would be necessary for practical purposes. Importantly, altering the positively charged residue side chain length should be a viable strategy to generate potentially useful RNA-targeting bioactive molecules.

  5. The seirena B Class Floral Homeotic Mutant of California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) Reveals a Function of the Enigmatic PI Motif in the Formation of Specific Multimeric MADS Domain Protein Complexes[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Orashakova, Svetlana; Lange, Sabrina; Melzer, Rainer; Theißen, Günter; Smyth, David R.; Becker, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The products of B class floral homeotic genes specify petal and stamen identity, and loss of B function results in homeotic conversions of petals into sepals and stamens into carpels. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of seirena-1 (sei-1), a mutant from the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) that shows homeotic changes characteristic of floral homeotic B class mutants. SEI has been previously described as EScaGLO, one of four B class–related MADS box genes in California poppy. The C terminus of SEI, including the highly conserved PI motif, is truncated in sei-1 proteins. Nevertheless, like the wild-type SEI protein, the sei-1 mutant protein is able to bind CArG-boxes and can form homodimers, heterodimers, and several higher order complexes with other MADS domain proteins. However, unlike the wild type, the mutant protein is not able to mediate higher order complexes consisting of specific B, C, and putative E class related proteins likely involved in specifying stamen identity. Within the PI motif, five highly conserved N-terminal amino acids are specifically required for this interaction. Several families lack this short conserved sequence, including the Brassicaceae, and we propose an evolutionary scenario to explain these functional differences. PMID:23444328

  6. Positive anti‐cyclic citrullinated proteins and rheumatoid factor during active lung tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Elkayam, O; Segal, R; Lidgi, M; Caspi, D

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of anti‐cyclic citrullinated proteins (anti‐CCP) and IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) in sera of patients with TB compared with healthy controls. Patients and methods 47 consecutive patients with recently diagnosed active pulmonary TB and 39 healthy controls were studied. Data were collected by questionnaire on clinical features of the disease, duration of symptoms, fever, cough, arthralgia, myalgia, sicca symptoms. Serum samples were collected from patients before starting treatment for TB and frozen at −20°C. Anti‐CCP and IgM RF were evaluated by ELISA. Results The mean (SD) duration of TB related symptoms was 4.4 (1.7) months, 73% had fever, 94% a cough. Rheumatic symptoms were relatively rare: arthralgia (4%), myalgias (4%), eye and mouth dryness (2% and 9%, respectively). Mean (SD) levels of anti‐CCP were significantly increased in patients with TB compared with controls: 44.9 (51) IU v 20 (7.3) IU (p = 0.002). Serum levels >40 U were found in 15/47 (32%) patients compared with 1/39 (2.6%) controls (p = 0.002). Mean (SD) serum levels of IgM RF were significantly increased in patients with TB: 17.8 (19) v 4.3 (5) (p<0.0001). IgM RF was positive (>6 IU) in 29/47 (62%) patients v 1/39 (2.6%) controls (p<0.0001). Conclusions A significant proportion of patients with active TB have an increased titre of anti‐CCP and IgM RF. PMID:16361276

  7. Polycomb group proteins are required to couple seed coat initiation to fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Roszak, Pawel; Köhler, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Seed development in flowering plants is initiated after a double fertilization event leading to the formation of zygotic embryo and endosperm tissues surrounded by the maternally derived seed coat. Although the seed coat does not take part in the fertilization process it develops immediately after fertilization, implicating a signaling mechanism from zygotic tissues to the surrounding maternal tissues. We addressed the question of the underlying mechanisms repressing seed coat development before fertilization and initiating seed coat development after fertilization by analyzing combinations of mutants that initiate seed development in the absence of fertilization. We discovered that seed coat development is actively repressed before fertilization by dosage-sensitive Polycomb group proteins acting in maternal tissues surrounding the female gametophyte. This repression is relieved after fertilization by a signal that is formed by the sexual endosperm. Fertilization is required for signal formation, as asexually formed endosperm fails to effectively initiate seed coat development in mutants with uncompromised maternal Polycomb group function. Mutants for the MADS-box transcription factor AGL62 initiate embryo and endosperm formation but fail to develop a seed coat, implicating AGL62 expression in the endosperm as a requirement for signal initiation. Together, our results provide evidence that fertilization of the central cell generates a signal that relieves Polycomb group-mediated repression in the surrounding maternal tissues to initiate seed coat formation. PMID:22143805

  8. Surface Proteins of Gram-Positive Pathogens: Using Crystallography to Uncover Novel Features in Drug and Vaccine Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward N.; Proft, Thomas; Kang, Haejoo

    Proteins displayed on the cell surfaces of pathogenic organisms are the front-line troops of bacterial attack, playing critical roles in colonization, infection and virulence. Although such proteins can often be recognized from genome sequence data, through characteristic sequence motifs, their functions are often unknown. One such group of surface proteins is attached to the cell surface of Gram-positive pathogens through the action of sortase enzymes. Some of these proteins are now known to form pili: long filamentous structures that mediate attachment to human cells. Crystallographic analyses of these and other cell surface proteins have uncovered novel features in their structure, assembly and stability, including the presence of inter- and intramolecular isopeptide crosslinks. This improved understanding of structures on the bacterial cell surface offers opportunities for the development of some new drug targets and for novel approaches to vaccine design.

  9. The transcriptional integrator CREB-binding protein mediates positive cross talk between nuclear hormone receptors and the hematopoietic bZip protein p45/NF-E2.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, X; Reginato, M J; Andrews, N C; Lazar, M A

    1997-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) and retinoic acid (RA) play important roles in erythropoiesis. We found that the hematopoietic cell-specific bZip protein p45/NF-E2 interacts with T3 receptor (TR) and RA receptor (RAR) but not retinoid X receptor. The interaction is between the DNA-binding domain of the nuclear receptor and the leucine zipper region of p45/NF-E2 but is markedly enhanced by cognate ligand. Remarkably, ligand-dependent transactivation by TR and RAR is markedly potentiated by p45/NF-E2. This effect of p45/NF-E2 is prevented by maf-like protein p18, which functions positively as a heterodimer with p45/NF-E2 on DNA. Potentiation of hormone action by p45/NF-E2 requires its activation domain, which interacts strongly with the multifaceted coactivator cyclic AMP response element protein-binding protein (CBP). The region of CBP which interacts with p45/NF-E2 is the same interaction domain that mediates inhibition of hormone-stimulated transcription by AP1 transcription factors. Overexpression of the bZip interaction domain of CBP specifically abolishes the positive cross talk between TR and p45/NF-E2. Thus, positive cross talk between p45/NF-E2 and nuclear hormone receptors requires direct protein-protein interactions between these factors and with CBP, whose integration of positive signals from two transactivation domains provides a novel mechanism for potentiation of hormone action in hematopoietic cells. PMID:9032267

  10. The protein phosphatase 2A functions in the spindle position checkpoint by regulating the checkpoint kinase Kin4

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leon Y.; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    In budding yeast, a surveillance mechanism known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) ensures accurate genome partitioning. In the event of spindle misposition, the checkpoint delays exit from mitosis by restraining the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN). To date, the only component of the checkpoint to be identified is the protein kinase Kin4. Furthermore, how the kinase is regulated by spindle position is not known. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with the regulatory subunit Rts1 as a component of the SPOC. Loss of PP2A-Rts1 function abrogates the SPOC but not other mitotic checkpoints. We further show that the protein phosphatase functions upstream of Kin4, regulating the kinase's phosphorylation and localization during an unperturbed cell cycle and during SPOC activation, thus defining the phosphatase as a key regulator of SPOC function. PMID:19605686

  11. The protein phosphatase 2A functions in the spindle position checkpoint by regulating the checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leon Y; Amon, Angelika

    2009-07-15

    In budding yeast, a surveillance mechanism known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) ensures accurate genome partitioning. In the event of spindle misposition, the checkpoint delays exit from mitosis by restraining the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN). To date, the only component of the checkpoint to be identified is the protein kinase Kin4. Furthermore, how the kinase is regulated by spindle position is not known. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with the regulatory subunit Rts1 as a component of the SPOC. Loss of PP2A-Rts1 function abrogates the SPOC but not other mitotic checkpoints. We further show that the protein phosphatase functions upstream of Kin4, regulating the kinase's phosphorylation and localization during an unperturbed cell cycle and during SPOC activation, thus defining the phosphatase as a key regulator of SPOC function.

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β positively regulates protein synthesis and cell proliferation through the regulation of translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Shin, S; Wolgamott, L; Tcherkezian, J; Vallabhapurapu, S; Yu, Y; Roux, P P; Yoon, S-O

    2014-03-27

    Protein synthesis has a key role in the control of cell proliferation, and its deregulation is associated with pathological conditions, notably cancer. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), was known to inhibit protein synthesis. However, it does not substantially inhibit protein synthesis and cell proliferation in many cancer types. We were interested in finding a novel target in rapamycin-resistant cancer. The rate-limiting factor for translation is eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), which is negatively regulated by eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). Here, we provide evidence that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β promotes cell proliferation through positive regulation of protein synthesis. We found that GSK-3β phosphorylates and inactivates 4E-BP1, thereby increasing eIF4E-dependent protein synthesis. Considering the clinical relevance of pathways regulating protein synthesis, our study provides a promising new strategy and target for cancer therapy.

  13. Expression of Slug in S100β-protein-positive cells of postnatal developing rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Yako, Hideji; Tateno, Kozue; Hasegawa, Rumi; Takigami, Shu; Ohsako, Shunji; Yashiro, Takashi; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    Among heterogeneous S100β-protein-positive (S100β-positive) cells, star-like cells with extended cytoplasmic processes, the so-called folliculo-stellate cells, envelop hormone-producing cells or interconnect homophilically in the anterior pituitary. S100β-positive cells are known, from immunohistochemistry, to emerge from postnatal day (P) 10 and to proliferate and migrate in the parenchyma of the anterior pituitary with growth. Recent establishment of S100β-GFP transgenic rats expressing specifically green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the S100β-promoter has allowed us to observe living S100β-positive cells. In the present study, we first confirmed that living S100β-positive cells in tissue cultures of S100β-GFP rat pituitary at P5 were present prior to P10 by means of confocal laser microscopy and that they proliferated and extended their cytoplasmic processes. Second, we examined the expression of the Snail-family zinc-finger transcription factors, Snail and Slug, to investigate the mechanism behind the morphological changes and the proliferation of S100β-positive cells. Interestingly, we detected Slug expression in S100β-positive cells and its increase together with development in the anterior pituitary. To analyze downstream of SLUG in S100β-positive cells, we utilized specific small interfering RNA for Slug mRNAs and observed that the expression of matrix metalloprotease (Mmp) 9, Mmp14 and chemokine Cxcl12 was down-regulated and that morphological changes and proliferation were decreased. Thus, our findings suggest that S100β-positive cells express Slug and that its expression is important for subsequent migration and proliferation.

  14. Positional effects of fusion partners on the yield and solubility of MBP fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Keefe, Karina; Waugh, David S

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) is exceptionally effective at promoting the solubility of its fusion partners. However, there are conflicting reports in the literature claiming that (1) MBP is an effective solubility enhancer only when it is joined to the N-terminus of an aggregation-prone passenger protein, and (2) MBP is equally effective when fused to either end of the passenger. Here, we endeavor to resolve this controversy by comparing the solubility of a diverse set of MBP fusion proteins that, unlike those analyzed in previous studies, are identical in every way except for the order of the two domains. The results indicate that fusion proteins with an N-terminal MBP provide an excellent solubility advantage along with more robust expression when compared to analogous fusions in which MBP is the C-terminal fusion partner. We find that only intrinsically soluble passenger proteins (i.e., those not requiring a solubility enhancer) are produced as soluble fusions when they precede MBP. We also report that even subtle differences in inter-domain linker sequences can influence the solubility of fusion proteins.

  15. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) regulate intracellular positioning of mitochondria in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Rajapakshe, Anupama R; Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A; Terasawa, Kazue; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Namba, Toshimitsu; Kumei, Yasuhiro; Yanagishita, Masaki; Hara-Yokoyama, Miki

    2015-02-01

    The intracellular positioning of both lysosomes and mitochondria meets the requirements of degradation and energy supply, which are respectively the two major functions for cellular maintenance. The positioning of both lysosomes and mitochondria is apparently affected by the nutrient status of the cells. However, the mechanism coordinating the positioning of the organelles has not been sufficiently elucidated. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins-1 and -2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are highly glycosylated proteins that are abundant in lysosomal membranes. In the present study, we demonstrated that the siRNA-mediated downregulation of LAMP-1, LAMP-2 or their combination enhanced the perinuclear localization of mitochondria, in the pre-osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. On the other hand, in the osteocytic cell line MLO-Y4, in which both the lysosomes and mitochondria originally accumulate in the perinuclear region and mitochondria also fill dendrites, the effect of siRNA of LAMP-1 or LAMP-2 was barely observed. LAMPs are not directly associated with mitochondria, and there do not seem to be any accessory molecules commonly required to recruit the motor proteins to lysosomes and mitochondria. Our results suggest that LAMPs may regulate the positioning of lysosomes and mitochondria. A possible mechanism involving the indirect and context-dependent action of LAMPs is discussed.

  16. Versatile protein-based bifunctional nano-systems (encapsulation and directed assembly): Selective nanoscale positioning of gold nanoparticle-viral protein hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Fukuta, Megumi; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Gamo, Kentaro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Yamashita, Ichiro; Watanabe, Heiji

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a selective nanoscale positioning of targeted Au nanoparticles (NPs) through a bifunctional protein-based encapsulation/delivery system. The newly designed recombinant bifunctional protein, appended with both gold-binding peptide (GBP) and Ti/Si-binding peptide (TBP) at the C- and N-termini efficiently encapsulated 15-20 nm-diameter Au NPs during the pH-controlled reversible reassembly process, and showed the ability of the internalized Au NPs in selective binding to nanometer-scale Ti islands without overshooting. This highly controlled placement of the Au NPs on substrates can be employed to make both large scale devices and point-contact devices.

  17. Evaluation of Non-Structural Protein-1(NS1) positive patients of 2013 dengue outbreak in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Lutfullah, Ghosia; Ahmed, Jawad; Khan, Aftab; Ihsan, Hina; Ahmad, Jamshed

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Dengue infection is an arthropod borne disease caused by Dengue virus in humans. Dengue virus infection has more potential to produce severe form of the disease with more severe symptoms. Proper diagnosis of dengue fever is very important for its safe management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the non structural protein-1 (NS1) positive parameter for identification of dengue fever by using ELISA from 2013 dengue outbreak in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Methods: It was a cross sectional study conducted among 384 patients tested for dengue admitted to different hospitals of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa April to December 2013 with symptoms related to classical dengue fever. Written informed consent was taken from 100 NS1 positive diagnosed patients, and 3 to 5 ml blood sample was collected for confirmation through ELISA testing. ELISA test for dengue IgG and IgM was performed two time in order to confirm the dengue cases. Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 16. Result: The study performed on 100 NS1 positive samples of patients, admitted to hospitals with symptoms related to classical dengue fever, indicated that after performing the IgM and IgG capture ELISA test only 76 samples were actually found positive for dengue. The rest of the 24 samples were found negative for both IgM and IgG capture ELISAs. The study also revealed that 90.8 % patients had primary dengue infection and 35.5% patients had secondary dengue infection. Most patients were between the age of 10-20 years (26%), among them19.7% were having primary dengue infection. Among 10-20 years of age 50% female patients were false dengue patients. Conclusion: About 24 % NSI protein positive samples were found negative for both IgM and IgG capture ELISAs showed that NS1protein positivity does not confirm actual dengue infection. PMID:28367194

  18. Variations in Protein Concentration and Nitrogen Sources in Different Positions of Grain in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangnan; Zhou, Longjing; Liu, Fulai; Zhou, Qin; Cai, Jian; Wang, Xiao; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The distribution patterns of total protein and protein components in different layers of wheat grain were investigated using the pearling technique, and the sources of different protein components and pearling fractions were identified using 15N isotope tracing methods. It was found that N absorbed from jointing to anthesis (JA) and remobilized to the grain after anthesis was the principal source of grain N, especially in the outer layer. For albumin and globulin, the amount of N absorbed during different stages all showed a decreasing trend from the surface layer to the center part. Whereas, for globulin and glutenin, the N absorbed after anthesis accounted for the main part indicating that for storage protein, the utilization of N assimilated after anthesis is greater than that of the stored N assimilated before anthesis. It is concluded that manipulation of the N application rate during different growth stages could be an effective approach to modulate the distribution of protein fractions in pearled grains for specific end-uses. PMID:27446169

  19. Importance of mutant position in Ramachandran plot for predicting protein stability of surface mutations.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Oobatake, Motohisa; Kono, Hidetoshi; Uedaira, Hatsuho; Sarai, Akinori

    2002-08-05

    Understanding the mechanisms by which mutations affect protein stability is one of the most important problems in molecular biology. In this work, we analyzed the relationship between changes in protein stability caused by surface mutations and changes in 49 physicochemical, energetic, and conformational properties of amino acid residues. We found that the hydration entropy was the major contributor to the stability of surface mutations in helical segments; other properties responsible for size and volume of molecule also correlated significantly with stability. Classification of coil mutations based on their locations in the (phi-psi) map improved the correlation significantly, demonstrating the existence of a relationship between stability and strain energy, which indicates that the role of strain energy is very important for the stability of surface mutations. We observed that the inclusion of sequence and structural information raised the correlation, indicating the influence of surrounding residues on the stability of surface mutations. Further, we examined the previously reported "inverse relationship" between stability and hydrophobicity, and observed that the inverse hydrophobic effect was generally applicable only to coil mutations. The present study leads to a simple method for predicting protein stability changes caused by amino acid substitutions, which will be useful for protein engineering in designing novel proteins with increased stability and altered function.

  20. The excision proteins of CTnDOT positively regulate the transfer operon.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Carolyn M; Park, Jiyeon; Wang, Gui-Rong; Hopp, Crystal M; Shoemaker, Nadja B; Gardner, Jeffrey F; Salyers, Abigail A

    2013-03-01

    The Bacteroides conjugative transposon, CTnDOT, is an integrated conjugative element (ICE), found in many human colonic Bacteroides spp. strains. It has a complex regulatory system for both excision from the chromosome and transfer and mobilization into a new host. It was previously shown that a cloned DNA segment encoding the xis2c, xis2d, orf3, and exc genes was required for tetracycline dependent activation of the P(tra) promoter. The Xis2c and Xis2d proteins are required for excision while the Exc protein stimulates excision. We report here that neither the Orf3 nor the Exc proteins are involved in activation of the P(tra) promoter. Deletion analysis and electromobility shift assays showed that the Xis2c and Xis2d proteins bind to the P(tra) promoter to activate the tra operon. Thus, the recombination directionality factors of CTnDOT excision also function as activator proteins of the P(tra) promoter.

  1. MYB98 positively regulates a battery of synergid-expressed genes encoding filiform apparatus localized proteins.

    PubMed

    Punwani, Jayson A; Rabiger, David S; Drews, Gary N

    2007-08-01

    The synergid cells within the female gametophyte are essential for reproduction in angiosperms. MYB98 encodes an R2R3-MYB protein required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation by the synergid cells. To test the predicted function of MYB98 as a transcriptional regulator, we determined its subcellular localization and examined its DNA binding properties. We show that MYB98 binds to a specific DNA sequence (TAAC) and that a MYB98-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to the nucleus, consistent with a role in transcriptional regulation. To identify genes regulated by MYB98, we tested previously identified synergid-expressed genes for reduced expression in myb98 female gametophytes and identified 16 such genes. We dissected the promoter of one of the downstream genes, DD11, and show that it contains a MYB98 binding site required for synergid expression, suggesting that DD11 is regulated directly by MYB98. To gain insight into the functions of the downstream genes, we chose five genes and determined the subcellular localization of the encoded proteins. We show that these five proteins are secreted into the filiform apparatus, suggesting that they play a role in either the formation or the function of this unique structure. Together, these data suggest that MYB98 functions as a transcriptional regulator in the synergid cells and activates the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation.

  2. The TRANSPARENT TESTA16 Locus Encodes the ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER MADS Domain Protein and Is Required for Proper Development and Pigmentation of the Seed Coat

    PubMed Central

    Nesi, Nathalie; Debeaujon, Isabelle; Jond, Clarisse; Stewart, Amanda J.; Jenkins, Gareth I.; Caboche, Michel; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2002-01-01

    Screening for seed pigmentation phenotypes in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of three allelic yellow-seeded mutants, which defined the novel TRANSPARENT TESTA16 (TT16) locus. Cloning of TT16 was performed by T-DNA tagging and confirmed by genetic complementation and sequencing of two mutant alleles. TT16 encodes the ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS) MADS domain protein. ABS belongs to the recently identified “B-sister” (BS) clade, which contains genes of unknown function that are expressed mainly in female organs. Phylogenetic analyses using a maximum parsimony approach confirmed that TT16/ABS and related proteins form a monophyletic group. TT16/ABS was expressed mainly in the ovule, as are the other members of the BS clade. TT16/ABS is necessary for BANYULS expression and proanthocyanidin accumulation in the endothelium of the seed coat, with the exception of the chalazal-micropylar area. In addition, mutant phenotype and ectopic expression analyses suggested that TT16/ABS also is involved in the specification of endothelial cells. Nevertheless, TT16/ABS apparently is not required for proper ovule function. We report the functional characterization of a member of the BS MADS box gene subfamily, demonstrating its involvement in endothelial cell specification as well as in the increasingly complex genetic control of flavonoid biosynthesis in the Arabidopsis seed coat. PMID:12368498

  3. MADS-box genes reveal that gnetophytes are more closely related to conifers than to flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Kai-Uwe; Becker, Annette; Münster, Thomas; Kim, Jan T.; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    1999-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of the angiosperms (flowering plants sensu stricto) is still enigmatic. Answers to the question of angiosperm origins are intimately connected to the identification of their sister group among extinct and extant taxa. Most phylogenetic analyses based on morphological data agree that among the groups of extant seed plants, the gnetophytes are the sister group of the angiosperms. According to this view, angiosperms and gnetophytes are the only extant members of a clade called “anthophytes” to emphasize their shared possession of flower-like reproductive structures. However, most phylogeny reconstructions based on molecular data so far did not support an anthophyte clade, but also could not clarify the case because support for alternative groupings has been weak or controversial. We have isolated 13 different homologs of MADS-type floral homeotic genes from the gnetophyte Gnetum gnemon. Five of these genes fall into monophyletic gene clades also comprising putatively orthologous genes from flowering plants and conifers, among them orthologs of floral homeotic B and C function genes. Within these clades the Gnetum genes always form distinct subclades together with the respective conifer genes, to the exclusion of the angiosperm genes. This provides strong molecular evidence for a sister-group relationship between gnetophytes and conifers, which is in contradiction to widely accepted interpretations of morphological data for almost a century. Our phylogeny reconstructions and the outcome of expression studies suggest that complex features such as flower-like reproductive structures and double-fertilization arose independently in gnetophytes and angiosperms. PMID:10377416

  4. S100 protein positive dendritic cells in primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic inflammatory liver diseases. Relevance to pathogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. J.; Sever, C.; Kakizoe, S.; Oguma, S.; Starzl, T. E.; Jaffe, R.

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine the location of dendritic cells, in chronic inflammatory liver disease was performed. S100 protein positivity and dendritic cytoplasmic morphology were used to identify dendritic cells. S100 protein positive dendritic cells (S100 + DC) were found inside the basement membrane between biliary epithelial cells of septal bile ducts of livers affected by early stage PBC, but were not present at later stages. S100 + DC also were seen in areas of piecemeal necrosis in chronic active hepatitis of various etiologies. In contrast, intra-epithelial S100 + DC were not found with any consistency in sclerosing cholangitis, secondary biliary cirrhosis, extrahepatic biliary atresia, or chronic liver allograft rejection, all of which are characterized by inflammatory bile duct damage. The possible relevance of DC in the pathogenesis of PBC is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2705505

  5. Disclosing early steps of protein-primed genome replication of the Gram-positive tectivirus Bam35

    PubMed Central

    Berjón-Otero, Mónica; Villar, Laurentino; Salas, Margarita; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto

    2016-01-01

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in a number of linear genomes of viruses, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism, a so-called terminal protein (TP) primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Bam35 belongs to a group of temperate tectiviruses infecting Gram-positive bacteria, predicted to replicate their genomes by a protein-primed mechanism. Here, we characterize Bam35 replication as an alternative model of protein-priming DNA replication. First, we analyze the role of the protein encoded by the ORF4 as the TP and characterize the replication mechanism of the viral genome (TP-DNA). Indeed, full-length Bam35 TP-DNA can be replicated using only the viral TP and DNA polymerase. We also show that DNA replication priming entails the TP deoxythymidylation at conserved tyrosine 194 and that this reaction is directed by the third base of the template strand. We have also identified the TP tyrosine 172 as an essential residue for the interaction with the viral DNA polymerase. Furthermore, the genetic information of the first nucleotides of the genome can be recovered by a novel single-nucleotide jumping-back mechanism. Given the similarities between genome inverted terminal repeats and the genes encoding the replication proteins, we propose that related tectivirus genomes can be replicated by a similar mechanism. PMID:27466389

  6. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10) are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR) gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection) hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω) >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive selection code for amino acid

  7. TRIM52: A nuclear TRIM protein that positively regulates the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenchun; Liu, Tingting; Li, Xiangmin; Zhou, Yun; Wu, Mengge; Cui, Xiaofang; Chen, Huanchun; Qian, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that TRIM family proteins play a crucial role in regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway. TRIM52 is a novel noncanonical antiviral TRIM gene with a unique expanded RING domain. Information on the biological function of TRIM52 is limited. Herein, we demonstrated TRIM52 involvement in NF-κB activation. We found that TRIM52 overexpression specifically activated the NF-κB signal. TRIM52 overexpression can significantly induce TNFα and IL-6 expression. We also found that the RING domain of TRIM52 was essential for its activation of the NF-κB signal. Further study showed that TRIM52 overexpression did not affect the protein level of IκBα and phosphorylated p65 protein. We found that the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 could induce TRIM52 expression. Overall, these data suggested that TRIM52 was a positive regulator of the NF-κB pathway.

  8. Identification of a Novel Slow-Muscle-Fiber Enhancer Binding Protein, MusTRD1

    PubMed Central

    O’Mahoney, John V.; Guven, Kim L.; Lin, Jia; Joya, Josephine E.; Robinson, C. Stephen; Wade, Robert P.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms which are responsible for restricting skeletal muscle gene expression to specific fiber types, either slow or fast twitch, are unknown. As a first step toward defining the components which direct slow-fiber-specific gene expression, we identified the sequence elements of the human troponin I slow upstream enhancer (USE) that bind muscle nuclear proteins. These include an E-box, a MEF2 element, and two other elements, USE B1 and USE C1. In vivo analysis of a mutation that disrupts USE B1 binding activity suggested that the USE B1 element is essential for high-level expression in slow-twitch muscles. This mutation does not, however, abolish slow-fiber specificity. A similar analysis indicated that the USE C1 element may play only a minor role. We report the cloning of a novel human USE B1 binding protein, MusTRD1 (muscle TFII-I repeat domain-containing protein 1), which is expressed predominantly in skeletal muscle. Significantly, MusTRD1 contains two repeat domains which show remarkable homology to the six repeat domains of the recently cloned transcription factor TFII-I. Furthermore, both TFII-I and MusTRD1 bind to similar but distinct sequences, which happen to conform with the initiator (Inr) consensus sequence. Given the roles of MEF2 and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins in muscle gene expression, the similarity of TFII-I and MusTRD1 is intriguing, as TFII-I is believed to coordinate the interaction of MADS-box proteins, bHLH proteins, and the general transcription machinery. PMID:9774679

  9. Positive selection on the Plasmodium falciparum clag2 gene encoding a component of the erythrocyte-binding rhoptry protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Jean SF; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Yahata, Kazuhide; Nakazawa, Shusuke; Kaneko, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    A protein complex of high-molecular-mass proteins (PfRhopH) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum induces host protective immunity and therefore is a candidate for vaccine development. Clarification of the level of polymorphism and the evolutionary processes is important both for vaccine design and for a better understanding of the evolution of cell invasion in this parasite. In a previous study on 5 genes encoding RhopH1/Clag proteins, positive diversifying selection was detected in clag8 and clag9 but not in the paralogous clag2, clag3.1 and clag3.2. In this study, to extend the analysis of clag polymorphism, we obtained sequences surrounding the most polymorphic regions of clag2, clag8, and clag9 from parasites collected in Thailand. Using sequence data obtained newly in this study and reported previously, we classified clag2 sequences into 5 groups based on the similarity of the deduced amino acid sequences and number of insertions/deletions. By the sliding window method, an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions over synonymous substitutions was detected in the group 1 and group 2 clag2 and clag8 sequences. Population-based analyses also detected a significant departure from the neutral expectation for group 1 clag2 and clag8. Thus, two independent approaches suggest that clag2 is subject to a positive diversifying selection. The previously suggested positive selection on clag8 was also supported by population-based analyses. However, the positive selection on clag9, which was detected by comparing the 5 sequences, was not detected using the additional 34 sequences obtained in this study. PMID:22028613

  10. Parameters affecting the transscleral delivery of two positively charged proteins of comparable size.

    PubMed

    Grimaudo, Maria Aurora; Tratta, Elena; Pescina, Silvia; Padula, Cristina; Santi, Patrizia; Nicoli, Sara

    2017-02-20

    Apart from molecular weight and net surface charge, there are other macromolecule-related factors that could, in principle, influence their diffusion across biological tissues, such as shape, conformability, water solubility and surface charge distribution. Lysozyme and cytochrome c, proteins with comparable molecular weight, isoelectric point and net surface charge in physiological conditions (approx. +7.8), are suitable model compounds for comparative studies, in particular to find out if other properties can have a role in the permeation across the sclera. The comparison between lysozyme and cytochrome c permeability was conducted by studying the permeation across the sclera and the choroid-Bruch's membrane and the diffusion across a hyaluronan gel-matrix. Melanin binding tests and the measurement of the electroosmosis flow during transscleral iontophoresis allowed for the evaluation of macromolecules affinity for the ocular tissues. Finally, anodal iontophoresis was applied to further confirm the interaction of the two proteins with the sclera. The data here collected show that two proteins with very similar MW, p Ka and charge can display very different diffusion properties across biological barriers. In particular, these differences can be attributed to a different interaction with specific components of ocular tissues: while the interaction with melanin and collagen fibers is apparently the same for the two molecules, a relevant difference was found in case of hyaluronic acid. Considering also literature evidences, the important parameters that can be responsible for this different affinity are molecular shape (spherical for cytochrome c vs prolate for lysozyme) and a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that depends on the surface charge distribution. The interactions between sclera components and lysozyme are relatively strong and were not altered by the application of electric current.

  11. Rewiring mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade by positive feedback confers potato blight resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamizo, Chihiro; Kuchimura, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Akira; Katou, Shinpei; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Jones, Jonathan D G; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2006-02-01

    Late blight, caused by the notorious pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and during the 1840s caused the Irish potato famine and over one million fatalities. Currently, grown potato cultivars lack adequate blight tolerance. Earlier cultivars bred for resistance used disease resistance genes that confer immunity only to some strains of the pathogen harboring corresponding avirulence gene. Specific resistance gene-mediated immunity and chemical controls are rapidly overcome in the field when new pathogen races arise through mutation, recombination, or migration from elsewhere. A mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a pivotal role in plant innate immunity. Here we show that the transgenic potato plants that carry a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase driven by a pathogen-inducible promoter of potato showed high resistance to early blight pathogen Alternaria solani as well as P. infestans. The pathogen attack provoked defense-related MAPK activation followed by induction of NADPH oxidase gene expression, which is implicated in reactive oxygen species production, and resulted in hypersensitive response-like phenotype. We propose that enhancing disease resistance through altered regulation of plant defense mechanisms should be more durable and publicly acceptable than engineering overexpression of antimicrobial proteins.

  12. Positive and negative regulation of antigen receptor signaling by the Shc family of protein adapters.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Savino, Maria Teresa; Baldari, Cosima T

    2009-11-01

    The Shc adapter family includes four members that are expressed as multiple isoforms and participate in signaling by a variety of cell-surface receptors. The biological relevance of Shc proteins as well as their variegated function, which relies on their highly conserved modular structure, is underscored by the distinct and dramatic phenotypic alterations resulting from deletion of individual Shc isoforms both in the mouse and in two model organisms, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. The p52 isoform of ShcA couples antigen and cytokine receptors to Ras activation in both lymphoid and myeloid cells. However, the recognition of the spectrum of activities of p52ShcA in the immune system has been steadily expanding in recent years to other fundamental processes both at the cell and organism levels. Two other Shc family members, p66ShcA and p52ShcC/Rai, have been identified recently in T and B lymphocytes, where they antagonize survival and attenuate antigen receptor signaling. These developments reveal an unexpected and complex interplay of multiple Shc proteins in lymphocytes.

  13. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lei; He, Chongsheng; Shen, Wen-Hui; Jin, Hong; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF), a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN). This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs), including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs. PMID:26760036

  14. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Chunmei; Cheng, Jingfei; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lei; He, Chongsheng; Shen, Wen-Hui; Jin, Hong; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF), a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN). This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs), including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  15. The relationship between the hierarchical position of proteins in the human signal transduction network and their rate of evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins evolve at disparate rates, as a result of the action of different types and strengths of evolutionary forces. An open question in evolutionary biology is what factors are responsible for this variability. In general, proteins whose function has a great impact on organisms’ fitness are expected to evolve under stronger selective pressures. In biosynthetic pathways, upstream genes usually evolve under higher levels of selective constraint than those acting at the downstream part, as a result of their higher hierarchical position. Similar observations have been made in transcriptional regulatory networks, whose upstream elements appear to be more essential and subject to selection. Less well understood is, however, how selective pressures distribute along signal transduction pathways. Results Here, I combine comparative genomics and directed protein interaction data to study the distribution of evolutionary forces across the human signal transduction network. Surprisingly, no evidence was found for higher levels of selective constraint at the upstream network genes (those occupying more hierarchical positions). On the contrary, purifying selection was found to act more strongly on genes acting at the downstream part of the network, which seems to be due to downstream genes being more highly and broadly expressed, performing certain functions and, in particular, encoding proteins that are more highly connected in the protein–protein interaction network. When the effect of these confounding factors is discounted, upstream and downstream genes evolve at similar rates. The trends found in the overall signaling network are exemplified by analysis of the distribution of purifying selection along the mammalian Ras signaling pathway, showing that upstream and downstream genes evolve at similar rates. Conclusions These results indicate that the upstream/downstream position of proteins in the signal transduction network has, in general, no direct effect

  16. DPDR-CPI, a server that predicts Drug Positioning and Drug Repositioning via Chemical-Protein Interactome.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Zhang, Ping; Cao, Xi Hang; Du, Dizheng; Ye, Hao; Huang, Hui; Li, Can; Qin, Shengying; Wan, Chunling; Shi, Leming; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2016-11-02

    The cost of developing a new drug has increased sharply over the past years. To ensure a reasonable return-on-investment, it is useful for drug discovery researchers in both industry and academia to identify all the possible indications for early pipeline molecules. For the first time, we propose the term computational "drug candidate positioning" or "drug positioning", to describe the above process. It is distinct from drug repositioning, which identifies new uses for existing drugs and maximizes their value. Since many therapeutic effects are mediated by unexpected drug-protein interactions, it is reasonable to analyze the chemical-protein interactome (CPI) profiles to predict indications. Here we introduce the server DPDR-CPI, which can make real-time predictions based only on the structure of the small molecule. When a user submits a molecule, the server will dock it across 611 human proteins, generating a CPI profile of features that can be used for predictions. It can suggest the likelihood of relevance of the input molecule towards ~1,000 human diseases with top predictions listed. DPDR-CPI achieved an overall AUROC of 0.78 during 10-fold cross-validations and AUROC of 0.76 for the independent validation. The server is freely accessible via http://cpi.bio-x.cn/dpdr/.

  17. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport.

  18. Advancing the prediction accuracy of protein-protein interactions by utilizing evolutionary information from position-specific scoring matrix and ensemble classifier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; You, Zhu-Hong; Xia, Shi-Xiong; Liu, Feng; Chen, Xing; Yan, Xin; Zhou, Yong

    2017-04-07

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are essential to most biological processes and play a critical role in most cellular functions. With the development of high-throughput biological techniques and in silico methods, a large number of PPI data have been generated for various organisms, but many problems remain unsolved. These factors promoted the development of the in silico methods based on machine learning to predict PPIs. In this study, we propose a novel method by combining ensemble Rotation Forest (RF) classifier and Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) algorithm to predict the interactions among proteins. Specifically, the protein amino acids sequence is transformed into Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) containing biological evolution information, and then the feature vector is extracted to present protein evolutionary information using DCT algorithm; finally, the ensemble rotation forest model is used to predict whether a given protein pair is interacting or not. When performed on Yeast and H. pylori data sets, the proposed method achieved excellent results with an average accuracy of 98.54% and 88.27%. In addition, we achieved good prediction accuracy of 98.08%, 92.75%, 98.87% and 98.72% on independent data sets (C.elegans, E.coli, H.sapiens and M.musculus). In order to further evaluate the performance of our method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and get good results. As a web server, the source code and Yeast data sets used in this article are freely available at http://202.119.201.126:8888/DCTRF/.

  19. Specific Marking of HIV-1 Positive Cells using a Rev-dependent Lentiviral Vector Expressing the Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuntao

    2010-01-01

    Most of HIV-responsive expression vectors are based on the HIV promoter, the long terminal repeat (LTR). While responsive to an early HIV protein, Tat, the LTR is also responsive to cellular activation states and to the local chromatin activity where the integration has occurred. This can result in high HIV-independent activity, and has restricted the usefulness of LTR-based reporter to mark HIV positive cells 1,2,3. Here, we constructed an expression lentiviral vector that possesses, in addition to the Tat-responsive LTR, numerous HIV DNA sequences that include the Rev-response element and HIV splicing sites 4,5,6. The vector was incorporated into a lentiviral reporter virus, permitting highly specific detection of replicating HIV in living cell populations. The activity of the vector was measured by expression of the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The application of this vector as reported here offers a novel alternative approach to existing methods, such as in situ PCR or HIV antigen staining, to identify HIV-positive cells. The vector can also express therapeutic genes for basic or clinical experimentation to target HIV-positive cells. PMID:20972394

  20. Structure–function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ

    PubMed Central

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L.; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure–function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division. PMID:27346279

  1. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L.; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M.; Vannieuwenhze, Michael S.; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure-function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division.

  2. Strong and widespread action of site-specific positive selection in the snake venom Kunitz/BPTI protein family

    PubMed Central

    Župunski, Vera; Kordiš, Dušan

    2016-01-01

    S1 family of serine peptidases is the largest family of peptidases. They are specifically inhibited by the Kunitz/BPTI inhibitors. Kunitz domain is characterized by the compact 3D structure with the most important inhibitory loops for the inhibition of S1 peptidases. In the present study we analysed the action of site-specific positive selection and its impact on the structurally and functionally important parts of the snake venom Kunitz/BPTI family of proteins. By using numerous models we demonstrated the presence of large numbers of site-specific positively selected sites that can reach between 30–50% of the Kunitz domain. The mapping of the positively selected sites on the 3D model of Kunitz/BPTI inhibitors has shown that these sites are located in the inhibitory loops 1 and 2, but also in the Kunitz scaffold. Amino acid replacements have been found exclusively on the surface, and the vast majority of replacements are causing the change of the charge. The consequence of these replacements is the change in the electrostatic potential on the surface of the Kunitz/BPTI proteins that may play an important role in the precise targeting of these inhibitors into the active site of S1 family of serine peptidases. PMID:27841308

  3. Mry, a trans-acting positive regulator of the M protein gene of Streptococcus pyogenes with similarity to the receptor proteins of two-component regulatory systems.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Casal, J; Caparon, M G; Scott, J R

    1991-01-01

    In the Streptococcus pyogenes M6 strain D471, an insertion of the conjugative transposon Tn916 into a region 2 kb upstream of the promoter of emm6 (the structural gene for the M protein) rendered the strain M negative (M. G. Caparon and J. R. Scott, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:8677-8681, 1987). In the present work, we show that this insertion mutation, mry-1, is 244 bp upstream of an open reading frame encoding a protein we call Mry. This protein is visible on a gel after transcription and translation in vitro. We have developed a technique for complementation analysis in S. pyogenes and have used it to show that the wild-type mry gene is dominant to two mutant alleles. This dominance indicates that Mry acts in trans as a positive regulator of the emm6 gene. The translated DNA sequence of mry has two regions of similarity to the motif common to the receptor protein of two-component regulatory systems. In addition, the N terminus of Mry has two regions resembling a helix-turn-helix motif. Mry does not appear to be a global regulator of virulence determinants in the group A streptococcus because there is no effect of the mry-1 mutation on production of the hyaluronic acid capsule or streptokinase. Images PMID:1849511

  4. Estimation of Position Specific Energy as a Feature of Protein Residues from Sequence Alone for Structural Classification

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2016-01-01

    A set of features computed from the primary amino acid sequence of proteins, is crucial in the process of inducing a machine learning model that is capable of accurately predicting three-dimensional protein structures. Solutions for existing protein structure prediction problems are in need of features that can capture the complexity of molecular level interactions. With a view to this, we propose a novel approach to estimate position specific estimated energy (PSEE) of a residue using contact energy and predicted relative solvent accessibility (RSA). Furthermore, we demonstrate PSEE can be reasonably estimated based on sequence information alone. PSEE is useful in identifying the structured as well as unstructured or, intrinsically disordered region of a protein by computing favorable and unfavorable energy respectively, characterized by appropriate threshold. The most intriguing finding, verified empirically, is the indication that the PSEE feature can effectively classify disorder versus ordered residues and can segregate different secondary structure type residues by computing the constituent energies. PSEE values for each amino acid strongly correlate with the hydrophobicity value of the corresponding amino acid. Further, PSEE can be used to detect the existence of critical binding regions that essentially undergo disorder-to-order transitions to perform crucial biological functions. Towards an application of disorder prediction using the PSEE feature, we have rigorously tested and found that a support vector machine model informed by a set of features including PSEE consistently outperforms a model with an identical set of features with PSEE removed. In addition, the new disorder predictor, DisPredict2, shows competitive performance in predicting protein disorder when compared with six existing disordered protein predictors. PMID:27588752

  5. Pellino protein from pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei positively regulates NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaozheng; Chai, Jiaoting; Li, Haoyang; Zuo, Hongliang; Wang, Sheng; Qiu, Wei; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2014-06-01

    Pellino, named after its property that binds Pelle (the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of IRAK1), is a highly conserved E3 class ubiquitin ligase in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Pellino interacts with phosphorylated IRAK1, causing polyubiquitination of IRAK1, and plays a critical upstream role in the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway. In this study, we firstly cloned and identified a crustacean Pellino from pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPellino). LvPellino contains a putative N-terminal forkhead-associated (FHA) domain and a C-terminal ring finger (RING) domain with a potential E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase activity, and shows a high similarity with D. melanogaster Pellino. LvPellino could interact with L. vannamei Pelle (LvPelle) and over-expression of LvPellino could increase the activity of LvDorsal (a L. vannamei homolog of NF-κB) on promoters containing NF-κB binding motifs and enhance the expression of arthropod antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). The LvPellino protein was located in the cytoplasm and nucleus and LvPellino mRNA was detected in all the tissues examined and could be up-regulated after lipopolysaccharides, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Staphylococcus aureus challenges, suggesting a stimulation response of LvPellino to bacterial and immune stimulant challenges. Knockdown of LvPellino in vivo could significantly decrease the expression of AMPs and increase the mortality of shrimps caused by V. parahaemolyticus challenge. However, suppression of the LvPellino expression could not change the mortality caused by WSSV infection, and dual-luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that over-expression of LvPellino could enhance the promoters of WSSV genes wsv069 (ie1), wsv303, and wsv371, indicating a complex role of LvPellino in WSSV pathogenesis and shrimp antiviral mechanisms.

  6. Salvianolic acid A positively regulates PTEN protein level and inhibits growth of A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    BI, LEI; CHEN, JIANPING; YUAN, XIAOJING; JIANG, ZEQUN; CHEN, WEIPING

    2013-01-01

    Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is an effective compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza which has been used in the treatment of various diseases. Preliminary data indicate that Sal A treatment has a specific anti-lung cancer effect. However, the manner in which Sal A regulates cancer growth remains unknown. In this study, the A549 lung cancer cell line and its response to Sal A treatment was examined. Results showed that Sal A treatment significantly decreased A549 cell growth, promoted partial apoptosis and increased mitochondrial membrane permeability. Western blot analysis showed that Sal A upregulated the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein level, while consistently downregulating Akt phosphorylation. These results indicate that Sal A negatively mediates A549 lung cancer cell line growth or apoptosis, most likely by positively regulating PTEN protein level. PMID:24648921

  7. Prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences using reduced PSSM and position-based secondary structural features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junru; Wang, Cong; Cao, Jiajia; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Yuhua; Dai, Qi

    2015-01-10

    Many efficient methods have been proposed to advance protein structural class prediction, but there are still some challenges where additional insight or technology is needed for low-similarity sequences. In this work, we schemed out a new prediction method for low-similarity datasets using reduced PSSM and position-based secondary structural features. We evaluated the proposed method with four experiments and compared it with the available competing prediction methods. The results indicate that the proposed method achieved the best performance among the evaluated methods, with overall accuracy 3-5% higher than the existing best-performing method. This paper also found that the reduced alphabets with size 13 simplify PSSM structures efficiently while reserving its maximal information. This understanding can be used to design more powerful prediction methods for protein structural class.

  8. PFMAGO, a MAGO NASHI-like factor, interacts with the MADS-domain protein MPF2 from Physalis floridana.

    PubMed

    He, Chaoying; Sommer, Hans; Grosardt, Britta; Huijser, Peter; Saedler, Heinz

    2007-05-01

    MADS-domain proteins serve as regulators of plant development and often form dimers and higher order complexes to function. Heterotopic expression of MPF2, a MADS-box gene, in reproductive tissues is a key component in the evolution of the inflated calyx syndrome in Physalis, but RNAi studies demonstrate that MPF2 has also acquired a role in male fertility in Physalis floridana. Using the yeast 2-hybrid system, we have now identified numerous MPF2-interacting MADS-domain proteins from Physalis, including homologs of SOC1, AP1, SEP1, SEP3, AG, and AGL6. Among the many non-MADS-domain proteins recovered was a homolog of MAGO NASHI, a highly conserved RNA-binding protein known to be involved in many developmental processes including germ cell differentiation. Two MAGO genes, termed P. floridana mago nashi1 (PFMAGO1) and PFMAGO2, were isolated from P. floridana. Both copies were found to be coexpressed in leaves, fruits, and, albeit at lower level, also in roots, stems, and flowers. DNA sequence analysis revealed that, although the coding sequences of the 2 genes are highly conserved, they differ substantially in their intron and promoter sequences. Two-hybrid screening of a Physalis expression library with both PFMAGO1 and PFMAGO2 as baits yielded numerous gene products, including an Y14-like protein. Y14 is an RNA-binding protein that forms part of various "gene expression machines." The function of MPF2 and 2 PFMAGO proteins in ensuring male fertility and evolution of calyx development in Physalis is discussed.

  9. Subgroup-Elimination Transcriptomics Identifies Signaling Proteins that Define Subclasses of TRPV1-Positive Neurons and a Novel Paracrine Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Isensee, Jörg; Wenzel, Carsten; Buschow, Rene; Weissmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Hucho, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Normal and painful stimuli are detected by specialized subgroups of peripheral sensory neurons. The understanding of the functional differences of each neuronal subgroup would be strongly enhanced by knowledge of the respective subgroup transcriptome. The separation of the subgroup of interest, however, has proven challenging as they can hardly be enriched. Instead of enriching, we now rapidly eliminated the subgroup of neurons expressing the heat-gated cation channel TRPV1 from dissociated rat sensory ganglia. Elimination was accomplished by brief treatment with TRPV1 agonists followed by the removal of compromised TRPV1(+) neurons using density centrifugation. By differential microarray and sequencing (RNA-Seq) based expression profiling we compared the transcriptome of all cells within sensory ganglia versus the same cells lacking TRPV1 expressing neurons, which revealed 240 differentially expressed genes (adj. p<0.05, fold-change>1.5). Corroborating the specificity of the approach, many of these genes have been reported to be involved in noxious heat or pain sensitization. Beyond the expected enrichment of ion channels, we found the TRPV1 transcriptome to be enriched for GPCRs and other signaling proteins involved in adenosine, calcium, and phosphatidylinositol signaling. Quantitative population analysis using a recent High Content Screening (HCS) microscopy approach identified substantial heterogeneity of expressed target proteins even within TRPV1-positive neurons. Signaling components defined distinct further subgroups within the population of TRPV1-positive neurons. Analysis of one such signaling system showed that the pain sensitizing prostaglandin PGD2 activates DP1 receptors expressed predominantly on TRPV1(+) neurons. In contrast, we found the PGD2 producing prostaglandin D synthase to be expressed exclusively in myelinated large-diameter neurons lacking TRPV1, which suggests a novel paracrine neuron-neuron communication. Thus, subgroup analysis based

  10. Concurrent administration of heparin and activated protein C in a patient with pulmonary embolism and severe sepsis with positive outcome.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Deven; Mohan, S; Veturi, Vivek V; Gopal, Palepu B

    2009-01-01

    Results of the PROWESS trial suggested that heparin may reduce the efficacy of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) and the XPRESS study also showed increased bleeding complications in patients receiving heparin with rhAPC. Although it has been shown that heparin prophylaxis may be used along with rhAPC, no study has shown the interaction between continuous heparin infusion and rhAPC. Here, we report a case of severe sepsis with pulmonary embolism who was concurrently administered heparin and rhAPC infusions, with positive results and no bleeding complications.

  11. Reelin is a platelet protein and functions as a positive regulator of platelet spreading on fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Lien; Huang, Chien-Ling; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Liao, Chang-Huei; Stern, Arnold; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2010-02-01

    Abnormalities of platelet functions have been linked to reelin-impaired neuronal disorders. However, little attention has been given to understanding the interplay between reelin and platelet. In this study, reelin was found to present in the human platelets and megakaryocyte-like leukemic cells. Reelin-binding assays revealed that extracellular reelin can interact with platelets through the receptor belonging to the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family. The reelin-to-platelet interactions enhance platelet spreading on fibrinogen concomitant with the augmentation of lamellipodia formation and F-actin bundling. In contrast, reelin has no effect on integrin alphaIIbbeta3 activation and agonist-induced platelet aggregation. Molecular analysis revealed that the up-regulation of Rac1 activity and the inhibition of protein kinase C delta-Thr505 phosphorylation are important for reelin-mediated enhancement of platelet spreading on fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate for the first time that reelin is present in platelets and the reelin-to-platelet interactions play a novel role in platelet signaling and functions.

  12. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  13. The RNA-binding protein CsrA plays a central role in positively regulating virulence factors in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Ancona, Veronica; Lee, Jae Hoon; Zhao, Youfu

    2016-11-15

    The GacS/GacA two-component system (also called GrrS/GrrA) is a global regulatory system which is highly conserved among gamma-proteobacteria. This system positively regulates non-coding small regulatory RNA csrB, which in turn binds to the RNA-binding protein CsrA. However, how GacS/GacA-Csr system regulates virulence traits in E. amylovora remains unknown. Results from mutant characterization showed that the csrB mutant was hypermotile, produced higher amount of exopolysaccharide amylovoran, and had increased expression of type III secretion (T3SS) genes in vitro. In contrast, the csrA mutant exhibited complete opposite phenotypes, including non-motile, reduced amylovoran production and expression of T3SS genes. Furthermore, the csrA mutant did not induce hypersensitive response on tobacco or cause disease on immature pear fruits, indicating that CsrA is a positive regulator of virulence factors. These findings demonstrated that CsrA plays a critical role in E. amylovora virulence and suggested that negative regulation of virulence by GacS/GacA acts through csrB sRNA, which binds to CsrA and neutralizes its positive effect on T3SS gene expression, flagellar formation and amylovoran production. Future research will be focused on determining the molecular mechanism underlying the positive regulation of virulence traits by CsrA.

  14. The RNA-binding protein CsrA plays a central role in positively regulating virulence factors in Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Ancona, Veronica; Lee, Jae Hoon; Zhao, Youfu

    2016-01-01

    The GacS/GacA two-component system (also called GrrS/GrrA) is a global regulatory system which is highly conserved among gamma-proteobacteria. This system positively regulates non-coding small regulatory RNA csrB, which in turn binds to the RNA-binding protein CsrA. However, how GacS/GacA-Csr system regulates virulence traits in E. amylovora remains unknown. Results from mutant characterization showed that the csrB mutant was hypermotile, produced higher amount of exopolysaccharide amylovoran, and had increased expression of type III secretion (T3SS) genes in vitro. In contrast, the csrA mutant exhibited complete opposite phenotypes, including non-motile, reduced amylovoran production and expression of T3SS genes. Furthermore, the csrA mutant did not induce hypersensitive response on tobacco or cause disease on immature pear fruits, indicating that CsrA is a positive regulator of virulence factors. These findings demonstrated that CsrA plays a critical role in E. amylovora virulence and suggested that negative regulation of virulence by GacS/GacA acts through csrB sRNA, which binds to CsrA and neutralizes its positive effect on T3SS gene expression, flagellar formation and amylovoran production. Future research will be focused on determining the molecular mechanism underlying the positive regulation of virulence traits by CsrA. PMID:27845410

  15. EBV-positive human sera contain antibodies against the EBV BMRF-2 protein

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianqiao; Palefsky, Joel M.; Herrera, Rossana; Sunshine, Carl; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that the EBV glycoprotein BMRF-2 contains a functional integrin-binding Arg–Gly–Asp (RGD) domain that plays an important role in viral infection and cell-to-cell spread of progeny virions in oral epithelial cells. In this study, we found that EBV-seropositive human sera contain antibodies against BMRF-2. The inhibitory effect of EBV-positive sera on EBV infection of oral epithelial cells was substantially reduced by pre-incubation of serum samples with the BMRF-2 RGD peptide, suggesting that anti-BMRF-2 human antibodies possess neutralizing activity. EBV-specific sera reacted strongly with the BMRF-2 extracellular domain (170-213 aa) containing the RGD motif, whereas they reacted only weakly or not at all with a mutated form of the BMRF-2 extracellular domain containing AAA instead of RGD. These data indicate that that RGD motif of BMRF-2 is part of an immunodominant antigenic determinant within the extracellular domain of BMRF-2 that may contribute to EBV neutralization during EBV reactivation. PMID:19698968

  16. A Novel Erythrocyte Binding Protein of Plasmodium vivax Suggests an Alternate Invasion Pathway into Duffy-Positive Reticulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomson-Luque, Richard; Torres, Letícia de Menezes; Gunalan, Karthigayan; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erythrocyte invasion by malaria parasites is essential for blood-stage development and an important determinant of host range. In Plasmodium vivax, the interaction between the Duffy binding protein (DBP) and its cognate receptor, the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC), on human erythrocytes is central to blood-stage infection. Contrary to this established pathway of invasion, there is growing evidence of P. vivax infections occurring in Duffy blood group-negative individuals, suggesting that the parasite might have gained an alternative pathway to infect this group of individuals. Supporting this concept, a second distinct erythrocyte binding protein (EBP2), representing a new member of the DBP family, was discovered in P. vivax and may be the ligand in an alternate invasion pathway. Our study characterizes this novel ligand and determines its potential role in reticulocyte invasion by P. vivax merozoites. EBP2 binds preferentially to young (CD71high) Duffy-positive (Fy+) reticulocytes and has minimal binding capacity for Duffy-negative reticulocytes. Importantly, EBP2 is antigenically distinct from DBP and cannot be functionally inhibited by anti-DBP antibodies. Consequently, our results do not support EBP2 as a ligand for invasion of Duffy-negative blood cells, but instead, EBP2 may represent a novel ligand for an alternate invasion pathway of Duffy-positive reticulocytes. PMID:27555313

  17. A Type Ib ParB Protein Involved in Plasmid Partitioning in a Gram-Positive Bacterium▿

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Li, Tai-Yuan; Xie, Mao-Hua; Jiang, Lina; Zhang, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Our current understanding of segregation of prokaryotic plasmids has been derived mainly from the study of the gram-negative bacterial plasmids. We previously reported a replicon of the cryptic plasmid from a gram-positive bacterium, Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis. The replicon contains a putative plasmid partition cassette including a Walker-type ATPase followed by open reading frame 4 without sequence homologue. Here we reported that the orf4 gene was essential for maintaining the plasmid stability in L. xyli subsp. cynodontis. Furthermore, the purified orf4 protein specifically and cooperatively bound to direct repeat sequences located upstream of the parA gene in vitro, indicating that orf4 is a parB gene and that the direct repeat DNA sequences constitute a partition site, parS. The location of parS and the features of ParA and ParB proteins suggest that this plasmid partition cassette belongs to type Ib, representing the first type Ib cassette identified from a gram-positive bacterial plasmid. PMID:16997970

  18. The protein phosphatase 2C clade A protein OsPP2C51 positively regulates seed germination by directly inactivating OsbZIP10.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Nikita; Min, Myung-Ki; Choi, Eun-Hye; Kim, Namhyo; Moon, Seok-Jun; Yoon, Insun; Kwon, Taekryoun; Jung, Ki-Hong; Kim, Beom-Gi

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphatase 2C clade A members are major signaling components in the ABA-dependent signaling cascade that regulates seed germination. To elucidate the role of PP2CA genes in germination of rice seed, we selected OsPP2C51, which shows highly specific expression in the embryo compared with other protein phosphatases based on microarray data. GUS histochemical assay confirmed that OsPP2C51 is expressed in the seed embryo and that this expression pattern is unique compared with those of other OsPP2CA genes. Data obtained from germination assays and alpha-amylase assays of OsPP2C51 knockout and overexpression lines suggest that OsPP2C51 positively regulates seed germination in rice. The expression of alpha-amylase synthesizing genes was high in OsPP2C51 overexpressing plants, suggesting that elevated levels of OsPP2C51 might enhance gene expression related to higher rates of seed germination. Analysis of protein interactions between ABA signaling components showed that OsPP2C51 interacts with OsPYL/RCAR5 in an ABA-dependent manner. Furthermore, interactions were observed between OsPP2C51 and SAPK2, and between OsPP2C51 and OsbZIP10 and we found out that OsPP2C51 can dephosphorylates OsbZIP10. These findings suggest the existence of a new branch in ABA signaling pathway consisting of OsPYL/RCAR-OsPP2C-bZIP apart from the previously reported OsPYL/RCAR-OsPP2C-SAPK-bZIP. Overall, our result suggests that OsPP2C51 is a positive regulator of seed germination by directly suppressing active phosphorylated OsbZIP10.

  19. A FRET-based study reveals site-specific regulation of spindle position checkpoint proteins at yeast centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gryaznova, Yuliya; Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Malengo, Gabriele; Sourjik, Victor; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-01-01

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a spindle pole body (SPB, equivalent of mammalian centrosome) associated surveillance mechanism that halts mitotic exit upon spindle mis-orientation. Here, we monitored the interaction between SPB proteins and the SPOC component Bfa1 by FRET microscopy. We show that Bfa1 binds to the scaffold-protein Nud1 and the γ-tubulin receptor Spc72. Spindle misalignment specifically disrupts Bfa1-Spc72 interaction by a mechanism that requires the 14-3-3-family protein Bmh1 and the MARK/PAR-kinase Kin4. Dissociation of Bfa1 from Spc72 prevents the inhibitory phosphorylation of Bfa1 by the polo-like kinase Cdc5. We propose Spc72 as a regulatory hub that coordinates the activity of Kin4 and Cdc5 towards Bfa1. In addition, analysis of spc72∆ cells shows that a mitotic-exit-promoting dominant signal, which is triggered upon elongation of the spindle into the bud, overrides the SPOC. Our data reinforce the importance of daughter-cell-associated factors and centrosome-based regulations in mitotic exit and SPOC control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14029.001 PMID:27159239

  20. A FRET-based study reveals site-specific regulation of spindle position checkpoint proteins at yeast centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Gryaznova, Yuliya; Koca Caydasi, Ayse; Malengo, Gabriele; Sourjik, Victor; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-05-09

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a spindle pole body (SPB, equivalent of mammalian centrosome) associated surveillance mechanism that halts mitotic exit upon spindle mis-orientation. Here, we monitored the interaction between SPB proteins and the SPOC component Bfa1 by FRET microscopy. We show that Bfa1 binds to the scaffold-protein Nud1 and the γ-tubulin receptor Spc72. Spindle misalignment specifically disrupts Bfa1-Spc72 interaction by a mechanism that requires the 14-3-3-family protein Bmh1 and the MARK/PAR-kinase Kin4. Dissociation of Bfa1 from Spc72 prevents the inhibitory phosphorylation of Bfa1 by the polo-like kinase Cdc5. We propose Spc72 as a regulatory hub that coordinates the activity of Kin4 and Cdc5 towards Bfa1. In addition, analysis of spc72∆ cells shows that a mitotic-exit-promoting dominant signal, which is triggered upon elongation of the spindle into the bud, overrides the SPOC. Our data reinforce the importance of daughter-cell-associated factors and centrosome-based regulations in mitotic exit and SPOC control.

  1. The scaffold protein MEK Partner 1 is required for the survival of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marina, Mihaela; Wang, Limin; Conrad, Susan E

    2012-07-09

    MEK Partner 1 (MP1 or MAPKSP1) is a scaffold protein that has been reported to function in multiple signaling pathways, including the ERK, PAK and mTORC pathways. Several of these pathways influence the biology of breast cancer, but MP1's functional significance in breast cancer cells has not been investigated. In this report, we demonstrate a requirement for MP1 expression in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer cells. MP1 is widely expressed in both ER-positive and negative breast cancer cell lines, and in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell lines. However, inhibition of its expression using siRNA duplexes resulted in detachment and apoptosis of several ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, but not ER-negative breast cancer cells or non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Inhibition of MP1 expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells did not affect ERK activity, but resulted in reduced Akt1 activity and reduced ER expression and activity. Inhibition of ER expression did not result in cell death, suggesting that decreased ER expression is not the cause of cell death. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of PI3K signaling did induce cell death in MCF-7 cells, and expression of a constitutively active form of Akt1 partially rescued the cell death observed when the MP1 gene was silenced in these cells. Together, these results suggest that MP1 is required for pro-survival signaling from the PI3K/Akt pathway in ER-positive breast cancer cells.

  2. Probing the existence of G protein-coupled receptor dimers by positive and negative ligand-dependent cooperative binding.

    PubMed

    Albizu, Laura; Balestre, Marie-Noëlle; Breton, Christophe; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Manning, Maurice; Mouillac, Bernard; Barberis, Claude; Durroux, Thierry

    2006-11-01

    An increasing amount of ligand binding data on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is not compatible with the prediction of the simple mass action law. This may be related to the propensity of most GPCRs, if not all, to oligomerize. Indeed, one of the consequences of receptor oligomerization could be a possible cross-talk between the protomers, which in turn could lead to negative or positive cooperative ligand binding. We prove here that this can be demonstrated experimentally. Saturation, dissociation, and competition binding experiments were performed on vasopressin and oxytocin receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary or COS-7 cells. Linear, concave, and convex Scatchard plots were then obtained, depending on the ligand used. Moreover, some competition curves exhibited an increase of the radiotracer binding for low concentrations of competitors, suggesting a cooperative binding process. These data demonstrate that various vasopressin analogs display either positive or negative cooperative binding. Because positive cooperative binding cannot be explained without considering receptor as multivalent, these binding data support the concept of GPCR dimerization process. The results, which are in good accordance with the predictions of previous mathematical models, suggest that binding experiments can be used to probe the existence of receptor dimers.

  3. The Escherichia coli L-arabinose operon: binding sites of the regulatory proteins and a mechanism of positive and negative regulation.

    PubMed

    Ogden, S; Haggerty, D; Stoner, C M; Kolodrubetz, D; Schleif, R

    1980-06-01

    The locations of DNA binding by the proteins involved with positive and negative regulation of transcription initiation of the L-arabinose operon in Escherichia coli have been determined by the DNase I protection method. Two cyclic AMP receptor protein sites were found, at positions -78 to -107 and -121 to -146, an araC protein--arabinose binding site was found at position -40 to -78, and an araC protein-fucose binding site was found at position -106 to -144. These locations, combined with in vivo data on induction of the two divergently oriented arabinose promoters, suggest the following regulatory mechanism: induction of the araBAD operon occurs when cyclic AMP receptor protein, araC protein, and RNA polymerase are all present and able to bind to DNA. Negative regulation is accomplished by the repressing form of araC protein binding to a site in the regulatory region such that it stimultaneously blocks access of cyclic AMP receptor protein to two sites on the DNA, one site of which serves each of the two promoters. Thus, from a single operator site, the negative regulator represses the two outwardly oriented ara promoters. This regulatory mechanism explains the known positive and negative regulatory properties of the ara promoters.

  4. Multiple phosphorylated forms of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm1 protein include an isoform induced in response to high salt concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, M H; Nadeau, E T; Grayhack, E J

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm1 protein is an essential multifunctional transcription factor which is highly homologous to human serum response factor. Mcm1 protein acts on a large number of distinctly regulated genes: haploid cell-type-specific genes, G2-cell-cycle-regulated genes, pheromone-induced genes, arginine metabolic genes, and genes important for cell wall and cell membrane function. We show here that Mcm1 protein is phosphorylated in vivo. Several (more than eight) isoforms of Mcm1 protein, resolved by isoelectric focusing, are present in vivo; two major phosphorylation sites lie in the N-terminal 17 amino acids immediately adjacent to the conserved MADS box DNA-binding domain. The implications of multiple species of Mcm1, particularly the notion that a unique Mcm1 isoform could be required for regulation of a specific set of Mcm1's target genes, are discussed. We also show here that Mcm1 plays an important role in the response to stress caused by NaCl. G. Yu, R. J. Deschenes, and J. S. Fassler (J. Biol. Chem. 270:8739-8743, 1995) showed that Mcm1 function is affected by mutations in the SLN1 gene, a signal transduction component implicated in the response to osmotic stress. We find that mcm1 mutations can confer either reduced or enhanced survival on high-salt medium; deletion of the N terminus or mutation in the primary phosphorylation site results in impaired growth on high-salt medium. Furthermore, Mcm1 protein is a target of a signal transduction system responsive to osmotic stress: a new isoform of Mcm1 is induced by NaCl or KCl; this result establishes that Mcm1 itself is regulated. PMID:9001236

  5. Phenotypic Consequences Resulting from a Methionine-to-Valine Substitution at Position 48 in the HPr Protein of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Plamondon, Pascale; Brochu, Denis; Thomas, Suzanne; Fradette, Julie; Gauthier, Lucie; Vaillancourt, Katy; Buckley, Nicole; Frenette, Michel; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    1999-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, the HPr protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) can be phosphorylated on a histidine residue at position 15 (His15) by enzyme I (EI) of the PTS and on a serine residue at position 46 (Ser46) by an ATP-dependent protein kinase (His∼P and Ser-P, respectively). We have isolated from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, by independent selection from separate cultures, two spontaneous mutants (Ga3.78 and Ga3.14) that possess a missense mutation in ptsH (the gene encoding HPr) replacing the methionine at position 48 by a valine. The mutation did not prevent the phosphorylation of HPr at His15 by EI nor the phosphorylation at Ser46 by the ATP-dependent HPr kinase. The levels of HPr(Ser-P) in glucose-grown cells of the parental and mutant Ga3.78 were virtually the same. However, mutant cells growing on glucose produced two- to threefold less HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P) than the wild-type strain, while the levels of free HPr and HPr(His∼P) were increased 18- and 3-fold, respectively. The mutants grew as well as the wild-type strain on PTS sugars (glucose, fructose, and mannose) and on the non-PTS sugars lactose and melibiose. However, the growth rate of both mutants on galactose, also a non-PTS sugar, decreased rapidly with time. The M48V substitution had only a minor effect on the repression of α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase by glucose, but this mutation abolished diauxie by rendering cells unable to prevent the catabolism of a non-PTS sugar (lactose, galactose, and melibiose) when glucose was available. The results suggested that the capacity of the wild-type cells to preferentially metabolize glucose over non-PTS sugars resulted mainly from inhibition of the catabolism of these secondary energy sources via a HPr-dependent mechanism. This mechanism was activated following glucose but not lactose metabolism, and it did not involve HPr(Ser-P) as the only regulatory molecule. PMID:10559156

  6. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dubrau, Danilo; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Rey, Félix A; Tautz, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS) proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132), which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region) suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation.

  7. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Félix A.

    2017-01-01

    The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS) proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132), which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region) suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation. PMID:28151973

  8. High positive frequency of antibodies to metallothionein and heat shock protein 70 in sera of patients with metal allergy

    PubMed Central

    JIN, G-B; NAKAYAMA, H; SHMYHLO, M; INOUE, S; KONDO, M; IKEZAWA, Z; OUCHI, Y; CYONG, J-C

    2003-01-01

    Two principal types of stress protein, heat shock proteins (hsps) and metallothionein (MT), are induced in cells responding to a variety of stresses. They play an important role in protecting cells from these stresses. However, many reports indicate that antibodies to hsps are present in human serum and are associated with several autoimmunity diseases. Metals, which are commonly allergenic to humans, induce both MT and hsp70 (one of the hsps family). Until now, there has been no report of any antibody to MT in human serum. In the present study, serum samples from healthy controls (Group I), and patients suffering from atopic dermatitis without (Group II) or with (Group III) metal allergy, were measured for antibodies to MT and hsp70, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Metal allergy was confirmed by patch testing. We first found that antibody to MT exists in human serum. We also found a high positive frequency of antibody to MT (51·3%) and to hsp70 (43·6%) in the sera of Group III, compared to those of Group I (3·8% and 5·1%) or Group II (6·4% and 5·1%). Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation between antibody to MT and antibody to hsp70 in Group III (P = 0·0013), but not in Group I and Group II. Our results indicate that antibody to MT exists in human serum, as do antibodies to hsps, and suggest that elevated levels of MT and hsp70 antibodies are associated with metal allergy in atopic patients. PMID:12562388

  9. Detection of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural proteins in anti-HCV-positive sera by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using synthetic peptides as antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, C; Matsumoto, K; Fukada, K; Matsushita, K; Shiraki, H; Maeda, Y

    1993-01-01

    We have defined 10 linear immunogenic regions encoded by the putative hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural proteins (core and envelope) by employing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by using 17 sequential synthetic peptides covering the N-terminal 330 amino acids of the structural polyproteins as antigens. These peptides correspond to amino acids 1 to 24, 21 to 44, 42 to 68, 64 to 91, and 100 to 120 of the putative core protein and amino acids 192 to 212, 223 to 238, 236 to 258, 250 to 266, and 307 to 330 of the putative envelope protein. In particular, the peptide covering amino acids 21 to 44 of the core protein was reactive with all but one (40 of 41) of the serum samples giving a positive signal in the passive hemagglutination assay (PHA) using the core and nonstructural proteins (NS 3/4) of the virus as antigens. We detected the HCV genome in 25 (61%) of 41 PHA-positive serum samples by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. Of 25 PCR-positive serum samples, 17 serum samples had reactivity to the peptides derived from the envelope protein. On the other hand, only 1 of the 16 PCR-negative serum samples had reactivity to the peptides derived from the envelope protein. Interestingly, we often observed high serum alanine aminotransferase levels in PCR-positive individuals bearing antibodies to the envelope protein. PMID:7681849

  10. Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 is a context-specific positive regulator of Notch signaling during neurogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jay Prakash; Deshpande, Girish; Shashidhara, L S

    2017-03-01

    The role of the Notch pathway during the lateral inhibition that underlies binary cell fate choice is extensively studied, but the context specificity that generates diverse outcomes is less well understood. In the peripheral nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster, differential Notch signaling between cells of the proneural cluster orchestrates sensory organ specification. Here we report functional analysis of Drosophila Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 (A2BP1) during this process. Its human ortholog is linked to type 2 spinocerebellar ataxia and other complex neuronal disorders. Downregulation of Drosophila A2BP1 in the proneural cluster increases adult sensory bristle number, whereas its overexpression results in loss of bristles. We show that A2BP1 regulates sensory organ specification by potentiating Notch signaling. Supporting its direct involvement, biochemical analysis shows that A2BP1 is part of the Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] complex in the presence and absence of Notch. However, in the absence of Notch signaling, the A2BP1 interacting fraction of Su(H) does not associate with the repressor proteins Groucho and CtBP. We propose a model explaining the requirement of A2BP1 as a positive regulator of context-specific Notch activity.

  11. Mcp4, a Meiotic Coiled-Coil Protein, Plays a Role in F-Actin Positioning during Schizosaccharomyces pombe Meiosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Saito, Takamune T.; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Some meiosis-specific proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe harbor coiled-coil motifs and play essential roles in meiotic progression. Here we describe Mcp4, a novel meiosis-specific protein whose expression is abruptly induced at the horsetail phase and which remains expressed until sporulation is finished. Fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that Mcp4 alters its subcellular localization during meiosis in a manner that partially resembles the movement of F-actin during meiosis. Mcp4 and F-actin never colocalize; rather, they are located in a side-by-side manner. When forespore membrane formation begins at metaphase II, the Mcp4 signals assemble at the lagging face of the dividing nuclei. At this stage, they are sandwiched between F-actin and the nucleus. Mcp4, in turn, appears to sandwich F-actin with Meu14. In mcp4Δ cells at anaphase II, the F-actin, which is normally dumbbell-shaped, adopts an abnormal balloon shape. Spores of mcp4Δ cells were sensitive to NaCl, although their shape and viability were normal. Taken together, we conclude that Mcp4 plays a role in the accurate positioning of F-actin during S. pombe meiosis. PMID:17435009

  12. Piezometric biosensors for anti-apoptotic protein survivin based on buried positive-potential barrier and immobilized monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Chalupa, Agata; Dworakowska, Beata

    2016-10-15

    The anti-apoptotic protein survivin (Sur) plays an important role in the regulation of cell division and inducing the chemotherapeutic drug resistance. The Sur protein and its mRNA have recently been studied as cancer biomarkers and potential targets for cancer therapy. In this work, we have focused on the design of immunosensors for the detection of Sur based on buried positive-potential barrier layer structure and anti-survivin antibody. The modification of solid AuQC piezoelectrodes was monitored by recording the resonance frequency shift and electrochemical measurements during each step of the sensor preparation. Our results indicate that the immunosensor with covalently bound monoclonal anti-survivin antibody can detect Sur with the limit of detection, LOD=1.7nM (S/N=3σ). The immunosensor applicability for the analysis of real samples was assessed by testing samples of cell lysate solutions obtained from human astrocytoma (glioblastoma) U-87MG cell line, with the experiments performed using the standard addition method. The good linearity of the calibration curves for PBS and lysate solutions at low Sur concentrations confirm the high specificity of the proposed biosensor and good discrimination against nonspecific interactions with lysate components. The calculations indicate that there is still room to increase the Sur capture capacity for Sur while miniaturizing the sensor. The important advantage of the sensor is that it can be reused by a simple regeneration procedure.

  13. Short communication: Proteins in heat-processed skim milk powder have no positive effects on bone loss of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Du, M; Kong, Y; Wang, C; Gao, H; Han, X; Yi, H; Zhang, L

    2011-06-01

    Milk has positive effects on bone growth. However, the effect of skim milk powder (SMP) on bone properties has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of SMP on bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and another 10 rats received a sham operation. The OVX rats were randomly separated into 4 groups: OVX control, OVX SMP1 (SMP at 0.04 g/d), OVX SMP2 (SMP at 0.20 g/d), and OVX SMP3 (SMP at 0.40 g/d). Skim milk powder was supplied in the rat diet for 12 wk, and the rats were gavaged once per day. The effects of SMP on calcium content and bone mineral density of femur were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Compared with the control, SMP at all dose levels tested had no particular effect on weight:length, calcium content, or bone mineral density of femurs. It was demonstrated that SMP (0.04 to 0.40 g/d) had no positive effect on bone loss in OVX rats, probably because the heat treatment used during SMP processing caused a loss of biological activity in the protein.

  14. NUCLEAR FACTOR Y, Subunit A (NF-YA) Proteins Positively Regulate Flowering and Act Through FLOWERING LOCUS T

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Chamindika L.; Kumimoto, Roderick W.; Mantovani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Photoperiod dependent flowering is one of several mechanisms used by plants to initiate the developmental transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth. The NUCLEAR FACTOR Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are heterotrimeric complexes composed of NF-YA and histone-fold domain (HFD) containing NF-YB/NF-YC, that initiate photoperiod-dependent flowering by cooperatively interacting with CONSTANS (CO) to drive the expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). This involves NF-Y and CO binding at distal CCAAT and proximal “CORE” elements, respectively, in the FT promoter. While this is well established for the HFD subunits, there remains some question over the potential role of NF-YA as either positive or negative regulators of this process. Here we provide strong support, in the form of genetic and biochemical analyses, that NF-YA, in complex with NF-YB/NF-YC proteins, can directly bind the distal CCAAT box in the FT promoter and are positive regulators of flowering in an FT-dependent manner. PMID:27977687

  15. Analysis of Flexibility of Proteins by means of Positive and Negative Ion MALDI In-Source Decay Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Iimuro, Ryunosuke; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The amino acid residues susceptible to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry have been identified from both positive and negative ion ISD spectra of cytochrome c, myoglobin, thioredoxin and bovine serum albumin. Backbone cleavages at the N–Cα bonds of Xxx–Asp, Xxx–Asn, Xxx–Cys, and Gly–Xxx residues gave discontinuous intense peaks of c-ions, independent of positive and negative ion mode. The intensity values for c-ions, Int(c), were defined to allow estimation of the discontinuous intense peaks of c-ions. The identities of the high intensity value residues Asp, Asn, Cys, and Gly were compared with those identified using other measures of flexibility such as the B-factor, turn preferential factor and protection factor. The comparison indicates that Asp, Asn, and Gly residues are common to all measures. Thus, the intensity values of c-ions can be adopted as a measure of protein flexibility. PMID:26819895

  16. Divergences of MPF2-like MADS-domain proteins have an association with the evolution of the inflated calyx syndrome within Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jisi; Khan, Muhammad Ramzan; Tian, Ying; Li, Zhichao; Riss, Simone; He, Chaoying

    2012-10-01

    The inflated calyx syndrome (ICS) is a post-floral novelty within Solanaceae. Previous work has shown that MPF2-like MADS-box genes have been recruited for the development and evolution of ICS through heterotopic expression from vegetative to floral organs. ICS seems to be a plesiomorphic trait in Physaleae, but it has been secondarily lost in some lineages during evolution. We hypothesized that molecular and functional divergences of MPF2-like proteins might play a role in the loss of ICS. In this study we analyzed the phylogeny, selection and various functions of MPF2-like proteins with respect to the evolution of ICS. Directional selection of MPF2-like orthologs toward evolution of ICS was detected. While auto-activation capacity between proteins varies in yeast, MPF2-like interaction with floral MADS-domain proteins is robustly detected, hence substantiating their integration into the floral developmental programs. Dimerization with A- (MPF3) and E-function (PFSEP1/3) proteins seems to be essential for ICS development within Solanaceae. Moreover, the occurrence of the enlarged sepals, reminiscent of ICS, and MPF2-like interactions with these specific partners were observed in transgenic Arabidopsis. The interaction spectrum relevant to ICS seems to be plesiomorphic, reinforcing the plesiomorphy of this trait. The inability of some MPF2-like to interact with either the A-function or any of the E-function partners characterized is correlated with the loss of ICS in the lineages that showed a MPF2-like expression in the calyx. Our findings suggest that, after recruitment of MPF2-like genes for floral development, diversification in their coding region due to directional selection leads to a modification of the MADS-domain protein interacting spectrum, which might serve as a constraint for the evolution of ICS within Solanaceae.

  17. Structure, position, and biosynthesis of the high mannose and the complex oligosaccharide side chains of the bean storage protein phaseolin.

    PubMed

    Sturm, A; Van Kuik, J A; Vliegenthart, J F; Chrispeels, M J

    1987-10-05

    Phaseolin, the major storage protein of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), is a glycoprotein which is synthesized during seed development and accumulates in protein storage vacuoles or protein bodies. The protein has three different N-linked oligosaccharide side chains: Man9(GlcNAc)2, Man7(GlcNAc)2, and Xyl-Man3(GlcNAc)2 (where Xyl represents xylose). The structures of these glycans were determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The Man9(GlcNAc)2 glycan has the typical structure found in plant and animal glycoproteins. The structures of the two other glycans are shown below. (Formula; see text) Phaseolin was separated by electrophoresis on denaturing gels into four size classes of polypeptides. The two abundant ones have two oligosaccharides each, whereas the less abundant ones have only one oligosaccharide each. Polypeptides with two glycans have Man7(GlcNAc)2 attached to Asn252 and Man9(GlcNAc)2 attached to Asn341. Polypeptides with only one glycan have Xyl-Man3(GlcNAc)2 attached to Asn252. Both these asparagine residues are in canonical glycosylation sites; the numbering starts with the N-terminal methionine of the signal peptide of phaseolin. The presence of the Man7(GlcNAc)2 and of Xyl-Man3(GlcNAc)2 at the same asparagine residue (position 252) of different polypeptides seems to be controlled by the glycosylation status of Asn341. When Asp341 is unoccupied, the glycan at Asn252 is complex. When Asn341 is occupied, the glycan at Asn252 is only modified to the extent that 2 mannosyl residues are removed. The processing of the glycans, after the removal of the glucose residues, involves enzymes in the Golgi apparatus as well as in the protein bodies. Formation of the Xyl-Man3(GlcNAc)2 glycan is a multistep process that involves the Golgi apparatus-mediated removal of 6 mannose residues and the addition of 2 N-acetylglucosamine residues and 1 xylose. The terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues are later removed in the protein bodies. The conversion of Man9(GlcNAc)2 to

  18. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is anatomically positioned to modulate synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Waters, Elizabeth M; Thompson, Louisa I; Patel, Parth; Gonzales, Andreina D; Ye, Hector Zhiyu; Filardo, Edward J; Clegg, Deborah J; Gorecka, Jolanta; Akama, Keith T; McEwen, Bruce S; Milner, Teresa A

    2015-02-11

    Both estrous cycle and sex affect the numbers and types of neuronal and glial profiles containing the classical estrogen receptors α and β, and synaptic levels in the rodent dorsal hippocampus. Here, we examined whether the membrane estrogen receptor, G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), is anatomically positioned in the dorsal hippocampus of mice to regulate synaptic plasticity. By light microscopy, GPER1-immunoreactivity (IR) was most noticeable in the pyramidal cell layer and interspersed interneurons, especially those in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Diffuse GPER1-IR was found in all lamina but was most dense in stratum lucidum of CA3. Ultrastructural analysis revealed discrete extranuclear GPER1-IR affiliated with the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum of neuronal perikarya and dendritic shafts, synaptic specializations in dendritic spines, and clusters of vesicles in axon terminals. Moreover, GPER1-IR was found in unmyelinated axons and glial profiles. Overall, the types and amounts of GPER1-labeled profiles were similar between males and females; however, in females elevated estrogen levels generally increased axonal labeling. Some estradiol-induced changes observed in previous studies were replicated by the GPER agonist G1: G1 increased PSD95-IR in strata oriens, lucidum, and radiatum of CA3 in ovariectomized mice 6 h after administration. In contrast, estradiol but not G1 increased Akt phosphorylation levels. Instead, GPER1 actions in the synapse may be due to interactions with synaptic scaffolding proteins, such as SAP97. These results suggest that although estrogen's actions via GPER1 may converge on the same synaptic elements, different pathways are used to achieve these actions.

  19. G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor 1 Is Anatomically Positioned to Modulate Synaptic Plasticity in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Louisa I.; Patel, Parth; Gonzales, Andreina D.; Ye, Hector (Zhiyu); Filardo, Edward J.; Clegg, Deborah J.; Gorecka, Jolanta; Akama, Keith T.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Both estrous cycle and sex affect the numbers and types of neuronal and glial profiles containing the classical estrogen receptors α and β, and synaptic levels in the rodent dorsal hippocampus. Here, we examined whether the membrane estrogen receptor, G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), is anatomically positioned in the dorsal hippocampus of mice to regulate synaptic plasticity. By light microscopy, GPER1-immunoreactivity (IR) was most noticeable in the pyramidal cell layer and interspersed interneurons, especially those in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Diffuse GPER1-IR was found in all lamina but was most dense in stratum lucidum of CA3. Ultrastructural analysis revealed discrete extranuclear GPER1-IR affiliated with the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum of neuronal perikarya and dendritic shafts, synaptic specializations in dendritic spines, and clusters of vesicles in axon terminals. Moreover, GPER1-IR was found in unmyelinated axons and glial profiles. Overall, the types and amounts of GPER1-labeled profiles were similar between males and females; however, in females elevated estrogen levels generally increased axonal labeling. Some estradiol-induced changes observed in previous studies were replicated by the GPER agonist G1: G1 increased PSD95-IR in strata oriens, lucidum, and radiatum of CA3 in ovariectomized mice 6 h after administration. In contrast, estradiol but not G1 increased Akt phosphorylation levels. Instead, GPER1 actions in the synapse may be due to interactions with synaptic scaffolding proteins, such as SAP97. These results suggest that although estrogen's actions via GPER1 may converge on the same synaptic elements, different pathways are used to achieve these actions. PMID:25673833

  20. Active transport of RB protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as one of the development mechanisms of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Artur; Kopczyński, Janusz; Wypiórkiewicz, Elżbieta; Góźdź, Stanisław; Meżyk, Ryszard; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2013-04-01

    HER2-positive breast cancer (HER2+) occurs in approximately 15-20% of all breast cancers. Biologically this cancer subtype is characterized by an aggressive clinical course (often spread to regional lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis), and after successful treatment high risk of recurrence. Deregulation of the cell cycle is the basis for cancer aggressiveness. The RB protein is one of the key regulators of the cell cycle. There are only a few published studies on the expression and localization of RB protein in the cells of HER2-positive breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the expression and localization of RB protein in HER2-positive breast cancers compared to breast cancers showing no expression of HER2. We used 50 tissue samples from HER2 positive breast cancer and 21 tissue samples derived from patients with HER2 negative breast cancer. The RB protein expression was measured by immunohistochemical techniques in tissue microarray format. Cytoplasmic RB expression was observed in 29 out of 50 (58%) HER2 positive breast cancers. In this group only cytoplasmic expression was observed. There was no case with nuclear expression. In contrast, in the HER2-negative breast cancer control group, in no case RB expression was observed in the cytoplasm (0/21, 0%). All 21 samples (100%) showed expression of RB protein in the nucleus (p < 0.0001). We can speculate that lack of expression suggests alternative mechanisms in the development of HER2 positive breast cancer. We hypothesize that HER2 overexpression is in some way associated with active transport of RB protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. This may be an indirect mechanism of inactivation of tumor suppressor protein in breast cancer exhibiting overexpression of HER2.

  1. The cortical protein Lte1 promotes mitotic exit by inhibiting the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzi, Daniela Trinca; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar

    2011-01-01

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is an essential surveillance mechanism that allows mitotic exit only when the spindle is correctly oriented along the cell axis. Key SPOC components are the kinase Kin4 and the Bub2–Bfa1 GAP complex that inhibit the mitotic exit–promoting GTPase Tem1. During an unperturbed cell cycle, Kin4 associates with the mother spindle pole body (mSPB), whereas Bub2–Bfa1 is at the daughter SPB (dSPB). When the spindle is mispositioned, Bub2–Bfa1 and Kin4 bind to both SPBs, which enables Kin4 to phosphorylate Bfa1 and thereby block mitotic exit. Here, we show that the daughter cell protein Lte1 physically interacts with Kin4 and inhibits Kin4 kinase activity. Specifically, Lte1 binds to catalytically active Kin4 and promotes Kin4 hyperphosphorylation, which restricts Kin4 binding to the mSPB. This Lte1-mediated exclusion of Kin4 from the dSPB is essential for proper mitotic exit of cells with a correctly aligned spindle. Therefore, Lte1 promotes mitotic exit by inhibiting Kin4 activity at the dSPB. PMID:21670215

  2. The cortical protein Lte1 promotes mitotic exit by inhibiting the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    PubMed

    Bertazzi, Daniela Trinca; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Pereira, Gislene

    2011-06-13

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is an essential surveillance mechanism that allows mitotic exit only when the spindle is correctly oriented along the cell axis. Key SPOC components are the kinase Kin4 and the Bub2-Bfa1 GAP complex that inhibit the mitotic exit-promoting GTPase Tem1. During an unperturbed cell cycle, Kin4 associates with the mother spindle pole body (mSPB), whereas Bub2-Bfa1 is at the daughter SPB (dSPB). When the spindle is mispositioned, Bub2-Bfa1 and Kin4 bind to both SPBs, which enables Kin4 to phosphorylate Bfa1 and thereby block mitotic exit. Here, we show that the daughter cell protein Lte1 physically interacts with Kin4 and inhibits Kin4 kinase activity. Specifically, Lte1 binds to catalytically active Kin4 and promotes Kin4 hyperphosphorylation, which restricts Kin4 binding to the mSPB. This Lte1-mediated exclusion of Kin4 from the dSPB is essential for proper mitotic exit of cells with a correctly aligned spindle. Therefore, Lte1 promotes mitotic exit by inhibiting Kin4 activity at the dSPB.

  3. Arthropod D2 receptors positively couple with cAMP through the Gi/o protein family.

    PubMed

    Clark, Merry C; Baro, Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    The pyloric network is an important model system for understanding neuromodulation of rhythmic motor behaviors like breathing or walking. Dopamine (DA) differentially modulates neurons within the pyloric network. However, while the electrophysiological actions of DA have been well characterized, nothing is known about the signaling events that mediate its effects. We have begun a molecular characterization of DA receptors (DARs) in this invertebrate system. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of the lobster D(2) receptor, D(2 alpha Pan). We found that when expressed in HEK cells, the D(2 alpha Pan) receptor is activated by DA, but not other monoamines endogenous to the lobster nervous system. This receptor positively couples with cAMP through multiple Gi/o proteins via two discrete pathways: 1) a G alpha mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC), leading to a decrease in cAMP and 2) a G beta gamma-mediated activation of phospholipase C beta (PLC beta), leading to an increase in cAMP. Alternate splicing alters the potency and efficacy of the receptor, but does not affect monoamine specificity. Finally, we show that arthropod D(2) receptor coupling with cAMP varies with the cellular milieu.

  4. Trypsin- and low pH-mediated fusogenicity of avian metapneumovirus fusion proteins is determined by residues at positions 100, 101 and 294.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bingling; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Gao, Yanni; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-10-26

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are members of the genus Metapneumovirus in the subfamily Pneumovirinae. Metapneumovirus fusion (F) protein mediates the fusion of host cells with the virus membrane for infection. Trypsin- and/or low pH-induced membrane fusion is a strain-dependent phenomenon for hMPV. Here, we demonstrated that three subtypes of aMPV (aMPV/A, aMPV/B, and aMPV/C) F proteins promoted cell-cell fusion in the absence of trypsin. Indeed, in the presence of trypsin, only aMPV/C F protein fusogenicity was enhanced. Mutagenesis of the amino acids at position 100 and/or 101, located at a putative cleavage region in aMPV F proteins, revealed that the trypsin-mediated fusogenicity of aMPV F proteins is regulated by the residues at positions 100 and 101. Moreover, we demonstrated that aMPV/A and aMPV/B F proteins mediated cell-cell fusion independent of low pH, whereas the aMPV/C F protein did not. Mutagenesis of the residue at position 294 in the aMPV/A, aMPV/B, and aMPV/C F proteins showed that 294G played a critical role in F protein-mediated fusion under low pH conditions. These findings on aMPV F protein-induced cell-cell fusion provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying membrane fusion and pathogenesis of aMPV.

  5. Floral ontogeny and gene protein localization rules out euanthial interpretation of reproductive units in Lepironia (Cyperaceae, Mapanioideae, Chrysitricheae)

    PubMed Central

    Prychid, C. J.; Bruhl, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In the sedge subfamily Mapanioideae there are considerable discrepancies between the standard trimerous monocot floral architecture expected and the complex floral and inflorescence morphologies seen. Decades of debate about whether the basic reproductive units are single flowers or pseudanthia have not resolved the question. This paper evaluates current knowledge about Mapaniid reproductive structures and presents an ontogenetic study of the Mapaniid genus Lepironia with the first floral protein expression maps for the family, localizing the products of the APETALA1/FRUITFULL-like (AP1/FUL) MADS-box genes with the aim of shedding light on this conundrum. Methods A range of reproductive developmental stages, from spikelet primordia through to infructescence material, were processed for anatomical and immunohistochemical analyses. Key Results The basic reproductive unit is subtended by a bract and possesses two prophyll-like structures, the first organs to be initiated on the primordium, which grow rapidly, enclosing two whorls of initiating leaf-like structures with intervening stamens and a central gynoecium, formed from an annular primordium. The subtending bract and prophyll-like structures possess very different morphologies from that of the internal leaf-like structures and do not show AP1/FUL-like protein localization, which is otherwise strongly localized in the internal leaf-like structures, stamens and gynoecia. Conclusions Results support the synanthial hypothesis as the evolutionary origin of the reproductive unit. Thus, the basic reproductive unit in Lepironia is an extremely condensed pseudanthium, of staminate flowers surrounding a central terminal pistillate female flower. Early in development the reproductive unit becomes enclosed by a split-prophyll, with the whole structure subtended by a bract. PMID:23723258

  6. p85 protein expression is associated with poor survival in HER2-positive patients with advanced breast cancer treated with trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Pavlakis, Kitty; Bobos, Mattheos; Batistatou, Anna; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Stofas, Anastasios; Timotheadou, Eleni; Pentheroudakis, George; Psyrri, Amanda; Koutras, Angelos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papakostas, Pavlos; Razis, Evangelia; Christodoulou, Christos; Kalogeras, Konstantine T; Fountzilas, George

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the immunohistochemical expression of p85 in a cohort of trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive and HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients. The medical records of all patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with trastuzumab-based regimens between 1998 and 2010 were reviewed and clinical information was obtained. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples with adequate material were retrospectively collected from 183 patients. Samples were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for p85, estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PgR), HER2, Ki67, PTEN and phosphorylated Akt (S473 and T308). HER2 status was studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well. PIK3CA mutational status was also evaluated. Median follow-up for all patients was 72 months. Central re-evaluation for HER2 revealed only 111 HER2-positive cases, with the remaining 72 patients being HER2-negative. Median survival was longer in HER2-positive patients (50.7 months) compared to HER2-negative patients (36.6 months) both treated with trastuzumab, but this difference has not reached significance (p = 0.068). In total, 62% of the patients were found positive for p85, however the p85 protein was not found to be differentially expressed in HER2-positive versus HER2-negative cases. There were no significant associations between protein expression of p85 and any of the markers under study, or with time to progression. Positive p85 protein expression was however associated with poor survival in trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive patients. In our cohort of trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive breast cancer patients, positive p85 protein expression appears to be a prognostic factor of poor survival and, if validated, might have important implications in the treatment of such patients.

  7. Positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with survival rates of NSCLC patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yujin; Wang, Liancong; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Guan; Wang, Yuezhen; Lai, Xiaojing; Li, Jianqiang

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic and predictive importance of p53, c-erbB2 and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) expression and its correlation with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins in 152 tumor samples from resected primary NSCLCs was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The correlation of proteins, survival and clinicopathological characteristics was investigated in 152 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. The positive rates of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression were 53.9 (82/152), 44.1 (67/152) and 43.4% (66/152), respectively. Overall survival rates of patients were markedly correlated with the overexpression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins. One, 2- and 3-year survival rates of patients exhibiting a positive expression of these proteins were 72.6, 54.8 and 32.2%, respectively. These rates were lower compared with those of patients with a negative expression of these proteins (92.1, 78.5 and 63.4%) (P=0.02, 0.01 or 0.00, respectively). Results of Cox's regression analysis showed that c-erbB2 expression and cell differentiation were independent prognostic factors in patients with NSCLC. These findings suggest that the positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with the survival rates of NSCLC patients. Detection of positive p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression may be a useful predictive indicator of prognosis. Positive c-erbB2 expression is an independent prognostic factor, with a potential to be used as a predictive indicator of chemotherapy efficacy in NSCLC patients.

  8. Major latex protein-like protein 43 (MLP43) functions as a positive regulator during abscisic acid responses and confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanping; Yang, Li; Chen, Xi; Ye, Tiantian; Zhong, Bao; Liu, Ruijie; Wu, Yan; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the disadvantageous environmental conditions for plant growth and reproduction. Given the importance of abscisic acid (ABA) to plant growth and abiotic stress responses, identification of novel components involved in ABA signalling transduction is critical. In this study, we screened numerous Arabidopsis thaliana mutants by seed germination assay and identified a mutant mlp43 (major latex protein-like 43) with decreased ABA sensitivity in seed germination. The mlp43 mutant was sensitive to drought stress while the MLP43-overexpressed transgenic plants were drought tolerant. The tissue-specific expression pattern analysis showed that MLP43 was predominantly expressed in cotyledons, primary roots and apical meristems, and a subcellular localization study indicated that MLP43 was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Physiological and biochemical analyses indicated that MLP43 functioned as a positive regulator in ABA- and drought-stress responses in Arabidopsis through regulating water loss efficiency, electrolyte leakage, ROS levels, and as well as ABA-responsive gene expression. Moreover, metabolite profiling analysis indicated that MLP43 could modulate the production of primary metabolites under drought stress conditions. Reconstitution of ABA signalling components in Arabidopsis protoplasts indicated that MLP43 was involved in ABA signalling transduction and acted upstream of SnRK2s by directly interacting with SnRK2.6 and ABF1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, ABA and drought stress down-regulated MLP43 expression as a negative feedback loop regulation to the performance of MLP43 in ABA and drought stress responses. Therefore, this study provided new insights for interpretation of physiological and molecular mechanisms of Arabidopsis MLP43 mediating ABA signalling transduction and drought stress responses. PMID:26512059

  9. Major latex protein-like protein 43 (MLP43) functions as a positive regulator during abscisic acid responses and confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Yang, Li; Chen, Xi; Ye, Tiantian; Zhong, Bao; Liu, Ruijie; Wu, Yan; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the disadvantageous environmental conditions for plant growth and reproduction. Given the importance of abscisic acid (ABA) to plant growth and abiotic stress responses, identification of novel components involved in ABA signalling transduction is critical. In this study, we screened numerous Arabidopsis thaliana mutants by seed germination assay and identified a mutant mlp43 (major latex protein-like 43) with decreased ABA sensitivity in seed germination. The mlp43 mutant was sensitive to drought stress while the MLP43-overexpressed transgenic plants were drought tolerant. The tissue-specific expression pattern analysis showed that MLP43 was predominantly expressed in cotyledons, primary roots and apical meristems, and a subcellular localization study indicated that MLP43 was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Physiological and biochemical analyses indicated that MLP43 functioned as a positive regulator in ABA- and drought-stress responses in Arabidopsis through regulating water loss efficiency, electrolyte leakage, ROS levels, and as well as ABA-responsive gene expression. Moreover, metabolite profiling analysis indicated that MLP43 could modulate the production of primary metabolites under drought stress conditions. Reconstitution of ABA signalling components in Arabidopsis protoplasts indicated that MLP43 was involved in ABA signalling transduction and acted upstream of SnRK2s by directly interacting with SnRK2.6 and ABF1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, ABA and drought stress down-regulated MLP43 expression as a negative feedback loop regulation to the performance of MLP43 in ABA and drought stress responses. Therefore, this study provided new insights for interpretation of physiological and molecular mechanisms of Arabidopsis MLP43 mediating ABA signalling transduction and drought stress responses.

  10. Serum Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2 binding protein in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Lee-Lee; Sthaneshwar, Pavai; Nik Mustapha, Nik Raihan; Goh, Khean-Lee; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2017-01-01

    Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2 binding protein (WFA+-M2BP) has been suggested to be useful for the assessment of disease severity in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Consecutive adult NAFLD patients who had a liver biopsy were included. Serum WFA+-M2BP level was measured using a lectin-antibody sandwich immunoassay using a chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay machine (HISCL-5000, Sysmex, Kobe, Japan). The measured levels were indexed using the following equation: Cut-off index (COI) = ([WFA+-M2BP]sample−[WFA+-M2BP]NC) / ([WFA+-M2BP]PC−[WFA+-M2BP]NC), where PC = positive control and NC = negative control. Histopathological examination of liver biopsy specimen was reported according to Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network Scoring System. Data for 220 cases were analyzed. The AUROC of the COI for the diagnosis of NASH was 0.65. The AUROC of the COI for the diagnosis of steatosis grade ≥2 and 3 was 0.64 and 0.53, respectively. The AUROC of the COI for the diagnosis of lobular inflammation grade ≥1, ≥2 and 3 was 0.57, 0.68 and 0.59, respectively. The AUROC of the COI for the diagnosis of hepatocyte ballooning grade ≥1 and 2 was 0.64 and 0.65, respectively. The AUROC of the COI for the diagnosis of fibrosis stage ≥1, ≥2, ≥3 and 4 was 0.61, 0.71, 0.74 and 0.84, respectively. Out of the 220 cases, 152 cases were the same 76 patients who had a repeat liver biopsy after 48 weeks of intervention. The AUROC of the change in the COI to detect improvement in steatosis, lobular inflammation, hepatocyte ballooning and fibrosis was 0.57, 0.54, 0.59 and 0.52, respectively. In conclusion, serum WFA+-M2BP was most useful for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis, advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis in NAFLD patients. However, it was less useful for differentiating NASH from non-NASH, and for diagnosis and follow-up of the individual histopathological components of NASH. PMID:28369100

  11. Comparative Distribution of Relaxin-3 Inputs and Calcium-Binding Protein-Positive Neurons in Rat Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fabio N; Pereira, Celia W; Sánchez-Pérez, Ana M; Otero-García, Marcos; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E

    2016-01-01

    The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or "hubs") within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI) in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals) within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR) and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and in the endopiriform nucleus. In

  12. Comparative Distribution of Relaxin-3 Inputs and Calcium-Binding Protein-Positive Neurons in Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fabio N.; Pereira, Celia W.; Sánchez-Pérez, Ana M.; Otero-García, Marcos; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L.; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E.

    2016-01-01

    The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or “hubs”) within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI) in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals) within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR) and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and in the endopiriform nucleus

  13. Distinctive Binding of Avibactam to Penicillin-Binding Proteins of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asli, Abdelhamid; Brouillette, Eric; Krause, Kevin M; Nichols, Wright W; Malouin, François

    2016-02-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that covalently acylates a variety of β-lactamases, causing inhibition. Although avibactam presents limited antibacterial activity, its acylation ability toward bacterial penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was investigated. Staphylococcus aureus was of particular interest due to the reported β-lactamase activity of PBP4. The binding of avibactam to PBPs was measured by adding increasing concentrations to membrane preparations of a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria prior to addition of the fluorescent reagent Bocillin FL. Relative binding (measured here as the 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) to PBPs was estimated by quantification of fluorescence after gel electrophoresis. Avibactam was found to selectively bind to some PBPs. In Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, and S. aureus, avibactam primarily bound to PBP2, with IC50s of 0.92, 1.1, 3.0, and 51 μg/ml, respectively, whereas binding to PBP3 was observed in Streptococcus pneumoniae (IC50, 8.1 μg/ml). Interestingly, avibactam was able to significantly enhance labeling of S. aureus PBP4 by Bocillin FL. In PBP competition assays with S. aureus, where avibactam was used at a fixed concentration in combination with varied amounts of ceftazidime, the apparent IC50 of ceftazidime was found to be very similar to that determined for ceftazidime when used alone. In conclusion, avibactam is able to covalently bind to some bacterial PBPs. Identification of those PBP targets may allow the development of new diazabicyclooctane derivatives with improved affinity for PBPs or new combination therapies that act on multiple PBP targets.

  14. Effect of rosiglitazone on visfatin and retinol-binding protein-4 plasma concentrations in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Haider, D G; Schindler, K; Mittermayer, F; Müller, M; Nowotny, P; Rieger, A; Luger, A; Ludvik, B; Wolzt, M

    2007-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZD) may improve insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and HIV. The novel adipocytokines visfatin and retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP-4) have been proposed to influence the development of impaired glucose tolerance. The impact of TZD on these cytokines is yet unknown. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group study, 37 lean HIV-positive subjects aged 19-50 years were treated with 8 mg/day rosiglitazone (n=20) or placebo (n=17) for 6 months. Insulin sensitivity was estimated from the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Fasting visfatin, RBP-4, leptin, and adiponectin plasma concentrations were analyzed by immunoassays. Rosiglitazone had no effect on impaired insulin sensitivity, but increased median plasma visfatin from 6.2 ng/ml (95% CI: 5.9; 6.5) to 13.7 ng/ml (12.6; 19.1) (P<0.001) and adiponectin from 3.2 ng/ml (2.2; 4.0) to 4.0 ng/ml (3.3; 8.5; P<0.001). RBP-4 was lowered from 21.0 ng/ml (19.6; 23.1) to 16.3 ng/ml (15.2; 17.0; P<0.001), and leptin concentrations were unchanged. Adipocytokine concentrations were stable in subjects receiving placebo, where a deterioration in insulin sensitivity was detectable (P<0.05). Changes in visfatin and RBP-4 were correlated in subjects receiving rosiglitazone (r=-0.64, P<0.01) but not placebo (r=0.12, P=0.15). TZD treatment affects circulating adipocytokine concentrations in subjects with HIV. Reductions in RBP-4 and increases in visfatin may contribute to the pharmacodynamic action of TZD on glucose homeostasis. Quantification of adipocytokines might be useful to assess TZD treatment effectiveness in insulin-resistant subjects with HIV.

  15. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    PubMed Central

    Otwell, A.E.; Sherwood, R.W.; Zhang, S.; Nelson, O.D.; Li, Z.; Lin, H.; Callister, S.J.; Richardson, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. Using non-denaturing separations and mass spectrometry identification, in combination with a colorimetric screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins from the D. reducens proteome not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. The proteins identified are NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:25389064

  16. Effect of amino acid sequence variations at position 149 on the fusogenic activity of the subtype B avian metapneumovirus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bingling; Gao, Yanni; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Liu, Changjun; Cui, Hongyu; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells requires the fusion of viral and cell membranes. These membrane fusion reactions are mediated by virus-encoded glycoproteins. In the case of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), the fusion (F) protein alone can mediate virus entry and induce syncytium formation in vitro. To investigate the fusogenic activity of the aMPV F protein, we compared the fusogenic activities of three subtypes of aMPV F proteins using a TCSD50 assay developed in this study. Interestingly, we found that the F protein of aMPV subtype B (aMPV/B) strain VCO3/60616 (aMPV/vB) was hyperfusogenic when compared with F proteins of aMPV/B strain aMPV/f (aMPV/fB), aMPV subtype A (aMPV/A), and aMPV subtype C (aMPV/C). We then further demonstrated that the amino acid (aa) residue 149F contributed to the hyperfusogenic activity of the aMPV/vB F protein. Moreover, we revealed that residue 149F had no effect on the fusogenic activities of aMPV/A, aMPV/C, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) F proteins. Collectively, we provide the first evidence that the amino acid at position 149 affects the fusogenic activity of the aMPV/B F protein, and our findings will provide new insights into the fusogenic mechanism of this protein.

  17. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics. PMID:26732734

  18. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-06

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics.

  19. Elicitin-membrane interaction is driven by a positive charge on the protein surface: role of Lys13 residue in lipids loading and resistance induction.

    PubMed

    Plešková, Veronika; Kašparovský, Tomáš; Obořil, Michal; Ptáčková, Nikola; Chaloupková, Radka; Ladislav, Dokládal; Damborský, Jiří; Lochman, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Elicitins are family of small proteins secreted by species of the pathogenic fungus Phytophthora inducing a defence reaction in plants. They contain a hydrophobic cavity capable of binding sterols and fatty acids, and on the basis of their pI they are classified as either α-elicitins or more necrotising β-elicitins. The residue Lys13 was previously identified as a key determinant of the necrotising activity of basic elicitins. In the present study we describe changes in the ability of cryptogein, a β-elicitin inducing a hypersensitive response in tobacco, to transfer sterols and fatty acids between micelles and liposomes upon Lys13Val mutation. We propose that the change in activity is influenced by the elimination of positive charge on the surface of cryptogein, which is significant for correct positioning of the protein during lipid loading, without adversely affecting the binding of sterol to the cavity of the protein. Compared to wild type cryptogein, mutation Lys13Val resulted in lowered expression of defence-related genes and compromised resistance to Phytophthora parasitica. Furthermore, resistance induced by Lys13Val mutant was similar to that induced by acidic elicitin capsicein containing at amino position 13 valine Determined results sustained a crucial role of positive lysine residues on the surface of basic elicitins and suggested their significant role in correct protein-membrane interaction and thus on their biological activity.

  20. Tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulates immunity-associated programmed cell death by enhancing accumulation and signaling ability of MAPKKKalpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is triggered when Pto, a serine-threonine protein kinase recognizes either the AvrPto or AvrPtoB effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. This PCD requires MAPKKKalpha as a positive regulator in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. To examine how PCD-eliciting activi...

  1. Multi-location gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial protein subcellular localization using gene ontology and multi-label classifier ensemble

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It has become a very important and full of challenge task to predict bacterial protein subcellular locations using computational methods. Although there exist a lot of prediction methods for bacterial proteins, the majority of these methods can only deal with single-location proteins. But unfortunately many multi-location proteins are located in the bacterial cells. Moreover, multi-location proteins have special biological functions capable of helping the development of new drugs. So it is necessary to develop new computational methods for accurately predicting subcellular locations of multi-location bacterial proteins. Results In this article, two efficient multi-label predictors, Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg-ECC-mPLoc, are developed to predict the subcellular locations of multi-label gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial proteins respectively. The two multi-label predictors construct the GO vectors by using the GO terms of homologous proteins of query proteins and then adopt a powerful multi-label ensemble classifier to make the final multi-label prediction. The two multi-label predictors have the following advantages: (1) they improve the prediction performance of multi-label proteins by taking the correlations among different labels into account; (2) they ensemble multiple CC classifiers and further generate better prediction results by ensemble learning; and (3) they construct the GO vectors by using the frequency of occurrences of GO terms in the typical homologous set instead of using 0/1 values. Experimental results show that Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg-ECC-mPLoc can efficiently predict the subcellular locations of multi-label gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial proteins respectively. Conclusions Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg-ECC-mPLoc can efficiently improve prediction accuracy of subcellular localization of multi-location gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial proteins respectively. The online web servers for Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg

  2. Purification of TAT-CC-HA protein under native condition, and its transduction analysis and biological effects on BCR-ABL positive cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenglan; Ji, Maosheng; Peng, Zhi; Huang, Shifeng; Xiao, Qing; Li, Chunli; Zeng, Jianming; Gao, Miao; Feng, Wenli

    2011-06-01

    BCR-ABL oncoprotein is the cause of chronic myeloid leukemia. The homologous oligomerization of BCR-ABL protein mediated by BCR coiled-coil (CC) domain plays an important role in ABL kinase activation. The HIV-1 TAT peptide has been used extensively for the introduction of proteins into cells. We recombinated a TAT-CC-HA protein to interrupt the homologous oligomerization of BCR-ABL. The expression conditions for TAT-CC-HA were optimized. The TAT-CC-HA fusion protein was purified with Ni+-NTA resin. TAT-CC-HA fusion protein was added into the cultures of Ba/F3-p210, 32D-p210, K562, KU812, Ba/F3, 32D, and HL-60 cells. It was found that TAT-CC-HA could transduce into these cells. It was confirmed that TAT-CC-HA fusion protein was internalized by Ba/F3-p210, K562, and Ba/F3 cells and located in the cytoplasm observed by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. The transduction of TAT-CC-HA fusion protein into K562 cells was in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The result of coimmunoprecipitation assay indicated that TAT-CC-HA could interact with BCR-ABL in K562 cells. The effects of TAT-CC-HA fusion protein on cell growth and apoptosis were detected by MTT test and flow cytometry. Our findings suggested that TAT-CC-HA fusion protein could specifically inhibit the growth of BCR-ABL positive cells, and specifically induce apoptosis of BCR-ABL positive cells, while not affect the growth and apoptosis of BCR-ABL negative cells.

  3. The Achilles' Heel of "Ultrastable" Hyperthermophile Proteins: Submillimolar Concentrations of SDS Stimulate Rapid Conformational Change, Aggregation, and Amyloid Formation in Proteins Carrying Overall Positive Charge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed M; Sharma, Prerna; Arora, Kanika; Kishor, Nitin; Kaila, Pallavi; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-07-19

    Low concentrations (<3.0 mM) of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid fibers in more than 20 different mesophile-derived proteins in the cationic state. It is not known whether SDS has similar effects on hyperthermophile-derived proteins, which are otherwise thought to be "ultrastable" and inordinately resistant to structural perturbations at room temperature. Here, we show that low (<4.5 mM) concentrations of SDS rapidly induce the formation of aggregates and amyloid fibers in five different ultrastable Pyrococcus furiosus proteins in the cationic state. We also show that amyloid formation is accompanied by the development of a characteristic, negative circular dichroism band at ∼230 nm. These effects are not seen if the proteins have a net negative charge or when higher concentrations of SDS are used (which induce helix formation instead). Our results appear to reveal a potential weakness or "Achilles' heel" in ultrastable proteins from hyperthermophiles. They also provide very strong support for the view that SDS initially interacts with proteins through electrostatic interactions, and not hydrophobic interactions, eliciting similar effects entirely regardless of protein molecular weight, or structural features such as quaternary structure or tertiary structural stability.

  4. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  5. The euAP1 protein MPF3 represses MPF2 to specify floral calyx identity and displays crucial roles in Chinese lantern development in Physalis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Ji-Si; Zhao, Man; Gong, Pichang; Riss, Simone; Saedler, Rainer; He, Chaoying

    2013-06-01

    The Chinese lantern phenotype or inflated calyx syndrome (ICS) is a postfloral morphological novelty in Physalis. Its origin is associated with the heterotopic expression of the MADS box gene 2 from Physalis floridana (MPF2) in floral organs, yet the process underlying its identity remains elusive. Here, we show that MPF3, which is expressed specifically in floral tissues, encodes a core eudicot APETALA1-like (euAP1) MADS-domain protein. MPF3 was primarily localized to the nucleus, and it interacted with MPF2 and some floral MADS-domain proteins to selectively bind the CC-A-rich-GG (CArG) boxes in the MPF2 promoter. Downregulating MPF3 resulted in a dramatic elevation in MPF2 in the calyces and androecium, leading to enlarged and leaf-like floral calyces; however, the postfloral lantern was smaller and deformed. Starch accumulation in pollen was blocked. MPF3 MPF2 double knockdowns showed normal floral calyces and more mature pollen than those found in plants in which either MPF3 or MPF2 was downregulated. Therefore, MPF3 specifies calyx identity and regulates ICS formation and male fertility through interactions with MPF2/MPF2. Furthermore, both genes were found to activate Physalis floridana invertase gene 4 homolog, which encodes an invertase cleaving Suc, a putative key gene in sugar partitioning. The novel role of the MPF3-MPF2 regulatory circuit in male fertility is integral to the origin of ICS. Our results shed light on the evolution and development of ICS in Physalis and on the functional evolution of euAP1s in angiosperms.

  6. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Mark D.; Block, Gregory J.; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C.; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Lasky, Joseph A.

    2011-06-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

  7. Quantitative analysis of modified proteins and their positional isomers by tandem mass spectrometry: human histone H4.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, James J; Mizzen, Craig A; Kelleher, Neil L

    2006-07-01

    Here we show that fragment ion abundances from dissociation of ions created from mixtures of multiply modified histone H4 (11 kDa) or of N-terminal synthetic peptides (2 kDa) correspond to their respective intact ion abundances measured by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Isomeric mixtures of modified forms of the same protein are resolved and quantitated with a precision of protein ions created by electrospray greatly easing many of the systematic biases that more strongly affect small peptides (e.g., differences in ionization efficiency and ion m/z values). The ion fragmentation methods validated here are directly extensible to intact human proteins to derive quantitative information on the highly related and often isomeric protein forms created by combinatorial arrays of posttranslational modifications.

  8. The effect of small cations on the positive electrospray responses of proteins at low pH.

    PubMed

    Pan, Peng; McLuckey, Scott A

    2003-10-15

    Solutions consisting of protein and small molecule mixtures have been subjected to electrospray ionization to study the influence of small molecule/cation components at high concentrations on the electrospray responses of proteins. Emphasis was placed on solutions consisting of equal parts methanol and water and containing 1 vol % acetic acid. The results, therefore, are relevant to low pH solutions with significant organic content, a commonly used set of conditions in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry that tends to denature proteins. A variety of small cations/molecules were selected to sample a range of chemical characteristics. For example, sodium and cesium cations were studied to represent metal ions, tetrabutylammonium and tetramethylammonium cations were studied to represent quaternary ammonium compounds with different surface activities, and octadecylamine and glycine were studied to represent species that compete for protons but have different surface activities. A methodology for measuring relative ion suppression efficiencies was developed and applied for protein ions derived from bovine cytochrome c. The form of the small cation (i.e., metal ion, quaternary ammonium ion, or protonated molecule) did not appear to be a factor in determining the efficiency with which protein ion signals were suppressed. The extent to which ions are expected to concentrate on the surface, however, was the major factor in determining the ion suppression efficiency. Itwas found that the ion suppression efficiency of the most surface active species in this study was comparable to that of a protein on another protein after normalization by charge. These results are particularly relevant to the development of mixture analysis strategies based on ionization and tandem mass spectrometry applied to mixtures of whole proteins.

  9. Identification of positive-acting domains in GCN2 protein kinase required for translational activation of GCN4 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wek, R.C.; Ramirez, M.; Jackson, B.M.; Hinnebusch, A.G. )

    1990-06-01

    GCN4 is a transcriptional activator of amino acid-biosynthetic genes in the yeast {ital Saccharomyces cerevisiae}. GCN2, a translational activator of {ital GCN4} expression, contains a domain homologous to the catalytic subunit of eukaryotic protein kinases. Substitution of a highly conserved lysine residue in the kinase domain abolished GCN2 regulatory function in vivo and its ability to autophosphorylate in vitro, indicating that GCN2 acts as a protein kinase in stimulating {ital GCN4} expression. Elevated {ital GCN2} gene dosage led to depression of {ital GCN4} under nonstarvation conditions; however, the authors found that {ital GCN2} mRNA and protein levels did not increase in wild-type cells in response to amino acid starvation. Therefore, it appears that GCN2 protein kinase function is stimulated postranslationally in amino acid-starved cells. Three dominant-constitutive {ital GCN2} point mutations were isolated that led to derepressed {ital GCN4} expression under nonstarvation conditions. Two of the {ital GCN2}(Con) mutations mapped in the kinase domain itself. The third mapped just downstream from a carboxyl-terminal segment homologous to histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS), which the authors suggest might function to detect uncharged tRNA in amino acid-starved cells and activate the adjacent protein kinase moiety.

  10. MYB98 Positively Regulates a Battery of Synergid-Expressed Genes Encoding Filiform Apparatus–Localized Proteins[W

    PubMed Central

    Punwani, Jayson A.; Rabiger, David S.; Drews, Gary N.

    2007-01-01

    The synergid cells within the female gametophyte are essential for reproduction in angiosperms. MYB98 encodes an R2R3-MYB protein required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation by the synergid cells. To test the predicted function of MYB98 as a transcriptional regulator, we determined its subcellular localization and examined its DNA binding properties. We show that MYB98 binds to a specific DNA sequence (TAAC) and that a MYB98–green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to the nucleus, consistent with a role in transcriptional regulation. To identify genes regulated by MYB98, we tested previously identified synergid-expressed genes for reduced expression in myb98 female gametophytes and identified 16 such genes. We dissected the promoter of one of the downstream genes, DD11, and show that it contains a MYB98 binding site required for synergid expression, suggesting that DD11 is regulated directly by MYB98. To gain insight into the functions of the downstream genes, we chose five genes and determined the subcellular localization of the encoded proteins. We show that these five proteins are secreted into the filiform apparatus, suggesting that they play a role in either the formation or the function of this unique structure. Together, these data suggest that MYB98 functions as a transcriptional regulator in the synergid cells and activates the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation. PMID:17693534

  11. Selective and Nonselective Cleavages in Positive and Negative CID of the Fragments Generated from In-Source Decay of Intact Proteins in MALDI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Sekiya, Sadanori; Iimuro, Ryunosuke; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Selective and nonselective cleavages in ion trap low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments of the fragments generated from in-source decay (ISD) with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) of intact proteins are described in both positive and negative ion modes. The MALDI-ISD spectra of the proteins demonstrate common, discontinuous, abundant c- and z'-ions originating from cleavage at the N-Cα bond of Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx residues in both positive- and negative-ion modes. The positive ion CID of the c- and z'-ions resulted in product ions originating from selective cleavage at Asp-Xxx, Glu-Xxx and Cys-Xxx residues. Nonselective cleavage product ions rationalized by the mechanism of a "mobile proton" are also observed in positive ion CID spectra. Negative ion CID of the ISD fragments results in complex product ions accompanied by the loss of neutrals from b-, c-, and y-ions. The most characteristic feature of negative ion CID is selective cleavage of the peptide bonds of acidic residues, Xxx-Asp/Glu/Cys. A definite influence of α-helix on the CID product ions was not obtained. However, the results from positive ion and negative ion CID of the MALDI-ISD fragments that may have long α-helical domains suggest that acidic residues in helix-free regions tend to degrade more than those in helical regions.

  12. Positively charged mini-protein Zbasic2 as a highly efficient silica binding module: opportunities for enzyme immobilization on unmodified silica supports.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-07-03

    Silica is a highly attractive support material for protein immobilization in a wide range of biotechnological and biomedical-analytical applications. Without suitable derivatization, however, the silica surface is not generally usable for attachment of proteins. We show here that Z(basic2) (a three α-helix bundle mini-protein of 7 kDa size that exposes clustered positive charges from multiple arginine residues on one side) functions as highly efficient silica binding module (SBM), allowing chimeras of target protein with SBM to become very tightly attached to underivatized glass at physiological pH conditions. We used two enzymes, d-amino acid oxidase and sucrose phosphorylase, to demonstrate direct immobilization of Z(basic2) protein from complex biological samples with extremely high selectivity. Immobilized enzymes displayed full biological activity, suggesting that their binding to the glass surface had occurred in a preferred orientation via the SBM. We also show that charge complementarity was the main principle of affinity between SBM and glass surface, and Z(basic2) proteins were bound in a very strong, yet fully reversible manner, presumably through multipoint noncovalent interactions. Z(basic2) proteins were immobilized on porous glass in a loading of 30 mg protein/g support or higher, showing that attachment via the SBM combines excellent binding selectivity with a technically useful binding capacity. Therefore, Z(basic2) and silica constitute a fully orthogonal pair of binding module and insoluble support for oriented protein immobilization, and this opens up new opportunities for the application of silica-based materials in the development of supported heterogeneous biocatalysts.

  13. Recent Positive Selection Has Acted on Genes Encoding Proteins with More Interactions within the Whole Human Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Pybus, Marc; Fares, Mario A.; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Laayouni, Hafid

    2015-01-01

    Genes vary in their likelihood to undergo adaptive evolution. The genomic factors that determine adaptability, however, remain poorly understood. Genes function in the context of molecular networks, with some occupying more important positions than others and thus being likely to be under stronger selective pressures. However, how positive selection distributes across the different parts of molecular networks is still not fully understood. Here, we inferred positive selection using comparative genomics and population genetics approaches through the comparison of 10 mammalian and 270 human genomes, respectively. In agreement with previous results, we found that genes with lower network centralities are more likely to evolve under positive selection (as inferred from divergence data). Surprisingly, polymorphism data yield results in the opposite direction than divergence data: Genes with higher centralities are more likely to have been targeted by recent positive selection during recent human evolution. Our results indicate that the relationship between centrality and the impact of adaptive evolution highly depends on the mode of positive selection and/or the evolutionary time-scale. PMID:25840415

  14. Recent positive selection has acted on genes encoding proteins with more interactions within the whole human interactome.

    PubMed

    Luisi, Pierre; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Pybus, Marc; Fares, Mario A; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Laayouni, Hafid

    2015-04-02

    Genes vary in their likelihood to undergo adaptive evolution. The genomic factors that determine adaptability, however, remain poorly understood. Genes function in the context of molecular networks, with some occupying more important positions than others and thus being likely to be under stronger selective pressures. However, how positive selection distributes across the different parts of molecular networks is still not fully understood. Here, we inferred positive selection using comparative genomics and population genetics approaches through the comparison of 10 mammalian and 270 human genomes, respectively. In agreement with previous results, we found that genes with lower network centralities are more likely to evolve under positive selection (as inferred from divergence data). Surprisingly, polymorphism data yield results in the opposite direction than divergence data: Genes with higher centralities are more likely to have been targeted by recent positive selection during recent human evolution. Our results indicate that the relationship between centrality and the impact of adaptive evolution highly depends on the mode of positive selection and/or the evolutionary time-scale.

  15. Death associated protein 1 (DAP 1) positively regulates virus replication and apoptosis of hemocytes in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wen-Li; Kang, Li-Hua; Liu, Chang-Bin; Kang, Cui-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Death-associated protein 1 (DAP1) is a small proline-rich cytoplasmic protein that functions both in the apoptosis and autophage process of mammalian and in the clinical cancer of human. However, little knowledge is known about the homologue gene of DAP1 and its roles in the physiological process of invertebrates. In this paper, we report a novel function of DAP1 in the antivirus immunity of shrimp. A homologue gene of DAP1 was cloned from Marsupenaeus japonicus and named as Mjdap-1. The full-length of Mjdap-1 was 1761 bp with a 309 bp open reading frame that encoded 102 amino acids. Reverse transcription-PCR results showed that Mjdap-1 was expressed in all tested tissues, including hemocytes, gills, intestines, stomach, heart, hepatopancreas, testes, and ovaries. In shrimp, Mjdap-1 transcripts were up-regulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection; Mjdap-1 knockdown decreased the virus copy in vivo and the mortality of M. japonicus to WSSV challenge. Conversely, injecting the purified recombinant MjDAP1 protein promoted the amplification of virus in shrimp. Flow cytometric assay showed, the virus infection-induced apoptosis of hemocytes was enhanced by MjDAP1 protein injection and inhibited in MjDAP1 knockdown shrimp. Furthermore, the expression of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was regulated by Mjdap-1, but the caspase transcripts were not affected. Our results suggested that MjDAP1 facilitated the amplification of virus in shrimp, which may be attributed to the promotion of hemocyte apoptosis in an AIF-dependent manner. These results provided a new insight into the function of this protein that may be used for virus disease control.

  16. Differential expression of cytoskeletal proteins in the dendrites of parvalbumin-positive interneurons versus granule cells in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    de Haas Ratzliff, A; Soltesz, I

    2000-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive interneurons and granule cells of the dentate gyrus exhibit characteristic differences in morphological, cytochemical, physiological, and pathophysiological properties. Several of these defining features, including dendritic morphology, spine density, and sensitivity to insults, are likely to be influenced by the neuronal cytoskeleton. The data in this paper demonstrate striking differences in the expression levels of all three neurofilament triplet proteins, as well as alpha-internexin and beta-tubulin III, between the parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dentate granule cells. Therefore, the molecular composition of intermediate filaments and microtubules in the dendritic domain of parvalbumin-positive dentate interneurons is distinct from the cytoskeleton of neighboring granule cells, indicating the existence of highly cell type-specific cytoskeletal architecture within the dentate gyrus.

  17. Targeted Therapy of Fn14-Positive Breast Tumors Using a TWEAK-Cytotoxin Fusion Protein or Noncovalent Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    represent a novel modality to inhibit tumor growth . The use of mAbs, ligands, designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins; ref. 14), and adnectins (15...untreated cells. Specific Aim 2: To determine if TWEAK-mediated cytotoxin delivery can inhibit breast tumor xenograft growth in mice. Task...if Fn14-targeted toxin reduces tumor growth . Progress: We obtained MDA-MB-231-luciferase cells from a collaborator (Dr. Martin, Univ. Md. School

  18. DPDR-CPI, a server that predicts Drug Positioning and Drug Repositioning via Chemical-Protein Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Zhang, Ping; Cao, Xi Hang; Du, Dizheng; Ye, Hao; Huang, Hui; Li, Can; Qin, Shengying; Wan, Chunling; Shi, Leming; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2016-01-01

    The cost of developing a new drug has increased sharply over the past years. To ensure a reasonable return-on-investment, it is useful for drug discovery researchers in both industry and academia to identify all the possible indications for early pipeline molecules. For the first time, we propose the term computational “drug candidate positioning” or “drug positioning”, to describe the above process. It is distinct from drug repositioning, which identifies new uses for existing drugs and maximizes their value. Since many therapeutic effects are mediated by unexpected drug-protein interactions, it is reasonable to analyze the chemical-protein interactome (CPI) profiles to predict indications. Here we introduce the server DPDR-CPI, which can make real-time predictions based only on the structure of the small molecule. When a user submits a molecule, the server will dock it across 611 human proteins, generating a CPI profile of features that can be used for predictions. It can suggest the likelihood of relevance of the input molecule towards ~1,000 human diseases with top predictions listed. DPDR-CPI achieved an overall AUROC of 0.78 during 10-fold cross-validations and AUROC of 0.76 for the independent validation. The server is freely accessible via http://cpi.bio-x.cn/dpdr/. PMID:27805045

  19. A sporulation-specific, sigF-dependent protein, SspA, affects septum positioning in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Tzanis, Angelos; Dalton, Kate A; Hesketh, Andrew; den Hengst, Chris D; Buttner, Mark J; Thibessard, Annabelle; Kelemen, Gabriella H

    2014-01-01

    The RNA polymerase sigma factor SigF controls late development during sporulation in the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. The only known SigF-dependent gene identified so far, SCO5321, is found in the biosynthetic cluster encoding spore pigment synthesis. Here we identify the first direct target for SigF, the gene sspA, encoding a sporulation-specific protein. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that SspA is a secreted lipoprotein with two PepSY signature domains. The sspA deletion mutant exhibits irregular sporulation septation and altered spore shape, suggesting that SspA plays a role in septum formation and spore maturation. The fluorescent translational fusion protein SspA–mCherry localized first to septum sites, then subsequently around the surface of the spores. Both SspA protein and sspA transcription are absent from the sigF null mutant. Moreover, in vitro transcription assay confirmed that RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing SigF is sufficient for initiation of transcription from a single sspA promoter. In addition, in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that sspA is a direct target of BldD, which functions to repress sporulation genes, including whiG, ftsZ and ssgB, during vegetative growth, co-ordinating their expression during sporulation septation. PMID:24261854

  20. Adjacent positioning of cellular structures enabled by a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein-mediated zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Gao, Xiang-Dong; Howell, Audrey S; Bose, Indrani; Lew, Daniel J; Bi, Erfei

    2007-12-31

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are born carrying localized transmembrane landmark proteins that guide the subsequent establishment of a polarity axis and hence polarized growth to form a bud in the next cell cycle. In haploid cells, the relevant landmark proteins are concentrated at the site of the preceding cell division, to which they recruit Cdc24, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the conserved polarity regulator Cdc42. However, instead of polarizing at the division site, the new polarity axis is directed next to but not overlapping that site. Here, we show that the Cdc42 guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) Rga1 establishes an exclusion zone at the division site that blocks subsequent polarization within that site. In the absence of localized Rga1 GAP activity, new buds do in fact form within the old division site. Thus, Cdc42 activators and GAPs establish concentric zones of action such that polarization is directed to occur adjacent to but not within the previous cell division site.

  1. Structural and functional analysis of an anchorless fibronectin-binding protein FBPS from Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Musyoki, Abednego Moki; Shi, Zhongyu; Xuan, Chunling; Lu, Guangwen; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, Feng; Zheng, Beiwen; Zhang, Qiangmin; Li, Yan; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Cuihua; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The anchorless fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) are a group of important virulence factors for which the structures are not available and the functions are not well defined. In this study we performed comprehensive studies on a prototypic member of this group: the fibronectin-/fibrinogen-binding protein from Streptococcus suis (FBPS). The structures of the N- and C-terminal halves (FBPS-N and FBPS-C), which together cover the full-length protein in sequence, were solved at a resolution of 2.1 and 2.6 Å, respectively, and each was found to be composed of two domains with unique folds. Furthermore, we have elucidated the organization of these domains by small-angle X-ray scattering. We further showed that the fibronectin-binding site is located in FBPS-C and that FBPS promotes the adherence of S. suis to host cells by attaching the bacteria via FBPS-N. Finally, we demonstrated that FBPS functions both as an adhesin, promoting S. suis attachment to host cells, and as a bacterial factor, activating signaling pathways via β1 integrin receptors to induce chemokine production. PMID:27834729

  2. Ectopic expression of the HAM59 gene causes homeotic transformations of reproductive organs in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Shulga, O A; Neskorodov, Ya B; Shchennikova, A V; Gaponenko, A K; Skryabin, K G

    2015-01-01

    The function of the HAM59 MADS-box gene in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) was studied to clarify homeotic C activity in the Asteraceae plant family. For the first time, transgenic sunflower plants with a modified pattern of HAM59 expression were obtained. It was shown that the HAM59 MADS-box transcription factor did mediate C activity in sunflower. In particular, it participated in termination of the floral meristem, repression of the cadastral function of A-activity, and together with other C-type sunflower protein HAM45-in the specification of the identity of stamens and pistils.

  3. Characterization of the Pathway-Specific Positive Transcriptional Regulator for Actinorhodin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as a DNA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Paloma; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Malpartida, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    The ActII-ORF4 protein has been characterized as a DNA-binding protein that positively regulates the transcription of the actinorhodin biosynthetic genes. The target regions for the ActII-ORF4 protein were located within the act cluster. These regions, at high copy number, generate a nonproducer strain by in vivo titration of the regulator. The mutant phenotype could be made to revert with extra copies of the wild-type actII-ORF4 gene but not with the actII-ORF4-177 mutant. His-tagged recombinant wild-type ActII-ORF4 and mutant ActII-ORF4-177 proteins were purified from Escherichia coli cultures; both showed specific DNA-binding activity for the actVI-ORF1–ORFA and actIII-actI intergenic regions. DNase I footprinting assays clearly located the DNA-binding sites within the −35 regions of the corresponding promoters, showing the consensus sequence 5′-TCGAG-3′. Although both gene products (wild-type and mutant ActII-ORF4) showed DNA-binding activity, only the wild-type gene was capable of activating transcription of the act genes; thus, two basic functions can be differentiated within the regulatory protein: a specific DNA-binding activity and a transcriptional activation of the act biosynthetic genes. PMID:10559161

  4. TaTypA, a Ribosome-Binding GTPase Protein, Positively Regulates Wheat Resistance to the Stripe Rust Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Myo, Thwin; Ma, Wei; Lan, Dingyun; Qi, Tuo; Guo, Jia; Song, Ping; Guo, Jun; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation protein A (TypA/BipA) belongs to the ribosome-binding GTPase superfamily. In many bacterial species, TypA acts as a global stress and virulence regulator and also mediates resistance to the antimicrobial peptide bactericidal permeability-increasing protein. However, the function of TypA in plants under biotic stresses is not known. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized a stress-responsive TypA gene (TaTypA) from wheat, with three copies located on chromosomes 6A, 6B, and 6D, respectively. Transient expression assays indicated chloroplast localization of TaTypA. The transcript levels of TaTypA were up-regulated in response to treatment with methyl viologen, which induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts through photoreaction, cold stress, and infection by an avirulent strain of the stripe rust pathogen. Knock down of the expression of TaTypA through virus-induced gene silencing decreased the resistance of wheat to stripe rust accompanied by weakened ROS accumulation and hypersensitive response, an increase in TaCAT and TaSOD expression, and an increase in pathogen hyphal growth and branching. Our findings suggest that TaTypA contributes to resistance in an ROS-dependent manner. PMID:27446108

  5. Role for the banana AGAMOUS-like gene MaMADS7 in regulation of fruit ripening and quality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhua; Liu, Lin; Li, Yujia; Jia, Caihong; Zhang, Jianbin; Miao, Hongxia; Hu, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-11-01

    MADS-box transcription factors play important roles in organ development. In plants, most studies on MADS-box genes have mainly focused on flower development and only a few concerned fruit development and ripening. A new MADS-box gene named MaMADS7 was isolated from banana fruit by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) based on a MADS-box fragment obtained from a banana suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. MaMADS7 is an AGAMOUS-like MADS-box gene that is preferentially expressed in the ovaries and fruits and in tobacco its protein product localizes to the nucleus. This study found that MaMADS7 expression can be induced by exogenous ethylene. Ectopic expression of MaMADS7 in tomato resulted in broad ripening phenotypes. The expression levels of seven ripening and quality-related genes, ACO1, ACS2, E4, E8, PG, CNR and PSY1 in MaMADS7 transgenic tomato fruits were greatly increased while the expression of the AG-like MADS-box gene TAGL1 was suppressed. Compared with the control, the contents of β-carotene, lycopene, ascorbic acid and organic acid in transformed tomato fruits were increased, while the contents of glucose and fructose were slightly decreased. MaMADS7 interacted with banana 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene 1 (MaACO1) and tomato phytoene synthase gene (LePSY1) promoters. Our results indicated that MaMADS7 plays an important role in initiating endogenous ethylene biosynthesis and fruit ripening.

  6. Oxidation of methionine 216 in sheep and elk prion protein is highly dependent upon the amino acid at position 218 but is not important for prion propagation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Christopher J; Dynin, Irina; Erickson, Melissa L; Requena, Jesús R; Balachandran, Aru; Hui, Colleen; Onisko, Bruce C; Carter, John Mark

    2013-03-26

    We employed a sensitive mass spectrometry-based method to deconstruct, confirm, and quantitate the prions present in elk naturally infected with chronic wasting disease and sheep naturally infected with scrapie. We used this approach to study the oxidation of a methionine at position 216 (Met216), because this oxidation (MetSO216) has been implicated in prion formation. Three polymorphisms (Ile218, Val218, and Thr218) of sheep recombinant prion protein were prepared. Our analysis showed the novel result that the proportion of MetSO216 was highly dependent upon the amino acid residue at position 218 (I > V > T), indicating that Ile218 in sheep and elk prion protein (PrP) renders the Met216 intrinsically more susceptible to oxidation than the Val218 or Thr218 analogue. We were able to quantitate the prions in the attomole range. The presence of prions was verified by the detection of two confirmatory peptides: GENFTETDIK (sheep and elk) and ESQAYYQR (sheep) or ESEAYYQR (elk). This approach required much smaller amounts of tissue (600 μg) than traditional methods of detection (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis) (60 mg). In sheep and elk, a normal cellular prion protein containing MetSO216 is not actively recruited and converted to prions, although we observed that this Met216 is intrinsically more susceptible to oxidation.

  7. Triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes by down-regulating expression of a viral protein LMP1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Heng; Guo, Wei; Long, Cong; Wang, Huan; Wang, Jingchao; Sun, Xiaoping

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Triptolide inhibits proliferation of EBV-positive lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. • Triptolide reduces expression of LMP1 by decreasing its transcription level. • Triptolide inhibits ED-L1 promoter activity. - Abstract: Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects various types of cells and mainly establishes latent infection in B lymphocytes. The viral latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) plays important roles in transformation and proliferation of B lymphocytes infected with EBV. Triptolide is a compound of Tripterygium extracts, showing anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and anti-cancer activities. In this study, it is determined whether triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes. The CCK-8 assays were performed to examine cell viabilities of EBV-positive B95-8 and P3HR-1 cells treated by triptolide. The mRNA and protein levels of LMP1 were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activities of two LMP1 promoters (ED-L1 and TR-L1) were determined by Dual luciferase reportor assay. The results showed that triptolide inhibited the cell viability of EBV-positive B lymphocytes, and the over-expression of LMP1 attenuated this inhibitory effect. Triptolide decreased the LMP1 expression and transcriptional levels in EBV-positive B cells. The activity of LMP1 promoter ED-L1 in type III latent infection was strongly suppressed by triptolide treatment. In addition, triptolide strongly reduced growth of B95-8 induced B lymphoma in BALB/c nude mice. These results suggest that triptolide decreases proliferation of EBV-induced B lymphocytes possibly by a mechanism related to down-regulation of the LMP1 expression.

  8. The role of positively charged amino acids and electrostatic interactions in the complex of U1A protein and U1 hairpin II RNA

    PubMed Central

    Law, Michael J.; Linde, Michael E.; Chambers, Eric J.; Oubridge, Chris; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Nilsson, Lennart; Haworth, Ian S.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2006-01-01

    Previous kinetic investigations of the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain of spliceosomal protein U1A, interacting with its RNA target U1 hairpin II, provided experimental evidence for a ‘lure and lock’ model of binding in which electrostatic interactions first guide the RNA to the protein, and close range interactions then lock the two molecules together. To further investigate the ‘lure’ step, here we examined the electrostatic roles of two sets of positively charged amino acids in U1A that do not make hydrogen bonds to the RNA: Lys20, Lys22 and Lys23 close to the RNA-binding site, and Arg7, Lys60 and Arg70, located on ‘top’ of the RRM domain, away from the RNA. Surface plasmon resonance-based kinetic studies, supplemented with salt dependence experiments and molecular dynamics simulation, indicate that Lys20 predominantly plays a role in association, while nearby residues Lys22 and Lys23 appear to be at least as important for complex stability. In contrast, kinetic analyses of residues away from the RNA indicate that they have a minimal effect on association and stability. Thus, well-positioned positively charged residues can be important for both initial complex formation and complex maintenance, illustrating the multiple roles of electrostatic interactions in protein–RNA complexes. PMID:16407334

  9. Specific protein profile in cerebrospinal fluid from HIV-1-positive cART-treated patients affected by neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Valentina; Delbue, Serena; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Tavazzi, Eleonora; Del Savio, Rossella; Crovella, Sergio; Marchioni, Enrico; Ferrante, Pasquale; Comar, Manola

    2012-10-01

    Cytokines/chemokines are involved in the immune response of infections, including HIV-1. We defined the profile of 48 cytokines/chemokines in cerebrospinal fluid from 18 cART patients with chronic HIV-1 infection by Luminex technology. Nine patients were affected with leukoencephalopathies: five with John Cunningham virus (JCV) + progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and four with JCV-not determined leukoencephalopathy (NDLE). In addition, nine HIV-1-positive patients with no neurological signs (NND) and five HIV-1-negative patients affected with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) were enrolled. Ten cytokines (IL-15, IL-3, IL-16, IL-18, CTACK, GRO1, SCF, MCP-1, MIF, SDF) were highly expressed in HIV-1-positive patients while IL-1Ra and IL-17 were present at a lower level. In addition, the levels of IL-17, IL-9, FGF-basic, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in patients with neurological diseases (PML, NDLE, ADEM) with respect to NND. Focusing the attention to the cytokine profile in JCV + PML patients with respect to JCV-NDLE patients, only TNF-β was significantly downregulated (p < 0.05) in JCV + PML patients. This pilot study emphasized the role of immunoregulation in HIV-1-related neurological disorders during cART treatment.

  10. The Arabidopsis AAA ATPase SKD1 is involved in multivesicular endosome function and interacts with its positive regulator LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5.

    PubMed

    Haas, Thomas J; Sliwinski, Marek K; Martínez, Dana E; Preuss, Mary; Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi; Nielsen, Erik; Odorizzi, Greg; Otegui, Marisa S

    2007-04-01

    In yeast and mammals, the AAA ATPase Vps4p/SKD1 (for Vacuolar protein sorting 4/SUPPRESSOR OF K(+) TRANSPORT GROWTH DEFECT1) is required for the endosomal sorting of secretory and endocytic cargo. We identified a VPS4/SKD1 homolog in Arabidopsis thaliana, which localizes to the cytoplasm and to multivesicular endosomes. In addition, green fluorescent protein-SKD1 colocalizes on multivesicular bodies with fluorescent fusion protein endosomal Rab GTPases, such as ARA6/RabF1, RHA1/RabF2a, and ARA7/RabF2b, and with the endocytic marker FM4-64. The expression of SKD1(E232Q), an ATPase-deficient version of SKD1, induces alterations in the endosomal system of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow 2 cells and ultimately leads to cell death. The inducible expression of SKD1(E232Q) in Arabidopsis resulted in enlarged endosomes with a reduced number of internal vesicles. In a yeast two-hybrid screen using Arabidopsis SKD1 as bait, we isolated a putative homolog of mammalian LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5 (LIP5)/SKD1 BINDING PROTEIN1 and yeast Vta1p (for Vps twenty associated 1 protein). Arabidopsis LIP5 acts as a positive regulator of SKD1 by increasing fourfold to fivefold its in vitro ATPase activity. We isolated a knockout homozygous Arabidopsis mutant line with a T-DNA insertion in LIP5. lip5 plants are viable and show no phenotypic alterations under normal growth conditions, suggesting that basal SKD1 ATPase activity is sufficient for plant development and growth.

  11. Rapid Assessment of Resistance to Antibiotic Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis in the Gram-Positive Pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Based on Evaluation of the Lytic Response.

    PubMed

    Otero, Fátima; Tamayo, María; Santiso, Rebeca; Gosálvez, Jaime; Bou, Germán; Fernández, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    A novel assay for rapid determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis was developed for the gram-positive pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. To this purpose, a lytic response was obtained by a brief incubation with lysozyme or a mixture of lysozyme, Triton X-100, and EDTA for E. faecalis (n = 82) and S. pneumoniae (n = 51), respectively. Lysis was quantified by visualizing the released nucleoids. Antibiotic-susceptible bacteria treated with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint doses of erythromycin, azithromycin, or doxycycline that inhibited protein synthesis demonstrated a large reduction of lysed cells with respect to the control, that is, without antibiotics. However, cell lysis prevention was much lower in nonsusceptible strains, with unsuccessful inhibition of protein synthesis. ROC analysis showed that a reduction value of ≥35.6% and ≥40.4% discriminates susceptible and nonsusceptible strains for erythromycin and for doxycycline, respectively, in E. faecalis, whereas ≥20.0% is adequate for both macrolides and doxycycline in S. pneumoniae. Resistant stains were identified in 90-120 min with sensitivity and specificity between 91.7% and 100%. This is a proof of concept that evaluation of the lytic response may be a rapid and efficient test for determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis.

  12. Arabidopsis Small Rubber Particle Protein Homolog SRPs Play Dual Roles as Positive Factors for Tissue Growth and Development and in Drought Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Yu; Park, Ki Youl; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-04-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as repositories for fatty acids and sterols, which are used for various cellular processes such as energy production and membrane and hormone synthesis. LD-associated proteins play important roles in seed development and germination, but their functions in postgermination growth are not well understood. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three SRP homologs (SRP1, SRP2, and SRP3) that share sequence identities with small rubber particle proteins of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In this report, the possible cellular roles of SRPs in postgermination growth and the drought tolerance response were investigated. Arabidopsis SRPs appeared to be LD-associated proteins and displayed polymerization properties in vivo and in vitro. SRP-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:SRP1, 35S:SRP2, and 35S:SRP3) exhibited higher vegetative and reproductive growth and markedly better tolerance to drought stress than wild-type Arabidopsis. In addition, constitutive over-expression of SRPs resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in postgermination seedlings. In contrast, single (srp1, 35S:SRP2-RNAi, and srp3) and triple (35S:SRP2-RNAi/srp1srp3) loss-of-function mutant lines exhibited the opposite phenotypes. Our results suggest that Arabidopsis SRPs play dual roles as positive factors in postgermination growth and the drought stress tolerance response. The possible relationships between LD-associated proteins and the drought stress response are discussed.

  13. Arabidopsis Small Rubber Particle Protein Homolog SRPs Play Dual Roles as Positive Factors for Tissue Growth and Development and in Drought Stress Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Yu; Park, Ki Youl; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as repositories for fatty acids and sterols, which are used for various cellular processes such as energy production and membrane and hormone synthesis. LD-associated proteins play important roles in seed development and germination, but their functions in postgermination growth are not well understood. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three SRP homologs (SRP1, SRP2, and SRP3) that share sequence identities with small rubber particle proteins of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In this report, the possible cellular roles of SRPs in postgermination growth and the drought tolerance response were investigated. Arabidopsis SRPs appeared to be LD-associated proteins and displayed polymerization properties in vivo and in vitro. SRP-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:SRP1, 35S:SRP2, and 35S:SRP3) exhibited higher vegetative and reproductive growth and markedly better tolerance to drought stress than wild-type Arabidopsis. In addition, constitutive over-expression of SRPs resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in postgermination seedlings. In contrast, single (srp1, 35S:SRP2-RNAi, and srp3) and triple (35S:SRP2-RNAi/srp1srp3) loss-of-function mutant lines exhibited the opposite phenotypes. Our results suggest that Arabidopsis SRPs play dual roles as positive factors in postgermination growth and the drought stress tolerance response. The possible relationships between LD-associated proteins and the drought stress response are discussed. PMID:26903535

  14. In vivo analysis of scaffold-associated regions in Drosophila: a synthetic high-affinity SAR binding protein suppresses position effect variegation.

    PubMed Central

    Girard, F; Bello, B; Laemmli, U K; Gehring, W J

    1998-01-01

    Scaffold-associated regions (SARs) were studied in Drosophila melanogaster by expressing a synthetic, high-affinity SAR-binding protein called MATH (multi-AT-hook), which consists of reiterated AT-hook peptide motifs; each motif is known to recognize a wide variety of short AT-rich sequences. MATH proteins were expressed specifically in the larval eye imaginal discs by means of the tetracycline-regulated transactivation system and tested for their effect on position effect variegation (PEV). MATH20, a highly potent SAR ligand consisting of 20 AT-hooks, was found to suppress whitemottled 4 variegation. This suppression required MATH20 expression at an early larval developmental stage. Our data suggest an involvement of the high AT-rich SARs in higher order chromatin structure and gene expression. PMID:9524129

  15. Conserved differential expression of paralogous DEFICIENS- and GLOBOSA-like MADS-box genes in the flowers of Orchidaceae: refining the 'orchid code'.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Theissen, Günter

    2011-06-01

    In flowering plants, class-B floral homeotic genes encode MADS-domain transcription factors, which are key in the specification of petal and stamen identity, and have two ancient clades: DEF-like and GLO-like genes. Many species have one gene of each clade, but orchids have typically four DEF-like genes, representing ancient gene clades 1, 2, 3 and 4. We tested the 'orchid code', a combinatorial genetic model suggesting that differences between the organs of the orchid perianth (outer tepals, inner lateral tepals and labellum) are generated by the combinatorial differential expression of four DEF-like genes. Our experimental test involves highly sensitive and specific measurements, with qRT-PCR of the expression of DEF- and GLO-like genes from the distantly related Vanilla planifolia and Phragmipedium longifolium, as well as from wild-type and peloric Phalaenopsis hybrid flowers. Our findings support the first 'orchid code' hypothesis, in that absence of clade-3 and -4 gene expression distinguishes the outer tepals from the inner tepals. In contrast to the original hypothesis, however, mRNA of both clade-3 and -4 genes accumulates in wild-type inner lateral tepals and the labellum, and in labellum-like inner lateral tepals of peloric flowers, albeit in different quantities. Our data suggest a revised hypothesis where high levels of clade-1 and -2, and low levels of clade-3 and -4, gene expression specify inner lateral tepals, whereas labellum development requires low levels of clade-1 and -2 expression and high levels of clade-3 and -4 expression.

  16. The onset of the progression of acute phase response mechanisms induced by extreme impacts can be followed by the decrease in blood levels of positive acute phase proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    Studies performed at space flights and earth-based simulation models detected the plasma indices of acute phase reaction (APR), i.e. the increase of APR cytokine mediators and alterations in the production of blood acute phase proteins (APP) at the initial stages of adaptation to altered gravity conditions. Acute phase response is the principal constituent of the functional activity of innate immunity system. Changes in plasma APPs contents are considered to serve the restoration of homeostasis state. According to trends of their concentration shifts at the evolving of acute phase reaction APPs are denoted as positive, neutral, or negative. Plasma concentrations of positive acute phase proteins α1-acid glycoprotein (α1-AGP), α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), and neutral α2-macroglobulin (α2-M) were measured in human study at 12-hour antiorthostatic position (AOP) with 15° head down tilt and hypoxia experiments at 14% oxygen in pressure chamber. Both of these impacts were shown to produce alterations in the APP levels indicative for acute phase response. Nevertheless, in AOP experiment noticeable decrease in α1-AGP concentration occurred by hour 12, and even more pronounced decline of α1-AGP and α1-AT were found on hypoxia hours 12 and 36. Acute phase proteins α1-AGP and α2-M possess the features of proteinase inhibitors. This function is implemented by the formation of complexes with the molecules of proteolytic enzymes which subsequently are removed from the blood flow. Transient decrease in plasma concentrations of protease inhibitors on early phases of APR development was reported to result from the growth of plasma protease activity due to cathepsin release from activated leukocytes, which had not yet been compensated by enhanced APP synthesis. Being a carrier protein for positively charged and neutral substances, α1-AGP shows pronounced elevation in its blood content during APR development. As assumed, it is required for the transportation of the increased

  17. Role of positively charged residues of the second transmembrane domain in the ion transport activity and conformation of human uncoupling protein-2.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tuan; Matovic, Tijana; Parker, James; Smith, Matthew D; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud

    2015-04-14

    Residing at the inner mitochondrial membrane, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) mediates proton transport from the intermembrane space (IMS) to the mitochondrial matrix and consequently reduces the rate of ATP synthesis in the mitochondria. The ubiquitous expression of UCP2 in humans can be attributed to the protein's multiple physiological roles in tissues, including its involvement in protective mechanisms against oxidative stress, as well as glucose and lipid metabolisms. Currently, the structural properties and ion transport mechanism of UCP2 and other UCP homologues remain poorly understood. UCP2-mediated proton transport is activated by fatty acids and inhibited by di- and triphosphate purine nucleotides. UCP2 also transports chloride and some other small anions. Identification of key amino acid residues of UCP2 in its ion transport pathway can shed light on the protein's ion transport function. On the basis of our previous studies, the second transmembrane helix segment (TM2) of UCP2 exhibited chloride channel activity. In addition, it was suggested that the positively charged residues on TM2 domains of UCPs 1 and 2 were important for their chloride transport activity. On this basis, to further understand the role of these positively charged residues on the ion transport activity of UCP2, we recombinantly expressed four TM2 mutants: R76Q, R88Q, R96Q, and K104Q. The wild type UCP2 and its mutants were purified and reconstituted into liposomes, and their conformation and ion (proton and chloride) transport activity were studied. TM2 Arg residues at the matrix interface of UCP2 proved to be crucial for the protein's anion transport function, and their absence resulted in highly diminished Cl(-) transport rates. On the other hand, the two other positively charged residues of TM2, located at the UCP2-IMS interface, could participate in the salt-bridge formation in the protein and promote the interhelical tight packing in the UCP2. Absence of these residues did not

  18. Determination of the relative positions of amino acids by partial specific cleavages of end-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Jue, R A; Doolittle, R F

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a new method for obtaining information about protein sequences that uses an approach analogous to that used to determine DNA sequences. In essence, three steps are involved. First, a detectable label is attached exclusively to the amino terminus of a polypeptide. Next, the labeled chain is subjected to partial specific cleavage in a way that produces roughly equimolar amounts of fragments of different sizes. Cleavages for methionine, tryptophan, arginine, aspartyl-proline bonds, and asparaginyl-glycine bonds have been employed. Lastly, the labeled fragments are separated according to size by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The distribution of target amino acids along the polypeptide chain can be deduced from the specific pattern of labeled bands by reading the "ladder" in the same way that DNA sequencing gels are read. Although the method can be conducted with a radioactive label, we have chosen to use a fluorescent label. We have applied the method successfully to the three subunit chains of two different fibrinogens.

  19. Kidney specific protein-positive cells derived from embryonic stem cells reproduce tubular structures in vitro and differentiate into renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Fujii, Shizuka; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Homma, Koichiro; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hideyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various organs and tissues, and are regarded as new tools for the elucidation of disease mechanisms as well as sources for regenerative therapies. However, a method of inducing organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells is urgently needed. Although many scientists have been developing methods to induce various organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells, renal lineage cells have yet to be induced in vitro because of the complexity of kidney structures and the diversity of kidney-component cells. Here, we describe a method of inducing renal tubular cells from mouse embryonic stem cells via the cell purification of kidney specific protein (KSP)-positive cells using an anti-KSP antibody. The global gene expression profiles of KSP-positive cells derived from ES cells exhibited characteristics similar to those of cells in the developing kidney, and KSP-positive cells had the capacity to form tubular structures resembling renal tubular cells when grown in a 3D culture in Matrigel. Moreover, our results indicated that KSP-positive cells acquired the characteristics of each segment of renal tubular cells through tubular formation when stimulated with Wnt4. This method is an important step toward kidney disease research using pluripotent stem cells, and the development of kidney regeneration therapies.

  20. C11ORF24 is a novel type I membrane protein that cycles between the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane in Rab6-positive vesicles.

    PubMed

    Fraisier, Vincent; Kasri, Amal; Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Nair, Deepak; Mayeux, Adeline; Bardin, Sabine; Toyoda, Yusuke; Poser, Ina; Poznyakovskiy, Andrei; Goud, Bruno; Hyman, Anthony A; Dimitrov, Ariane

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is an intracellular compartment necessary for post-translational modification, sorting and transport of proteins. It plays a key role in mitotic entry through the Golgi mitotic checkpoint. In order to identify new proteins involved in the Golgi mitotic checkpoint, we combine the results of a knockdown screen for mitotic phenotypes and a localization screen. Using this approach, we identify a new Golgi protein C11ORF24 (NP_071733.1). We show that C11ORF24 has a signal peptide at the N-terminus and a transmembrane domain in the C-terminal region. C11ORF24 is localized on the Golgi apparatus and on the trans-Golgi network. A large part of the protein is present in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus whereas only a short tail extends into the cytosol. This cytosolic tail is well conserved in evolution. By FRAP experiments we show that the dynamics of C11ORF24 in the Golgi membrane are coherent with the presence of a transmembrane domain in the protein. C11ORF24 is not only present on the Golgi apparatus but also cycles to the plasma membrane via endosomes in a pH sensitive manner. Moreover, via video-microscopy studies we show that C11ORF24 is found on transport intermediates and is colocalized with the small GTPase RAB6, a GTPase involved in anterograde transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Knocking down C11ORF24 does not lead to a mitotic phenotype or an intracellular transport defect in our hands. All together, these data suggest that C11ORF24 is present on the Golgi apparatus, transported to the plasma membrane and cycles back through the endosomes by way of RAB6 positive carriers.

  1. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  2. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  3. Efficacy of an adapted granzyme B-based anti-CD30 cytolytic fusion protein against PI-9-positive classical Hodgkin lymphoma cells in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, S; Hansen, H P; Hehmann-Titt, G; Huhn, M; Fischer, R; Barth, S; Thepen, T

    2013-03-22

    Tumors develop when infiltrating immune cells contribute growth stimuli, and cancer cells are selected to survive within such a cytotoxic microenvironment. One possible immune-escape mechanism is the upregulation of PI-9 (Serpin B9) within cancer cells. This serine proteinase inhibitor selectively inactivates apoptosis-inducing granzyme B (GrB) from cytotoxic granules of innate immune cells. We demonstrate that most classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL)-derived cell lines express PI-9, which protects them against the GrB attack and thereby renders them resistant against GrB-based immunotherapeutics. To circumvent this disadvantage, we developed PI-9-insensitive human GrB mutants as fusion proteins to target the Hodgkin-selective receptor CD30. In contrast to the wild-type GrB, a R201K point-mutated GrB construct most efficiently killed PI-9-positive and -negative cHL cells. This was tested in vitro and also in vivo whereby a novel optical imaging-based tumor model with HL cell line L428 was applied. Therefore, this variant, as part of the next generation immunotherapeutics, also named cytolytic fusion proteins showing reduced immunogenicity, is a promising molecule for (targeted) therapy of patients with relapsing malignancies, such as cHL, and possibly other PI-9-positive malignancies, such as breast or lung carcinoma.

  4. Coexisting adult polyglucosan body disease with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with transactivation response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43)-positive neuronal inclusions.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Jill G; Crain, Barbara J; Harris, Brent T; Turner, R Scott

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U) is one of the most common pathological findings associated with the clinical FTLD syndromes. However, molecular characterization with genetic sequencing and protein expression techniques are recognizing many new subtypes for FTLDs. FTLDs are diverse and new nomenclature schemes have been proposed based on the molecular defects that are being discovered ( Mackenzie et al., 2010 , Acta Neuropathologica, 119, 1). Adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD) is a very rare disorder associated with systemic neurological signs and symptoms including progressive dementia with executive dysfunction and motor neuron disease. We report the clinical course of an individual with a clinical FTLD and the as yet unreported findings of coexistent APBD with FTLD-U and transactivation response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43)-positive inclusions at autopsy (or more accurately, FTLD-TDP). It is unclear if these distinct findings are coincidental in this individual, or if pathogenic pathways may intersect to promote these coexisting pathologies.

  5. The gene transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein: role in positive and negative affective states of alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Subhash C

    2004-10-01

    The gene transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-responsive element binding (CREB) protein is a nuclear protein that regulates synaptic plasticity via modulating the expression of several (cAMP)-inducible genes. Alcohol addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder and is characterized by a compulsive and uncontrolled pattern of alcohol drinking by an individual in spite of the adverse consequences of its abuse. Ethanol produces both euphoric (reward and reinforcing) and dysphoric (negative withdrawal reactions) effects and these are most likely involved in the initiation and maintenance of alcohol use and abuse. Several neurotransmitter systems in the brain might be involved in the effects of alcohol but the exact molecular mechanisms of both the positive and negative affective states of alcohol abuse are still unclear. Recent research in molecular neurosciences using animal models have identified the role of extended amygdaloid (shell structures of nucleus accumbens [NAc] and central and medial amygdaloid nuclei) CREB signaling in positive and negative affective states of alcohol drinking behaviors. This review article highlights the current findings on the role of nucleus accumbal and amygdaloid CREB signaling in behavioral consequences of alcohol use and abuse.

  6. A Set of miRNAs, Their Gene and Protein Targets and Stromal Genes Distinguish Early from Late Onset ER Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, E. P.; Brentani, H.; Pereira, C. A. B.; Polpo, A.; Lima, L.; Puga, R. D.; Pasini, F. S.; Osorio, C. A. B. T.; Roela, R. A.; Achatz, M. I.; Trapé, A. P.; Gonzalez-Angulo, A. M.; Brentani, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) in young adult patients (YA) has a more aggressive biological behavior and is associated with a worse prognosis than BC arising in middle aged patients (MA). We proposed that differentially expressed miRNAs could regulate genes and proteins underlying aggressive phenotypes of breast tumors in YA patients when compared to those arising in MA patients. Objective: Using integrated expression analyses of miRs, their mRNA and protein targets and stromal gene expression, we aimed to identify differentially expressed profiles between tumors from YA-BC and MA-BC. Methodology and Results: Samples of ER+ invasive ductal breast carcinomas, divided into two groups: YA-BC (35 years or less) or MA-BC (50–65 years) were evaluated. Screening for BRCA1/2 status according to the BOADICEA program indicated low risk of patients being carriers of these mutations. Aggressive characteristics were more evident in YA-BC versus MA-BC. Performing qPCR, we identified eight miRs differentially expressed (miR-9, 18b, 33b, 106a, 106b, 210, 518a-3p and miR-372) between YA-BC and MA-BC tumors with high confidence statement, which were associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics. The expression profiles by microarray identified 602 predicted target genes associated to proliferation, cell cycle and development biological functions. Performing RPPA, 24 target proteins differed between both groups and 21 were interconnected within a network protein-protein interactions associated with proliferation, development and metabolism pathways over represented in YA-BC. Combination of eight mRNA targets or the combination of eight target proteins defined indicators able to classify individual samples into YA-BC or MA-BC groups. Fibroblast-enriched stroma expression profile analysis resulted in 308 stromal genes differentially expressed between YA-BC and MA-BC. Conclusion: We defined a set of differentially expressed miRNAs, their mRNAs and protein targets and stromal

  7. Lah is a transmembrane protein and requires Spa10 for stable positioning of Woronin bodies at the septal pore of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Yannik; Carina Kakoschke, Sara; Wagener, Johannes; Ebel, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Woronin bodies are specialized, fungal-specific organelles that enable an immediate closure of septal pores after injury to protect hyphae from excessive cytoplasmic bleeding. In most Ascomycetes, Woronin bodies are tethered at the septal pore by so-called Lah proteins. Using the pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus as a model organism, we show that the C-terminal 288 amino acids of Lah (LahC288) bind to the rim of the septal pore. LahC288 essentially consists of a membrane spanning region and a putative extracellular domain, which are both required for the targeting to the septum. In an A. fumigatus rho4 deletion mutant that has a severe defect in septum formation, LahC288 is recruited to spot-like structures in or at the lateral membrane. This suggests that LahC is recruited before Rho4 starts to govern the septation process. Accordingly, we found that in wild type hyphae Lah is bound before a cross-wall emerges and thus enables a tethering of Woronin bodies at the site of the newly formed septum. Finally, we identified Spa10, a member of a recently described family of septal pore-associated proteins, as a first protein that directly or indirectly interacts with LahC to allow a stable positioning of Woronin bodies at the mature septum. PMID:28281662

  8. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H.; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  9. MILI, a PIWI-interacting RNA-binding protein, is required for germ line stem cell self-renewal and appears to positively regulate translation.

    PubMed

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Hao, Yi; Beyret, Ergin; Yin, Hang; Kuramochi-Miyagawa, Satomi; Nakano, Toru; Lin, Haifan

    2009-03-06

    The Argonaute/PIWI protein family consists of Argonaute and PIWI subfamilies. Argonautes function in RNA interference and micro-RNA pathways; whereas PIWIs bind to PIWI-interacting RNAs and regulate germ line development, stem cell maintenance, epigenetic regulation, and transposition. However, the role of PIWIs in mammalian stem cells has not been demonstrated, and molecular mechanisms mediated by PIWIs remain elusive. Here we show that MILI, a murine PIWI protein, is expressed in the cytoplasm of testicular germ line stem cells, spermatogonia, and early spermatocytes, where it is enriched in chromatoid bodies. MILI is essential for the self-renewing division and differentiation of germ line stem cells but does not affect initial establishment of the germ line stem cell population at 7 days postpartum. Furthermore, MILI forms a stable RNA-independent complex with eIF3a and associates with the eIF4E- and eIF4G-containing m7G cap-binding complex. In isolated 7 days postpartum seminiferous tubules containing mostly germ line stem cells, the mili mutation has no effect on the cellular mRNA level yet significantly reduces the rate of protein synthesis. These observations indicate that MILI may positively regulate translation and that such regulation is required for germ line stem cell self-renewal.

  10. Development of a positive genetic selection system for inhibition of protein splicing using mycobacterial inteins in Escherichia coli DNA gyrase subunit A.

    PubMed

    Adam, Eric; Perler, Francine B

    2002-09-01

    An intein-based positive genetic selection system was developed to study protein splicing and to provide a selection system with the potential for finding splicing inhibitors. Inteins can be novel antimicrobial targets when present in essential proteins since blocking splicing would kill the organism. For example, pathogenic mycobacteria encode inteins that interrupt DNA gyrase. The gyrase selection system exploits (1) splicing of inteins out of Gyrase A and (2) the dominant lethal effect of quinolone poisoning of DNA gyrase, which in turn blocks replication. The system was adapted for whole-cell high-throughput screening using green fluorescent protein as an automatable readout of viability. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system, mutations that blocked splicing of the Mycobacterium xenopi Gyrase A intein were isolated. Splicing was then assayed at a second temperature to identify inteins with a temperature-sensitive splicing phenotype. Mutations were mapped onto a structure-based sequence alignment, which led to the rational prediction of a temperature-sensitive splicing mutation. GyrA intein subdomain relationships also provided insight into intein evolution.

  11. Preferential binding of positive nanoparticles on cell membranes is due to electrostatic interactions: A too simplistic explanation that does not take into account the nanoparticle protein corona.

    PubMed

    Forest, Valérie; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2017-01-01

    The internalization of nanoparticles by cells (and more broadly the nanoparticle/cell interaction) is a crucial issue both for biomedical applications (for the design of nanocarriers with enhanced cellular uptake to reach their intracellular therapeutic targets) and in a nanosafety context (as the internalized dose is one of the key factors in cytotoxicity). Many parameters can influence the nanoparticle/cell interaction, among them, the nanoparticle physico-chemical features, and especially the surface charge. It is generally admitted that positive nanoparticles are more uptaken by cells than neutral or negative nanoparticles. It is supposedly due to favorable electrostatic interactions with negatively charged cell membrane. However, this theory seems too simplistic as it does not consider a fundamental element: the nanoparticle protein corona. Indeed, once introduced in a biological medium nanoparticles adsorb proteins at their surface, forming a new interface defining the nanoparticle "biological identity". This adds a new level of complexity in the interactions with biological systems that cannot be any more limited to electrostatic binding. These interactions will then influence cell behavior. Based on a literature review and on an example of our own experience the parameters involved in the nanoparticle protein corona formation as well as in the nanoparticle/cell interactions are discussed.

  12. Lack of the H-NS Protein Results in Extended and Aberrantly Positioned DNA during Chromosome Replication and Segregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helgesen, Emily; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The architectural protein H-NS binds nonspecifically to hundreds of sites throughout the chromosome and can multimerize to stiffen segments of DNA as well as to form DNA-protein-DNA bridges. H-NS has been suggested to contribute to the orderly folding of the Escherichia coli chromosome in the highly compacted nucleoid. In this study, we investigated the positioning and dynamics of the origins, the replisomes, and the SeqA structures trailing the replication forks in cells lacking the H-NS protein. In H-NS mutant cells, foci of SeqA, replisomes, and origins were irregularly positioned in the cell. Further analysis showed that the average distance between the SeqA structures and the replisome was increased by ∼100 nm compared to that in wild-type cells, whereas the colocalization of SeqA-bound sister DNA behind replication forks was not affected. This result may suggest that H-NS contributes to the folding of DNA along adjacent segments. H-NS mutant cells were found to be incapable of adopting the distinct and condensed nucleoid structures characteristic of E. coli cells growing rapidly in rich medium. It appears as if H-NS mutant cells adopt a “slow-growth” type of chromosome organization under nutrient-rich conditions, which leads to a decreased cellular DNA content. IMPORTANCE It is not fully understood how and to what extent nucleoid-associated proteins contribute to chromosome folding and organization during replication and segregation in Escherichia coli. In this work, we find in vivo indications that cells lacking the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS have a lower degree of DNA condensation than wild-type cells. Our work suggests that H-NS is involved in condensing the DNA along adjacent segments on the chromosome and is not likely to tether newly replicated strands of sister DNA. We also find indications that H-NS is required for rapid growth with high DNA content and for the formation of a highly condensed nucleoid structure under such

  13. Eubacterial components similar to small nuclear ribonucleoproteins: identification of immunoprecipitable proteins and capped RNAs in a cyanobacterium and a gram-positive eubacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, S A; O'Neil, J; Watcharapijarn, J; Moe-Kirvan, C; Vijay, S; Silva, V

    1993-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles play an important role in the processing of pre-mRNA. snRNPs have been identified immunologically in a variety of cells, but none have ever been observed in prokaryotic systems. This report provides the first evidence for the presence of snRNP-like components in two types of prokaryotic cells: those of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis and those of the gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus subtilis. These components consist of snRNP-immunoreactive proteins and RNAs, including some with the snRNP-unique 5' m2,2,7G (m3G) cap. Immunoreactivity was determined by immunoprecipitation procedures, with either antinuclear-antibody-positive (RNP- and Sm-monospecific) patient sera or a m3G monoclonal antibody, with radiolabelled cell extracts that were preadsorbed with antinuclear-antibody-negative sera. S. leopoliensis immunoprecipitates showed the presence of high-molecular-mass proteins (14 to 70 kDa) and RNAs (138 to 243 nucleotides) that are analogous in size to proteins and RNAs found in human (HEp-2) cell immunoprecipitates but absent in Escherichia coli immunoprecipitates. Thin-layer chromatography of S. leopoliensis immunoprecipitates confirmed the presence of a capped nucleotide similar to a capped nucleotide in HEp-2 immunoprecipitates; no such nucleotide was observed in E. coli immunoprecipitates. Immunoreactive RNAs (117-170 nucleotides) were identified in a second eubacterium, B. subtilis, as well. This work suggests that snRNPs or their evolutionary predecessors predate the emergence of eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8458830

  14. Protein kinase A and regulation of neonatal Nav1.5 expression in human breast cancer cells: activity-dependent positive feedback and cellular migration.

    PubMed

    Chioni, Athina-Myrto; Shao, Dongmin; Grose, Richard; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2010-02-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are expressed in excitable cells (e.g. neurons and muscles), as well as in some classically 'non-excitable' cells (e.g. fibroblasts), and in carcinomas. In general, functional expression of VGSCs in plasma membrane (PM) is hierarchical and dynamic. Previously, we have shown that an activity-dependent positive feedback mechanism involving cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) plays a significant role in upregulation of VGSCs in strongly metastatic rat prostate cancer Mat-LyLu cells expressing Nav1.7. Here, we investigated the possible role of PKA in VGSC regulation and its functional consequences in strongly metastatic human breast cancer (BCa) MDA-MB-231 cells, where the neonatal splice form of Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) is the predominant VGSC present. Treatment with the PKA activator forskolin for 24h increased mRNA and PM protein levels of nNav1.5, without changing the total VGSC protein level. Opposite effects were obtained by application of the PKA inhibitor KT5720 or the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), the latter implying activity-dependent upregulation. We tested the possibility, therefore, that the activity dependence of VGSC (nNav1.5) expression involved PKA. Indeed, TTX pretreatment reduced the level of phosphorylated PKA and eliminated basal and PKA-stimulated cellular migration. These data suggested that activity-dependent positive feedback mediated by PKA plays an important role in the functional expression of nNav1.5 in BCa, and in turn, this enhances the cells' metastatic potential.

  15. A Critical Role of Lyst-Interacting Protein5, a Positive Regulator of Multivesicular Body Biogenesis, in Plant Responses to Heat and Salt Stresses1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Yang, Yan; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are unique endosomes containing vesicles in the lumen and play critical roles in many cellular processes. We have recently shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Lyst-Interacting Protein5 (LIP5), a positive regulator of the Suppressor of K+ Transport Growth Defect1 (SKD1) AAA ATPase in MVB biogenesis, is a critical target of the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and plays an important role in the plant immune system. In this study, we report that the LIP5-regulated MVB pathway also plays a critical role in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Disruption of LIP5 causes compromised tolerance to both heat and salt stresses. The critical role of LIP5 in plant tolerance to abiotic stresses is dependent on its ability to interact with Suppressor of K+ Transport Growth Defect1. When compared with wild-type plants, lip5 mutants accumulate increased levels of ubiquitinated protein aggregates and NaCl under heat and salt stresses, respectively. Further analysis using fluorescent dye and MVB markers reveals that abiotic stress increases the formation of endocytic vesicles and MVBs in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. LIP5 is also required for the salt-induced increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in signaling of salt stress responses. Basal levels of LIP5 phosphorylation by MPKs and the stability of LIP5 are elevated by salt stress, and mutation of MPK phosphorylation sites in LIP5 reduces the stability and compromises the ability to complement the lip5 salt-sensitive mutant phenotype. These results collectively indicate that the MVB pathway is positively regulated by pathogen/stress-responsive MPK3/6 through LIP5 phosphorylation and plays a critical role in broad plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26229051

  16. Gene Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ferrai, Carmelo; de Castro, Inês Jesus; Lavitas, Liron; Chotalia, Mita; Pombo, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is an intricate multistep process, regulated within the cell nucleus through the activation or repression of RNA synthesis, processing, cytoplasmic export, and translation into protein. The major regulators of gene expression are chromatin remodeling and transcription machineries that are locally recruited to genes. However, enzymatic activities that act on genes are not ubiquitously distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, but limited to specific and spatially defined foci that promote preferred higher-order chromatin arrangements. The positioning of genes within the nuclear landscape relative to specific functional landmarks plays an important role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:20484389

  17. Gram-positive bacteria are held at a distance in the colon mucus by the lectin-like protein ZG16

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Joakim H.; Katona, Gergely; Schütte, André; Ermund, Anna; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2016-01-01

    The distal colon functions as a bioreactor and harbors an enormous amount of bacteria in a mutualistic relationship with the host. The microbiota have to be kept at a safe distance to prevent inflammation, something that is achieved by a dense inner mucus layer that lines the epithelial cells. The large polymeric nets made up by the heavily O-glycosylated MUC2 mucin forms this physical barrier. Proteomic analyses of mucus have identified the lectin-like protein ZG16 (zymogen granulae protein 16) as an abundant mucus component. To elucidate the function of ZG16, we generated recombinant ZG16 and studied Zg16−/− mice. ZG16 bound to and aggregated Gram-positive bacteria via binding to the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. Zg16−/− mice have a distal colon mucus layer with normal thickness, but with bacteria closer to the epithelium. Using distal colon explants mounted in a horizontal perfusion chamber we demonstrated that treatment of bacteria with recombinant ZG16 hindered bacterial penetration into the mucus. The inner colon mucus of Zg16−/− animals had a higher load of Gram-positive bacteria and showed bacteria with higher motility in the mucus close to the host epithelium compared with cohoused littermate Zg16+/+. The more penetrable Zg16−/− mucus allowed Gram-positive bacteria to translocate to systemic tissues. Viable bacteria were found in spleen and were associated with increased abdominal fat pad mass in Zg16−/− animals. The function of ZG16 reveals a mechanism for keeping bacteria further away from the host colon epithelium. PMID:27849619

  18. Budding yeast dma proteins control septin dynamics and the spindle position checkpoint by promoting the recruitment of the Elm1 kinase to the bud neck.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Laura; Fraschini, Roberta; Boettcher, Barbara; Barral, Yves; Lucchini, Giovanna; Piatti, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    The first step towards cytokinesis in budding yeast is the assembly of a septin ring at the future site of bud emergence. Integrity of this ring is crucial for cytokinesis, proper spindle positioning, and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). This checkpoint delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis as long as the anaphase spindle does not properly align with the division axis. SPOC signalling requires the Kin4 protein kinase and the Kin4-regulating Elm1 kinase, which also controls septin dynamics. Here, we show that the two redundant ubiquitin-ligases Dma1 and Dma2 control septin dynamics and the SPOC by promoting the efficient recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck. Indeed, dma1 dma2 mutant cells show reduced levels of Elm1 at the bud neck and Elm1-dependent activation of Kin4. Artificial recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck of the same cells is sufficient to re-establish a normal septin ring, proper spindle positioning, and a proficient SPOC response in dma1 dma2 cells. Altogether, our data indicate that septin dynamics and SPOC function are intimately linked and support the idea that integrity of the bud neck is crucial for SPOC signalling.

  19. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  20. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go lean with protein. • Choose lean meats and poultry. Lean beef cuts include round steaks (top loin, ... main dishes. • Use nuts to replace meat or poultry, not in addition to meat or poultry (i. ...

  1. Activation of G protein-coupled receptor 30 by thiodiphenol promotes proliferation of estrogen receptor α-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bingli; Peng, Wei; Xu, Gang; Wu, Minghong; Wen, Yu; Xu, Jie; Yu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yipei

    2017-02-01

    Many studies have been shown that environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) can activate nuclear receptor (estrogen receptor alpha, ERα) or membrane receptor (G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30) in breast cancer cells and exerts genomic or nongenomic actions inducing cell proliferation. 4,4'-thiodiphenol (TDP) as one of BPA derivatives exhibits more potent estrogenic activity than BPA does. However, comparatively little is known about the ways in which TDP interferes with these signaling pathways and produces cell biological changes. This study evaluated the effect of TDP on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and intercellular calcium (Ca(2+)) fluctuation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The underlying molecular mechanism of cell proliferation induced by TDP was analyzed by examining the activation of ERα and GPR30-mediated phosphatidylinotidol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and extracellular-signa1regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathways. The results showed that exposure to 0.1-10 μM TDP for 24, 48, and 72 h significantly increased viability of MCF-7 cells. At the same concentration range, TDP exposure for 3 and 24 h markedly elevated ROS production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. In addition, 0.01-1 μM TDP significantly increased the expression of ERα, GPR30, p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 protein. Specific protein inhibitors blocked phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT and decreased TDP-induced cell proliferation. These findings show that TDP activated the GPR30-PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 pathways, and the resulting interaction with ERα stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation. Our results indicate a novel mechanism through which TDP may exert relevant estrogenic action in ERα positive cancer cells.

  2. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings.

  3. The pineapple AcMADS1 promoter confers high level expression in tomato and arabidopsis flowering and fruiting tissues, but AcMADS1 does not complement the tomato LeMADS-RIN (rin) mutant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous EST study identified a MADS box transcription factor coding sequence, AcMADS1, that is strongly induced during non-climacteric pineapple fruit ripening. Phylogenetic analyses place the AcMADS1 protein in the same superclade as LeMADS-RIN, a master regulator of fruit ripening upstream of e...

  4. Low Ki67/high ATM protein expression in malignant tumors predicts favorable prognosis in a retrospective study of early stage hormone receptor positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaolan; Li, Haocheng; Kornaga, Elizabeth N.; Dean, Michelle; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Riabowol, Karl; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Morris, Don; Watson, Peter H.; Enwere, Emeka K.; Bebb, Gwyn; Paterson, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study was designed to investigate the combined influence of ATM and Ki67 on clinical outcome in early stage hormone receptor positive breast cancer (ES-HPBC), particularly in patients with smaller tumors (< 4 cm) and fewer than four positive lymph nodes. Methods 532 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of resected primary breast tumors were used to construct a tissue microarray. Samples from 297 patients were suitable for final statistical analysis. We detected ATM and Ki67 proteins using fluorescence and brightfield immunohistochemistry respectively, and quantified their expression with digital image analysis. Data on expression levels were subsequently correlated with clinical outcome. Results Remarkably, ATM expression was useful to stratify the low Ki67 group into subgroups with better or poorer prognosis. Specifically, in the low Ki67 subgroup defined as having smaller tumors and no positive nodes, patients with high ATM expression showed better outcome than those with low ATM, with estimated survival rates of 96% and 89% respectively at 15 years follow up (p = 0.04). Similarly, low-Ki67 patients with smaller tumors, 1-3 positive nodes and high ATM also had significantly better outcomes than their low ATM counterparts, with estimated survival rates of 88% and 46% respectively (p = 0.03) at 15 years follow up. Multivariable analysis indicated that the combination of high ATM and low Ki67 is prognostic of improved survival, independent of tumor size, grade, and lymph node status (p = 0.02). Conclusions These data suggest that the prognostic value of Ki67 can be improved by analyzing ATM expression in ES-HPBC. PMID:27741524

  5. Protein kinase D1 regulates ERα-positive breast cancer cell growth response to 17β-estradiol and contributes to poor prognosis in patients.

    PubMed

    Karam, Manale; Bièche, Ivan; Legay, Christine; Vacher, Sophie; Auclair, Christian; Ricort, Jean-Marc

    2014-12-01

    About 70% of human breast cancers express and are dependent for growth on estrogen receptor α (ERα), and therefore are sensitive to antiestrogen therapies. However, progression to an advanced, more aggressive phenotype is associated with acquisition of resistance to antiestrogens and/or invasive potential. In this study, we highlight the role of the serine/threonine-protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in ERα-positive breast cancers. Growth of ERα-positive MCF-7 and MDA-MB-415 human breast cancer cells was assayed in adherent or anchorage-independent conditions in cells overexpressing or depleted for PKD1. PKD1 induces cell growth through both an ERα-dependent manner, by increasing ERα expression and cell sensitivity to 17β-estradiol, and an ERα-independent manner, by reducing cell dependence to estrogens and conferring partial resistance to antiestrogen ICI 182,780. PKD1 knockdown in MDA-MB-415 cells strongly reduced estrogen-dependent and independent invasion. Quantification of PKD1 mRNA levels in 38 cancerous and non-cancerous breast cell lines and in 152 ERα-positive breast tumours from patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen showed an association between PKD1 and ERα expression in 76.3% (29/38) of the breast cell lines tested and a strong correlation between PKD1 expression and invasiveness (P < 0.0001). In tamoxifen-treated patients, tumours with high PKD1 mRNA levels (n = 77, 50.66%) were significantly associated with less metastasis-free survival than tumours with low PKD1 mRNA expression (n = 75, 49.34%; P = 0.031). Moreover, PKD1 mRNA levels are strongly positively associated with EGFR and vimentin levels (P < 0.0000001). Thus, our study defines PKD1 as a novel attractive prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  6. Serum Zinc Concentration and C-Reactive Protein in Individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: the Positive Living with HIV (POLH) Study.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Krishna C; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R; Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana

    2016-05-01

    Low zinc levels and chronic inflammation are common in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Zinc deficiency may promote systemic inflammation, but research on the role of zinc in inflammation among HIV-positive individuals taking account of anti-retroviral therapy is lacking. We assessed the association between serum zinc and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration in a cohort of HIV-positive individuals. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 311 HIV-positive individuals (177 men and 134 women) aged 18-60 years residing in Kathmandu, Nepal. High-sensitive or regular serum CRP concentrations were measured by the latex agglutination nephelometry or turbidimetric method, and zinc concentrations were measured by the atomic absorption method. Relationships were assessed using multiple linear regression analysis. The geometric means of zinc in men and women were 73.83 and 71.93 ug/dL, respectively, and of CRP were 1.64 and 0.96 mg/L, respectively. Mean serum CRP concentration was significantly decreased with increasing serum zinc concentration across zinc tertiles (P for trend = 0.010), with mean serum CRP concentration in the highest tertile of serum zinc concentration was 44.2 % lower than that in the lowest tertile. The mean serum CRP concentrations in men and women in the highest tertile of serum zinc concentrations were 30 and 35.9 % lower, respectively, than that in the lowest tertile (P for trend = 0.263 and 0.162, respectively). We found a significant inverse relation between log zinc and log CRP concentrations (beta for 1 unit change in log zinc; β = -1.79, p = 0.0003). Serum zinc concentration may be inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in HIV-positive individuals.

  7. Protein kinase D1 regulates ERα-positive breast cancer cell growth response to 17β-estradiol and contributes to poor prognosis in patients

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Manale; Bièche, Ivan; Legay, Christine; Vacher, Sophie; Auclair, Christian; Ricort, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    About 70% of human breast cancers express and are dependent for growth on estrogen receptor α (ERα), and therefore are sensitive to antiestrogen therapies. However, progression to an advanced, more aggressive phenotype is associated with acquisition of resistance to antiestrogens and/or invasive potential. In this study, we highlight the role of the serine/threonine-protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in ERα-positive breast cancers. Growth of ERα-positive MCF-7 and MDA-MB-415 human breast cancer cells was assayed in adherent or anchorage-independent conditions in cells overexpressing or depleted for PKD1. PKD1 induces cell growth through both an ERα-dependent manner, by increasing ERα expression and cell sensitivity to 17β-estradiol, and an ERα-independent manner, by reducing cell dependence to estrogens and conferring partial resistance to antiestrogen ICI 182,780. PKD1 knockdown in MDA-MB-415 cells strongly reduced estrogen-dependent and independent invasion. Quantification of PKD1 mRNA levels in 38 cancerous and non-cancerous breast cell lines and in 152 ERα-positive breast tumours from patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen showed an association between PKD1 and ERα expression in 76.3% (29/38) of the breast cell lines tested and a strong correlation between PKD1 expression and invasiveness (P < 0.0001). In tamoxifen-treated patients, tumours with high PKD1 mRNA levels (n = 77, 50.66%) were significantly associated with less metastasis-free survival than tumours with low PKD1 mRNA expression (n = 75, 49.34%; P = 0.031). Moreover, PKD1 mRNA levels are strongly positively associated with EGFR and vimentin levels (P < 0.0000001). Thus, our study defines PKD1 as a novel attractive prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25287328

  8. The oncogenic fusion protein RUNX1-CBFA2T1 supports proliferation and inhibits senescence in t(8;21)-positive leukaemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Natalia; Drescher, Bettina; Riehle, Heidemarie; Cullmann, Claire; Vornlocher, Hans-Peter; Ganser, Arnold; Heil, Gerhard; Nordheim, Alfred; Krauter, Jürgen; Heidenreich, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Background The fusion protein RUNX1-CBFA2T1 associated with t(8;21)-positive acute myeloid leukaemia is a potent inhibitor of haematopoetic differentiation. The role of RUNX1-CBFA2T1 in leukaemic cell proliferation is less clear. We examined the consequences of siRNA-mediated RUNX1-CBFA2T1 depletion regarding proliferation and clonogenicity of t(8;21)-positive cell lines. Methods The t(8;21)-positive cell line Kasumi-1 was electroporated with RUNX1-CBFA2T1 or control siRNAs followed by analysis of proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and senescence. Results Electroporation of Kasumi-1 cells with RUNX1-CBFA2T1 siRNAs, but not with control siRNAs, resulted in RUNX1-CBFA2T1 suppression which lasted for at least 5 days. A single electroporation with RUNX1-CBFA2T1 siRNA severely diminished the clonogenicity of Kasumi-1 cells. Prolonged RUNX1-CBFA2T1 depletion inhibited proliferation in suspension culture and G1-S transition during the cell cycle, diminished the number of apoptotic cells, but induced cellular senescence. The addition of haematopoetic growth factors could not rescue RUNX1-CBFA2T1-depleted cells from senescence, and could only partially restore their clonogenicity. Conclusions RUNX1-CBFA2T1 supports the proliferation and expansion of t(8;21)-positive leukaemic cells by preventing cellular senescence. These findings suggest a central role of RUNX1-CBFA2T1 in the maintenance of the leukaemia. Therefore, RUNX1-CBFA2T1 is a promising and leukaemia-specific target for molecularly defined therapeutic approaches. PMID:15298716

  9. The total number of neurons and calcium binding protein positive neurons during aging in the cochlear nucleus of CBA/CaJ mice: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Idrizbegovic, E; Canlon, B; Bross, L S; Willott, J F; Bogdanovic, N

    2001-08-01

    The quantitative stereological method, the optical fractionator, was used for determining the total number of neurons and the total number of neurons immunostained with parvalbumin, calbindin-D28k (calbindin), and calretinin in the dorsal and posteroventral cochlear nucleus (DCN and PVCN) in CBA/CaJ (CBA) mice during aging (1-39 months old). CBA mice have only a modest sensorineural pathology late in life. An age-related decrease of the total number of neurons was demonstrated in the DCN (r=-0.54, P<0.03), while the total number of neurons in the PVCN did not show any significant age-related differences (r=0.16, P=0.57). In the DCN 5.5% of neurons were parvalbumin positive in the very old (30-39 months) mice, vs. 2.2% in the 1 month old mice. In the DCN 3% of the neurons were calbindin immunopositive in the 30-39 months mice compared to 1.9% in the 1 month old group. In the PVCN, 20% of the neurons in the very old mice were parvalbumin immunopositive, compared to 12% in the young mice. Calbindin did not show any significant age-related differences in the PVCN. The total number of calretinin immunopositive neurons both in the DCN and PVCN did not show any significant change with increasing age. In conclusion, the total neuronal number in the DCN and PVCN was age-related and region-specific. While the neuronal number in the DCN and PVCN was decreased or unchanged, respectively, the calcium binding protein positive neuronal number showed a graded increase during aging in a region-specific and protein-specific manner.

  10. A peptidoglycan recognition protein from Sciaenops ocellatus is a zinc amidase and a bactericide with a substrate range limited to Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-Fei; Zhang, Min; Wang, Chun-Lin; Sun, Li

    2012-02-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are a family of innate immune molecules that recognize bacterial peptidoglycan. PGRPs are highly conserved in invertebrates and vertebrates including fish. However, the biological function of teleost PGRP remains largely uninvestigated. In this study, we identified a PGRP homologue, SoPGLYRP-2, from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and analyzed its activity and potential function. The deduced amino acid sequence of SoPGLYRP-2 is composed of 482 residues and shares 46-94% overall identities with known fish PGRPs. SoPGLYRP-2 contains at the C-terminus a single zinc amidase domain with conserved residues that form the catalytic site. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis detected SoPGLYRP-2 expression in multiple tissues, with the highest expression occurring in liver and the lowest expression occurring in brain. Experimental bacterial infection upregulated SoPGLYRP-2 expression in kidney, spleen, and liver in time-dependent manners. To examine the biological activity of SoPGLYRP-2, purified recombinant proteins representing the intact SoPGLYRP-2 (rSoPGLYRP-2) and the amidase domain (rSoPGLYRP-AD) were prepared from Escherichia coli. Subsequent analysis showed that rSoPGLYRP-2 and rSoPGLYRP-AD (i) exhibited comparable Zn(2+)-dependent peptidoglycan-lytic activity and were able to recognize and bind to live bacterial cells, (ii) possessed bactericidal effect against Gram-positive bacteria and slight bacteriostatic effect against Gram-negative bacteria, (iii) were able to block bacterial infection into host cells. These results indicate that SoPGLYRP-2 is a zinc-dependent amidase and a bactericide that targets preferentially at Gram-positive bacteria, and that SoPGLYRP-2 is likely to play a role in host innate immune defense during bacterial infection.

  11. Abrogation of the Brd4-Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b Complex by Papillomavirus E2 Protein Contributes to Viral Oncogene Repression▿

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Li, Qing; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; You, Jianxin

    2010-01-01

    The cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 is a major interacting partner of the papillomavirus (PV) E2 protein. Interaction of E2 with Brd4 contributes to viral episome maintenance. The E2-Brd4 interaction also plays an important role in repressing viral oncogene expression from the integrated viral genome in human PV (HPV)-positive cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism is not clearly understood. In host cells, Brd4 recruits positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to stimulate RNA polymerase II phosphorylation during cellular and viral gene expression. P-TEFb associates with the C terminus of Brd4, which largely overlaps with the E2 binding site on Brd4. In this study, we demonstrate that E2 binding to Brd4 inhibits the interaction of endogenous Brd4 and P-TEFb. P-TEFb is essential for viral oncogene E6/E7 transcription in both HeLa and CaSki cells that contain integrated HPV genomes. E2 binding to Brd4 abrogates the recruitment of P-TEFb to the integrated viral chromatin template, leading to inactivation of P-TEFb and repression of the viral oncogene E6/E7. Furthermore, dissociation of the Brd4-P-TEFb complex from the integrated viral chromatin template using a Brd4 bromodomain dominant-negative inhibitor also hampers HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression. Our data support that Brd4 recruitment of P-TEFb to the viral chromatin template is essential for viral oncogene expression. Abrogation of the interaction between P-TEFb and Brd4 thus provides a mechanism for E2-mediated repression of the viral oncogenes from the integrated viral genomes in cancer cells. PMID:19846528

  12. Extensive protein hydrolysate formula effectively reduces regurgitation in infants with positive and negative challenge tests for cow’s milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, Y; De Greef, E

    2014-01-01

    Aim Cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) is treated using an elimination diet with an extensive protein hydrolysate. We explored whether a thickened or nonthickened version was best for infants with suspected CMPA, which commonly causes regurgitation/vomiting. Methods Diagnosis of CMPA was based on a positive challenge test. We compared the efficacy of two casein extensive hydrolysates (eCH), a nonthickened version (NT-eCH) and a thickened version (T-eCH), using a symptom-based score covering regurgitation, crying, stool consistency, eczema, urticarial and respiratory symptoms. Results A challenge was performed in 52/72 infants with suspected CMPA and was positive in 65.4%. All confirmed CMPA cases tolerated eCH. The symptom-based score decreased significantly in all infants within a month, and the highest reduction was in those with confirmed CMPA. Regurgitation was reduced in all infants (6.4 ± 3.2–2.8 ± 2.9, p < 0.001), but fell more with the T-eCH (−4.2 ± 3.2 regurgitations/day vs. −3.0 ± 4.5, ns), especially in infants with a negative challenge (−3.9 ± 4.0 vs. −1.9 ± 3.4, ns). Conclusion eCH fulfilled the criteria for a hypoallergenic formula, and the NT-eCH and T-eCH formulas both reduced CMPA symptoms. The symptom-based score is useful for evaluating how effective dietary treatments are for CMPA. PMID:24575806

  13. Hidden variability of floral homeotic B genes in Solanaceae provides a molecular basis for the evolution of novel functions.

    PubMed

    Geuten, Koen; Irish, Vivian

    2010-08-01

    B-class MADS box genes specify petal and stamen identities in several core eudicot species. Members of the Solanaceae possess duplicate copies of these genes, allowing for diversification of function. To examine the changing roles of such duplicate orthologs, we assessed the functions of B-class genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference approaches. Loss of function of individual duplicates can have distinct phenotypes, yet complete loss of B-class gene function results in extreme homeotic transformations of petal and stamen identities. We also show that these duplicate gene products have qualitatively different protein-protein interaction capabilities and different regulatory roles. Thus, compensatory changes in B-class MADS box gene duplicate function have occurred in the Solanaceae, in that individual gene roles are distinct, but their combined functions are equivalent. Furthermore, we show that species-specific differences in the stamen regulatory network are associated with differences in the expression of the microRNA miR169. Whereas there is considerable plasticity in individual B-class MADS box transcription factor function, there is overall conservation in the roles of the multimeric MADS box B-class protein complexes, providing robustness in the specification of petal and stamen identities. Such hidden variability in gene function as we observe for individual B-class genes can provide a molecular basis for the evolution of regulatory functions that result in novel morphologies.

  14. CO2-Responsive CONSTANS, CONSTANS-Like, and Time of Chlorophyll a/b Binding Protein Expression1 Protein Is a Positive Regulator of Starch Synthesis in Vegetative Organs of Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Miho; Hatanaka, Tomoko; Misoo, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    A unique CO2-Responsive CONSTANS, CONSTANS-like, and Time of Chlorophyll a/b Binding Protein1 (CCT) Protein (CRCT) containing a CCT domain but not a zinc finger motif is described, which is up-regulated under elevated CO2 in rice (Oryza sativa). The expression of CRCT showed diurnal oscillation peaked at the end of the light period and was also increased by sugars such as glucose and sucrose. Promoter β-glucuronidase analysis showed that CRCT was highly expressed in the phloem of various tissues such as leaf blade and leaf sheath. Overexpression or RNA interference knockdown of CRCT had no appreciable effect on plant growth and photosynthesis except that tiller angle was significantly increased by the overexpression. More importantly, starch content in leaf sheath, which serves as a temporary storage organ for photoassimilates, was markedly increased in overexpression lines and decreased in knockdown lines. The expressions of several genes related to starch synthesis, such as ADP-glucose pyrophospholylase and α-glucan phospholylase, were significantly changed in transgenic lines and positively correlated with the expression levels of CRCT. Given these observations, we suggest that CRCT is a positive regulator of starch accumulation in vegetative tissues, regulating coordinated expression of starch synthesis genes in response to the levels of photoassimilates. PMID:25717036

  15. NHE-RF, a Merlin-Interacting Protein, Is Primarily Expressed in Luminal Epithelia, Proliferative Endometrium, and Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Wiederhold, Thorsten; Nielsen, G. Petur; James, Marianne; Pinney-Michalowski, Denise; Roy, Jennifer E.; Cohen, Wendy A.; Ramesh, Vijaya; Louis, David N.

    2001-01-01

    NHE-RF, a regulatory cofactor for NHE (Na+-H+ exchanger) type 3, interacts with ion transporters and receptors through its PDZ domains and with the MERM proteins (merlin, ezrin, radixin and moesin) via its carboxyl terminus. Thus, NHE-RF may act as a multifunctional adaptor protein and play a role in the assembly of signal transduction complexes, linking ion channels and receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. NHE-RF expression is up-regulated in response to estrogen in estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinoma cell lines, suggesting that it may be involved in estrogen signaling. To further understand NHE-RF function and its possible role in estrogen signaling, we analyzed NHE-RF expression in normal human tissues, including cycling endometrium, and in breast carcinomas, tissues in which estrogen plays an important role in regulating cell growth and proliferation. NHE-RF is expressed in many epithelia, especially in cells specialized in ion transport or absorption, and is often localized to apical (luminal) membranes. NHE-RF expression varies markedly in proliferative versus secretory endometrium, with high expression in proliferative (estrogen-stimulated) endometrium. Furthermore, estrogen receptor status and NHE-RF expression correlate closely in breast carcinoma specimens. These findings support a role for NHE-RF in estrogen signaling. PMID:11141479

  16. A calmodulin like EF hand protein positively regulates oxalate decarboxylase expression by interacting with E-box elements of the promoter

    PubMed Central

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Kamthan, Mohan; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Pratima; Ansari, Sekhu; Thakur, Sarjeet Singh; Chaudhuri, Abira; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC) enzyme has immense biotechnological applications due to its ability to decompose anti-nutrient oxalic acid. Flammulina velutipes, an edible wood rotting fungus responds to oxalic acid by induction of OXDC to maintain steady levels of pH and oxalate anions outside the fungal hyphae. Here, we report that upon oxalic acid induction, a calmodulin (CaM) like protein-FvCaMLP, interacts with the OXDC promoter to regulate its expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that FvCamlp specifically binds to two non-canonical E-box elements (AACGTG) in the OXDC promoter. Moreover, substitutions of amino acids in the EF hand motifs resulted in loss of DNA binding ability of FvCamlp. F. velutipes mycelia treated with synthetic siRNAs designed against FvCaMLP showed significant reduction in FvCaMLP as well as OXDC transcript pointing towards positive nature of the regulation. FvCaMLP is different from other known EF hand proteins. It shows sequence similarity to both CaMs and myosin regulatory light chain (Cdc4), but has properties typical of a calmodulin, like binding of 45Ca2+, heat stability and Ca2+ dependent electrophoretic shift. Hence, FvCaMLP can be considered a new addition to the category of unconventional Ca2+ binding transcriptional regulators. PMID:26455820

  17. Changes in gene expression, protein content and morphology of chondrocytes cultured on a 3D Random Positioning Machine and 2D rotating clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela; Sahana, Jayashree

    Chondrocytes are the only cell type found in human cartilage consisting of proteoglycans and type II collagen. Several studies on chondrocytes cultured either in Space or on a ground-based facility for simulation of microgravity revealed that these cells are very resistant to adverse effects and stress induced by altered gravity. Tissue engineering of chondrocytes is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine and a 2D rotating clinostat, devices designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of microgravity exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced for 24 h. Based on the results achieved, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to simulated microgravity seem to change their extracellular matrix production behavior while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates.

  18. A maize mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, ZmMKK1, positively regulated the salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guohua; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Li; Liu, Yang; Pan, Jiaowen; Li, Dequan

    2014-07-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signal transduction modules in animals, plants and yeast. MAPK cascades are complicated networks and play vital roles in signal transduction pathways involved in biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a maize MAPKK gene, ZmMKK1, was characterized. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that ZmMKK1 transcripts were induced by diverse stresses and ABA signal molecule in maize root. Further study showed that the ZmMKK1-overexpressing Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance to salt and drought stresses. However, seed germination, post-germination growth and stomatal aperture analysis demonstrated that ZmMKK1 overexpression was sensitive to ABA in transgenic Arabidopsis. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that the overexpression of ZmMKK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced the expression of ROS scavenging enzyme- and ABA-related genes, such as POD, CAT, RAB18 and RD29A under salt and drought conditions. In addition, heterologous overexpression of ZmMKK1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) improved the tolerance to salt and drought stresses. These results suggested that ZmMKK1 might act as an ABA- and ROS-dependent protein kinase in positive modulation of salt and drought tolerance. Most importantly, ZmMKK1 interacted with ZmMEKK1 as evidenced by yeast two-hybrid assay, redeeming a deficiency of MAPK interaction partners in maize.

  19. A calmodulin like EF hand protein positively regulates oxalate decarboxylase expression by interacting with E-box elements of the promoter.

    PubMed

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Kamthan, Mohan; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Pratima; Ansari, Sekhu; Thakur, Sarjeet Singh; Chaudhuri, Abira; Datta, Asis

    2015-10-12

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC) enzyme has immense biotechnological applications due to its ability to decompose anti-nutrient oxalic acid. Flammulina velutipes, an edible wood rotting fungus responds to oxalic acid by induction of OXDC to maintain steady levels of pH and oxalate anions outside the fungal hyphae. Here, we report that upon oxalic acid induction, a calmodulin (CaM) like protein-FvCaMLP, interacts with the OXDC promoter to regulate its expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that FvCamlp specifically binds to two non-canonical E-box elements (AACGTG) in the OXDC promoter. Moreover, substitutions of amino acids in the EF hand motifs resulted in loss of DNA binding ability of FvCamlp. F. velutipes mycelia treated with synthetic siRNAs designed against FvCaMLP showed significant reduction in FvCaMLP as well as OXDC transcript pointing towards positive nature of the regulation. FvCaMLP is different from other known EF hand proteins. It shows sequence similarity to both CaMs and myosin regulatory light chain (Cdc4), but has properties typical of a calmodulin, like binding of (45)Ca(2+), heat stability and Ca(2+) dependent electrophoretic shift. Hence, FvCaMLP can be considered a new addition to the category of unconventional Ca(2+) binding transcriptional regulators.

  20. High calcium and dobutamine positive inotropy in the perfused mouse heart: myofilament calcium responsiveness, energetic economy, and effects of protein kinase C inhibition

    PubMed Central

    MacGowan, Guy A; Du, Congwu; Koretsky, Alan P

    2001-01-01

    Background In perfused hearts, high calcium-induced inotropy results in less developed pressure relative to myocardial oxygen consumption compared to the β-adrenergic agonist dobutamine. Calcium handling is an important determinant of myocardial oxygen consumption. Therefore, we hypothesized that this phenomenon was due to reduced myofilament responsiveness to calcium, related to protein kinase C activation. Results Developed pressure was significantly higher with dobutamine compared to high perfusate calcium of 3.5 mM (73 ± 10 vs 63 ± 10 mmHg, p < 0.05), though peak systolic intracellular calcium was not significantly different, suggesting reduced myofilament responsiveness to intracellular calcium with high perfusate calcium. The ratio of developed pressure to myocardial oxygen consumption, an index of economy of contraction, was significantly increased with dobutamine compared to high perfusate calcium (1.35 ± 0.15 vs 1.15 ± 0.15 mmHg/μmoles/min/g dry wt, p < 0.05), suggesting energetic inefficiency with high perfusate calcium. The specific protein kinase C inhibitor, chelerythrine, significantly attenuated the expected increase in developed pressure when increasing perfusate calcium from 2.5 to 3.5 mM (3.5 mM: 64 ± 8 vs 3.5 mM + chelerythrine: 55 ± 5 mmHg, p < 0.05), though had no effects on dobutamine, or lower levels of perfusate calcium (1.5 to 2.5 mM). Conclusions By measuring intracellular calcium, developed pressures and myocardial oxygen consumption in perfused mouse hearts, these results demonstrate that high perfusate calcium positive inotropy compared to dobutamine results in reduced myofilament responsiveness to intracellular calcium, which is associated with energetic inefficiency and evidence of protein kinase C activation. PMID:11553322

  1. Conjugative type IV secretion in Gram-positive pathogens: TraG, a lytic transglycosylase and endopeptidase, interacts with translocation channel protein TraM.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Verena; Probst, Ines; Aufschnaiter, Andreas; Büttner, Sabrina; Schaden, Lisa; Rechberger, Gerald N; Koraimann, Günther; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Keller, Walter

    2017-02-17

    Conjugative transfer plays a major role in the transmission of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. pIP501 is a Gram-positive conjugative model plasmid with the broadest transfer host-range known so far and is frequently found in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates. The pIP501 type IV secretion system is encoded by 15 transfer genes. In this work, we focus on the VirB1-like protein TraG, a modular peptidoglycan metabolizing enzyme, and the VirB8-homolog TraM, a potential member of the translocation channel. By providing full-length traG in trans, but not with a truncated variant, we achieved full recovery of wild type transfer efficiency in the traG-knockout mutant E. faecalis pIP501ΔtraG. With peptidoglycan digestion experiments and tandem mass spectrometry we could assign lytic transglycosylase and endopeptidase activity to TraG, with the CHAP domain alone displaying endopeptidase activity. We identified a novel interaction between TraG and TraM in a bacterial-2-hybrid assay. In addition we found that both proteins localize in focal spots at the E. faecalis cell membrane using immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy. Extracellular protease digestion to evaluate protein cell surface exposure revealed that correct membrane localization of TraM requires the transmembrane helix of TraG. Thus, we suggest an essential role for TraG in the assembly of the pIP501 type IV secretion system.

  2. Transcription enhancer factor 1 interacts with a basic helix-loop-helix zipper protein, Max, for positive regulation of cardiac alpha-myosin heavy-chain gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, M P; Amin, C S; Gupta, M; Hay, N; Zak, R

    1997-01-01

    The M-CAT binding factor transcription enhancer factor 1 (TEF-1) has been implicated in the regulation of several cardiac and skeletal muscle genes. Previously, we identified an E-box-M-CAT hybrid (EM) motif that is responsible for the basal and cyclic AMP-inducible expression of the rat cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC) gene in cardiac myocytes. In this study, we report that two factors, TEF-1 and a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper protein, Max, bind to the alpha-MHC EM motif. We also found that Max was a part of the cardiac troponin T M-CAT-TEF-1 complex even when the DNA template did not contain an apparent E-box binding site. In the protein-protein interaction assay, a stable association of Max with TEF-1 was observed when glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TEF-1 or GST-Max was used to pull down in vitro-translated Max or TEF-1, respectively. In addition, Max was coimmunoprecipitated with TEF-1, thus documenting an in vivo TEF-1-Max interaction. In the transient transcription assay, overexpression of either Max or TEF-1 resulted a mild activation of the alpha-MHC-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene at lower concentrations and repression of this gene at higher concentrations. However, when Max and TEF-1 expression plasmids were transfected together, the repression mediated by a single expression plasmid was alleviated and a three- to fourfold transactivation of the alpha-MHC-CAT reporter gene was observed. This effect was abolished once the EM motif in the promoter-reporter construct was mutated, thus suggesting that the synergistic transactivation function of the TEF-1-Max heterotypic complex is mediated through binding of the complex to the EM motif. These results demonstrate a novel association between Max and TEF-1 and indicate a positive cooperation between these two factors in alpha-MHC gene regulation. PMID:9199327

  3. Isoform-dependent effects of apoE on doublecortin-positive cells and microtubule-associated protein 2 immunoreactivity following (137)Cs irradiation.

    PubMed

    Villasana, Laura; Pfankuch, Timothy; Raber, Jacob

    2010-08-01

    Previously we found apoE isoform-dependent effects of (137)Cs irradiation on cognitive function of female mice 3 months following irradiation. Alterations in the number of immature neurons and in the levels of the dendritic marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) might contribute to the cognitive changes following irradiation. Therefore, in the present study we determined if, following (137)Cs irradiation, there are apoE isoform-dependent effects on loss of doublecortin-positive neuroprogenitor cells or MAP-2 immumonoreactivity. In the dentate gyrus, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, enthorhinal and sensorimotor cortex, and central and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala of apoE3 female mice, MAP-2 immunoreactivity increased 3 months following (137)Cs irradiation. In addition, at 8 h following irradiation, the number of doublecortin-positive cells was higher in apoE3 than apoE2 or apoE4 mice. Together, these data indicate that brains of apoE3 mice respond differently to (137)Cs irradiation than those of apoE2 or apoE4 mice.

  4. The Hydroxyl at Position C1 of Genipin Is the Active Inhibitory Group that Affects Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 in Panc-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianwei; Ding, Yue; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jianying; Shi, Chenchen; Fu, Wenwei; Cai, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    Genipin (GNP) effectively inhibits uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), which regulates the leakage of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. UCP2 inhibition may induce pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell death by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In this study, the hydroxyls at positions C10 (10-OH) and C1 (1-OH) of GNP were hypothesized to be the active groups that cause these inhibitory effects. Four GNP derivatives in which the hydroxyl at position C10 or C1 was replaced with other chemical groups were synthesized and isolated. Differences in the inhibitory effects of GNP and its four derivatives on pancreatic carcinoma cell (Panc-1) proliferation were assessed. The effects of GNP and its derivatives on apoptosis, UCP2 inhibition and ROS production were also studied to explore the relationship between GNP’s activity and its structure. The derivatives with 1-OH substitutions, geniposide (1-GNP1) and 1-ethyl-genipin (1-GNP2) lacked cytotoxic effects, while the other derivatives that retained 1-OH, 10-piv-genipin (10-GNP1) and 10-acetic acid-genipin (10-GNP2) exerted biological effects similar to those of GNP, even in the absence of 10-OH. Thus, 1-OH is the key functional group in the structure of GNP that is responsible for GNP’s apoptotic effects. These cytotoxic effects involve the induction of Panc-1 cell apoptosis through UCP2 inhibition and subsequent ROS production. PMID:26771380

  5. AtPP2CG1, a protein phosphatase 2C, positively regulates salt tolerance of Arabidopsis in abscisic acid-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Zhu, Yanming; Zhai, Hong; Cai, Hua; Ji, Wei; Luo, Xiao; Li, Jing; Bai, Xi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AtPP2CG1 positively regulates salt tolerance in ABA-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AtPP2CG1 up-regulates the expression of marker genes in different pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AtPP2CG1 expresses in the vascular system and trichomes of Arabidopsis. -- Abstract: AtPP2CG1 (Arabidopsis thaliana protein phosphatase 2C G Group 1) was predicted as an abiotic stress candidate gene by bioinformatic analysis in our previous study. The gene encodes a putative protein phosphatase 2C that belongs to Group G of PP2C. There is no report of Group G genes involved in abiotic stress so far. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that AtPP2CG1 expression was induced by salt, drought, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. The expression levels of AtPP2CG1 in the ABA synthesis-deficient mutant abi2-3 were much lower than that in WT plants under salt stress suggesting that the expression of AtPP2CG1 acts in an ABA-dependent manner. Over-expression of AtPP2CG1 led to enhanced salt tolerance, whereas its loss of function caused decreased salt tolerance. These results indicate that AtPP2CG1 positively regulates salt stress in an ABA-dependent manner. Under salt treatment, AtPP2CG1 up-regulated the expression levels of stress-responsive genes, including RD29A, RD29B, DREB2A and KIN1. GUS activity was detected in roots, leaves, stems, flower, and trichomes of AtPP2CG1 promoter-GUS transgenic plants. AtPP2CG1 protein was localized in nucleus and cytoplasm via AtPP2CG1:eGFP and YFP:AtPP2CG1 fusion approaches.

  6. The synthetic heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor EC141 induces degradation of Bcr-Abl p190 protein and apoptosis of Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei-Gang; Estrov, Zeev; Wang, Yongtao; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Harris, David M; Van Pham, Quin; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Liu, Zhiming; Koch, Patricia; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael J; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-12-01

    The prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is poor. Chemotherapy is rarely curative and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) induce only transient responses. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a chaperone protein that is important in signal transduction, cell cycle control, and transcription regulation in both normal and leukemia cells. In the current study, we tested the growth inhibitory and apoptotic effects of a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, EC141 on the Ph+ ALL lines Z-119, Z-181, and Z-33, as well as primary bone marrow-derived blasts from patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. We found that EC141 inhibited the growth of Ph+ ALL cells in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) ranged from 1 to 10 nM. EC141 also inhibited the proliferation of primary bone marrow-derived blasts using the ALL blast colony assay. EC141 down-regulated Hsp90 and up-regulated Hsp70 protein levels, inhibited CrkL phosphorylation, and induced degradation of Bcr-Abl p190 protein through ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. Furthermore, exposure of Ph+ ALL cells to EC141 resulted in activation of caspase-3, cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggest that EC141 is a potent Hsp90 inhibitor with activity against Ph+ ALL. Further studies to investigate the anticancer effect of EC141 either as a single agent, or in combination in Ph+ ALL and other hematological malignancies are warranted.

  7. 5-Aminolaevulinate synthase gene promoter contains two cAMP-response element (CRE)-like sites that confer positive and negative responsiveness to CRE-binding protein (CREB).

    PubMed Central

    Giono, L E; Varone, C L; Cánepa, E T

    2001-01-01

    The first and rate-controlling step of the haem biosynthetic pathway in mammals and fungi is catalysed by the mitochondrial-matrix enzyme 5-aminolaevulinate synthase (ALAS). The purpose of this work was to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the cAMP regulation of rat housekeeping ALAS gene expression. Thus we have examined the ALAS promoter for putative transcription-factor-binding sites that may regulate transcription in a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-induced context. Applying both transient transfection assays with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene driven by progressive ALAS promoter deletions in HepG2, and electrophoresis mobility-shift assays we have identified two putative cAMP-response elements (CREs) at positions -38 and -142. Functional analysis showed that both CRE-like sites were necessary for complete PKA induction, but only one for basal expression. Co-transfection with a CRE-binding protein (CREB) expression vector increased PKA-mediated induction of ALAS promoter transcriptional activity. However, in the absence of co-transfected PKA, CREB worked as a specific repressor for ALAS promoter activity. A CREB mutant deficient in a PKA phosphorylation site was unable to induce expression of the ALAS gene but could inhibit non-stimulated promoter activity. Furthermore, a DNA-binding mutant of CREB did not interfere with ALAS promoter basal activity. Site-directed-mutagenesis studies showed that only the nearest element to the transcription start site was able to inhibit the activity of the promoter. Therefore, we conclude that CREB, through its binding to CRE-like sites, mediates the effect of cAMP on ALAS gene expression. Moreover, we propose that CREB could also act as a repressor of ALAS transcription, but is able to reverse its role after PKA activation. Dephosphorylated CREB would interfere in a spatial-disposition-dependent manner with the transcriptional machinery driving inhibition of gene expression. PMID:11139395

  8. SALT TOLERANCE HOMOLOG2, a B-box protein in Arabidopsis that activates transcription and positively regulates light-mediated development.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sourav; Hettiarachchi, Chamari; Johansson, Henrik; Holm, Magnus

    2007-10-01

    CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) and ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) are two major regulators of light signaling in plants. Here, we identify SALT TOLERANCE HOMOLOG2 (STH2) as a gene that interacts genetically with both of these key regulators. STH2 encodes a B-box-containing protein that interacts physically with HY5 in yeast and in plant cells. Whereas STH2 is uniformly nuclear by itself, it shows a COP1-dependent localization to speckles when coexpressed with COP1. We identified two independent T-DNA insertion lines in STH2. Both alleles are hyposensitive to blue, red, and far-red light. The sth2 mutant, like hy5, shows an enhanced number of lateral roots and accumulates less anthocyanin. Analysis of double mutants between sth2 and hy5 indicates that STH2 has both HY5-dependent and -independent functions. Furthermore, besides partially suppressing the hypocotyl phenotype of dark-grown cop1 alleles, sth2 also suppresses the reduced number of lateral roots and high anthocyanin levels in light-grown cop1 alleles. Interestingly, we found that STH2 can activate transcription. Transient transfection assays in protoplasts using a LUC reporter driven by the chalcone isomerase promoter show that the B-boxes in STH2 and a functional G-box element in the promoter are required for this activity. In conclusion, we have identified STH2, a B-box protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, as a positive regulator of photomorphogenesis and report that the B-box domain plays a direct role in activating transcription in plants.

  9. A novel approach for targeted elimination of CSPG4-positive triple-negative breast cancer cells using a MAP tau-based fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Amoury, Manal; Mladenov, Radoslav; Nachreiner, Thomas; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Di Fiore, Stefano; Helfrich, Wijnand; Pardo, Alessa; Fey, Georg; Schwenkert, Michael; Thepen, Theophilus; Kiessling, Fabian; Hussain, Ahmad F; Fischer, Rainer; Kolberg, Katharina; Barth, Stefan

    2016-08-15

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) has been identified as a highly promising target antigen for immunotherapy of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). TNBC represents a highly aggressive heterogeneous group of tumors lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. TNBC is particularly prevalent among young premenopausal women. No suitable targeted therapies are currently available and therefore, novel agents for the targeted elimination of TNBC are urgently needed. Here, we present a novel cytolytic fusion protein (CFP), designated αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP, that consists of a high affinity CSPG4-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) genetically fused to a functionally enhanced form of the human microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau. Our data indicate that αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP efficiently targets CSPG4(+) TNBC-derived cell lines MDA-MB-231 and Hs 578T and potently inhibits their growth with IC50 values of ∼200 nM. Treatment with αCSPG(scFv)-MAP resulted in induction of the mitochondrial stress pathway by activation of caspase-9 as well as endonuclease G translocation to the nucleus, while induction of the caspase-3 apoptosis pathway was not detectable. Importantly, in vivo studies in mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts revealed efficient targeting to and accumulation of αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP at tumor sites resulting in prominent tumor regression. Taken together, this preclinical proof of concept study confirms the potential clinical value of αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP as a novel targeted approach for the elimination of CSPG4-positive TNBC.

  10. Elevated levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein correlate positively with C-reactive protein in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-chen; Wei, Jing-jing; Wang, Fei; Chen, Man-tian; Zhang, Mao-zhen

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is unknown. We, therefore, measured serum levels of Ox-LDL and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP in 90 ACS patients, 45 stable angina pectoris (SAP) patients, and 66 healthy controls using sandwich ELISA. ACS patients were subdivided into: (1) acute myocardial infarction (AMI; n = 45); (2) unstable angina pectoris (UAP; n = 45) groups. In AMI patients, Ox-LDL (177.5 mmol/l) and hs-CRP (25.40 mg/l) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in UAP (Ox-LDL:107.5 mmol/l, hs-CRP:10.7 mg/l) and SAP (Ox-LDL:82.3 mmol/l, hs-CRP:2.10 mg/l) patients as well as controls (Ox-LDL:41.4 mmol/l, hs-CRP:1.76 mg/l). Ox-LDL/hs-CRP levels in UAP patients were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in SAP patients and controls. Importantly, a positive correlation was found between Ox-LDL and CRP (r = 0.622; P < 0.01) levels. Serum levels of total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol did not differ among these patient groups. In conclusion, our data show that Ox-LDL and hs-CRP levels correlate positively in ACS patients, supporting the hypothesis that Ox-LDL and CRP may play a direct role in promoting the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis in these individuals. We suggest that Ox-LDL/CRP elevated levels may serve as markers of the severity of the disease in evaluation and management of ACS patients.

  11. The Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Shp2, Positively Contributes to FLT3-ITD-Induced Hematopoietic Progenitor Hyperproliferation and Malignant Disease In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nabinger, Sarah C.; Li, XingJun; Ramdas, Baskar; He, Yantao; Zhang, Xian; Zeng, Lifan; Richine, Briana; Bowling, Joshua D.; Fukuda, Seiji; Goenka, Shreevrat; Liu, Ziyue; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Yu, Menggang; Sandusky, George E.; Boswell, H. Scott; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Kapur, Reuben; Chan, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Internal tandem duplications in the fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor (FLT3-ITDs) confer a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. We hypothesized that increased recruitment of the protein tyrosine phosphatase, Shp2, to FLT3-ITDs contributes to FLT3 ligand (FL)-independent hyperproliferation and STAT5 activation. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated constitutive association of Shp2 with the FLT3-ITD, N51-FLT3, as well as with STAT5. Knock-down of Shp2 in Baf3/N51-FLT3 cells significantly reduced proliferation while having little effect on WT-FLT3-expressing cells. Consistently, mutation of N51-FLT3 tyrosine 599 to phenylalanine or genetic disruption of Shp2 in N51-FLT3-expressing bone marrow low density mononuclear cells reduced proliferation and STAT5 activation. In transplants, genetic disruption of Shp2 in vivo yielded increased latency to and reduced severity of FLT3-ITD-induced malignancy. Mechanistically, Shp2 co-localizes with nuclear phospho-STAT5, is present at functional interferon-γ activation sites (GAS) within the BCL2L1 promoter, and positively activates the human BCL2L1 promoter, suggesting that Shp2 works with STAT5 to promote pro-leukemogenic gene expression. Further, using a small molecule Shp2 inhibitor, the proliferation of N51-FLT3-expressing bone marrow progenitors and primary AML samples was reduced in a dose-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that Shp2 positively contributes to FLT3-ITD-induced leukemia and suggest that Shp2 inhibition may provide a novel therapeutic approach to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23103841

  12. alpha-Synucleinopathy in the human olfactory system in Parkinson's disease: involvement of calcium-binding protein- and substance P-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Argandoña-Palacios, Lucia; Garcia-Muñozguren, Susana; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2010-06-01

    Hyposmia is an early symptom of idiopathic Parkinson's disease but the pathological bases of such dysfunction are largely unknown. The distribution of alpha-synuclein, which forms Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, and the types of neurons (based on their neurotransmitters) affected by alpha-synucleinopathy were investigated in the olfactory system in Parkinson's disease. Immunohistochemical distribution of alpha-synuclein and its co-localization with tyrosine hydroxylase, somatostatin, calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin and substance P in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, olfactory tubercle and piriform, periamygdaloid and rostral entorhinal cortices of idiopathic Parkinson's disease cases (n = 11) and age-matched controls (n = 11) were investigated. Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites were present in the olfactory bulb, particularly in mitral cells and in the inner plexiform layer. alpha-synuclein was particularly abundant in the different divisions of the anterior olfactory nucleus (bulbar, intrapeduncular, retrobulbar and cortical). In contrast, Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites were less abundant in the olfactory tubercle and olfactory cortices. In the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory cortices, cells affected by alpha-synucleinopathy rarely co-localized tyrosine hydroxylase or somatostatin, but they frequently co-localized calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin and substance P. The present data provide evidence that alpha-synucleinopathy affects neurons along the olfactory pathway. Dopamine- and somatostatin-positive cells are rarely affected; whereas the cell types most vulnerable to neurodegeneration include glutamate- (mitral cells), calcium-binding protein- and substance P-positive cells. These results provide data on the distribution and cell types involved by alpha-synucleinopathy in the human olfactory system during Parkinson disease that may be useful for future clinical investigation.

  13. Sry HMG box protein 9-positive (Sox9+) epithelial cell adhesion molecule-negative (EpCAM-) biphenotypic cells derived from hepatocytes are involved in mouse liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Nishikawa, Yuji; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2014-03-14

    It has been shown that mature hepatocytes compensate tissue damages not only by proliferation and/or hypertrophy but also by conversion into cholangiocyte-like cells. We found that Sry HMG box protein 9-positive (Sox9(+)) epithelial cell adhesion molecule-negative (EpCAM(-)) hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α-positive (HNF4α(+)) biphenotypic cells showing hepatocytic morphology appeared near EpCAM(+) ductular structures in the livers of mice fed 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-containing diet. When Mx1-Cre:ROSA mice, which were injected with poly(I:C) to label mature hepatocytes, were fed with the DDC diet, we found LacZ(+)Sox9(+) cells near ductular structures. Although Sox9(+)EpCAM(-) cells adjacent to expanding ducts likely further converted into ductular cells, the incidence was rare. To know the cellular characteristics of Sox9(+)EpCAM(-) cells, we isolated them as GFP(+)EpCAM(-) cells from DDC-injured livers of Sox9-EGFP mice. Sox9(+)EpCAM(-) cells proliferated and could differentiate to functional hepatocytes in vitro. In addition, Sox9(+)EpCAM(-) cells formed cysts with a small central lumen in collagen gels containing Matrigel® without expressing EpCAM. These results suggest that Sox9(+)EpCAM(-) cells maintaining biphenotypic status can establish cholangiocyte-type polarity. Interestingly, we found that some of the Sox9(+) cells surrounded luminal spaces in DDC-injured liver while they expressed HNF4α. Taken together, we consider that in addition to converting to cholangiocyte-like cells, Sox9(+)EpCAM(-) cells provide luminal space near expanded ductular structures to prevent deterioration of the injuries and potentially supply new hepatocytes to repair damaged tissues.

  14. Sry HMG Box Protein 9-positive (Sox9+) Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-negative (EpCAM−) Biphenotypic Cells Derived from Hepatocytes Are Involved in Mouse Liver Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Nishikawa, Yuji; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that mature hepatocytes compensate tissue damages not only by proliferation and/or hypertrophy but also by conversion into cholangiocyte-like cells. We found that Sry HMG box protein 9-positive (Sox9+) epithelial cell adhesion molecule-negative (EpCAM−) hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α-positive (HNF4α+) biphenotypic cells showing hepatocytic morphology appeared near EpCAM+ ductular structures in the livers of mice fed 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-containing diet. When Mx1-Cre:ROSA mice, which were injected with poly(I:C) to label mature hepatocytes, were fed with the DDC diet, we found LacZ+Sox9+ cells near ductular structures. Although Sox9+EpCAM− cells adjacent to expanding ducts likely further converted into ductular cells, the incidence was rare. To know the cellular characteristics of Sox9+EpCAM− cells, we isolated them as GFP+EpCAM− cells from DDC-injured livers of Sox9-EGFP mice. Sox9+EpCAM− cells proliferated and could differentiate to functional hepatocytes in vitro. In addition, Sox9+EpCAM− cells formed cysts with a small central lumen in collagen gels containing Matrigel® without expressing EpCAM. These results suggest that Sox9+EpCAM− cells maintaining biphenotypic status can establish cholangiocyte-type polarity. Interestingly, we found that some of the Sox9+ cells surrounded luminal spaces in DDC-injured liver while they expressed HNF4α. Taken together, we consider that in addition to converting to cholangiocyte-like cells, Sox9+EpCAM− cells provide luminal space near expanded ductular structures to prevent deterioration of the injuries and potentially supply new hepatocytes to repair damaged tissues. PMID:24482234

  15. High-Content Positional Biosensor Screening Assay for Compounds to Prevent or Disrupt Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Intermediary Factor 2 Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yun; Shun, Tong Ying; Strock, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The androgen receptor–transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (AR-TIF2) positional protein–protein interaction (PPI) biosensor assay described herein combines physiologically relevant cell-based assays with the specificity of binding assays by incorporating structural information of AR and TIF2 functional domains along with intracellular targeting sequences and fluorescent reporters. Expression of the AR-red fluorescent protein (RFP) “prey” and TIF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) “bait” components of the biosensor was directed by recombinant adenovirus constructs that expressed the ligand binding and activation function 2 surface domains of AR fused to RFP with nuclear localization and nuclear export sequences, and three α-helical LXXLL motifs from TIF2 fused to GFP and an HIV Rev nucleolar targeting sequence. In unstimulated cells, AR-RFP was localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and TIF2-GFP was localized to nucleoli. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment induced AR-RFP translocation into the nucleus where the PPIs between AR and TIF2 resulted in the colocalization of both biosensors within the nucleolus. We adapted the translocation enhanced image analysis module to quantify the colocalization of the AR-RFP and TIF2-GFP biosensors in images acquired on the ImageXpress platform. DHT induced a concentration-dependent AR-TIF2 colocalization and produced a characteristic condensed punctate AR-RFP PPI nucleolar distribution pattern. The heat-shock protein 90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and antiandrogens flutamide and bicalutamide inhibited DHT-induced AR-TIF2 PPI formation with 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50s) of 88.5±12.5 nM, 7.6±2.4 μM, and 1.6±0.4 μM, respectively. Images of the AR-RFP distribution phenotype allowed us to distinguish between 17-AAG and flutamide, which prevented AR translocation, and bicalutamide, which blocked AR-TIF2 PPIs. We screened the Library of Pharmacologically Active

  16. A Positive Feedback Loop between HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN101 and HEAT STRESS-ASSOCIATED 32-KD PROTEIN Modulates Long-Term Acquired Thermotolerance Illustrating Diverse Heat Stress Responses in Rice Varieties1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-yi; Chai, Kuo-hsing; Ko, Swee-suak; Kuang, Lin-yun; Lur, Huu-Sheng; Charng, Yee-yung

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is an important factor that has a negative impact on rice (Oryza sativa) production. To alleviate this problem, it is necessary to extensively understand the genetic basis of heat tolerance and adaptability to heat stress in rice. Here, we report the molecular mechanism underlying heat acclimation memory that confers long-term acquired thermotolerance (LAT) in this monocot plant. Our results showed that a positive feedback loop formed by two heat-inducible genes, HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN101 (HSP101) and HEAT STRESS-ASSOCIATED 32-KD PROTEIN (HSA32), at the posttranscriptional level prolongs the effect of heat acclimation in rice seedlings. The interplay between HSP101 and HSA32 also affects basal thermotolerance of rice seeds. These findings are similar to those reported for the dicot plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), suggesting a conserved function in plant heat stress response. Comparison between two rice cultivars, japonica Nipponbare and indica N22 showed opposite performance in basal thermotolerance and LAT assays. ‘N22’ seedlings have a higher basal thermotolerance level than cv Nipponbare and vice versa at the LAT level, indicating that these two types of thermotolerance can be decoupled. The HSP101 and HSA32 protein levels were substantially higher in cv Nipponbare than in cv N22 after a long recovery following heat acclimation treatment, at least partly explaining the difference in the LAT phenotype. Our results point out the complexity of thermotolerance diversity in rice cultivars, which may need to be taken into consideration when breeding for heat tolerance for different climate scenarios. PMID:24520156

  17. Characterization of an AGAMOUS homologue from the conifer black spruce (Picea mariana) that produces floral homeotic conversions when expressed in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, R; Regan, S; Nicolas, O; Fobert, P; Côté, C; Bosnich, W; Kauffeldt, C; Sunohara, G; Séguin, A; Stewart, D

    1998-09-01

    Advances in elucidating the molecular processes controlling flower initiation and development have provided unique opportunities to investigate the developmental genetics of non-flowering plants. In addition to providing insights into the evolutionary aspects of seed plants, identification of genes regulating reproductive organ development in gymnosperms could help determine the level of homology with current models of flower induction and floral organ identity. Based upon this, we have searched for putative developmental regulators in conifers with amino acid sequence homology to MADS-box genes. PCR cloning using degenerate primers targeted to the MADS-box domain revealed the presence of over 27 MADS-box genes within black spruce (Picea mariana), including several with extensive homology to either AP1 or AGAMOUS, both known to regulate flower development in Arabidopsis. This indicates that like angiosperms, conifers contain a large and diverse MADS-box gene family that probably includes regulators of reproductive organ development. Confirmation of this was provided by the characterization of an AGAMOUS-like cDNA clone called SAG1, whose conservation of intron position and tissue-specific expression within reproductive organs indicate that it is a homologue of AGAMOUS. Functional homology with AGAMOUS was demonstrated by the ability of SAG1 to produce homeotic conversions of sepals to carpels and petals to stamens when ectopically expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. This suggests that some of the genetic pathways controlling flower and cone development are homologous, and antedate the 300-million-year-old divergence of angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  18. Substitution of lysine at 627 position in PB2 protein does not change virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huachen; Wang, Jia; Wang, Pui; Song, Wenjun; Zheng, Zuoyi; Chen, Rirong; Guo, Kunyuan; Zhang, Taixing; Peiris, Joseph S.M.; Chen, Honglin; Guan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    A lysine at the 627 position (627K) of PB2 protein of influenza virus has been recognized as a determinant for host adaptation and virulent element for some influenza viruses. While seasonal influenza viruses exclusively contained 627K, the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 possessed a glutamic acid (627E), even after circulation in humans for more than 6 months. To explore the potential role of E627K substitution in PB2 in the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, we compared pathogenicity and growth properties between a recombinant virus containing 627K PB2 gene and the parental A/California/4/2009 strain containing 627E. Our results showed that substitution of 627K in PB2 gene does not confer higher virulence and growth rate for the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in mice and cell culture respectively, suggesting 627K is not required for human adaptation of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. PMID:20303563

  19. The conserved macrodomains of the non-structural proteins of Chikungunya virus and other pathogenic positive strand RNA viruses function as mono-ADP-ribosylhydrolases.

    PubMed

    Eckei, Laura; Krieg, Sarah; Bütepage, Mareike; Lehmann, Anne; Gross, Annika; Lippok, Barbara; Grimm, Alexander R; Kümmerer, Beate M; Rossetti, Giulia; Lüscher, Bernhard; Verheugd, Patricia

    2017-02-02

    Human pathogenic positive single strand RNA ((+)ssRNA) viruses, including Chikungunya virus, pose severe health problems as for many neither efficient vaccines nor therapeutic strategies exist. To interfere with propagation, viral enzymatic activities are considered potential targets. Here we addressed the function of the viral macrodomains, conserved folds of non-structural proteins of many (+)ssRNA viruses. Macrodomains are closely associated with ADP-ribose function and metabolism. ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification controlling various cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription and stress response. We found that the viral macrodomains possess broad hydrolase activity towards mono-ADP-ribosylated substrates of the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases ARTD7, ARTD8 and ARTD10 (aka PARP15, PARP14 and PARP10, respectively), reverting this post-translational modification both in vitro and in cells. In contrast, the viral macrodomains possess only weak activity towards poly-ADP-ribose chains synthesized by ARTD1 (aka PARP1). Unlike poly-ADP-ribosylglycohydrolase, which hydrolyzes poly-ADP-ribose chains to individual ADP-ribose units but cannot cleave the amino acid side chain - ADP-ribose bond, the different viral macrodomains release poly-ADP-ribose chains with distinct efficiency. Mutational and structural analyses identified key amino acids for hydrolase activity of the Chikungunya viral macrodomain. Moreover, ARTD8 and ARTD10 are induced by innate immune mechanisms, suggesting that the control of mono-ADP-ribosylation is part of a host-pathogen conflict.

  20. A role for the Drosophila SU(VAR)3-9 protein in chromatin organization at the histone gene cluster and in suppression of position-effect variegation.

    PubMed Central

    Ner, Sarbjit S; Harrington, Michael J; Grigliatti, Thomas A

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for Su(var)3-9 are dominant suppressors of position-effect variegation (PEV). We show that SU(VAR)3-9 is a chromatin-associated protein and identify the large multicopy histone gene cluster (HIS-C) as one of its target loci. The organization of nucleosomes over the entire HIS-C region is altered in Su(var)3-9 mutants and there is a concomitant increase in expression of the histone genes. SU(VAR)3-9 is a histone H3 methyltransferase and, using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that SU(VAR)3-9 is present at the HIS-C locus and that the histone H3 at the HIS-C locus is methylated. We propose that SU(VAR)3-9 is involved in packaging HIS-C into a distinct chromatin domain that has some of the characteristics of beta-heterochromatin. We suggest that methylation of histone H3 is important for the chromatin structure at HIS-C. The chromosomal deficiency for the HIS-C is also a suppressor of PEV. In contrast to what might be expected, we show that hemizygosity for the HIS-C locus leads to a substantial increase in the histone transcripts. PMID:12524347

  1. Iron-Regulated Protein HupB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Positively Regulates Siderophore Biosynthesis and Is Essential for Growth in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Satya Deo; Choudhury, Mitali; Yousuf, Suhail; Wheeler, Paul R.; Gordon, Stephen V.; Ranjan, Akash

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses the 28-kDa protein HupB (Rv2986c) and the Fe3+-specific high-affinity siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin upon iron limitation. The objective of this study was to understand the functional role of HupB in iron acquisition. A hupB mutant strain of M. tuberculosis, subjected to growth in low-iron medium (0.02 μg Fe ml−1), showed a marked reduction of both siderophores with low transcript levels of the mbt genes encoding the MB biosynthetic machinery. Complementation of the mutant strain with hupB restored siderophore production to levels comparable to that of the wild type. We demonstrated the binding of HupB to the mbtB promoter by both electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA footprinting. The latter revealed the HupB binding site to be a 10-bp AT-rich region. While negative regulation of the mbt machinery by IdeR is known, this is the first report of positive regulation of the mbt operon by HupB. Interestingly, the mutant strain failed to survive inside macrophages, suggesting that HupB plays an important role in vivo. PMID:24610707

  2. The 14-3-3 protein Bmh1 functions in the spindle position checkpoint by breaking Bfa1 asymmetry at yeast centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Micoogullari, Yagmur; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Palani, Saravanan; Pereira, Gislene

    2014-07-15

    In addition to their well-known role in microtubule organization, centrosomes function as signaling platforms and regulate cell cycle events. An important example of such a function is the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) of budding yeast. SPOC is a surveillance mechanism that ensures alignment of the mitotic spindle along the cell polarity axis. Upon spindle misalignment, phosphorylation of the SPOC component Bfa1 by Kin4 kinase engages the SPOC by changing the centrosome localization of Bfa1 from asymmetric (one centrosome) to symmetric (both centrosomes). Here we show that, unexpectedly, Kin4 alone is unable to break Bfa1 asymmetry at yeast centrosomes. Instead, phosphorylation of Bfa1 by Kin4 creates a docking site on Bfa1 for the 14-3-3 family protein Bmh1, which in turn weakens Bfa1-centrosome association and promotes symmetric Bfa1 localization. Consistently, BMH1-null cells are SPOC deficient. Our work thus identifies Bmh1 as a new SPOC component and refines the molecular mechanism that breaks Bfa1 centrosome asymmetry upon SPOC activation.

  3. The 14-3-3 protein Bmh1 functions in the spindle position checkpoint by breaking Bfa1 asymmetry at yeast centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Micoogullari, Yagmur; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Palani, Saravanan; Pereira, Gislene

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their well-known role in microtubule organization, centrosomes function as signaling platforms and regulate cell cycle events. An important example of such a function is the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) of budding yeast. SPOC is a surveillance mechanism that ensures alignment of the mitotic spindle along the cell polarity axis. Upon spindle misalignment, phosphorylation of the SPOC component Bfa1 by Kin4 kinase engages the SPOC by changing the centrosome localization of Bfa1 from asymmetric (one centrosome) to symmetric (both centrosomes). Here we show that, unexpectedly, Kin4 alone is unable to break Bfa1 asymmetry at yeast centrosomes. Instead, phosphorylation of Bfa1 by Kin4 creates a docking site on Bfa1 for the 14-3-3 family protein Bmh1, which in turn weakens Bfa1–centrosome association and promotes symmetric Bfa1 localization. Consistently, BMH1-null cells are SPOC deficient. Our work thus identifies Bmh1 as a new SPOC component and refines the molecular mechanism that breaks Bfa1 centrosome asymmetry upon SPOC activation. PMID:24850890

  4. The conserved macrodomains of the non-structural proteins of Chikungunya virus and other pathogenic positive strand RNA viruses function as mono-ADP-ribosylhydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Eckei, Laura; Krieg, Sarah; Bütepage, Mareike; Lehmann, Anne; Gross, Annika; Lippok, Barbara; Grimm, Alexander R.; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Rossetti, Giulia; Lüscher, Bernhard; Verheugd, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Human pathogenic positive single strand RNA ((+)ssRNA) viruses, including Chikungunya virus, pose severe health problems as for many neither efficient vaccines nor therapeutic strategies exist. To interfere with propagation, viral enzymatic activities are considered potential targets. Here we addressed the function of the viral macrodomains, conserved folds of non-structural proteins of many (+)ssRNA viruses. Macrodomains are closely associated with ADP-ribose function and metabolism. ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification controlling various cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription and stress response. We found that the viral macrodomains possess broad hydrolase activity towards mono-ADP-ribosylated substrates of the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases ARTD7, ARTD8 and ARTD10 (aka PARP15, PARP14 and PARP10, respectively), reverting this post-translational modification both in vitro and in cells. In contrast, the viral macrodomains possess only weak activity towards poly-ADP-ribose chains synthesized by ARTD1 (aka PARP1). Unlike poly-ADP-ribosylglycohydrolase, which hydrolyzes poly-ADP-ribose chains to individual ADP-ribose units but cannot cleave the amino acid side chain - ADP-ribose bond, the different viral macrodomains release poly-ADP-ribose chains with distinct efficiency. Mutational and structural analyses identified key amino acids for hydrolase activity of the Chikungunya viral macrodomain. Moreover, ARTD8 and ARTD10 are induced by innate immune mechanisms, suggesting that the control of mono-ADP-ribosylation is part of a host-pathogen conflict. PMID:28150709

  5. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  6. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications.

    PubMed

    Imaduwage, Kasun P; Go, Eden P; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Human epididymis protein 4 expression positively correlated with miR-21 and served as a prognostic indicator in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Gao, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of gynecological malignancy-related mortality. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a useful biomarker for ovarian cancer when either used alone or in combination with carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125). What is more, aberrant expression of microRNA-21 (miR-21) has been shown to be involved in oncogenesis, but the relationship between miR-21 and HE4 in ovarian cancer is not clear. Tumor and adjacent tumor tissues from 43 patients with ovarian cancer were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of HE4 in the carcinoma and adjacent tissues. The associations between HE4 and tumor biological characters were discussed. TaqMan(®) MicroRNA (miRNA) assays were employed to detect the expression of miR-21 in the ovarian carcinoma. In ovarian cancer, the expression of HE4 messenger RNA (mRNA) in cancer tissues was higher than adjacent tumor tissues (P < 0.0001), which was 1.299-fold of adjacent tumor tissues. And, the expression of miR-21 was also up-regulated which was significantly different in the ovarian cancer (the positive rate was 76.74 %). There was a significantly positive correlation between miR-21 and HE4 expression (r = 0.283 and P = 0.066 for HE4 mRNA, r = 0.663 and P < 0.0001 for serum HE4). There was also a significant correlation between miR-21 and tumor grade (r = 0.608, P < 0.0001). Significantly, patients with recent recurrence (less than 6 months, n = 17) have a higher miR-21 expression than those with no recent recurrence. Therefore, HE4 and miR-21 may play an important role in the development and progression of ovarian cancer and they may serve as prognostic indicators in ovarian cancer.

  8. Elevated serum levels of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive human Mac-2 binding protein predict the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C patients

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Kazumi; Tateyama, Masakuni; Abiru, Seigo; Komori, Atsumasa; Nagaoka, Shinya; Saeki, Akira; Hashimoto, Satoru; Sasaki, Ryu; Bekki, Shigemune; Kugiyama, Yuki; Miyazoe, Yuri; Kuno, Atsushi; Korenaga, Masaaki; Togayachi, Akira; Ocho, Makoto; Mizokami, Masashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive human Mac-2-binding protein (WFA+-M2BP) was recently shown to be a liver fibrosis glycobiomarker with a unique fibrosis-related glycoalteration. We evaluated the ability of WFA+-M2BP to predict the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients who were infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). A total of 707 patients who had been admitted to our hospital with chronic HCV infection without other potential risk factors were evaluated to determine the ability of WFA+-M2BP to predict the development of HCC; factors evaluated included age, sex, viral load, genotypes, fibrosis stage, aspartate and alanine aminotransferase levels, bilirubin, albumin, platelet count, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), WFA+-M2BP, and the response to interferon (IFN) therapy. Serum WFA+-M2BP levels were significantly increased according to the progression of liver fibrosis stage (P < 0.001). In each distinctive stage of fibrosis (F0-F1, F2, F3, and F4), the risk of development of HCC was increased according to the elevation of WFA+-M2BP. Multivariate analysis identified age >57 years, F4, AFP >20 ng/mL, WFA+-M2BP ≥4, and WFA+-M2BP 1-4 as well as the response to IFN (no therapy vs. sustained virological response) as independent risk factors for the development of HCC. The time-dependent areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve demonstrated that the WFA+-M2BP assay predicted the development of HCC with higher diagnostic accuracy than AFP. Conclusion: WFA+-M2BP can be applied as a useful surrogate marker for the risk of HCC development, in addition to liver biopsy. (Hepatology 2014;60:1563–1570) PMID:25042054

  9. Prediction of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development after Hepatitis C Virus Eradication Using Serum Wisteria floribunda Agglutinin-Positive Mac-2-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shunsuke; Genda, Takuya; Ichida, Takafumi; Amano, Nozomi; Sato, Sho; Murata, Ayato; Tsuzura, Hironori; Narita, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yoshio; Hirano, Katsuharu; Shimada, Yuji; Iijima, Katsuyori; Wada, Ryo; Nagahara, Akihito; Watanabe, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to clarify the association between a novel serum fibrosis marker, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein (WFA+-M2BP), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in 355 patients with chronic hepatitis C who achieved sustained virologic response (SVR) through interferon-based antiviral therapy. Pretreatment serum WFA+-M2BP levels were quantified and the hazard ratios (HRs) for HCC development were retrospectively analyzed by Cox proportional hazard analysis. During the median follow-up time of 2.9 years, 12 patients developed HCC. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that high serum WFA+-M2BP (≥2.80 cut off index (COI), HR = 15.20, p = 0.013) and high fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) index (≥3.7, HR = 5.62, p = 0.034) were independent risk factors for HCC development. The three- and five-year cumulative incidence of HCC in patients with low WFA+-M2BP were 0.4% and 0.4%, respectively, whereas those of patients with high WFA+-M2BP were 7.7% and 17.6%, respectively (p < 0.001). In addition, combination of serum WFA+-M2BP and FIB-4 indices successfully stratified the risk of HCC: the five-year cumulative incidences of HCC were 26.9%, 6.8%, and 0.0% in patients with both, either, and none of these risk factors, respectively (p < 0.001). In conclusion, pretreatment serum WFA+-M2BP level is a useful predictor for HCC development after achieving SVR. PMID:27999409

  10. Novobiocin and Peptide Analogs of α-factor are Positive Allosteric Modulators of the Yeast G Protein-Coupled Receptor Ste2p

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, Jeffrey K.; Hauser, Melinda; Bourdon, Allen K.; Campagna, Shawn R.; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the target of many drugs prescribed for human medicine and are therefore the subject of intense study. It has been recognized that compounds called allosteric modulators can regulate GPCR activity by binding to the receptor at sites distinct from, or overlapping with, that occupied by the orthosteric ligand. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of the interaction between putative allosteric modulators and Ste2p, a model GPCR expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that binds the tridecapeptide mating pheromone α-factor. Biological assays demonstrated that an eleven amino acid α-factor analog and the antibiotic novobiocin were positive allosteric modulators of Ste2p. Both compounds enhanced the biological activity of α-factor, but did not compete with α-factor binding to Ste2p. To determine if novobiocin and the 11-mer shared a common allosteric binding site, a biologically-active analog of the 11-mer peptide ([Bio-DOPA]11-mer) was chemically cross-linked to Ste2p in the presence and absence of novobiocin. Immunoblots probing for the Ste2p-[Bio-DOPA]11-mer complex revealed that novobiocin markedly decreased cross-linking of the [Bio-DOPA]11-mer to the receptor, but cross-linking of the α-factor analog [Bio-DOPA]13-mer, which interacts with the orthosteric binding site of the receptor, was minimally altered. This finding suggests that both novobiocin and [Bio-DOPA]11-mer compete for an allosteric binding site on the receptor. These results indicate that Ste2p may provide an excellent model system for studying allostery in a GPCR. PMID:25576192

  11. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    PubMed

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynam