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Sample records for magmatic sources setting

  1. Pyroxene megacrysts in Proterozoic anorthosites: Implications for tectonic setting, magma source and magmatic processes at the Moho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bybee, G. M.; Ashwal, L. D.; Shirey, S. B.; Horan, M.; Mock, T.; Andersen, T. B.

    2014-03-01

    from which the anorthosites are derived. Modeling of these anorthositic magmas with MELTS indicates that their ultramafic cumulates would have sunk in the magma and been sequestered at the Moho, where they may have sunk deeper into the mantle resulting in large-scale compositional differentiation. The HAOMs thus represent a rare example of part of a cumulate assemblage that was carried to the upper crust during anorthosite emplacement and, together with the anorthosites, illustrate the dramatic influence that magma ponding and differentiation at the Moho has on residual magmas traveling towards the surface. The new geochronologic and isotopic data indicate that the magmas were derived by melting of the mantle, forming magmatic systems that could have been long-lived (e.g. 80-100 m.y.). A geologic setting that would fit these temporal constraints is a long-lived Andean-type margin.

  2. Characteristics of mantle sources in Jurassic to Quaternary magmatic history of the territory of Armenia, as a guide to diverse geodynamic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghosyan, Igor; Meliksetian, Khachatur; van Bergen, Manfred; Mason, Paul; Jrbashyan, Ruben; Navasardyan, Gevorg; Ghukasyan, Yura; Melkonyan, Rafael; Karapetyan, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Complex geological mosaic of the territory of Armenia is presented by units consisting by fragments of continental blocks of Gondwanaland origin, Mesozoic Tethian island arc and Mesozoic ophiolitic complexes. Extensive magmatic activity traced from Early Jurassic to Holocene developed in diverse geological settings, such as Jurassic Tethyian MORB lavas, Upper Cretaceous and Eocene rift-related magmas and post-collisional Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic series. Despite the remarkable existence of subduction, obduction and collisional orogenic processes, accompanied by extensional and compressional tectonics, little is known about the relation between geodynamics and magma generation conditions, as mantles sources types and primary melts characteristics during the evolution of the region. Current study is intended to get new information that help to fill the gaps between the geodynamical puzzle and conditions of the mantle sources melting within the selected key areas of the territory of Armenia and Lesser Caucasus in general. In this contribution we focus on discussion of results of detailed geochemical and petrological studies of representative, highest-MgO samples of Jurassic picrites within Vedi ophiolites, picrite dyke of Alaverdi cutting Mesozoic Tethian island arc complexes, Upper Cretaceous rift-related sub-alkaline/alkaline basaltic series of Idjevan and Gochas, Late Eocene alkaline basaltic dyke of Jajur cutting Eocene volcanic and sedimentary complexes and Pliocene - Quaternary post-collisional volcanism, presented by 1) rifting-related flood basalts (dolerites); 2) HKCA basaltic series of Aragats stratovolcano and Gegham monogenetic volcanic upland and 3) high-alkaline, silica-undersaturated basaltic series of Syunik and Kapan. Geochemical signatures of most studied samples are characterised by enrichments in LILE and LREE, but depleted in HFSE, reflecting to OIB/MORB-type mantle source that may have been modified by subduction-related processes. Exceptions

  3. Copahue volcano and its regional magmatic setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varekamp, J C; Zareski, J E; Camfield, L M; Todd, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Copahue volcano (Province of Neuquen, Argentina) has produced lavas and strombolian deposits over several 100,000s of years, building a rounded volcano with a 3 km elevation. The products are mainly basaltic andesites, with the 2000–2012 eruptive products the most mafic. The geochemistry of Copahue products is compared with those of the main Andes arc (Llaima, Callaqui, Tolhuaca), the older Caviahue volcano directly east of Copahue, and the back arc volcanics of the Loncopue graben. The Caviahue rocks resemble the main Andes arc suite, whereas the Copahue rocks are characterized by lower Fe and Ti contents and higher incompatible element concentrations. The rocks have negative Nb-Ta anomalies, modest enrichments in radiogenic Sr and Pb isotope ratios and slightly depleted Nd isotope ratios. The combined trace element and isotopic data indicate that Copahue magmas formed in a relatively dry mantle environment, with melting of a subducted sediment residue. The back arc basalts show a wide variation in isotopic composition, have similar water contents as the Copahue magmas and show evidence for a subducted sedimentary component in their source regions. The low 206Pb/204Pb of some backarc lava flows suggests the presence of a second endmember with an EM1 flavor in its source. The overall magma genesis is explained within the context of a subducted slab with sediment that gradually looses water, water-mobile elements, and then switches to sediment melt extracts deeper down in the subduction zone. With the change in element extraction mechanism with depth comes a depletion and fractionation of the subducted complex that is reflected in the isotope and trace element signatures of the products from the main arc to Copahue to the back arc basalts.

  4. Isotopic evidence of magmatism and a sedimentary carbon source at the Endeavour hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T A; Proskurowski, G; Lilley, M D

    2004-01-07

    Stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements made on CO{sub 2} from high temperature hydrothermal vents on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate both magmatic and sedimentary sources of carbon to the hydrothermal system. The Endeavour segment is devoid of overlying sediments and has shown no observable signs of surficial magmatic activity during the {approx}20 years of ongoing studies. The appearance of isotopically heavy, radiocarbon dead CO{sub 2} after a 1999 earthquake swarm requires that this earthquake event was magmatic in origin. Evidence for a sedimentary organic carbon source suggests the presence of buried sediments at the ridge axis. These findings, which represent the first temporally coherent set of radiocarbon measurements from hydrothermal vent fluids, demonstrate the utility of radiocarbon analysis in hydrothermal studies. The existence of a sediment source at Endeavour and the occurrence of magmatic episodes illustrate the extremely complex and evolving nature of the Endeavour hydrothermal system.

  5. Geochemical evolution of Cenozoic-Cretaceous magmatism and its relation to tectonic setting, southwestern Idaho, U.S.A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Marc D.; Leeman, William P.

    1989-01-01

    The relationships between Cretaceous to Neogene magmatism and the tectonic setting of southwestern and central Idaho are evaluated. An overview of the tectonics and geology of the northwestern U.S. is presented. Major element, trace element, and Sr, Pb, and Nd isotopic data for the region are used to place constraints on magma source characteristics, the manner in which the magmatic sources evolved through time, and the nature of interactions among mantle and crustal domains in response to changing tectonic environment.

  6. Magma sources during Gondwana breakup: chemistry and chronology of Cretaceous magmatism in Westland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Quinten H. A.; Waight, Tod E.; Scott, James M.

    2013-04-01

    Cretaceous-Paleogene rifting of the Eastern Gondwana margin thinned the continental crust of Zealandia and culminated in the opening of the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand and the Southern Ocean, separating both from Antarctica. The Western Province of New Zealand consists of a succession of metasedimentary rocks intruded by Palaeozoic and Mesozoic granitoids that formed in an active margin setting through the Phanerozoic. Upon cessation of subduction, the earliest stages of extension (~110-100 Ma) were expressed in the formation of metamorphic core complexes, followed by emplacement of granitoid plutons, the deposition of terrestrial Pororari Group sediments in extensional half-grabens across on- and offshore Westland, and the intrusion of mafic dikes from ~90 Ma. These dikes are concentrated in the swarms of the Paparoa and Hohonu Ranges and were intruded prior to and simultaneous with volumetrically minor A-type plutonism at 82 Ma. The emplacement of mafic dikes and A-type plutonism at ~82 Ma is significant as it coincides with the age of the oldest seafloor in the Tasman Sea, therefore it represents magmatism coincident with the initiation of seafloor spreading which continued until ~53 Ma. New 40Ar-39Ar ages indicate that the intrusion of mafic dikes in basement lithologies both preceded and continued after the initial opening of the Tasman Sea, including an additional population of ages at ~70 Ma. This indicates either a prolonged period of extension-related magmatism that continued >10 Ma after initial breakup, or two discrete episodes of magmatism during Tasman Sea spreading. Volumetrically minor Cenozoic within-plate magmatism continued sporadically throughout the South Island and bears a characteristic HIMU (high time integrated U/Pb) signature. A detailed geochemistry and chronological study of Cretaceous mafic and felsic magmatism is currently in progress and aims to better understand the transition of magma sources from a long lived active

  7. Synchronous alkaline and subalkaline magmatism during the late Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic Ross orogeny, Antarctica: Insights into magmatic sources and processes within a continental arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Peter, Graham; Cottle, John M.

    2016-10-01

    Extensive exposure of intrusive igneous rocks along the Ross orogen of Antarctica-an ancient accretionary orogen on the margin of East Gondwana-provides an exceptional opportunity to study continental arc magmatism. There is significant petrologic and geochemical variability in igneous rocks within a 500-km-long segment of the arc in southern Victoria Land. The conspicuous occurrence of carbonatite and alkaline silicate rocks (nepheline syenite, A-type granite, and alkaline mafic rocks) adjacent to large complexes of subalkaline granitoids is not adequately explained by traditional models for continental arc magmatism. Extensive geochemical analysis (> 100 samples) and zircon U-Pb geochronology (n = 70) confirms that alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism was partially contemporaneous with the emplacement of large subduction-related igneous complexes in adjacent areas. Major pulses of subalkaline magmatism were compositionally distinct and occurred at different times along the arc. Large bodies of subalkaline orthogneiss and granite (sensu lato) were emplaced over similar time intervals (ca. 25 Myr) to the north (ca. 515-492 Ma) and south (ca. 550-525 Ma) of the alkaline magmatic province, although the initiation of these major pulses of magmatism was offset by ca. 35 Myr. Alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism spanned at least ca. 550-509 Ma, overlapping with voluminous subalkaline magmatism in adjacent areas. The most primitive rocks from each area have similarly enriched trace element compositions, indicating some common characteristics of the magma sources along the arc. The samples from the older subalkaline complex have invariably low Sr/Y ratios (< 40), consistent with relatively shallow magma generation and differentiation. The younger subalkaline complex and subalkaline rocks within the area of the alkaline province extend to higher Sr/Y ratios (up to 300), indicative of generation and differentiation at deeper levels. The significant spatial and temporal

  8. Mode of rifting in magmatic-rich setting: Tectono-magmatic evolution of the Central Afar rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Pik, Raphaël; Leroy, Sylvie; Ayalew, Dereje

    2014-05-01

    Observation of deep structures related to break-up processes at volcanic passive margins (VPM) is often a troublesome exercise: thick pre- to syn-breakup seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR) usually mask the continent-ocean boundary and hide the syn-rift tectonic structures that accommodate crustal stretching and thinning. Some of the current challenges are about clarifying 1) if tectonic stretching fits the observed thinning and 2) what is the effect of continuous magma supply and re-thickening of the crust during extension from a rheological point of view? The Afar region in Ethiopia is an ideal natural laboratory to address those questions, as it is a highly magmatic rift that is probably close enough to breakup to present some characteristics of VPM. Moreover, the structures related to rifting since Oligocene are out-cropping, onshore and well preserved. In this contribution, we present new structural field data and lavas (U-Th/He) datings along a cross-section from the Ethiopian Plateau, through the marginal graben down to the Manda-Hararo active rift axis. We mapped continent-ward normal fault array affecting highly tilted trapp series unconformably overlain by tilted Miocene (25-7 Ma) acid series. The main extensional and necking/thinning event took place during the end of this Miocene magmatic episode. It is itself overlain by flat lying Pliocene series, including the Stratoid. Balanced cross-sections of those areas allow us to constrain a surface stretching factor of about 2.1-2.9. Those findings have the following implications: - High beta factor constrained from field observations is at odd with thinning factor of ~1.3 predicted by seismic and gravimetric studies. We propose that the continental crust in Central Afar has been re-thickened by the emplacement of underplated magma and SDR. - The deformation in Central Afar appears to be largely distributed through space and time. It has been accommodated in a 200-300 km wide strip being a diffuse incipient

  9. Magmatic Degassing in the Crust Is Mantle Source Dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, P.

    2014-12-01

    The 4He/40Ar* ratio (where 40Ar* is 40Ar corrected for atmospheric contamination) is known to be sensitive to magmatic degassing due to the different solubilities of He and Ar in silicate melts: 4He/40Ar* increases in the residual liquids because Ar is less soluble than He and therefore degasses more rapidly. Conversely, lithophile isotope ratios and incompatible trace element ratios (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, La/Sm etc) are specifically chosen as these are largely insensitive to magmatic processes, including degassing (as far as mid-ocean ridges are concerned) but rather trace mantle heterogeneities. It is astonishing therefore that correlations between 4He/40Ar* and lithophile isotope ratios (such as 87Sr/86Sr or 143Nd/144Nd) exist in South East Indian Ridge basalts and basaltic glasses [1]. These correlations appear to be the result of enhanced degassing of magmas produced from enriched mantle: enriched mantle probably has higher C contents relative to depleted mantle, therefore degassing of 'enriched' compositions will start at higher pressure and the proportion of volatiles lost will be greater than for 'depleted' lavas. The 4He/40Ar* ratio of the erupted products depends on the proportion of volatiles lost, therefore 4He/40Ar* is higher in lavas derived from enriched as opposed to depleted magmas. Naturally, enriched lavas are also distinct from depleted lavas in their lithophile isotopic composition (high 87Sr/86Sr, low 143Nd/144Nd) and thus the observed correlations between lithophile isotopes and degassing (4He/40Ar*) is created. A simple degassing model suggests that, in order to generate the correlated variability in Sr and Nd isotopes and 4He/40Ar*, the mantle C concentration likely varies by factor ~2 [1]. Thus it is possible to link mantle C variability - which is difficult to asses due to shallow level degassing - with Sr isotopic composition, which is very commonly measured in mid-ocean ridge basalts: Sr isotopes can be used as a proxy for mantle C

  10. Towards a magmatic quartz database: tracing melt sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailby, N. D.; Ackerson, M. R.; Watson, E. B.; Thomas, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Quartz composition has seen increasing interest among the scientific community over the last decade due to new calibrations (e.g., Ti-in-quartz) and the proliferation of trace element analytical facilities. What is presently lacking in the field of quartz research is a quartz composition database. Such a single body of information can be used to evaluate whether variation seen in different crystallization environments is equally manifest in quartz composition. In this study we present >2000 new quartz analyses from >70 different granitoids and volcanic settings from around the globe (Lachlan Fold Belt, High Himalaya, French Massif, Cordilleran, Caledonian, White Mountains, Bishop, Toba, Snake River, Oman ophiolite and a number of other select locations). This dataset also combines data from a number of previous studies and together the data may collectively be used to determine which geochemical characteristics can be used to distinguish quartz from different magma types. A number of trace element concentrations or ratios (e.g., Al/Ti, Ge, Li, P and B) are notably useful when distinguishing peraluminous (e.g., cordierite-bearing granitoid) systems from more metaluminous systems (e.g., hornblende granodiorite) or plagiogranites.

  11. Wave Propagation in Axi-Symmetrical Magmatic Conduits Due to an Internal Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Negri, R. S.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2014-12-01

    The classical Trefftz's method is implemented to simulate wave propagation in and around axi-symmetrical magmatic conduits. In this fluid-solid system the fluid (magma) is confined by an elastic unbounded medium that represents the surrounding rock. Our aim is to associate wave behavior with mechanical and geometrical conduit characteristics. The source is assumed to be at a point along the conduit centered axis medium are constructed in both cases as linear combinations of particular solutions.Within the fluid such solutions are spherical standing waves that are smooth at the origins. In the elastic solid region the field is constructed with monopoles and dipoles for the P waves and spheroidal dipoles for SV waves. The particular solutions satisfy the elastodynamic equations that govern the wave motion at those media and are associated to origins (selected points) distributed along the conduit axis. For the surrounding rock the solutions are sources that satisfy Sommerfeld's radiation condition. These sets of solutions are assumed to be complete. This conjecture is exact in 2D acoustic problems. The conduit can be closed or open at the ends and the surrounding elastic domain is unbounded. In order to find the coefficients of Trefftz's wave expansions, boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface (null shear and continuity of pressures and normal velocities) are satisfied in the least squares sense. The solution is obtained in the frequency domain and the source time function can be introduced using Fourier analysis.Regardless the low order of the formulation our results display a rich variety of behaviors. For a uniform infinite cylinder we reproduced the exact analytical solution. In addition, this approach allows identifying some important effects of the conduit geometry, including changes of sections. Lateral and longitudinal resonances of irregular axi-symmetric conduits are well resolved. The stiffness of the solid domain with respect to the fluid

  12. Tectonic setting of the Jurassic bimodal magmatism in the Sakarya Zone (Central and Western Pontides), Northern Turkey: A geochemical and isotopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genç, Ş. Can; Tüysüz, Okan

    2010-07-01

    The Lower to Middle Jurassic Mudurnu formation of the Sakarya Zone (Northern Turkey) was deposited in an extensional basin. This unit crops out along the southern Pontide range and consists of marine sedimentary rocks including debris flows, lignite-bearing clastic rocks and Ammonitico Rosso horizons alternating with mafic and felsic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks. Magmatic rocks of the Mudurnu formation comprise two compositionally different groups; 1) a mafic group including diabase-microgabbro-basaltic lavas and their pyroclastic equivalents, and 2) a felsic group including granite porphyries and felsic pyroclastic rocks. All the magmatic members of the Mudurnu formation are subalkaline and display a calc-alkaline affinity. They are bimodal, with a significant silica gap between the mafic and felsic members with the exception of a few samples. These magmatic rocks display enrichment in LILE and depletion in Nb, Ta, P and Ti, implying a subduction-related magmatic signature. Melting modelling for the mafic rocks indicates that they originated possibly from subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) composed of spinel lherzolite. ɛNd(i) values (+ 1.5 to + 4.3) imply that the mafic volcanic and hypabyssal rocks were possibly derived from a time-integrated LREE-depleted mantle source. The initial Sr and Nd isotope values, and ɛNd(i) of the felsic hypabyssal rocks are comparable to the mafic ones. The isotope data point to a genetic relationship between the felsic and mafic members. Results obtained from the geochemical modelling of incompatible versus compatible trace elements show that the felsic rocks were derived from the mafic melts by fractional crystallization (FC) process. In the light of their regional geological setting and these geochemical characteristics, we propose that the magmatic rocks of the Mudurnu formation formed in an extensional basin situated on an active and/or just ended subduction zone during the Jurassic period. The Mudurnu formation

  13. Martian Magmatic-Driven Hydrothermal Sites: Potential Sources of Energy, Water, and Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Ferris, J. C.; Hare, T. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Klemaszewski, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Scott, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    Magmatic-driven processes and impact events dominate the geologic record of Mars. Such recorded geologic activity coupled with significant evidence of past and present-day water/ice, above and below the martian surface, indicate that hydrothermal environments certainly existed in the past and may exist today. The identification of such environments, especially long-lived magmatic-driven hydrothermal environments, provides NASA with significant target sites for future sample return missions, since they (1) could favor the development and sustenance of life, (2) may comprise a large variety of exotic mineral assemblages, and (3) could potentially contain water/ice reservoirs for future Mars-related human activities. If life developed on Mars, the fossil record would presumably be at its greatest concentration and diversity in environments where long-term energy sources and water coexisted such as at sites where long-lived, magmatic-driven hydrothermal activity occurred. These assertions are supported by terrestrial analogs. Small, single-celled creatures (prokaryotes) are vitally important in the evolution of the Earth; these prokaryotes are environmentally tough and tolerant of environmental extremes of pH, temperature, salinity, and anoxic conditions found around hydrothermal vents. In addition, there is a great ability for bacteria to survive long periods of geologic time in extreme conditions, including high temperature hydrogen sulfide and sulfur erupted from Mount St. Helens volcano. Our team of investigators is conducting a geological investigation using multiple mission-derived datasets (e.g., existing geologic map data, MOC imagery, MOLA, TES image data, geophysical data, etc.) to identify prime target sites of hydrothermal activity for future hydrological, mineralogical, and biological investigations. The identification of these sites will enhance the probability of success for future missions to Mars.

  14. Martian Magmatic-Driven Hydrothermal Sites: Potential Sources of Energy, Water, and Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Ferris, J. C.; Hare, T. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Klemaszewski, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Scott, D. H.

    2000-07-01

    Magmatic-driven processes and impact events dominate the geologic record of Mars. Such recorded geologic activity coupled with significant evidence of past and present-day water/ice, above and below the martian surface, indicate that hydrothermal environments certainly existed in the past and may exist today. The identification of such environments, especially long-lived magmatic-driven hydrothermal environments, provides NASA with significant target sites for future sample return missions, since they (1) could favor the development and sustenance of life, (2) may comprise a large variety of exotic mineral assemblages, and (3) could potentially contain water/ice reservoirs for future Mars-related human activities. If life developed on Mars, the fossil record would presumably be at its greatest concentration and diversity in environments where long-term energy sources and water coexisted such as at sites where long-lived, magmatic-driven hydrothermal activity occurred. These assertions are supported by terrestrial analogs. Small, single-celled creatures (prokaryotes) are vitally important in the evolution of the Earth; these prokaryotes are environmentally tough and tolerant of environmental extremes of pH, temperature, salinity, and anoxic conditions found around hydrothermal vents. In addition, there is a great ability for bacteria to survive long periods of geologic time in extreme conditions, including high temperature hydrogen sulfide and sulfur erupted from Mount St. Helens volcano. Our team of investigators is conducting a geological investigation using multiple mission-derived datasets (e.g., existing geologic map data, MOC imagery, MOLA, TES image data, geophysical data, etc.) to identify prime target sites of hydrothermal activity for future hydrological, mineralogical, and biological investigations. The identification of these sites will enhance the probability of success for future missions to Mars.

  15. Magmatic vapor source for sulfur dioxide released during volcanic eruptions: Evidence from Mount Pinatubo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, P.J.; Gerlach, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) released by the explosive eruption of Mount Pinatubo on 15 June 1991 had an impact on climate and stratospheric ozone. The total mass of SO2 released was much greater than the amount dissolved in the magma before the eruption, and thus an additional source for the excess SO2 is required. Infrared spectroscopic analyses of dissolved water and carbon dioxide in glass inclusions from quartz phenocrysts demonstrate that before eruption the magma contained a separate, SO2-bearing vapor phase. Data for gas emissions from other volcanoes in subduction-related arcs suggest that preeruptive magmatic vapor is a major source of the SO2 that is released during many volcanic eruptions.

  16. Early Mesozoic granitoid and rhyolite magmatism of the Bureya Terrane of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Age and geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Kotov, A. B.; Kudryashov, N. M.; Kovach, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Early Mesozoic granitoids and volcanic rocks are widespread throughout the structures of all of the continental massifs in the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, although its tectonic setting is not yet clear. Generally, they are associated with subduction and plume processes or rifting. Such uncertainty is mostly explained by the unequal investigation of Early Mesozoic magmatism. This paper presents the results of geochemical, Sm-Nd isotope, and U-Pb geochronologic (ID-TIMS) studies of "key-type" Early Mesozoic magmatic rock complexes of the Bureya Terrane. This is one of the largest continental massifs in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt and knowledge of its geological structure is of fundamental importance in understanding the history of its formation. It has been established that the leucogranites of the Altakhtinsky Complex and the trachyrhyolites of the Talovsky Complex are practically coeval ( 209-208 Ma). The subalkaline leucogranites of the Kharinsky Complex have a slightly younger age of 199 Ma. These data correspond to the general stage of Early Mesozoic magmatic and metamorphic events (236-180 Ma) in most continental massifs in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. We believe that large-scale Early Mesozoic events were related to the amalgamation of the continental massifs of the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt into a single continental structure (the Amur superterrane or microcontinent Amuria) and collision with the North Asian Craton. It should be noted that the collision processes were followed by crustal thickening, thus creating the conditions for metamorphism and formation of magmatic rock complexes of various geochemical types.

  17. Magmatic Fluid Source of the Chingshui Geothermal Field: Evidence of Carbonate Isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. R.; Lu, Y. C.; Wang, P. L.; John, C. M.; MacDonald, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Chingshui geothermal field is located at the northern tip of the Miocene Lushan Slate Formation, which was part of the Eurasian continental margin subject to the Plio-Pleistocene collision associated with the Luzon Arc. The remnant heat of the Taiwan orogeny has long been considered to drive the circulation of hydrothermal fluids in the Chingshui geothermal field. However, recent studies based on magnetic anomalies and helium isotopic ratios suggest that the heat might instead be derived from igneous bodies. By examining isotope data of calcite veins and scaling in geothermal wells, this study aimed to clarify the fluid origin and possible heat source accounting for the geothermal fluids in the Chingshui geothermal field. Carbon and oxygen isotope analyses indicate that veins from outcrops and scalings in geothermal wells have high and low d values, respectively. Data for veins in drilled cores fall in between outcrop veins and scalings values. Such an isotopic pattern could be interpreted as the mixing of two end member fluids. The clumped isotope analysis of calcite veins from the outcrops yielded precipitation temperatures of up to 232 ± 16 ℃ and a reconstructed d18O fluid value of 9.5 ‰(magmatic fluid: 6-11 ‰; metamorphic fluid: 5-28 ‰ by Taylor, 1974). The inferred d18O values of hot fluids for the vein formation are significantly different from that of meteoric water in Chingshui area (around -5.4 ‰) as well as the scaling in geothermal wells (around -7.6 ‰). Previous study of magnetotelluric image demonstrated two possible fluid reservoirs at different depths (Chen et al. 2012). Our isotope data combined with these lines of evidence suggest that the scaling in geothermal wells could be derived from fluids originating from the shallower reservoir. In contrast, the veins present at outcrops could have been formed from 18O-enriched, deeply-sourced fluids related to either metamorphic dehydration or magmatic processes.

  18. Modes of rifting in magma-rich settings: Tectono-magmatic evolution of Central Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Pik, Raphaël.; Quidelleur, Xavier; Ayalew, Dereje; Leroy, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in Afar (northern Ethiopia) has largely focused on the formation of the present-day ocean-continent transition at active segments (e.g., Manda Hararo). However, the Oligo-Miocene history of extension, from the onset of rifting at ~25 Ma to the eruption of the massive Stratoïd flood basalts at ~4 Ma, remains poorly constrained. Here we present new structural data and radiometric dating from Central Afar, obtained along a zone stretching from the undeformed Oligocene Ethiopian plateau to the Manda Hararo and Tat'Ale active volcanic segments. Basaltic and rhyolitic formations were mapped in two key areas corresponding to the proximal and distal parts of a half-rift. We present a balanced composite cross section of Central Afar, reconstructed using our new data and previously published geophysical data on the crustal structure. Our main findings are as follows: (1) Extension during the Mio-Pliocene corresponds to a "wide rift" style of rifting. (2) The lower crust has been underplated/intruded and rethickened during rifting by magmatic injection. (3) Our restoration points to the existence of midcrustal shear zones that have helped to distribute extension in the upper crust and to localize extension at depth in a necking zone. Moreover, we suggest that there is a close relationship between the location of a shear zone and the underplated/intruded material. In magma-rich environments such as Central Afar, breakup should be achieved once the initial continental crust has been completely replaced by the newly, magmatically accreted crust. Consequently, and particularly in Afar, crustal thickness is not necessarily indicative of breakup but instead reflects differences in tectono-magmatic regimes.

  19. Source and tectonic implications of tonalite-trondhjemite magmatism in the Klamath Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, C.G.; Petersen, S.W.; Kistler, R.W.; Murray, R.; Kays, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the Klamath Mountains, voluminous tonalite-trondhjemite magmatism was characteristic of a short period of time from about 144 to 136 Ma (Early Cretaceous). It occurred about 5 to l0 m.y. after the ??? 165 to 159 Ma Josephine ophiolite was thrust beneath older parts of the province during the Nevadan orogeny (thrusting from ??? 155 to 148 Ma). The magmatism also corresponds to a period of slow or no subduction. Most of the plutons crop out in the south-central Klamath Mountains in California, but one occurs in Oregon at the northern end of the province. Compositionally extended members of the suite consist of precursor gabbroic to dioritic rocks followed by later, more voluminous tonalitic and trondhjemitic intrusions. Most plutons consist almost entirely of tonalite and trondhjemite. Poorlydefined concentric zoning is common. Tonalitic rocks are typically of the Iow-Al type but trondhjemites are generally of the high-Al type, even those that occur in the same pluton as low-Al tonalite??. The suite is characterized by low abundances of K2O, Rb, Zr, and heavy rare earth elements. Sr contents are generally moderate ( ???450 ppm) by comparison with Sr-rich arc lavas interpreted to be slab melts (up to 2000 ppm). Initial 87Sr/ 86Sr, ??18O, and ??Nd are typical of mantle-derived magmas or of crustally-derived magmas with a metabasic source. Compositional variation within plutons can be modeled by variable degrees of partial melting of a heterogeneous metabasaltic source (transitional mid-ocean ridge to island arc basalt), but not by fractional crystallyzation of a basaltic parent. Melting models require a residual assemblage of clinopyroxene+garnet??plagioclase??amphibole; residual plagioclase suggests a deep crustal origin rather than melting of a subducted slab. Such models are consistent with the metabasic part of the Josephine ophiolite as the source. Because the Josephine ophiolite was at low T during Nevadan thrusting, an external heat source was probably

  20. Sources of granite magmatism in the Embu Terrane (Ribeira Belt, Brazil): Neoproterozoic crust recycling constrained by elemental and isotope (Sr-Nd-Pb) geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Campos Neto, Mario da Costa

    2016-07-01

    Whole rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry and in situ K-feldspar Pb isotope geochemistry were used to identify the sources involved in the genesis of Neoproterozoic granites from the Embu Terrane, Ribeira Belt, SE Brazil. Granite magmatism spanned over 200 Ma (810-580 Ma), and is dominated by crust-derived relatively low-T (850-750 °C, zircon saturation) biotite granites to biotite-muscovite granites. Two Cryogenian plutons show the least negative εNdt (-8 to -10) and highest mg# (30-40) of the whole set. Their compositions are strongly contrasted, implying distinct sources for the peraluminous (ASI ∼ 1.2) ∼660 Ma Serra do Quebra-Cangalha batholith (metasedimentary rocks from relatively young upper crust with high Rb/Sr and low Th/U) and the metaluminous (ASI = 0.96-1.00) ∼ 630 Ma Santa Catarina Granite. Although not typical, the geochemical signature of these granites may reflect a continental margin arc environment, and they could be products of a prolonged period of oceanic plate consumption started at ∼810 Ma. The predominant Ediacaran (595-580 Ma) plutons have a spread of compositions from biotite granites with SiO2 as low as ∼65% (e.g., Itapeti, Mauá, Sabaúna and Lagoinha granites) to fractionated muscovite granites (Mogi das Cruzes, Santa Branca and Guacuri granites; up to ∼75% SiO2). εNdT are characteristically negative (-12 to -18), with corresponding Nd TDM indicating sources with Paleoproterozoic mean crustal ages (2.0-2.5 Ga). The Guacuri and Santa Branca muscovite granites have the more negative εNdt, highest 87Sr/86Srt (0.714-0.717) and lowest 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb, consistent with an old metasedimentary source with low time-integrated Rb/Sr. However, a positive Nd-Sr isotope correlation is suggested by data from the other granites, and would be consistent with mixing between an older source predominant in the Mauá granite and a younger, high Rb/Sr source that is more abundant in the Lagoinha granite sample. The

  1. Paleozoic magmatism and porphyry Cu-mineralization in an evolving tectonic setting in the North Qilian Orogenic Belt, NW China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qiu, Kun-Feng; Deng, Jun; Taylor, Ryan D.; Song, Kai-Rui; Song, Yao-Hui; Li, Quan-Zhong; Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The NWW-striking North Qilian Orogenic Belt records the Paleozoic accretion–collision processes in NW China, and hosts Paleozoic Cu–Pb–Zn mineralization that was temporally and spatially related to the closure of the Paleo Qilian-Qinling Ocean. The Wangdian Cu deposit is located in the eastern part of the North Qilian Orogenic Belt, NW China. Copper mineralization is spatially associated with an altered early Paleozoic porphyritic granodiorite, which intruded tonalites and volcaniclastic rocks. Alteration zones surrounding the mineralization progress outward from a potassic to a feldspar-destructive phyllic assemblage. Mineralization consists mainly of quartz-sulfide stockworks and disseminated sulfides, with ore minerals chalcopyrite, pyrite, molybdenite, and minor galena and sphalerite. Gangue minerals include quartz, orthoclase, biotite, sericite, and K-feldspar. Zircon LA-ICPMS U–Pb dating of the ore-bearing porphyritic granodiorite yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 444.6 ± 7.8 Ma, with a group of inherited zircons yielding a mean U–Pb age of 485 ± 12 Ma, consistent with the emplacement age (485.3 ± 6.2 Ma) of the barren precursor tonalite. Rhenium and osmium analyses of molybdenite grains returned model ages of 442.9 ± 6.8 Ma and 443.3 ± 6.2 Ma, indicating mineralization was coeval with the emplacement of the host porphyritic granodiorite. Rhenium concentrations in molybdenite (208.9–213.2 ppm) suggest a mantle Re source. The tonalities are medium-K calc-alkaline. They are characterized by enrichment of light rare-earth elements (LREEs) and large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs), depletion of heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs) and high-field-strength elements (HFSEs), and minor negative Eu anomalies. They have εHf(t) values in the range of +3.6 to +11.1, with two-stage Hf model ages of 0.67–1.13 Ga, suggesting that the ca. 485 Ma barren tonalites were products of arc magmatism incorporating melts from the mantle wedge and

  2. Paleozoic magmatism and porphyry Cu-mineralization in an evolving tectonic setting in the North Qilian Orogenic Belt, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kun-Feng; Deng, Jun; Taylor, Ryan D.; Song, Kai-Rui; Song, Yao-Hui; Li, Quan-Zhong; Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    The NWW-striking North Qilian Orogenic Belt records the Paleozoic accretion-collision processes in NW China, and hosts Paleozoic Cu-Pb-Zn mineralization that was temporally and spatially related to the closure of the Paleo Qilian-Qinling Ocean. The Wangdian Cu deposit is located in the eastern part of the North Qilian Orogenic Belt, NW China. Copper mineralization is spatially associated with an altered early Paleozoic porphyritic granodiorite, which intruded tonalites and volcaniclastic rocks. Alteration zones surrounding the mineralization progress outward from a potassic to a feldspar-destructive phyllic assemblage. Mineralization consists mainly of quartz-sulfide stockworks and disseminated sulfides, with ore minerals chalcopyrite, pyrite, molybdenite, and minor galena and sphalerite. Gangue minerals include quartz, orthoclase, biotite, sericite, and K-feldspar. Zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating of the ore-bearing porphyritic granodiorite yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 444.6 ± 7.8 Ma, with a group of inherited zircons yielding a mean U-Pb age of 485 ± 12 Ma, consistent with the emplacement age (485.3 ± 6.2 Ma) of the barren precursor tonalite. Rhenium and osmium analyses of molybdenite grains returned model ages of 442.9 ± 6.8 Ma and 443.3 ± 6.2 Ma, indicating mineralization was coeval with the emplacement of the host porphyritic granodiorite. Rhenium concentrations in molybdenite (208.9-213.2 ppm) suggest a mantle Re source. The tonalities are medium-K calc-alkaline. They are characterized by enrichment of light rare-earth elements (LREEs) and large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs), depletion of heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs) and high-field-strength elements (HFSEs), and minor negative Eu anomalies. They have εHf(t) values in the range of +3.6 to +11.1, with two-stage Hf model ages of 0.67-1.13 Ga, suggesting that the ca. 485 Ma barren tonalites were products of arc magmatism incorporating melts from the mantle wedge and the lithosphere. In contrast, the

  3. Rapid Rejuvenation of the Source of a Backarc Sheeted Magmatic Complex (Torres del Paine, Patagonia): Evidence From Hf isotopes in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, T. A.; Muntener, O.; Leuthold, J.; Chiaradia, M.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Putlitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Miocene Torres del Paine intrusive complex (TPIC) in Patagonia is a spectacularly exposed example of a bimodal shallow crustal laccolith, made up of a sill complex and a subvertical feeder system. The TPIC was emplaced in a back-arc setting, but slightly older arc-related intrusive units in this area testify to an earlier shift from an arc to a backarc setting. The entire ~88 km3 main complex was emplaced over short time scales of 162 ± 11 ka between ~12.4 and 12.6 Ma, with mafic units from the feeder zone found to be older than mafic units from the sill complex1,2. We aim to assess whether successive pulses of mafic magmatism can tap different geochemical reservoirs in sheeted magmatic complexes emplaced on such short timescales. Hf isotope compositions of individual zircons from mafic units from both the feeder zone and the sill complex were determined by solution MC-ICPMS. Zircons from all units have Hf isotope compositions that indicate a slightly enriched mantle source. Zircons from the mafic sill complex units have higher (more juvenile) initial ɛHf than zircons from feeder zone mafic units. The shift towards more depleted Hf isotope compositions in the sill complex units, which are younger, demonstrates the rapid input of new juvenile material into the source region between ~12.6 Ma and ~12.5 Ma. A similar shift is also seen in bulk rock Nd and Sr isotope data for related samples3. The Hf isotope data demonstrate that significant variability in source geochemistry is possible for sheeted magmatic complexes built up on very short timescales. Analysis of zircons from a range of dikes and intrusive bodies external to the main Torres del Paine complex, with ages that span ~12-29 Ma, will provide a more complete picture in time and space of the geochemical evolution of this magmatic system as it switches between an arc and backarc setting. 1Leuthold et al., 2012, EPSL, 325: 85-92 2Michel et al., 2008, Geology, 36: 459-462 3Leuthold et al., 2013, JPET, 54

  4. The magmatic source of the Tristan da Cunha hotspot: Implication from electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Baba, Kiyoshi; Jegen, Marion; Utada, Hisashi; Geissler, Wolfram; Jokat, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    Tristan da Cunha Island is one of the classical hot spots in the Atlantic Ocean, situated at the western end of the aseismic Walvis Ridge which forms a connection to the Cretaceous Etendeka flood basalt province in northwestern Namibia. The discussion about its source (in shallow asthenosphere or deeper mantle) have not reached consensus yet because of lack of the geophysical observations in the area. A marine magnetotelluric (MT) experiment was conducted together with seismological observations in the area in 2012-2013 through a German-Japanese collaboration with the goal to constrain the physical state of the mantle beneath the area. A total of 26 MT seafloor stations were deployed around the Tristan da Cunha Islands and available data were retrieved and processed from 24 stations. We applied iterative topographic effect correction and one-dimensional (1-D) conductivity structure inversion to the data. Then, three-dimensional (3-D) inversion analysis incorporating the topographic effect was carried out, using the 1-D model as the initial model. The local small-scale topography and the far continental coast effects are incorporated as the distortion term in the 3-D inversion. The preliminary result of our analysis shows no evidence of a significant conductive anomaly arising from the mantle transition zone, suggesting that the current magmatic source (major place of melting) of the hotspot activity is in the shallow upper mantle. This is in contrast to results from geochemical analysis, in which samples along the Tristan track exhibit an ocean-island-basalt-type incompatible element pattern pointing to a deep mantle source of the melt. Our findings therefore might indicate that the deep mantle up-welling underneath Tristan da Cunha Islands may be almost dead. A conductive anomaly at approx. 100 km depth in our derived conductivity model to the southwest of Tristan da Cunha Islands suggests an interaction between the mid-ocean ridge and/or up-welling further south

  5. Rapakivi granites in the geological history of the earth. Part 1, magmatic associations with rapakivi granites: Age, geochemistry, and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. M.

    2009-06-01

    Rapakivi granites characteristic practically of all old platforms are greatly variable in age and irregularly distributed over the globe. Four types of magmatic associations, which include rapakivi granites, are represented by anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite, anorthosite-mangerite-rapakivi-peralkaline granite, gabbro-rapakivi granite-foidite, and rapakivi granite-shoshonite rock series. Granitoids of these associations used to be divided into the following three groups: (1) classical rapakivi granites from magmatic associations of the first three types, which correspond to subalkaline high-K and high-Fe reduced A2-type granites exemplifying the plumasitic trend of evolution; (2) peralkaline granites of the second magmatic association representing the highly differentiated A1-type reduced granites of Na-series, which are extremely enriched in incompatible elements and show the agpaitic trend of evolution; and (3) subalkaline oxidized granites of the fourth magmatic association ranging in composition from potassic A2-type granites to S-granites. Magmatic complexes including rapakivi granites originated during the geochronological interval that spanned three supercontinental cycles 2.7-1.8, 1.8-1.0 and 1.0-0.55 Ga ago. The onset and end of each cycle constrained the assembly periods of supercontinents and the formation epochs of predominantly anorthosite-charnockite complexes of the anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite magmatic association. Peak of the respective magmatism at the time of Grenvillian Orogeny signified the transition from the tectonics of small lithospheric plates to the subsequent plate tectonics of the current type. The outburst of rapakivi granite magmatism was typical of the second cycle exclusively. The anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite magmatic series associated with this magmatism originated in back-arc settings, if we consider the latter in a broad sense as corresponding to the rear parts of

  6. The Oxidation State of Global Subduction Zone Basalts and its Relationship to Volatiles, Magmatic Processes, and Source Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.

    2008-12-01

    Oxidation state is a central variable in magmatic systems. In subduction zones, the mantle wedge is exposed to hydrous fluids from an oxidized subducting plate, potentially driving a fundamental shift in the oxidation states of arc and back-arc basin magmas and their sources. Despite its importance, however, magmatic oxidation state and its relationship to conditions in the mantle source can be difficult to constrain. Here, we present new, in-situ μ-XANES analyses of Fe+3/ΣFe ratios, as an indicator of melt oxidation state, in natural, primitive pillow glasses from the Mariana, Lau, and Manus back-arc basins (MgO>6 wt.%; n=31) and a global suite of olivine-hosted arc melt inclusions (MI; MgO>4 wt.%; n=16). These new data show that back-arc basin basalts preserve Fe+3/ΣFe ratios of 0.14-0.21, more oxidized than MORB (Fe+3/ΣFe=0.11-0.17), and arc basalts range to even higher ratios of 0.17-0.36. Analysis of MI equilibrium with host olivine compositions indicates that either post-entrapment crystallization or outward Fe+2 diffusion may have occurred in the MI's studied, but the magnitude of these effects is small (9±5% change in FeO; see also Cottrell & Kelley, this mtg.). Coupled with new and existing major element, volatile (H2O±CO2, S, Cl, F), and trace element data, we also test the variation of melt oxidation state with indicators of extent of crystal fractionation and of mantle source composition. The arc and back-arc glasses capture a full range of natural, undegassed magmatic H2O concentrations (0.1-5.3 wt.%), and show a general, global increase in Fe+3/ΣFe with increasing H2O content, although the Mariana trough defines a trend distinct from the Manus and Lau basins. The Fe+3/ΣFe ratio does not correlate with Mg#, suggesting that the melt oxidation states are not controlled by the extent of crystal fractionation. In the Mariana trough, Fe+3/ΣFe does increase with increasing Ba and Sr concentrations, suggesting a direct link between melt oxidation

  7. Tectonic implications of Early Miocene OIB magmatism in a near-trench setting: The Outer Zone of SW Japan and the northernmost Ryukyu Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminami, Kazuo; Imaoka, Teruyoshi; Ogura, Kazuki; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Hideo; Mori, Yasushi

    2017-03-01

    The Outer Zone of the SW Japan and northernmost Ryukyu arcs was affected by intense igneous activity during the Miocene, characterized by MORB-like basalts, alkaline basalts, and S-type (with subordinate I-type) felsic to intermediate volcano-plutonic complexes. These igneous rocks are inferred to be the products of near-trench magmatism. Early Miocene (∼18 Ma) alkaline basalt dikes from the Shingu-Otoyo area in central northern Shikoku, and an alkaline lamprophyre dike from Tanegashima, one of the northernmost Ryukyu Islands, pre-date the Middle Miocene felsic to intermediate igneous rocks. The basalts and lamprophyre have compositions of basanite, basalt, trachybasalt and phonotephrite. They are characterized by elevated large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs; e.g., Sr, Ba, and Th) and high concentrations of high-field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., TiO2, Nb, and Zr). The geochemical signatures of the basalts and lamprophyre suggest an ocean island basalt-type (OIB-type) mantle source. The occurrence of alkaline basalts and lamprophyre with OIB-type, intraplate geochemical signatures in a near-trench setting is unusual with regard to plate tectonic processes. We propose that trench-ward motion of the overriding plate during the period around the Early Miocene resulted in a shallowly dipping slab, and interplate coupling between the subducting Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) and the overlying crust beneath most of the Outer Zone in the western part of SW Japan and the northernmost Ryukyu Islands. The OIB-type magmatism in the near-trench environment is most plausibly explained by the upwelling of asthenospheric material from beneath the subducting slab, which migrated through fractures and/or tears in the slab. We envisage two possible scenarios for the formation of these fractures or tears: (1) the shallowing dip angle of the subducted PSP resulted in concave-upwards flexure of the slab, generating fractures in the flexed region; and (2) differential motion within

  8. Temporal Variations of Yellowstone Ground Deformation, 2004-2011, from Geodetic Observations and Magmatic Source Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Smith, R. B.; Farrell, J.; Puskas, C.

    2011-12-01

    In mid-2004, GPS and InSAR measurements of Yellowstone revealed the initiation of accelerated uplift of the Yellowstone caldera, with maximum rates of ~7 cm/yr near the Sour Creek resurgent dome in the northeastern caldera. From mid-2006 to 2010, the ground uplift rates declined in two distinct phases: in 2006-2009 from 7 to 5 cm/yr in the northeast caldera and from 4 to 2 cm/yr in the southwest, and in 2009-2010 to 2 cm/yr and 0.5 cm/yr at the same areas. Elastic dislocation modeling of the GPS and InSAR data suggest that magmatic intrusions at 7- 10 km beneath the caldera have been responsible for the uplift, and that a decreasing rate of magmatic replenishment from beneath the northeast caldera and an increase of seismic moment release can plausibly account for reduced rates of caldera uplift. Furthermore, geodetic measurements, including three campaign-mode GPS surveys from 2008 to 2010, revealed that the caldera-wide vertical motion reverted to subsidence in 2010, with an average rate of 2-3 cm/yr (see the attached figure). The initiation of the reversal in vertical deformation was coincident with the occurrence of a large earthquake swarm (a total moment of ~3×1022 dyne-cm) that occurred in January 2010 at the northwestern caldera boundary. With new geodetic measurements in 2011, we expect to present key information for decadal-scale observations and modeling of the Yellowstone caldera deformation that provide insight on temporal variations in the context of Yellowstone magma reservoir replacement and transport.

  9. The southern margin of the Caribbean Plate in Venezuela: tectono-magmatic setting of the ophiolitic units and kinematic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, Giuseppe; Beccaluva, Luigi; Coltorti, Massimo; Siena, Franca; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2002-07-01

    The southern Caribbean Plate margin in Venezuela consists of a W-E elongated deformed belt, composed of several tectonic units dismembered along the northern part of the South America continental Plate since the Late Cretaceous. The present review, based on petrology and tectono-magmatic significance of each unit, makes it possible to define the main geotectonic elements and to reconstruct the paleogeographic domains from Late Jurassic to Tertiary: (a) Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) proto-Caribbean oceanic basin (Loma de Hierro Unit); (b) oceanic plateau (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands basement); (c) rifted continental margin (Cordillera de La Costa and Caucagua-El Tinaco Units) with Within Plate Tholeiitic (WPTh) magmatism; (d) an intra-oceanic subduction zone represented by Island Arc Tholeiitic (IAT) magmatism (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units) of Early Cretaceous age; (e) an Early Cretaceous ocean-continent subduction trench filled by melange (Franja Costera); (f) a new intra-oceanic subduction zone, represented by the tonalitic arc magmatism of Late Cretaceous age (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands). Regional tectonic constraints and coherent kinematic reconstruction suggest an original "near-Mid America" location of the Jurassic-Cretaceous "proto-Caribbean" oceanic realm. From Early to Late Cretaceous one sub-continental subduction with melanges (Franja Costera Unit) and two main stages of intra-oceanic arc magmatism are recorded in the so-called "eo-Caribbean" phases. The first consists of generally metamorphosed and deformed volcano-plutonic sequences with IAT affinity (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units), probably in relation to a southeastward-dipping subduction. The second is mainly represented by generally unmetamorphosed tonalitic intrusives cutting the oceanic plateau in the Dutch and Venezuelan Islands, and related to the new intra-oceanic subduction with reverse lithospheric sinking. The latter probably marked the onset of the Aves/Lesser Antilles arc

  10. The Ezhimala Igneous Complex, southern India: Possible imprint of Late Cretaceous magmatism within rift setting associated with India-Madagascar separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, M. Ram; Shaji, E.; Satyanarayanan, M.; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, T.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Dhanil Dev, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    The gabbro-granophyre-granite complex of Ezhimala emplaced along the western rifted continental margin of India preserves evidence for bimodal magmatism, with related magma mixing and mingling processes. Here we report petrological, geochemical, zircon U-Pb geochronological and Lu-Hf isotopic data from the Ezhimala Igneous Complex (EIC) that provide insights into the Late Cretaceous magmatic activity. Field investigations and petrographic observations in Zircon U-Pb data from the granophyres show emplacement ages of 93.21 ± 0.6 Ma and 94.26 ± 0.92 Ma. The evolved Lu-Hf isotopic systematics for these rocks are indicative of the involvement of older crustal material during magma genesis. The geochemical systematics together with isotopic data suggest magma generation in a rift-related setting, and interaction with or melting of Neoproterozoic basement rocks. The timing of magmatism broadly correlates with the Late Cretaceous Marion hotspot activity which is considered to be responsible for the break-up of India and Madagascar. We thus interpret the EIC to be one of the rare signatures in southern India for the final phase of rifting of Gondwana.

  11. Diverse mantle sources for Ninetyeast Ridge magmatism: Geochemical constraints from basaltic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, F. A.; Pringle, M.; Meleney, P.; Huang, S.; Piotrowski, A.

    2011-03-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge (NER), a north-south striking, 5,000 km long, 77 to 43 Ma chain of basaltic submarine volcanoes in the eastern Indian Ocean formed as a hotspot track created by rapid northward migration of the Indian Plate over the Kerguelen hotspot. Based on the major and trace element contents of unaltered basaltic glasses from six locations along the NER, we show that the NER was constructed by basaltic magma derived from at least three geochemically distinct mantle sources: (1) a source enriched in highly incompatible elements relative to primitive mantle like the source of the 29-24 Ma flood basalts in the Kerguelen Archipelago; (2) an incompatible element-depleted source similar to the source of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) erupted along the currently active Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR); and (3) an incompatible element-depleted source that is compositionally and mineralogically distinct from the source of SEIR MORB. Specifically, this depleted mantle source was garnet-bearing and had higher Y/Dy and Nb/Zr, but lower Zr/Sm, than the SEIR MORB source. We infer that this third source formed as a garnet-bearing residue created during a previous melting event, perhaps an initial partial melting of the mantle hotspot. Subsequently, this residue partially melted over a large pressure range, from slightly over 3 GPa to less than 1 GPa, and to a high extent (~ 30%) thereby creating relatively high SiO2 and FeO contents in some NER basalts relative to SEIR MORB.

  12. An assessment of the record in compositional variations from mantle source to magmatism at East Island, Crozet archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyzen, C. M.; Marzoli, A.; Bellieni, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Crozet archipelago, located midway between Madagascar and Antarctica, constitutes the emerged part of the easternmost bank of the Crozet plateau, which lies upon upper Cretaceous oceanic seafloor derived from the Southeast Indian Ridge. It forms an elongated chain of five islands and islets, divided into two groups: an older eastern island group (< 9 Ma) composed by large-scale volcanic landmasses (i.e. East and Possession islands) and a younger western one (< 5.5 Ma) with pint-sized islands. The whole region exhibits some of the most typical gravimetric, seismic and bathymetric characteristics associated with upwelling hotter than average mantle including: a geoid high, a topographic swell, a deep low-velocity zone (up to 2350 km), an anomalous heat flow and a thickened crust (10-16.5 km). Most of these features are exacerbated by the near stationary absolute motion of the Antarctic plate. However, since thirty years, the chemical composition of Crozet archipelago magmas has beneficiated from little interest compared to that of other Earth's hotspots. Because of the occurrence of both a thick and old lithosphere and of a near stagnant absolute plate motion, new data from the Crozet archipelago magmatic record will provide new critical perspective on oceanic island building processes. The data presented here are based on a basaltic suite of ~ 25 samples collected by a 'Terres Australes et Antarctiques Francaises' expedition in 1969 from the northern part of East Island. Our alkali basalts from the Crozet archipelago are distinct from other oceanic within-plate magmatic rocks in showing ubiquitous large depletions in LILE with respect to other incompatible elements, although these rocks constitute one of the most incompatible-element-enriched suites among Earth's oceanic island basalts (OIB). The similarity of their trace element ratios and parallelism of their rare earth element patterns indicate: (1) a mantle source homogeneity over at least 1 Ma; (2) an

  13. Late orogenic mafic magmatism in the North Cascades, Washington: Petrology and tectonic setting of the Skymo layered intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, D.L.; Tepper, J.H.; Hirschmann, M.M.; Hurlow, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Skymo Complex in the North Cascades, Washington, is a layered mafic intrusion within the Ross Lake fault zone, a major orogen-parallel structure at the eastern margin of the Cascades crystalline core. The complex is composed dominantly of troctolite and gabbro, both with inclusions of primitive olivine gabbro. Low-pressure minerals in the metasedimentary contact aureole and early crystallization of olivine + plagioclase in the mafic rocks indicate the intrusion was emplaced at shallow depths (<12 km). The Skymo rocks have trace-element characteristics of arc magmas, but the association of Mg-rich olivine (Fo88-80) with relatively sodic plagioclase (An75-60) and the Al/Ti ratios of clinopyroxene are atypical of arc gabbros and more characteristic of rift-related gabbros. A Sm-Nd isochron indicates crystallization in the early Tertiary (ca. 50 Ma), coeval with the nearby Golden Horn alkaline granite. Mantle melting to produce Skymo magma likely occurred in a mantle wedge with a long history of arc magmatism. The Skymo mafic complex and the Golden Horn granite were emplaced during regional extension and collapse of the North Cascades orogen and represent the end of large-scale magmatism in the North Cascades continental arc. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  14. EXCITATION OF A BURIED MAGMATIC PIPE: A SEISMIC SOURCE MODEL FOR VOLCANIC TREMOR.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    A model of volcanic tremor is presented in which the modes of vibration of a volcanic pipe are excited by the motion of the fluid within the pipe in response to a short-term perturbation in pressure. The model shows the relative importance of the various parts constituting this composite source in the radiated elastic field at near and intermediate distances. The paper starts with the presentation of the elastic field radiated by the source, and proceeds with an analysis of the energy balance between hydraulic and elastic motions. Next, the hydraulic excitation of the source is addressed and, finally, the ground response to this excitation is analyzed in the simple case of a pipe buried in a homogeneous half space.

  15. A Proterozoic lithospheric source for Karoo magmatism: evidence from the Nuanetsi picrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellam, R. M.; Cox, K. G.

    1989-03-01

    Highly magnesian Jurassic picrite basalts from the Nuanetsi area of southeastern Zimbabwe are close to primary mantle melts, not substantially modified by high level fractionation processes. The lavas display a wide variation in isotope ratios and incompatible trace element abundances, which may be attributed to a heterogeneous mantle source. Sm sbnd Nd isotope results, on samples carefully selected to be thoroughly representative of the chemical variation within the whole suite, reveal a late Proterozoic isochron. One possibility is that this represents a mantle isochron corresponding to the last episode of Sm sbnd Nd fractionation within a lithospheric source. Alternatively, binary mixing might explain the apparent isochron, but there are problems identifying a mantle reservoir with sufficiently high Sm/Nd ratios. In either case a significant role for an ancient sub-crustal lithospheric source is implied. Rb sbnd Sr data do not lie on a well-defined isochron, and probably reflect Rb sbnd Sr fractionation at, or close to, the time of eruption. Pb isotope data are broadly consistent with the late Proterozoic age. The apparent age of the mantle isochron is similar to that of a crust-forming event in the Natal-Namaqualand belt, which may indicate coupled evolution of the continental crust and lithospheric mantle.

  16. Petrogenesis of postcollisional magmatism at Scheelite Dome, Yukon, Canada: Evidence for a lithospheric mantle source for magmas associated with intrusion-related gold systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mair, John L.; Farmer, G. Lang; Groves, David I.; Hart, Craig J.R.; Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    are attributes of the ancient North American cratonic margin that appear to be essential prerequisites to this style of postcollisional magmatism and associated gold-rich fluid exsolution. This type of magmatic hydrothermal activity occurs in a very specific tectonic setting that typically sets intrusion-related gold deposits apart from orogenic gold deposits, which are synorogenic in timing and have no consistent direct relationship to such diverse and contemporaneous lithospheric mantle-derived magmas, although they too are commonly sited adjacent to lithospheric boundaries.

  17. Timing of magmatism following initial convergence at a passive margin, southwestern U.S. Cordillera, and ages of lower crustal magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Initiation of the Cordilleran magmatic arc in the southwestern United States is marked by intrusion of granitic plutons, predominantly composed of alkali-calcic Fe- and Sr-enriched quartz monzodiorite and monzonite, that intruded Paleoproterozoic basement and its Paleozoic cratonal-miogeoclinal cover. Three intrusive suites, recognized on the basis of differences in high field strength element and large ion lithophile element abundances, contain texturally complex but chronologically distinctive zircons. These zircons record heterogeneous but geochemically discrete mafic crustal magma sources, discrete Permo-Triassic intrusion ages, and a prolonged postemplacement thermal history within the long-lived Cordilleran arc, leading to episodic loss of radiogenic Pb. Distinctive lower crustal magma sources reflect lateral heterogeneity within the composite lithosphere of the Proterozoic craton. Limited interaction between derived magmas and middle and upper crustal rocks probably reflects the relatively cool thermal structure of the nascent Cordilleran continental margin magmatic arc. ?? 2006 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  18. The giant Pan-African Hook Batholith, Central Zambia: A-type magmatism in a syn-collisional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Lorenzo; Lehmann, Jérémie; Naydenov, Kalin V.; Saalmann, Kerstin; Kinnaird, Judith A.; Daly, J. Stephen; Frei, Dirk; Lobo-Guerrero Sanz, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    The Pan-African Hook Batholith formed during the assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent between 570 and 520 Ma (U-Pb on zircon) as a result of syn-collisional stage interaction between the Congo and Kalahari Cratons1. The extension of the batholith, exposed and undercover, is estimated to be between 25,000 and 30,000 km2. The bimodal magmatism (mafic to predominantly felsic) is characterized by both an alkali-calcic and an alkalic suite, with the felsic rocks featuring a typical A-type, metaluminous, high Fe/Mg and K/Na geochemical signature. The scattered outcrops of gabbroic rocks, both tholeiitic and alkaline, suggest periodic input of mantle material, which, in some cases, interacted with metasomatizing fluids. Fractional crystallization is invoked for the most differentiated products, while Sr-Nd isotopes rule out any significant contribution from crustal assimilation. Exceptionally highly radiogenic Pb isotopes have been measured on both unaltered and hydrothermally altered rocks, and attest to the radiogenic character of the batholith. The Pb isotopes indicate that the anomalous signature was acquired during, or soon after, magma emplacement, and was likely enhanced by metasomatizing fluids. An enrichment in Th and U, affecting large portions of the crust along the southern margin of the Congo Craton, is suggested by comparable anomalous Pb isotopes measured in basement gneisses in the Domes Region, Zambian Copperbelt. Geochemical and isotopic evidence support interaction between mantle components and portions of the deep crust at pressures of < 10 kbar, while decompression melting of rising asthenospheric mantle ponding at the base of the crust heated, and ultimately melted, crustal material. Low-pressure mineral phases in metasedimentary wall rocks along the eastern margin of the pluton indicate that the magma was subsequently emplaced at shallow crustal depths. A crucial contribution to the crustal melting was likely provided by internal radiogenic heat

  19. Cenozoic magmatism in the South China Basin: Decompression melting and implications of an enriched mantle source

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, M.F.J.; Kan Tu; Ming Zhang ); Guanghong Xie )

    1990-06-01

    A widespread eposide of interplate volcanism followed the cessation of seafloor spreading in the South China Basin (SCB), affecting the South China Sea, and fringing areas of southern China and Indochina. Geochemical data for basalts from South China Sea islands and seamounts, Hainan Island, and Taiwan define an enriched (Dupal-like) mantle domain yielding oceanic island basalt (OIB) suites with {Delta}7/4Pb = 2-13, {Delta}8/4Pb = 45-73, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr > {approximately}0.70325, Th/Ta > 2, and Th/Ba > 0.02. Opening of the SCB resulted from disaggregation of the South China block in response to the Indo-Eurasian collision, a process involving at least one seafloor spreading episode, terminated by collision of microcontinents with the Philippines and Borneo. The lack of precursive flood basalt suggests that active mantle upwelling was not involved and that melting was a passive effect of lithosphere stretching. However, while mantle decompression at ambient stretching factors ({approximately}1.7-2.5) appears to permit melting on the observed scale, the enriched source may preclude such a simple mantle dynamic. Three alternatives are considered: (1) passive melting of a mature metasomatised boundary layer, (2) active melting of thermally eroded subcontinental lithosphere (deep enrichment) or metasomatised boundary layer (shallow enrichment), and (3) relict diapirs of pre-SCB and/or Java trench subduction slabs (intermediate/deep enrichment). These models are evaluated in terms of chemical and isotopic mass balances associated with the generation and movement of small melt fractions in depleted, nondepleted, and enriched mantle.

  20. Geochemical Diversity of Near-Ridge Seamounts: Insights into Oceanic Magmatic Processes and Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, N. L.; Perfit, M. R.; Wendt, R. E.; Lundstrom, C.; Clague, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical studies of lavas erupted at seamounts that form in close proximity to active mid-ocean ridges provide an opportunity to better understand the composition of shallow mantle underneath spreading ridges and how it melts in order to form new oceanic crust. This is because while on-axis samples mostly reflect homogenization of melts within the axial magma lens, seamount lavas bypass this process providing a window into the diversity of melts produced in the melting column. We have analyzed lavas from small near-axis seamounts and two larger near-ridge seamount chains for trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes: the Lamont Seamounts adjacent to the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ~ 10°N and the Vance Seamounts next to the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) ~45°N. One purpose of the study is to test the hypothesis that near ridge seamount chains reflect focusing of melts by dunite channels in the upwelling asthenospheric mantle and that such conduits might affect melting in the shallow mantle (Lundstrom et al., 2000). Our results indicate that lavas from these seamounts have incompatible trace element patterns varying from very depleted to moderately enriched (found at the oldest, most distant Vance seamounts) relative to typical mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Trace element compositions and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data show that lava compositions vary significantly between seamounts in the chain as well as within individual seamounts. Overall, the Vance and Lamont seamount lavas are more primitive and diverse than associated ridge samples. These variations can be explained by multiple sources as well as different extents of melting, and are unlikely to reflect shallow level fractional crystallization. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data also indicate some mixing between mantle end members. The significant variations in incompatible trace element and isotopic compositions that are somewhat correlated suggest that the mantle underneath the seamounts is heterogeneous on a small scale. The fact that

  1. Mid-Tertiary magmatism in western Big Bend National Park, Texas, U.S.A.: Evolution of basaltic source regions and generation of peralkaline rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Don F.; Ren, Minghua; Adams, David T.; Tsai, Heng; Long, Leon E.

    2012-07-01

    Tertiary magmatism in the Big Bend region of southwestern Texas spanned 47 to 17 Ma and included representatives of all three phases (Early, Main and Late) of the Trans-Pecos magmatic province. Early phase magmatism was manifested in the Alamo Creek Basalt, an alkalic lava series ranging from basalt to benmoreite, and silicic alkalic intrusions of the Christmas Mountains. Main phase magmatism in the late Eocene/early Oligocene produced Bee Mountain Basalt, a lava series ranging from hawaiite and potassic trachybasalt to latite, widespread trachytic lavas of Tule Mountain Trachyte and silicic rocks associated with the Pine Mountain Caldera in the Chisos Mountains. Late main phase magmatism produced trachyte lava and numerous dome complexes of peralkaline Burro Mesa Rhyolite (~ 29 Ma) in western Big Bend National Park. Late stage basaltic magmatism is sparsely represented by a few lavas in the Big Bend Park area, the adjacent Black Gap area and, most notably, in the nearby Bofecillos Mountains, where alkalic basaltic rocks were emplaced as lava and dikes concurrent with active normal faulting. Trace element modeling, Nd isotope ratios and calculated depths of segregation for estimated ancestral basaltic magmas suggest that Alamo Creek basalts (ɛNdt ~ 6.15 to 2.33) were derived from depths (~ 120 to 90 km) near the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary at temperatures of ~ 1600 to1560 °C, whereas primitive Bee Mountain basalts (ɛNdt ~ 0.285 to - 1.20) may have been segregated at shallower depths (~ 80 to 50 km) and lower temperatures (~ 1520 to 1430 °C) within the continental lithosphere. Nb/La versus Ba/La plots suggest that all were derived from OIB-modified continental lithosphere. Late stage basaltic rocks from the Bofecillos Mountains may indicate a return to source depths and temperatures similar to those calculated for Alamo Creek Basalt primitive magmas. We suggest that a zone of melting ascended into the continental lithosphere during main-phase activity and

  2. Helium isotopic variations in Ethiopian plume lavas: nature of magmatic sources and limit on lower mantle contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Bernard; Pik, Raphae¨l.; Gezahegn, Yirgu

    1996-10-01

    Oligocene Continental Flood Basalts (CFB) from Ethiopia exhibit a wide range of 3He/ 4He ratios, from 0.035 Ra in crust-contaminated Low-Ti lava to 19.6 Ra in plume-derived high-Ti lava (where Ra is the atmospheric ratio of 1.38 × 10 -6). Quaternary basalts sampled in the Main Ethiopian Rift and in Afar also display dramatic 3He/ 4He variations from 0.009 Ra to 16.9 Ra. Low isotopic ratios partly reflect crustal assimilation whereas 3He/ 4He values higher than the mean isotopic ratio of the upper mantle (8 ± 1 Ra as measured in Normal Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts [N-MORB]) indicate the contribution of a lower mantle component. The geographical extension of plume-type He is consistent with an approximate radius of ˜ 1000 km for the flattened plume head. Helium isotopic data show that strong lower mantle signals were already apparent during early emissions of CFB and pre-dated by more than 15 Ma the major phases of rifting in the African Horn region, contrary to the view of passive decompression melting contemporary with large-scale rifting. The He-Sr composition of the plume component cannot result from a simple binary mixing between lower mantle and upper mantle end-members and requires the contribution of other component(s) such as recycled crust. The proportion of the lower mantle contribution to the total mass of material involved in the building of the Ethiopian magmatic province, as estimated from He contents and isotopic ratios in the respective mantle sources, is found to be small (< 5%). Except for He (and Ne), such contribution has no impact on the trace element and isotopic compositions of plume basalts, which are dominated by mixing between upper mantle, continental crust and recycled sources. If the thermal anomaly necessary to produce CFB originates in the lower mantle, as generally proposed, then there exists a dramatic decoupling between mass and heat transfers across the lower mantle-upper mantle boundary layer.

  3. Magmatic tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Aams, A.I.; McMurtry, G.M.; Shevenell, L.; Pettit, D.R.; Stimac, J.A.; Werner, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed geochemical sampling of high-temperature fumaroles, background water, and fresh magmatic products from 14 active volcanoes reveal that they do not produce measurable amounts of tritium ({sup 3}H) of deep origin (<0.1 T.U. or <0.32 pCi/kg H{sub 2}O). On the other hand, all volcanoes produce mixtures of meteoric and magmatic fluids that contain measurable {sup 3}H from the meteoric end-member. The results show that cold fusion is probably not a significant deep earth process but the samples and data have wide application to a host of other volcanological topics.

  4. Source and magmatic evolution inferred from geochemical and Sr-O-isotope data on hybrid lavas of Arso, the last eruption at Ischia island (Italy; 1302 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, Raffaella Silvia; Mazzeo, Fabio Carmine; Arienzo, Ilenia; D'Antonio, Massimo; Wörner, Gerhard; Civetta, Lucia; Pastore, Zeudia; Orsi, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    Geochemical and isotopic (87Sr/86Sr and 18O/16O) data have been acquired on whole rock and separated mineral samples from volcanic products of the 1302 AD Arso eruption, Ischia volcanic island (Gulf of Naples, Southern Italy), to investigate magmatic processes. Our results highlight petrographic and isotopic disequilibria between phenocrysts and their host rocks. Similar disequilibria are observed also for more mafic volcanic rocks from Ischia and in the Phlegraean Volcanic District in general. Moreover, 87Sr/86Sr and 18O/16O values suggest mixing between chemically and isotopically distinct batches of magma, and crystals cargo from an earlier magmatic phase. The radiogenic Sr isotope composition suggests that the mantle source was enriched by subduction-derived sediments. Furthermore, magmas extruded during the Arso eruption were affected by crustal contamination as suggested by high oxygen isotope ratios. Assimilation and fractional crystallization modelling of the Sr-O isotope compositions indicates that not more than 7% of granodioritic rocks from the continental crust have been assimilated by a mantle-derived mafic magma. Hence the recent volcanic activity of Ischia has been fed by distinct batches of magma, variably contaminated by continental crust, that mixed during their ascent towards the surface and remobilized phenocrysts left from earlier magmatic phases.

  5. Zircon Hf isotopic constraints on the mantle source of felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin, northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuki, T.; Lan, C.; Tran, T.; Pham, T.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Permian plume-related rocks, such as picrites, flood basalts and silicic volcanic rocks occur in northern Vietnam. This area was displaced 600 km southeastward along the Ailao Shan-Red River fault during mid-Tertiary in response to the India-Eurasia collision. The original location of the area was situated at the central Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) in SW China before Tertiary. The picrites and flood basalts in northern Vietnam have been investigated by many authors and are comparable with the ELIP. While, felsic magmatisms in northern Vietnam has been poorly studied. Zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopic data are useful to compare the felsic magmatism in northern Vietnam with that in the ELIP, because the magmatisms of the ELIP had a characteristic time period (260-250 Ma) and the Hf isotopes show a remarkable mantle signature. Therefore, this study carried out in-situ U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions for 300 zircon grains in eighteen granitoids and rhyolites in Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin in northern Vietnam. Zircons from the granitoids and rhyolites occasionally show development of {101} pyramid and {100} prism crystal facies, suggesting typical zircons crystallized from high temperature alkaline granite. 206Pb/238U ages of granitoid and rhyolite yield consistently in a narrow range of 260 to 250 Ma, which coincides with those from peralkaline to metaluminous granites in the ELIP. ɛHf(t) values of zircons in rhyolites and granites of this study dominate in the range of +5 to +10, which is consistent with those from the ELIP. U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons indicate that felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu La basin have been derived from the same mantle source with the ELIP.

  6. Magmatic Enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past three decades, the term "magmatic enclave" has become widely accepted for small (typically <1 m) spheroidal bodies of igneous rock that are compositionally distinct from their coeval lava or intrusive hosts (e.g., Didier and Barbarin, 1991). Certain magmatic enclaves are crystal cumulates but most are globs of magma more mafic and hotter than their host. Understanding the origins and scientific utility of enclaves is aided by their common occurrence in both plutonic and volcanic rocks. Enclaves were noticed and described by geologists and petrographers for decades (e.g., Lacroix, 1890; Pabst, 1928; Williams, 1931) before it was demonstrated that many enclaves were introduced into their hosts while both were in a magmatic state: For example, in plutons by Wager and Bailey (1953), Walker and co-workers (1960's), Didier (1973), Wiebe (1980), and Vernon (1984), and in volcanic rocks by Wilcox (1944), Eichelberger (1980), and Bacon (1986). Spheroidal forms, crenulated or fine-grained margins, and crystal textures of enclaves are evidence of magmatic behavior. On entrapment, an enclave rapidly loses heat to its host and grows groundmass crystals whose size and morphology reflect the degree of enclave undercooling that is closely related to compositional contrast. At depth, some of the water dissolved in enclave magma may enter hydrous silicates but much can exsolve, including during partial crystallization. Vapor exsolution creates spherical vesicles and irregular gas pockets between crystals that give most volcanic enclaves porous textures. A vapor pressure gradient between an incompletely crystallized rigid enclave interior and host magma can drive residual melt into segregation vesicles and even out of the enclave by gas-driven filter pressing. Such enclaves have cores with cumulate-like compositions. Felsic droplets in mafic inclusions in plutonic rocks are interpreted as crystallized segregation vesicles. Enclaves are samples of magma that may not

  7. Transition from adakitic to bimodal magmatism induced by the paleo-Pacific plate subduction and slab rollback beneath SE China: Evidence from petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Xu, Xisheng; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The late Mesozoic magmatic record of SE China is dominated by felsic volcanics and intrusions. However, this magmatism mainly occurred in coastal areas at 110-80 Ma, in contrast to poorly researched dike swarms that were emplaced inland at 165-120 Ma. Here, we focus on Early Cretaceous mafic and felsic dike swarms that provide new insights into the tectono-magmatic evolution of SE China. The swarms were intruded into Neoproterozoic plutons and include granodioritic porphyry, granitic porphyry, and diabase dikes. The granodioritic porphyry (128 ± 2 Ma) dikes are geochemically similar to adakitic rocks, suggesting that inland adakitic magmatism occurred between ca. 175 and ca. 130 Ma. The majority of these adakitic rocks are calc-alkaline and have Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic compositions that are indicative of derivation from a Neoproterozoic magmatic arc source within the lower crust. The granitic porphyry and diabase dikes were emplaced coevally at ca. 130 Ma, and the former contain high alkali and high field strength element (HFSE; e.g., Zr, Nb, Ce, and Y) concentrations that together with their high Ga/Al and FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios imply an A-type affinity. The widespread ca. 130 Ma magmatism that formed the A-type granites and coeval diabase dikes defines a NE-SW trending inland belt of bimodal magmatism in SE China. The presence of mafic enclaves in some of the A-type granites, and the Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of the latter are indicative of inadequate mixing between the basement sediment-derived and coeval mantle-derived basaltic melts that define the bimodal magmatism. The transition from adakitic rocks to bimodal magmatism in the inland region of SE China indicates a change in the prevailing tectonic regime. This change was associated with an increase in the dip angle of the northwestward-subducting paleo-Pacific Plate beneath SE China between the Middle Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous. This resulted in a transition from a local intra-plate extensional

  8. Timing and sources of granite magmatism in the Ribeira Belt, SE Brazil: Insights from zircon in situ U-Pb dating and Hf isotope geochemistry in granites from the São Roque Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Andrade, Sandra; Vasconcellos, Antonio Carlos B. C.; Henrique-Pinto, Renato; Ulbrich, Horstpeter H. G. J.

    2016-07-01

    Eight new in situ U-Pb zircon age determinations by SHRIMP and LA-MC-ICPMS reveal that the main granitic magmatism in the São Roque Domain, which is largely dominated by metaluminous high-K calc-alkaline monzogranites with subordinate peraluminous leucogranites, occurred between 604 ± 3 and 590 ± 4 Ma. This small temporal range is ca. 20-30 Ma younger than previously admitted based on U-Pb TIMS dates from literature, some of which obtained in the same occurrences now dated. The observed discrepancy seems related to the presence of small Paleoproterozoic inherited cores in part of the zircon populations used for TIMS multigrain dating, which could also respond for the unusually high (up to 10 Ma) uncertainty associated with most of these dates. The younger age range now identified for the São Roque granite magmatism has important implications for the evolution of the Ribeira Fold Belt. Whilst previously admitted ages ca. 620-630 Ma substantiated correlations with the widespread and intensely foliated high-K calc-alkaline granitoid rocks of the neighbor Socorro-Guaxupé Nappe (potentially associated with an accretionary continental margin), the ˜600-590 Ma interval seems more consistent with a late deformation tectonic setting. Strongly negative ɛHf(t) characterize the magmatic zircons from the São Roque Domain granites. An eastward increase from -22 in the São Roque Granite to -11 in the Cantareira Granite and neighboring stocks suggests an across-domain shift in granite sources. Such eastward younging of sources, also indicated by Sm-Nd isotope data from granites and supracrustal sequences in neighboring domains, is suggestive that some of the first-order limits and discontinuities in this belt are not defined by the strike-slip fault systems traditionally taken to separate distinct domains. Although the negative ɛHf(t) and ɛNd(t) indicate sources with long crustal residence for all studied granite plutons, the observed range is more radiogenic than the

  9. Volcanic cycles and setting in the Neoproterozoic III to Ordovician Camaquã Basin succession in southern Brazil: characteristics of post-collisional magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildner, W.; Lima, E. F.; Nardi, L. V. S.; Sommer, C. A.

    2002-11-01

    The Camaquã Basin comprises a volcano-sedimentary succession, located in southernmost Brazil, and represents a molasse basin formed at the post-collisional stage of the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenic cycle in the Neoproterozoic III to Ordovician period. This basin is one of the most well-preserved ancient volcano-sedimentary sequences undeformed and unmetamorphic in the world, dominantly developed on a continental setting under subaerial conditions. It is composed of five major stratigraphic units, four of them with a distinct volcanic character from the bottom to the top, as: (1) Maricá; (2) Bom Jardim; (3) Acampamento Velho; (4) Santa Bárbara; and (5) Guaritas Allogroups. A concise sight of geochemical and isotopic rock data is presented, as well as stratigraphic correlation and description of rock structures and textures that lead to the identification of their genetic processes, the aim of this paper, indicating a relation with a coeval plutonism, and volcanism that evolved from high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic and ended with a silica-saturated sodic alkaline magmatism, with a crustal component represented by peraluminous granites. Volcanic deposits from bottom to top are made mostly of volcanogenic sedimentary deposits, succeeded by basic to intermediate lava and pyroclastic flows of shoshonitic affinity, followed by intermediate and acid lava flows and ignimbrites of sodic alkaline affinity. The last volcanic event is represented by basalt pahoehoe flows, probably of mildly alkaline sodic affinity.

  10. Discrimination between magmatic and hydrothermal nature of the sources responsible for the unrest phenomena at Yellowstone caldera via integrated model of InSAR time series, leveling and gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzani, Pietro; Battaglia, Maurizio; Castaldo, Raffaele; Pepe, Antonio; Zeni, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We studied the Yellowstone caldera geological unrest between 1977 and 2010 by investigating temporal changes in differential InSAR, precise spirit leveling and gravity measurements. In particular, we start by investigating the InSAR results obtained through the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) differential InSAR technique, applied to a data set of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT SAR images spanning 18 years, from 1992 to 2010. Moreover, we analyze the leveling data, which cover an additional time period of about 19 years from 1976 to 1995, and the gravity measurements that span the interval from 1977 to 1993. Inverting InSAR, leveling and gravity measurements infer parameters of the caldera best-fitting deformation sources by using the dMODELS software package. Compared to previous work on Yellowstone caldera, (i) we present long-term deformation time series derived from InSAR and their comparison to GPS results, (ii) we identify and remove the tectonic signal from the retrieved time-series, (iii) we jointly exploit InSAR, leveling and gravity measurements to investigate the deformation sources geometric characteristics and their densities; to do this we search for the best fit deformation source identified by inverting more than one source geometry and we use statistical analysis to discriminate among different geometries. Our study indicates the existence of different distinct deformation sources within the caldera and we show that the detected sources have been intermittently active for the past three decades. We interpret the results of our inversions in view of the seismic tomography studies. This allows us to discriminate between the magmatic and the hydrothermal nature of the sources responsible for the unrest phenomena that affected the Sour Creek (SC) and Mallard (ML) Dome resurgent caldera domes during the last three decades. Our study indicates the existence of different distinct deformation sources within the caldera and we show that the detected sources have been

  11. Late Eocene-Oligocene post-collisional monzonitic intrusions from the Alborz magmatic belt, NW Iran. An example of monzonite magma generation from a metasomatized mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Antonio; Aghazadeh, Mehraj; Badrzadeh, Zahra; Chichorro, Martim

    2013-11-01

    A potassic magmatic association in the Zagros hinterland of the Tethyan orogen in Iran is identified and characterized for relevant geochronologic and petrologic features. New data, including a combination of field relations, U-Pb zircon geochronology and rock geochemistry, come from seven plutons (Khankandi, Shaivar-Dagh, Yuseflu, Mizan, Saheb-Divan, Roudbar and Abhar) that form the Arasbaran-Taroum batholith (ATB), which forms part of the Alborz magmatic belt (AMB) of NW Iran. Zircon SHRIMP ages range from 38.32 ± 0.17 Ma, 38.94 ± 0.42 Ma and 37.78 ± 0.28 Ma for magma pulses of the Abhar pluton, at the East of the batholith, to 24.51 ± 0.27 Ma and 23.55 ± 0.47 Ma for pulses of the Mizan pluton at the West. Considering these ages and the previously published ones together, emplacement of the batholith took place during Late Eocene and Oligocene, from 38 to 23 Ma, with an age progression from SE to NW at a rate of 2 cm/year. The whole batholith is characterized by potassic rocks with K2O > 2 wt.% in gabbros and diorites (SiO2 < 50 wt.%). Higher contents of K2O, of up to > 6 wt.%, are normally found in rocks with intermediate silica contents of about 60 wt.% SiO2. These intermediate silica rocks are truly monzonites and are the most abundant in each pluton. With regard to trace elements, the monzonitic rocks of the ATB show some of the typical signatures of arc magmatism (depletion in Nb and Ti). Most samples contain moderate contents of Sr (500-800 ppm), close to similar potassic magmas forming Cenozoic complexes in Central Iran. The relatively moderate Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios suggest that ATB magmas retain some adakitic signatures from the source region. Geochemical modeling is performed by using melt compositions and phase relations calculated with MELTS software, combined with experimental data and trace element signatures. We conclude that monzonitic and shoshonitic magmas of some plutons of the ATB (Shaivar-Dagh, Kahnkandi and Yuseflu) have an adakitic

  12. Petrogenesis and geochemistry of circa 2.5 Ga granitoids in the Zanhuang Massif: Implications for magmatic source and Neoarchean metamorphism of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junpeng; Kusky, Timothy; Wang, Lu; Polat, Ali; Wang, Songjie; Deng, Hao; Fu, Jianmin; Fu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    The tectonic framework of the North China Craton (NCC) during late Archean to early Paleoproterozoic (circa 2.5 Ga) is still lacking comprehensive understanding due to subsequent strong deformation and metamorphic overprinting events. Circa 2.5 Ga magmatic and metamorphic activities are widely spread throughout the NCC, which can be used as an efficient target to better understand the tectonic evolution at this period. In this study, based on a detailed field, structural, geochemical, geochronological and Sm-Nd isotopic study, we focus our work on the Haozhuang granitoids in the Zanhuang Massif located at the eastern margin of the Central Orogenic Belt of the NCC. The granitoids mainly include undeformed pegmatite and granodiorite. One pegmatite and two granodiorite samples yield zircon 207Pb/206Pb ages of 2513 ± 29 Ma, 2511 ± 36 Ma and 2528 ± 18 Ma, respectively. The granodiorites show metaluminous and shoshonitic to high-K calc-alkaline series characteristics with A-type granite affinity. The circa 2.5 Ga granodiorites have highly negative εNd(t) values (- 29.22 - 33.12) and TDM model ages between 2671 Ma and 3151 Ma. This work shows clearly, from whole-rock major and trace elements and Sm-Nd isotopic studies, that the Haozhuang granodiorites were derived from partial melting of old and thickened TTG crust rather than mantle sources, and formed in a subduction-related tectonic setting. With geochemical comparison studies to other similar-aged granitic rocks in the Zanhuang Massif, we suggest that these granitic rocks possibly have a certain correlation during the magma evolution. Coupled with our previous geochemical and isotopic studies on circa 2.5 Ga mafic dike swarms, we propose that the similar-aged granitic rocks and mafic dike swarms were produced by an east-dipping subduction polarity reversal event following an arc-continent collision between the Fuping/Wutai island arc and Eastern Block of the NCC above a west-dipping slab. The east

  13. Petrologic observations and multiphase dynamics in highly-crystalline magmatic mushes sourcing Galápagos Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, J.; Bergantz, G. W.; Geist, D.

    2013-12-01

    The inability to directly observe magma chambers makes it difficult to understand their dynamics. Yet conditions within the chamber determines whether an eruption will occur, or if the magma is allowed to cool to complete crystallization. Eruption styles are also conditioned by these dynamics, as the amount of overpressure within the chamber regulates effusive or explosive eruptions. Plutons and volcanoes appear to share similar states: magma reservoirs that are temporally and spatially dominated by crystal-rich states, known as magmatic mushes. To explore the dynamics of mushes, we turn to the relatively simple ocean island end-member of magmatic systems. Ocean island porphyritic basalt flows provide a snapshot of the mush conditions prior to eruption. The Galápagos Islands are a system of ocean islands displaying spatial and temporal variation in their eruption styles and deposits. We have collected porphyritic basalt samples from Rábida Island of the Galápagos Archipelago which contains deposits ranging in ages from 0.7-1.0 Ma. Chemical zoning within phenocrysts indicates intermittent efficient mixing occurs within the mush, despite high viscosities and corresponding low-Reynolds number conditions. To further explore the dynamics of mixing, we present preliminary Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase models using the fluids modeling software MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges). This computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM) allows for individual crystal tracking within the system and monitors interactions between the fluid and solid phases. Of special interest is the open-system dynamical response of a mush to a reintrusion event. Unlike high-Reynolds number flows, such as air or water systems, magmatic mushes have high viscosities, indicating that turbulent motion is not the primary mixing mechanism. Instead, mixing appears to be caused by mechanical unlocking from an increase in pore pressure as additional magma is injected. The

  14. Examining Student Factors in Sources of Setting Accommodation DIF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated potential sources of setting accommodation resulting in differential item functioning (DIF) on math and reading assessments for examinees with varied learning characteristics. The examinees were those who participated in large-scale assessments and were tested in either standardized or accommodated testing…

  15. An experimental and petrologic investigation of the source regions of lunar magmatism in the context of the primordial differentiation of the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elardo, Stephen M.

    The primordial differentiation of the Moon via a global magma ocean has become the paradigm under which all lunar data are interpreted. The success of this model in explaining multiple geochemical, petrologic, and isotopic characteristics lunar geology has led to magma oceans becoming the preferred model for the differentiation of Earth, Mars, Mercury, Vesta, and other large terrestrial bodies. The goal of this work is to combine petrologic analyses of lunar samples with high pressure, high temperature petrologic experiments to place new and detailed constraints the petrogenetic processes that operated during different stages of lunar magmatism, the processes that have acted upon these magmas to obscure their relationship to their mantle source regions, and how those source regions fit into the context of the lunar magma ocean model. This work focuses on two important phases of lunar magmatism: the ancient crust-building plutonic lithologies of the Mg-suite dating to ~4.3 Ga, and the most recent known mare basaltic magmas dating to ~3 Ga. These samples provide insight into the petrogenesis of magmas and interior thermal state when the Moon was a hot, juvenile planet, and also during the last gasps of magmatism from a cooling planet. Chapter 1, focusing on Mg-suite troctolite 76535, presents data on chromite symplectites, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, intercumulus mineral assemblages, and cumulus mineral chemistry to argue that the 76535 was altered by metasomatism by a migrating basaltic melt. This process could effectively raise radioisotope systems above their mineral-specific blocking temperatures and help explain some of the Mg-suite-FAN age overlap. Chapter 2 focuses on lunar meteorites NWA 4734, 032, and LAP 02205, which are 3 of the 5 youngest igneous samples from the Moon. Using geochemical and isotopic data combined with partial melting models, it is shown that these basalts do not have a link to the KREEP reservoir, and a model is presented for low

  16. Source-inherited compositional diversity in granite batholiths: The geochemical message of Late Paleozoic intrusive magmatism in central Calabria (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiannacca, Patrizia; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Bonanno, Fiorenza; Carciotto, Manuele Mario

    2015-11-01

    magma source. Mantle-derived magmas do not appear to have played a role in the geochemical diversity of the Serre Batholith granitoids; their inherited arc signature resulted from partial melting of crustal material of magmatic arc derivation, such as magnesian igneous rocks and sediments derived from their rapid erosion. This study suggests that post-collisional granitoid magmatism is likely not to be associated with the direct generation of new continental crust; all the granitoid rock types appear to represent recycled and reworked crustal material.

  17. Magmatic gas source for the stratospheric SO[sub 2] cloud from the June 15, 1991, eruption of Mount Pinatubo

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, H.R. ); Gerlach, T.M. )

    1992-10-01

    A water-rich magmatic gas phase escaped explosively from Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991, taking with it a load of crystalline and molten material sufficient to form pumice and tephra deposits with an estimated total dense-rock-equivalent volume of 3-5 km[sup 3], and carrying in it enough sulfur to form a 20 Mt SO[sub 2] cloud in the stratosphere. Application of the petrologic method for estimating sulfur degassing during the climatic event from the sulfur content of trapped glass inclusions and matrix glasses in the pumice deposits requires an unacceptably large volume of erupted magma to account for SO[sub 2] in the stratospheric cloud. The ubiquitous presence of primary vapor bubbles in glass inclusions and unaltered anhydrite phenocrysts in the pumice suggest that sulfur was present in a separate H[sub 2]O-rich gas phase of the Pinatubo magma before eruption. Thus, for this eruption, and perhaps others, the petrologic method for estimating sulfur degassing is prone to substantial underestimation of sulfur release and the potential climatic impact of past explosive eruptions.

  18. Source rock potential of shallow-water evaporitic settings

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.K.

    1986-05-01

    In the major evaporitic environments on the world's surface today, most organic matter accumulates in shallow subaqueous to seasonally subaerially exposed, algal-mat sediments. Given the present depositional setting, this organic matter probably could not be preserved to form source rocks. However, if the authors place such evaporite deposition into a geologic context, source rocks could have formed in shallow-water settings in the past. Such settings were characterized by hydrologic conditions that allowed the retention of hypersaline, anoxic pore water to depths where the organic material was buried deep enough to generate hydrocarbons. When deep-basin, shallow-water, evaporite successions were laid down in basins such as the Mediterranean during the late Miocene, the Michigan basin during the Silurian, and in other large saline giants, conditions were right for source rocks to form within shallow-water and salt-flat evaporitic environments. The evaporites in these saline giants were deposited under conditions of relatively shallow water (< 50 m); the basin never appears to have dried out, but water levels changed quickly (approx. 10,000 years) from shallow to deep. Continual water saturation coupled with saline pore fluids prevented the inflow of fresh, oxidizing ground water into the basin center of shallow-water organic-rich evaporites. Immature hydrocarbons derived from such rocks today drip from the 5.5-m.y. old evaporites of Sicily in active salt and sulfur mines. Organic-rich sediments could also be preserved to generate hydrocarbons in rapidly subsiding rift basins. In such basins, rapid burial has prevented the entrance of fresher oxygenated waters and the associated degradation and destruction of the organic matter. The early continental rift stage generates the source rocks; the ephemeral streams, wadis, and dune fields become the reservoirs, and the subsequent evaporite stage seals the reservoir.

  19. Crustal rifting and magmatic underplating in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) intra-oceanic arc detected by active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic experiments using a multichannel reflection system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) arc region since 2002 to understand growth process of continental crust. The source was an airgun array with a total capacity of 12,000 cubic inches and the OBSs as the receiver were deployed with an interval of 5 km for all seismic refraction experiments. As the results, we obtained crustal structures across the whole IBM arc with an interval of 50 km and detected the structural characteristics showing the crustal growth process. The IBM arc is one of typical oceanic island arc, which crustal growth started from subduction of an oceanic crust beneath the other oceanic crust. The arc crust has developed through repeatedly magmatic accretion from subduction slab and backarc opening. The volcanism has activated in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Quaternary (e.g., Taylor, 1992), however, these detailed locations of past volcanic arc has been remained as one of unknown issues. In addition, a role of crustal rifting for the crustal growth has also been still unknown issue yet. Our seismic structures show three rows of past volcanic arc crusts except current arc. A rear arc and a forearc side have one and two, respectively. The first one, which was already reported by Kodaira et al. (2008), distributes in northern side from 27 N of the rear arc region. The second one, which develops in the forearc region next to the recent volcanic front, distributes in whole of the Izu-Ogasawara arc having crustal variation along arc direction. Ones of them sometimes have thicker crust than that beneath current volcanic front and no clear topographic high. Last one in the forearc connects to the Ogasawara Ridge. However, thickest crust is not always located beneath these volcanic arcs. The initial rifting region like the northern end of the Mariana Trough and the Sumisu

  20. The lower Paleozoic granitoids from the central part of the Qilian block, NW China: An example of granitoid magmatism in a continental backarc setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, kuo-an; Yang, Houng-yi; Yang, Huai-jen; Liu, Dunyi; Zhang, Jianxin; Wu, Cailai; Shau, Yen-hong; Tseng, Chien-yuan

    2016-04-01

    The petrology, geochemistry, geochronology, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of the backarc granitoids from the central part of the Qilian block are studied in the present work. Both S- and I-type granitoids are present. In petrographic classification, they are granite, alkali feldspar granite, felsic granite, diorite, quartz diorite, granodiorite, and albite syenite. The SHRIMP ages are 402-447 Ma for the S-type and 419-451 Ma for the I-type granitoids. They are mostly high-K calc-alkaline granitoids. The S-type granitoids are weakly to strongly peraluminous and are characterized by negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.18-0.79). The I-type granitoids are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous and are characterized mostly by small negative to small positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.71-1.16). The initial (87Sr/86Sr) values are 0.708848-0.713651 for the S-type and 0.704230-0.718108 for the I-type granitoids. The ɛNd(450 Ma) values are -8.9-~-4.1 and -9.7~+1.9 for the S-type and I-type granitoids, respectively. The TDM values are 1.5-2.4 Ga for the S-type and 1.0-2.3 Ga for the I-type granitoids. For the Qilian block, the backarc granitoid magmatism took place approximately 60 million years after the onset of the southward subduction of the north Qilian oceanic lithosphere and lasted approximately 50 million years. Partial melting of the source rocks consisting of the Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Huangyuan Group and the intruding lower Paleozoic basaltic rocks could produce the S-type granitoid magmas. Partial melting of basaltic rocks mixed with lower continental crustal materials could produce the I-type granitoid magmas. Major crustal growth occurred in the late Archean and Meso-Paleoproterozoic time for the Qilian block. The magma generation was primarily remelting of the crustal rocks with only little addition of the mantle materials after 1.0 Ga for the Qilian block.

  1. Evidence for prolonged mid-Paleozoic plutonism and ages of crustal sources in east-central Alaska from SHRIMP U-Pb dating of syn-magmatic, inherited, and detrital zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Williams, I.S.

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb analyses of igneous zircons from the Lake George assemblage in the eastern Yukon-Tanana Upland (Tanacross quadrangle) indicate both Late Devonian (???370 Ma) and Early Mississippian (???350 Ma) magmatic pulses. The zircons occur in four textural variants of granitic orthogneiss from a large area of muscovite-biotite augen gneiss. Granitic orthogneiss from the nearby Fiftymile batholith, which straddles the Alaska-Yukon border, yielded a similar range in zircon U-Pb ages, suggesting that both the Fiftymile batholith and the Tanacross orthogneiss body consist of multiple intrusions. We interpret the overall tectonic setting for the Late Devonian and Early Mississippian magmatism as an extending continental margin (broad back-arc region) inboard of a northeast-dipping (present coordinates) subduction zone. New SHRIMP U-Pb ages of inherited zircon cores in the Tanacross orthogneisses and of detrital zircons from quartzite from the Jarvis belt in the Alaska Range (Mount Hayes quadrangle) include major 2.0-1.7 Ga clusters and lesser 2.7-2.3 Ga clusters, with subordinate 3.2, 1.4, and 1.1 Ga clusters in some orthogneiss samples. For the most part, these inherited and core U-Pb ages match those of basement provinces of the western Canadian Shield and indicate widespread potential sources within western Laurentia for most grain populations; these ages also match the detrital zircon reference for the northern North American miogeocline and support a correlation between the two areas.

  2. Comprehensive, Multi-Source Cyber-Security Events Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kent, Alexander D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-21

    This data set represents 58 consecutive days of de-identified event data collected from five sources within Los Alamos National Laboratory’s corporate, internal computer network. The data sources include Windows-based authentication events from both individual computers and centralized Active Directory domain controller servers; process start and stop events from individual Windows computers; Domain Name Service (DNS) lookups as collected on internal DNS servers; network flow data as collected on at several key router locations; and a set of well-defined red teaming events that present bad behavior within the 58 days. In total, the data set is approximately 12 gigabytes compressed across the five data elements and presents 1,648,275,307 events in total for 12,425 users, 17,684 computers, and 62,974 processes. Specific users that are well known system related (SYSTEM, Local Service) were not de-identified though any well-known administrators account were still de-identified. In the network flow data, well-known ports (e.g. 80, 443, etc) were not de-identified. All other users, computers, process, ports, times, and other details were de-identified as a unified set across all the data elements (e.g. U1 is the same U1 in all of the data). The specific timeframe used is not disclosed for security purposes. In addition, no data that allows association outside of LANL’s network is included. All data starts with a time epoch of 1 using a time resolution of 1 second. In the authentication data, failed authentication events are only included for users that had a successful authentication event somewhere within the data set.

  3. Post-rift magmatic evolution of the eastern North American "passive-aggressive" margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Sarah E.; Gazel, Esteban; Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Bizimis, Michael; McAleer, Ryan; Biryol, C. Berk

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of passive margins requires knowledge of temporal and chemical constraints on magmatism following the transition from supercontinent to rifting, to post-rifting evolution. The Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) is an ideal study location as several magmatic pulses occurred in the 200 My following rifting. In particular, the Virginia-West Virginia region of the ENAM has experienced two postrift magmatic pulses at ˜152 Ma and 47 Ma, and thus provides a unique opportunity to study the long-term magmatic evolution of passive margins. Here we present a comprehensive set of geochemical data that includes new 40Ar/39Ar ages, major and trace-element compositions, and analysis of radiogenic isotopes to further constrain their magmatic history. The Late Jurassic volcanics are bimodal, from basanites to phonolites, while the Eocene volcanics range from picrobasalt to rhyolite. Modeling suggests that the felsic volcanics from both the Late Jurassic and Eocene events are consistent with fractional crystallization. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics for the Late Jurassic event suggests HIMU and EMII components in the magma source that we interpret as upper mantle components rather than crustal interaction. Lithospheric delamination is the best hypothesis for magmatism in Virginia/West Virginia, due to tectonic instabilities that are remnant from the long-term evolution of this margin, resulting in a "passive-aggressive" margin that records multiple magmatic events long after rifting ended.

  4. Constraining Slab Breakoff Induced Magmatism through Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburn, R.; Van Hunen, J.; Maunder, B. L.; Magni, V.; Bouilhol, P.

    2015-12-01

    Post-collisional magmatism is markedly different in nature and composition than pre-collisional magmas. This is widely interpreted to mark a change in the thermal structure of the system due to the loss of the oceanic slab (slab breakoff), allowing a different source to melt. Early modelling studies suggest that when breakoff takes place at depths shallower than the overriding lithosphere, magmatism occurs through both the decompression of upwelling asthenopshere into the slab window and the thermal perturbation of the overriding lithosphere (Davies & von Blanckenburg, 1995; van de Zedde & Wortel, 2001). Interpretations of geochemical data which invoke slab breakoff as a means of generating magmatism mostly assume these shallow depths. However more recent modelling results suggest that slab breakoff is likely to occur deeper (e.g. Andrews & Billen, 2009; Duretz et al., 2011; van Hunen & Allen, 2011). Here we test the extent to which slab breakoff is a viable mechanism for generating melting in post-collisional settings. Using 2-D numerical models we conduct a parametric study, producing models displaying a range of dynamics with breakoff depths ranging from 150 - 300 km. Key models are further analysed to assess the extent of melting. We consider the mantle wedge above the slab to be hydrated, and compute the melt fraction by using a simple parameterised solidus. Our models show that breakoff at shallow depths can generate a short-lived (< 3 Myr) pulse of mantle melting, through the hydration of hotter, undepleted asthenosphere flowing in from behind the detached slab. However, our results do not display the widespread, prolonged style of magmatism, observed in many post-collisional areas, suggesting that this magmatism may be generated via alternative mechanisms. This further implies that using magmatic observations to constrain slab breakoff is not straightforward.

  5. Insights from and in-depth analysis of CGPS time series at Mt.Etna: evolution of magmatic sources between 2003 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Marco; Valentina, Bruno; Flavio, Cannavò; Carmelo, Ferlito; Mario, Mattia; Daniele, Pellegrino; Mario, Pulvirenti; Massimo, Rossi; Danila, Scandura

    2013-04-01

    The detection and monitoring of crustal deformation on Mt. Etna is performed through the Etn@net continuous GPS network that is currently one of the largest worldwide in an active volcano, with its 40 stations. Knowledge of the ground deformation of Mt. Etna with a good spatial and temporal resolution allows inferences to be made about the physics of the underlying deformation. In particular, we propose a modelling of the magmatic sources acting inside the volcano between 2003 and 2012 and their temporal evolution. We performed an analysis of the CGPS long time series in order to investigate time spans characterized by coherent crustal deformation patterns. The analysed period has been divided into different coherent inflation/deflation phases and two phases characterized by a more complex deformation pattern. In particular, during the period 02 August 2008 - 14 June 2009 we observed the coexistence of a deflation of the summit area and an inflation at lower heights while the period 21 May 2010 - 31 December 2010 was characterized by an inflation at medium height without significant areal deformation changes at the summit. Analytical models indicate a non-uniform deformation style revealing spaced sources acting at different time on different segments of a multi-level magma reservoir. The imaged Etnean plumbing system is depicted as an elongated magma reservoir that extends from the volcano body downwards to about 8.0 km below sea level (b.s.l.), sloping slightly towards the North-West, with storage volumes located at about 8.0, 4.0 and 2.0 km (b.s.l.). The high quality of data collected on the dense configuration of the Etn@net CGPS network permits a detailed analysis of the mechanisms of magma migration from depth and, therefore, allows a fast and accurate evaluation of volcanic hazard. In particular, the analysis proposed here highlights some significant characteristics: 1) the inflation pressure sources are located between the eastern border of the low vp

  6. Joint analysis of geodetic and earthquake fault-plane solution data to constrain magmatic sources: A case study from Kīlauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wauthier, Christelle; Roman, Diana C.; Poland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A joint analysis of geodetic and seismic datasets from Kīlauea Volcano during a period of magmatic unrest in 2006 demonstrates the effectiveness of this combination for testing and constraining models of magma dynamics for a complex, multi-source system. At the end of 2003, Kīlauea's summit began a four-year-long period of inflation due to a surge in magma supply to the volcano. In 2006, for the first time since 1982, Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) also experienced inflation. To investigate the characteristics of active magma sources and the nature of their interactions with faults in the SWRZ during 2006, we integrate, through Coulomb stress modeling, contemporary geodetic data from InSAR and GPS with a new catalogue of double-couple fault-plane solutions for volcano-tectonic earthquakes. We define two periods of inflation during 2006 based on the rate of deformation measured in daily GPS data, spanning February to 15 March 2006 (Period 1) and 16 March to 30 September 2006 (Period 2). InSAR data for these two periods are inverted to determine the position, change in size, and shape of inflation sources in each period. Our new models are consistent with microseismic activity from each period. They suggest that, during Period 1, deformation in the SWRZ can be explained by pressurization of magma in a spherical reservoir beneath the south caldera, and that, during Period 2, magma was also aseismically intruded farther to the southwest into the SWRZ along a sub-horizontal plane. Our Coulomb stress analysis shows that the microseismicity recorded in the SWRZ is induced by overpressurization of the south caldera reservoir, and not by magma intrusion into the SWRZ. This study highlights the importance of a joint analysis of independent geophysical datasets to fully constrain the nature of magma accumulation.

  7. Joint analysis of geodetic and earthquake fault-plane solution data to constrain magmatic sources: A case study from Kīlauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, Christelle; Roman, Diana C.; Poland, Michael P.

    2016-12-01

    A joint analysis of geodetic and seismic datasets from Kīlauea Volcano during a period of magmatic unrest in 2006 demonstrates the effectiveness of this combination for testing and constraining models of magma dynamics for a complex, multi-source system. At the end of 2003, Kīlauea's summit began a four-year-long period of inflation due to a surge in magma supply to the volcano. In 2006, for the first time since 1982, Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) also experienced inflation. To investigate the characteristics of active magma sources and the nature of their interactions with faults in the SWRZ during 2006, we integrate, through Coulomb stress modeling, contemporary geodetic data from InSAR and GPS with a new catalogue of double-couple fault-plane solutions for volcano-tectonic earthquakes. We define two periods of inflation during 2006 based on the rate of deformation measured in daily GPS data, spanning February to 15 March 2006 (Period 1) and 16 March to 30 September 2006 (Period 2). InSAR data for these two periods are inverted to determine the position, change in size, and shape of inflation sources in each period. Our new models are consistent with microseismic activity from each period. They suggest that, during Period 1, deformation in the SWRZ can be explained by pressurization of magma in a spherical reservoir beneath the south caldera, and that, during Period 2, magma was also aseismically intruded farther to the southwest into the SWRZ along a sub-horizontal plane. Our Coulomb stress analysis shows that the microseismicity recorded in the SWRZ is induced by overpressurization of the south caldera reservoir, and not by magma intrusion into the SWRZ. This study highlights the importance of a joint analysis of independent geophysical datasets to fully constrain the nature of magma accumulation.

  8. An overview of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic magmatism and tectonics in Eastern Paraguay and central Andes (Western Gondwana): Implications for the composition of mantle sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omarini, Ricardo H.; Gasparon, Massimo; De Min, Angelo; Comin-Chiaramonti, Piero

    2016-12-01

    The amalgamation of the Western Gondwana (including the Greater Gondwana supercraton) occurred at 600 Ma during the Brazilian - Pan African orogeny. A plate junction related to this event is marked by the Transbrazilian lineament which separates the South American continent into two sectors: the Eastern Paraguay-Brazilian and Central Andean domains. An overview of the geodynamic data from these two sectors indicates that the two domains were subjected to distinct evolutions from the Proterozoic to the present. The Andean domain is characterized by long-lived subduction processes linked to the convergence and consequent collision of microplates since the Middle Proterozoic (western Amazonian Craton) with a peak at about 600-580 Ma. The Paraguay-Brazilian domain remained relatively stable but was affected by extension episodes that reactivated ancient (Early and Middle Proterozoic) suture zones. These different geodynamic evolutions seem to reflect broadly distinct mantle compositions. In the subduction zones of the Andean domain the mantle was deeply modified by metasomatic processes following the subduction of oceanic plates. Consequently, the Andean type magma sources show a clear HIMU imprint inherited from the MORB, whereas the Paraguay-Brazilian sector shows a prevalent EMI and subordinate EMII character. The petrological data mainly from Mesozoic and Cenozoic magmatic events in the two sectors are reviewed to investigate the current mantle plume and mantle dome models for the uprising of the asthenospheric (or sub-lithospheric) material.

  9. The Banhadão Alkaline Complex, Southeastern Brazil: source and evolution of potassic SiO2-undersaturated high-Ca and low-Ca magmatic series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, Excelso; Enrich, Gaston E. R.; Azzone, Rogério G.; Comin-Chiaramonti, Piero; de Min, Angelo; Gomes, Celso B.

    2012-01-01

    The Cretaceous Banhadão alkaline complex in southeastern Brazil presents two potassic SiO2-undersaturated series. The high-Ca magmatic series consist of initially fractionated olivine (Fo92-91) + diopside (Wo48-43En49-35Ae0-7), as evidenced by the presence of xenocrysts and xenoliths. In that sequence, diopside (Wo47-38En46-37Ae0-8) + phlogopite + apatite + perovskite (Prv>92) crystallized to form the phlogopite melteigite and led to the Ca enrichment of the magma. Diopside (Wo47-41En32-24 Ae3-14) continued to crystallize as an early mafic mineral, followed by nepheline (Ne74.8-70.1Ks26.3-21.2Qz7.6-0.9) and leucite (Lc65-56) and subsequently by melanite and potassic feldspar (Or85-99Ab1-7) to form melanite ijolites, wollastonite-melanite urtites and melanite-nepheline syenites. Melanite-pseudoleucite-nepheline syenites are interpreted to be a leucite accumulation. Melanite nephelinite dykes are believed to represent some of the magmatic differentiation steps. The low-Ca magmatic series is representative of a typical fractionation of aegirine-augite (Wo36-29En25-4Ae39-18) + alkali feldspar (Or57-96Ab3-43) + nepheline (Ne76.5-69.0Ks19.9-14.4Qz15.1-7.7) + titanite from phonolite magma. The evolution of this series from potassic nepheline syenites to sodic sodalite syenites and sodalitolites is attributed to an extensive fractionation of potassic feldspar, which led to an increase of the NaCl activity in the melt during the final stages forming sodalite-rich rocks. Phonolite dykes followed a similar evolutionary process and also registered some crustal assimilation. The mesocratic nepheline syenites showed interactions with phlogopite melteigites, such as compatible trace element enrichments and the presence of diopside xenocrysts, which were interpreted to be due to a mixing/mingling process of phonolite and nephelinite magmas. The geochemical data show higher TiO2 and P2O5 contents and lower SiO2 contents for the high-Ca series and different LILE evolution trends

  10. Hydrothermal-flow regime and magmatic heat source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Williams, A.E.; Schiffman, P.

    1982-01-01

    This detailed three-dimensional model of the natural flow regime of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, before steam production began, is based on patterns of hydrothermal mineral zones and light stable isotopic ratios observed in rock samples from more than fifty deep wells, together with temperature gradients, wireline logs and other data. At the level so far penetrated by drilling, this hydrothermal system was heated by a thermal plume of water close to boiling, inclined at 45/sup 0/, rising from the northeast and discharging to the west. To the east a zone of cold water recharge overlies the inclined thermal plume. Fission track annealing studies shows that the reservoir reached 170/sup 0/C only 10/sup 4/ years ago. Oxygen isotope exchange data indicate that a 12 km/sup 3/ volume of rock subsequently reacted with three times its volume of water hotter than 200/sup 0/C. Averaged over the duration of the heating event this would require a flow velocity of about 6 m/year through the pores of a typical cross section of the reservoir having an average porosity of 10%. Although this is an extensional tectonic environment of leaky transform faulting in which repeated intrusions of basalt magma are likely, for simplicity of computation possible heat sources were modelled as simple two dimensional basalt intrusions of various sizes, shapes and locations. We have calculated a series of two-dimensional convective heat transfer models, with different heat sources and permeability distributions. The models which produce the best fit for the temperature distributions observed in the field today have in common a heat source which is a funnel-shaped basalt intrusion, 4 km wide at the top, emplaced at a depth of 5 km to 6 km about 40,000 to 50,000 years ago.

  11. The gravimetric picture of magmatic and hydrothermal sources driving hybrid unrest on Tenerife in 2004/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prutkin, Ilya; Vajda, Peter; Gottsmann, Jo

    2014-08-01

    We present results from the inversion of gravity changes observed at the central volcanic complex (CVC) of Tenerife, Canary Islands, between May 2004 and July 2005. Marking a period of elevated activity and a reawakening of the volcanic system, the data depict spatial and temporal variations in the sub-surface processes that defined this period of unrest at the Pico Viejo (PV)-Pico Teide (PT) complex, after the last volcanic eruption on Tenerife in 1909. An initial non-linear inversion, based on 3D line segments approximation, yielded three line segments at depths between 1 km a.s.l. and 2 km b.s.l. Our interpretation of the initial inversion results is that the line segments represent apparent composite sources, a superposition of deep and shallow seated sources. We therefore decomposed the gravity changes into shallow and deep parts (fields) using a procedure based on triple harmonic continuation. The shallow and deep fields could then be inverted separately, using the same inversion methodology. The deep field constrains two connected line segments at the depth of about 6 km b.s.l., in the center of the NW seismogenic zone of VT event swarm of the seismic unrest, that we interpret as magma input. The inversion of the shallow field images three weak line segments that are all situated at very shallow, near-surface depths. We interpret the weak segments as hydrothermal sources potentially excited by the deeper magma injection. Our results indicate no significant input into the shallow phonolitic plumbing system of the PV-PT complex, but rather a deeper-seated rejuvenation of the mafic feeder reservoir. The emerging picture from our analysis is that the 2004/5 unrest on Tenerife was of a hybrid nature due to the combination of a deep magma injection (failed eruption?) coupled with fluid migration to shallow depths. The identified causative link between deep and shallow unrest sources indicates the presence of permeable pathways for shallow fluid migration at the

  12. Transition of Mount Etna lavas from a mantle-plume to an island-arc magmatic source.

    PubMed

    Schiano, P; Clocchiatti, R; Ottolini, L; Busà, T

    2001-08-30

    Mount Etna lies near the boundary between two regions that exhibit significantly different types of volcanism. To the north, volcanism in the Aeolian island arc is thought to be related to subduction of the Ionian lithosphere. On Sicily itself, however, no chemical or seismological evidence of subduction-related volcanism exists, and so it is thought that the volcanism-including that on Mount Etna itself-stems from the upwelling of mantle material, associated with various surface tectonic processes. But the paucity of geological evidence regarding the primary composition of magma from Mount Etna means that its source characteristics remain controversial. Here we characterize the trace-element composition of a series of lavas emitted by Mount Etna over the past 500 kyr and preserved as melt inclusions inside olivine phenocrysts. We show that the compositional change in primary magmas from Mount Etna reflects a progressive transition from a predominantly mantle-plume source to one with a greater contribution from island-arc (subduction-related) basalts. We suggest that this is associated with southward migration of the Ionian slab, which is becoming juxtaposed with a mantle plume beneath Sicily. This implies that the volcanism of Mount Etna has become more calc-alkaline, and hence more explosive, during its evolution.

  13. Petrology, geochemistry and genesis of newly discovered Mesoproterozoic highly magnesian, calcite-rich kimberlites from Siddanpalli, Eastern Dharwar Craton, Southern India: products of subduction-related magmatic sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Dongre, A.; Kamde, G.; Srivastava, Rajesh K.; Sridhar, M.; Kaminsky, F. V.

    2010-03-01

    The Siddanpalli kimberlites constitute a newly discovered cluster (SKC) of Mesoproterozoic (1090 Ma) dykes occurring in the granite-greenstone terrain of the Gadwal area in the Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC), Southern India. They belong to coherent facies and contain serpentinized olivines (two generations), phlogopite, spinel, perovskite, ilmenite, apatite, carbonate and garnet xenocrysts. A peculiar feature of these kimberlites is the abundance of carbonate and limestone xenoliths of the eroded platformal Proterozoic (Purana) sedimentary cover of Kurnool/Bhima age. Chemically, the Siddanpalli dykes are the most magnesium-rich (up to 35 wt.% MgO) and silica-undersaturated (SiO2 < 35 wt.%) of all kimberlites described so far from the Eastern Dharwar Craton. The La/Yb ratio in the Siddanpalli kimberlites (64-105) is considerably lower than that in the other EDC kimberlites (108-145), primarily owing to their much higher HREE abundances. Since there is no evidence of any crustal contamination by granitic rocks we infer this to be a specific character of the magmatic source. A comparison of the REE geochemistry of the Siddanpalli kimberlites with petrogenetic models for southern African kimberlites suggests that they display involvement of a wide range in the degree of melting in their genesis. The different geochemical signatures of the SKC compared to the other known kimberlites in the EDC can be explained by a combination of factors involving: (i) higher degrees of partial melting; (ii) relatively shallower depths of derivation; (iii) possible involvement of subducted component in their mantle source region; and (iv) previous extraction of boninitic magmas from their geological domain.

  14. A-type magmatism in a syn-collisional setting: The case of the Pan-African Hook Batholith in Central Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Lorenzo; Lehmann, Jérémie; Naydenov, Kalin V.; Saalmann, Kerstin; Kinnaird, Judith A.; Daly, J. Stephen; Frei, Dirk; Lobo-Guerrero Sanz, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    The Pan-African Hook Batholith formed during the assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent as a result of syn-collisional stage interaction between the Congo and Kalahari Cratons. The bimodal magmatism (mafic to predominantly felsic) is characterized by both an alkali-calcic and an alkalic suite, with typical A-type, metaluminous, high Fe/Mg and K/Na geochemical signature. Occasionally, sodic granitoids have been documented. Compositions were driven to more differentiated products by fractional crystallization, while Sr-Nd isotopes exclude crustal assimilation during crystallization. Recent new U-Pb age data constrain most of the felsic magmatism between 550 and 540 Ma. Scattered outcrops of gabbroic rocks, both tholeiitic and alkaline, testify to periodic input of mantle material, and, in some cases, to interaction with metasomatizing fluids. Crystallization ages on mafic rocks span from 570 to 520 Ma, thus indicating that they were contemporaneous with the major granitic intrusion, which was the result of a number of successive felsic batches, eventually forming a coalescing batholith. Highly radiogenic Pb isotopic values attest to the radiogenic character of the rocks. Such an anomalous signature was acquired during, or soon after, magma emplacement, perhaps as result of metasomatizing fluids. Enrichment in Th-U of large portions of the crust along this part of the margin of the Congo Craton is suggested. Geochemical and isotopic evidence support the interaction between mantle components and portions of the deep crust at pressure of < 10 kbar, while decompression melting of rising asthenospheric mantle ponding at the base of the crust heated, and ultimately melted, crustal material. An additional and crucial contribution to the crustal melting was likely provided by internal radiogenic heat production of the thickened crust, and is in agreement with the high radioactivity of the pluton. A tectono-thermal model, implying crustal accretion accompanied by slab

  15. Feedback between deformation and magmatism in the Lloyds River Fault Zone: An example of episodic fault reactivation in an accretionary setting, Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissenberg, C. Johan; van Staal, Cees R.

    2006-08-01

    The Lloyds River Fault Zone is a 10-15 km wide amphibolite-grade shear zone that formed during the Ordovician Taconic Orogeny. It separates ophiolites and arc-back-arc complexes formed in Iapetus from a peri-Laurentian microcontinent (Dashwoods microcontinent). The Lloyds River Fault Zone comprises three high-strain zones, dominantly composed of mylonitic amphibolites, separated by less deformed plutonic rocks. Structural, age and metamorphic data suggest the Lloyds River Fault Zone accommodated sinistral-oblique underthrusting of ophiolites underneath the Dashwoods microcontinent prior to 471 ± 5 Ma at 800°C and 6 kbar. Plutonic rocks within the Lloyds River Fault Zone comprise two suites dated at 464 ± 2 plus 462 ± 2 and 459 ± 3 Ma, respectively. The younger age of the plutons with respect to some of the amphibolites, evidence for magmatic deformation, and the elongate nature of the plutons parallel to the Lloyds River Fault Zone suggest they were emplaced within the fault zone during deformation. Both intrusive episodes triggered renewed deformation at high temperatures (770-750°C), illustrating the positive feedback between deformation and magmatism. Offshoots of the plutons intruded undeformed ophiolitic gabbros outside the Lloyds River Fault Zone. Deformation localized within the intrusive sheets, coeval with static contact metamorphism of the host gabbros, leading to the development of new, small-scale shear zones. This illustrates that channeling of plutons into shear zones and nucleation of shear zones in melt-rich zones may occur simultaneously within the same fault system.

  16. Two mantle sources, two plumbing systems: Tholeiitic and alkaline magmatism of the Maymecha River basin, Siberian flood volcanic province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arndt, N.; Chauvel, C.; Czamanske, G.; Fedorenko, V.

    1998-01-01

    Rocks of two distinctly different magma series are found in a ???4000-m-thick sequence of lavas and tuffs in the Maymecha River basin which is part of the Siberian flood-volcanic province. The tholeiites are typical low-Ti continental flood basalts with remarkably restricted, petrologically evolved compositions. They have basaltic MgO contents, moderate concentrations of incompatible trace elements, moderate fractionation of incompatible from compatible elements, distinct negative Ta(Nb) anomalies, and ??Nd values of 0 to + 2. The primary magmas were derived from a relatively shallow mantle source, and evolved in large crustal magma chambers where they acquired their relatively uniform compositions and became contaminated with continental crust. An alkaline series, in contrast, contains a wide range of rock types, from meymechite and picrite to trachytes, with a wide range of compositions (MgO from 0.7 to 38 wt%, SiO2 from 40 to 69 wt%, Ce from 14 to 320 ppm), high concentrations of incompatible elements and extreme fractionation of incompatible from compatible elements (Al2O3/TiO2 ??? 1; Sm/Yb up to 11). These rocks lack Ta(Nb) anomalies and have a broad range of ??Nd values, from -2 to +5. The parental magmas are believed to have formed by low-degree melting at extreme mantle depths (>200 km). They bypassed the large crustal magma chambers and ascended rapidly to the surface, a consequence, perhaps, of high volatile contents in the primary magmas. The tholeiitic series dominates the lower part of the sequence and the alkaline series the upper part; at the interface, the two types are interlayered. The succession thus provides evidence of a radical change in the site of mantle melting, and the simultaneous operation of two very different crustal plumbing systems, during the evolution of this flood-volcanic province. ?? Springer-Verlag 1998.

  17. Magmatic systems of large continental igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    major series: (1) "green" - spinel peridotite (maily lherzolite) and minor spinel pyroxenite (websterites), and (2) "black" - wehrlite, Al-Ti-augite and hornblende clinopyroxenite, hornblendite, etc., and megacrysts of Al-Ti-augite, kaersutite, ilmenite, sanidine, etc. They often contain vesicles which evidence that their crystallization occurred from fluid-saturated melts. The rocks of this series form veins in peridotite matrix. So, two types of material participated in melting process: moderate-depleted peridotites and geochemical-enriched phase - fluid-saturated melts or high-density fluid. Because the both types of xenoliths are fragments of upper cooled rim of mantle plume head above magma-generation zone, we suggest that they together represent material, which composed plume head and accordingly - the melting substratum. At that the fluid phase exactly provided specific composition of basaltic melts at the initial stages of LIPs development, typical for intraplate settings. The middle level of magmatic systems is represented by transitional magmatic chambers (now large layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions), where newly-formed magmas were accumulated, undergone by crystallizing differentiation, mixing and crustal contamination. Such transformed in a variable degree magmas continued their way to surface led to general diversity of magmatic rocks, erupted on the surface; contribution of subvolcanic magmatic chambers was, probably, small. So, systematic study of processes in LIPs' magmatic systems as a whole can help to reveal processes of primary magmas transformation and thereby to determine their initial composition and source material.

  18. Cenozoic magmatism of north Victoria Land, Antarctica: an experimental study on the mantle source of a primary basanite from the McMurdo Volcanic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Freda, C.; Misiti, V.; Perinelli, C.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes of the McMurdo Vocanic Group (MMVG) (Antarctica) dot the eastern shoulder of Ross Sea Rift System giving rise to alkaline transitional volcanic suites which in north Victoria Land are emplaced since Early Cenozoic. Geochemical geological, geophysical and geochronological data on Cenozoic volcanic activity in NVL suggest that the region is a site of passive astenospheric rise, rather than affected by a thermally active mantle plume. Furthermore the comparison of geochemical and isotopical data of basic lavas with those provided by mantle xenoliths they carry to the surface, document the compositional heterogeneity of sublithospheric mantle caused by the coupled action of partial melting and metasomatism. In particular the metasomatic episode is probably linked to the amagmatic extensional event that affected the West Antarctic Rift System in the Late Cretaceous. The astenospheric melts generated during this event, moving through the upper mantle, can have crystallized as veins or may have led to the formation of metasomatic minerals such as amphibole or phlogopite. In this scenario the mineralogical and chemical composition of sources responsible for Cenozoic magmatism, amphibole-bearing spinel-peridotite versus pyroxenite in the garnet stability field, it is still a matter of debate. To shed light on this argument a previous experimental study on a basanite of MMVG, representative of primary magma (Orlando et al., 2000) has been integrated with new experimental investigation on the same basanitic composition. The preliminary experiments were conducted to pressures of 1.0 - 2.0GPa in the presence of 0-1% of added water and indicate olivine on the liquidus at 1.0 GPa that is substitute by clinopyroxene at 2.0GPa. The addition of 1% of water induces a decrease of liquidus temperature of about 40°C shifting its value in the T range (1280-1310°C) the same that was inferred by melt inclusions hosted in the olivine phenocrysts of the studied basanite.

  19. Permian to Triassic I to S-type magmatic switch in the northeast Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and adjacent regions, Colombian Caribbean: Tectonic setting and implications within Pangea paleogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Garzón, A.; Montes, C.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Late Paleozoic to Triassic tectonics of northwestern South America have major implications for the understanding of Laurentia-Gondwana interactions that formed Pangea, and the origin of several tectonostratigraphic terranes dispersed by the break-up of this supercontinent during the formation of the Caribbean. Two mylonitic and orthogneissic granitoid suites have been recognized in the northeastern segment of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, the lower Magdalena basin and the Guajira Serranias, within the Caribbean region of Colombia. For the Santa Marta region U/Pb LAM-ICP-MS analysis yielded zircon crystallization ages of 288.1 ± 4.5 Ma, 276.5 ± 5,1 Ma and 264.9 ± 4.0 Ma, related to the magmatic intrusion. Geochemical and modal variations show a compositional spectrum between diorite and granite, whereas LREE enrichment, Ti and Nb anomalies and geochemical discrimination suggest that this granitoid suite was formed within a magmatic arc setting. Inherited zircons suggest that this Early Permian plutonism was formed with the participation of Neoproterozoic and Grenvillian basement proximal to the South American continent. Evidence of a superimposed Early Triassic (ca. 250 Ma) deformational event in Santa Marta, together with a well defined S-type magmatism in the basement rocks from the adjacent lower Magdalena Valley and Guajira Peninsula regions are related to a major shift in the regional tectonic evolution. It's envisioned that this event records either terrane accretion or strong plate coupling during the final stages of Pangea agglutination. Connections with the main Alleghanian-Ouachitan Pangean orogen are precluded due to their timing differences. The plutons temporally and compositionally correlate with an arc found in the northern Andes and Mexican Gondwana terranes, and represent a broader magmatic event formed at the proto-Pacific margin, outside the nucleus of the Laurentia-Gondwana Alleghanian-Oachitan orogens. Evidence of lower temperature

  20. Mantle source heterogeneity and magmatic evolution at Carlsberg Ridge (3.7°N): constrains from elemental and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Pb) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling; Tang, Limei; Yu, Xing; Dong, Yanhui

    2016-12-01

    We present new major element, ICP-MS trace element, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data of basalts from four locations along the Carlsberg Ridge (CR), northern Indian Ocean. The basalts are low-K tholeiites with 7.52-9.51 wt% MgO, 49.40-50.60 wt% SiO2, 0.09-0.27 wt% K2O, 2.55-2.90 wt% Na2O, and 0.60-0.68 Mg#. Trace element contents of the basalts show characteristics similar to those of average normal MORB, such as LREE depleted patterns with (La/Sm)N ratio of 0.55-0.69; however, some samples are enriched in large-ion lithophile elements such as K and Rb, suggesting probable modification of the mantle source. Poor correlations between the compatible elements [e.g. Ni, Cr, and Sr (related to olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase, respectively)] and the incompatible elements (e.g. Zr and Y), and positive correlations in the Zr versus Zr/Y and Nb versus Nb/Y plots suggest a magmatic evolution controlled mainly by mantle melting rather than fractional crystallization. Our results extend the CR basalt range to higher radiogenic Pb isotopes and lower 143Nd/144Nd. These basalts and basalts from the northern Indian Ocean Ridge show lower 143Nd/144Nd and higher 87Sr/86Sr values than those of the depleted mantle (DM), defining a trend towards pelagic sediment composition. The Pb isotopic ratios of basalts from CR 3-4°N lie along the compositional mixing lines between the DM and the upper continental crust. However, the low radiogenic Pb of basalts from CR 9-10°N lie on the mixing line between the DM and lower continental crust. Since the Pb isotopic ratio of MORB would decrease if the source mantle was contaminated by continental lithospheric mantle, we suggest that CR contains continental lithospheric material, resulting in heterogeneous mantle beneath different ridge segments. The continental lithospheric material was introduced into the asthenosphere before or during the breakup of the Gondwana. These results support the long-term preservation of continental material in the

  1. The Timing of Early Magmatism and Extension in the Southern East African Rift: Tracking Geochemical Source Variability with 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology at the Rungwe Volcanic Province, SW Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, G. T.; Class, C.; Maqway, M. D.; Boniface, N.; Manya, S.; Hemming, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Rungwe Volcanic Province is the southernmost expression of volcanism in the East African Rift System. Rungwe magmatism is focused in a transfer zone between two weakly extended rift segments, unlike more developed rifts where magmatism occurs along segment axes (e.g. mid-ocean ridges). Rungwe was selected as the site of the multinational SEGMeNT project, an integrated geophysical, geochronological and geochemical study to determine the role of magmatism during early stage continental rifting. Argon geochronology is underway for an extensive collection of Rungwe volcanic rocks to date the eruptive sequence with emphasis on the oldest events. The age and location of the earliest events remains contested, but is critical to evaluating the relationship between magmatism and extension. Dated samples are further analyzed to model the geochemistry and isotopic signature of each melt's source and define it as lithospheric, asthenospheric, or plume. Given the goals, the geochronology focuses on mafic lavas most likely to preserve the geochemical signature of the mantle source. Groundmass was prepared and analyzed at the LDEO AGES lab. Twelve preliminary dates yield ages from 8.5 to 5.7Ma, consistent with prior results, supporting an eruptive episode concurrent with tectonic activity on the Malawi and Rukwa border faults (Ebinger et al., JGR 1989; 1993). Three additional samples yield ages from 18.51 to 17.6 Ma, consistent with the 18.6 ±1.0 Ma age obtained by Rasskazov et al. (Russ. Geology & Geophys. 2003). This eruptive episode is spatially limited to phonolite domes in the Usangu Basin and a mafic lava flow on the uplifted Mbeya Block. These eruptions predate the current tectonic extensional structure, suggesting magmatism predates extension, or that the two are not highly interdependent. No Rungwe samples dated yet can be the source of the of 26Ma carbonatitic tuffs in the nearby Songwe River Basin sequence (Roberts et al., Nature Geoscience 2012). Isochron ages

  2. The Interplay Between Saline Fluid Flow and Dynamic Permeability in Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, P.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits document the interplay between saline fluid flow and rock permeability. Numerical simulations of multi-phase flow of variably miscible, compressible H20-NaCl fluids in concert with a dynamic permeability model can reproduce characteristics of porphyry copper and epithermal gold systems. This dynamic permeability model incorporates depth-dependent permeability profiles characteristic for tectonically active crust as well as pressure- and temperature-dependent relationships describing hydraulic fracturing and the transition from brittle to ductile rock behavior. In response to focused expulsion of magmatic fluids from a crystallizing upper crustal magma chamber, the hydrothermal system self-organizes into a hydrological divide, separating an inner part dominated by ascending magmatic fluids under near-lithostatic pressures from a surrounding outer part dominated by convection of colder meteoric fluids under near-hydrostatic pressures. This hydrological divide also provides a mechanism to transport magmatic salt through the crust, and prevents the hydrothermal system to become "clogged" by precipitation of solid halite due to depressurization of saline, high-temperature magmatic fluids. The same physical processes at similar permeability ranges, crustal depths and flow rates are relevant for a number of active systems, including geothermal resources and excess degassing at volcanos. The simulations further suggest that the described mechanism can separate the base of free convection in high-enthalpy geothermal systems from the magma chamber as a driving heat source by several kilometers in the vertical direction in tectonic settings with hydrous magmatism. This hydrology would be in contrast to settings with anhydrous magmatism, where the base of the geothermal systems may be closer to the magma chamber.

  3. Magmatism in the Carolina terrane: Isotopic evidence for a Grenville-age source for Late Proterozoic volcanics and a mantle source for Silurian Concord syenite

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuch, M.; Heatherington, A.L.; Mueller, P.A. . Dept. of Geology); Offield, T.W.; Koeppen, R.P.; Klein, T.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Rhyolitic to andesitic volcanic rocks from the central portion of the Carolina slate belt in North Carolina were analyzed for Sr and Nd isotopic composition and dated by U-Pb zircon geochronology. Samples were from the greenschist-facies Late Proterozoic Albemarle Group, Uwharrie Formation, and the informal Virginia sequence. A rhyolite from the Cid Formation of the Albemarle Group dated by U-Pb zircon geochronology yielded a Pb-207/Pb-206 age of 575 [+-] 7.6 Ma, consistent with its position below strata containing the Late Proterozoic trace fossil Pteridinium and above rocks previously dated at 586 [+-] 10 Ma. Rb-Sr isotopic analyses of late Proterozoic rocks showed average initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of approximately 0.704, indicating a moderately depleted source for these samples. E[sub ND] values at 600 Ma are moderately positive (+0.7 [minus] +2.3) and T(DM) values range from 1.19--1.04 Ga. These isotopic data, along with major and trace element data, suggest that andesites and rhyolites of the Carolina slate belt may have formed by partial melting of attenuated, Grenville-aged continental lithosphere during a 600 Ma episode of arc volcanism. In contrast, Sr and Nd data for the younger ([approximately]400 Ma) Concord pluton indicate it was derived from a depleted mantle source (Sr-87/Sr-86 = 0.7021 and E[sub ND] = +0.4 at 400 Ma) without significant involvement of older lithosphere (T(DM) = 370 Ma).

  4. An overview of the volatile systematics of the Lau Basin - Resolving the effects of source variation, magmatic degassing and crustal contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Doshik; Hilton, David R.; Castillo, Paterno R.; Hawkins, James W.; Hanan, Barry B.; Hauri, Erik H.

    2012-05-01

    The Lau Basin erupts lavas with a range of geochemical features reflecting a complex history of interaction involving different mantle sources. The Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) and Mangatolu Triple Junction (MTJ) region have lavas with arc-like characteristics, Niuafo'ou Island (NV), Peggy Ridge and Central and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers (PR, CLSC and ELSC) erupt mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-like volcanics, whereas the Rochambeau Bank (RB) has features akin to ocean island basalt (OIB). To characterize the volatile systematics of these various regions, we report a comprehensive study of 39 submarine lavas from these various eruptive centers encompassing analyses of the noble gases (He, Ne, and Ar) and carbon (CO2) - both isotopes and abundances - together with other major volatile phases (H2O, S, Cl, and F). Helium isotope ratios of the NV, MTJ, CLSC, and ELSC are MORB-like for the most part except for differentiated lavas that tend to have lower, more radiogenic 3He/4He values. The RB has considerably higher 3He/4He ratios (up to 23 RA in this work) which extend as far south as the PR. The influence of 'plume-like' sources in the RB is also apparent in Ne isotopes: RB samples follow a trend similar to Hawaiian basalts in 3-isotope neon space. However, RB lavas have lower 40Ar/36Ar (300-730) and higher [36Ar] than CLSC and ELSC, suggesting greater air contamination. Elemental He/Ne ratios (3He/22NeS and 4He/21Ne∗ where S = solar and * = nucleogenic) are high throughout the Lau Basin and identify the Lau mantle as one of only two high 3He/4He provinces worldwide with such an enrichment of He relative to Ne. Magmatic CO2 and δ13C fall in the range 7-350 ppm and -28‰ to -6‰, respectively. RB lavas have less [CO2] and slightly lower δ13C than CLSC and ELSC. The lowest values are found among MTJ lavas. These lavas also have the highest [H2O], [F], [Cl], and [S] whereas the PR, ELSC and CLSC have the lowest. RB has intermediate [H2O]. We estimate primary [CO2] in

  5. Physics Mining of Multi-Source Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helly, John; Karimabadi, Homa; Sipes, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Powerful new parallel data mining algorithms can produce diagnostic and prognostic numerical models and analyses from observational data. These techniques yield higher-resolution measures than ever before of environmental parameters by fusing synoptic imagery and time-series measurements. These techniques are general and relevant to observational data, including raster, vector, and scalar, and can be applied in all Earth- and environmental science domains. Because they can be highly automated and are parallel, they scale to large spatial domains and are well suited to change and gap detection. This makes it possible to analyze spatial and temporal gaps in information, and facilitates within-mission replanning to optimize the allocation of observational resources. The basis of the innovation is the extension of a recently developed set of algorithms packaged into MineTool to multi-variate time-series data. MineTool is unique in that it automates the various steps of the data mining process, thus making it amenable to autonomous analysis of large data sets. Unlike techniques such as Artificial Neural Nets, which yield a blackbox solution, MineTool's outcome is always an analytical model in parametric form that expresses the output in terms of the input variables. This has the advantage that the derived equation can then be used to gain insight into the physical relevance and relative importance of the parameters and coefficients in the model. This is referred to as physics-mining of data. The capabilities of MineTool are extended to include both supervised and unsupervised algorithms, handle multi-type data sets, and parallelize it.

  6. Age and nature of Triassic magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex, West Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Max; White, Lloyd T.

    2016-12-01

    We report field observations together with petrological, geochemical and geochronological data from granitoids of the Netoni Intrusive Complex of West Papua. Until now, our knowledge of the timing of granitic magmatism in this region has been limited to a wide range of ages (241-6.7 Ma) obtained from K-Ar measurements of hornblende, biotite and plagioclase, primarily from samples of river detritus. We collected in situ samples along several traverses into the intrusive complex to: (1) develop a better understanding of the lithologies within the intrusive complex; and (2) determine the timing of magmatism using U-Pb dating of zircon. We also dated zircons from two river sand samples to identify other potential pulses of magmatism that may have been missed due to a sampling bias. The zircons extracted from the river sands yield age spectra similar to those obtained from the in situ samples. The combined data demonstrate that magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex occurred between 248 Ma and 213 Ma. The petrological and geochemical data indicate that the granitoids were most likely emplaced in an ocean-continent (Andean style) subduction setting. This builds on previous work which suggests that a magmatic belt extended along eastern Gondwana (now New Guinea and eastern Australia) throughout much of the Paleozoic. The volcanic ejecta that were produced along this arc and the subsequent erosion of the mountain chain are a potential source of detritus for Triassic and younger sedimentary rocks in New Guinea, eastern Indonesia and north/northwestern Australia.

  7. Source and mode of the Permian Panjal Trap magmatism: Evidence from zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes and trace element data from the Himalayan ultrahigh-pressure rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Lee, Hao-Yang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Khan, Tahseenullah; O'Brien, Patrick J.; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated study of LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age, Hf isotopes, and trace element geochemistry of zircons from the Himalayan eclogites (mafic rocks) and their host gneisses (felsic rocks) from the Kaghan Valley in Pakistan in order to understand the source and mode of their magmatic protoliths and the effect of metamorphism. Zircons from the so-called Group I (high-pressure) eclogites yielded U-Pb mean ages of 259 ± 10 Ma (MSWD = 0.74), whereas those of Group II (ultrahigh-pressure) eclogites yielded 48 ± 3 Ma (MSWD = 0.71). In felsic gneisses the central or core domains of zircons yielded ages similar to those from Group I eclogites but zircon overgrowth domains yielded 47 ± 1 Ma (MSWD = 1.9). Trace element data suggest a magmatic origin for Group I-derived (having Th/U ratios: > 0.5) and metamorphic origin for Group II-derived (Th/U < 0.07) zircons, respectively. Zircon Hf isotope data, obtained from the same dated spots, show positive initial 176Hf/177Hf isotopic ratios referred to as "ƐHf(t)" of around + 10 in Group I eclogites; + 7 in Group II eclogites; and + 8 in felsic gneisses zircons, respectively, thus indicate a juvenile mantle source for the protolith rocks (Panjal Traps) with almost no contribution from the ancient crustal material. The similar ƐHf(t) values, identical protolith ages and trace element compositions of zircons in felsic (granites or rhyolites) and mafic (basalt and dolerite) rocks attest to a bimodal magmatism accounting for the Panjal Traps during the Permian. Later, during India-Asia collision in Eocene times, both the felsic and mafic lithologies were subducted to mantle-depths (> 90 km: coesite-stable) and experienced ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism before their final exhumation.

  8. Sources of Artefacts in Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becek, K.; Borkowski, A.

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, much attention has been devoted to digital elevation models (DEMs) produced using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). This has been triggered by the relative novelty of the InSAR method and its world-famous product—the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM. However, much less attention, if at all, has been paid to sources of artefacts in SRTM. In this work, we focus not on the missing pixels (null pixels) due to shadows or the layover effect, but rather on outliers that were undetected by the SRTM validation process. The aim of this study is to identify some of the causes of the elevation outliers in SRTM. Such knowledge may be helpful to mitigate similar problems in future InSAR DEMs, notably the ones currently being developed from data acquired by the TanDEM-X mission. We analysed many cross-sections derived from SRTM. These cross-sections were extracted over the elevation test areas, which are available from the Global Elevation Data Testing Facility (GEDTF) whose database contains about 8,500 runways with known vertical profiles. Whenever a significant discrepancy between the known runway profile and the SRTM cross-section was detected, a visual interpretation of the high-resolution satellite image was carried out to identify the objects causing the irregularities. A distance and a bearing from the outlier to the object were recorded. Moreover, we considered the SRTM look direction parameter. A comprehensive analysis of the acquired data allows us to establish that large metallic structures, such as hangars or car parking lots, are causing the outliers. Water areas or plain wet terrains may also cause an InSAR outlier. The look direction and the depression angle of the InSAR system in relation to the suspected objects influence the magnitude of the outliers. We hope that these findings will be helpful in designing the error detection routines of future InSAR or, in fact, any microwave aerial- or space-based survey. The

  9. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  10. What olivine and clinopyroxene mineral chemistry and melt inclusion study can tell us about magmatic processes in a post-collisional setting. Examples from the Miocene-Quaternary East Carpathian volcanic chain, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Mason, Paul R. D.

    2015-04-01

    Calc-alkaline magmatism occurred along the easternmost margin of Tisia-Dacia at the contact with East European Platform forming the Călimani-Gurghiu- Harghita volcanic chain. Its northern part represented by Călimani-Gurghiu-North Harghita (CGNH hereafter) is showing a diminishing age and volume southwards at 10-3.9 Ma. This marks the end of subduction-related magmatism along the post-collision front of the European convergent plate margin. Magma generation was associated with progressive break-off of a subducted slab and asthenosphere uprise. Fractionation and crustal assimilation were typical CGNH volcanic chain. The rocks show homogeneous 87Sr/86Sr, but a linear trend of Th/Y vs Nb/Y that reflects a common mantle source considered to be the metasomatized lithospheric mantle wedge. Fractionation and/or assimilation-fractional crystallization are characteristic for each main volcanic area, suggestive of lower to middle crust magma chamber processes. The South Harghita (SH) volcanic area represents direct continuation of the CGNH volcanic chain. Here at ca. 3 Ma following a time-gap, magma compositions changed to adakite-like calc-alkaline and continued until recent times (< 0.03 Ma). This volcanism was interrupted at ~1.6-1.8 Ma by simultaneous generation of Na- and K-alkalic varieties in nearby areas, suggestive of various sources and melting mechanisms, closely related to the hanging block beneath Vrancea seismic zone. The specific geochemistry is revealed by higher Nb/Y and Th/Y ratios and lower 87Sr/86Sr as compared to the CGNH chain. Identification of primitive magmas has been difficult despite the fact that this volcanic area contains more basalts than any other in the Carpathian-Pannonian region. Since the most primitive rocks represent the best opportunity to identify the trace element composition of the mantle source beneath the East Carpathian volcanic chain we use mineral and melt inclusions in olivine and composition of the most primitive

  11. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Heyu; Qu Xiaochao; Liang Jimin; He Xiaowei; Chen Xueli; Yang Da'an; Tian Jie

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  12. "Fingerprinting" tectono-magmatic provenance using trace elements in igneous zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. B.; Wooden, J. L.; Cheadle, M. J.; John, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over 5300 recent SHRIMP-RG analyses of trace elements (TE) in igneous zircon have been compiled and classified based on their original tectono-magmatic setting to empirically evaluate "geochemical fingerprints" unique to those settings. Immobile element geochemical fingerprints used for lavas are applied with the same rational to zircon, including consideration of mineral competition on zircon TE ratios, and new criteria for distinguishing mid-ocean ridge (MOR), magmatic arc, and ocean island (and other plume-influenced) settings are proposed. The elemental ratios in zircon effective for fingerprinting tectono-magmatic provenance are systematically related to lava composition from equivalent settings. Existing discrimination diagrams using zircon U/Yb versus Hf or Y do not distinguish TE-enriched ocean island settings (i.e., Iceland, Hawaii) from magmatic arc settings. However, bivariate diagrams with combined cation ratios involving U-Nb-Sc-Yb-Gd-Ce provide a more complete distinction of zircon from these settings. On diagrams of U/Yb versus Nb/Yb, most MOR, ocean island, and kimberlite zircon define a broad "mantle-zircon array"; arc zircon defines a parallel array offset to higher U/Yb. Distinctly low U/Yb ratios of MOR zircon (typically <0.1) mirror their parental magmas and long-term incompatible element depletion of the MORB mantle. Plume-influenced sources are distinguished from MOR by higher U/Yb, U/Nb, Nb/Yb, and Nb/Sc. For zircon with U/Yb > 0.1, high Sc/Yb separates arc settings from low-Sc/Yb plume-influenced sources. The slope of scandium enrichment trends in zircon differ between MOR and continental arc settings, likely reflecting the involvement of amphibole during melt differentiation. Scandium is thus also critical for discriminating provenance, but its behavior in zircon probably reflects contrasting melt fractionation trends between tholeiitic and calc-alkaline systems more than compositional differences in primitive magmas sourced at each

  13. Syn- and post-orogenic alkaline magmatism in a continental arc: Along-strike variations in the composition, source, and timing of igneous activity in the Ross Orogen, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Peter, G.; Cottle, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Neoproterozoic-Paleozoic convergence and subduction along the margin of East Gondwana (Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica) resulted in a belt of deformed and metamorphosed sedimentary rocks and batholith-scale igneous intrusions comparable in size to the present day Andes. Mid-crustal levels of this belt, known as the Ross Orogen in Antarctica, are exposed in the basement of the Cenozoic Transantarctic Mountains, providing snapshots of the intrusive magma system of a major continental arc. Whole rock major- and trace-element geochemistry, Hf isotopes in zircon, and U-Pb geochronology have identified along-strike variations in the composition, source, and timing of magmatism along ~200 km of the southern Victoria Land segment of the orogen. There is an apparent younging of the igneous activity from south to north. New U-Pb ages for intrusive rocks from the Koettlitz Glacier Alkaline Province (KGAP) reveal that igneous activity spanned ca. 565-500 Ma (~30 m.y. longer than previously recognized), while immediately to the north in the Dry Valleys area most igneous activity was confined to a relatively short period (ca. 515-495 Ma). Alkaline and subalkaline igneous rocks occur in both the Dry Valleys area and the KGAP, but alkaline rocks in the Dry Valleys are restricted to the latest phase of magmatism. Na-alkaline rocks in the KGAP, including nepheline syenites, carbonatites, and A-type granites, range in age from ca. 545-500 Ma and overlap in age with more typical subduction/collision-related I- and S-type granites elsewhere in southern Victoria Land. Strong enrichments in the LILE and LREE and high LILE/HFSE and LREE/HREE of samples from the KGAP reveal a source enriched in aqueous-mobile elements, potentially a strongly metasomatized mantle wedge beneath the arc. In the Dry Valleys area, rocks with alkali-calcic composition constitute only the youngest intrusions (505-495 Ma), apparently reflecting a shift to post-orogenic magmatism. Zircons from Dry Valleys

  14. Brazil's premier gold province. Part I: The tectonic, magmatic, and structural setting of the Archean Rio das Velhas greenstone belt, Quadrilátero Ferrífero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Lydia; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Luiz; Zucchetti, Márcia; Noce, Carlos; Baltazar, Orivaldo; da Silva, Luiz; Pinto, Claiton

    2001-07-01

    Quadrilátero Ferrífero region. Deformation related to the west-vergent thrust-and-fold belts of the Brasiliano orogeny is recognized at the eastern margin of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero region. Defining structures as Archean, Trans-Amazonian, and Brasiliano in age is still difficult, although it is accepted that the gold-related Archean structures are best preserved in the central and western parts of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero. The principal source for the Rio das Velhas sedimentary rocks was probably the trondhjemite-tonalite-granodiorite crust that formed in multiple episodes after ~3,500 Ma, and was widely metamorphosed and intruded at 2,880-2,850 Ma. Felsic volcanism at 2,772±6 Ma formed the Rio das Velhas greenstone belt. The volcanic succession was a source for some overlying sedimentary rock units, as indicated by the presence of detrital zircons dated at 2,777-2,771 Ma. Strongly foliated granitic plutons range between 2,712+5/-4 and 2,698±18 Ma. The age of gold mineralization is inferred between 2,698 and 2,670 Ma. A metamorphic overprint during the Trans-Amazonian orogeny is estimated at ~2,050 Ma. There is evidence of local isotopic disturbances because of post-Trans-Amazonian tectonic events, at ~1.8-1.7 and 0.6 Ga.

  15. Melt source and evolution of I-type granitoids in the SE Tibetan Plateau: Late Cretaceous magmatism and mineralization driven by collision-induced transtensional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Qiang; Deng, Jun; Dilek, Yildirim; Meng, Jian-Yin; Gao, Xue; Santosh, M.; Wang, Da; Yan, Han

    2016-02-01

    We report new whole-rock geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope and zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotope data of the Hongshan intrusive suite in the Triassic Yidun Terrane, eastern Tibet. These data allow us to explore the possible causative links between the magmatism and the coeval Cu-Mo mineralization in the region. The Hongshan intrusive rocks have SiO2 of 65.06-73.60 wt.%, K2O of 3.17-6.41 wt.%, and P2O5 of 0.11-0.39 wt.%, enriched in Rb, Th, and U, and depleted in Ba, Sr, P, Ti, Nb, and Eu. These rocks are of high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonite series, showing geochemical signatures of metaluminous to slightly peraluminous I-type granite. Magmatic zircons separated from four samples yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 79 ± 0.7 Ma, 78 ± 0.5 Ma, 77 ± 0.8 Ma, and 76 ± 0.8 Ma. Low MgO (0.42-1.47 wt%), low HREE and Y, varying εHf(t) (- 9.5 to - 2.2), and negative εNd(t) (- 7.7 to - 5.8) suggest that magmas of the late Cretaceous Hongshan plutons were most likely generated by partial melting and mixing of ~ 20% juvenile lower crust-derived melts, represented by the ca. 215 Ma basaltic andesite from the southern Yidun Terrane, with ancient basement-derived melts represented by the Baoshan S-type granitic melts from the Zhongza Block. We consider that partial melting processes are capable of removing chalcophile elements (such as Cu) and leaving siderophile metals (such as Mo) as residue in the lower crust of the Yidun Terrane, consequently inducing porphyry Cu-Mo mineralization. This consideration enables us to propose that the Triassic subduction-modified, copper-rich lithosphere was crucial for the giant copper mineralization that occurred in the Yidun Terrane during the late Cretaceous. Lithospheric-scale, transtensional faulting, developed as a result of collision-induced escape tectonics in SE Tibet, triggered asthenospheric upwelling, which in turn caused intra-plate extension and magmatism during the late Cretaceous, forming the Hongshan and coeval I

  16. Chromites from the Gogoł;ów-Jordanów Serpentinite Massif (SW Poland) - evidence of the arc setting magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtulek, Piotr; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Bukała, Michał

    2014-05-01

    The Gogołów-Jordanów Serpentinite Massif (GJSM) is a peridotitic member of the Variscan Ślęża Ophiolite (SW Poland). Chromitite veinlets and pockets occur in the central part of the massif in the Czernica Hill area within completely serpentinized rocks. Chromitites consist of rounded chromite grains up to 4 cm and chlorite filling the interstices. The veins are embedded in serpentine-olivine-chlorite aggregates. Chemical composition of chromite occurring in chromitites defines two varieties. Chromite I (Cr# = 0.49 - 0.58) contains 23.32 - 28.36 wt.% Al2O3, 40.29 - 48.10 wt.% Cr2O3, 15.10 - 15.50 wt.% FeO, 14.50 - 15.50 wt.% MgO and ~0.1 wt.% TiO2. Chromite II (Cr# = 0.71 - 0.73) contains 13.83 - 15.24 wt.% Al2O3, 54.85 - 56.65 wt.% Cr2O3, 16.71 - 18.04 wt.% FeO, 10.62 - 11.59 wt.% MgO and 0.1 wt.% TiO2. Chromite grains are composed mostly of chromite I. Chromite II forms irregular spongy domains up to 150 µm, located at fissures or forming grain rims. The bulk chromitite composition of the massive ores reveals Rb, Ba, Pb and Sb enrichment relative to primitive mantle; Pt and Pd (up to 36 ppb) are also enriched relative to primitive mantle. Other phases coexisting with chromite are chlorite and olivine. Chlorite (Fe# = 0.02) contains 17.5 - 23.0 wt.% Al2O3, 0.6 - 1.8 wt.% Cr2O3 and 31.8 - 34.2 wt.% MgO. Olivine (Fo93.5-96.2) contains 0.44- 0.51 wt.% NiO. Olivine grains are zoned - the low-forsteritic cores are surrounded by high-forsteritic domain. Chromite II and chlorite are secondary phases and were probably formed due to greenschist facies metamorphism. Chromitites are cumuletes of melt blocked during its flow through peridotitic host. Low TiO2 content and moderate chromian number of the GJSM chromitites is typical for chromian spinels originated from melt derived from back arc depleted source (cf. Python et al., 2008, Gonzalez-Jimenez, 2011). The GJSM chromitites are rich in Al and poor in Pt and Pd what is typical for chromitites occurring in the

  17. Modelling the role of magmatic intrusions in the post-breakup thermal evolution of Volcanic Passive Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peace, Alexander; McCaffrey, Ken; Imber, Jonny; van Hunen, Jeroen; Hobbs, Richard; Gerdes, Keith

    2013-04-01

    Passive margins are produced by continental breakup and subsequent seafloor spreading, leaving a transition from continental to oceanic crust. Magmatism is associated with many passive margins and produces diagnostic criteria that include 1) abundant breakup related magmatism resulting in a thick igneous crust, 2) a high velocity zone in the lower crust and 3) seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs) in seismic studies. These Volcanic Passive Margins (VPMs) represent around 75% of the Atlantic passive margins, but beyond this high level description, these magma-rich settings remain poorly understood and present numerous challenges to petroleum exploration. In VPMs the extent to which the volume, timing, location and emplacement history of magma has played a role in controlling heat flow and thermal evolution during margin development remains poorly constrained. Reasons for this include; 1) paucity of direct heat flow and thermal gradient measurements at adequate depth ranges across the margins, 2) poor onshore exposure 3) highly eroded flood basalts and 4) poor seismic imaging beneath thick offshore basalt sequences. As a result, accurately modelling the thermal history of the basins located on VPMs is challenging, despite the obvious importance for determining the maturation history of potential source rocks in these settings. Magmatism appears to have affected the thermal history of the Vøring Basin on the Norwegian VPM, in contrast the effects on the Faeroe-Shetland Basin was minimal. The more localised effects in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin compared to Vøring Basin may be explained by the fact that the main reservoir sandstones appear to be synchronous with thermal uplift along the basin margin and pulsed volcanism, indicating that the bulk of the magmatism occurred at the basin extremities in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin, where its effect on source maturation was lessened. Our hypothesis is that source maturation occurs as a result of regional temperature and pressure

  18. Late Triassic syn-exhumation magmatism in central Qiangtang, Tibet: Evidence from the Sangehu adakitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Wang, Bao-di; Ma, Long; Gao, Rui; Chen, Li; Li, Xiao-bo; Wang, Li-quan

    2016-12-01

    The geodynamic setting of Late Triassic magmatic activity along the Longmu Co-Shuanghu suture zone (LSSZ) in central Qiangtang, Tibet is a matter of debate. This paper presents zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages, zircon Hf isotopic compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data for the Sangehu (SGH) granitic intrusion in central Qiangtang, and addresses the petrogenesis of Late Triassic magmatism, and the history of collision between the northern and southern Qiangtang terranes. The SGH pluton consists mainly of biotite adamellite with mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs), and small amounts of K-feldspar granite. The biotite adamellite, MMEs, and K-feldspar granite give ages of 207.8 ± 3.0 Ma, 212.4 ± 31 Ma, and 211.6 ± 3.8 Ma, respectively. The MMEs show magmatic textures and acicular apatite, and are coeval with the host biotite adamellite, suggesting they were produced by magma mixing. All samples from the SGH pluton show high Sr and low Y contents, and positive Eu anomalies, similar to adakitic rocks. The high K2O contents and low Mg#, Cr, and Ni contents, and enriched Hf isotopic characteristics of the zircons indicate that these magmas were derived from the partial melting of thickened crust. However, the whole-rock geochemical data and zircon Hf isotopic compositions also reveal heterogeneity at the source. The combined magmatic and metamorphic records suggest that Triassic magmatic activity in central Qiangtang was closely related to the collision of the northern and southern Qiangtang terranes. The large-scale Late Triassic (225-200 Ma) magmatic event in central Qiangtang may have resulted from the breakoff of the Longmu Co-Shuanghu Tethys Ocean lithospheric slab in the early Late Triassic (236-230 Ma). The Late Triassic magmatic rocks, including adakitic rocks, are coeval with retrograde high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks in central Qiangtang, and show characteristics of syn-exhumation magmatism. The early adakitic rocks (>220 Ma

  19. Uralian magmatism: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fershtater, G. B.; Montero, P.; Borodina, N. S.; Pushkarev, E. V.; Smirnov, V. N.; Bea, F.

    1997-07-01

    This paper is an attempt to summarize current knowledge of Uralian magmatism, focusing on those aspects relevant for understanding its geodynamic evolution. The Urals consist of three tectonomagmatic domains: a Suture Sector, in the west, and two N-S imbricated Island-Arc Continental Sectors in the east. The Suture Sector comprises lower Palaeozoic mafic-ultramafic complexes which show eastward impoverishment in LILE, thus reflecting the transition of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle of the Russian plate to the suboceanic lithospheric mantle of the subducted Uralian palaeo-ocean. The two Island-Arc Continental Sectors represent the transition from oceanic to continental environments in the middle and south Urals. Collisional magmatism started in the Silurian and persisted till the Permian, migrating progressively eastward and increasing in abundance of LILE and {87Sr }/{86Sr initial}. Magmatic polarity is very similar to that of modern subduction zones and indicates that the subducted slab was dipping eastward during that period. The Northern and Southern Island-Arc Continental Sectors show many similarities regarding the nature and spatial-temporal distribution of magmatism, but there are also some important differences which probably indicate somewhat different geodynamic regimes. In the Northern Sector, Carboniferous tonalite-granodiorite batholiths have features compatible with an origin by melting of the oceanic crust in the subducted slab. In the Southern Sector, however, Carboniferous tonalite-granodiorite batholiths have features more consistent with a melting event within the lower continental crust above the subduction zone than with melting within the subducted slab. Upper Carboniferous-Permian granites have high {87Sr }/{86Sr initial} in the north (e.g., 0.7120 in the Murzinka batholith) but very low {87Sr }/{86Sr initial} in the south (e.g., 0.7045 in the Dzhabyk batholith) in spite of rocks from both batholiths being equally peraluminous and

  20. Sr, Nd and Pb isotope and geochemical data from the Quaternary Nevado de Toluca volcano, a source of recent adakitic magmatism, and the Tenango Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Serrano, Raymundo G.; Schaaf, Peter; Solís-Pichardo, Gabriela; Hernández-Bernal, Ma. del Sol; Hernández-Treviño, Teodoro; Julio Morales-Contreras, Juan; Macías, José Luis

    2004-11-01

    Volcanic activity at Nevado de Toluca (NT) volcano began 2.6 Ma ago with the emission of andesitic lavas, but over the past 40 ka, eruptions have produced mainly lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of predominantly orthopyroxene-hornblende dacitic composition. In the nearby Tenango Volcanic Field (TVF) pyroclastic products and lava flows ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to andesite were erupted at most of 40 monogenetic volcanic centers and were coeval with the last stages of NT. All volcanic rocks in the study area are characterized by a calc-alkaline affinity that is consistent with a subduction setting. Relatively high concentrations of Sr (>460 ppm) coupled with low Y (<21 ppm), along with relatively low HREE contents and Pb isotopic values similar to MORB-EPR, suggest a possible geochemical adakitic signature for the majority of the volcanic rocks of NT. The HFS- and LIL-element patterns for most rocks of the TVF suggest a depleted source in the subcontinental lithosphere modified by subduction fluids, similar to most rocks from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). The isotopic compositions are similar for volcanic rocks of NT and TVF regions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr: 0.703853-0.704226 and 0.703713-0.704481; ɛNd: +4.23-+5.34 and +2.24-+6.85; 206Pb/ 204Pb: 18.55-18.68 and 18.58-18.69; 207Pb/ 204Pb: 15.54-15.62 and 15.56-15.61; 208Pb/ 204Pb: 38.19-38.47 and 38.28-38.50, respectively), suggesting a MORB-like source with low crustal contamination. Metamorphic xenoliths from deeper continental crust beneath NT volcano show isotopic patterns similar to those of Grenvillian rocks of north-central Mexico ( 87Sr/ 86Sr: 0.715653-0.721984, ɛNd: -3.8 to -7.2, 206Pb/ 204Pb: 18.98-19.10, 207Pb/ 204Pb: 15.68-15.69, 208Pb/ 204Pb: 39.16-39.26 and Nd model age (T DM) of 1.2-1.3 Ga). In spite of a thick continental crust (>45 km) that underlies the volcanoes of the study area, the geochemical and isotopic patterns of these rocks indicate low interaction with this crust. NT

  1. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly accomplished by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. Using this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within +/- 0.5K. However, because of the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP has been carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor is placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir is cold-biased and is heated by a control heater. Tests results show that it is feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. Using this method, the heat source temperature can be maintained within a tight range for moderate and high powers. At low powers, however, temperature oscillations may occur due to interactions among the reservoir control heater power, the heat source mass, and the heat output from the heat source. In addition, the heat source temperature could temporarily deviate from its set point during fast thermal transients. The implication is that more sophisticated feedback control algorithms need to be implemented for LHP transient operation when the heat source temperature is used for feedback control.

  2. Mid-Neoproterozoic intraplate magmatism in the northern margin of the Southern Granulite Terrane, India: Constraints from geochemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeju, T. R.; Santosh, M.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Pradeepkumar, A. P.; Shaji, E.

    2016-11-01

    The northern margin of the Southern Granulite Terrane in India hosts a number of mafic, felsic and alkaline magmatic suites proximal to major shear/paleo-suture zones and mostly represents magmatism in rift-settings. Here we investigate a suite of gabbros and granite together with intermediate (dioritic) units generated through mixing and mingling of a bimodal magmatic suite. The massive gabbro exposures represent the cumulate fraction of a basic magma whereas the granitoids represent the product of crystallization in felsic magma chambers generated through crustal melting. Diorites and dioritic gabbros mostly occur as enclaves and lenses within host granitoids resembling mafic magmatic enclaves. Geochemistry of the felsic units shows volcanic arc granite and syn-collisional granite affinity. The gabbro samples show mixed E-MORB signature and the magma might have been generated in a rift setting. The trace and REE features of the rocks show variable features of subduction zone enrichment, crustal contamination and within plate enrichment, typical of intraplate magmatism involving the melting of source components derived from both depleted mantle sources and crustal components derived from older subduction events. The zircons in all the rock types show magmatic crystallization features and high Th/U values. Their U-Pb data are concordant with no major Pb loss. The gabbroic suite yields 206Pb/238U weighted mean ages in the range of 715 ± 4-832.5 ± 5 Ma marking a major phase of mid Neoproterozoic magmatism. The diorites crystallized during 206Pb/238U weighted mean age of 724 ± 6-830 ± 2 Ma. Zircons in the granite yield 206Pb/238U weighted mean age of 823 ± 4 Ma. The age data show broadly similar age ranges for the mafic, intermediate and felsic rocks and indicate a major phase of bi-modal magmatism during mid Neoproterozoic. The zircons studied show both positive and negative εHf(t) values for the gabbros (-6.4 to 12.4), and negative values for the diorites (-7

  3. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) have been used for thermal control of several NASA and commercial orbiting spacecraft. The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC). Most LHPs use the CC temperature for feedback control of its operating temperature. There exists a thermal resistance between the heat source to be cooled by the LHP and the LHP's CC. Even if the CC set point temperature is controlled precisely, the heat source temperature will still vary with its heat output. For most applications, controlling the heat source temperature is of most interest. A logical question to ask is: "Can the heat source temperature be used for feedback control of the LHP operation?" A test program has been implemented to answer the above question. Objective is to investigate the LHP performance using the CC temperature and the heat source temperature for feedback control

  4. Public Data Set: Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup

    SciTech Connect

    Hinson, Edward T.; Barr, Jayson L.; Bongard, Michael W.; Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Perry, Justin M.

    2016-05-31

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in E.T. Hinson et al., 'Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup,' Physics of Plasmas 23, 052515 (2016).

  5. The geochemistry of primitive volcanic rocks of the Ankaratra volcanic complex, and source enrichment processes in the genesis of the Cenozoic magmatism in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melluso, L.; Cucciniello, C.; le Roex, A. P.; Morra, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Ankaratra volcanic complex in central Madagascar consists of lava flows, domes, scoria cones, tuff rings and maars of Cenozoic age that are scattered over 3800 km2. The mafic rocks include olivine-leucite-nephelinites, basanites, alkali basalts and hawaiites, and tholeiitic basalts. Primitive samples have high Mg# (>60), high Cr and Ni concentrations; their mantle-normalized patterns peak at Nb and Ba, have troughs at K, and smoothly decrease towards the least incompatible elements. The Ankaratra mafic rocks show small variation in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70377-0.70446, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51273-0.51280, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.25-18.87). These isotopic values differ markedly from those of Cenozoic mafic lavas of northern Madagascar and the Comoro archipelago, typical Indian Ocean MORB and oceanic basalt end-members. The patterns of olivine nephelinitic magmas can be obtained through 3-10% partial melting of a mantle source that was enriched by a Ca-rich alkaline melt, and that contained garnet, carbonates and phlogopite. The patterns of tholeiitic basalts can be obtained after 10-12% partial melting of a source enriched with lower amounts of the same alkaline melt, in the spinel- (and possibly amphibole-) facies mantle, hence in volumes where carbonate is not a factor. The significant isotopic change from the northernmost volcanic rocks of Madagascar and those in the central part of the island implicates a distinct source heterogeneity, and ultimately assess the role of the continental lithospheric mantle as source region. The source of at least some volcanic rocks of the still active Comoro archipelago may have suffered the same time-integrated geochemical and isotopic evolution as that of the northern Madagascar volcanic rocks.

  6. Was Late Cretaceous Magmatism in the Northern Rocky Mountains Really Arc-Related?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, G.

    2011-12-01

    Calc-alkaline, Cretaceous magmatism affected much of the northern Rocky Mountain region in the western U.S. and is generally interpreted as continental arc magmatism despite the fact that it occurred as far east into the continental interior as the Late Cretaceous (75 Ma to 78 Ma) Sliderock Mountain volcanoplutonic complex in south-central Montana. Magmatism may have migrated so far inboard as a response to shallowing of the dip angle of underthrust oceanic lithosphere, but the exact sources, tectonic setting and trigger mechanisms for the Late Cretaceous igneous activity remain unclear. In this study, new trace element and Nd and Sr isotopic data, combined with existing age and major element data (duBray et al., 1998, USGS Prof. Paper 1602), from the most mafic lavas present at the Sliderock Mountain Volcano were used to further define the source regions of the Late Cretaceous magmatism. The most mafic lava flows are high K (~2-3 wt. % K2O), low Ti (< 1 wt. % TiO2), low Ni (< 20 ppm) basaltic andesites. Major element oxide contents for these rocks are only weakly correlated with increasing wt. % SiO2 on conventional Harker diagrams. All of the rocks are characterized by high LILE/HFSE ratios and high Pb contents (17-20 ppm), as expected for arc-related magmatism. The rocks also have high (La/Yb)N (7-20) but show decreasing (Dy/Yb)N with increasing wt.% SiO2, suggesting a cryptic role for amphibole fractionation during evolution of their parental magmas. Initial ɛNd values range from -19 to -29 but do not covary with rock bulk composition and as a result are unlikely to represent the result of interaction with local Archean continental crust. Initial 87Sr/86Sr, in contrast, vary over a restricted range from 0.7045 to 0.7065. The lowest 87Sr/86Sr correspond to samples with the highest Sr/Y (120-190). The low ɛNd values for the basaltic andesites suggest that if these volcanic rocks were ultimately derived from ultramafic mantle sources, melting must have occurred

  7. Inferring source attribution from a multiyear multisource data set of Salmonella in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, C; Muellner, P; Spencer, S E F; Hong, S; Saupe, A; Rovira, A; Hedberg, C; Perez, A; Muellner, U; Alvarez, J

    2017-03-13

    Salmonella enterica is a global health concern because of its widespread association with foodborne illness. Bayesian models have been developed to attribute the burden of human salmonellosis to specific sources with the ultimate objective of prioritizing intervention strategies. Important considerations of source attribution models include the evaluation of the quality of input data, assessment of whether attribution results logically reflect the data trends and identification of patterns within the data that might explain the detailed contribution of different sources to the disease burden. Here, more than 12,000 non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates from human, bovine, porcine, chicken and turkey sources that originated in Minnesota were analysed. A modified Bayesian source attribution model (available in a dedicated R package), accounting for non-sampled sources of infection, attributed 4,672 human cases to sources assessed here. Most (60%) cases were attributed to chicken, although there was a spike in cases attributed to a non-sampled source in the second half of the study period. Molecular epidemiological analysis methods were used to supplement risk modelling, and a visual attribution application was developed to facilitate data exploration and comprehension of the large multiyear data set assessed here. A large amount of within-source diversity and low similarity between sources was observed, and visual exploration of data provided clues into variations driving the attribution modelling results. Results from this pillared approach provided first attribution estimates for Salmonella in Minnesota and offer an understanding of current data gaps as well as key pathogen population features, such as serotype frequency, similarity and diversity across the sources. Results here will be used to inform policy and management strategies ultimately intended to prevent and control Salmonella infection in the state.

  8. Venus magmatic and tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Hansen, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Two years beyond the initial mapping by the Magellan spacecraft, hypotheses for the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Venus have become refined and focused. We present our view of these processes, attempting to synthesize aspects of a model for the tectonic and magmatic behavior of the planet. The ideas presented should be taken collectively as an hypothesis subject to further testing. The quintessence of our model is that shear and buoyancy forces in the upper boundary layer of mantle convection give rise to a spatially and temporally complex pattern of strain in a one-plate Venusian lithosphere and modulate the timing and occurrence of magmatism on a global basis.

  9. Long-term monitoring on active volcanoes. Time relationship between surface variations of temperature and changes of energy release from magmatic sources, verified by multi-parameter and interdisciplinary comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diliberto, I. S.; Bellomo, S.; Camarda, M.; D'Alessandro, W.; Gagliano Candela, E.; Gagliano, A. L.; Longo, M.; Pisciotta, F.; Pecoraino, G.; Vita, F.

    2015-12-01

    The longest records of temperature data from active volcanoes in southern Italy are presented. One dataset comes from continuous monitoring of fumaroles temperature of la Fossa cone of Vulcano (Aeolian Islands), it runs from 1990 to 2014, but the first measurements started in 1984. Another dataset is from thermal aquifers of Mount Etna volcano, since 1989 the acquisition period has been one month, more recently data with hourly frequency are registered on the continuous monitoring network. Both monitoring systems are still ongoing. In 1984 at Vulcano the monitoring of fumaroles suffered of a pioneering approach, our technicians faced for the first time with extreme condition, absence of energy power, temperature range covering up to 2 order of magnitude (from normal ambient to several hundreds °C), steam, corrosive acidic fluids released by fumaroles (Sulphur and Chlorine compounds, Carbon dioxide). The experience matured in the high temperature fumarole field of Vulcano can be useful to support new surveillance programs on other volcanoes around the world. Time series analysis applied to fumaroles temperature highlighted the cyclic character of the main observed variations and major trends, lasting some years. Long term monitoring allowed comparisons of many temperature subsets with other validated geochemical and geophysical dataseries and highlighted common source mechanisms accounting for endogenous processes. Changes in the magma source and/or seismo-tectonic activity are the primary causes of the main time variations. A similar comparative approach has been applied to time series of temperature data recorded on Etna volcano. Time relationships have been found with the eruptive activity, particularly with the emission rates of volcanic products, although the monitoring sites are far from the eruptive vents. The collected data show confirmation about the effectiveness of the geochemical approach to follow in real time changes from the source, even being far

  10. Changes in magmatic oxidation state induced by degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brounce, M. N.; Stolper, E. M.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Temporal variations in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the mantle may have been transmitted to Earth's atmosphere and oceans by volcanic degassing. However, it is unclear how redox states of volatiles relate to their source magmas because degassing and assimilation can impact fO2 before or during eruption. To explore this, we present µ-XANES measurements of the oxidation states of Fe and S and laser fluorination measurements of 18O/16O ratios in submarine glasses from two settings where degassing is recorded: 1) submarine glasses from the Reykjanes Ridge as it shoals to Iceland, including subglacial glasses from the Reykjanes Peninsula; and 2) submarine glasses from Mauna Kea recovered by the Hawaii Shield Drilling Program (HSDP). Glasses from both settings are basalts with 5.5-9.9 wt% MgO and 350-1790 ppm S. Submarine Reykjanes glasses are sulfide saturated. Subglacial Reykjanes and HSDP glasses are not sulfide saturated, and S and H2O contents are consistent with S+H2O degassing. Submarine Reykjanes glasses have 18O/16O indistinguishable from MORB and become progressively 18O-depleted as MgO decreases. Subglacial glasses have lower 18O/16O than submarine glasses at a given MgO, but both sample types project to a common 18O/16O near 10 wt% MgO, suggesting that 18O-depletion in these lavas is generated by fractional crystallization and assimilation of an 18O-depleted crustal component. The oxidation state of Fe increases only slightly as 18O/16O decrease, suggesting that the assimilant is not oxidized enough to change magmatic fO2. Fe and S do not oxidize or reduce with decreasing S or H2O, suggesting that relatively reduced magmas at depth degassed S+H2O without changing magmatic fO2, and that the fO2 of these lavas reflect the fO2of their mantle source. The oxidation states of Fe and S in HSDP glasses are broadly correlated and samples with the highest S concentrations are the most oxidized. Both Fe and S reduce with decreasing S and H2O contents. This suggests

  11. Activities and source mechanisms of volcanic deep low-frequency earthquakes and its implication for deep crustal process in magmatic arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamichi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Rocks under upper mantle and lower crustal temperatures and pressures typically deform in a ductile manner, therefore it is difficult to accumulate enough deviatoric stress in rocks to generate brittle failure under this condition. However earthquakes occur at upper mantle and lower crust beneath active volcanoes, and are recognized as volcanic deep low-frequency earthquakes (VDLFs). VDLFs are characterized by mostly low-frequency energy (<5 Hz), emergent arrivals and long-duration codas. VDLF activity observed at depths of 10-50 km in Japan, the Philippines, Alaska and the Western US (Power et al., 2004; Ukawa, 2005; Nichols et al. 20011), has generally been attributed to magma transport in the mid-to-lower crustal and uppermost mantle regions. However because VDLF seismicity is infrequent, with relatively weak and emergent signals, the relationship between deep magma transport and seismic radiation remains poorly understood. Borehole dense seismic observation systems, such as the high-sensitivity seismograph network 'Hi-net' in Japan (Obara et al. 2005), are effective for detecting not only non-VDLFs (Obara, 2002) but also VDLFs. Since 1997 the Japan Meteorological Agency has routinely detected and located DLFs using the Hi-net dataset, and have identified DLFs in and around most quaternary volcanoes in Japan (Takahashi and Miyamura, 2009). Several studies have attempted to estimate source mechanisms of VDLFs in Japan. The first attempt by Ukawa and Ohtake (1987), obtained a single force as the source mechanism of a VDLF beneath Izu-Ohshima by using particle motions of S-waves. Following that work strike-slip type and non-double-couple source mechanisms were obtained using waveform inversions for VDLFs in Northeast Japan (Nishidomi and Takeo 1996; Okada and Hasegawa, 2000). Nakamichi et al. (2003; 2004) estimated the source mechanisms of Mts. Iwate and Fuji through the moment tensor inversion of spectral ratios of body waves from using data from a dense seismic

  12. Properties of truly magmatic epidote

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.W.; Vance, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Euhedral phenocrysts of prismatic epidote up to 4mm in length are present (2 modal %) in a sample of porphyritic rhyodacite (69.5% SiO/sub 2/) in the authors undergraduate teaching collection. The sample is believed to be a Tertiary dike-rock from Ward, Boulder County, Colorado. Phenocrysts of corroded quartz, oscillatory-zoned plagioclase (An30-40), kinked and bent biotite, and very pale yellow pleochroic epidote (Fe/(Fe+Al) = 0.21, 2V(-) large, lamellar twinning on (100)) are set in a finely crystalline groundmass of quartz, potash feldspar (Or92) and oligoclase (An26). Rare small euhedral garnets (Al54Pyl3Gr22 Sp8An3) are enclosed in plagioclase and biotite phenocrysts. Some of the epidote prisms have very pale brown allanitic cores, which are oscillatory-zoned and in part embayed. The bulk of the epidote, however, is poor in allanite component. Critical igneous textural features of the allanite-poor epidote are: euhedral form; euhedral oscillatory zoning; clustering of phenocrysts in synneusis relation; and the presence of euhedral inclusions of zircon that apatite. Since phenocrysts constitute only 26 modal % of the rock, crystallization of epidote, in fact, took place relatively early in the rock's cooling history. A description of this rock is provided as a petrographic guide to those using allegedly magmatic epidote in silicic plutonic rocks as an indicator of minimum pressure of crystallization.

  13. Managing ground water contamination sources in wellhead protection areas: A priority setting approach

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The document is one of a series of technical assistance documents designed by the U.S. EPA to help local governments and public water suppliers protect their wells and implement their state and local Wellhead Protection Programs. The priority setting approach provides a risk screening tool that helps users to assess and rank the relative threats to ground-water supplies posed by specific potential contamination sources.

  14. East Asia: Seismotectonics, magmatism and mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Yu, Sheng; Ohtani, Eiji

    2011-02-01

    In this article, we review the significant recent results of geophysical studies and discuss their implications on seismotectonics, magmatism, and mantle dynamics in East Asia. High-resolution geophysical imaging revealed structural heterogeneities in the source areas of large crustal earthquakes, which may reflect magma and fluids that affected the rupture nucleation of large earthquakes. In subduction zone regions, the crustal fluids originate from the dehydration of the subducting slab. Magmatism in arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab. The intraplate magmatism has different origins. The continental volcanoes in Northeast Asia (such as Changbai and Wudalianchi) seem to be caused by the corner flow in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and the deep dehydration of the stagnant slab as well. The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is possibly caused by a similar process in BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China seems to be a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and the Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle. The occurrence of deep earthquakes under the Japan Sea and the East Asia margin may be related to a metastable olivine wedge in the subducting Pacific slab. The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which may trigger upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and cause the slab-plume interactions. Some of these issues, such as the origin of intraplate magmatism, are still controversial, and so further detailed studies are needed from now.

  15. Paired MEG data set source localization using recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J J; Mosher, J C; Huang, M; Leahy, R M

    2000-09-01

    An important class of experiments in functional brain mapping involves collecting pairs of data corresponding to separate "Task" and "Control" conditions. The data are then analyzed to determine what activity occurs during the Task experiment but not in the Control. Here we describe a new method for processing paired magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data sets using our recursively applied and projected multiple signal classification (RAP-MUSIC) algorithm. In this method the signal subspace of the Task data is projected against the orthogonal complement of the Control data signal subspace to obtain a subspace which describes spatial activity unique to the Task. A RAP-MUSIC localization search is then performed on this projected data to localize the sources which are active in the Task but not in the Control data. In addition to dipolar sources, effective blocking of more complex sources, e.g., multiple synchronously activated dipoles or synchronously activated distributed source activity, is possible since these topographies are well-described by the Control data signal subspace. Unlike previously published methods, the proposed method is shown to be effective in situations where the time series associated with Control and Task activity possess significant cross correlation. The method also allows for straightforward determination of the estimated time series of the localized target sources. A multiepoch MEG simulation and a phantom experiment are presented to demonstrate the ability of this method to successfully identify sources and their time series in the Task data.

  16. Apero, AN Open Source Bundle Adjusment Software for Automatic Calibration and Orientation of Set of Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrot Deseilligny, M.; Clery, I.

    2011-09-01

    IGN has developed a set of photogrammetric tools, APERO and MICMAC, for computing 3D models from set of images. This software, developed initially for its internal needs are now delivered as open source code. This paper focuses on the presentation of APERO the orientation software. Compared to some other free software initiatives, it is probably more complex but also more complete, its targeted user is rather professionals (architects, archaeologist, geomophologist) than people. APERO uses both computer vision approach for estimation of initial solution and photogrammetry for a rigorous compensation of the total error; it has a large library of parametric model of distortion allowing a precise modelization of all the kind of pinhole camera we know, including several model of fish-eye; there is also several tools for geo-referencing the result. The results are illustrated on various application, including the data-set of 3D-Arch workshop.

  17. He, Ar, N and C isotope compositions in Tatun Volcanic Group (TVG), Taiwan: Evidence for an important contribution of pelagic carbonates in the magmatic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulleau, Emilie; Sano, Yuji; Takahata, Naoto; Yang, Frank T.; Takahashi, Hiroshi A.

    2015-09-01

    The Tatun Volcanic Group (TVG), Northeastern Taiwan, is considered to be the extension of the Ryukyu arc, and belongs to the post-collisional collapse Okinawa Trough. Strong hydrothermal activity is concentrated along the Chinshan fault, and Da-you-keng (DYK) represents the main fumarolic area where the most primitive isotopic and chemical composition is observed. In this study, we present chemical and He, Ar, C and N isotopic compositions of fumaroles, bubbling gas and water from hot springs sampled in 2012 and 2013. High 3He/4He ratios from DYK fumaroles (≈ 6.5 Ra) show a typical arc-like setting, whereas other sampling areas show a strong dependence of 3He/4He and CH4/3He ratios with the distance from the main active hydrothermal area (DYK). This could mean strong crustal contamination and thermal decomposition of organic matter from local sediments. Carbon isotope compositions of DYK range from - 6.67‰ to - 5.85‰, and indicate that carbon contribution comes mainly from pelagic carbonates from the slab (limestone, mantle and sediment contributions are 63%, 19% and 18%, respectively). This is consistent with the negative δ15N values (- 1.4 ± 0.5‰) observed for DYK, implying a strong nitrogen-mantle contribution, and an absence of contribution from nitrogen-pelagic carbonates. These results have important consequences related to the Ryukyu subducted slab. In fact, the Ryukyu margin presents little in off scraping the sedimentary cover to the subducting plate that does not permit any nitrogen contribution in magma from TVG.

  18. Fast Identification of Methane and Other Atmospheric Contaminant Sources in Complex Urban Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, G. A.; Crosson, E.; Tan, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The identification and quantification of greenhouse gas emissions (fluxes) from urban centers have become of increasing interest over the last few years. This interest is driven by recent measurements indicating that urban emissions are a significant source of methane (CH4) and in fact may be substantially higher than current inventory estimates(1). Urban CH4 emissions could contribute 7-15% to the global anthropogenic budget of methane. Although it is known that the per capita carbon footprint of compact cities, such as New York City, Boston, and San Francisco, are smaller than sprawling cities, such as Houston, the strengths of individual sources within these cities are not well known. Such information is of use to policy makers because it can be used to incentivize changes in transportation and land use patterns. The work discussed here will highlight a vehicle-based methodology for characterizing urban emissions that enables extremely fast identification of methane sources in complex urban settings. Measurements were taken while driving at speeds from 20 to 40 miles per hour in stop and go traffic and were able to not only identify methane plumes but in addition, provide information about the location of the sources generating these methane plumes. Results showed that a large number of highly localized methane sources were found in Boston and San Francisco. For example, leaks from natural gas production, transmission and distribution lines were found in both cities. Flux chamber measurements of these leaks indicate that the methane flux ranged from 40 to 300 standard cubic feet of natural gas per day. For reference, the average American home uses approximately 200-300 cubic feet of natural gas per day. These leaks increase cost to natural gas suppliers, add to greenhouse gas concentrations, and in extreme cases pose a safety hazard. In this work, results showing the identification, location, and quantifying methane sources in urban settings will be presented

  19. Reduced Magmatic Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Ardia, P.; Stanley, B. D.; Foley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Volatiles in Earth's upper mantle are dominated by H2O and CO2, but under more reduced conditions likely deeper in the mantle, other volatile species may be important or dominant. However, the speciation, solubilities, and effect on physical properties of reduced magmatic volatiles are poorly constrained. Here we summarize results from an experimental campaign to better understand reduced volatiles in magmas. Experiments emphasize spectroscopic and SIMS characterization of dissolved species in experiments for which fluid fugacities are known, thereby facilitating thermodynamic parameterization. Experimental determinations of molecular H2 solubility in basaltic and andesitic liquids show concentrations that are proportional to H2 fugacity. Because H2 increases with fH2 whereas dissolved H2O increases with fH2O1/2, the relative importance of H2 increases with pressure and for more hydrous magmas. At 1 GPa and IW-1, solubility in basalt reaches 0.3 wt.% (equivalent to 2.7 wt.% H2O). Solubilities at pressures of the deep upper mantle have not been explored experimentally (as is also true for H2O and CO2), but H2 could become the dominant hydrous species at 400 km and deeper, and so deep hydrous melts may have chiefly H2 rather than H2O or OH. Experiments suggest an extremely low partial specific density (0.18 kg/m3) for dissolved H2 at low pressure, and so appreciable dissolved H2 in melt atop the 410 km discontinuity or in the lower mantle may promote positive buoyancy. Solubilities of reduced C-species remain poorly known. In contrast to results in Na2O-SiO2 liquids (Mysen et al., 2009), experiments with a haplobasaltic liquid at controlled CH4 fugacities indicated very small (<0.05 wt.%) CH4 solubilities even at very reduced conditions (

  20. Magmatism on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, Chloé; Thorey, Clément; Pinel, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism on the Moon is dominated by large fissure eruptions of mare basalt and seems to lack large, central vent, shield volcanoes as observed on all the other terrestrial planets. Large shield volcanoes are constructed over millions to several hundreds of millions of years. On the Moon, magmas might not have been buoyant enough to allow for a prolonged activity at the same place over such lengths of time. The lunar crust was indeed formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean, resulting in a particularly light and relatively thick crust. This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the denser primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basins where at least part of the crust was removed by the impact process. Thus, the ascent of lunar magmas might have been limited by their reduced buoyancy, leading to storage zone formation deep in the lunar crust. Further magma ascent to shallower depths might have required local or regional tensional stresses. Here, we first review evidences of shallow magmatic intrusions within the lunar crust of the Moon that consist in surface deformations presenting morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. We then study the preferential zones of magma storage in the lunar crust as a function of the local and regional state of stress. Evidences of shallow intrusions are often contained within complex impact craters suggesting that the local depression caused by the impact exerted a strong control on magma ascent. The depression is felt over a depth equivalent to the crater radius. Because many of these craters have a radius less than 30km, the minimum crust thickness, this suggests that the magma was already stored in deeper intrusions before ascending at shallower depth. All the evidences for intrusions are also preferentially located in the internal

  1. Geochemistry of the Ediacaran-Early Cambrian transition in Central Iberia: Tectonic setting and isotopic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenlabrada, José Manuel; Pieren, Agustín P.; Díez Fernández, Rubén; Sánchez Martínez, Sonia; Arenas, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    A complete Ediacaran-Early Cambrian stratigraphic transition can be observed in the southern part of the Central Iberian Zone (Iberian Massif). Two different stratigraphic units, underlying Ordovician series, display geochemical and Sm-Nd isotopic features in agreement with an evolving geodynamic setting. Pusa Shales (Early Cambrian) rest unconformably on greywackes of the Lower Alcudian Formation (Late Ediacaran). Both sequences present minor compositional variations for major and trace element contents and similar REE patterns, close to those of PAAS (Post Archean Australian Shale). Trace element contents and element ratios suggest mixed sources, with intermediate to felsic igneous contributions for both units. Tectonic setting discrimination diagrams for the Ediacaran greywackes indicate that these turbiditic series were deposited in a sedimentary basin associated with a mature active margin (volcanic arc). However, the compositions of the Cambrian shales fit better with a more stable context, a back-arc or retro-arc setting. εNd(T) and TDM ages are compatible with dominance of a similar cratonic source for both sequences, probably the West Africa Craton. εNd565 values for the Ediacaran greywackes (- 3.0 to - 1.4) along with TDM ages (1256-1334 Ma) imply a significant contribution of juvenile material, probably derived from the erosion of the volcanic arc. However, εNd530 values in the Cambrian shales (- 5.2 to - 4.0) together with older TDM ages (1444-1657 Ma), suggest a higher contribution of cratonic isotopic sources, probably derived from erosion of the adjacent mainland. Coeval with the progressive cessation of arc volcanism along the peri-Gondwanan realm during the Cambrian, there was a period of more tectonic stability and increasing arrival of sediments from cratonic areas. The geochemistry of the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition in Central Iberia documents a tectonic switch in the periphery of Gondwana, from an active margin to a more stable context

  2. An integrated, open-source set of tools for urban vulnerability monitoring from Earth observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vecchi, Daniele; Harb, Mostapha; Dell'Acqua, Fabio; Aurelio Galeazzo, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Aim: The paper introduces an integrated set of open-source tools designed to process medium and high-resolution imagery with the aim to extract vulnerability indicators [1]. Problem: In the context of risk monitoring [2], a series of vulnerability proxies can be defined, such as the extension of a built-up area or buildings regularity [3]. Different open-source C and Python libraries are already available for image processing and geospatial information (e.g. OrfeoToolbox, OpenCV and GDAL). They include basic processing tools but not vulnerability-oriented workflows. Therefore, it is of significant importance to provide end-users with a set of tools capable to return information at a higher level. Solution: The proposed set of python algorithms is a combination of low-level image processing and geospatial information handling tools along with high-level workflows. In particular, two main products are released under the GPL license: source code, developers-oriented, and a QGIS plugin. These tools were produced within the SENSUM project framework (ended December 2014) where the main focus was on earthquake and landslide risk. Further development and maintenance is guaranteed by the decision to include them in the platform designed within the FP 7 RASOR project . Conclusion: With the lack of a unified software suite for vulnerability indicators extraction, the proposed solution can provide inputs for already available models like the Global Earthquake Model. The inclusion of the proposed set of algorithms within the RASOR platforms can guarantee support and enlarge the community of end-users. Keywords: Vulnerability monitoring, remote sensing, optical imagery, open-source software tools References [1] M. Harb, D. De Vecchi, F. Dell'Acqua, "Remote sensing-based vulnerability proxies in the EU FP7 project SENSUM", Symposium on earthquake and landslide risk in Central Asia and Caucasus: exploiting remote sensing and geo-spatial information management, 29-30th January 2014

  3. The distribution of intraplate volcanism and controls on the generation of intraplate magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Rushmer, T. A.; Smith, I. E.

    2011-12-01

    Although volumetrically subordinate to mid-ocean ridge and volcanic arc magmatism, intraplate volcanism (as typified by the magmatic products of Ocean Islands) is probably the most ubiquitous form of volcanism on Earth. It is semantically associated with plate interiors (and thus also hot spot volcanism), but is also produced in a variety of plate margin settings. Thus it characterizes the circum-Pacific rim, the Caribbean, west Antarctica, and widespread regions affected by the collision of fragments of Gondwana with Laurasia (e.g. the circum Mediterranean and central East Asia). In these settings, volcanism is typically dispersed rather than focussed, and need not be obviously associated with particular tectonic features and events (in contrast to mid-ocean ridge and arc volcanism). Typically, volcanism is also prolonged and may be erupted intermittently and in small volumes for tens of millions of years. A key feature of these plate margin settings is that they involve either plate convergence (e.g. the circum Mediterranean and Central America) or a past history of plate convergence (e.g. eastern Australia). Intraplate volcanism is notably absent from many rifted continental margins where this requirement is not fulfilled (e.g. Western Australia and east Antarctica). Although rare in the Pre-Cambrian record, evidence of intraplate style magmatism extends as far back as the Archaean. Compositionally, intraplate magmas are distinguished both by their diversity and by strong relative enrichments in incompatible elements, including Nb. These features cannot be attributed simply to enriched sources, because Nd and Sr isotopes are consistent with sources that were (in most cases) depleted in incompatibles relative to the primitive mantle. Instead, the incompatible element characteristics of most intraplate basalts appear to be dominated by the consequences of near-solidus melting of normal mantle sources. In this case, the conditions required to initiate intraplate

  4. Evolution of the late Paleozoic accretionary complex and overlying forearc-magmatic arc, south central Chile (38°-41°S): Constraints for the tectonic setting along the southwestern margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Mark W.; Kato, Terence T.; Rodriguez, Carolina; Godoy, Estanislao; Duhart, Paul; McDonough, Michael; Campos, Alberto

    1999-08-01

    Stratigraphic, structural, metamorphic, and geochronologic studies of basement rocks in the Andean foothills and Coast Ranges of south central Chile (39°-41°S) suggest a protracted late Paleozoic to middle Mesozoic deformational and metamorphic history that imposes important constraints on the tectonic development of the southwestern Gondwana margin. In the study area the late Paleozoic paired metamorphic belt, coeval magmatic arc, and overlying Triassic sedimentary units preserve a record of Late Carboniferous to Early Permian subduction and arc magmatism, subsequent deep exhumation of the Western Series subduction complex, and diminished uplift and erosion of the Eastern Series arc-forearc region by the Late Triassic. Late Paleozoic structural elements and metamorphic assemblages formed during early subduction and arc magmatism, collectively referred to as Dl, are largely erased in the Western Series by the dominant D2 schistosity and lower greenschist grade metamorphism. D1 structural features, as well as original sedimentary textures, are relatively well preserved in the less penetratively deformed Eastern Series. The regional distribution of late Paleozoic arc magmatism suggests that the late Paleozoic convergent margin deviated from a N-S trend north of this area to a NW-SE trend near this latitude and faced an open marine environment to the southwest. A transition from F2 isoclinal folding to more open, larger-scale F3 folds, interpreted as change in ductility during differential uplift of the Western Series, is not apparent in the Eastern Series. Despite a lesser degree of uplift during the main exhumational D2 event, delineation of unconformities and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons and intrusions into the Eastern Series allow tighter constraints to be placed on timing of uplift and denudation of the Eastern Series than on that in the Western Series. A regional unconformity exposed in the Lake District that separates more highly deformed Eastern Series

  5. [The first set of legislation for doctors in Denmark and its source of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Brix, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The first set of legislation for doctors in Denmark was conditional on a national need to regulate the conditions of the pharmaceutical and medical professions. By request of the king, this legislation, which came into force in 1672, was made by doctors residing in Denmark. These doctors had all been educated at foreign universities where the existing legislation had Roger II's and Friedrich II's legislation from the 12th and 13th centuries' South Italy as its source of inspiration. Thus, it is reasonable to presume that the doctors who participated in the making of the Danish legislation were familiar with this legislation. A translation into Danish of Roger II's and Friedrich II's sections regarding the work of a doctor has been made in order to be able to compare it with the content of the Danish set of legislation from 1672. The result of this comparison is that there are so many similarities that there can hardly be any doubt about the fact that the medieval legislation has been used as source for the Danish legislation from 1672.

  6. Sediment composition of big Chinese and Indochinese rivers reflects geology of their source, not tectonic setting of their sink.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Andò, Sergio; Limonta, Mara; Nie, Junsheng; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Wang, Jiangang; Yang, Shouye

    2016-04-01

    There are several reasons why the tectonic setting of a sedimentary basin cannot be inferred from the composition of its sedimentary fill. One is that sediments can, and quite often are transported for thousands of kilometers from sources uplifted by certain tectonic processes to subsident basins created by totally different tectonic processes. A classical case is the Amazon River, carrying detritus from the Andean Cordillera to the Atlantic passive margin on the opposite side of South America (Franzinelli and Potter, 1983; Dickinson, 1988). Similar is the case of major rivers in China and Indochina, sourced in Tibetan orogenic highlands and reaching the Chinese passive margin or the back-arc/pull-apart Andaman Sea. The Huang He (Yellow River), the most sediment-laden river in the world, delivers annually to the Bohai Sea 1 billion tons of litho-feldspatho-quartzose sedimentaclastic/metamorphiclastic sediments with moderately rich, amphibole-epidote-garnet suites including apatite and zircon (Nie et al., 2015). The Changjiang (Yangtze) River, the fourth longest on Earth and the largest in Eurasia, carries to the East China Sea litho-feldspatho-quartzose sedimentaclastic/metamorphiclastic sand with moderately poor, amphibole-epidote suites including clinopyroxene and garnet (Vezzoli et al., 2016). The Ayeyarwadi (Irrawaddy) River, ranking among the five major rivers in the world for its annual load of 0.4 billion tons, carries to the Andaman Sea litho-feldspatho-quartzose metamorphiclastic/sedimentaclastic sand with moderately rich, amphibole-epidote suites including garnet and clinopyroxene (Garzanti et al., 2013). Detrital modes in these three very big river basins are thus similar, and would plot in the "Recycled Orogen" field of Dickinson (1985) rather than in the "Continental Block" or "Magmatic Arc" fields. The orogenic signature acquired in mountainous headwaters is carried all the way to the mouth, and even after long-distance transport across wide

  7. Use of standardized source sets for enhanced EMI classification of buried heterogeneous objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; O'Neill, Kevin; Shamatava, Irma; Sun, Keli; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2004-09-01

    Most unexploded ordinance (UXO) are heterogeneous objects containing parts of different metals, e.g., head, body, tail and fins, copper banding, etc. Recently, low frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensing, based on the EM diffusion phenomena, has shown considerable progress for the detection and discrimination of UXO. EMI responses are sensitive to the type of metal (conductivity and permeability), to the distance between the sensor and scatterer, and to the coupling effects between different parts of the object. Until now, the simple dipole models used to represent EMI response have neglected the coupling and close proximity effects seen for realistic objects. These factors can interact with the particulars of excitation and observation to produce substantially varied signature patterns for a given object. This means that a key requirement in discrimination/inversion processing is to calculate very fast but very realistic EMI responses for actual target types. This work presents a new discrimination technique based on the standardized excitation approximation (SEA). The SEA seeks to identify objects in terms of their characteristic responses to sets of well defined excitations that can be used to describe any primary (excitation) field. In the new SEA system presented here, the standardized excitations are those produced by a standardized source set (SSS), in particular, fictitious magnetic sources distributed mathematically over a surface surrounding a scatterer. Several numerical results are given to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed new technique. Finally, the spatial distribution and frequency dependence of responding equivalent sources are analyzed to demonstrate the usefulness of SSS for target discrimination.

  8. Why are plutons dry? Outgassing mechanisms of crustal magmatic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    parmigiani, andrea; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Leclaire, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    Magma bodies crystallizing to completion within the crust (i.e., forming plutons) typically undergo significant amounts of second boiling (i.e. cooling and crystallization of dominantly anhydrous minerals lead to volatile saturation and bubble nucleation/growth). The low water content (< 1 wt % H2O) and vanishing residual porosity of most plutons, despite the high volatile concentrations of their magma sources (commonly > 6 wt % H2O for evolved compositions in subduction zones), testify that outgassing from crystalline mushy reservoirs must be an efficient and widespread process. Understanding this outgassing mechanism is key to understand how volatiles are transferred from mantle depths to the surface. From the hydrodynamics point of view, the mass balance of exsolved volatiles in these plutonic bodies is controlled by the difference between the rate of degassing (formation of bubbles by 2nd boiling) and outgassing (transport of gas out of the magma body). In this study, we use pore-scale multiphase modeling to constrain these rates as function of the crystal and volatile contents in the magma. Because second boiling is a slow process, one can consider equilibrium degassing as a valid assumption. Outgassing, on the other end, is controlled by the competition between buoyancy, capillary and viscous forces. Our numerical simulations are used to determine the most efficient setting for gas to escape its magmatic trap. The high viscosity of interstitial melts and capillary forces (due to the non-wetting nature of the gas phase with most of the mineral phases in magmatic systems) strongly limits gas transport until vertically extensive gas channels are generated. We show that channels can readily form in volatile-rich coarse-grained mush zones in the upper crust, and allow efficient outgassing at crystallinities around 50-75 vol%, when millimetric bubbles can still win capillary resistive forces.

  9. Hercynian post-collisional magmatism in the context of Paleozoic magmatic evolution of the Tien Shan orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Reimar; Konopelko, Dmitry; Biske, Georgy; Divaev, Farid; Sergeev, Sergei

    2011-10-01

    The Hercynian Tien Shan (Tianshan) orogen formed during Late Palaeozoic collision between the Karakum-Tarim and the Kazakhstan paleo-continents. In order to constrain timing of Hercynian post-collisional magmatism, 27 intrusions were sampled for U-Pb zircon dating along a ca. 2000 km - long profile in Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. The samples were dated utilizing sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP-II). The obtained ages, together with previously published age data, allowed the timing of Hercynian post-collisional magmatism to be constrained and interpreted in the context of the Paleozoic magmatic evolution of the region. Apart from Hercynian post-collisional magmatism, two older magmatic episodes have been recognized, and the following sequence of events has been established: (1) approximately 10 Ma after cessation of continuous Caledonian magmatism a number of Late Silurian-Early Devonian intrusions were emplaced in the Middle and Northern Tien Shan terranes between 420 and 390 Ma. The intrusions probably formed in an extensional back arc setting during coeval subduction under the margins of Caledonian Paleo-Kazakhstan continent; (2) the next relatively short Late Carboniferous episode of subduction under Paleo-Kazakhstan was registered in the Kurama range of the Middle Tien Shan. Calc-alkaline volcanics and granitoids with ages 315-300 Ma have distinct metallogenic affinities typical for subduction-related rocks and are not found anywhere outside the Middle Tien Shan terrane west of the Talas-Farghona fault; (3) the Early Permian Hercynian post-collisional magmatism culminated after the closure of the Paleo-Turkestan ocean and affected the whole region across terrane boundaries. The post-collisional intrusions formed within a relatively short time span between 295 and 280 Ma. The model for Hercynian post-collisional evolution suggests that after collision the Tien Shan was affected by trans-crustal strike-slip motions which provided suitable conduits

  10. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  11. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-11

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  12. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci outside the health-care setting: prevalence, sources, and public health implications.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, L. C.; Kuehnert, M. J.; Tenover, F. C.; Jarvis, W. R.

    1997-01-01

    Although nosocomial acquisition and subsequent colonization of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), an emerging international threat to public health, has been emphasized in the United States, colonization among nonhospitalized persons has been infrequently documented. In contrast, in Europe, colonization appears to occur frequently in persons outside the health-care setting. An important factor associated with VRE in the community in Europe has been avoparcin, a glycopeptide antimicrobial drug used for years in many European nations at subtherapeutic doses as a growth promoter in food-producing animals. In Europe, evidence suggests that foodborne VRE may cause human colonization. Although avoparcin has never been approved for use in the United States, undetected community VRE transmission may be occurring at low levels. Further studies of community transmission of VRE in the United States are urgently needed. If transmission with VRE from unrecognized community sources can be identified and controlled, increased incidence of colonization and infection among hospitalized patients may be prevented. PMID:9284375

  13. Revision of earthquake hypocentre locations in global bulletin data sets using source-specific station terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshiri, Nima; Saul, Joachim; Heimann, Sebastian; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-02-01

    Global earthquake locations are often associated with very large systematic travel-time residuals even for clear arrivals, especially for regional and near-regional stations in subduction zones because of their strongly heterogeneous velocity structure. Travel-time corrections can drastically reduce travel-time residuals at regional stations and, in consequence, improve the relative location accuracy. We have extended the shrinking-box source-specific station terms technique to regional and teleseismic distances and adopted the algorithm for probabilistic, nonlinear, global-search location. We evaluated the potential of the method to compute precise relative hypocentre locations on a global scale. The method has been applied to two specific test regions using existing P- and pP-phase picks. The first data set consists of 3103 events along the Chilean margin and the second one comprises 1680 earthquakes in the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone. Pick data were obtained from the GEOFON earthquake bulletin, produced using data from all available, global station networks. A set of timing corrections varying as a function of source position was calculated for each seismic station. In this way, we could correct the systematic errors introduced into the locations by the inaccuracies in the assumed velocity structure without explicitly solving for a velocity model. Residual statistics show that the median absolute deviation of the travel-time residuals is reduced by 40-60 per cent at regional distances, where the velocity anomalies are strong. Moreover, the spread of the travel-time residuals decreased by ˜20 per cent at teleseismic distances (>28°). Furthermore, strong variations in initial residuals as a function of recording distance are smoothed out in the final residuals. The relocated catalogues exhibit less scattered locations in depth and sharper images of the seismicity associated with the subducting slabs. Comparison with a high-resolution local catalogue reveals that

  14. Open-source mobile digital platform for clinical trial data collection in low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Joris; Omondi Onyango, Kevin; Midamba, Brian; Groosman, Nele; Hooper, Norman; Spector, Jonathan; Pillai, Goonaseelan (Colin); Ogutu, Bernhards

    2017-01-01

    Background Governments, universities and pan-African research networks are building durable infrastructure and capabilities for biomedical research in Africa. This offers the opportunity to adopt from the outset innovative approaches and technologies that would be challenging to retrofit into fully established research infrastructures such as those regularly found in high-income countries. In this context we piloted the use of a novel mobile digital health platform, designed specifically for low-resource environments, to support high-quality data collection in a clinical research study. Objective Our primary aim was to assess the feasibility of a using a mobile digital platform for clinical trial data collection in a low-resource setting. Secondarily, we sought to explore the potential benefits of such an approach. Methods The investigative site was a research institute in Nairobi, Kenya. We integrated an open-source platform for mobile data collection commonly used in the developing world with an open-source, standard platform for electronic data capture in clinical trials. The integration was developed using common data standards (Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model), maximising the potential to extend the approach to other platforms. The system was deployed in a pharmacokinetic study involving healthy human volunteers. Results The electronic data collection platform successfully supported conduct of the study. Multidisciplinary users reported high levels of satisfaction with the mobile application and highlighted substantial advantages when compared with traditional paper record systems. The new system also demonstrated a potential for expediting data quality review. Discussion and Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using a mobile digital platform for clinical research data collection in low-resource settings. Sustainable scientific capabilities and infrastructure are essential to attract and

  15. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, Alexey L.; Masurenkov, Yuri P.; Pouzich, Irina N.; Laverova, Ninel I.

    2013-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  16. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, A. L.; Masurenkov, Yu. P.; Pouzich, I. N.; Laverova, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  17. Measuring Data Quality Through a Source Data Verification Audit in a Clinical Research Setting.

    PubMed

    Houston, Lauren; Probst, Yasmine; Humphries, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Health data has long been scrutinised in relation to data quality and integrity problems. Currently, no internationally accepted or "gold standard" method exists measuring data quality and error rates within datasets. We conducted a source data verification (SDV) audit on a prospective clinical trial dataset. An audit plan was applied to conduct 100% manual verification checks on a 10% random sample of participant files. A quality assurance rule was developed, whereby if >5% of data variables were incorrect a second 10% random sample would be extracted from the trial data set. Error was coded: correct, incorrect (valid or invalid), not recorded or not entered. Audit-1 had a total error of 33% and audit-2 36%. The physiological section was the only audit section to have <5% error. Data not recorded to case report forms had the greatest impact on error calculations. A significant association (p=0.00) was found between audit-1 and audit-2 and whether or not data was deemed correct or incorrect. Our study developed a straightforward method to perform a SDV audit. An audit rule was identified and error coding was implemented. Findings demonstrate that monitoring data quality by a SDV audit can identify data quality and integrity issues within clinical research settings allowing quality improvement to be made. The authors suggest this approach be implemented for future research.

  18. Sources of Cognitive Inflexibility in Set-Shifting Tasks: Insights Into Developmental Theories From Adult Data.

    PubMed

    Dick, Anthony Steven

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined processes underlying cognitive inflexibility in set-shifting tasks typically used to assess the development of executive function in children. Adult participants performed a Flexible Item Selection Task (FIST) that requires shifting from categorizing by one dimension (e.g., color) to categorizing by a second orthogonal dimension (e.g., shape). The experiments showed performance of the FIST involves suppression of the representation of the ignored dimension; response times for selecting a target object in an immediately-following oddity task were slower when the oddity target was the previously-ignored stimulus of the FIST. However, proactive interference from the previously relevant stimulus dimension also impaired responding. The results are discussed with respect to two prominent theories of the source of difficulty for children and adults on dimensional shifting tasks: attentional inertia and negative priming. In contrast to prior work emphasizing one over the other process, the findings indicate that difficulty in the FIST, and by extension other set-shifting tasks, can be attributed to both the need to shift away from the previously attended representation (attentional inertia), and the need to shift to the previously ignored representation (negative priming). Results are discussed in relation to theoretical explanations for cognitive inflexibility in adults and children.

  19. InP MMIC Chip Set for Power Sources Covering 80-170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    We will present a Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chip set which provides high output-power sources for driving diode frequency multipliers into the terahertz range. The chip set was fabricated at HRL Laboratories using a 0.1-micrometer gate-length InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process, and features transistors with an f(sub max) above 600 GHz. The HRL InP HEMT process has already demonstrated amplifiers in the 60-200 GHz range. In this paper, these high frequency HEMTs form the basis for power sources up to 170 GHz. A number of state-of-the-art InP HEMT MMICs will be presented. These include voltage-controlled and fixed-tuned oscillators, power amplifiers, and an active doubler. We will first discuss an 80 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator with 5 GHz of tunability and at least 17 mW of output power, as well as a 120 GHz oscillator providing 7 mW of output power. In addition, we will present results of a power amplifier which covers the full WRIO waveguide band (75-110 GHz), and provides 40-50 mW of output power. Furthermore, we will present an active doubler at 164 GHz providing 8% bandwidth, 3 mW of output power, and an unprecedented 2 dB of conversion loss for an InP HEMT MMIC at this frequency. Finally, we will demonstrate a power amplifier to cover 140-170 GHz with 15-25 mW of output power and 8 dB gain. These components can form a power source in the 155-165 GHz range by cascading the 80 GHz oscillator, W-band power amplifier, 164 GHz active doubler and final 140-170 GHz power amplifier for a stable, compact local oscillator subsystem, which could be used for atmospheric science or astrophysics radiometers.

  20. Long-lasting Cadomian magmatic activity along an active northern Gondwana margin: U-Pb zircon and Sr-Nd isotopic evidence from the Brunovistulian Domain, eastern Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soejono, Igor; Janoušek, Vojtěch; Žáčková, Eliška; Sláma, Jiří; Konopásek, Jiří; Machek, Matěj; Hanžl, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Cadomian magmatic complexes of the Brunovistulian Domain crop out at the eastern termination of the Bohemian Massif. However, the age, nature and geotectonic affinity of some of pre-Variscan (meta-)igneous rock complexes from this domain are still unknown. Geochronological and geochemical study of the granitic rocks across the Brunovistulian Domain reveals new information about the timing and nature of this magmatic activity originally situated along the northern margin of Gondwana. Zircon U-Pb data (601 ± 3 Ma, Brno Massif; 634 ± 6 Ma, paraautochtonous core of the Svratka Dome; 568 ± 3 Ma, Bíteš orthogneiss) from the allochtonous Moravicum indicate the prolonged magmatic activity within the Brunovistulian Domain during the Ediacaran. The major- and trace-element and Sr-Nd isotopic signatures show heterogeneous geochemical characteristics of the granitic rocks and suggest a magmatic-arc geotectonic setting. The two-stage Depleted Mantle Nd model ages (c. 1.3-2.0 Ga) indicate derivation of the granitic rocks from a relatively primitive crustal source, as well as from an ancient and evolved continental crust of the Brunovistulian Domain. These results constrain the magmatic-arc activity to c. 635-570 Ma and provide a further evidence for a long-lived (at least c. 65 Myr) and likely episodic subduction-related magmatism at the northern margin of Gondwana. The presence of granitic intrusions derived from variously mature crustal sources at different times suggests heterogeneous crustal segments to having been involved in the magmatic-arc system during its multistage evolution.

  1. Magmatic unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie

    2005-09-01

    Mammoth Mountain, which stands on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern California, last erupted ˜57,000 years BP. Episodic volcanic unrest detected beneath the mountain since late 1979, however, emphasizes that the underlying volcanic system is still active and capable of producing future volcanic eruptions. The unrest symptoms include swarms of small ( M ≤ 3) earthquakes, spasmodic bursts (rapid-fire sequences of brittle-failure earthquakes with overlapping coda), long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) volcanic earthquakes, ground deformation, diffuse emission of magmatic CO 2, and fumarole gases with elevated 3He/ 4He ratios. Spatial-temporal relations defined by the multi-parameter monitoring data together with earthquake source mechanisms suggest that this Mammoth Mountain unrest is driven by the episodic release of a volume of CO 2-rich hydrous magmatic fluid derived from the upper reaches of a plexus of basaltic dikes and sills at mid-crustal depths (10-20 km). As the mobilized fluid ascends through the brittle-plastic transition zone and into overlying brittle crust, it triggers earthquake swarm activity and, in the case of the prolonged, 11-month-long earthquake swarm of 1989, crustal deformation and the onset of diffuse CO 2 emissions. Future volcanic activity from this system would most likely involve steam explosions or small-volume, basaltic, strombolian or Hawaiaan style eruptions. The impact of such an event would depend critically on vent location and season.

  2. Magmatic unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.; Prejean, S.

    2005-01-01

    Mammoth Mountain, which stands on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern California, last erupted ???57,000 years BP. Episodic volcanic unrest detected beneath the mountain since late 1979, however, emphasizes that the underlying volcanic system is still active and capable of producing future volcanic eruptions. The unrest symptoms include swarms of small (M ??? 3) earthquakes, spasmodic bursts (rapid-fire sequences of brittle-failure earthquakes with overlapping coda), long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) volcanic earthquakes, ground deformation, diffuse emission of magmatic CO2, and fumarole gases with elevated 3He/4He ratios. Spatial-temporal relations defined by the multi-parameter monitoring data together with earthquake source mechanisms suggest that this Mammoth Mountain unrest is driven by the episodic release of a volume of CO2-rich hydrous magmatic fluid derived from the upper reaches of a plexus of basaltic dikes and sills at mid-crustal depths (10-20 km). As the mobilized fluid ascends through the brittle-plastic transition zone and into overlying brittle crust, it triggers earthquake swarm activity and, in the case of the prolonged, 11-month-long earthquake swarm of 1989, crustal deformation and the onset of diffuse CO2 emissions. Future volcanic activity from this system would most likely involve steam explosions or small-volume, basaltic, strombolian or Hawaiaan style eruptions. The impact of such an event would depend critically on vent location and season.

  3. Tonian granitic magmatism of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Ignez P.; de Fatima L. de Brito, Maria; de A. Lages, Geysson; da Silva Filho, Adejardo F.; Santos, Lucilene; Brasilino, Roberta G.

    2016-07-01

    involvement of distinct proportions of mantle and crustal components in the source of their protoliths. There is no consensus in the literature about the tectonic setting of the CVG ie they have been related to either continental margin magmatic arc, with possible back-arc association, or extention-related setting, with generation of A-type granites. However, all the available geochemical data suggest that the CVG represent extension related magmatism. The geochemical signature associated to bimodal volcanism, including pyroclastic rocks, with similar ages, and absence, up to now, of evidence for metamorphism of Tonian age, support the hypothesis of extension - related magmatism.

  4. Tectonics and magmatism of ultraslow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Kokhan, A. V.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The tectonics, structure-forming processes, and magmatism in rift zones of ultraslow spreading ridges are exemplified in the Reykjanes, Kolbeinsey, Mohns, Knipovich, Gakkel, and Southwest Indian ridges. The thermal state of the mantle, the thickness of the brittle lithospheric layer, and spreading obliquety are the most important factors that control the structural pattern of rift zones. For the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges, the following are crucial factors: variations in the crust thickness; relationships between the thicknesses of its brittle and ductile layers; width of the rift zone; increase in intensity of magma supply approaching the Iceland thermal anomaly; and spreading obliquety. For the Knipovich Ridge, these are its localization in the transitional zone between the Gakkel and Mohns ridges under conditions of shear and tensile stresses and multiple rearrangements of spreading; nonorthogonal spreading; and structural and compositional barrier of thick continental lithosphere at the Barents Sea shelf and Spitsbergen. The Mohns Ridge is characterized by oblique spreading under conditions of a thick cold lithosphere and narrow stable rift zone. The Gakkel and the Southwest Indian ridges are distinguished by the lowest spreading rate under the settings of the along-strike variations in heating of the mantle and of a variable spreading geometry. The intensity of endogenic structure-forming varies along the strike of the ridges. In addition to the prevalence of tectonic factors in the formation of the topography, magmatism and metamorphism locally play an important role.

  5. Sediment and weathering control on the distribution of Paleozoic magmatic tin-tungsten mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Rolf L.; Kroner, Uwe

    2015-03-01

    The formation of major granite-hosted Sn and/or W deposits and lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) type pegmatites in the Acadian, Variscan, and Alleghanian orogenic belts of Europe and Atlantic Northern America involves weathering-related Sn and W enrichment in the sedimentary debris of the Cadomian magmatic arc and melting of these sedimentary source rocks during later tectonic events, followed by magmatic Sn and W enrichment. We suggest that within this, more than 3,000-km long late Paleozoic belt, large Sn and/or W deposits are only found in regions where later redeposition of the Sn-W-enriched weathered sediments, followed by tectonic accumulation, created large volumes of Sn-W-enriched sedimentary rocks. Melting of these packages occurred both during the formation of Pangea, when continental collision subjected these source rocks to high-grade metamorphism and anatexis, and during post-orogenic crustal extension and mantle upwelling. The uncoupling of source enrichment and source melting explains (i) the diachronous occurrence of tin granites and LCT pegmatites in this late Paleozoic orogenic belt, (ii) the occurrence of Sn and/or W mineralizations and LCT pegmatites on both sides of the Rheic suture, and (iii) the contrasting tectonic setting of Sn and/or W mineralizations within this belt. Source enrichment, sedimentary and tectonic accumulation of the source rocks, and heat input to mobilize metals from the source rocks are three unrelated requirements for the formation of Sn and/or W granites. They are the controlling features on the large scale. Whether a particular granite eventually generates a Sn and/or W deposit depends on local conditions related to source melting, melt extraction, and fractionation processes.

  6. On the scaling of multicrystal data sets collected at high-intensity X-ray and electron sources

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Philip; Fournier, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    The need for data-scaling has become increasingly evident as time-resolved pump-probe photocrystallography is rapidly developing at high intensity X-ray sources. Several aspects of the scaling of data sets collected at synchrotrons, XFELs (X-ray Free Electron Lasers) and high-intensity pulsed electron sources are discussed. They include laser-ON/laser-OFF data scaling, inter- and intra-data set scaling. PMID:26798829

  7. Geochemical characterization of fluids along the Dead Sea Rift: implications for fluids sources and regional geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inguaggiato, Claudio; Censi, Paolo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Zuddas, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea Fault where a lateral displacement between the African and Arabian plates occurs is characterized by anomalous heat flux in the northern Israel area close to the border with Syria and Jordan (Shalev et al., 2012). The concentrations of He and CO2, and isotopic composition of He and total dissolved inorganic carbon were studied in cold and thermal waters collected along the Dead Sea Fault, in order to investigate the source of volatiles and their relationship with the tectonic framework of the Dead Sea Fault. The waters with higher temperature (up to 57.2 ° C) are characterized by higher amounts of CO2and helium (up to 55.72 and 1.91*10-2 cc l-1, respectively). Helium isotopic data (R/Ra from 0.11 to 2.14) and 4He/20Ne ratios (0.41 - 106.86) show the presence of deep-deriving fluids consisting of a variable mixture of mantle and crust end-members, with the former reaching up to 35%. Carbon isotope signature of total dissolved carbon from hot waters falls within the range of magmatic values, suggesting the delivery of deep-seated CO2. The geographical distribution of helium isotopic data and isotopic carbon (CO2) values coupled with (CO2/3He ratios) indicate a larger contribution of mantle-derived fluids affecting the northern part of the investigated area, where the waters reach the highest temperature and anomalous heat flux was recognized by Shalev et al. (2012). Such occurrence is probably favoured by the peculiar tectonic framework recognized in the northern part of Israel (Segev et al., 2006), including a Moho discontinuity up-rise and/or the presence of a deep fault system coupled with the recent magmatic activity. References: Segev, A., Rybakov, M., Lyakhovsky, V, Hofstetter, A, Tibor, G., Goldshmidt, V., 2006. The structure, isostasy and gravity field of the Levant continental margin and the southeast Mediterranean area. Tectonophysics 425, 137-157. Shalev, E., Lyakhosky, V., Weinstein, Y., Ben-Avraham, Z., 2013. The thermal structure of Israel

  8. Petrogenesis of Sveconorwegian magmatism in southwest Norway; constraints from zircon U-Pb-Hf-O and whole-rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Nick M. W.; Slagstad, Trond; Parrish, Randall R.; Norry, Michael J.; Marker, Mogens; Horstwood, Matthew S. A.; Røhr, Torkil

    2013-04-01

    The Sveconorwegian orogen is traditionally interpreted as a Himalayan-scale continental collision, and the eastward continuation of the Grenville Province of Laurentia; however, it has recently been proposed that it represents an accretionary orogen without full-scale continental collision (Slagstad et al., in press). We suggest that magmatism is one of the key constraints to differentiate between different types of orogens; thus, detailed investigation of the timing and petrogenesis of the magmatic record is a requirement for better understanding of the Sveconorwegian orogen as a whole. Here, we present new U-Pb geochronology, zircon Hf-O isotope, and whole-rock geochemical data to constrain the petrogenesis of the early -Sveconorwegian Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB). The SMB is a batholithic-scale complex of intrusions that intrudes into most of the Rogaland-Hardangervidda Block in southwest Norway. Current age constraints put emplacement between ~1050 to 1020 Ma. New ages from the Suldal region indicate that the onset of SMB magmatism can be put back to 1070 Ma, which is some 30-50 Myrs prior to high-grade metamorphism. Average initial ɛHf signatures range from ~0 to 4; these overlap with later post-Sveconorwegian granites and with early-/pre-Sveconorwegian ferroan (A-type) granites. Average δ18O signatures range from ~5.7 to 8.7, except for one anomalous granite at ~11.6. The Hf-O signatures are compatible with a mixed mantle-crustal source. Crustal sources may include ~1500 Ma Telemarkian or ~1200 Ma juvenile crust. Hf-O bulk-mixing modelling using a 1500 Ma crustal source indicates >50 % mantle input. Although much further mapping and geochronological work is required, granitic magmatism appears to have persisted throughout much of the ~1100 to 900 Ma period that spans the Sveconorwegian orogen. This magmatism is consistently ferroan (i.e. dry); however, the SMB marks a clear transition to magnesian (i.e. wet) magmatism, with a return to ferroan magmatism at

  9. Late Miocene to Quaternary Transition in Magmatism and Tectonics, Sierra Nevada - Basin and Range Boundary, Northern California-Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytulak, J.; Cousens, B. L.; Henry, C. D.

    2001-12-01

    During the late Miocene and early Pliocene, the Ancestral Cascades Arc (ARC) in northern CA and western NV shut off as the Mendocino triple junction migrated northward. At the same time, Basin and Range extension migrated westward into the Sierra Nevada block, with major episodes at 12 and 3 Ma. These tectonic events are reflected in a complex transition in magmatic composition and style. We are using geochemical, isotopic, and 40Ar/39Ar data to evaluate magma petrogenesis, the timing of volcanism, and the relationship between volcanism and tectonism in this poorly understood region of Mio-Pliocene arc volcanism. The ARC erupted highly porphyritic, pyroxene- or hornblende-plagioclase andesites to dacites, termed the Kate Peak Formation, from numerous stratovolcano complexes over basement rocks of the Sierra Nevada Batholith. Our new and published dating indicate activity from \\sim16 to 4 Ma. Immediately west of Reno, sequences dominated by poorly-phyric, olivine- and pyroxene-basaltic andesite, commonly termed Lousetown Formation, began to erupt as early as 10 Ma and continued to \\sim1 Ma. Early episodes, at 10.3 and 4 Ma, were contemporaneous with continued arc magmatism. Further, post-arc mafic volcanism continued in the area north of Lake Tahoe between 2.9 and 1.2 Ma. Although the change from hydrous intermediate rocks to \\sim anhydrous mafic rocks suggests a fundamental change in magmatic sources and tectonic setting, the mafic rocks have normalized incompatible element patterns and radiogenic isotope compositions that include a strong subduction component that is virtually indistinguishable from that in ARC intermediate lavas. Thus mafic and intermediate magmas, including post-arc magmas, share a common, fluid-modified, mantle wedge source. Additionally, the timing of mafic magmatism coincides only imprecisely with extension. No mafic magmas erupted before the beginning of extension at any location, but the earliest activity followed extension by \\sim2Ma

  10. Novel open-source electronic medical records system for palliative care in low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The need for palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa is staggering: this region shoulders over 67% of the global burden of HIV/AIDS and cancer. However, provisions for these essential services remain limited and poorly integrated with national health systems in most nations. Moreover, the evidence base for palliative care in the region remains scarce. This study chronicles the development and evaluation of DataPall, an open-source electronic medical records system that can be used to track patients, manage data, and generate reports for palliative care providers in these settings. DataPall was developed using design criteria encompassing both functional and technical objectives articulated by hospital leaders and palliative care staff at a leading palliative care center in Malawi. The database can be used with computers that run Windows XP SP 2 or newer, and does not require an internet connection for use. Subsequent to its development and implementation in two hospitals, DataPall was tested among both trained and untrained hospital staff populations on the basis of its usability with comparison to existing paper records systems as well as on the speed at which users could perform basic database functions. Additionally, all participants evaluated this program on a standard system usability scale. Results In a study of health professionals in a Malawian hospital, DataPall enabled palliative care providers to find patients’ appointments, on average, in less than half the time required to locate the same record in current paper records. Moreover, participants generated customizable reports documenting patient records and comprehensive reports on providers’ activities with little training necessary. Participants affirmed this ease of use on the system usability scale. Conclusions DataPall is a simple, effective electronic medical records system that can assist in developing an evidence base of clinical data for palliative care in low resource settings. The

  11. Changing magmatic and tectonic styles along the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana and the onset of early Paleozoic magmatism in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encarnación, John; Grunow, Anne

    1996-12-01

    Basement rocks of the Transantarctic Mountains are believed to record a change in the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana from a passive to a tectonically active margin. Widespread emplacement of calc-alkaline batholiths (Granite Harbor intrusives) occurred during the active margin phase. We present new concordant zircon and titanite U-Pb ages for these magmatic rocks in southern Victoria Land and the Scott Glacier area. Most magmatic rocks previously associated with a pre-late Early Cambrian (>530 Ma) deformational event(s) (Beardmore orogeny) have yielded younger crystallization ages. The lack of definite arc magmatism prior to ˜530 Ma suggests that deformation may have been associated with a strike or oblique-slip regime, although shallow subduction without significant arc magmatism cannot be ruled out. Local transpressional and transtensional domains may account for compressional deformation and rare alkaline and carbonatite magmatism during this early period. The oldest and most voluminous magmatic rocks were emplaced after ˜530 Ma. This magmatism has been associated with active subduction, and suggests a fundamental change in the plate boundary at ˜530 Ma. Ductile shearing of plutons and contractional deformation of supracrustal rocks after ˜530 Ma (Ross orogeny) may have been due to transpressional tectonics in an oblique subduction setting and/or a collision. Compressional deformation associated with the Ross orogeny may have ceased by ˜500 Ma along the southern Victoria Land-Scott Glacier segment of the Antarctic margin, as indicated by undeformed magmatic rocks of this age, although magmatic activity continued to at least ˜485 Ma.

  12. Efflorescence as a source of hydrated sulfate minerals in valley settings on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szynkiewicz, Anna; Borrok, David M.; Vaniman, David T.

    2014-05-01

    A distinctive sulfur cycle dominates many geological processes on Mars and hydrated sulfate minerals are found in numerous topographic settings with widespread occurrences on the Martian surface. However, many of the key processes controlling the hydrological transport of sulfur, including sulfur sources, climate and the depositional history that led to precipitation of these minerals, remain unclear. In this paper, we use a model for the formation of sulfate efflorescent salts (Mg-Ca-Na sulfates) in the Rio Puerco watershed of New Mexico, a terrestrial analog site from the semiarid Southwest U.S., to assess the origin and environmental conditions that may have controlled deposition of hydrated sulfates in Valles Marineris on Mars. Our terrestrial geochemical results (δS34 of -36.0 to +11.1‰) show that an ephemeral arid hydrological cycle that mobilizes sulfur present in the bedrock as sulfides, sulfate minerals, and dry/wet atmospheric deposition can lead to widespread surface accumulations of hydrated sulfate efflorescences. Repeating cycles of salt dissolution and reprecipitation appear to be major processes that migrate sulfate efflorescences to sites of surface deposition and ultimately increase the aqueous SO42- flux along the watershed (average 41,273 metric tons/yr). We suggest that similar shallow processes may explain the occurrence of hydrated sulfates detected on the scarps and valley floors of Valles Marineris on Mars. Our estimates of salt mass and distribution are in accord with studies that suggest a rather short-lived process of sulfate formation (minimum rough estimate ∼100 to 1000 years) and restriction by prevailing arid conditions on Mars.

  13. Global combustion sources of organic aerosols: model comparison with 84 AMS factor-analysis data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Emissions of organic compounds from biomass, biofuel, and fossil fuel combustion strongly influence the global atmospheric aerosol load. Some of the organics are directly released as primary organic aerosol (POA). Most are emitted in the gas phase and undergo chemical transformations (i.e., oxidation by hydroxyl radical) and form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we use the global chemistry climate model ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) with a computationally efficient module for the description of organic aerosol (OA) composition and evolution in the atmosphere (ORACLE). The tropospheric burden of open biomass and anthropogenic (fossil and biofuel) combustion particles is estimated to be 0.59 and 0.63 Tg, respectively, accounting for about 30 and 32 % of the total tropospheric OA load. About 30 % of the open biomass burning and 10 % of the anthropogenic combustion aerosols originate from direct particle emissions, whereas the rest is formed in the atmosphere. A comprehensive data set of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements along with factor-analysis results from 84 field campaigns across the Northern Hemisphere are used to evaluate the model results. Both the AMS observations and the model results suggest that over urban areas both POA (25-40 %) and SOA (60-75 %) contribute substantially to the overall OA mass, whereas further downwind and in rural areas the POA concentrations decrease substantially and SOA dominates (80-85 %). EMAC does a reasonable job in reproducing POA and SOA levels during most of the year. However, it tends to underpredict POA and SOA concentrations during winter indicating that the model misses wintertime sources of OA (e.g., residential biofuel use) and SOA formation pathways (e.g., multiphase oxidation).

  14. On the scaling of multicrystal data sets collected at high-intensity X-ray and electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, Philip; Fournier, Bertrand

    2015-11-11

    Here, the need for data-scaling has become increasingly evident as time-resolved pump-probe photocrystallography is rapidly developing at high intensity X-ray sources. Several aspects of the scaling of data sets collected at synchrotrons, XFELs (X-ray Free Electron Lasers) and high-intensity pulsed electron sources are discussed. They include laser-ON/laser-OFF data scaling, inter- and intra-data set scaling. (C) 2015 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  15. Lithospheric Structure, Stress, and Magmatism at the Rainbow Non-Transform Offset on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulatto, M.; Canales, J. P.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    New oceanic lithosphere is formed at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges by a combination of eruption and intrusion of magma and by tectonic exhumation and alteration of lower crustal and mantle rocks. We look at the relationship between these two processes and how their relative contributions vary at non-transform ridge-segment offsets (NTOs). Models of mantle upwelling predict magmatic input and heat flux to be relatively low at NTOs, yet many host high-temperature hydrothermal systems, which are difficult to explain without the presence of a crustal magmatic source. We analyzed newly acquired swath bathymetry, gravity and magnetic data from the MARINER experiment together with archived data from the Rainbow NTO (36º10' N) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This NTO is currently experiencing both mantle exhumation and magmatic input as evidenced by the active Rainbow high-temperature hydrothermal field. We calculate mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies and crustal magnetization to constrain the lithospheric structure and tectonic evolution of the NTO during the past ~2 Myr. The swath bathymetry data are used to map faults, extrusive volcanic terrain and tectonized blocks and show that the style of crustal accretion varies along the adjacent ridge segments. Spatial changes in the style of extensional faulting are indicative of variations in the mechanical properties and the state of stress of the lithosphere. We suggest that the availability of magma to drive hydrothermal activity at Rainbow and other similar settings is controlled not only by the thermal regime and the structure of the lithosphere but also by the effect of local stress conditions on magma migration. Models of magma migration and dyking show that changes in the direction of minimum compressive stress affect the propagation of magmatic intrusions. We argue that stress rotation can explain the formation of crustal magma chambers at NTOs despite a reduced magmatic flux. These constraints help determine the role of

  16. Tectonic significance of Neoproterozoic magmatism of Nakora area, Malani igneous suite, Western Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Vallinayagam, G.

    2014-05-01

    Three magmatic phases are distinguished in the Neoproterozoic Nakora Ring Complex (NRC) of Malani Igneous Suite (MIS), namely (a) Extrusive (b) Intrusive and (c) Dyke phase. Magmatism at NRC initiated with minor amount of (basic) basalt flows and followed by the extensive/voluminous acid (rhyolites-trachytes) flows. The ripple marks are observed at the Dadawari area of NRC in tuffaceous rhyolite flow which suggests the aqueous condition of flows deposition. The emplacement of the magma appears to have been controlled by a well defined NE-SW tectonic lineament and cut by radial pattern of dykes. These NE-SW tectonic lineaments are the linear zones of crustal weakness and high heat flow. The spheroidal and rapakivi structures in the Nakora acid volcanics indicate the relationship between genetic link and magma mixing. Basalt-trachyte-rhyolite association suggests that the large amount of heat is supplied to the crust from the magma chamber before the eruption. The field (elliptical/ring structures), mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Nakora granites attest an alkaline character in their evolution and consistent with within plate tectonic setting. The emplacement of these granites and associated volcanics is controlled by ring structures, a manifestation of plume activity and cauldron subsidence, an evidence of extensional tectonic environment. NRC granites are the product of partial melting of rocks similar to banded gneiss from Kolar Schist Belt of India. The present investigations suggest that the magmatic suites of NRC rocks are derived from a crustal source and the required heat supplied from a mantle plume.

  17. Rural Parentage and Labor Market Disadvantage in a Sub-Saharan Setting: Sources and Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Sarah C.

    2008-01-01

    High unemployment in many developing countries is intensifying job competition and raising concern for the employment prospects of vulnerable groups, including children of rural parents. This paper examines the trends and sources in employment disadvantage associated with rural parentage in Cameroon. In documenting the sources of inequality, the…

  18. Quantification of Methane Source Locations and Emissions in AN Urban Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, E.; Richardson, S.; Tan, S. M.; Whetstone, J.; Bova, T.; Prasad, K. R.; Davis, K. J.; Phillips, N. G.; Turnbull, J. C.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The regulation of methane emissions from urban sources such as landfills and waste-water treatment facilities is currently a highly debated topic in the US and in Europe. This interest is fueled, in part, by recent measurements indicating that urban emissions are a significant source of Methane (CH4) and in fact may be substantially higher than current inventory estimates(1). As a result, developing methods for locating and quantifying emissions from urban methane sources is of great interest to industries such as landfill and wastewater treatment facility owners, watchdog groups, and the governmental agencies seeking to evaluate or enforce regulations. In an attempt to identify major methane source locations and emissions in Boston, Indianapolis, and the Bay Area, systematic measurements of CH4 concentrations and meteorology data were made at street level using a vehicle mounted cavity ringdown analyzer. A number of discrete sources were detected at concentration levels in excess of 15 times background levels. Using Gaussian plume models as well as tomographic techniques, methane source locations and emission rates will be presented. In addition, flux chamber measurements of discrete sources such as those found in natural gas leaks will also be presented. (1) Wunch, D., P.O. Wennberg, G.C. Toon, G. Keppel-Aleks, and Y.G. Yavin, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from a North American Megacity, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 36, L15810, doi:10.1029/2009GL)39825, 2009.

  19. Quaternary Magmatism in the Cascades - Geologic Perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes

    2007-01-01

    Foreward The Cascade magmatic arc is a belt of Quaternary volcanoes that extends 1,250 km from Lassen Peak in northern California to Meager Mountain in Canada, above the subduction zone where the Juan de Fuca Plate plunges beneath the North American Plate. This Professional Paper presents a synthesis of the entire volcanic arc, addressing all 2,300 known Quaternary volcanoes, not just the 30 or so visually prominent peaks that comprise the volcanic skyline. Study of Cascade volcanoes goes back to the geological explorers of the late 19th century and the seminal investigations of Howel Williams in the 1920s and 1930s. However, major progress and application of modern scientific methods and instrumentation began only in the 1970s with the advent of systematic geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the entire arc. Initial stimulus from the USGS Geothermal Research Program was enhanced by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Together, these two USGS Programs have provided more than three decades of stable funding, staffing, and analytical support. This Professional Paper summarizes the resultant USGS data sets and integrates them with the parallel contributions of other investigators. The product is based upon an all-encompassing and definitive geological database, including chemical and isotopic analyses to characterize the rocks and geochronology to provide the critical time constraints. Until now, this massive amount of data has not been summarized, and a systematic and uniform interpretation firmly grounded in geological fact has been lacking. Herein lies the primary utility of this Cascade volume. It not only will be the mandatory starting point for new workers, but also will provide essential geological context to broaden the perspectives of current investigators of specific Cascade volcanoes. Wes Hildreth's insightful understanding of volcanic processes and his uncompromising scientific integrity make him

  20. Sources of Anxiety Within the School Setting as Reported by Emory University Preservice and Inservice Teachers. A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Cheryl Granade

    Data gathered in three Delphi rounds indicated a dichotomy between 12 inservice supervising teachers and 12 preservice teachers at Emory University in their reports of sources of anxiety within the school setting. Preservice teachers reported concerns focused primarily on pupils and pupil-teacher interaction. Inservice teachers had anxiety…

  1. Using Narrative as a Data Source and Analytic Method to Investigate Learning Outside of Traditional School Settings with Diverse Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martell, Sandra Toro; Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene

    2008-01-01

    Narrative is used to describe and understand how people construct meaning of their lives and experiences and how they think about their own and others' identities. We examined narrative as both data source and method of analysis for investigating learning in non-traditional school settings with students from diverse socio-economic status and…

  2. Time-Dependent Selection of an Optimal Set of Sources to Define a Stable Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Bail, Karine; Gordon, David

    2010-01-01

    Temporal statistical position stability is required for VLBI sources to define a stable Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) and has been studied in many recent papers. This study analyzes the sources from the latest realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) with the Allan variance, in addition to taking into account the apparent linear motions of the sources. Focusing on the 295 defining sources shows how they are a good compromise of different criteria, such as statistical stability and sky distribution, as well as having a sufficient number of sources, despite the fact that the most stable sources of the entire ICRF2 are mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Nevertheless, the selection of a stable set is not unique: studying different solutions (GSF005a and AUG24 from GSFC and OPA from the Paris Observatory) over different time periods (1989.5 to 2009.5 and 1999.5 to 2009.5) leads to selections that can differ in up to 20% of the sources. Observing, recording, and network improvement are some of the causes, showing better stability for the CRF over the last decade than the last twenty years. But this may also be explained by the assumption of stationarity that is not necessarily right for some sources.

  3. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  4. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon

    PubMed Central

    McCubbin, Francis M.; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H2O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher. PMID:20547878

  5. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon.

    PubMed

    McCubbin, Francis M; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-06-22

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H(2)O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher.

  6. Magmatic occurrences in the Central Arava (southern Israel) based on Geology and Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, Ginat; Michael, Rybakov; Boris, Shirman; Michael, Lazar

    2014-05-01

    The Eshet Ridge is located in the Central Arava near Wadi Paran. Geological data were collected using ground magnetic surveys and petrophysical measurements (magnetic susceptibility and density). The goal was to reveal the structure and nature of a concealed magmatic body under the ridge. Integrated gravity and magnetic interpretation together with seismic reflection data (including 2¾ modeling) indicated the presence of a deep-seated basic magmatic intrusion. Occurrence of Fe-mineralized rocks along the ridge supports subsurface data. The magmatic body was intruded in the hard Turonian rocks of the Eshet Ridge. Basic magmatic exposures dating from the Early Miocene were evident along Wadi Ashosh (in the eastern Negev) and its margins 18 km. to the north of the ridge. A new outcrop of basic magmatic intrusion was found southwest of the Tzukim settlement. Magnetic measurements indicated a similarity between their magnetic pattern and the Ashosh basic magmatics, which were dated to 20.4 ± 0.7 Ma. Volcanoclastic tuff pebbles (magnetic susceptibility of around 2-7 * 10-3 SI) surrounded by conglomerate were discovered at two sites in Wadi Demma and Wadi Menuha (streams that drain near the Eshet Ridge and 2 km south of it, respectively). The conglomerates contained mostly limestone, chalk and chert fragments; not more than 5% of which were volcanic pebbles. Two pebbles were dated to 24.4 ± 0.7and 21.5 ± 0.5 Ma. The magmatic outcrops in Wadi Ashosh, the magmatic dyke near Tzukim and the volcanic purple and black pebbles near Wadi Menuha were all dated to the very Late Oligocene-Early Miocene. The magmatic body identified in this study under the Eshet Ridge was termed the Eshet Intrusion and is connected to, and even the source of, all these phenomena.

  7. Introduction to Special Section on Open Magmatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, Wes; Grove, Timothy L.; Dungan, Michael A.

    1986-05-01

    The idea that magmatic systems are open to intermittent gains and losses of mass and energy is hardly new. Eruptive, conductive, and hydrothermally convective losses are obvious, and both wall rock assimilation and mixing of discrete magma batches are petrological ideas with long and distinguished conceptual lineages. New ideas of the last decade are largely outgrowths of the mounting evidence that mixing and assimilation are ubiquitous, that heterogeneity and mixing in mantle source regions are common, and that few igneous rock suites are likely to reflect strictly closed-system fractionation of single magma batches. The evidence has accumulated quickly on many fronts, owing in part to the wider availability of high-precision analytical tools and the development of sophisticated methods for modeling the wealth of chemical and isotopic data. Detailed studies of zoned ash flow sheets, zoned and layered plutons, and macroscopically mixed igneous rocks have made petrologists aware that dynamic and nonequilibrium aspects of magma transport play important roles in the evolution of many magmatic systems. Technological advances have permitted routine experimentation over a wide range of pressures, providing kinetic data and phase equilibrum constraints essential to understanding both mantle source processes and magmatic evolution in crustal reservoirs. Finally, the plate tectonic synthesis and seafloor sampling programs have respectively provided the impetus for a detailed assessment of geochemical heterogeneity in a dynamic mantle and an important avenue for accomplishing that assessment.

  8. CO2-fluxing collapses metal mobility in magmatic vapour

    DOE PAGES

    van Hinsberg, V. J.; Berlo, K.; Migdisov, A. A.; ...

    2016-05-18

    Magmatic systems host many types of ore deposits, including world-class deposits of copper and gold. Magmas are commonly an important source of metals and ore-forming fluids in these systems. In many magmatic-hydrothermal systems, low-density aqueous fluids, or vapours, are significant metal carriers. Such vapours are water-dominated shallowly, but fluxing of CO2-rich vapour exsolved from deeper magma is now recognised as ubiquitous during open-system magma degassing. Furthermore, we show that such CO2-fluxing leads to a sharp drop in element solubility, up to a factor of 10,000 for Cu, and thereby provides a highly efficient, but as yet unrecognised mechanism for metalmore » deposition.« less

  9. Mesozoic mafic alkaline magmatism of southern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian

    2004-11-01

    More than 100 volcanic necks in central Scania (southern Sweden) are the product of Jurassic continental rift-related mafic alkaline magmatism at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield. They are mainly basanites, with rarer melanephelinites. Both rock groups display overlapping primitive Mg-numbers, Cr and Ni contents, steep chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns (LaN /YbN = 17 27) and an overall enrichment in incompatible elements. However, the melanephelinites are more alkaline and have stronger high field strength element enrichment than the basanites. The existence of distinct primary magmas is also indicated by heterogeneity in highly incompatible element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb, La/Nb). Trace element modelling indicates that the magmas were generated by comparably low degrees of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source. Such a source can best be explained by a metasomatic overprint of the mantle lithosphere by percolating evolved melts. The former existence of such alkaline trace element-enriched melts can be demonstrated by inversion of the trace element content of green-core clinopyroxenes and anorthoclase which occur as xenocrysts in the melanephelinites and are interpreted as being derived from crystallization of evolved mantle melts. Jurassic magmatic activity in Scania was coeval with the generation of nephelinites in the nearby Egersund Basin (Norwegian North Sea). Both Scanian and North Sea alkaline magmas share similar trace element characteristics. Mantle enrichment processes at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield and the North Sea Basin generated trace element signatures similar to those of ocean island basalts (e.g. low Zr/Nb and La/Nb) but there are no indications of plume activity during the Mesozoic in this area. On the contrary, the short duration of rifting, absence of extensive lithospheric thinning, and low magma volumes argue against a Mesozoic mantle plume. It seems likely that the metasomatic imprint resulted from the

  10. Magmatic volatiles and the weathering of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1993-01-01

    The sources for volatiles on Mars have been the subject of many hypotheses for exogenous influences including late accretion of volatile-enriched material, impact devolatilization to create massive early atmospheres, and even major bombardment by comets. However, the inventory of chemically active volatiles observable at the contemporary surface of Mars is consistent with domination by endogenous, subsequent planetary processes, viz., persistent magmatic outgassing. Volcanism on Mars has been widespread in both space and time. Notwithstanding important specific differences between the mantles of Earth and Mars, the geochemical similarities are such that the suite of gases emitted from Martian volcanic activity should include H2O, CO2, S-containing gases (e.g. H2S and/or SO2), and Cl-containing gases (e.g., Cl2 and/or HCl). H2O and CO2 exist in the atmosphere of Mars. Both are also present as surface condensates. However, spectroscopic observations of the Martian atmosphere clearly show that the S- and Cl-containing gases are severely depleted, with upper limits of less than or equal to 10(exp -7) the abundance of CO2. Likewise, there is no evidence of polar condensates of compounds of these elements as there is for CO2 and H2O. Within the soil, on the other hand, there has been direct measurement of incorporated H2O and abundant compounds containing S and Cl. Barring some as yet implausible geochemical sequestering process, the S/Cl ratio of about 6:1 in Martian soils implies a limit of 5% on the contribution of matter of solarlike composition (e.g., carbonaceous chondrite or cometary material) to these volatiles. Hence, exogenous sources are minor or not yet observed. From analysis of elemental trends in Martian soils, it has been recently shown that a simple two-component model can satisfy the Viking in situ measurements. Component A includes Si and most or all the Al, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Component B, taken as 16 +/- 3% by weight of the total, contains S and most or

  11. Sources and Correlates of Role Strain Among Teachers in Varied Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Pat

    This study investigated the relationship between role strain and several personal and organizational variables for teachers in self-contained classrooms and team teaching settings. Role strain was identified by the Job Related Tension Index; personal variables were identified by the Teacher Conception of the Educative Process Questionnaire; and…

  12. Sources of Cognitive Inflexibility in Set-Shifting Tasks: Insights into Developmental Theories from Adult Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Anthony Steven

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined processes underlying cognitive inflexibility in set-shifting tasks typically used to assess the development of executive function in children. Adult participants performed a Flexible Item Selection Task (FIST) that requires shifting from categorizing by one dimension (e.g., color) to categorizing by a second orthogonal…

  13. School-Community Collaboration in a Rural Setting: Sources and Profiles. Knowledge Brief, Number Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Sylvie van Heusden

    This article provides resources for school-community collaboration to support at-risk students and their families in rural settings. Rural schools and their communities must work together efficiently and economically to counteract problems such as geographic isolation, shortage of resources, economic decline, lack of political power and…

  14. The synoptic setting and possible energy sources for mesoscale wave disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uccellini, Louis W.; Koch, Steven E.

    1987-01-01

    Published data on 13 cases of mesoscale wave disturbances and their environment were examined to isolate common features for these cases and to determine possible energy sources for the waves. These events are characterized by either a singular wave of depression or wave packets with periods of 1-4 h, horizontal wavelengths of 50-500 km, and surface-pressure perturbation amplitudes of 0.2-7.0 mb. These wave events are shown to be associated with a distinct synoptic pattern (including the existence of a strong inversion in the lower troposphere and the propagation of a jet streak toward a ridge axis in the upper troposphere) while displaying little correlation with the presence of convective storm cells. The observed development of the waves is consistent with the hypothesis that the energy source needed to initiate and sustain the wave disturbances may be related to a geostrophic adjustment process associated with upper-tropospheric jet streaks.

  15. Magmatic epidote and its petrologic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, A.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Epidote is a major magmatic mineral in tonalite and granodiorite in a belt coextensive with the Mesozoic accreted terranes between northern California and southeastern Alaska. Textural and chemical evidence indicates that epidote crystallized as a relatively late but magmatic mineral that formed through reaction with hornblende in the presence of a melt phase. The observed relations concur with experimental data on crystallization of epidote from synthetic granodiorite at 8 kbar total pressure. Plutonic rocks bearing magmatic epidote must have formed under moderately high pressures, corresponding to lower crustal depths, under fairly oxidizing conditions. 23 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  16. Magmatic versus sedimentary volcanism: similarities of two different geological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Adriano

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary volcanoes (or more commonly called mud volcanoes) are geological phenomena that are present in sedimentary basins of passive and active margins. At these localities gas and water related to hydrocarbon diagenetic and catagenetic production generate overpressure facilitating the rise of mobile and ductily deformable materials that breach through the denser overlying rocks. The results are surface powerful manifestations of mud eruptions that strikingly resemble to those of magmatic volcanoes. Magmatic and sedimentary volcanoes share many other similarities. Initially both systems are essentially gas driven and the subsurface plumbing systems are characterized by intrusions and a complex system of fractures and conduits that bifurcate from a central feeder channel that manifest in the surface as numerous satellite seeps and vents. In both cases are inferred secondary shallower chambers where reactions take place. Comparable structural morphologies (e.g. conical, elongated, pie-shaped, multicrater, swap-like, caldera collapse, subsiding flanks, plateau-like) and/or alteration of the original shape are in both cases related to e.g. density and viscosity of the erupted solids, to the gas content, to the frequency of the eruptions, and to the action of meteoric factors (e.g. strong erosion by rain, wind, temperature changes etc. etc.). Like for magmatic volcanoes, the periodicity of the eruptive activity is related to the time required to charge the system and create new overpressure, as well as how the structure seals during periods of dormancy. Earthquakes are documented to be a powerful trigger capable to activate faults (often hosting magmatic and sedimentary volcanoes) and/or facilitating the breaching of the upper layers, and allowing the rise of deeper charged fluids. Finally, both systems significantly contribute as active source for CH4 (sedimentary) and CO2 (magmatic) resulting of great importance for global budget estimates of sensitive gasses. The

  17. Magmatic Evolution of the Skye Igneous Center, Western Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, S. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Spera, F. J.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemically complex igneous suites are the result of interplay between deep and crustal-level processes. Quantitatively modeling the contribution that crustal-level processes such as magma recharge, crustal assimilation, and fractional crystallization have is critical for developing realistic models of how magma transport/storage systems evolve. The Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, and Fractional Crystallization simulator (EC-RAFC, Spera & Bohrson, 2001, 2002; Bohrson & Spera, 2001, 2003) provides a means to model thermal, compositional, and magma volume data for complex magmatic systems. The Skye igneous center, western Scotland, spanning the period 60.53 +/- 0.08 Ma - 53.5 +/- 0.8 Ma and characterized by a well-documented suite of lavas and intrusive rocks of picritic to granitic composition, is the first natural data set to which the EC-RAFC model has been applied in detail. Based on analysis of published field, stratigraphic, petrographic, and chemical data, we propose that the Skye Tertiary magmatic sequence be divided into four petrogenetically related lineages. EC-RAFC results indicate that each lineage is characterized by a unique parental magma that has undergone distinct episodes of RAFC. Model results, constrained by published data on the nature of the crust beneath Skye, indicate that the character of the assimilant changes upsection, suggesting that the associated magma reservoirs migrated to shallower levels as the magmatic system matured. The magmatic products of each group also record the fingerprint of multiple episodes of magma recharge, where the character of the recharge magma also evolves with time. The image of the magma transport system that emerges is one in which magma is initially intruded at lower crustal levels and undergoes a distinct RAFC episode. Residual magma from this event then migrates to shallower levels, where mid-crustal wallrock is assimilated; recharge magma is characterized by increasingly crustal chemical and

  18. Characterization of gas chemistry and noble-gas isotope ratios of inclusion fluids in magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam alunite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Rye, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    -hydrothermal or magmatic-steam fluids. Thus, the oxidation of SO2 to aqueous sulfate in the magmatic-steam fluids did not result from mixing with atmospheric oxygen. Both of the fluid types are characterized by high H2 contents that range from 0.2 mol% to the extraordinarily large amounts (66 mol%) observed in some magmatic-steam fluids. Modeling of gas speciation using SOLVGAS requires most of the gas species to have been in disequilibrium at the time of their trapping in the fluid inclusions. The origin of such extreme H2 concentrations, although problematic, is thought to be largely related to accumulation of H2 from the reaction of water with ferrous iron during the rise of magma and probably even after exsolution of fluid from a magma. The large contents of reduced gases in the inclusion fluids are far in excess of those observed in volcanic emanations, and are thought to reflect the close "sampling position" of the host alunite relative to the location of the magma. Isotope ratios of He and Ne indicate largely crustal sources for these gases in the alunite parental fluids derived from Tertiary magmas, but a greater mantle component for the gases in alunite parental fluids derived from Proterozoic magmas.

  19. Depositional setting and hydrocarbon source potential of the Miocene Gulf of Suez syn-rift evaporites

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Arthur, M.A.; Quinn, J.S.; Whelan, J.K.; Katz, B.J. )

    1988-08-01

    The Red Sea rift basin and its northern continuation, the Gulf of Suez, has experienced continuous deposition of marine evaporites throughout much of its development from the early Miocene to the Pliocene resulting in the accumulation of up to 5 km of evaporite strata in the rift. In this paper, the geologic history of these evaporites are discussed, along with their petroleum source rock potential. The authors hypothesize that rapid deposition of organic matter occurred during episodic storms and freshening events in which a less saline surface layer developed.

  20. On correlated sources of uncertainty in four dimensional computed tomography data sets.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Eric D; Tome, Wolfgang A

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to estimate the degree of uncertainty inherent to a given four dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) imaging modality and to test for interaction of the investigated factors (i.e., object displacement, velocity, and the period of motion) when determining the object motion coordinates, motion envelope, and the confomality in which it can be defined within a time based data series. A motion phantom consisting of four glass spheres imbedded in low density foam on a one dimensional moving platform was used to investigate the interaction of uncertainty factors in motion trajectory that could be used in comparison of trajectory definition, motion envelope definition and conformality in an optimal 4D-CT imaging environment. The motion platform allowed for a highly defined motion trajectory that could be as the ground truth in the comparison with observed motion in 4D-CT data sets. 4D-CT data sets were acquired for 9 different motion patterns. Multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed where the factors considered were the phantom maximum velocity, object volume, and the image intensity used to delineate the high density objects. No statistical significance was found for three factor interaction for definition of the motion trajectory, motion envelope, or Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) conformality. Two factor interactions were found to be statistically significant for the DSC for the interactions of 1) object volume and the HU threshold used for delineation and 2) the object velocity and object volume. Moreover, a statistically significant single factor direct proportionality was observed between the maximum velocity and the mean tracking error. In this work multiple factors impacting on the uncertainty in 4D data sets have been considered and some statistically significant two-factor interactions have been identified. Therefore, the detailed evaluation of errors and uncertainties in 4D imaging modalities is recommended in

  1. Sources and prevalence of self-reported asthma diagnoses in adults in urban and rural settings of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Emily; Parr, John; Lindeboom, Wietze; Khanam, Masuma Akter; Koehlmoos, Tracy Pérez

    2013-01-01

    This study provides data on the sources of asthma diagnoses in the adult Bangladeshi population in urban and rural settings. The paper also reports the prevalence of self-reported asthma diagnoses and associated socio-demographic factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three communities: two rural settings and one urban setting, with a total sample size of 32,665 subjects. Pre-existing surveillance data provided individual socio-demographic factors. Provider categories were based on previous research describing provider plurality in Bangladesh. Descriptive statistics, univariate regression and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) generalists provided the largest proportion of diagnoses in both urban (54.6%) and rural (42.4%) sites. The largest proportion of non-MBBS-trained healthcare workers providing diagnoses of asthma was spiritual healers (13.3%) in the urban settings and village doctors (42.4%) in rural settings. The overall prevalence of self-reported asthma diagnoses was 5.0% in the urban population and 3.5% in the rural population. The results highlight the importance of non-MBBS doctors in serving the healthcare needs of the Bangladeshi population. This study reveals a higher prevalence of self-reported asthma diagnoses in the urban setting than in rural ones, which is consistent with international literature on the topic.

  2. Defect inspection in hot slab surface: multi-source CCD imaging based fuzzy-rough sets method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liming; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Xiaodong; Xiao, Hong; Huang, Chao

    2016-09-01

    To provide an accurate surface defects inspection method and make the automation of robust image region of interests(ROI) delineation strategy a reality in production line, a multi-source CCD imaging based fuzzy-rough sets method is proposed for hot slab surface quality assessment. The applicability of the presented method and the devised system are mainly tied to the surface quality inspection for strip, billet and slab surface etcetera. In this work we take into account the complementary advantages in two common machine vision (MV) systems(line array CCD traditional scanning imaging (LS-imaging) and area array CCD laser three-dimensional (3D) scanning imaging (AL-imaging)), and through establishing the model of fuzzy-rough sets in the detection system the seeds for relative fuzzy connectedness(RFC) delineation for ROI can placed adaptively, which introduces the upper and lower approximation sets for RIO definition, and by which the boundary region can be delineated by RFC region competitive classification mechanism. For the first time, a Multi-source CCD imaging based fuzzy-rough sets strategy is attempted for CC-slab surface defects inspection that allows an automatic way of AI algorithms and powerful ROI delineation strategies to be applied to the MV inspection field.

  3. Collision zone magmatism aids continental crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Ralf, Halama; Gevorg, Navasardian; Chuck, Connor; Massimo, D'Antonio; Samuele, Agostini; Osamu, Ishizuka; Sergei, Karapetian; Arkadi, Karakhanian

    2014-05-01

    .51282, respectively). These isotopic signatures are much more similar to those typical of intra-oceanic subduction zones than those typical of continental crust, likely due to the very young age of the rocks. In contrast, trace element abundances reveal many similarities to average CC, such as Nb-Ta and Ti troughs and Pb peaks. The range of d11B isotope ratios (-8.7 to +2.1 per mil) signifies magmas originating from moderately metasomatised (arc preconditioned) mantle sources. Our combined results reveal that the collision-related mantle melting is capable of generating large volumes of plutons and volcanic rocks that resemble (although not perfectly) the composition of the average CC. We will attempt to use the new combined datasets in order to quantify the importance of the collision zone magmatism for continental crustal growth. [1] Lee et al. (2007) EPSL 263, 370-387; [2] Niu et al. (2013) Earth-Science Reviews 127, 96-110; [3] Connor et al., (2012) J.Applied Volcanology, 1:3, 1-19.

  4. Role of crustal contribution in the early stage of the Damara Orogen, Namibia: new constraints from combined U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes from the Goas Magmatic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Lorenzo; Kinnaird, Judith; Lehmann, Jeremie; Naydenov, Kalin; Saalmann, Kerstin; Frei, Dirk; Gerdes, Axel

    2014-05-01

    invoke large-scale reworking in the lower crust. Hf model ages, coupled with an exhaustive set of U-Pb geochronological data and with the new magmatic and detrital age record, suggest that the crustal components which developed the Goas sources might have formed during specific orogenic events, with a maximum contribution of rocks derived from the central-western African Paleoproterozoic Eburnean Orogeny.

  5. The nature of magmatism at Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Island, Philippines: implications for geothermal activity and regional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Andrew J.; Cooke, David R.; Phillips, David; Zaide-Delfin, Maribel

    2004-01-01

    The Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Island, Philippines is a high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system in an active island-arc volcanic setting. This paper presents a regional context for the Palinpinon geology, discusses the petrogenetic evolution of magmatism in the district and assesses the genetic relationships between intrusion and geothermal circulation. The oldest rock formation, the Lower Puhagan Volcanic Formation (Middle Miocene), is part of a volcanic sequence that is traceable throughout the Visayas region and is related to subduction of the Sulu Sea oceanic basin in a southeasterly direction beneath the Sulu arc. Late Miocene to Early Pliocene times mark a period of regional subsidence and marine sedimentation. A thick sequence of calcareous sediments (Okoy Formation) was deposited during this period. Magmatism in Early Pliocene to Recent times coincided with commencement of subduction at the Negros-Sulu Arc. This produced basaltic andesites and andesites belonging to the Southern Negros and Cuernos Volcanic Formations. During this time the Puhagan dikes and the Nasuji Pluton intruded Middle Miocene, Late Miocene and Early-Late Pliocene formations. Based on radiogenic ( 40Ar/ 39Ar) dating of hornblende, the Puhagan dikes are 4.1-4.2 Ma and the Nasuji Pluton 0.3-0.7 Ma. This age difference confirms these intrusions are not genetically related. The Early Pliocene age of the Puhagan dikes also confirms they are not the heat source for the current geothermal system and that a much younger intrusion is situated beyond drill depths. Igneous rock formations in southern Negros are the products of regional island-arc magmatism with medium K, calc-alkaline, basaltic to dacitic compositions. Their adakitic affinity implies that the melting of subducted oceanic basalt has influenced magmatism in this region. Considering the regional tectonic history the most likely scenarios for the generation of slab melts are: (1) during the Middle Miocene, by the

  6. Loop Heat Pipe Transient Behavior Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control with Thermoelectric Converter on Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly done by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. With this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within 0.5K or better. However, because the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if the LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP was carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor was placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir was cold-biased and was heated by a control heater. Test results show that it was feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. In particular, when a thermoelectric converter was used as the reservoir control heater, the heat source temperature could be maintained within a tight range using a proportional-integral-derivative or on/off control algorithm. Moreover, because the TEC could provide both heating and cooling to the reservoir, temperature oscillations during fast transients such as loop startup could be eliminated or substantially reduced when compared to using an electrical heater as the control heater.

  7. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  8. Vapor intrusion in urban settings: effect of foundation features and source location.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric

    2011-01-01

    In many urban settings, groundwater contains volatile organic compounds, such as tricholoroethene, tetrachloroethene, benzene, etc., at concentrations that are at or slightly below non-potable groundwater standards. Some non-potable groundwater standards do not protect against human health risks that might result from vapor intrusion. Vapor intrusion is a process by which vapor phase contaminants present in the subsurface migrate through the soil and ultimately enter a building through foundation cracks. The end result is a decrease in air quality within the building. Predicting whether or not vapor intrusion will occur at rates sufficient to cause health risks is extremely difficult and depends on many factors. In many cities, a wide-range of property uses take place over a relatively small area. For instance, schools, commercial buildings and residential buildings may all reside within a few city blocks. Most conceptual site models assume the ground surface is open to the atmosphere (i.e. green space); however the effect that an impervious surface (e.g. paving) may have on vapor transport rates is not routinely considered. Using a 3-D computational fluid dynamics model, we are investigating how the presence of impervious surfaces affects vapor intrusion rates. To complement our modeling efforts, we are in the initial stages of conducting a field study in a neighborhood where vapor intrusion is occurring.

  9. Vapor intrusion in urban settings: effect of foundation features and source location

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yijun; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In many urban settings, groundwater contains volatile organic compounds, such as tricholoroethene, tetrachloroethene, benzene, etc., at concentrations that are at or slightly below non-potable groundwater standards. Some non-potable groundwater standards do not protect against human health risks that might result from vapor intrusion. Vapor intrusion is a process by which vapor phase contaminants present in the subsurface migrate through the soil and ultimately enter a building through foundation cracks. The end result is a decrease in air quality within the building. Predicting whether or not vapor intrusion will occur at rates sufficient to cause health risks is extremely difficult and depends on many factors. In many cities, a wide-range of property uses take place over a relatively small area. For instance, schools, commercial buildings and residential buildings may all reside within a few city blocks. Most conceptual site models assume the ground surface is open to the atmosphere (i.e. green space); however the effect that an impervious surface (e.g. paving) may have on vapor transport rates is not routinely considered. Using a 3-D computational fluid dynamics model, we are investigating how the presence of impervious surfaces affects vapor intrusion rates. To complement our modeling efforts, we are in the initial stages of conducting a field study in a neighborhood where vapor intrusion is occurring. PMID:24619471

  10. Capillary glucose meter accuracy and sources of error in the ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Helen; Florkowski, Christopher; Bignall, Michael; Budgen, Christopher

    2010-03-05

    Hand-held glucose meters are used throughout the health system by both patients with diabetes and also by health care practitioners. Glucose meter technology is constantly evolving. The current generation of meters and strips are quick to use and require a very small volume of blood. This review aims to describe meters currently available in New Zealand, for use in the ambulatory setting. It also aims to discuss the limits of meter performance and provide technical information that is relevant to the clinician, using locally available data. Commoner causes and consequences of end-user (patient and health professional) error are illustrated using clinical case examples. No meter offers definite advantages over other meters in all clinical situations, rather meters should be chosen because they fit the needs of individual patients and because the provider is able to offer appropriate educational and quality assurance backup to the meter user. A broad understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of the subsidised meter systems available in New Zealand will help the health practitioner decide when it is in the best interests of their patients to change or update meter technology.

  11. Developing open source, self-contained disease surveillance software applications for use in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Emerging public health threats often originate in resource-limited countries. In recognition of this fact, the World Health Organization issued revised International Health Regulations in 2005, which call for significantly increased reporting and response capabilities for all signatory nations. Electronic biosurveillance systems can improve the timeliness of public health data collection, aid in the early detection of and response to disease outbreaks, and enhance situational awareness. Methods As components of its Suite for Automated Global bioSurveillance (SAGES) program, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory developed two open-source, electronic biosurveillance systems for use in resource-limited settings. OpenESSENCE provides web-based data entry, analysis, and reporting. ESSENCE Desktop Edition provides similar capabilities for settings without internet access. Both systems may be configured to collect data using locally available cell phone technologies. Results ESSENCE Desktop Edition has been deployed for two years in the Republic of the Philippines. Local health clinics have rapidly adopted the new technology to provide daily reporting, thus eliminating the two-to-three week data lag of the previous paper-based system. Conclusions OpenESSENCE and ESSENCE Desktop Edition are two open-source software products with the capability of significantly improving disease surveillance in a wide range of resource-limited settings. These products, and other emerging surveillance technologies, can assist resource-limited countries compliance with the revised International Health Regulations. PMID:22950686

  12. Magmatic gas emissions at Holocene volcanic features near Mono Lake, California, and their relation to regional magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Howle, James F.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-02-01

    Silicic lavas have erupted repeatedly in the Mono Basin over the past few thousand years, forming the massive domes and coulees of the Mono Craters chain and the smaller island vents in Mono Lake. We report here on the first systematic study of magmatic CO2 emissions from these features, conducted during 2007-2010. Most notably, a known locus of weak steam venting on the summit of North Coulee is actually enclosed in a large area (~ 0.25 km2) of diffuse gas discharge that emits 10-14 t/d of CO2, mostly at ambient temperature. Subsurface gases sampled here are heavily air-contaminated, but after standard corrections are applied, show average δ13C-CO2 of - 4.72‰, 3He/4He of 5.89RA, and CO2/3He of 0.77 × 1010, very similar to the values in fumarolic gas from Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera immediately to the south of the basin. If these values also characterize the magmatic gas source at Mono Lake, where CO2 is captured by the alkaline lake water, a magmatic CO2 upflow beneath the lake of ~ 4 t/d can be inferred. Groundwater discharge from the Mono Craters area transports ~ 13 t/d of 14C-dead CO2 as free gas and dissolved carbonate species, and adding in this component brings the estimated total magmatic CO2 output to 29 t/d for the two silicic systems in the Mono Basin. If these emissions reflect intrusion and degassing of underlying basalt with 0.5 wt.% CO2, a modest intrusion rate of 0.00075 km3/yr is indicated. Much higher intrusion rates are required to account for CO2 emissions from Mammoth Mountain and the West Moat of the Long Valley Caldera.

  13. Cenozoic Ignimbrites, Source Calderas, Relict Magma Chambers, and Tectonic Settings: Perspectives from Cordilleran North America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipman, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    In the early 1960s, new concepts and innovative techniques coalesced spectacularly to improve understanding of Tertiary pyroclastic volcanism in North America. Spotty recognition of welded tuff, among rocks mostly described as silicic lava flows, exploded with identification of individual ignimbrite sheets, some having volumes >103 km3 and extending >100 km from source calderas. R.l. Smith, during study of the Bandelier Tuff in New Mexico, documented complexities of welding and crystallization zones that provided a genetic framework (cooling units) for ignimbrite studies (even while confusion continues in some areas where talus and vegetation obscure bench-forming contact zones between densely welded cliffs). Also in the 1960s, application of isotopic age determinations (initially K-Ar, now largely superceded by 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion) and precise paleomagnetic pole directions became key tools for correlating ignimbrites, deciphering eruptive histories, and determining volcano-tectonic patterns. Dated ignimbrites provide unique stratigraphic markers within volcanic field, as well as datums for regional structures and the shifting patterns of volcanism related to global plate motions--another happy coincidence in the 1960s as plate-tectonic models were formulated. Tertiary ignimbrite flare-ups along the Cordilleran margin increasingly are recognized as coinciding with inception of regional extension, especially during transitions from episodes of low-angle convergence. Many large caldera sources for the Tertiary ignimbrites have now been identified, in place of prior vague concepts of “volcano-tectonic depressions”, especially as the contrasts between thin outflow and thickly ponded intracaldera ignimbrite with interleaved collapse breccia became appreciated. Multi-km-thick fills in many calderas document that collapse begins early during large ignimbrite eruptions, and downsag inception was succeeded by breakage along ring faults. Resurgent uplift has been

  14. Numerical model for the evaluation of Earthquake effects on a magmatic system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Deepak; Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A finite element numerical model is presented to compute the effect of an Earthquake on the dynamics of magma in reservoirs with deformable walls. The magmatic system is hit by a Mw 7.2 Earthquake (Petrolia/Capo Mendocina 1992) with hypocenter at 15 km diagonal distance. At subsequent times the seismic wave reaches the nearest side of the magmatic system boundary, travels through the magmatic fluid and arrives to the other side of the boundary. The modelled physical system consists in the magmatic reservoir with a thin surrounding layer of rocks. Magma is considered as an homogeneous multicomponent multiphase Newtonian mixture with exsolution and dissolution of volatiles (H2O+CO2). The magmatic reservoir is made of a small shallow magma chamber filled with degassed phonolite, connected by a vertical dike to a larger deeper chamber filled with gas-rich shoshonite, in condition of gravitational instability. The coupling between the Earthquake and the magmatic system is computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the deformation of the magmatic reservoir walls, along with the conservation equations of mass of components and momentum of the magmatic mixture. The characteristic elastic parameters of rocks are assigned to the computational domain at the boundary of magmatic system. Physically consistent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions are assigned according to the evolution of the seismic signal. Seismic forced displacements and velocities are set on the part of the boundary which is hit by wave. On the other part of boundary motion is governed by the action of fluid pressure and deviatoric stress forces due to fluid dynamics. The constitutive equations for the magma are solved in a monolithic way by space-time discontinuous-in-time finite element method. To attain additional stability least square and discontinuity capturing operators are included in the formulation. A partitioned algorithm is used to couple the magma and thin layer of rocks. The

  15. Study of MOSFET Low Frequency Noise Source Fluctuation Using a New Fully Programmable Test Set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochereau, K.; Blanc, C.; Marin, M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate the huge spread that can be seen on flicker (1/f) noise figures of advanced MOS devices. In order to do so, we set up a new fully programmable test bench including low frequency noise (1Hz-few Mhz) measurement capability. Once all the hurdles we faced during measurement optimization have been overpassed, we show indeed 1/f noise dispersion over wafer is far larger than simple drive current one. We introduce the first steps of a global study of noise source fluctuation that has still to be led.

  16. Evaporatic-source model for igneous-related Fe oxide (REE-Cu-Au-U) mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    We propose that many igneous-related Fe oxide-rich (REE-Cu-Au-U-bearing) deposits form by hydrothermal processes involving evaporitic ligand sources, either coeval salars or older evaporites. These deposits are abundant in both Phanerozoic and Proterozoic extensional continental and continent-margin settings. They commonly form in global arid zones, but they also occur where magmatism is superimposed upon older evaporites. Magmatic compositions exert only second-order control, mainly on alteration mineralogy and on element abundances. Hot S-poor brines generated by interaction with evaporitic materials are consistent with geologic settings and help rationalize the distinctive element enrichments (siderophile, lithophile) and hydrothermal alteration (sodic, locally alkaline) found in these systems. This model contrasts with immiscible oxide melt and magmatic-hydrothermal origins commonly proposed for these deposits, although all three mechanisms can occur. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Palaeoproterozoic continental arc magmatism, and Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India: New constraints from in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope systematics, monazite dating and whole-rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parampreet; Zeh, Armin; Chaudhri, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    Presently, the extent, origin and petrogenesis of late Palaeoproterozoic (ca. 1.85 Ga) magmatism in the north-central Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India and subsequent metamorphic overprints are poorly constrained. Results of new in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope analyses in combination with whole-rock elemental and isotopic data provide the first hard evidence that granitoid magmatism occurred in a continental magmatic arc setting between 1.86 and 1.81 Ga. The Hf-Nd model ages of 3.0-2.6 Ga and inherited zircon grains of 3.3-2.5 Ga indicate abundant reworking of Archaean crust. Flat HREE patterns with negative Eu anomalies furthermore reveal that the granitoids were generated from garnet-free and plagioclase-rich sources at shallow depths. Significant isotope variation among granitoid samples (εHft = -3.7 to -9.0; εNdt = -4.8 to -7.9) indicate that the reworked Archaean crust was not completely homogenised during the Palaeoproterozoic. This is best reflected by zircon Hf-isotope variation of ca. 9.5 epsilon units within the oldest granitoid sample. Zircon grains from this sample define three discrete Hf-isotope groups at εHf1.86Ga = -8.9, -4.8 and -1.6. These are interpreted to result from mixing of zircon-saturated magmas derived from three distinct sources within the crust prior to solidification. A monazite U-Pb isochron age of 868 ± 4 Ma from one of the granitoid samples furthermore indicates that the Aravalli fold belt was affected by an important post-magmatic overprint, perhaps related to the widespread metasomatic, granulite metamorphic and/or magmatic events during the same time span.

  18. Cretaceous crust-mantle interaction and tectonic evolution of Cathaysia Block in South China: Evidence from pulsed mafic rocks and related magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Hai-Xiang; Zhao, Kui-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Cretaceous tectono-magmatic evolution of the Cathaysia Block in South China is important but their mechanism and geodynamics remain highly disputed. In this study we carried out a detailed geochemical study on the recently found Kuokeng mafic dikes in the western Fujian Province (the Interior Cathaysia Block) to reveal the petrogenesis and geodynamics of the Cretaceous magmatism. Kuokeng mafic dikes were emplaced in three principal episodes: ~ 129 Ma (monzogabbro), ~ 107 Ma (monzodiorite), and ~ 97 Ma (gabbro). Geochemical characteristics indicate that the monzogabbros were derived from the unmodified mantle source, while gabbros were likely derived from metasomatized mantle by subducted slab (fluids and sediments). Sr-Nd isotope compositions indicate that the parental magmas of the monzodiorites were generated by mixing of enriched, mantle-derived, mafic magmas and felsic melts produced by partial melting of crustal materials. Until the Early Cretaceous (~ 123 Ma), the dominant ancient Interior Cathaysia lithospheric mantle exhibited insignificant subduction signature, indicating the melting of asthenospheric mantle and the consequent back-arc extension, producing large-scale partial melting of the crustal materials under the forward subduction regime of the paleo-Pacific plate. The monzodiorites and gabbros appear to be associated with northwestward subduction of Pacific plate under an enhanced lithospheric extensional setting, accompanying with mantle modification, which triggered shallower subduction-related metasomatically enriched lithospheric mantle to melt partially. After ca. 110 Ma, the coastal magmatic belts formed due to a retreat and rollback of the subducting Pacific Plate underneath SE China in the continental margin arc system.

  19. Magmatic gas scrubbing: Implications for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Gerlach, T.M.; Reed, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the abundance of SO2(g) in magmatic gases, precursory increases in magmatic SO2(g) are not always observed prior to volcanic eruption, probably because many terrestrial volcanoes contain abundant groundwater or surface water that scrubs magmatic gases until a dry pathway to the atmosphere is established. To better understand scrubbing and its implications for volcano monitoring, we model thermochemically the reaction of magmatic gases with water. First, we inject a 915??C magmatic gas from Merapi volcano into 25??C air-saturated water (ASW) over a wide range of gas/water mass ratios from 0.0002 to 100 and at a total pressure of 0.1 MPa. Then we model closed-system cooling of the magmatic gas, magmatic gas-ASW mixing at 5.0 MPa, runs with varied temperature and composition of the ASW, a case with a wide range of magmatic-gas compositions, and a reaction of a magmatic gas-ASW mixture with rock. The modeling predicts gas and water compositions, and, in one case, alteration assemblages for a wide range of scrubbing conditions; these results can be compared directly with samples from degassing volcanoes. The modeling suggests that CO2(g) is the main species to monitor when scrubbing exists; another candidate is H2S(g), but it can be affected by reactions with aqueous ferrous iron. In contrast, scrubbing by water will prevent significant SO2(g) and most HCl(g) emissions until dry pathways are established, except for moderate HCl(g) degassing from pH 100 t/d (tons per day) of SO2(g) in addition to CO2(g) and H2S(g) should be taken as a criterion of magma intrusion. Finally, the modeling suggests that the interpretation of gas-ratio data requires a case-by-case evaluation since ratio changes can often be produced by several mechanisms; nevertheless, several gas ratios may provide useful indices for monitoring the drying out of gas pathways. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. Phase-in of nonpoint sources in a transferable discharge permit system for water quality management: setting permit prices.

    PubMed

    Collentine, Dennis

    2005-11-01

    The composite market design is a proposal for a transferable discharge permit system that specifically includes agricultural non-point-source dischargers and addresses both property rights and transaction cost problems. The first step to implementation of a composite market scheme is the estimation of a supply curve for abatement measures in the catchment area. Estimation is performed by combining costs with modeled loss reductions from selected best management practices and then using this information to estimate the supply curve for abatement, which in turn can then be used to set permit prices. The Rönneå catchment in southern Sweden is used as a pilot study area for making this type of estimate. Costs for existing measures that reduce nutrient losses from farmland (catch crops and spring planting) are based on existing programs financed by the Swedish Agricultural Board. A set of supply curves is calculated for these measures using retention estimates for seven subcatchments and three soil types in the area. Although existing information is sufficient to calculate partial supply curves and may be used to set permit prices, additional measures should be included as well as an increased number of variables for differentiating site specific reduction costs.

  1. Magmatic epidote and its petrologic significance.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.-A.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three epidote-bearing tonalitic plutons from the North American Cordillera were studied in detail. These three plutons have close petrographic and chemical similarities. Epidote is always euhedral against biotite but shows highly embayed, vermiform contacts with plagioclase and quartz. Rounded to highly embayed hornblendes are enclosed in epidote as well as in magmatic plagioclase. The pistacite content of epidote, atomic Fe3+/(Fe3+ + Al), is approx 23-27%. These and other textural relations, the lack of alteration of minerals, and the involvement of epidote in flow banding show that the epidote is magmatic, crystallized later through reaction with hornblende in the presence of a melt phase. The observed relations agree with experimental data on crystallization of epidote from synthetic granodiorite at 8 kbar total P. Plutonic rocks bearing magmatic epidote must have formed under moderately high P, corresponding with lower crustal depth, under fairly oxidizing conditions.-L.di H.

  2. Detecting Aseismic Fault Slip and Magmatic Intrusion From Seismicity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llenos, A. L.; McGuire, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Seismicity triggered by aseismic deformation, such as magmatic intrusions or afterslip, can be used to detect the occurrence of these otherwise difficult to observe processes. Recent studies suggest that aseismic deformation can trigger large amounts of seismicity in a variety of plate tectonic settings. We have developed a new technique that takes advantage of this triggered seismicity to estimate the time-history of aseismic stressing rate on a fault- zone by combining the rate and state dependent friction and the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models of seismicity-rate [ Dieterich, 1994; Ogata, 1988]. In the rate-state model, the integration of an observed seismicity rate results in an estimate of the stress rate acting in a given space-time window. However, the seismicity rate observed in any catalog comes from 3 primary sources: coseismically-triggered seismicity (aftershocks), tectonically-triggered seismicity (i.e., from long-term tectonic loading), and aseismically-triggered seismicity (e.g., from dike intrusion, aseismic slip transients, or fluid migration). In catalogs dominated by directly triggered aftershocks (i.e., ETAS branching ratios >~0.7), the coseismically-triggered seismicity rate will be much larger than the aseismically-triggered rate and will dominate the estimate of stressing-rate, obscuring the aseismic transient of interest if the rate-state method is applied directly. The challenge therefore lies in isolating the aseismically-triggered seismicity rate from the coseismically-triggered seismicity rate. The ETAS model [ Ogata, 1988] provides a natural way to separate the aseismic and coseismic seismicity rates, as the ETAS parameter μ essentially reflects the aseismically-triggered rate (as well as the background tectonically-triggered rate). To develop a method that can resolve the magnitude and time history of aseismic stress transients even in high branching ratio regions, we combine the rate-state and ETAS models into a

  3. Sources of inaccuracy in the measurement of adult patients’ resting blood pressure in clinical settings: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kallioinen, Noa; Hill, Andrew; Horswill, Mark S.; Ward, Helen E.; Watson, Marcus O.

    2017-01-01

    Background: To interpret blood pressure (BP) data appropriately, healthcare providers need to be knowledgeable of the factors that can potentially impact the accuracy of BP measurement and contribute to variability between measurements. Methods: A systematic review of studies quantifying BP measurement inaccuracy. Medline and CINAHL databases were searched for empirical articles and systematic reviews published up to June 2015. Empirical articles were included if they reported a study that was relevant to the measurement of adult patients’ resting BP at the upper arm in a clinical setting (e.g. ward or office); identified a specific source of inaccuracy; and quantified its effect. Reference lists and reviews were searched for additional articles. Results: A total of 328 empirical studies were included. They investigated 29 potential sources of inaccuracy, categorized as relating to the patient, device, procedure or observer. Significant directional effects were found for 27; however, for some, the effects were inconsistent in direction. Compared with true resting BP, significant effects of individual sources ranged from −23.6 to +33 mmHg SBP and −14 to +23 mmHg DBP. Conclusion: A single BP value outside the expected range should be interpreted with caution and not taken as a definitive indicator of clinical deterioration. Where a measurement is abnormally high or low, further measurements should be taken and averaged. Wherever possible, BP values should be recorded graphically within ranges. This may reduce the impact of sources of inaccuracy and reduce the scope for misinterpretations based on small, likely erroneous or misleading, changes. PMID:27977471

  4. Spatial and temporal variations of loads and sources of total and dissolved Phosphorus in a set of rivers (Western France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeay, Pierre-Louis; Moatar, Florentina; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-04-01

    In intensive agricultural regions with important livestock farming, long-term land application of Phosphorus (P) both as chemical fertilizer and animal wastes, have resulted in elevated P contents in soils. Since we know that high P concentrations in rivers is of major concern, few studies have been done at to assess the spatiotemporal variability of P loads in rivers and apportionment of point and nonpoint source in total loads. Here we focus on Brittany (Western France) where even though P is a great issue in terms of human and drinking water safety (cyano-toxins), environmental protection and economic costs for Brittany with regards to the periodic proliferations of cyanobacteria that occur every year in this region, no regional-scale systematic study has been carried out so far. We selected a set of small rivers (stream order 3-5) with homogeneous agriculture and granitic catchment. By gathering data from three water quality monitoring networks, covering more than 100 measurements stations, we provide a regional-scale quantification of the spatiotemporal variability of dissolved P (DP) and total P (TP) interannual loads from 1992 to 2012. Build on mean P load in low flows and statistical significance tests, we developed a new indicator, called 'low flow P load' (LFP-load), which allows us to determine the importance of domestic and industrial P sources in total P load and to assess their spatiotemporal variability compared to agricultural sources. The calculation and the map representation of DP and TP interannual load variations allow identification of the greatest and lowest P contributory catchments over the study period and the way P loads of Brittany rivers have evolved through time. Both mean DP and TP loads have been divided by more than two over the last 20 years. Mean LFDP-load decreased by more than 60% and mean LFTP-load by more than 45% on average over the same period showing that this marked temporal decrease in total load is largely due to the

  5. Magmatism and Geodynamics of Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, Mehmet; Oyan, Vural; Sharkov, Evgenii V.; Chugaev, Andrey V.; Genç, Ş. Can; Ünal, Esin; Aysal, Namık; Duru, Olgun; Kavak, Orhan

    2013-04-01

    Eastern Turkey has been an active collision zone for the last 15 My between the Arabian Plate and Eurasian continent. The collision initiated after the closure of the southern branch of the Neotethys Ocean by northward subduction beneath E Anatolia at ~15 Ma. The collision-related volcanism started immediately after the closure of the ocean (again at around 15 Ma) in the north of the present day Lake Van with the eruption of mostly intermediate to acid lavas displaying distinct subduction characteristics. Both continental collision and the magmatism are still active, because the Arabian plate still converges to Anatolia with a velocity of ~2.5 cm/y. The overriding Anatolian block experienced a major uplift event around 10 Ma. The region once resided below the sea level merged as a widespread plateau ~2 km above the sea level as part of a regional dome structure with ~1000 km diameter, extending from Central Anatolia in the West to Azerbaijan in the East. The first alkaline lavas derived from a relatively more enriched source erupted to the surface in the N of Lake Van coeval with the initiation of the uplift at around 10 Ma. The underthrusting Arabian platform, on the other hand, was deformed as a result of both crustal-scale east-west folds adjacent to the major thrust zone and extensional deformations perpendicular to the suture zone. Alkaline within-plate lavas with no subduction component erupted through these extension zones. This intraplate volcanism focused on the Karacadaǧ volcanic complex that covers an area of ~10,000 km2. Early Stage volcanism of Karacadaǧ was dominated by magmas derived from a shallower metasomatized (litospheric) mantle source, while magmas of the later stages were derived from deeper (asthenospheric) sources. The Karacadaǧ volcanic area of SE Anatolia was sourced by a garnet bearing, deep asthenospheric mantle which is similar to that of Afar in terms of its Pb isotopic ratios. This brings into question whether the mantle material

  6. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  7. Palinspastic restoration of NAVDat and implications for the origin of magmatism in southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuarrie, Nadine; Oskin, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Simultaneous palinspastic restoration of deformation and volcanism illuminates relationships between magmatism and tectonics in western North America. Using ArcGIS, we retrodeformed the NAVDat (North American Volcanic Database, navdat.geongrid.org) using the western North America reconstruction of McQuarrie and Wernicke (2005). From these data sets we quantitatively compare rates of magmatism and deformation and evaluate the age, composition, and migration of Cenozoic volcanism from 36 Ma to present. These relationships are shown in a series of palinspastic maps as well as animations that highlight migrating extension and volcanism with time. Western North America is grouped into eight different regions with distinct relationships between strain and volcanism to evaluate competing hypotheses regarding the relationship of extension to continental magmatism. A first-order observation from this study is that magmatism throughout the Basin and Range appears to be primarily driven by plate boundary effects, notably subducting and foundering slabs as well as slab windows. Exceptions include the Yellowstone hotspot system along the northern border of our study area and late-stage (<8 Ma) passive, extension-related asthenospheric upwelling along the eastern and western margins of the Basin and Range. The palinspastic reconstructions presented here highlight that the classic, high-angle, Basin and Range faulting that comprises most of the physiographic Basin and Range Province commenced during a magmatic lull. More broadly, with the exception of the Rio Grande rift we find that pulses of magmatism lag the onset of extension. These observations largely contradict the active rifting model where magmatism triggers Basin and Range extension.

  8. The magmatic history of the Vetas-California mining district, Santander Massif, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla Figueroa, Luis C.; Bissig, Thomas; Valencia, Víctor; Hart, Craig J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The Vetas-California Mining District (VCMD), located in the central part of the Santander Massif (Colombian Eastern Cordillera), based on U-Pb dating of zircons, records the following principal tectono-magmatic events: (1) the Grenville Orogenic event and high grade metamorphism and migmatitization between ˜1240 and 957 Ma; (2) early Ordovician calc-alkalic magmatism, which was synchronous with the Caparonensis-Famatinian Orogeny (˜477 Ma); (3) middle to late Ordovician post-collisional calc-alkalic magmatism (˜466-436 Ma); (4) late Triassic to early Jurassic magmatism between ˜204 and 196 Ma, characterized by both S- and I-type calc-alkalic intrusions and; (5) a late Miocene shallowly emplaced intermediate calc-alkaline intrusions (10.9 ± 0.2 and 8.4 ± 0.2 Ma). The presence of even younger igneous rocks is possible, given the widespread magmatic-hydrothermal alteration affecting all rock units in the area. The igneous rocks from the late Triassic-early Jurassic magmatic episodes are the volumetrically most important igneous rocks in the study area and in the Colombian Eastern Cordillera. They can be divided into three groups based on their field relationships, whole rock geochemistry and geochronology. These are early leucogranites herein termed Alaskites-I (204-199 Ma), Intermediate rocks (199-198 Ma), and late leucogranites, herein referred to as Alaskites-II (198-196 Ma). This Mesozoic magmatism is reflecting subtle changes in the crustal stress in a setting above an oblique subduction of the Panthalassa plate beneath Pangea. The lower Cretaceous siliciclastic Tambor Formation has detrital zircons of the same age populations as the metamorphic and igneous rocks present in the study area, suggesting that the provenance is related to the erosion of these local rocks during the late Jurassic or early Cretaceous, implying a local supply of sediments to the local depositional basins.

  9. Integrating GRACE and multi-source data sets to quantify the seasonal groundwater depletion in mega agricultural regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Wang, D.; Zhu, T.; Ringler, C.; Sun, A. Y.

    2015-12-01

    It is challenging to quantify the groundwater depletion in the mega basins owing to the huge spatial scale and the intensive anthrophonic activities (e.g. dams and reservoirs). Recently, the satellite Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data provides an opportunity to monitor large-scale groundwater depletion. However, the data is only available after 2002, limiting the understanding of inter-annual variability of seasonal groundwater depletion. In this study, a simple model with two parameters is developed, based on the seasonal Budyko framework for quantifying the seasonal groundwater depletion. The model is applied to the Indus and Ganges River basin in South Asia and the High Plain/Ogallala aquifer in United States. The parameters of the model are estimated by integrating GRACE and other multi-source data sets. Total water storage changes before 2003 are reconstructed based on the developed model with available data of evaporation, precipitation, and potential evaporation.

  10. The aeromagnetic method as a tool to identify Cenozoic magmatism in the West Antarctic Rift System beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet: a review; Thiel subglacial volcano as possible source of the ash layer in the WAISCOR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) flows through the volcanically active West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). The aeromagnetic method has been the most useful geophysical tool for identification of subglacial volcanic rocks, since 1959–64 surveys, particularly combined with 1978 radar ice-sounding. The unique 1991–97 Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey covering 354,000 km2 over the WAIS, (5-km line-spaced, orthogonal lines of aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, and aerogravity measurements), still provides invaluable information on subglacial volcanic rocks, particularly combined with the older aeromagnetic profiles. These data indicate numerous 100–>1000 nT, 5–50-km width, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over an area greater than 1.2 × 106 km2, mostly from subglacial volcanic sources. I interpreted the CWA anomalies as defining about 1000 “volcanic centers” requiring high remanent normal magnetizations in the present field direction. About 400 anomaly sources correlate with bed topography. At least 80% of these sources have less than 200 m relief at the WAIS bed. They appear modified by moving ice, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (about 25 Ma). Exposed volcanoes in the WARS are The present rapid changes resulting from global warming, could be accelerated by subglacial volcanism.

  11. Model of the magmatic thermolysis of coal matter deep in the earth (short communication)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu.M. Korolev; S.G. Gagarin

    2008-06-15

    A model of contact thermolysis was constructed based on a combined set of equations for heat transfer from a magmatic intrusion to a coal bed and the kinetics of thermal coal conversion. This model was illustrated by the generation of petroleum hydrocarbons deep in the earth by the thermolysis of the sapropelic matter of boghead.

  12. The aeromagnetic method as a tool to identify Cenozoic magmatism in the West Antarctic Rift System beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet — A review; Thiel subglacial volcano as possible source of the ash layer in the WAISCORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, John C.

    2013-02-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) flows through the volcanically active West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). The aeromagnetic method has been the most useful geophysical tool for identification of subglacial volcanic rocks, since 1959-64 surveys, particularly combined with 1978 radar ice-sounding. The unique 1991-97 Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey covering 354,000 km2 over the WAIS, (5-km line-spaced, orthogonal lines of aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, and aerogravity measurements), still provides invaluable information on subglacial volcanic rocks, particularly combined with the older aeromagnetic profiles. These data indicate numerous 100->1000 nT, 5-50-km width, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over an area greater than 1.2 × 106 km2, mostly from subglacial volcanic sources. I interpreted the CWA anomalies as defining about 1000 "volcanic centers" requiring high remanent normal magnetizations in the present field direction. About 400 anomaly sources correlate with bed topography. At least 80% of these sources have less than 200 m relief at the WAIS bed. They appear modified by moving ice, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (about 25 Ma). Exposed volcanoes in the WARS are < 34 Ma, but at least four are active. If a few buried volcanic centers are active, subglacial volcanism may well affect the WAIS regime. Aerogeophysical data (Blankenship et al., 1993, Mt. Casertz; Corr and Vaughan, 2008, near Hudson Mts.) indicated active subglacial volcanism. Magnetic data indicate a caldera and a surrounding "low" in the WAISCORE vicinity possibly the result of a shallow Curie isotherm. High heat flow reported from temperature logging in the WAISCORE (Conway et al., 2011; Clow, personal commun.) and a volcanic ash layer (Dunbar, 2012) are consistent with this interpretation. A subaerially erupted subglacial volcano, (Mt Thiel), about 100 km distant, may be the ash source. The present rapid changes resulting from global warming, could be

  13. Late-Variscan rare metal ore deposition and plume-related magmatism in the eastern European Variscides (D, CZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    includes a range of mafic calc-alkaline and shoshonitic rock types, and lamprophyres (spessartites and camptonites) with age data between 300-270 Ma. The Mid-European Variscides show a large number of Permo-Carboniferous magmatic complexes with similar ages (Halle Volcanic Complex, Saar-Nahe Basin, Thuringian Forest, Harz Mts., Northwest-Saxonian Volcanic Complexes, bimodal volcanic rocks of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin and the Rhyolite Complex of Tharandt as well as Li-F-Sn small intrusion granites and lamprophyric intrusions in the Erzgebirge. It is important to note that the late-Variscan W-Mo, Sn-W-Mo, Ag-bearing Sn-In-base metal, Ag-Sb-base metal, and U mineralizations in the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory are spatially and temporal associated with intrusion centers of Permo-Carboniferous post-collisional mafic and rhyolitic (sub)volcanic bimodal magmatism (315-290 Ma) along deep-rooted NW-SE fault zones, especially at the intersections with NE-SW, E-W, and N-S major regional structural zones. The bimodal lamprophyre-rhyolite assemblage in the Erzgebirge / Sub-Erzgebirge basin area was formed during intracontinental rifting in a 'Fast Extension' setting by melting of a metasomatic enriched mantle source. The emplacement of fluid-enriched lamprophyres and F-rich rhyolitic intrusions at the same time is probably associated with decompression melting of updoming asthenosphere which is possibly associated with the above mentioned mantle plume.

  14. Multiple rifting and alkaline magmatism in southern India during Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renjith, M. L.; Santosh, M.; Satyanarayanan, M.; Rao, D. V. Subba; Tang, Li

    2016-06-01

    The Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) in India preserves the history of tectonothermal events ranging from Paleoarchean to latest Neoproterozoic-Cambrian. Here we investigate alkaline magmatism possibly associated with rifting events in Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic based on petrological, geochemical and zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic studies on the alkaline complexes of Korangani (KGAC) and Kambamettu (KAC) in the Madurai Block of SGT. The mica pyroxenite which represents the first intrusive phase at KGAC crystallized from a mildly alkaline hydrous magma derived from a metasomatized mantle. The younger shoshonitic syenite was emplaced at 2533 ± 16 Ma, carries mafic microgranular enclaves, and shows trace-elements ratios consistent with magma mixing trend, and zircon εHf(t) values display mixed positive and negative values - 2.6 to 3.6 suggesting the mixing of adakite-like felsic crustal melt and non-adakitic mantle derived melt. In KAC, four distinct magmatic intrusions are identified: i) quartz-monzonite (emplaced at 2498 ± 16 Ma), an ultrapotassic adakitic rock derived from a carbonated alkali-rich lower crustal source with negative zircons εHf(t) values in zircon (- 8.0 to - 0.8); Y/Nb (> 1.2) and Th/Ce (0.03-0.8) ratios; lower Ni (< 30 ppm) and Cr (< 14 ppm) contents; ii) phlogopite-rich pyroxenite, crystallized from an alkali-rich basaltic parental magma derived from carbonate metasomatized mantle; iii) mantle derived high Ba-Sr carbonatite (emplaced at 2470 ± 15 Ma); and iv) shoshonitic peralkaline syenite rock (emplaced at 608 ± 6 Ma) with strong adakitic signature, low MgO (< 1 wt.%), Ni (12-5 ppm) and Cr (49-35 ppm) contents and negative zircon εHf(t) values (- 30.3 to - 27.3) and trough of Zr-Hf in spidergrams suggesting a carbonated alkali-rich garnet-bearing crustal source. The geochemical features and petrogenetic considerations of the felsic shoshonitic-ultrapotassic adakite-like rocks (syenite, quartz monzonite), mica-pyroxenites and

  15. Design and implementation of an open source indexing solution for a large set of radiological reports and images.

    PubMed

    Voet, T; Devolder, P; Pynoo, B; Vercruysse, J; Duyck, P

    2007-11-01

    This paper hopes to share the insights we experienced during designing, building, and running an indexing solution for a large set of radiological reports and images in a production environment for more than 3 years. Several technical challenges were encountered and solved in the course of this project. One hundred four million words in 1.8 million radiological reports from 1989 to the present were indexed and became instantaneously searchable in a user-friendly fashion; the median query duration is only 31 ms. Currently, our highly tuned index holds 332,088 unique words in four languages. The indexing system is feature-rich and language-independent and allows for making complex queries. For research and training purposes it certainly is a valuable and convenient addition to our radiology informatics toolbox. Extended use of open-source technology dramatically reduced both implementation time and cost. All software we developed related to the indexing project has been made available to the open-source community covered by an unrestricted Berkeley Software Distribution-style license.

  16. Decreasing Magmatic Footprints of Individual Volcanos in a Waning Basaltic Field

    SciTech Connect

    G.A> Valentine; F.V. Perry

    2006-06-06

    The distribution and characteristics of individual basaltic volcanoes in the waning Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field provide insight into the changing physical nature of magmatism and the controls on volcano location. During Pliocene-Pleistocene times the volumes of individual volcanoes have decreased by more than one order of magnitude, as have fissure lengths and inferred lava effusion rates. Eruptions evolved from Hawaiian-style eruptions with extensive lavas to eruptions characterized by small pulses of lava and Strombolian to violent Strombolian mechanisms. These trends indicate progressively decreasing partial melting and length scales, or magmatic footprints, of mantle source zones for individual volcanoes. The location of each volcano is determined by the location of its magmatic footprint at depth, and only by shallow structural and topographic features that are within that footprint. The locations of future volcanoes in a waning system are less likely to be determined by large-scale topography or structures than were older, larger volume volcanoes.

  17. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-01-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80–40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70–43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52–51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma. PMID:26395973

  18. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  19. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-23

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  20. Magmatism on rift flanks: Insights from ambient noise phase velocity in Afar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, Félicie; Weemstra, Cornelis; Leroy, Sylvie; Boschi, Lapo; Keir, Derek; Ren, Yong; Molinari, Irene; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Stuart, Graham W.; Rolandone, Frédérique; Khanbari, Khaled; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J. M.; Doubre, Cécile; Ganad, Ismail Al; Goitom, Berhe; Ayele, Atalay

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of continents in magmatic settings, the extension of the rift valley is commonly assumed to initially occur by border faulting and progressively migrate in space and time toward the spreading axis. Magmatic processes near the rift flanks are commonly ignored. We present phase velocity maps of the crust and uppermost mantle of the conjugate margins of the southern Red Sea (Afar and Yemen) using ambient noise tomography to constrain crustal modification during breakup. Our images show that the low seismic velocities characterize not only the upper crust beneath the axial volcanic systems but also both upper and lower crust beneath the rift flanks where ongoing volcanism and hydrothermal activity occur at the surface. Magmatic modification of the crust beneath rift flanks likely occurs for a protracted period of time during the breakup process and may persist through to early seafloor spreading.

  1. Eocene-Oligocene calcalkaline magmatism in the Lut-Sistan region, eastern Iran: petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K.; Chung, S.; Zarrinkoub, M. H.; Khatib, M. M.; Mohammadi, S. S.; Lee, H.; Chu, C.; Lin, I.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive Eocene-Oligocene (45-25 Ma) magmatic rocks crop out in the Sistan suture zone and to the west in the Lut Block, eastern Iran. These rocks are widespread (~31 to 34 N and 57 to 61 E) but poorly studied using modern geochemical methods. In this study, we present new geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic results on this rock suite to examine their origin and tectonic implications. This suite of rocks is dominated by andesites and dacites with minor diorites, granites and rhyolites. The rocks are mostly subalkaline (alkalinity index = +1.0 to -5.9) and conform to the original definition of calcalkaline rocks by Peacock [J. Geol. 39 (1931) 54-67]. They exhibit variable fractionation between light and heavy rare earth elements (REE) (i.e. La/Yb = 7.9-31) and between middle and heavy REE (i.e. Sm/Yb = 1.4-3.8). They are also enriched in large ion lithophile elements, depleted in high field strength elements and show Ba and P troughs and a Pb spike in a primitive mantle-normalized variation diagram. The initial Sr isotopic ratios and ɛNd(t) values, calculated at the ages of each individual rocks, range from 0.7042 to 0.7065 and from -4.9 to +5.5, respectively, consistent with a mantle origin for this rock suite. Further, a high-87Sr/86Sr(t), low-ɛNd(t) component is required to explain the observed isotopic variations, either via crustal contamination or recycling of subducted sediments in the mantle source. A subset of samples exhibit unique incompatible trace element ratios, with Rb/Cs = 2.4-17, Ba/Rb = 0.6-7.1, Ce/Pb = 1.2-3.6 and Nb/U = 1.7-4.2, the extreme compositions of which are significantly lower than average values for continental crust and most mantle-derived magmas. These features are thus attributable to enrichment in the mantle source by slab-derived hydrous fluid, presumably during subduction of the Sistan oceanic lithosphere during Cretaceous. The diffuse pattern of magmatism without any prominent linear trends is best explained by a model involving

  2. The potential role of magmatic gases in the genesis of Illinois- Kentucky fluorspar deposits: implications from chemical reaction path modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, G.S.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Rowan, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    Presents results of reaction path calculations using the chemical speciation and reaction path program SOLVEQ and CHILLER to model possible fluorite deposition mechanisms in the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district. The results indicate that the fluids responsible for Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar mineralization were most likely quite acidic (pH < 4) and rich in fluorine in order to produce the fluorite-rich, dolomite-poor mineral assemblages and extensive dissolution of host limestones. A possible source for the acid and fluorine may have been HF-rich gases which were expelled from alkalic magmas and then incorporated by migrating basinal brines. An analysis of the geologic setting of other fluorite deposits and districts worldwide suggests that involvement of magmatic gases is probable for many of these districts as well. -from Authors

  3. New boron isotopic evidence for sedimentary and magmatic fluid influence in the shallow hydrothermal vent system of Milos Island (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shein-Fu; You, Chen-Feng; Lin, Yen-Po; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Baltatzis, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Magmatic sources may contribute a significant amount of volatiles in geothermal springs; however, their role is poorly understood in submarine hydrothermal systems worldwide. In this study, new results of B and δ11B in 41 hydrothermal vent waters collected from the shallow hydrothermal system of Milos island in the Aegean Sea were combined with previously published data from other tectonic settings and laboratory experiments to quantify the effects of phase separation, fluid/sediment interaction and magmatic contribution. Two Cl-extreme solutions were identified, high-Cl waters (Cl as high as 2000 mM) and low-Cl waters (Cl < 80 mM). Both sets of waters were characterized by high B/Cl (~ 1.2-5.3 × 10- 3 mol/mol) and extremely low δ11B (1.4-6.3‰), except for the waters with Mg content of near the seawater value and δ11B = 10.3-17.4‰. These high-Cl waters with high B/Cl and low δ11B plot close to the vent waters in sediment-hosted hydrothermal system (i.e., Okinawa Trough) or fumarole condensates from on-land volcanoes, implying B addition from sediment or magmatic fluids plays an important role. This is in agreement with fluid/sediment interactions resulting in the observed B and δ11B, as well as previously reported Br/I/Cl ratios, supporting a scenario of slab-derived fluid addition with elevated B, 11B-rich, and low Br/Cl and I/Cl, which is derived from the dehydration of subducted-sediments. The slab fluid becomes subsequently mixed with the parent magma of Milos. The deep brine reservoir is partially affected by injections of magmatic fluid/gases during degassing. The results presented here are crucial for deciphering the evolution of the brine reservoirs involved in phase separation, fluid/sediment interaction and magmatic contribution in the deep reaction zone of the Milos hydrothermal system; they also have implications in the understanding of the formation of metallic vein mineralization.

  4. The Archean kalsilite-nepheline syenites of the Awsard intrusive massif (Reguibat Shield, West African Craton, Morocco) and its relationship to the alkaline magmatism of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haissen, Faouziya; Cambeses, Aitor; Montero, Pilar; Bea, Fernando; Dilek, Yildirim; Mouttaqi, Abdellah

    2017-03-01

    More than 40% of the known alkaline complexes are reported from Africa. Most are ring complexes composed of syenites and associated or not, lithotypes as carbonatites, granites and mafic rocks. Radiometric dating indicates the presence of alkaline complexes with ages spanning from Precambrian to the present. In terms of outcrops, alkaline complexes are reported from cratonic zones and from belts embedded between cratonic areas. Because of the high economic potential for associated REE deposits, these alkaline complexes have received much attention from Earth scientists. These studies aim mainly to constrain the role of the mantle and the crust (and the interaction between them) in the genesis of this peculiar magmatism, and also to explain the variability observed in lithotypes and geotectonic settings. Among those alkaline complexes, Precambrian occurrences are rare. Up-to-date only a few Proterozoic examples were cited in Africa. The recently studied Awsard complex in Southern Morocco is a peculiar one with a crystallization age of 2.46 Ga and an unusual rock assemblages. This paper is a first approximation to a comparison of geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of the Awsard magmatism (as the oldest one) with other known different ages African complexes from different geotectonic settings, aiming to detect if there is any evolution in this alkaline magmatism through time. A first conclusion is that magma sources for this alkaline magmatism has been probably evaluating over geological time, from parental magmas compositions close to that of primitive mantle in these early geological time to compositions holding more and more depleted mantle and continental crust components. However, to go further in this debate more modern isotopic, geochemical and geochronological data from all these complexes are needed. Nevertheless, this comparison highlighted the peculiar character of the Awsard magmatism with an isotopic composition very close to that of Primitive mantle

  5. Does subduction zone magmatism produce average continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellam, R. M.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether present day subduction zone magmatism produces material of average continental crust composition, which perhaps most would agree is andesitic, is addressed. It was argued that modern andesitic to dacitic rocks in Andean-type settings are produced by plagioclase fractionation of mantle derived basalts, leaving a complementary residue with low Rb/Sr and a positive Eu anomaly. This residue must be removed, for example by delamination, if the average crust produced in these settings is andesitic. The author argued against this, pointing out the absence of evidence for such a signature in the mantle. Either the average crust is not andesitic, a conclusion the author was not entirely comfortable with, or other crust forming processes must be sought. One possibility is that during the Archean, direct slab melting of basaltic or eclogitic oceanic crust produced felsic melts, which together with about 65 percent mafic material, yielded an average crust of andesitic composition.

  6. Breakup Style and Magmatic Underplating West of the Lofoten Islands, Norway, Based on OBS Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.; Mjelde, R.; Murai, Y.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of the Northeast Atlantic in the Early Eocene was magma-rich, forming the major part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). This is seen as extrusive and intrusive magmatism in the continental domain, and as a thicker than normal oceanic crust produced the first few million years after continental breakup. The maximum magma productivity and the duration of excess magmatism varies along the margins of Northwest Europe and East Greenland, to some extent as a function of the distance from the Iceland hotspot. The Vøring Plateau off mid-Norway is the northernmost of the margin segments in northwestern Europe with extensive magmatism. North of the plateau, magmatism dies off towards the Lofoten Margin, marking the northern boundary of the NAIP here. In 2003, as part of the Euromargins Program we collected an Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) profile from mainland Norway, across the Lofoten Islands, and out into the deep ocean. Forward velocity modeling using raytracing reveals a continental margin that shows transitional features between magma-rich and magma-poor rifting. On one hand, we detect an up to 2 km thick and 40-50 km wide magmatic underplate of the outer continent, on the other hand, continental thinning is greater and intrusive magmatism less than farther south. Continental breakup also appears to be somewhat delayed compared to breakup on the Vøring Plateau, consistent with increased extension. This indicates that magmatic diking, believed to quickly lead to continental breakup of volcanic margins and thus to reduce continental thinning, played a much lesser role here than at the plateau. Early post-breakup oceanic crust is up to 8 km thick, less than half of that observed farther south. The most likely interpretation of these observations, is that the source for the excess magmatism of the NAIP was not present at the Lofoten Margin during rifting, and that the excess magmatism actually observed was the result of lateral transport from the

  7. Silurian magmatism in eastern Senegal and its significance for the Paleozoic evolution of NW-Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullgraf, Thomas; Ndiaye, Papa Moussa; Blein, Olivier; Buscail, François; Lahondère, Didier; Le Métour, Joël; Sergeev, Sergey; Tegyey, Monique

    2013-02-01

    Submarine basalt and trachyte of the Nandoumba group occur in eastern Senegal within the Bassarides branch of the Mauritanides orogen. The unit forms part of the parautochthonous domain which is stacked between underlying Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic foreland and overlying Variscan nappes. The crystallisation age of the volcanic to subvolcanic rocks has been determined by U-Pb single zircon SHRIMP method at 428 ± 5.2 Ma whereas zircon xenocryst ages vary from 500 to 2200 Ma. The shape of the xenocryst grains document proximal Neo- and Paleoproterozoic and distal Mesoproterozoic provenance areas for assimilated sediments. This is compatible with the Paleoproterozoic Birimian basement and Neoproterozoic cover rocks nearby whereas an origin from the Amazonian craton could be assumed for distal Mesoproterozoic zircons. Geochemical and Sm-Nd isotope whole rock analysis show that basalts of the Nandoumba group are similar to modern transitional to alkaline volcanic lavas in intraplate settings. Those basalts have a deep mantle source with a great contribution of a recycled mantle component such as EM1 and/or EM2. The basalts resemble in their composition those from the Meguma terrane of Nova Scotia which are of similar age suggesting a common source and therefore connection of Meguma with Gondwana during this period. Review of circum-Atlantic Silurian magmatism indicates ongoing fragmentation of NW-Gondwana that started in Cambro/Ordovician times.

  8. Argon isotopes as recorders of magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layer, P. W.; Gardner, J. E.; Mora Chaparro, J. C.; Arce, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Argon isotopic ratios vary enough between different reservoirs (atmosphere, crust, mantle) and diffuse fast enough through most minerals at magmatic temperatures (700-1200 C) to make them ideal for looking at magma chamber dynamics. Indeed, diffusion is sufficiently fast to allow short time scales to be deciphered, setting argon apart from many other isotopic methods. A mineral's ability to retain "excess" argon (40Ar/36Ar ratios greater than the atmospheric value and apparent ages older than the known eruption age) during post-eruption cooling is key to Ar studies. Previous work shows that both phenocrysts (crystallizing in the magma chamber; e.g. Mt St. Helens; Layer and Gardner, 2001) and xenocrysts (introduced into the magma chamber; e.g Toba; Gardner et al., 2002) preserve excess argon, which enables magma chamber processes to be deciphered through the variable diffusion rates between crystal phases. Single crystal 40Ar/39Ar step-heating of biotite from the 10.5 ka eruption of Nevado de Toluca volcano, Mexico indicates that they are xenocrystic and resided for only a short (< 1 year) time in the magma before it erupted. The biotite has reaction rims of hornblende, orthopyroxene and plagioclase, and failed to grow experimentally at pressure-temperature conditions of the magma, confirming the xenocrystic nature of this phase. Single-step fusion of plagioclase phenocrysts from eruptions of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, shows evidence of excess (mantle) argon, whereas hornblende from the same eruptions contains little or none. In this case, faster diffusion of Ar in plagioclase than in hornblende allow plagioclase to incorporate excess argon during magma recharge; hornblende does not. Combining such results with other isotopic systems may in fact better determine magma chamber processes. At El Chichon, Sr isotopes suggest magma recharges ocurred (Tepley et al., 2000), whereas the argon isotopes suggest such pulses occurred just before each eruption. The fast and

  9. Simulating the Thermochemical Magmatic and Tectonic Evolution of Venus's Mantle and Lithosphere: Intrusive vs. Extrusive Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul; Armann, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Here we extend the models of [1]. Numerical convection models of the thermochemical evolution of Venus are compared to present-day topography and geoid, recent resurfacing history and surface deformation. The models include melting, magmatism, decaying heat-producing elements, core cooling, realistic temperature-dependent viscosity and either stagnant lid or episodic lithospheric overturn. In [1] it was found that in stagnant lid convection the dominant mode of heat loss is magmatic heat pipe, which requires massive magmatism and produces very thick crust, inconsistent with observations. Partitioning of heat-producing elements into the crust helps but does not help enough. Episodic lid overturn interspersed by periods of quiescence effectively loses Venus's heat while giving lower rates of volcanism and a thinner crust. Calculations predict 5-8 overturn events over Venus's history, each lasting ~150 Myr, initiating in one place and then spreading globally. During quiescent periods convection keeps the lithosphere thin. Magmatism keeps the mantle temperature constant over Venus's history. Crustal recycling occurs by entrainment in stagnant lid convection, and by lid overturn in episodic mode. Venus-like amplitudes of topography and geoid can be produced in either stagnant or episodic modes, with a viscosity profile that is Earth-like but shifted to higher values. The basalt density inversion below the olivine-perovskite transition causes compositional stratification around 730 km; breakdown of this layering increases episodicity but far less than episodic lid overturn. The classical stagnant lid mode with interior temperature rheological temperature scale lower than TCMB is not reached because mantle temperature is controlled by magmatism while the core cools slowly from a superheated start. Core heat flow decreases with time, possibly shutting off the dynamo, particularly in episodic cases. Here we extend [1] by considering intrusive magmatism as an alternative to

  10. Bidirectional feedback observed between a magmatic intrusion and shallow earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Susanna; Elliott, John; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Biggs, Juliet; Mothes, Patricia; Jarrín, Paúl; Yépez, Marco; Aguaiza, Santiago; Lundgren, Paul; Samsonov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Moderate volcano-tectonic earthquakes (M 5-6) during volcanic unrest are unusual, and tend to be associated with major stress perturbations to the crust, occurring during episodes of rifting or the onset of volcanic eruptions. The feedback from such events may be positive, easing magma ascent and eruption, or, as we demonstrate here, negative, hindering any further magma movement. We present measurements of deformation at Chiles-Cerro Negro volcanoes on the Ecuador-Colombian border. There was previously no record of historical activity at either volcano, but between 2013 and early 2015 there were three episodes of unrest characterised by swarms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes of increasing energy and duration and thought to be associated with the hydrothermal system. In October 2014, magmatic processes not only caused many thousands of small earthquakes per day, but culminated in a Mw 5.6 earthquake located on a system of active tectonic faults that last ruptured in 1868. We find that inflation of a mid-crustal magmatic source ~10 km south of the volcanoes ceased abruptly at the time of the earthquake, after which time the rate of seismicity also began a gradual decline. The Chiles-Cerro Negro unrest is therefore an interesting example of magma ascent triggering a moderate earthquake on a tectonic fault and subsequently being inhibited by co-seismic stress changes. This is an important observation for the interpretation of moderate earthquakes during volcanic unrest in terms of evolving hazard.

  11. Paired Magmatic-Metallogenic Belts in Myanmar - an Andean Analogue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Nicholas; Robb, Laurence; Searle, Michael; Morley, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Myanmar (Burma) is richly endowed in precious and base metals, having one of the most diverse collections of natural resources in SE Asia. Its geological history is dominated by the staged closing of Tethys and the suturing of Gondwana-derived continental fragments onto the South China craton during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic. The country is located at a crucial geologic juncture where the main convergent Tethyan collision zone swings south around the Namche Barwa Eastern Himalayan syntaxis. However, despite recent work, the geological and geodynamic history of Myanmar remains enigmatic. Plate margin processes, magmatism, metasomatism and the genesis of mineral deposits are intricately linked, and there has long been recognized a relationship between the distribution of certain mineral deposit types, and the tectonic settings which favour their genesis. A better knowledge of the regional tectonic evolution of a potential exploration jurisdiction is therefore crucial to understanding its minerals prospectivity. This strong association between tectonics and mineralization can equally be applied in reverse. By mapping out the spatial, and temporal, distribution of presumed co-genetic mineral deposits, coupled with an understanding of their collective metallogenetic origin, a better appreciation of the tectonic evolution of a terrane may be elucidated. Identification and categorization of metallotects within a geodynamically-evolving terrane thus provides a complimentary tool to other methodologies (e.g. geochemical, geochronological, structural, geophysical, stratigraphical), for determining the tectonic history and inferred geodynamic setting of that terrane through time. Myanmar is one such study area where this approach can be undertaken. Here are found two near-parallel magmatic belts, which together contain a significant proportion of that country's mineral wealth of tin, tungsten, copper, gold and silver. Although only a few 100 km's apart, these belts exhibit a

  12. The amniotic fluid as a source of neural stem cells in the setting of experimental neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher G; Klein, Justin D; Wang, Junmei; Thakor, Devang; Benedict, Darcy; Ahmed, Azra; Teng, Yang D; Fauza, Dario O

    2013-02-15

    We sought to determine whether neural stem cells (NSCs) can be isolated from the amniotic fluid in the setting of neural tube defects (NTDs), as a prerequisite for eventual autologous perinatal therapies. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams (n=62) were divided into experimental (n=42) and control (n=20) groups, depending on prenatal exposure to retinoic acid for the induction of fetal NTDs. Animals were killed before term for analysis (n=685 fetuses). Amniotic fluid samples from both groups underwent epigenetic selection for NSCs, followed by exposure to neural differentiation media. Representative cell samples underwent multiple morphological and phenotypical analyses at different time points. No control fetus (n=267) had any structural abnormality, whereas at least one type of NTD developed in 52% (217/418) of the experimental fetuses (namely, isolated spina bifida, n=144; isolated exencephaly, n=24; or a combination of the two, n=49). Only amniotic samples from fetuses with a NTD yielded cells with typical neural progenitor morphology and robust expression of both Nestin and Sox-2, primary markers of NSCs. These cells responded to differentiation media by displaying typical morphological changes, along with expression of beta-tubulin III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and/or O4, markers for immature neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively. This was concurrent with downregulation of Nestin and Sox-2. We conclude that the amniotic fluid can harbor disease-specific stem cells, for example, NSCs in the setting of experimental NTDs. The amniotic fluid may be a practical source of autologous NSCs applicable to novel forms of therapies for spina bifida.

  13. Mantle source of the 2.44-2.50-Ga mantle plume-related magmatism in the Fennoscandian Shield: evidence from Os, Nd, and Sr isotope compositions of the Monchepluton and Kemi intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Hong; Hanski, Eero; Li, Chao; Maier, Wolfgang D.; Huhma, Hannu; Mokrushin, Artem V.; Latypov, Rais; Lahaye, Yann; O'Brien, Hugh; Qu, Wen-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Significant PGE and Cr mineralization occurs in a number of 2.44-2.50-Ga mafic layered intrusions located across the Karelian and Kola cratons. The intrusions have been interpreted to be related to mantle plume activity. Most of the intrusions have negative ɛNd values of about -1 to -2 and slightly radiogenic initial Sr isotope compositions of about 0.702 to 0.703. One potential explanation is crustal contamination of a magma derived from a mantle plume, but another possibility is that the magma was derived from metasomatized sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Samples from the upper chromitite layers of the Kemi intrusion and most samples from the previously studied Koitelainen and Akanvaara intrusions have supra-chondritic γOs values indicating some crustal contamination, which may have contributed to the formation of chromitites in these intrusions. Chromite separates from the main ore zone of the Kemi and Monchepluton intrusions show nearly chondritic γOs, similar to the coeval Vetreny belt komatiites. We suggest that the Os isotope composition of the primitive magma was not significantly changed by crustal contamination due to a high Os content of the magma and a low Os content of the contaminant. Modeling suggests that the Os and Nd isotope compositions of the Monchepluton and Kemi intrusions cannot be explained by assuming a magma source in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle with sub-chondritic γOs. A better match for the isotope data would be a plume mantle source with chondritic Re/Os and Os isotope composition, followed by crustal contamination.

  14. Rockfall source characterization at high rock walls in complex geological settings by photogrammetry, structural analysis and DFN techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Riva, Federico; Galletti, Laura; Zanchi, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall quantitative risk analysis in areas impended by high, subvertical cliffs remains a challenge, due to the difficult definition of potential rockfall sources, event magnitude scenarios and related probabilities. For this reasons, rockfall analyses traditionally focus on modelling the runout component of rockfall processes, whereas rock-fall source identification, mapping and characterization (block size distribution and susceptibility) are over-simplified in most practical applications, especially when structurally complex rock masses are involved. We integrated field and remote survey and rock mass modelling techniques to characterize rock masses and detect rockfall source in complex geo-structural settings. We focused on a test site located at Valmadrera, near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy), where cliffs up to 600 m high impend on a narrow strip of Lake Como shore. The massive carbonates forming the cliff (Dolomia Principale Fm), normally characterized by brittle structural associations due to their high strength and stiffness, are here involved in an ENE-trending, S-verging kilometre-scale syncline. Brittle mechanisms associated to folding strongly controlled the nature of discontinuities (bedding slip, strike-slip faults, tensile fractures) and their attributes (spacing and size), as well as the spatial variability of bedding attitude and fracture intensity, with individual block sizes up to 15 m3. We carried out a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 1500 m (11 camera stations from the opposite lake shore, 265 pictures) to 150 m (28 camera stations along N-S directed boat routes, 200 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion techniques resulted in detailed long-range (1500 m) and medium-range (150 to 800 m) point clouds covering the entire slope with maximum surface point densities exceeding 50 pts/m2. Point clouds allowed a detailed

  15. Magmatic gas emissions at Holocene volcanic features near Mono Lake, California, and their relation to regional magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.; Howle, James F.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Silicic lavas have erupted repeatedly in the Mono Basin over the past few thousand years, forming the massive domes and coulees of the Mono Craters chain and the smaller island vents in Mono Lake. We report here on the first systematic study of magmatic CO2 emissions from these features, conducted during 2007–2010. Most notably, a known locus of weak steam venting on the summit of North Coulee is actually enclosed in a large area (~ 0.25 km2) of diffuse gas discharge that emits 10–14 t/d of CO2, mostly at ambient temperature. Subsurface gases sampled here are heavily air-contaminated, but after standard corrections are applied, show average δ13C-CO2 of − 4.72‰, 3He/4He of 5.89RA, and CO2/3He of 0.77 × 1010, very similar to the values in fumarolic gas from Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera immediately to the south of the basin. If these values also characterize the magmatic gas source at Mono Lake, where CO2 is captured by the alkaline lake water, a magmatic CO2 upflow beneath the lake of ~ 4 t/d can be inferred. Groundwater discharge from the Mono Craters area transports ~ 13 t/d of 14C-dead CO2 as free gas and dissolved carbonate species, and adding in this component brings the estimated total magmatic CO2 output to 29 t/d for the two silicic systems in the Mono Basin. If these emissions reflect intrusion and degassing of underlying basalt with 0.5 wt.% CO2, a modest intrusion rate of 0.00075 km3/yr is indicated. Much higher intrusion rates are required to account for CO2 emissions from Mammoth Mountain and the West Moat of the Long Valley Caldera.

  16. Sublithospheric Triggers for Episodic Silicic Magmatism in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Vogt, K.; Schubert, M.

    2014-12-01

    The melt source and ascent mechanisms for crustal-scale silicic magmatism in subduction zones remain a matter of debate. Recent petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical experiments suggest that important physical controls of this process can be of sublithospheric origin. Firstly, deep sources of silicic magma can be related to episodic development of positively buoyant diapiric structures in the mantle wedge originated from deeply subducted rock mélanges (Gerya and Yuen, 2003; Castro and Gerya, 2008). Partial melting of these rapidly ascending lithologically mixed structures can produce silicic magmas with a relatively constant major element composition and variable time-dependent isotopic ratios inherited from the mélange (Vogt et al., 2013). Secondly, episodic injections of subduction-related mantle-derived mafic magmas into a partially molten hot zone of the arc lower crust can drive ascents of pre-existing felsic crustal magmas toward upper crustal levels. The injection of mafic magma induces overpressure in the lower crustal magma reservoir, which increases crustal stresses and triggers development of brittle/plastic fracture zones serving as conduits for the rapid episodic ascent of felsic magmas (Shubert et al., 2013). Our numerical results thus imply that subduction-related sublithospheric magma intrusions into the lower arc crust may both be the prime source for the generation of silicic magmas and the major physical driving mechanism for their episodic ascent toward upper crustal levels. References:Castro, A., and Gerya, T.V., 2008. Magmatic implications of mantle wedge plumes: experimental study. Lithos 103, 138-148. Gerya, T.V., and Yuen, D.A., 2003. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities from hydration and melting propel "cold plumes" at subduction zones. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 212, 47-62.Schubert, M., Driesner, T., Gerya, T.V., Ulmer, P., 2013. Mafic injection as a trigger for felsic magmatism: A numerical study. Geochemistry, Geophysics

  17. Aspects of the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Gottfried, D.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1973-01-01

    Bismuth has been determined in 74 rocks from a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite, two calc-alkaline batholith suites and in 66 mineral separates from one of the batholiths. Average bismuth contents, weighted for rock type, of the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite, the Southern California batholith and the Idaho batholith are, 32, 50 and 70 ppb respectively. All three bodies demonstrate an enrichment of bismuth in residual magmas with magmatic differentiation. Bismuth is greatly enriched (relative to the host rock) in the calcium-rich accessory minerals, apatite and sphene, but other mineral analyses show that a Bi-Ca association is of little significance to the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth. Most of the bismuth, in the Southern California batholith at least, occurs in a trace mineral phase (possibly sulfides) present as inclusions in the rock-forming minerals. ?? 1973.

  18. Variations in magmatic processes among igneous asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Six asteroid classes (types V, E, A, R, M, S) are composed primarily of differentiated assemblages produced by igneous processes within their parent planetesimals. These are identified by surface materials which deviate from a chondritic composition to a degree that require igneous chemical fractionation processes. There are large variations among these igneous asteroids in the peak temperatures attained, in the efficiency of magmatic phase separation, and in the depth within the original parent body exposed at the present surface. These variations provide important constraints on the nature of asteroidal heating events, on the differentiation processes within small planetary bodies, and on the disruption of those parent bodies. Variations due to depth within the parent body and due to degree of magmatic differentiation are detailed.

  19. Neoproterozoic, Paleozoic, and Mesozoic granitoid magmatism in the Qinling Orogen, China: Constraints on orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Chengli

    2013-08-01

    The Qinling Orogen is one of the main orogenic belts in Asia and is characterized by multi-stage orogenic processes and the development of voluminous magmatic intrusions. The results of zircon U-Pb dating indicate that granitoid magmatism in the Qinling Orogen mainly occurred in four distinct periods: the Neoproterozoic (979-711 Ma), Paleozoic (507-400 Ma), and Early (252-185 Ma) and Late (158-100 Ma) Mesozoic. The Neoproterozoic granitic magmatism in the Qinling Orogen is represented by strongly deformed S-type granites emplaced at 979-911 Ma, weakly deformed I-type granites at 894-815 Ma, and A-type granites at 759-711 Ma. They can be interpreted as the products of respectively syn-collisional, post-collisional and extensional setting, in response to the assembly and breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. The Paleozoic magmatism can be temporally classified into three stages of 507-470 Ma, 460-422 Ma and ˜415-400 Ma. They were genetically related to the subduction of the Shangdan Ocean and subsequent collision of the southern North China Block and the South Qinling Belt. The 507-470 Ma magmatism is spatially and temporally related to ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in the studied area. The 460-422 Ma magmatism with an extensive development in the North Qinling Belt is characterized by I-type granitoids and originated from the lower crust with the involvement of mantle-derived magma in a collisional setting. The magmatism with the formation age of ˜415-400 Ma only occurred in the middle part of the North Qinling Belt and is dominated by I-type granitoid intrusions, and probably formed in the late-stage of a collisional setting. Early Mesozoic magmatism in the study area occurred between 252 and 185 Ma, with the cluster in 225-200 Ma. It took place predominantly in the western part of the South Qinling Belt. The 250-240 Ma I-type granitoids are of small volume and show high Sr/Y ratios, and may have been formed in a continental arc setting related to subduction

  20. Macrostructural and microstructural architecture of the Karakoram fault: Relationship between magmatism and strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Richard J.; Searle, Michael P.

    2007-06-01

    A key factor in interpreting the significance of large-scale strike-slip faults in models of continental deformation is an understanding of the temporal relationship between faulting and magmatism. Knowledge of when a strike-slip fault initiated is essential in order to determine its long-term slip rate and its significance in accommodating strain. We review key structural criteria that identify whether magmatism is prekinematic or synkinematic with faulting and apply these criteria to a major Tibet-bounding strike-slip fault. Along the Karakoram fault, in western Tibet, opinion is divided between (1) those advocating that magmatism and shearing were coeval, in which case the youngest U-Pb crystallization age provides a minimum age of shear, and (2) those advocating that magmatism preceded strike-slip shearing, in which case the youngest U-Pb crystallization age provides a maximum age of shear. Fault zone rocks within the central segment of the fault are variably deformed, displaying high- to low-temperature solid-state fabrics. Mylonites indicate subsolidus noncoaxial deformation at temperatures that have not exceeded greenschist-lower amphibolite facies. There is no evidence for submagmatic deformation, and there are no textural or structural indicators that suggest synkinematic magmatism. Consequently, magmatism preceded shearing suggesting that the U-Pb age of proximal leucogranites sets a maximum age for shear. Coupled with a limited offset (<150 km), these data confirm a low long-term slip rate for the Karakoram fault (3-10 mm/yr). Consequently, the fault is unlikely to have played a significant role in accommodating strain during the Indo-Asian collision, and thus its role in suggested extrusion models of deformation is limited.

  1. Compositional spatial zonation and 2005-2013 temporal evolution of the hydrothermal-magmatic fluids from the submarine fumarolic field at Panarea Island (Aeolian Archipelago, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, Franco; Capaccioni, Bruno; Vaselli, Orlando

    2014-05-01

    The November 2002 submarine gas blast at Panarea Island (Sicily, southern Italy) was an unexpected reactivation event able to locally affect this hydrothermal-magmatic system whose the youngest eruptive products were dated at 20,000 ± 2000 years BP. The presence of magmatic gases (SO2 and HF) in the fumarolic gas discharges after the violent exhalative event was indicative of a magmatic input that temporary displaced the hydrothermal system. A few months later these acidic gases were indeed not detected in any of the studied fumaroles. Nevertheless, new geochemical data obtained by periodical sampling up to June 2013 suggest that the chemical-physical conditions of the hydrothermal-magmatic system at Panarea were not completely restored with respect to the geochemical data obtained in the early nineties. Thus, the 2002 gas burst has unequivocally caused a permanent modification to the fluid circulation system feeding the submarine fumaroles. In addition, strong compositional differences were observed by the 46 gases collected in 2012-2013 from submarine fumaroles located in different sites of the studied area, allowing to distinguish three different groups of fumaroles: A) H2- and CO-rich gases, which also show relatively low Ar concentrations, B) H2S-rich gases, having variable CO/CH4 ratios, and C) Ar-rich gases, having relatively low H2 concentrations. Gases from group A are distributed along NW- and NE-trending fault systems, whereas those of groups B and C discharge at increasing distance from the intersection of the two fault systems, indicating a spatial and compositional control by the local tectonic setting. The H2/CO ratios of groups A and B gases are significantly lower than those measured prior to 2012. This would imply an increase of gas pressure at depth, possibly caused by continuous addition of gas and energy from the magmatic source to the hydrothermal reservoir. Continuation of this process may lead to the occurrence of gas burst events in the

  2. Early Yellowstone hotspot magmatism and gold metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, Willis; Unger, Derick; Saunders, James; Kamenov, George

    2009-11-01

    High-grade epithermal gold deposits in the Northern Great Basin have long been associated with regional Miocene basaltic to rhyolitic volcanism. Previous models for the low-sulfidation epithermal gold ores in this region have generally portrayed the bimodal magmas as a source of heat to drive large-scale convection of meteoritic water that leached gold from crustal sources and deposited it in hydrothermal vein systems, or required that the gold evolve from fractionated silicic magmas. New data of the present study indicate a more direct genetic link to the plume-related basaltic magmas of the region. Laser 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental heating plateau ages for single crystals of adularia from several of these low-sulfidation epithermal gold deposits range from 16.6 Ma to 15.5 Ma. Adularia from the Jumbo deposit yields three concordant plateau ages with a combined statistical result of 16.54 ± 0.04 Ma (95% confidence level, MSWD = 0.23). Plateau ages for adularia from other deposits in the region, and from gold-bearing veins in the Owyhee Mountains of southwestern Idaho, yield similar ages up to ~16.5 Ma, however some veins are as young as ca. 15.5 Ma and the grain-to-grain ages for a given sample can vary by up to ca. 0.5 Ma. Observed variations in age among the adularia crystals of a given rock sample indicate varying amounts of extraneous argon, and also loss of radiogenic 40Ar, among the population of grains for a particular sample. The single-crystal results are interpreted to indicate a 16.5-15.5 Ma interval for formation of gold-bearing adularia veins in the region. The initiation and duration of this gold-forming event appears contemporaneous (within uncertainties) with the basaltic volcanism at the Steens Mountain section and an ensuing one-million-year episode of basaltic volcanism from multiple centers in the region ( Brueseke et al., 2007). Trace amounts of lead are alloyed with gold in the deposits studied. The isotopic compositions of this lead are not

  3. Source to Sink studies in Spain: a catalogue and data set of Mediterranean river basins and deltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canals, M.; Arnau, P.; Colas, S.

    2003-04-01

    Deltas and their alongshore extensions form most of the low Spanish Mediterranean shorelines. Prodeltas form the offshore, fine-grained continuation of deltaic edifices. Both large river systems, like the Ebro, and tens of small to very small river systems coexist in the Spanish Mediterrranean watershed. A general north (wetter) to south (drier) climatic gradient has an influence on precipitation and natural river discharge. Local precipitation anomalies appear mostly because of altitudinal differences. The Ebro is a especial case since its upper basin is under the influence of the Atlantic climate. This natural scenario has been profoundly disturbed by river management schemes. Damming and water diversion has been almost everywhere particularly intensive during the XXth century and has strongly reduced water and sediment discharge at river mouths. The Ebro River is the most dramatic example, with up to 97% of the basin surface now behind dams, and >90% reduction of the sediment discharge, suspended and bedload, at its mouth. Beach stability has much suffered because of the drastic reduction in the volumes of solid load reaching river mouth and being redistributed by alongshore currents. A similar situation, although perhaps less dramatic, could be depicted for other Mediterranean countries. However, a consistent and comprehensive catalogue and data set of Mediterranean river basins and deltaic systems are still lacking. Although some information can be easilly accessed (i.e., via Internet), lots of valuable information remain to be mined to a great extent from basin authorities in order to achieve a comprehensive compilation and understanding of source to sink river systems in the Spanish Mediterranean. A team from the University of Barcelona has collected a vast quantity of information on the totality of Spanish Mediterranean river systems, with a substantial amount of it kindly provided by river basin authorities. The collection includes DTMs, aerial photographs

  4. Influence of depth, focal mechanism, and tectonic setting on the shape and duration of earthquake source time functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Heidi

    2001-06-01

    Source time functions of 255 moderate to great earthquakes obtained from inversions of teleseismic body waves by Tanioka and Ruff [1997] and coworkers were compared in a systematic way. They were scaled to remove the effect of moment and to allow the direct comparison and averaging of time function shape as well as duration. Time function durations picked by Tanioka and Ruff [1997] are proportional to the cube root of seismic moment if moments from the Harvard centroid moment tensor catalog are used. The average duration of scaled time functions is shorter and the average shape has a more abrupt termination for deeper events than shallower ones, with a distinct change occurring at ˜40 km depth. The complexity of the time functions, as quantified by the number of subevents, appears to decrease below ˜40 km depth. Furthermore, among events shallower than 40 km, the average duration of scaled time functions is shorter, and their average shape has a more abrupt termination (1) for events with strike-slip focal mechanisms compared to thrust events and (2) for the few thrust events associated with an intraplate setting compared to the majority associated with an interplate (subduction) boundary. In each of these cases, events in more technically and seismically active settings have a longer duration and a more gradual termination. This can be interpreted in terms of lower stress drops and/or slower rupture velocities at active plate boundaries, suggesting that fault rheology depends on slip rate and may evolve as total fault slip accumulates. Furthermore, differences in average time function shape and duration associated with different subduction zones suggest that differences exist in the rheology on the plate boundaries at the various subduction zones. Supporting data table is available via Web browser or via Anonymous FTP from ftp://kosmos.agu.org, directory "append" (Username = "anonymous", Password = "guest"); subdirectories in the ftp site are arranged by paper

  5. A model for northern Vermont's Acadian magmatism with insight from Italy's Tuscan magmatic province

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, D.S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    S-type Devonian acidic intrusives in northern Vermont occur scattered throughout the turbiditic flysch sequence and pervasive horizon of mafic Standing Pond Volcanics of the Connecticut Valley--Gaspe Trough (CVGT). These granitoids formed in a successor basin that opened over the stalled Taconic subduction zone located between the Bronson Hill--Boundary Mountain Volcanic arc (east) and the ophiolite-bearing accretionary complex of the Green Mountains (west). Contact aureoles surrounding the granitoids are superimposed over low-pressure facies series metamorphic isograds that have concentric pattern correlated with the centers of intrusion. Italy's Tuscan Magmatic Province, also dominated by S-type acidic intrusives, developed between 7 and 2 Ma in a successor basin over an extinct subduction zone. In that case, the basin and its plutons developed when the Corsica-Sardinia plate pulled back to form the Tyrrhenian Sea after having collided with Italy to form the Apennine range approximately 10 m.y. earlier. In this model for northern Vermont, a volcanic arc and accretionary complex developed during Ordovician subduction, perhaps with continuing trench--arc separation due to shallow subduction. When the leading edge of continental North America entered the subduction zone, the process stalled and the subducted Iapetus slab continued to lose heat and increase density, promoting its separation from the overlying plate. Upwelling under the former forearc region rifted the crust to form the CVGT. The mantle-derived mafic melts rose, transferring heat to metamorphose and partially melt the basin fill. The Standing Pond Volcanics represent this melt that reached the surface at one stage and flooded the basin. Northern Vermont's granitoids rose, penetrating the domed strata above their source region, as extensional tectonism was replaced by Acadian compression.

  6. Modelling magmatic gas scrubbing in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, Rossella; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Valenza, Mariano; Bergsson, Baldur; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Rakel Guðjónsdóttir, Sylvía

    2015-04-01

    In volcano-hosted hydrothermal systems, the chemistry of deeply rising magmatic gases is extensively modified by gas-water-rock interactions taking place within the hydrothermal reservoir, and/or at shallow groundwaters conditions. These reactions can scrub reactive, water-soluble species (S, halogens) from the magmatic gas phase, so that their quantitative assessment is central to understanding the chemistry of surface gas manifestations, and brings profound implications to the interpretation of volcanic-hydrothermal unrests. Here, we present the results of numerical simulations of magmatic gas scrubbing, in which the reaction path modelling approach (Helgeson, 1968) is used to reproduce hydrothermal gas-water-rock interactions at both shallow (temperature up to 109°C; low-T model runs) and deep reservoir (temperature range: 150-250 °C; high-T model runs) conditions. The model was built based upon the EQ3/6 software package (Wolery and Daveler, 1992), and consisted into a step by step addition of a high-temperature magmatic gas to an initial meteoric water, in the presence of a dissolving aquifer rock. The model outputted, at each step of gas addition, the chemical composition of a new aqueous solution formed after gas-water-rock interactions; which, upon reaching gas over-pressuring (PgasTOT > Psat(H2O) at run T), is degassed (by single-step degassing) to separate a scrubbed gas phase. As an application of the model results, the model compositions of the separated gases are finally compared with compositions of natural gas emissions from Hekla volcano (T< 100°C) and from Krisuvik geothermal system (T> 100°C), resulting into an excellent agreement. The compositions of the model solutions are also in fair agreement with compositions of natural thermal water samples. We conclude that our EQ3/6-based reaction path simulations offer a realistic representation of gas-water-rock interaction processes occurring underneath active magmatic-hydrothermal systems

  7. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    , even if one data object lies behind another. Stereoscopic viewing is another powerful tool to investigate 3-D relationships between objects. This form of immersion is constructed through viewing two separate images that are interleaved--typically 48 frames per second, per eye--and synced through an emitter and a set of specialized polarizing eyeglasses. The polarizing lenses flicker at an equivalent rate, blanking the eye for which a particular image was not drawn, producing the desired stereo effect. Volumetric visualization of the ARAD 3-D seismic dataset will be presented. The effective use of transparency reveals detailed structure of the melt-lens beneath the 9°03'N overlapping spreading center (OSC) along the East Pacific Rise, including melt-filled fractures within the propagating rift-tip. In addition, range-gated images of seismic reflectivity will be co-registered to investigate the physical properties (melt versus mush) of the magma chamber at this locale. Surface visualization of a dense, 2-D grid of MCS seismic data beneath Axial seamount (Juan de Fuca Ridge) will also be highlighted, including relationships between the summit caldera and rift zones, and the underlying (and humongous) magma chamber. A selection of Quicktime movies will be shown. Popcorn will be served, really!

  8. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge axes is ubiquitous, associated with mass, chemical, and heat exchanges between the deep lithosphere and the overlying envelopes, and sustaining chemiosynthetic ecosystems at the seafloor. Compared with hydrothermal fields at fast-spreading ridges, those at slow spreading ones show a large variability as their location and nature is controlled or influenced by several parameters that are inter-related: a) tectonic setting, ranging from 'volcanic systems' (along the rift valley floor, volcanic ridges, seamounts), to 'tectonic' ones (rift-bounding faults, oceanic detachment faults); b) the nature of the host rock, owing to compositional heterogeneity of slow-spreading lithosphere (basalt, gabbro, peridotite); c) the type of heat source (magmatic bodies at depth, hot lithosphere, serpentinization reactions); d) and the associated temperature of outflow fluids (high- vs.- low temperature venting and their relative proportion). A systematic review of the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal fields along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity is concentrated either at oceanic detachment faults, or along volcanic segments with evidence of robust magma supply to the axis. A detailed study of the magmatically robust Lucky Strike segment suggests that all present and past hydrothermal activity is found at the center of the segment. The association of these fields to central volcanos, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the remaining of the ridge segment, suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity in these volcanic systems is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build these volcanic edifices. In this setting, hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust exploit permeable fault zones to circulate. While

  9. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions. Part I: study area description, data set acquisition and qualitative data analysis of the data set.

    PubMed

    Badol, Caroline; Locoge, Nadine; Léonardis, Thierry; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-25

    The global objective of this two part study was (1) to conduct VOC measurements in order to further understand VOC behaviour in an urban area influenced by industrial emissions and (2) to evaluate the role of these specific sources relative to urban sources. In this first paper a thorough descriptive and qualitative analysis is performed. A second article will be devoted to the quantitative analysis using Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) modelling. In the Dunkerque (France) area most industrial sources are situated in the north and the west of the receptor site whereas urban and traffic sources are located in the south and the east. A data set constituted of nearly 330,000 VOC data has been developed from the hourly measurements of 53 VOCs for 1 year from September 2002 to August 2003. It also contains meteorological parameters such as temperature, wind direction and wind speed. Using different graphical methods, the influence of the different sources on the ambient VOC concentrations has been highlighted at different time scales. In this work, the analysis of daily time series for the 53 VOCs shows the influence of traffic exhaust emissions because of the increases at traffic rush hours. Besides, the seasonal evolution of the VOC/acetylene ratio points out the influence of evaporative sources on ambient VOC concentration. Concerning other point sources, the variations of measured VOC concentrations for different wind directions and scatter plots of VOC hourly concentrations highlight the influence of some industrial sources.

  10. Complete Sets of Radiating and Nonradiating Parts of a Source and Their Fields with Applications in Inverse Scattering Limited-Angle Problems

    PubMed Central

    Louis, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    Many algorithms applied in inverse scattering problems use source-field systems instead of the direct computation of the unknown scatterer. It is well known that the resulting source problem does not have a unique solution, since certain parts of the source totally vanish outside of the reconstruction area. This paper provides for the two-dimensional case special sets of functions, which include all radiating and all nonradiating parts of the source. These sets are used to solve an acoustic inverse problem in two steps. The problem under discussion consists of determining an inhomogeneous obstacle supported in a part of a disc, from data, known for a subset of a two-dimensional circle. In a first step, the radiating parts are computed by solving a linear problem. The second step is nonlinear and consists of determining the nonradiating parts. PMID:23165060

  11. Detrital geochronology of unroofing magmatic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malusà, Marco Giovanni; Villa, Igor Maria; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Tectonic reconstructions performed in recent years are increasingly based on petrographic (Dickinson & Suczek, 1979; Garzanti et al., 2007) and geochronological (Brandon et al., 1998; DeCelles et al., 2004) analyses of detrital systems. Detrital age patterns are traditionally interpreted as a result of cooling induced by exhumation (Jäger, 1967; Dodson, 1973). Such an approach can lead to infer extremely high erosion rates (Giger & Hurford 1989) that conflict with compelling geological evidence (Garzanti & Malusà, 2008). This indicates that interpretations solely based on exhumational cooling may not have general validity (Villa, 2006). Here we propose a new detrital geochronology model that takes into account the effects of both crystallization and exhumational cooling on geochronometers, from U-Pb on zircon to fission tracks on apatite. This model, specifically designed for unroofing magmatic complexes, predicts both stationary and moving mineral-age peaks. Because its base is the ordinary interaction between endogenic and exogenic processes, it is applicable to any geological setting. It was tested on the extremely well-studied Bregaglia-Bergell pluton in the Alps, and on the sedimentary succession derived from its erosion. The consistency between predicted and observed age patterns validates the model. Our results demonstrate that volcanoes were active on top of the growing Oligocene Alps, and resolve a long-standing paradox in quantitative erosion-sedimentation modelling, the scarcity of sediment during apparently fast erosion. Dickinson, W. R. & Suczek, C. A. Plate tectonics and sandstone composition. Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. Bull. 63, 2164-2172 (1979). Garzanti, E., Doglioni, C., Vezzoli. G. & Andò, S. Orogenic belts and orogenic sediment provenance. J. Geol. 115, 315-334 (2007). Brandon, M. T., Roden-Tice, M. K. & Garver, J. I. Cenozoic exhumation of the Cascadia accretionary wedge in the Olympic Mountains, northwest Washington State. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull

  12. Stochastic modelling of deep magmatic controls on porphyry copper deposit endowment.

    PubMed

    Chiaradia, Massimo; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-03-15

    Porphyry deposits, our main source of copper and of significant amounts of Mo, Re and Au, form at convergent margins in association with intermediate-felsic magmas. Although it is accepted that copper is transported and precipitated by fluids released by these magmas, the magmatic processes leading to the formation of economic deposits remain elusive. Here we perform Monte Carlo petrological and geochemical modelling to quantitatively link crustal magmatic processes and the geochemical signatures of magmas (i.e., Sr/Y) to the formation of porphyry Cu deposits of different sizes. Our analysis shows that economic deposits (particularly the largest ones) may only form in association with magma accumulated in the lower-middle crust (P > ~0.5 GPa) during ≥2-3 Ma, and subsequently transferred to and degassed in the upper crust over periods of up to ~2.0 Ma. Magma accumulation and evolution at shallower depths (<~0.4 GPa) dramatically reduces the potential of magmatic systems to produce economic deposits. Our modelling also predicts the association of the largest porphyry deposits with a specific Sr/Y interval (~100 ± 50) of the associated magmatic rocks, which is virtually identical to the range measured in giant porphyry copper deposits.

  13. Stochastic modelling of deep magmatic controls on porphyry copper deposit endowment

    PubMed Central

    Chiaradia, Massimo; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Porphyry deposits, our main source of copper and of significant amounts of Mo, Re and Au, form at convergent margins in association with intermediate-felsic magmas. Although it is accepted that copper is transported and precipitated by fluids released by these magmas, the magmatic processes leading to the formation of economic deposits remain elusive. Here we perform Monte Carlo petrological and geochemical modelling to quantitatively link crustal magmatic processes and the geochemical signatures of magmas (i.e., Sr/Y) to the formation of porphyry Cu deposits of different sizes. Our analysis shows that economic deposits (particularly the largest ones) may only form in association with magma accumulated in the lower-middle crust (P > ~0.5 GPa) during ≥2–3 Ma, and subsequently transferred to and degassed in the upper crust over periods of up to ~2.0 Ma. Magma accumulation and evolution at shallower depths (<~0.4 GPa) dramatically reduces the potential of magmatic systems to produce economic deposits. Our modelling also predicts the association of the largest porphyry deposits with a specific Sr/Y interval (~100 ± 50) of the associated magmatic rocks, which is virtually identical to the range measured in giant porphyry copper deposits. PMID:28295045

  14. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as 'cratonization', is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons. The majority of magmatic zircons from the main magmatic cycles have Hf isotopic compositions that are generally more evolved than CHUR, forming vertical arrays that extend to moderately radiogenic compositions. Complimentary O isotope data, also show a significant variation in composition. However, combined, these data define not only the source components from which the magmas were derived, but also a range of physio-chemical processes that operated during magma transport and emplacement. These data also identify a previously unknown crustal reservoir in the Capricorn Orogen.

  15. Stochastic modelling of deep magmatic controls on porphyry copper deposit endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaradia, Massimo; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Porphyry deposits, our main source of copper and of significant amounts of Mo, Re and Au, form at convergent margins in association with intermediate-felsic magmas. Although it is accepted that copper is transported and precipitated by fluids released by these magmas, the magmatic processes leading to the formation of economic deposits remain elusive. Here we perform Monte Carlo petrological and geochemical modelling to quantitatively link crustal magmatic processes and the geochemical signatures of magmas (i.e., Sr/Y) to the formation of porphyry Cu deposits of different sizes. Our analysis shows that economic deposits (particularly the largest ones) may only form in association with magma accumulated in the lower-middle crust (P > ~0.5 GPa) during ≥2–3 Ma, and subsequently transferred to and degassed in the upper crust over periods of up to ~2.0 Ma. Magma accumulation and evolution at shallower depths (<~0.4 GPa) dramatically reduces the potential of magmatic systems to produce economic deposits. Our modelling also predicts the association of the largest porphyry deposits with a specific Sr/Y interval (~100 ± 50) of the associated magmatic rocks, which is virtually identical to the range measured in giant porphyry copper deposits.

  16. Plate Tectonics Constrained by Evidence-Based Magmatic Temperatures and Phase Relations of Fertile Lherzolite (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. H.; Falloon, T.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand Earth’s plate tectonics we must interpret the most direct probes for mantle composition and temperature distribution i.e. the primitive basaltic magmas and peridotites representing partial melts and mantle residues. An evidence-based approach to identification of parental magmas and determination of their temperatures requires glass and phenocryst compositions and experimentally calibrated Fe/Mg partitioning between olivine and melt. We have compared magmatic crystallization temperatures between ‘hot-spot’(proposed to be plume-related) and normal mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) parental liquids, by examining three representative magmatic suites from both ocean island (Hawaii, Iceland, and Réunion) and mid-ocean ridge settings (Cocos-Nazca, East Pacific Rise, and Mid-Atlantic Ridge). We have glass and olivine phenocryst compositions, including volatile (H2O) contents, and have calculated parental liquid compositions at 0.2GPa by incrementally adding olivine back into the glass compositions until a liquid in equilibrium with the most-magnesian olivine phenocryst composition is obtained. The results of these calculations demonstrate that there is very little difference (maximum of ~20°C) between the ranges of crystallization temperatures of the parental liquids (MORB:1243-1351°C versus OIB:1286-1372°C) when volatile contents are taken into account. However while lacking temperature contrast, the source regions for ‘hot-spot’ parental magmas contain geochemical signatures of old subducted crust/lithosphere. The mantle depths of origin determined for both the MORB and OIB suites are similar (MORB:1-2 GPa; OIB:1-2.5 GPa). Calculations of mantle potential temperatures (Tp) are model dependent, particularly to melt fraction from an inferred source. Assuming similar fertile lherzolite sources, the differences in Tp values between the hottest MORB and the hottest ocean island tholeiite sources are ~80°C. These differences disappear if the

  17. Intrusive LIPs: Deep crustal magmatic processes during the emplacement of Large Igneous Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. A.; Karlstrom, L.

    2011-12-01

    Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are characterized by magmatic activity on two distinct timescales. While these provinces have total active lifetimes of order 10-30 Ma, most of the erupted volume is emplaced within <1 Ma in many cases. The latter timescale is likely controlled by magmatic intrusion/evolution processes within the deep crust. We present seismic evidence for 5-15 km thick Moho-level ultramafic intrusive/cumulate layers underlying Phanerozoic LIPs worldwide [Ridley and Richards, 2010]. These deep crustal bodies are both observed and predicted to have volumes at least as large as the extrusive components of flood volcanism. The evidence for these layers is particularly clear for oceanic LIPs (plateaus). We hypothesize that thermally activated creep of the lower crust due to magma chamber emplacement controls a transition from largely extrusive to largely intrusive magmatism during mantle plume impingement on the lithosphere [Karlstrom and Richards, 2011]. We explore this hypothesis by modeling the thermomechanical evolution of Moho-level magma chambers. Comparing the timescale for viscoelastic relaxation of intrusion-related stresses with the timescale for sill formation and magma differentiation, we find that fracture processes leading to diking from Moho levels may plausibly be shut off on a timescale of ~1 Ma. Continued melt influx therefore results in intrusive magmatism, which may be manifest as plateau growth in oceanic settings. We suggest that maximum intrusion size may be limited by crustal thickness, resulting in smaller volume individual eruptions in oceanic versus continental LIPs.

  18. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    PubMed Central

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes. PMID:26055494

  19. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G; González, Pablo J; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-06-09

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes.

  20. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-06-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes.

  1. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  2. Silicon isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2011-10-01

    The Si isotopic composition of Earth's mantle is thought to be homogeneous (δ 30Si = -0.29 ± 0.08‰, 2 s.d.) and not greatly affected by partial melting and recycling. Previous analyses of evolved igneous material indicate that such rocks are isotopically heavy relative to the mantle. To understand this variation, it is necessary to investigate the degree of Si isotopic fractionation that takes place during magmatic differentiation. Here we report Si isotopic compositions of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, which has formed in a region devoid of old, geochemically diverse crust. We show that Si isotopic composition varies linearly as a function of silica content, with more differentiated rocks possessing heavier isotopic compositions. Data for samples from the Afar Rift Zone, as well as various igneous USGS standards are collinear with the Hekla trend, providing evidence of a fundamental relationship between magmatic differentiation and Si isotopes. The effect of fractionation has been tested by studying cumulates from the Skaergaard Complex, which show that olivine and pyroxene are isotopically light, and plagioclase heavy, relative to the Si isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle. Therefore, Si isotopes can be utilised to model the competing effects of mafic and felsic mineral fractionation in evolving silicate liquids and cumulates. At an average SiO 2 content of ˜60 wt.%, the predicted δ 30Si value of the continental crust that should result from magmatic fractionation alone is -0.23 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.e.), barely heavier than the mantle. This is, at most, a maximum estimate, as this does not take into account weathered material whose formation drives the products toward lighter δ 30Si values. Mass balance calculations suggest that removal of continental crust of this composition from the upper mantle will not affect the Si isotopic composition of the mantle.

  3. Tritium and stable isotopes of magmatic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; McMurtry, G. M.

    2000-04-01

    To investigate the isotopic composition and age of water in volcanic gases and magmas, we analyzed samples from 11 active volcanoes ranging in composition from tholeiitic basalt to rhyolite: Mount St. Helens (USA), Kilauea (USA), Pacaya (Guatemala), Galeras (Colombia), Satsuma Iwo-Jima (Japan), Sierra Negra and Alcedo (Ecuador), Vulcano (Italy), Parı´cutin (Mexico), Kudryavy (Russia), and White Island (New Zealand). Tritium at relatively low levels (0.1-5 T.U.) is found in most emissions from high-temperature volcanic fumaroles sampled, even at discharge temperatures >700°C. Although magmatic fluids sampled from these emissions usually contain high CO 2, S total, HCl, HF, B, Br, 3He R/ RA, and low contents of air components, stable isotope and tritium relations of nearly all such fluids show mixing of magmatic volatiles with relatively young meteoric water (model ages≤75 y). Linear δD/ δ18O and 3H/ δ18O mixing trends of these two end-members are invariably detected at arc volcanoes. Tritium is also detected in fumarole condensates at hot spot basalt volcanoes, but collecting samples approaching the composition of end-member magmatic fluid is exceedingly difficult. In situ production of 3H, mostly from spontaneous fission of 238U in magmas is calculated to be <0.001 T.U., except for the most evolved compositions (high U, Th, and Li and low H 2O contents). These values are below the detection limit of 3H by conventional analytical techniques (about 0.01 T.U. at best). We found no conclusive evidence that natural fusion in the Earth produces anomalous amounts of detectable 3H (>0.05 T.U.).

  4. Grenvillian magmatism in the northern Virginia Blue Ridge: Petrologic implications of episodic granitic magma production and the significance of postorogenic A-type charnockite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollo, R.P.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Borduas, E.A.; Dickin, A.P.; McNutt, R.H.; Fanning, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Grenvillian (1.2 to 1.0 Ga) plutonic rocks in northern Virginia preserve evidence of episodic, mostly granitic magmatism that spanned more than 150 million years (m.y.) of crustal reworking. Crystallization ages determined by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon and monazite, combined with results from previous studies, define three periods of magmatic activity at 1183-1144 Ma (Magmatic Interval I), 1120-1111 Ma (Magmatic Interval II), and 1078-1028 Ma (Magmatic Interval III). Magmatic activity produced dominantly tholeiitic plutons composed of (1) low-silica charnockite, (2) leucogranite, (3) non-leucocratic granitoid (with or without orthopyroxene (opx)), and (4) intermediate biotite-rich granitoid. Field, petrologic, geochemical, and geochronologic data indicate that charnockite and non-charnockitic granitoids were closely associated in both space and time, indicating that presence of opx is related to magmatic conditions, not metamorphic grade. Geochemical and Nd isotopic data, combined with results from experimental studies, indicate that leucogranites (Magmatic Intervals I and III) and non-leucocratic granitoids (Magmatic Intervals I and II) were derived from parental magmas produced by either a high degree of partial melting of isotopically evolved tonalitic sources or less advanced partial melting of dominantly tonalitic sources that also included a more mafic component. Post-orogenic, circa 1050 Ma low-silica charnockite is characterized by A-type compositional affinity including high FeOt/(FeOt + MgO), Ga/Al, Zr, Nb, Y, and Zn, and was derived from parental magmas produced by partial melting of potassic mafic sources in the lower crust. Linear geochemical trends defined by leucogranites, low-silica charnockite, and biotite-rich monzogranite emplaced during Magmatic Interval III reflect differences in source-related characteristics; these features do not represent an igneous fractionation sequence. A

  5. Magmatic volatiles in explosive rhyolitic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Westrich, H.R.

    1981-07-01

    Obsidian clasts in rhyolitic tephra deposits preserve preeruption magmatic volatile contents, providing a direct means for determining the volatile content of explosively erupted magmas. Small to moderate volume Plinian eruptions (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/ km/sup 3/) appear to be driven by 0.5--1.0 wt.% volatiles, consisting dominantly of H/sub 2/O with minor CO/sub 2/. Analysis of obsidian from eruptive sequences consisting of tephra and flows indicates that this hydrous magma abruptly overlies magma with only 0.1--0.2 wt.% H/sub 2/O.

  6. Sr isotopic microsampling of magmatic rocks; a review (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Sr isotopes have been used since the 1960s as powerful tracers of source for igneous rocks. In the past 10 years in-situ isotopic microsampling has afforded us tremendous progress in our capacity to understand magmatic processes. This progress is underpinned by analytical advances particularly in sample extraction through laser or micromill and in multicollector mass spectrometer improvements to sensitivity and precision. Perhaps the biggest surprise was the recognition in the 1990s that young magmatic rocks are commonly isotopically heterogeneous at the component (inter- or intra- crystal) scale. Given that melting and fractionation do not affect 87Sr/86Sr we would not a priori expect isotopic variations within or among crystals in a young igneous rock. This observation alone attests to open system behavior in magmas, and tells us that many of the crystals have been mechanically aggregated and not grown directly from the melt in which they are found solidified (a conclusion that can also commonly be drawn from cursory petrographic examination). This recognition in turn means that we can make use of the crystals as recorders of the isotopic environments in which they crystallise: If a crystal grows progressively from a melt which changes its isotopic composition through processes such as contamination and mixing, then the only record of the melt evolution is in the core-rim compositions of the crystals - analogous to the environmental record of tree rings. Plagioclase crystals in mafic enclaves from Lassen (CA) and Purico-Chascon (Chile), for instance, have isotopic records that reflect origination from the more silicic host. Core-rim records of evolution can also be integrated with textural measurements. At Stromboli we have shown how isotopic zoning correlates with crystal size distribution. The detailed records of single crystals can be complemented by multi crystal core analyses which can be used to distinguish specific populations. This approach was used on

  7. Magmatic Degassing and the Volatile Depletion of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Saal, A. E.; Hauri, E.

    2015-12-01

    The detection of highly volatile elements in lunar volcanic glasses and melt inclusions has provided the first definitive evidence for the accretion and retention of these elements in the Moon's interior1,2. Measurement of H in lunar apatite, at levels similar to terrestrial apatite, has added weight to this discovery3,4. These results are at odds with the longest-standing observations that the abundances of highly- and moderately-volatile elements in lunar basalts are as much as 1000 times more depleted than in terrestrial basalts5. We will show that most of these apparent contradictions have arisen due to the previously unappreciated importance of a single widespread process, magmatic degassing. Degassing occurs in all eruptions of magma, with the consequent release of volatile elements into an exsolved vapor phase. We use ours and previously published results to evaluate lunar magmatic degassing and to show that A) volatile element contents for the bulk silicate Moon (BSM) are only moderately depleted compared with the bulk silicate Earth (range 0.5-0.1, avg. 0.25 x BSE), B) they essentially overlap the composition of the terrestrial depleted MORB source and C) the volatile depletion pattern for the BSM is largely flat, and so does not correlate with condensation temperature at 10-4 bars, nor with bond energy for likely ligands. Published high-precision Sr and Pb isotope ratios on well-dated lunar rocks6-8 reveal 87Rb/86Sr and 238U/204Pb ratios of the lunar mantle a factor of 0.3-0.5 and 0.28-0.85 depleted compared to those of the BSE, respectively; lending support to our estimates for the abundances of Rb (0.245 x BSE) and Pb (0.187 x BSE) in the BSM. Before the Moon's extent of volatile depletion can be confidently attributed to the accretion processes, magmatic degassing must be examined and critically evaluated. References [1] Saal et al., 2008. Nature 454, 192. [2] Hauri et al., 2015. FEPS 409, 252. [3] Boyce et al., 2014. Sc. 344, 400. [4] Anand et al

  8. Identification of the sources of Escherichia coli in a watershed using carbon-utilization patterns and composite data sets.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Samir H; Massengale, Rene D

    2008-06-01

    The field of bacterial source tracking (BST) has been rapidly evolving to meet the demands of water pollution analysis, specifically the contamination of waterways and drinking water reservoirs by point source and nonpoint source pollution. The goal of the current study was to create a BST library based on carbon-utilization patterns (CUP) for predicting sources of E. coli in a watershed, to compare this library to an antibiotic-resistance analysis (ARA) library previously published for the same isolates, and to determine the efficacy of using a composite dataset which combines data from both datasets into a single library for predicting the source of unknown isolates. This was accomplished by generating a CUP dataset and a composite ARA-CUP dataset for the E. coli isolates from known fecal sources within a watershed. These libraries were then used to predict the sources of E. coli isolates collected from 13 water sites in the same watershed and compared in regard to predictive accuracy. The dominant sources of E. coli in the South Bosque watershed were cattle as identified by all three methods. The 6-source composite library had higher average rates of correct classification (96.7%), specificity (99.2%), positive-predictive value (99.1%), and negative-predictive value (96.8%) than either the ARA or CUP 6 source libraries (ARCC 80.1% and 86.7% respectively). The current study is the first field study to compare two phenotypic methods, Antibiotic Resistance Analysis (ARA) and Carbon Utilization Profiling (CUP). This study is also the first to combine both of these methods to create a composite "toolbox" type approach.

  9. From birth to death of arc magmatism: The igneous evolution of Komandorsky Islands recorded tectonic changes during 50 Ma of westernmost Aleutian history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfig, T. W.; Portnyagin, M.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F. F.; van den Bogaard, P.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Komandorsky Islands form the westernmost end of the Aleutian Island Arc. Four igneous complexes, spanning almost 50 Ma of magmatism, have previously been identified (Ivaschenko et al., 1984: Far East Scientific Centre, Vladivostok, 192 pp.). The petrogenesis of this protracted magmatic record and accurate absolute ages of events, however, remain poorly constrained. Our study investigates the relationship between magma composition and tectonic setting. The Komandorsky igneous basement formed in subduction zone setting. It hosts some of the oldest igneous rocks of the entire Aleutian Arc with the onset of magmatism occurring at 47 Ma. This early stage was characterized by classic fluid-dominated arc volcanism, which produced two coeval but likely genetically unrelated magmatic series of tholeiitic mafic and tholeiitic to calc-alkaline felsic rocks. To date, no boninites have been found and therefore arc initiation is different at the Aleutians than at Izu-Bonin-Marianas or the oldest rocks in the Aleutians have yet to be discovered. The prolonged production of the contrasting basalt-rhyolite association on Komandorsky Islands had lasted ~25 Ma and ceased around the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Concurrently to this long-lasting activity, a gradual transition to a different mode of arc magmatism took place reflected by newly discovered Sr-enriched, HREE-depleted calc-alkaline basaltic andesitic lavas of mid-upper Eocene age spanning a time of at least ~7 Ma. This so-called Transition Series displays a moderate garnet signature marking the increased contribution of a slab-melt component to the magma sources of the Komandorsky Islands. Slab-melt contribution increased with decreasing age leading to strongly adakitic magmatism as early as ~33 Ma (Lower Oligocene), reflected by eruption of high-Sr (up to 2,500 ppm), highly HREE-depleted Adak-type magnesian basaltic andesites and andesites. These remarkable magmas became predominant during the Lower Miocene. They were

  10. Rhenium and Iridium Partitioning in Silicate and Magmatic Spinels: Implications for Planetary Magmatism and Mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements Re, Ru and Ir partition strongly into spinel structures with large octahedral sites. New experimental results for both magmatic and silicate spinels will be presented with a few planetary implications. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. USE OF COMPOSITE DATA SETS FOR SOURCE-TRACKING ENTEROCCOCCI IN THE WATER COLUMN AND SHORELINE INTERSTITIAL WATERS ON PENSACOLA BEACH, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genthner, Fred J., Joseph B. James, Diane F. Yates and Stephanie D. Friedman. Submitted. Use of Composite Data Sets for Source-Tracking Enterococci in the Water Column and Shoreline Interstitial Waters on Pensacola Beach Florida. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 33 p. (ERL,GB 1212).

    So...

  12. Magmatic Processes and Systems Deduced from Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J.; Bezard, R. C.; Morgan, D. J.; Ginibre, C.

    2014-12-01

    When crystals grow in liquids the composition of their outermost layer will reflect that of the host with which they are in equilibrium and will therefore record the liquid composition, pressure and temperature.. Following separation from their sources, magmas differentiate. This change in liquid composition is driven largely by crystallisation in response to cooling or decompression. Other open system processes such as mixing and contamination are common. These can lead to abrupt changes in trace element and isotopic composition, accompanied by petrographic features, such as dissolution surfaces or zones of melt inclusions. Where such careful mineral-scale studies have been performed, the prevalence of open system processes is clear. In many cases these are shown by core-rim isotopic variations. Crystal-scale compositional variations in the context of whole rock compositions and petrography have allowed us to show crustal assimilation even from regions of supposedly oceanic crust such as the Lesser Antilles. In tandem with tracking magma evolution, core-rim analyses of appropriate crystals have also provided diffusion profiles which reflect timescales of magmatic processes. A key point, long recognised by Bruce Marsh, is that in situ geochemical data should be considered in a petrographic context in order to gain the most (and most credible) insights on the workings of magma systems from hand specimen to whole volcano/pluton scales: The petrographic microscope is not dead yet Identification of magmatic processes from in situ scrutiny allows us to synthesise the architectures and inner workings of magma systems. The evidence for interaction among magmas in many systems is compelling and suggests that many exist as stacked dike-sill arrangements with wall-rock focussed crystal growth and mush zones. These are consistent with many of the systematics suggested some time ago by Bruce Marsh

  13. Imaging the magmatic and hydrothermal systems of Long Valley Caldera, California with magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J.; Mangan, M.; McPhee, D.; Ponce, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Long Valley Caldera (LVC) in Eastern California contains active hydrothermal systems, areas of episodic seismicity, and areas of elevated gas emissions, all of which are related to a deeper magmatic system that is not well characterized. To better image the Long Valley magmatic system, 60 full-tensor broadband magnetotelluric (MT) stations were collected in LVC and modeled in three-dimensions to constrain the subsurface electrical resistivity structure down to 30 km. Three conductive zones are imaged in the preferred resistivity model. The most prominent conductive zone (<7 Ohm-m) is located 5 km beneath the resurgent dome (near the center of Long Valley Caldera), where it elongates in a north-south direction, and has westward connection to the surface close to well 44-16 near Deer Mountan. This conductive zone is interpreted to be an accumulation zone of hydrothermal fluids originating from a deeper magmatic source. The shape of the conductive body suggests that the fluids pool under the resurgent dome and migrate westward, upwelling just south of well 44-16 to feed the near surface geothermal system. A second conductive zone (<10 Ohm-m) is 4 km southeast of the resurgent dome and 5 km deep and coincident with the seismic swarm of 2014. This is another zone of fluid accumulation, where the source could be the fluid accumulation zone to the west or an independent deeper source. The third conductive anomaly (<10 Ohm-m) is a few kilometers south of the resurgent dome below a depth of 15 km, and collocated with a low p- and s-wave velocity zone, and directly beneath a GPS inflation area, all of which advocate for a magma mush zone of as much as 30% interstitial melt. The preferred resistivity model suggests an accumulation of hydrothermal fluids 5 km below the resurgent dome that originates from a deeper magmatic source at 15 km depth.

  14. A 17 Ma onset for the post-collisional K-rich calc-alkaline magmatism in the Maghrebides: Evidence from Bougaroun (northeastern Algeria) and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbassene, Fatiha; Chazot, Gilles; Bellon, Hervé; Bruguier, Olivier; Ouabadi, Aziouz; Maury, René C.; Déverchére, Jacques; Bosch, Delphine; Monié, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Bougaroun is the largest pluton (~ 200 km2) in the 1200 km-long Neogene magmatic belt located along the Mediterranean coast of Maghreb. New U-Pb dating on zircons and K-Ar ages on whole rocks and separated minerals document its emplacement at 17 Ma within the Lesser Kabylian basement, a continental block that collided with the African margin during the Neogene. This Upper Burdigalian intrusion is therefore the oldest presently identified K-rich calc-alkaline massif in the whole Maghrebides magmatic lineament and marks the onset of its activity. The Bougaroun peraluminous felsic rocks display a very strong crustal imprint. Associated mafic rocks (LREE-enriched gabbros) have preserved the "orogenic" (subduction-related) geochemical signature of their mantle source. Older depleted gabbros cropping out at Cap Bougaroun are devoid of clear subduction-related imprint and yielded Ar-Ar hornblende ages of 27.0 ± 3.0 Ma and 23.3 ± 3.2 Ma. We suggest that they are related to the Upper Oligocene back-arc rifted margin and Early Miocene oceanic crust formation of the nearby Jijel basin, an extension of the Algerian basin developed during the African (Tethyan) slab rollback. The fact that the Bougaroun pluton intrudes exhumed Kabylian lower crustal units, mantle slices and flysch nappes indicates that the Kabylian margin was already stretched and in a post-collisional setting at 17 Ma. We propose a tectono-magmatic model involving an Early Miocene Tethyan slab breakoff combined with delamination of the edges of the African and Kabylian continental lithospheres. At 17 Ma, the asthenospheric thermal flux upwelling through the slab tear induced the thermal erosion of the Kabylian lithospheric mantle metasomatized during the previous subduction event and triggered its partial melting. We attribute the strong trace element and isotopic crustal signature of Bougaroun felsic rocks to extensive interactions between ascending mafic melts and the African crust underthrust beneath the

  15. Use of composite data sets for source-tracking enterococci in the water column and shoreline interstitial waters on Pensacola Beach, Florida.

    PubMed

    Genthner, Fred J; James, Joseph B; Yates, Diane F; Friedman, Stephanie D

    2005-07-01

    Sources of Enterococcus faecalis isolates from Pensacola Beach, FL. were identified using a library-based approach by applying the statistical method of average similarity to single and composite data sets generated from separate analyses. Data sets included antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA), rep-fingerprints, and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles. Use of a composite data set composed of ARA and rep-fingerprints, added to the confidence of the identifications. The addition of FAME data to composite data sets did not add to the confidence of identifications. Source identification was performed to better understand risk associated with higher densities of enterococci found in swash zone interstitial water (SZIW) as compared to adjacent bathing water on Pensacola Beach, FL. The "swash zone" is that area of the beach continually washed over by waves. As the potential sources of enterococci were limited in this environment, only two library units, sea gull and human, were constructed. Identification of the beach isolates using a composite data set indicated a sea gull origin. The clonality of the beach isolates suggested that the beach environment selects certain subspecies of E. faecalis.

  16. Magmatic heat and the El Nino cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.; Moore, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Large submarine lava flows with apparent volumes exceeding 10 km3 have recently been imaged on the deep ocean floor in various parts of the Pacific by means of GLORIA and SeaMarc side-looking sonar surveys. Such flows may produce thermal anomalies large enough to perturb the cyclic processes of the ocean and could be a factor in the genesis of El Nino phenomena. We find that known volume rates of mid-ocean magma production could generate repetitive thermal anomalies as large as 10% of the average El Nino sea surface anomaly at intervals of about 5 years (the mean interval of El Nino events between 1935 and 1984). Likewise, estimated rates of eruption, cooling of lava on the seafloor, and transfer of heat to the near-surface environment could reasonably produce a thermal anomaly comparable to that associated with El Nino. Larger magmatic events, associated with fluctuations in the total magmatic power and seismicity along the East Pacific Rise, are possible at longer intervals and may explain the extreme size of some El Nino events, such as that of 1982-1983. -Authors

  17. Claritas rise, Mars: Pre-Tharsis magmatism?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Williams, J.-P.; Ruiz, J.; McGuire, P.C.; Buczkowski, D.L.; Wang, R.; Scharenbroich, L.; Hare, T.M.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Baker, V.R.; Wheelock, S.J.; Ferris, J.C.; Miyamoto, H.

    2009-01-01

    Claritas rise is a prominent ancient (Noachian) center of tectonism identified through investigation of comprehensive paleotectonic information of the western hemisphere of Mars. This center is interpreted to be the result of magmatic-driven activity, including uplift and associated tectonism, as well as possible hydrothermal activity. Coupled with its ancient stratigraphy, high density of impact craters, and complex structure, a possible magnetic signature may indicate that it formed during an ancient period of Mars' evolution, such as when the dynamo was in operation. As Tharsis lacks magnetic signatures, Claritas rise may pre-date the development of Tharsis or mark incipient development, since some of the crustal materials underlying Tharsis and older parts of the magmatic complex, respectively, could have been highly resurfaced, destroying any remanent magnetism. Here, we detail the significant characteristics of the Claritas rise, and present a case for why it should be targeted by the Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Mars Express spacecrafts, as well as be considered as a prime target for future tier-scalable robotic reconnaissance. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Supercontinental inheritance and its influence on supercontinental breakup: The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province and the breakup of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Lisa; Gazel, Esteban; Vidito, Christopher; Puffer, John; Bizimis, Michael; Henika, William; Caddick, Mark J.

    2015-10-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is the large igneous province (LIP) that coincides with the breakup of the supercontinent Pangea. Major and trace element data, Sr-Nd-Pb radiogenic isotopes, and high-precision olivine chemistry were collected on primitive CAMP dikes from Virginia (VA). These new samples were used in conjunction with a global CAMP data set to elucidate different mechanisms for supercontinent breakup and LIP formation. On the Eastern North American Margin, CAMP flows are found primarily in rift basins that can be divided into northern or southern groups based on differences in tectonic evolution, rifting history, and supercontinental inheritance. Geochemical signatures of CAMP suggest an upper mantle source modified by subduction processes. We propose that the greater number of accretionary events, or metasomatism by sediment melts as opposed to fluids on the northern versus the southern Laurentian margin during the formation of Pangea led to different subduction-related signatures in the mantle source of the northern versus southern CAMP lavas. CAMP samples have elevated Ni and low Ca in olivine phenocrysts indicating a significant pyroxenite component in the source, interpreted here as a result of subduction metasomatism. Different collisional styles during the Alleghanian orogeny in the North and South may have led to the diachroneity of the rifting of Pangea. Furthermore, due to a low angle of subduction, the Rheic Plate may have underplated the lithosphere then delaminated, triggering both the breakup of Pangea and the formation of CAMP.

  19. Investigating the long-term geodetic response to magmatic intrusions at volcanoes in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. L.; Biggs, J.; Annen, C.; Houseman, G. A.; Yamasaki, T.; Wright, T. J.; Walters, R. J.; Lu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Ratios of intrusive to extrusive activity at volcanic arcs are thought to be high, with estimates ranging between 5:1 and 30:1. Understanding the geodetic response to magmatic intrusion is therefore fundamental to large-scale studies of volcano deformation, providing insight into the dynamics of the inter-eruptive period of the volcano cycle and the building of continental crust. In northern California, we identify two volcanoes - Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV) and Lassen Volcanic Center (LaVC) - that exhibit long-term (multi-decadal) subsidence. We test the hypothesis that deformation at these volcanoes results from processes associated with magmatic intrusions. We first constrain the spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation fields, establishing the first time-series of deformation at LaVC using InSAR data, multi-temporal analysis techniques and global weather models. Although the rates of deformation at the two volcanoes are similar (~1 cm/yr), our results show that the ratio of vertical to horizontal displacements is significantly different, suggesting contrasting source geometries. To test the origin of deformation, we develop modeling strategies to investigate thermal and viscoelastic processes associated with magmatic intrusions. The first model we develop couples analytical geodetic models to a numerical model of volume loss due to cooling and crystallization based upon temperature-melt fraction relationships from petrological experiments. This model provides evidence that magmatic intrusion at MLV has occurred more recently than the last eruption ~1 ka. The second model we test uses a finite element approach to simulate the time-dependent viscoelastic response of the crust to magmatic intrusion. We assess the magnitude and timescales of ground deformation that may result from these processes, exploring the model parameter space before applying the models to our InSAR observations of subsidence in northern California.

  20. The Tertiary dike magmatism in the Southern Alps: geochronological data and geodynamic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergomi, Maria Aldina; Zanchetta, Stefano; Tunesi, Annalisa

    2015-03-01

    The relationships between tectonics and magmatic activity in the Alps are still debated. Despite an active subduction since the Late Cretaceous, no arc-related magmatism is recorded prior of the Middle Eocene. The emplacement of plutons along the Insubric Fault in a short time span (~34-28 Ma) has been generally interpreted in terms of the slab break-off model. The Tertiary magmatism, however, is also characterized by the occurrence of widespread calcalkaline dikes not necessarily intruded along the Insubric Fault. The geochemical features of dikes vary along the Alps belt and are interpreted in terms of mantle source heterogeneity and degree of crustal contamination. U-Pb zircon dating of studied dikes indicates intrusion ages in the 42- to 34-Ma time interval. These data provide evidence for a pre-Oligocene magmatic activity that was not solely limited to the Adamello batholith. Moreover, it appears that dikes rejuvenate from SE to NW, in an opposite direction with respect to the Alpine subduction polarity. Thus, a more complex geodynamic scenario than the slab break-off model must be envisaged. The absence of arc magmatism prior to the Middle Eocene can be explained by the low-angle subduction of the Tethyan slab that confined the mantle partial melting zone away from the orogenic wedge. The onset of the Apennines subduction at 55-50 Ma caused the Alpine slab to retreat. The partial melting zone progressively migrated beneath the orogenic wedge and finally reached the axial belt in the Late Eocene, when the Alpine collision was completed. Only at this stage, slab break-off occurred and promoted the intrusion of the Periadriatic plutons.

  1. The thermal evolution of a episodic, convergent-margin, magmatic center: Evidence from the Tatoosh Magmatic Complex, Mount Rainier National Park, southern Washington Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Use of Mount Rainier as an IAVCEI Decade Volcano requires an assessment of long-term, magmatic activity cycles. Recent activity could represent either a waxing or waning step, relative to the main cone. The Tertiary record at Mount Rainier, represented by the Tatoosh complex, suggests evolution into larger and more energetic systems. This sequence included bimodal dikes and sills (Chinook Pass episode), through dacitic dome and pyroclastic eruptions (Sourdough Mountains episode), shallow monzonitic plutons, culminating in large granodiorite plutons (White River episode). Limited geochronology, geochemistry and field relations support this conceptual model. Simple thermal modeling of this hypothesis suggests that for the first two episodes, transport was insufficient to support a magma chamber. This is consistent with field relations. Repeated magmatism could have perturbed the geotherm, allowing a magma chamber during White River time. This suggests a potential 3 million-year-long, volcanic source for dacitic clasts of the Ellensburg Formation. Uplifts from such a thermal load would be consistent with independent estimates of Miocene deformation in the Washington Cascades. A 7 million year cycle for magmatism at Mount Rainier is consistent with the rock record and the cooling of a 0.5-km accumulation zone of melt at the mid crust. This suggests that any current activity at Mount Rainier could relate to the 0.7-Ma stratovolcano or the Lily Creek Formation (3 Ma). These results indicate the detailed petrologic and geochronological work in the Tatoosh complex necessary to Decade Volcano studies at Mount Rainier.

  2. The magmatic and eruptive response of arc volcanoes to deglaciation: insights from southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Harriet; Mather, Tamsin A.; Pyle, David M.; Smith, Victoria C.; Fontijn, Karen; Lachowycz, Stefan; Naranjo, José A.; Watt, Sebastian F. L.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism exerts a major influence on Earth's atmosphere and surface environments. Understanding feedbacks between climate and long-term changes in rates or styles of volcanism is important, but unresolved. For example, it has been proposed that a pulse of activity at once-glaciated volcanoes contributed to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide accelerating early Holocene climate change. In plate-tectonic settings where magmatism is driven by decompression melting there is convincing evidence that activity is modulated by changes in ice- or water-loading across glacial/interglacial cycles. The response of subduction-related volcanoes, where the crust is typically thicker and mantle melting is dominated by flux melting, remains unclear. Since arc volcanoes account for 90% of subaerial eruptions, they are the most significant sources of volcanic gases and tephra directly to the atmosphere. Testing the response of arc volcanoes to deglaciation requires careful work to piece together eruption archives. Records of effusive eruptions from long-lived, arc stratovolcanoes are challenging to obtain and date; while deposits from the explosive eruptions, which dominate arc records, are prone to erosion and reworking. Our new high-resolution post-glacial (<18 ka) eruption record from a large stratovolcano in southern Chile (Mocho Choshuenco) provides new insight into the magmatic response following the removal of a regional ice load. We observe significant variations in eruptive flux, eruption size and magma composition across three distinct phases of post-glacial volcanic activity. Phase 1, shortly after deglaciation, was dominated by large explosive eruptions of dacite and rhyolite. During Phase 2 (7.3 - 2.9 ka) eruption rates and eruptive fluxes were lower, and activity was dominated by moderate-scale basaltic-andesite eruptions. For the past 2.4 kyr (Phase 3), eruptive fluxes have been elevated, and dominated by explosive eruptions of intermediate magmas. We propose that

  3. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  4. "Normal" to adakite-like arc magmatism associated with the El Abra porphyry copper deposit, Central Andes, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbia, Osvaldo M.; Correa, Karen J.; Hernández, Laura B.; Ulrich, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The El Abra porphyry copper deposit belongs to the Late Eocene—Early Oligocene metallogenic belt of northern Chile, which host several world-class porphyry copper deposits. Our previous geochronological work done on this deposit provides the temporal framework for petrological data interpretation. The magmatic history of the El Abra deposit lasts for 8.6 Ma and can be divided into two stages. An early period, from about 45 to 38.7 Ma, dominated by diorites and quartz monzodiorites with "normal" (non-adakite) arc geochemistry and a late period, with rocks younger than 38.7 Ma that developed adakite-like geochemistry, where equigranular granodiorites are the volumetrically dominant rock type (e.g., Clara granodiorite 38 Ma). These granodiorites are then intruded by leucocratic porphyry dikes and aplites. Most copper mineralization is associated with multiple intrusions of these younger porphyritic rocks, described as the El Abra porphyry unit, and emplaced over a 1.4 Ma period, from 37.5 to 36.1 Ma. The adakite-like geochemistry of the younger rock units (<38.7 Ma) is attested by a significant depletion in REE contents, particularly MREE and HREE (concave MREE distribution patterns), high La/Yb and Sr/Y ratios, and Na2O and Al2O3 contents, along with the absence of the Eu anomaly in normalized REE distribution patterns. The evolution of this large, long-lived magmatic system from "normal" to adakite-like arc magmatism is discussed in a tectonic context of crust overthickening due to a major orogenic episode (Incaic compressive phase). This tectonic setting may have promoted higher pressure conditions at the lower crust "hot zone" and increased the crustal residence time of derivative melts favoring extensive differentiation leading to water-rich (and oxidized?) felsic melts, where amphibole fractionation played an important role. Strontium, Nd, and Pb isotope data suggest a common mantle source for both the non-adakite and adakite-like rocks. This implies that

  5. Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP): The Palisade Sill Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, A.; Basu, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    The extensively studied 200Ma Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is considered to be the world's largest continental Large Igneous Province (LIP) covering up to 7 X 106 km2. This igneous province has been linked to the ~200Ma Mesozoic opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean. This opening fragmented the CAMP into several segments that occur on four different tectonic plates today. The CAMP related LIP is different from others in that it constitutes almost entirely of dikes and sills with sparse volcanic outflows. The 200 Ma Palisade Sill, exposed along the Hudson River in northeastern North America is an expression of the CAMP magmatism. On the basis of similar ages of eruption, Palisade Sill tholeiites have been correlated to other CAMP exposures in four continents. We provide an isotopic tracer study of the Palisade Sill basalts and relate them to low-Ti (<2 wt %) CAMP related tholeiites from North and South America, western Europe, and West Africa. We report Nd-Sr-Pb isotopic and multiple trace element data of 19 basalts and gabbros, 3 chilled margin basalts, and 4 sandstones spanning the entire length and thickness of the Palisade Sill in New York and New Jersey. These geochemical data are essential to understand the relationship between mantle geodynamic processes involved in the generation of the CAMP tholeiites prior to the formation of the of the Atlantic Ocean crust. The Palisade Sill basalts of this study yield the typical composition of low-Ti CAMP tholeiites with small LREE enrichments (LaN/SmN = 1.7 to 2.3), radiogenic Sr and negative ɛNd(I) values (87Sr/87Sr(I) = 0.70668 to 0.71037; ɛNd(I) = -0.64 to -3.8), and Pb-isotopic ratios (e.g. 206Pb/204Pb = 18.11 to 18.69) above the NHRL and subparallel to it. These geochemical data indicate the Palisade Sill basalts were derived from a slightly enriched OIB-like mantle source. Further, these rocks were derived by ~15% melting of a slightly depleted spinel peridotite with up to 20% contamination by the

  6. Paleoproterozoic gabbro-diorite-granite magmatism of the Batomga Rise (NE Aldan Shield): Sm-Nd isotope geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. K.; Bogomolov, E. S.; Glebovitskii, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The geochemical similarity and almost simultaneous (2055-2060 Ma) formation of Utakachan gabbro-amphibolite, Jagdakin granodiorite-diorite, Khoyunda granitoid, and Tygymyt leucogranite complexes, which inruded metamorphic formations of the Batomga Group are evidence of their formaton from unified magmatic source. All this makes it possibble to combine aforementioned complexes into the unified Early Proterozoic diferentiated gabbro-diorite-granite complex.

  7. Chemical mass transfer in magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, Mark S.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.

    1985-07-01

    Numerical examples of the approach described in Part I of this series (Ghiorso, 1985) are presented in this paper. These examples include the calculation of the compositions and proportions of liquid and solid phases produced during (1) the equilibrium crystallization of a basaltic andesite at 1 bar, (2) the fractional crystallization of an olivine tholeiite at 1 bar and elevated pressures, (3) the fractional and equilibrium crystallization of an olivine boninite at 1 bar, and (4) the (a) isothermal and (b) isenthalpic assimilation of olivine (Fo90) into a liquid/solid assemblage of quartz dioritic composition at ˜1,125° C and 3 kbars. The numerical results on the crystallization of the basaltic andesite are verified by comparison with experimental data while those calculations performed using olivine tholeiitic and olivine boninitic compositions are favorably compared against whole rock and mineral analytical data and petrographic and field observations. In each of the examples presented, the heat effects associated with the modelled process are calculated (e.g. heat of crystallization, heat of assimilation), and free energies of crystallization are examined as a function of the degree of mineral supersaturation. The former quantities are on the order of 173 cal/grm for the cooling and fractional crystallization of an olivine tholeiite to a rhyolitic residuum (corresponding to a 400° C temperature interval). The latter represents an important petrological parameter, in that it quantifies the driving force for the rate of crystal growth and rate of nucleation in magmatic systems. Calculated free energies of crystallization are small (on the order of hundreds of calories per mole per 25° C of undercooling) which indicates that the kinetics of crystallization in magmatic systems are affinity controlled. Melt oxygen fugacity and the degree of oxygen metasomatism play a major role in controlling the fractionation trends produced from crystallizing basaltic liquids

  8. Geodynamics of late Paleozoic magmatism in the Tien Shan and its framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biske, Yu. S.; Konopelko, D. L.; Seltmann, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Devonian-Permian history of magmatic activity in the Tien Shan and its framework has been considered using new isotopic datings. It has been shown that the intensity of magmatism and composition of igneous rocks are controlled by interaction of the local thermal upper mantle state (plumes) and dynamics of the lithosphere on a broader regional scale (plate motion). The Kazakhstan paleocontinent, which partly included the present-day Tien Shan and Kyzylkum, was formed in the Late Ordovician-Early Silurian as a result of amalgamation of ancient continental masses and island arcs. In the Early Devonian, heating of the mantle resulted in the within-plate basaltic volcanism in the southern framework of the Kazakhstan paleocontinent (Turkestan paleoocean) and development of suprasubduction magmatism over an extensive area at its margin. In the Middle-Late Devonian, the margins of the Turkestan paleoocean were passive; the area of within-plate oceanic magmatism shifted eastward, and the active margin was retained at the junction with the Balkhash-Junggar paleoocean. A new period of active magmatism was induced by an overall shortening of the region under the settings of plate convergence. The process started in the Early Carboniferous at the Junggar-Balkhash margin of the Kazakhstan paleocontinent and the southern (Paleotethian) margin of the Karakum-Tajik paleocontinent. In the Late Carboniferous, magmatism developed along the northern boundary of the Turkestan paleoocean, which was closing between them. The disappearance of deepwater oceanic basins by the end of the Carboniferous was accompanied by collisional granitic magmatism, which inherited the paleolocations of subduction zones. Postcollision magmatism fell in the Early Permian with a peak at 280 Ma ago. In contrast to Late Carboniferous granitic rocks, the localization of Early Permian granitoids is more independent of collision sutures. The magmatism of this time comprises: (1) continuation of the

  9. Shear-tensile/implosion source model vs. moment tensor: benefit in single-azimuth monitoring. Cotton Valley set-up.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sileny, J.

    2012-12-01

    Moment tensor (MT) has become a standard for description of seismic sources, both in earthquake seismology and for various types of induced seismicity. It is a general dipole source, but for practice it may be too general, its generality causing troubles during its reconstruction from noisy data in the inverse process, which may be additionally ill-conditioned due to inexact hypocenter location or availability of a rough velocity/attenuation model only. Then, the retrieved source may be biased. It seems reasonable to assume a simpler and intuitivelly more physical source model directly describing the physical phenomena anticipated in the particular focus. A simple combination of a shear slip with tensile crack or 1D implosion (STI) may be a good model both for natural earthquakes and induced events. The model simplification introduced is crucial in cases of depleted sensor configuration when the moment tensor fails, in single-azimuth monitoring in particular. This is just the case of application in oil and gas industry, where the monitoring of seismicity induced by hydrofracturing is typically performed from single monitoring borehole. Then, MT is able to provide constrained solutions only (e.g. deviatoric), but STI detects also non-shear component correctly, providing important information on increase of permeability of the reservoir.

  10. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF SEATTLE PM 2.5: A COMPARISON OF IMPROVE AND ENHANCED STN DATA SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seattle, WA, STN and IMPROVE data sets with STN temperature resolved carbon peaks were analyzed with both the PMF and Unmix receptor models. In addition, the IMPROVE trace element data was combined with the major STN species to examine the role of IMPROVE metals. To compare the ...

  11. Off-axis magmatism along a subaerial back-arc rift: Observations from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Hamling, Ian J.; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Bannister, Stephen; Palmer, Neville

    2016-01-01

    Continental rifting and seafloor spreading play a fundamental role in the generation of new crust. However, the distribution of magma and its relationship with tectonics and volcanism remain poorly understood, particularly in back-arc settings. We show evidence for a large, long-lived, off-axis magmatic intrusion located on the margin of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. Geodetic data acquired since the 1950s show evidence for uplift outside of the region of active extension, consistent with the inflation of a magmatic body at a depth of ~9.5 km. Satellite radar interferometry and Global Positioning System data suggest that there was an increase in the inflation rate from 2003 to 2011, which correlates with intense earthquake activity in the region. Our results suggest that the continued growth of a large magmatic body may represent the birth of a new magma chamber on the margins of a back-arc rift system. PMID:27386580

  12. Off-axis magmatism along a subaerial back-arc rift: Observations from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hamling, Ian J; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Bannister, Stephen; Palmer, Neville

    2016-06-01

    Continental rifting and seafloor spreading play a fundamental role in the generation of new crust. However, the distribution of magma and its relationship with tectonics and volcanism remain poorly understood, particularly in back-arc settings. We show evidence for a large, long-lived, off-axis magmatic intrusion located on the margin of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. Geodetic data acquired since the 1950s show evidence for uplift outside of the region of active extension, consistent with the inflation of a magmatic body at a depth of ~9.5 km. Satellite radar interferometry and Global Positioning System data suggest that there was an increase in the inflation rate from 2003 to 2011, which correlates with intense earthquake activity in the region. Our results suggest that the continued growth of a large magmatic body may represent the birth of a new magma chamber on the margins of a back-arc rift system.

  13. Remote detection of magmatic water in Bullialdus crater on the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klima, Rachel L.; Cahill, John; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David

    2013-01-01

    Once considered dry compared with Earth, laboratory analyses of igneous components of lunar samples have suggested that the Moon’s interior is not entirely anhydrous. Water and hydroxyl have also been detected from orbit on the lunar surface, but these have been attributed to nonindigenous sources, such as interactions with the solar wind. Magmatic lunar volatiles—evidence for water indigenous to the lunar interior—have not previously been detected remotely. Here we analyse spectroscopic data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) and report that the central peak of Bullialdus Crater is significantly enhanced in hydroxyl relative to its surroundings. We suggest that the strong and localized hydroxyl absorption features are inconsistent with a surficial origin. Instead, they are consistent with hydroxyl bound to magmatic minerals that were excavated from depth by the impact that formed Bullialdus Crater. Furthermore, estimates of thorium concentration in the central peak using data from the Lunar Prospector orbiter indicate an enhancement in incompatible elements, in contrast to the compositions of water-bearing lunar samples. We suggest that the hydroxyl-bearing material was excavated from a magmatic source that is distinct from that of samples analysed thus far.

  14. Developing and Exploiting a Unique Seismic Data Set from South African Gold Mines for Source Characterization and Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    the University of the Witwatersrand . RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHED Three complimentary data sets are being assembled in this project: (1) high...frequency in-mine seismic data from three mines along the northwestern edge of the Witwatersrand basin, (2) seismograms from mine events recorded at...Seismicity The Witwatersrand basin is part of a granite-greenstone complex constituting the basement of the Kaapvaal craton. The basement evolved

  15. CO2-fluxing collapses metal mobility in magmatic vapour

    SciTech Connect

    van Hinsberg, V. J.; Berlo, K.; Migdisov, A. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-05-18

    Magmatic systems host many types of ore deposits, including world-class deposits of copper and gold. Magmas are commonly an important source of metals and ore-forming fluids in these systems. In many magmatic-hydrothermal systems, low-density aqueous fluids, or vapours, are significant metal carriers. Such vapours are water-dominated shallowly, but fluxing of CO2-rich vapour exsolved from deeper magma is now recognised as ubiquitous during open-system magma degassing. Furthermore, we show that such CO2-fluxing leads to a sharp drop in element solubility, up to a factor of 10,000 for Cu, and thereby provides a highly efficient, but as yet unrecognised mechanism for metal deposition.

  16. Heat flux from magmatic hydrothermal systems related to availability of fluid recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J.V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C.F.; Bloomberg, S.; Hernandez, P.A.; Mazot, A.; Viveiros, F.; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Magmatic hydrothermal systems are of increasing interest as a renewable energy source. Surface heat flux indicates system resource potential, and can be inferred from soil CO2 flux measurements and fumarole gas chemistry. Here we compile and reanalyze results from previous CO2 flux surveys worldwide to compare heat flux from a variety of magma-hydrothermal areas. We infer that availability of water to recharge magmatic hydrothermal systems is correlated with heat flux. Recharge availability is in turn governed by permeability, structure, lithology, rainfall, topography, and perhaps unsurprisingly, proximity to a large supply of water such as the ocean. The relationship between recharge and heat flux interpreted by this study is consistent with recent numerical modeling that relates hydrothermal system heat output to rainfall catchment area. This result highlights the importance of recharge as a consideration when evaluating hydrothermal systems for electricity generation, and the utility of CO2 flux as a resource evaluation tool.

  17. Crustal migration of magmatic CO2 tracked by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Shelly, D. R.; King, J.; McGeehin, J. P.; Mangan, M.; Evans, W.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a dacitic dome complex situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, eastern California. Since 1989, unrest at Mammoth Mountain has been expressed by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated 3He/4He ratios in fumarolic gases, all apparently driven by the release of CO2-rich aqueous fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Three lower-crustal (32-19 km depth) seismic swarms occurred beneath the mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 and were consistently followed several months later by peaks in the frequency of shallow (≤10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured the radiocarbon depletion relative to global background values in the annual rings (1998-2012) of a tree growing in the largest (~0.3 km2) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK). We modeled the ground surface area, on average, that emitted the magmatic CO2 photosynthesized by the study tree (the magmatic CO2 source area) using measured atmospheric parameters. Results indicated that the tree integrated magmatic CO2 emissions over the majority of the HLTK area. The tree-ring radiocarbon record and magmatic CO2 source area modeling together implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season immediately after the largest (February 2010) peak in shallow earthquake frequency. Propagation of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, whereas the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled temporal variations in surface CO2 emissions.

  18. The Dynamics of the Post-Caldera Magmatic System at Yellowstone: Insights from Age, Trace Element, and Isotopic Data of Zircon and Sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, M. E.; Cooper, K. M.; Vazquez, J. A.; Calvert, A. T.; Glessner, J. J.; Wimpenny, J.; Yin, Q. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Yellowstone hosts a voluminous magmatic system that produced three silicic caldera-forming eruptions over the past 2.1 My. Following the most recent of these (the Lava Creek Tuff at 639 ka), the magma system at Yellowstone underwent two episodes of intracaldera eruptions, the latest of which produced the Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites. The CPM rhyolites erupted intermittently from ca. 170 ka to ca. 70 ka and can be viewed as snapshots of the magma system through time, which provides a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of an evolving caldera system. To constrain the nature and timescales of magmatic processes at Yellowstone we examine four CPM rhyolites that erupted from ca. 116 ka to ca. 74 ka and present a comprehensive data set that integrates (1) 238U-230Th ages, trace-elements, and Hf isotope compositions of the surfaces and interiors of single zircons, (2) bulk 238U-230Th ages and in situ Ba and Pb isotope compositions of sanidines, (3) sanidine 40Ar-39Ar ages, and (4) trace-element and isotopic compositions of the CPM glasses. Zircon 238U-230Th ages and Hf isotope data demonstrate that isotopically juvenile magmas, derived from Yellowstone basalts, were added to the Yellowstone magma reservoir over time and were fundamental to its post-caldera isotopic evolution. We use zircon Hf isotope data along with new Hf isotope data (and existing O isotope data) for the Yellowstone basalts (whole-rocks), older Yellowstone rhyolites (glasses), and local crustal sources to quantify the role of isotopically juvenile magma in the evolution of the magmatic system. Additionally, linking age, trace-element, and isotopic data from zircon and sanidine demonstrates that eruptible CPM rhyolites were generated by extracting melt and antecrystic zircon from a long-lived (>200 ky) crystal mush, while sanidine remained trapped in the crystal network. The extracted melts amalgamated and then crystallized new sanidines and rims on the antecrystic zircons that were in

  19. Relationships between deformation and magmatism in the Pan-African Kandi Shear Zone: Microstructural and AMS studies of Ediacaran granitoid intrusions in central Bénin (West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adissin Glodji, L.; Bascou, J.; Yessoufou, S.; Ménot, R.-P.; Villaros, A.

    2014-09-01

    Relationships between the metamorphic basement, granitic intrusions and the Kandi Shear Zone (KSZ) in central Bénin have been investigated using petrological and structural approaches, in order to better understand the space and time parameters of the Pan-African shear deformation and the Ediacaran magmatism. In central Bénin, metamorphic rocks from the KSZ display a steep to vertical N-S trending foliation, a sub-horizontal mineral lineation together with kinematic indicators in agreement with a dextral transcurrent mega-shear zone. Four granitic intrusions (Dassa, Tré, Gobada and Tchetti) show many petrological similarities. They are biotite ± amphibole - ilmenite ± magnetite monzogranites with ferrous and metaluminous I-type features derived from high-K calk-alkaline magma. A fifth intrusion (Fita) is an alkali-feldspar, biotite, magnetite and ilmenite bearing granite crystallized from an alkaline magma. Moreover, high K2O, Zr, Y, Nb and low CaO, MgO and Al2O3 contents together with high (FeOt/MgO) and low LIL/HFS elements ratios suggesting an A-type granite affinity. Microstructural and AMS investigations presented in this paper show (i) solid-state deformation evidence for Dassa pluton and (ii) a magmatic deformation for the Tré, Tchetti, Gobada and Fita granitoids. Foliation in Dassa is parallel to the mesoscopic planar mylonitic foliation of the metamorphic basement. In the Tré, Tchetti, Gobada and Fita granitoids, magmatic textures and magnetic fabrics are coherent with the KSZ activity. These data suggest (i) a syn-kinematic nature for most of the intrusions (Tré, Gobada, Tchetti and Fita), except Dassa which correspond to an earlier event (ii) the succession of high-K calk-alkaline (Dassa, Tré, Gobada, Tchetti) evolves toward alkaline magmas (Fita) during the KSZ strike-slip tectonics. These observations highlight the changing nature of magma composition, magmatic processes and the different sources during KSZ activity in the Bénin Nigerian

  20. Magmatic differentiation in a chaotic background: A comparison of multiphase simulations and magmatic chronometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    The location and timescales of silicic magma production has received much recent attention and these questions are at the forefront of understanding incubation times for eruptive episodes and ultimately, the production of continental crust. While idealizations of differentiation in simplified magma reservoir geometries have been useful to frame end-member behavior, most magmatic systems, and particular large magma reservoirs, are open systems with time varying geometries. Evidence of open systems and assembly of magmatic systems incrementally are present in a range of plutonic and volcanic rocks. To evaluate the timescales of silicic magma production, a 3D multiphase dynamics model was implemented that includes heat transfer, phase change and magma dynamics. The size of the magmatic systems under consideration are not prescribed, but rather grow or shrink in response to the flux of heat and intrusions. To compare simulations to a range of data, major element chemistry, phase assemblage, and tracking of representative crystals are made through time. A particular focus of this presentation is a comparison of dynamic processes to proxies used as chronometers. This includes recording the timescale of appearance of different phases that can be compared to timescales inferred from diffusion profiles and monitoring zircon saturation and dispersal. Both the differentiation timescale and timescales of the major growth of zircons are a relatively small fraction of the melt-present lifetime of magma reservoirs, and in particular, typically represent relatively smaller fractions for larger magmatic systems. Melt can exist at low melt fraction (<0.2) for timescales of 100s kyr for the largest systems, while spending only a small amount of time at high melt fraction. Nevertheless, these reservoirs can be assembled incrementally with magma fluxes in the ranges estimated for arcs. A mid-upper crust location is important to have phase assemblages with sufficient leverage to produce

  1. Permian-Triassic Magmatism Along the Southern Gondwana Margin: Correlating Proximal and Distal Volcanic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, M. P.; Weislogel, A. L.; Fildani, A.

    2014-12-01

    Active margins are dominated by erosion, structural deformation, tectonic dissection, and igneous intrusions. These destructive processes lead to an incomplete record of past magmatism in active margins. Volcanic airfall tuffs that are transported and deposited in distal sedimentary basins may be more likely to be preserved in the rock record. Tuffs, however, may be affected by atmospheric fractionation during transport, postdepositional weathering, and diagenesis during burial, potentially altering ash texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry. We use outcrop observations, stratigraphic relationships, whole rock geochemistry, U-Pb zircon geochronology, and zircon rare-earth element geochemistry from Permian-Triassic strata of South Africa and South America to correlate distal volcanic ashes to proximal volcanic deposits and plutonic suites within southern Gondwana. U-Pb zircon signals of the tuffs are treated as "detrital"; the distinct zircon signals were then used to correlate distal airfall ashes to potential magmatic sources. This suggests that airfall fractionation of zircon populations is not a significant concern in tuff geochronology. Additionally, zircon inheritance may be a useful tool in matching far-traveled ashes with parental magmatic suites. Although previous studies have shown that the geochemistry of volcanic tuff deposits varies with distance from the volcanic vent, we employ whole rock and zircon REE compositions to differentiate distinct magmatic periods using distal ashes that were deposited >750 km from the volcanic source. The results of this study support a geochronologic interpretation that the Karoo strata of S. Africa are >10 Ma younger than previously thought based on biostratigraphy. Since the Karoo basin is heavily studied as a record of the end-Permian extinction and paleoclimate change, our results have major implication for this key time in Earth History.

  2. Use of iterative OASIS with low resolution SAD laboratory X-ray source (Cr Kα) data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvanayagam, S.; Velmurugan, D.; Yamane, T.; Suzuki, A.

    2009-12-01

    Anomalous scattering methods are widely used for phasing macromolecular structures. OASIS program works on a direct methods procedure and is used to break the phase ambiguity intrinsic in a single wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) experiment. An iterative phasing/model-building procedure for processing SAD data includes the initial direct method phasing of SAD data, density modification, automatic model building and direct methods phasing of SAD data with feed back from partial structure information. This dual-space procedure has been tested on two experimental Cr Kα SAD data sets, 2.3 Å for S-SAD and 2.4 Å for I-SAD, of an enzyme glucose isomerase with an approximate molecular weight of 44 kDa (388 residues). HYSS in PHENIX was used to locate the anomalous scatterers for both the data sets (11 sulfurs for 2.3 Å data and 9 iodines for 2.4 Å data). Phasing and density modification were carried out using OASIS, DM and model building was then carried out using ARP/wARP. Two iterative cycles were necessary for the successful structure solution and refinement of the 2.3 Å data set which built 384 residues out of 388. Regular ARP/wARP failed for the 2.4 Å resolution data and hence the modified version of REFMAC5 was used in ARP/wARP. A successful model could be built after three iterative cycles of OASIS using this modified version which built 382 residues out of 388 residues. Minimal manual model building was required at this stage and the structure determination was completed using regular REFMAC5. All the computations mentioned here were carried out using Pentium IV PC.

  3. Community-based Services that Facilitate Interoperability and Inter-comparison Between Precipitation Data Sets from Multiple Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Kempler, S. J.; Teng, W. L.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Ostrenga, D.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 12 years, large volumes of precipitation data have been generated from space-based observatories (e.g., TRMM), merging of data products (e.g., gridded 3B42), models (e.g., GMAO), climatologies (e.g., Chang SSM/I derived rain indices), field campaigns, and ground-based measuring stations. The science research, applications, and education communities have greatly benefited from the unrestricted availability of these data from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) and, in particular, the services tailored toward precipitation data access and usability. In addition, tools and services that are responsive to the expressed evolving needs of the precipitation data user communities have been developed at the Precipitation Data and Information Services Center (PDISC) (http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/precipitation or google NASA PDISC), located at the GES DISC, to provide users with quick data exploration and access capabilities. In recent years, data management and access services have become increasingly sophisticated, such that they now afford researchers, particularly those interested in multi-data set science analysis and/or data validation, the ability to homogenize data sets, in order to apply multi-variant, comparison, and evaluation functions. Included in these services is the ability to capture data quality and data provenance. These interoperability services can be directly applied to future data sets, such as those from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. This presentation describes the data sets and services at the PDISC that are currently used by precipitation science and applications researchers, and which will be enhanced in preparation for GPM and associated multi-sensor data research. Specifically, the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) will be illustrated. Giovanni enables scientific exploration of Earth science data without researchers having to

  4. Petrological variability in recent magmatism at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount is known for its compositional homogeneity. We report on petrological variability in lavas from the summit caldera and rims of Axial Seamount during the last ~1.2ka and its implications for shallow crustal magma dynamics. AUVs have mapped the summit at ~1 m resolution, and ROVs have collected numerous lavas and volcaniclastic cores. Geospatial, superpositional, compositional, and age constraint data were used to outline flow units and construct geologic maps. Nearly 200 glasses from summit lavas were analyzed for major elements. A subset of ~20 samples were analyzed for selected trace elements, Pb-, U-, and Th- isotope ratios, and 226Ra and 210Pb. The results a) confirm a high degree compositional homogeneity, b) demonstrate a more restricted range in Pb-isotope ratios than previous data, c) indicate uniform compositional source component(s) genetically linked to that of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, and d) expand the dataset of distinctly-low 230Th/232Th lavas and subdivide them into geospatial groups. Hundreds of volcaniclastic grains collected from subsurface depths of up to several tens of cm analyzed for major elements extend the record of summit magmatism beyond what is exposed. Summit lava glasses are compositionally N-MORB. Summit volcaniclastics range to higher MgO (+1%); thus, magmatism likely included more mafic episodes than is recorded in the flows as yet sampled or that volcaniclastics preferentially sample higher temperature lavas. Negative correlation of CaO/Al2O3 with MgO in all glasses suggests fractionation from parental melt(s) of plag ± ol but not cpx. K2O/TiO2 ranges are typical for much of the JdFR. Summit lavas range from aphyric to ~35% plag phyric ± a few % ol. Plag-phyric summit lavas tend to have greater MgO (>7.5%), lower CaO/Al2O3 (<0.80), and lower K2O/TiO2 (<0.10) compared to aphyric lavas. For ~18 caldera flows with absolute or relative age control, plag-phyric lavas are older than aphyric lavas, the oldest of

  5. Physical setting and natural sources of exposure to carcinogenic trace elements and radionuclides in Lahontan Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, Ralph L.

    2012-01-01

    In Lahontan Valley, Nevada, arsenic, cobalt, tungsten, uranium, radon, and polonium-210 are carcinogens that occur naturally in sediments and groundwater. Arsenic and cobalt are principally derived from erosion of volcanic rocks in the local mountains and tungsten and uranium are derived from erosion of granitic rocks in headwater reaches of the Carson River. Radon and 210Po originate from radioactive decay of uranium in the sediments. Arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, iron, and manganese concentrations in household dust suggest it is derived from the local soils. Excess zinc and chromium in the dust are probably derived from the vacuum cleaner used to collect the dust, or household sources such as the furnace. Some samples have more than 5 times more cobalt in the dust than in the local soil, but whether the source of the excess cobalt is anthropogenic or natural cannot be determined with the available data. Cobalt concentrations are low in groundwater, but arsenic, uranium, radon, and 210Po concentrations often exceed human-health standards, and sometime greatly exceed them. Exposure to radon and its decay products in drinking water can vary significantly depending on when during the day that the water is consumed. Although the data suggests there have been no long term changes in groundwater chemistry that corresponds to the Lahontan Valley leukemia cluster, the occurrence of the very unusual leukemia cluster in an area with numerous 210Po and arsenic contaminated wells is striking, particularly in conjunction with the exceptionally high levels of urinary tungsten in Lahontan Valley residents. Additional research is needed on potential exposure pathways involving food or inhalation, and on synergistic effects of mixtures of these natural contaminants on susceptibility to development of leukemia.

  6. Physical setting and natural sources of exposure to carcinogenic trace elements and radionuclides in Lahontan Valley, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Ralph

    2012-04-05

    In Lahontan Valley, Nevada, arsenic, cobalt, tungsten, uranium, radon, and polonium-210 are carcinogens that occur naturally in sediments and groundwater. Arsenic and cobalt are principally derived from erosion of volcanic rocks in the local mountains and tungsten and uranium are derived from erosion of granitic rocks in headwater reaches of the Carson River. Radon and 210Po originate from radioactive decay of uranium in the sediments. Arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, iron, and manganese concentrations in household dust suggest it is derived from the local soils. Excess zinc and chromium in the dust are probably derived from the vacuum cleaner used to collect the dust, or household sources such as the furnace. Some samples have more than 5 times more cobalt in the dust than in the local soil, but whether the source of the excess cobalt is anthropogenic or natural cannot be determined with the available data. Cobalt concentrations are low in groundwater, but arsenic, uranium, radon, and 210Po concentrations often exceed human-health standards, and sometime greatly exceed them. Exposure to radon and its decay products in drinking water can vary significantly depending on when during the day that the water is consumed. Although the data suggests there have been no long term changes in groundwater chemistry that corresponds to the Lahontan Valley leukemia cluster, the occurrence of the very unusual leukemia cluster in an area with numerous 210Po and arsenic contaminated wells is striking, particularly in conjunction with the exceptionally high levels of urinary tungsten in Lahontan Valley residents. Additional research is needed on potential exposure pathways involving food or inhalation, and on synergistic effects of mixtures of these natural contaminants on susceptibility to development of leukemia.

  7. Understanding the hydrologic sources and sinks in the Nile Basin using multisource climate and remote sensing data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Demissie, Yonas; Gebremichael, Mekonnen

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we integrated satellite-drived precipitation and modeled evapotranspiration data (2000-2012) to describe spatial variability of hydrologic sources and sinks in the Nile Basin. Over 2000-2012 period, 4 out of 11 countries (Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda) in the Nile Basin showed a positive water balance while three downstream countries (South Sudan, Sudan, and Egypt) showed a negative balance. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mass deviation in storage data analysis showed that at annual timescales, the Nile Basin storage change is substantial while over longer time periods, it is minimal (<1% of basin precipitation). We also used long-term gridded runoff and river discharge data (1869-1984) to understand the discrepancy in the observed and expected flow along the Nile River. The top three countries that contribute most to the flow are Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Kenya. The study revealed that ˜85% of the runoff generated in the equatorial region is lost in an interstation basin that includes the Sudd wetlands in South Sudan; this proportion is higher than the literature reported loss of 50% at the Sudd wetlands alone. The loss in runoff and flow volume at different sections of the river tend to be more than what can be explained by evaporation losses, suggesting a potential recharge to deeper aquifers that are not connected to the Nile channel systems. On the other hand, we also found that the expected average annual Nile flow at Aswan is greater (97 km3) than the reported amount (84 km3). Due to the large variations of the reported Nile flow at different locations and time periods, the study results indicate the need for increased hydrometeorological instrumentation of the basin. The study also helped improve our understanding of the spatial dynamics of water sources and sinks in the Nile Basin and identified emerging hydrologic questions that require further attention.

  8. Simulating the behavior of volatiles belonging to the C-O-H-S system in silicate melts under magmatic conditions with the software D-Compress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgisser, Alain; Alletti, Marina; Scaillet, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Modeling magmatic degassing, or how the volatile distribution between gas and melt changes at pressure varies, is a complex task that involves a large number of thermodynamical relationships and that requires dedicated software. This article presents the software D-Compress, which computes the gas and melt volatile composition of five element sets in magmatic systems (O-H, S-O-H, C-S-O-H, C-S-O-H-Fe, and C-O-H). It has been calibrated so as to simulate the volatiles coexisting with three common types of silicate melts (basalt, phonolite, and rhyolite). Operational temperatures depend on melt composition and range from 790 to 1400 °C. A specificity of D-Compress is the calculation of volatile composition as pressure varies along a (de)compression path between atmospheric and 3000 bars. This software was prepared so as to maximize versatility by proposing different sets of input parameters. In particular, whenever new solubility laws on specific melt compositions are available, the model parameters can be easily tuned to run the code on that composition. Parameter gaps were minimized by including sets of chemical species for which calibration data were available over a wide range of pressure, temperature, and melt composition. A brief description of the model rationale is followed by the presentation of the software capabilities. Examples of use are then presented with outputs comparisons between D-Compress and other currently available thermodynamical models. The compiled software and the source code are available as electronic supplementary materials.

  9. Volatile Exsolution Experiments: Sampling Exsolved Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattitch, B.; Blundy, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    In magmatic arcs the conditions of volatile exsolution exert a direct control on the composition of exsolved magmatic volatiles phases (MVPs), as well as on their parental magmas. The ability to accurately assess the exchange of major and trace elements between MVPs and magmas is key to understanding the evolution of arc magmas. The trace element signatures measured in arc volcanoes, fumaroles, and hydrothermal ore deposits are greatly influenced by the role of MVPs. In order to investigate the interplay and evolution of melts and MVPs we need experimental methods to simulate MVP exsolution that impose minimal external constraints on their equilibration. Previous experiments have focused on evaluating the exchange of elements between aqueous fluids and silicate melts under equilibrium conditions[1,2]. However, the large mass proportion of fluid to melt in these experiment designs is unrealistic. As a result, the idealized compositions of the aqueous fluids may exert a strong control on melt compositions for which they are out of equilibrium, especially at low melt fractions. In contrast, other experiments have focused on the melt during crystallization but must calculate MVP compositions by mass balance[3]. In order to investigate MVPs and magmas during this critical period of MVP exsolution, we present a new two-stage fluid-melt experimental design. Stage one experiments generate super-liquidus hydrous melts using Laguna del Maule rhyolites and dactites, as analogues for ascending arc magmas. Stage two experiments allow aliquots of stage one melt/glass to crystallize and exsolve MVPs. The design then uses pressure cycling to promote infiltration of in-situ fractured quartz[4] and traps the MVPs as synthetic fluid inclusions. We present results from trial stage 2 experiments, which produced synthetic fluid inclusions consistent with literature values of fluid-melt Cl partitioning[5] and of sufficient size for LA-ICPMS analysis. Trace element partitioning for Li, Na

  10. YELLOWSTONE MAGMATIC-HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM, U. S. A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Pitt, A.M.; ,

    1985-01-01

    At Yellowstone National Park, the deep permeability and fluid circulation are probably controlled and maintained by repeated brittle fracture of rocks in response to local and regional stress. Focal depths of earthquakes beneath the Yellowstone caldera suggest that the transition from brittle fracture to quasi-plastic flow takes place at about 3 to 4 km. The maximum temperature likely to be attained by the hydrothermal system is 350 to 450 degree C, the convective thermal output is about 5. 5 multiplied by 10**9 watts, and the minimum average thermal flux is about 1800 mW/m**2 throughout 2,500 km**2. The average thermal gradient between the heat source and the convecting hydrothermal system must be at least 700 to 1000 degree C/km. Crystallization and partial cooling of about 0. 082 km**3 of basalt or 0. 10 km**3 of rhyolite annually could furnish the heat discharged in the hot-spring system. The Yellowstone magmatic-hydrothermal system as a whole appears to be cooling down, in spite of a relatively large rate of inflation of the Yellowstone caldera.

  11. Isotopic Characterisation of Methane Emissions: use of Keeling-plot Methods to Identify Source Signatures in Boreal Wetlands and Other Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. E.; Lowry, D.; France, J.; Lanoiselle, M.; Zazzeri, G.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    Different methane sources have different δ13CCH4 and δDCH4 signatures, which potentially provides a powerful constraint on models of methane emission budgets. However source signatures remain poorly known and need to be studied in more detail if isotopic measurements of ambient air are to be used to constrain regional and global emissions. The Keeling plot method (plotting δ13CCH4 or δDCH4 against 1/CH4 concentration in samples of ambient air in the close vicinity of known sources) directly assesses the source signature of the methane that is actually emitted to the air. This contrasts with chamber studies, measuring air within a chamber, where local micro-meteorological and microbiological processes are occurring. Keeling plot methods have been applied to a wide variety of settings in this study. The selection of appropriate background measurements for Keeling plot analysis is also considered. The method has been used on a local scale to identify the source signature of summer emissions from subarctic wetlands in Fennoscandia. Samples are collected from low height (0.3-3m) over the wetlands during 24-hour periods, to collect daily emissions maxima (warm late afternoons), inversion maxima (at the coldest time of the 24hr daylight: usually earliest morning), and ambient minima when mixing occurs (often mid afternoon). Some results are comparable to parallel chamber studies, but in other cases there are small but significant shifts between CH4 in chamber air and CH4 that is dispersing in the above-ground air. On a regional to continental scale the isotopic signature of bulk sources of emissions can be identified using Keeling plots. The methodology is very applicable for use in urban and urban-rural settings. For example, the winter SE monsoon sweeps from inland central Asia over China to Hong Kong. Application of back trajectory analysis and Keeling plot methods implied coal emissions may be a significant Chinese source of methane in January, although in other

  12. Colorado Plateau magmatism and uplift by warming of heterogeneous lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mousumi; Jordan, Thomas H; Pederson, Joel

    2009-06-18

    The forces that drove rock uplift of the low-relief, high-elevation, tectonically stable Colorado Plateau are the subject of long-standing debate. While the adjacent Basin and Range province and Rio Grande rift province underwent Cenozoic shortening followed by extension, the plateau experienced approximately 2 km of rock uplift without significant internal deformation. Here we propose that warming of the thicker, more iron-depleted Colorado Plateau lithosphere over 35-40 Myr following mid-Cenozoic removal of the Farallon plate from beneath North America is the primary mechanism driving rock uplift. In our model, conductive re-equilibration not only explains the rock uplift of the plateau, but also provides a robust geodynamic interpretation of observed contrasts between the Colorado Plateau margins and the plateau interior. In particular, the model matches the encroachment of Cenozoic magmatism from the margins towards the plateau interior at rates of 3-6 km Myr(-1) and is consistent with lower seismic velocities and more negative Bouguer gravity at the margins than in the plateau interior. We suggest that warming of heterogeneous lithosphere is a powerful mechanism for driving epeirogenic rock uplift of the Colorado Plateau and may be of general importance in plate-interior settings.

  13. Sr-Nd-Os-S isotope and PGE geochemistry of the Xiarihamu magmatic sulfide deposit in the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Tang, Qingyan; Li, Chusi; Wang, Yalei; Ripley, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    The newly discovered Xiarihamu Ni-Cu deposit is located in the Eastern Kunlun orogenic belt in the northern part of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, western China. It is the largest magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposit found thus far in an arc setting worldwide and ranks second in China in terms of total Ni resources. Fe-Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization occurs in a small ultramafic body that is part of a larger mafic-ultramafic complex formed by protracted Silurian-Early Devonian basaltic magmatism. The mineralized ultramafic body is composed predominantly of lherzolite and olivine websterite, with minor dunite, websterite and orthopyroxenite. Here we report new PGE (platinum group element) data and the results of a new, integrated Sr-Nd-Os-S isotope study. The initial concentrations of Rh and Pd in the parental magma are estimated to be 0.014 ppb and 0.24 ppb, respectively, which are more than one order of magnitude lower than those in undepleted mantle-derived magmas such as many continental picrites. The observed PGE depletions in the Xiarihamu parental magma are attributed to sulfide retention in the source mantle, because the degree of partial melting required to generate the Xiarihamu primary magma was not high enough for a magma of that composition to dissolve all sulfides in the source. The (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios and ɛNd (t) of the Xiarihamu host rocks range from 0.7062 to 0.7105 and from -1.97 to -5.74, respectively, indicating 5-30 wt% crustal contamination in the Xiarihamu magma. These data also reveal that the source mantle for the Xiarihamu magma is isotopically (Sr-Nd) more enriched than that for the average Cenozoic arc basalt. The γOs(t) and δ34S values of sulfide ores from the Xiarihamu deposit range from 78 to 1393 and from 2 to 6‰, respectively. These values clearly indicate addition of crustal Os and S to the Xiarihamu parental magma. Metal tenors such as Ni and Rh are inversely correlated with γOs(t) and δ34S values. This indicates that mixing between

  14. Spatial and temporal variation of OIB-like magmatism in the Western Pacific: Plume or non-plume related enriched magmatism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Taylor, R. N.; Ohara, Y.; Tani, K.; Yuasa, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages as well as geochemical data for samples recovered from bathymetric highs in the West Philippine Basin (WPB) and Daito Ridge group in the Philippine Sea. This data defines the volcanic history of OIB-like magmatism in and around the WPB and enables a tectonic reconstruction of the early history of the Philippine Sea. The prominent bathymetric features in the WPB include broad highs (plateaus) of Benham Rise and Urdaneta Plateau which lie at equal distances from the extinct spreading centre of the WPB. The northern margin of the WPB is marked by Daito Ridge group, including Oki-Daito and Daito Ridges, and Amami Plateau as well as the recently-defined Oki-Daito Rise. New drilling and dredge sampling from these bathymetric features as well as from the WPB, recovered dominantly basaltic lavas with minor but significant quantites of more differentiated volcanic rocks. Basalts with OIB-like geochemical characteristics (an overall enrichment of incompatible elements and associated radiogenic isotopes) were found from these bathymetric highs and some locations on the Daito Ridge group. In addition, basalts from the WPB are found to have variable enrichment relative to N-MORB. The age range obtained from OIB-like basalts from Urdaneta Plateau (34.6 to 38.0Ma) agrees with that reported from the Benham Rise. Meanwhile, older ages of around 40-42 Ma were obtained from basalts from the Oki-Daito Rise, north of Urdaneta Plateau. These ages overlap with those we have determined from the Minami-Daito Basin (Hickey-Vargas, 1998). This implies that Urdaneta Plateau and Oki-Daito Rise represent age-progressive record of OIB-like magmatism in the West Philippine Basin, and the source for the OIB-like magmatism existed near the spreading center of the West Philippine Basin at 34-42 Ma. Significantly, the OIB-like magmatism is not restricted to the plateaus, but is also found on the WPB floor. This might indicate that besides the continuous supply of the

  15. Seismic constraints on Late Mesozoic magmatic plumbing system in the onshore-offshore area of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, S.; Qiu, X.; Wan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We used active source wide-angle seismic data to determine a crustal structure beneath the onshore-offshore area of Hong Kong at the southern end of a broad belt dominated by Late Mesozoic intrusive and extrusive rocks in the coastal region of Southeast China. High-resolution tomographic images provide direct seismic evidence for the magmatic plumbing system of Late Mesozoic calderas. A localized high-velocity anomaly is revealed in the lower crust offshore between Hong Kong and Dangan Island, which may reflect basaltic underplating that induced voluminous silicic eruptions and granitoid plutons in the onshore-offshore area of Hong Kong. Tilted high-velocity zones are revealed in the entire crust beneath Dangan Island and the Late Mesozoic calderas of Hong Kong, which may reflect ascending magma chambers. We propose a paleo-Pacific plate subduction model to interpret our tomographic results and the generation of strong granitic magmatism in the Hong Kong area. Combining the tomographic image beneath the Lianhuashan Fault Zone with the distribution of Late Mesozoic calderas, we infer that the Lianhuashan Fault Zone might be the dominant magmatic conduit for mantle-derived magmas ascending to the upper crust. In addition, intersecting faults with different orientations could control the distribution and geometry of the vents, calderas, dykes and plutons and play an important role in forming magma conduits for individual volcanoes. Keywords: Basaltic underplating; Magmatic plumbing; Southeast China; Calderas; Active-source seismic tomography

  16. Does magmatism influence low-angle normal faulting?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Thompson, George A.

    1993-01-01

    Synextensional magmatism has long been recognized as a ubiquitous characteristic of highly extended terranes in the western Cordillera of the United States. Intrusive magmatism can have severe effects on the local stress field of the rocks intruded. Because a lower angle fault undergoes increased normal stress from the weight of the upper plate, it becomes more difficult for such a fault to slide. However, if the principal stress orientations are rotated away from vertical and horizontal, then a low-angle fault plane becomes more favored. We suggest that igneous midcrustal inflation occurring at rates faster than regional extension causes increased horizontal stresses in the crust that alter and rotate the principal stresses. Isostatic forces and continued magmatism can work together to create the antiformal or domed detachment surface commonly observed in the metamorphic core complexes of the western Cordillera. Thermal softening caused by magmatism may allow a more mobile mid-crustal isostatic response to normal faulting.

  17. Eruptive history and magmatic stability of Erebus volcano, Antarctica: Insights from englacial tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Nels A.; Kyle, Philip R.; Dunbar, Nelia W.; McIntosh, William C.; Pearce, Nicholas J. G.

    2014-11-01

    tephrostratigraphy of the active Antarctic Erebus volcano was determined from englacial tephra on the ice-covered flanks of Erebus and an adjacent volcano. The tephra are used to reconstruct the eruptive history and magmatic evolution of Erebus. More fine-grained and blocky particles define tephra formed in phreatomagmatic eruptions and larger fluidal shards are characteristic of magmatic eruptions and in some cases both eruptive types are identified in a single mixed tephra. The eruptions forming the mixed tephra likely started as phreatomagmatic eruptions which transitioned into Strombolian eruptions as the nonmagmatic water source was exhausted. We reconstructed the eruptive history of Erebus using the tephra layers stratigraphic position, 40Ar/39Ar ages, shard morphology, and grain size. Major and trace element analyses of individual glass shards were measured by electron probe microanalysis and LA-ICP-MS. Trachybasalt, trachyte, and phonolite tephra were identified. All phonolitic tephra are Erebus-derived with compositions similar to volcanic bombs erupted from Erebus over the past 40 years. The tephra show that Erebus magma has not significantly changed for 40 ka. The uniformity of the glass chemical composition implies that the phonolite magma has crystallized in the same manner without change throughout the late Quaternary, suggesting long-term stability of the Erebus magmatic system. Trachyte and trachybasalt tephra were likely erupted from Marie Byrd Land and the McMurdo Sound area, respectively. The trachytic tephra can be regionally correlated and could provide an important time-stratigraphic marker in Antarctic ice cores.

  18. Magmatic origin of giant ‘Kiruna-type’ apatite-iron-oxide ores in Central Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Erik; Troll, Valentin R.; Högdahl, Karin; Harris, Chris; Weis, Franz; Nilsson, Katarina P.; Skelton, Alasdair

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the most important metal for modern industry and Sweden is by far the largest iron-producer in Europe, yet the genesis of Sweden's main iron-source, the ‘Kiruna-type’ apatite-iron-oxide ores, remains enigmatic. We show that magnetites from the largest central Swedish ‘Kiruna-type’ deposit at Grängesberg have δ18O values between −0.4 and +3.7‰, while the 1.90−1.88 Ga meta-volcanic host rocks have δ18O values between +4.9 and +9‰. Over 90% of the magnetite data are consistent with direct precipitation from intermediate to felsic magmas or magmatic fluids at high-temperature (δ18Omgt > +0.9‰, i.e. ortho-magmatic). A smaller group of magnetites (δ18Omgt ≤ +0.9‰), in turn, equilibrated with high-δ18O, likely meteoric, hydrothermal fluids at low temperatures. The central Swedish ‘Kiruna-type’ ores thus formed dominantly through magmatic iron-oxide precipitation within a larger volcanic superstructure, while local hydrothermal activity resulted from low-temperature fluid circulation in the shallower parts of this system. PMID:23571605

  19. Seismic detection of an active subglacial magmatic complex in Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, Amanda C.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Grace Barcheck, C.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Aster, Richard C.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Nyblade, Andrew; Young, Duncan A.; Wilson, Terry J.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous volcanoes exist in Marie Byrd Land, a highland region of West Antarctica. High heat flow through the crust in this region may influence the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Volcanic activity progressed from north to south in the Executive Committee mountain range between the Miocene and Holocene epochs, but there has been no evidence for recent magmatic activity. Here we use a recently deployed seismic network to show that in 2010 and 2011, two swarms of seismic activity occurred at 25-40km depth beneath subglacial topographic and magnetic highs, located 55km south of the youngest subaerial volcano in the Executive Committee Range. We interpret the swarm events as deep long-period earthquakes based on their unusual frequency content. Such earthquakes occur beneath active volcanoes, are caused by deep magmatic activity and, in some cases, precede eruptions. We also use radar profiles to identify a prominent ash layer in the ice overlying the seismic swarm. Located at 1,400m depth, the ash layer is about 8,000years old and was probably sourced from the nearby Mount Waesche volcano. Together, these observations provide strong evidence for ongoing magmatic activity and demonstrate that volcanism continues to migrate southwards along the Executive Committee Range. Eruptions at this site are unlikely to penetrate the 1.2 to 2-km-thick overlying ice, but would generate large volumes of melt water that could significantly affect ice stream flow.

  20. Continent-scale linearity of kimberlite-carbonatite magmatism, mid-continent North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Genet Ide; Carlson, Richard W.; Frost, Carol D.; Hearn, B. C.; Eby, G. Nelson

    2014-10-01

    Cretaceous-Tertiary kimberlite-carbonatite magmatism in mid-continent North America extends along a N40°W linear trend from Louisiana to Alberta, and occurs in at least four different pulses (∼109-85, 67-64, 55-52, and less than 50 Ma). The lack of spatial age progressions of magmatism consistent with motion of North America over a fixed hot spot, the presence of Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic and trace-element compositions that show a temporal evolution from lithospheric to asthenospheric melt-sources, and the orientation of the magmatic belt parallel to the western subduction margin of the North American plate, suggest that this linear zone is the surface expression of mantle melting related to the subduction system. We propose that fragmentation of Farallon and Kula plates opened slab windows perpendicular to their convergence direction. In this model, sheet-like mantle upwellings were induced along slab-window margins, and these upwellings underwent low-degree partial melting to produce highly alkalic magmas along the trend parallel to, but ∼2000 km east of, the convergent margin. The N40°W trend may reflect melting associated with penetration of the mantle transition-zone by the downgoing oceanic plate(s).

  1. Magmatic differentiation processes at Merapi Volcano: inclusion petrology and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troll, Valentin R.; Deegan, Frances M.; Jolis, Ester M.; Harris, Chris; Chadwick, Jane P.; Gertisser, Ralf; Schwarzkopf, Lothar M.; Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Sumarti, Sri; Preece, Katie

    2013-07-01

    Indonesian volcano Merapi is one of the most hazardous volcanoes on the planet and is characterised by periods of active dome growth and intermittent explosive events. Merapi currently degasses continuously through high temperature fumaroles and erupts basaltic-andesite dome lavas and associated block-and-ash-flows that carry a large range of magmatic, coarsely crystalline plutonic, and meta-sedimentary inclusions. These inclusions are useful in order to evaluate magmatic processes that act within Merapi's plumbing system, and to help an assessment of which phenomena could trigger explosive eruptions. With the aid of petrological, textural, and oxygen isotope analysis we record a range of processes during crustal magma storage and transport, including mafic recharge, magma mixing, crystal fractionation, and country rock assimilation. Notably, abundant calc-silicate inclusions (true xenoliths) and elevated δ18O values in feldspar phenocrysts from 1994, 1998, 2006, and 2010 Merapi lavas suggest addition of limestone and calc-silicate materials to the Merapi magmas. Together with high δ13C values in fumarole gas, crustal additions to mantle and slab-derived magma and volatile sources are likely a steady state process at Merapi. This late crustal input could well represent an eruption trigger due to sudden over-pressurisation of the shallowest parts of the magma storage system independently of magmatic recharge and crystal fractionation. Limited seismic precursors may be associated with this type of eruption trigger, offering a potential explanation for the sometimes erratic behaviour of Merapi during volcanic crises.

  2. Magmatic origin of giant 'Kiruna-type' apatite-iron-oxide ores in central Sweden.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Erik; Troll, Valentin R; Högdahl, Karin; Harris, Chris; Weis, Franz; Nilsson, Katarina P; Skelton, Alasdair

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the most important metal for modern industry and Sweden is by far the largest iron-producer in Europe, yet the genesis of Sweden's main iron-source, the 'Kiruna-type' apatite-iron-oxide ores, remains enigmatic. We show that magnetites from the largest central Swedish 'Kiruna-type' deposit at Grängesberg have δ(18)O values between -0.4 and +3.7‰, while the 1.90-1.88 Ga meta-volcanic host rocks have δ(18)O values between +4.9 and +9‰. Over 90% of the magnetite data are consistent with direct precipitation from intermediate to felsic magmas or magmatic fluids at high-temperature (δ(18)Omgt > +0.9‰, i.e. ortho-magmatic). A smaller group of magnetites (δ(18)Omgt ≤ +0.9‰), in turn, equilibrated with high-δ(18)O, likely meteoric, hydrothermal fluids at low temperatures. The central Swedish 'Kiruna-type' ores thus formed dominantly through magmatic iron-oxide precipitation within a larger volcanic superstructure, while local hydrothermal activity resulted from low-temperature fluid circulation in the shallower parts of this system.

  3. The Role of Magma Mixing in Creating Magmatic Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.; Collins, S.; Morgan, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Most magmas derived from the mantle are fundamentally basaltic. An assessment of actual magmatic rock compositions erupted at the earth's surface, however, shows greater diversity. While still strongly dominated by basalts, magmatic rock compositions extend to far more differentiated (higher SiO2, LREE enriched) compositions. Magmatic diversity is generated by differentiation processes, including crystal fractionation/ accumulation, crustal contamination and magma mixing. Among these, magma mixing is arguably inevitable in magma systems that deliver magmas from source-to-surface, since magmas will tend to multiply re-occupy plumbing systems. A given mantle-derived magma type will mix with any residual magmas (and crystals) in the system, and with any partial melts of the wallrock which are generated as it is repeatedly flushed through the system. Evidence for magma mixing can be read from the petrography (identification of crystals derived from different magmas), a technique which is now well-developed and supplemented by isotopic fingerprinting (1,2) As a means of creating diversity, mixing is inevitably not efficient as its tendency is to blend towards a common composition (i.e. converging on homogeneity rather than diversity). It may be surprising then that many systems do not tend to homogenise with time, meaning that the timescales of mixing episodes and eruption must be similar to external magma contributions of distinct composition (recharge?). Indeed recharge and mixing/ contamination may well be related. As a result, the consequences of magma mixing may well bear on eruption triggering. When two magmas mix, volatile exsolution may be triggered by retrograde boiling, with crystallisation of anhydrous phase(s) in either of the magmas (3) or volatiles may be generated by thermal breakdown of a hydrous phase in one of the magmas (4). The generation of gas pressures in this way probably leads to geophysical signals too (small earthquakes). Recent work pulling

  4. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  5. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2014-04-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation, altering the structure, porosity and permeability of the material, and the magnetic signature typifies local electric currents in faults. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV. Frictional melting of Soufrière Hills andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) thought to be required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is a common consequence of seismogenic magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may govern the ascent of magma in the upper conduit.

  6. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2013-10-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes (Cashman et al., 2008; Kennedy and Russell, 2011) and of thermal anomalies (Kendrick et al., 2012), key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation with an isothermal remanent magnetisation signature that typifies local electric currents in faults. The pseudotachylyte presents an impermeable barrier, which is thought to have influenced the degassing pathway. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV (Neuberg et al., 2006). Frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is an inevitable consequence of seismogenic, conduit-dwelling magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may have an important influence on magma ascent dynamics.

  7. Cenozoic extension and magmatism in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, S. J.; Spencer, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Basin and Range Province of Arizona was the site of two episodes of Cenozoic extension that can be distinguished on the basis of timing, direction and style of extension, and associated magmatism. The first episode of extension occurred during Oligocene to mid-Miocene time and resulted in the formation of low-angle detachment faults, ductile shear zones (metamorphic core complexes), and regional domains of tilted fault blocks. Evidence for extreme middle Tertiary crustal extension in a NE to SW to SW to ENE to WSW direction has been recognized in various parts of the Basin and Range of Arizona, especially in the Lake Mead area and along the belf of metamorphic core complexes that crosses southern Arizona from Parker to Tucson. New geologic mapping and scrutiny of published geologic maps indicates that significant middle Tertiary extension is more widely distributed than previously thought. The state can be subdivided into regional tilt-block domains in which middle Tertiary rocks dip consistently in one direction. The dip direction in any tilt-block domain is generally toward the breakaway of a low-angle detachment fault that underlies the tilt-block domain; we interpret this an indicating that normal faults in the upper plate of a detechment fault are generally synthetic, rather than antithetic, with respect to the detachment fault.

  8. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Phosphorus as indicator of magmatic olivine residence time, morphology and growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Alexander; Batanova, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus is among of slowest elements by diffusion rate in silicate melts and crystals (e.g. Spandler et al, 2007). In the same time it is moderately incompatible to compatible with olivine (Brunet & Chazot, 2001; Grant & Kohn, 2013). This makes phosphorus valuable tracer of olivine crystallization in natural conditions. Indeed, it is shown that natural magmatic olivine crystals commonly posses strong and complicated zoning in phosphorus (Milman-Barris et al, 2008; Welsch et al, 2014). In this paper we intend to review phosphorus behavior in olivine in published experimental and natural olivine studies and present large set of new EPMA data on phosphorus zoning in olivine phenocrysts from MORBs, OIBs, komatiites and kimberlites. We will show that sharp olivine zones enriched in phosphorus by a factor of 10-20 over prediction by equilibrium partition may be due to formation of P-rich boundary layer on the interface of fast growing olivine. This is proved by finding of small-size (normally 10 mkm or less) exceptionally P-rich melt inclusions in olivine, which are otherwise similar in composition to typical melt. These observations could provide potential olivine growth speedometer. We will also demonstrate, that sharp zoning in phosphorus may provide valuable information on the residence time of olivine crystals in different environments: magma chambers and conduits as well as mantle sources. This study has been founded by Russian Science Foundation grant 14-17-00491. References: Spandler, et al, 2007, Nature, v. 447, p. 303-306; Brunet & Chazot, 2001, Chemical Geology, v. 176, p. 51-72; Grant & Kohn, 2013, American Mineralogist, v. 98, p. 1860-1869; Milman-Barris et al, 2008, Contr. Min. Petrol. v. 155, p.739-765; Welsch et al, 2014, Geology, v. 42, p.867-870.

  10. Assessment of potential nitrate pollution sources in the Marano Lagoon (Italy) and set-up of an environmental monitoring programme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, Pierpaolo; Leis, Albrecht

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the project is to identify and differentiate the main anthropogenic nitrogen sources present and their impact on the Marano Lagoon (Italy) and its catchment area by applying a combined approach of hydrochemical, isotopic and remote sensing techniques. The present investigation represents a new study, which, beside the traditional hydrochemical analyses (main ions and nutrients), introduces stable isotopes of nitrate, the stable isotope signature of boron and the stable isotopes of water. The analysis of stable isotopes in the nitrate molecule will be used to differentiate between nitrate coming from agriculture (synthetic and natural fertilizer), airborne nitrate and nitrate from nitrification processes in soils. Boron isotopes will be used to identify the impact of domestic wastewater on the aquatic system. The stable isotopes of the water molecule are useful tracers to calculate mixing ratios between sea and fresh water and the mean altitude of the recharge area of surface water. Moreover, this study represents a very new innovative approach for the investigation of the complex hydrogeochemical processes at the mixing interface between sea and fresh water. In addition to the analytical part, the monitoring programme will also include remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed data from the satellites Landsat 1 MSS, Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM+ will be analysed and processed. This analysis is to assess the multi-temporal and spatial evolution of most superficial algae flora activity and the water temperature of the Lagoon as main indicators of eutrophication and, additionally, to identify the main environmental and morphological changes of the Lagoon since the beginning of the seventies.

  11. Strain distribution across magmatic margins during the breakup stage: Seismicity patterns in the Afar rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.; Gregg, T.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Aronovitz, A.; Campbell, E.

    2008-12-01

    Fault patterns record the strain history along passive continental margins, but geochronological constraints are, in general, too sparse to evaluate these patterns in 3D. The Afar depression in Ethiopia provides a unique setting to evaluate the time and space relations between faulting and magmatism across an incipient passive margin that formed above a mantle plume. The margin comprises a high elevation flood basalt province with thick, underplated continental crust, a narrow fault-line escarpment underlain by stretched and intruded crust, and a broad zone of highly intruded, mafic crust lying near sealevel. We analyze fault and seismicity patterns across and along the length of the Afar rift zone to determine the spatial distribution of strain during the final stages of continental breakup, and its relation to active magmatism and dike intrusions. Seismicity data include historic data and 2005-2007 data from the collaborative US-UK-Ethiopia Afar Geodynamics Project that includes the 2005-present Dabbahu rift episode. Earthquake epicenters cluster within discrete, 50 km-long magmatic segments that lack any fault linkage. Swarms also cluster along the fault-line scarp between the unstretched and highly stretched Afar rift zone; these earthquakes may signal release of stresses generated by large lateral density contrasts. We compare Coulomb static stress models with focal mechanisms and fault kinematics to discriminate between segmented magma intrusion and crank- arm models for the central Afar rift zone.

  12. Three stages in the Late Paleozoic to Triassic magmatism of southwestern Gondwana, and the relationships with the volcanogenic events in coeval basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ana María; Llambías, Eduardo J.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Castro, Carlos E.

    2015-11-01

    The intermediate to acid Choiyoi Magmatic Province is the most conspicuous feature along the Late Paleozic continental margin of southwestern Gondwana, and is generally regarded as the possible source for the widespread ash fall deposits interlayered with sedimentary sequences in the adjacent Gondwana basins. The Choiyoi magmatism is geologically constrained between the early Permian San Rafael orogenic phase and the Triassic extensional Huarpica phase in the region of Argentine Frontal Cordillera, Precordillera and San Rafael Block. In order to better assess the Choiyoi magmatism in Argentine Frontal Cordillera, we obtained 6 new LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages between 278.8 ± 3.4 Ma and 252.5 ± 1.9 Ma from plutonic rocks of the Colangüil Batholith and an associated volcanic rock. The global analysis of age data compiled from Chilean and Argentine Late Paleozoic to Triassic outcrops allows us to identify three stages of magmatism: (1) pre-Choiyoi orogenic magmatism, (2) Choiyoi magmatism (286-247 Ma), and (3) post-Choiyoi magmatism related to extensional tectonics. In the Choiyoi stage is there an eastward shift and expansion of the magmatism to the southeast, covering an extensive region that defines the Choiyoi magmatic province. On the basis of comparison with the ages from volcanogenic levels identified in the coeval Gondwana basins, we propose: (a) The pre-Choiyoi volcanism from the Paganzo basin (320-296 Ma) probably has a local source in addition to the Frontal Cordillera region. (b) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events identified in the Paraná basin (304-275 Ma) are likely to have their source in the Chilean Precordillera. (c) The early stage of the Choiyoi magmatism found in the Sauce Grande basin (284-281 Ma) may have come from the adjacent Las Matras to Chadileuvú blocks. (d) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events in the Karoo basins (302-253 Ma) include the longest Choiyoi interval, and as a whole bear the best resemblance to the age records along the Chilean and

  13. The calc-alkaline and adakitic volcanism of the Sabzevar structural zone (NE Iran): Implications for the Eocene magmatic flare-up in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Rossetti, Federico; Lucci, Federico; Chiaradia, Massimo; Gerdes, Axel; Martinez, Margarita Lopez; Ghorbani, Ghasem; Nasrabady, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    A major magmatic flare-up is documented along the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone in Eocene-Oligocene times. The Cenozoic magmatism of intraplate Central Iran is an integrant part of this tectono-magmatic scenario. The Cenozoic magmatism of the Sabzevar structural zone consists of mostly intermediate to felsic intrusions and volcanic products. These igneous rocks have calc-alkaline and adakitic geochemical signatures, with nearly coincident zircon U-Pb and mica Ar-Ar ages of ca. 45 Ma. Adakitic rocks have quite low HREE and high Sr/Y ratio, but share most of their geochemical features with the calc-alkaline rocks. The Sabzevar volcanic rocks have similar initial Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios, showing their cogenetic nature. Nd model ages cluster tightly around ~ 0.2-0.3 Ga. The geochemistry of the Sabzevar volcanic rocks, along with their isotopic signatures, might strangle that an upper mantle source, metasomatized by slab-derived melts was involved in generating the Sabzevar calc-alkaline rocks. A bulk rock trace element modeling suggests that amphibole-plagioclase-titanite-dominated replenishment-fractional crystallization (RFC) is further responsible for the formation of the middle Eocene Sabzevar adakitic rocks. Extensional tectonics accompanied by lithospheric delamination, possibly assisted by slab break-off and melting at depth was responsible for the Eocene formation of the Sabzevar magmatic rocks and, more in general, for the magmatic "flare-up" in Iran.

  14. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First‐Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources

    PubMed Central

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree–Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double‐zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6‐31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean‐field methods. PMID:27308221

  15. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods.

  16. Coupling geodynamic with thermodynamic modelling for reconstructions of magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, Lisa; Kaus, Boris J. P.; White, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Coupling geodynamic with petrological models is fundamental for understanding magmatic systems from the melting source in the mantle to the point of magma crystallisation in the upper crust. Most geodynamic codes use very simplified petrological models consisting of a single, fixed, chemistry. Here, we develop a method to better track the petrological evolution of the source rock and corresponding volcanic and plutonic rocks by combining a geodynamic code with a thermodynamic model for magma generation and evolution. For the geodynamic modelling a finite element code (MVEP2) solves the conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations. The thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibria in magmatic systems is performed with pMELTS for mantle-like bulk compositions. The thermodynamic dependent properties calculated by pMELTS are density, melt fraction and the composition of the liquid and solid phase in the chemical system: SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3-Fe2O3-Cr2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO-Na2O-K2O-P2O5-H2O. In order to take into account the chemical depletion of the source rock with increasing melt extraction events, calculation of phase diagrams is performed in two steps: 1) With an initial rock composition density, melt fraction as well as liquid and solid composition are computed over the full upper mantle P-T range. 2) Once the residual rock composition (equivalent to the solid composition after melt extraction) is significantly different from the initial rock composition and the melt fraction is lower than a critical value, the residual composition is used for next calculations with pMELTS. The implementation of several melt extraction events take the change in chemistry into account until the solidus is shifted to such high temperatures that the rock cannot be molten anymore under upper mantle conditions. An advantage of this approach is that we can track the change of melt chemistry with time, which can be compared with natural constraints. In the thermo-mechanical code the

  17. Open-source point-of-care electronic medical records for use in resource-limited settings: systematic review and questionnaire surveys

    PubMed Central

    Bru, Juan; Berger, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Background Point-of-care electronic medical records (EMRs) are a key tool to manage chronic illness. Several EMRs have been developed for use in treating HIV and tuberculosis, but their applicability to primary care, technical requirements and clinical functionalities are largely unknown. Objectives This study aimed to address the needs of clinicians from resource-limited settings without reliable internet access who are considering adopting an open-source EMR. Study eligibility criteria Open-source point-of-care EMRs suitable for use in areas without reliable internet access. Study appraisal and synthesis methods The authors conducted a comprehensive search of all open-source EMRs suitable for sites without reliable internet access. The authors surveyed clinician users and technical implementers from a single site and technical developers of each software product. The authors evaluated availability, cost and technical requirements. Results The hardware and software for all six systems is easily available, but they vary considerably in proprietary components, installation requirements and customisability. Limitations This study relied solely on self-report from informants who developed and who actively use the included products. Conclusions and implications of key findings Clinical functionalities vary greatly among the systems, and none of the systems yet meet minimum requirements for effective implementation in a primary care resource-limited setting. The safe prescribing of medications is a particular concern with current tools. The dearth of fully functional EMR systems indicates a need for a greater emphasis by global funding agencies to move beyond disease-specific EMR systems and develop a universal open-source health informatics platform. PMID:22763661

  18. Food composition tables in resource-poor settings: exploring current limitations and opportunities, with a focus on animal-source foods in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Julia; Ferguson, Elaine; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Darnton-Hill, Ian; Maulaga, Wende; Msuya, John; Alders, Robyn

    2016-11-08

    Animal-source foods (ASF) have the potential to enhance the nutritional adequacy of cereal-based diets in low- and middle-income countries, through the provision of high-quality protein and bioavailable micronutrients. The development of guidelines for including ASF in local diets requires an understanding of the nutrient content of available resources. This article reviews food composition tables (FCT) used in sub-Saharan Africa, examining the spectrum of ASF reported and exploring data sources for each reference. Compositional data are shown to be derived from a small number of existing data sets from analyses conducted largely in high-income nations, often many decades previously. There are limitations in using such values, which represent the products of intensively raised animals of commercial breeds, as a reference in resource-poor settings where indigenous breed livestock are commonly reared in low-input production systems, on mineral-deficient soils and not receiving nutritionally balanced feed. The FCT examined also revealed a lack of data on the full spectrum of ASF, including offal and wild foods, which correspond to local food preferences and represent valuable dietary resources in food-deficient settings. Using poultry products as an example, comparisons are made between compositional data from three high-income nations, and potential implications of differences in the published values for micronutrients of public health significance, including Fe, folate and vitamin A, are discussed. It is important that those working on nutritional interventions and on developing dietary recommendations for resource-poor settings understand the limitations of current food composition data and that opportunities to improve existing resources are more actively explored and supported.

  19. Updated Magmatic Flux Rate Estimates for the Hawaii Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies have estimated the magmatic flux rate along the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain using a variety of methods and arriving at different results. These flux rate estimates have weaknesses because of incomplete data sets and different modeling assumptions, especially for the youngest portion of the chain (<3 Ma). While they generally agree on the 1st order features, there is less agreement on the magnitude and relative size of secondary flux variations. Some of these differences arise from the use of different methodologies, but the significance of this variability is difficult to assess due to a lack of confidence bounds on the estimates obtained with these disparate methods. All methods introduce some error, but to date there has been little or no quantification of error estimates for the inferred melt flux, making an assessment problematic. Here we re-evaluate the melt flux for the Hawaii plume with the latest gridded data sets (SRTM30+ and FAA 21.1) using several methods, including the optimal robust separator (ORS) and directional median filtering techniques (DiM). We also compute realistic confidence limits on the results. In particular, the DiM technique was specifically developed to aid in the estimation of surface loads that are superimposed on wider bathymetric swells and it provides error estimates on the optimal residuals. Confidence bounds are assigned separately for the estimated surface load (obtained from the ORS regional/residual separation techniques) and the inferred subsurface volume (from gravity-constrained isostasy and plate flexure optimizations). These new and robust estimates will allow us to assess which secondary features in the resulting melt flux curve are significant and should be incorporated when correlating melt flux variations with other geophysical and geochemical observations.

  20. Brumalia Tholus: Magmatic Intrusion on Vesta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, Debra L.; DeSanctis, M. Christina; Raymond, Carol A.; Ammannito, Eleonora; Frigeri, Alessandro; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Williams, David; Russell, Christopher T.

    2013-04-01

    Geologic mapping of Vesta was based on Dawn spacecraft Framing Camera (FC) images and compositional data from the Visible & Infrared Spectrometer (VIR). Mapping reveals that while the equatorial region of Vesta displays numerous wide, flat-floored troughs [1], these troughs do not cut the Vestalia Terra plateau (VT) [2]. However, three large pit crater chains are observed on the VT surface [2,3]. Pit crater chains are hypothesized to form when dilational motion on buried normal faults causes overlying material to collapse into the opening portions of the buried fault [4]. The merged pits of the VT pit crater chains show signs of collapse but distinct fault faces can also be observed [3]. It has thus been suggested that the VT pit crater chains are representative of subsurface faulting of the plateau [2]. The pit crater chain Albalonga Catena phases from being a topographically low feature of merged pits into being the topographically high Brumalia Tholus, an elongate hill. If Albalonga Catena represents a buried normal fault, then the topographic high that emerges along its length could have been formed by a magmatic intrusion utilizing the subsurface fracture as a conduit to the surface. Brumalia Tholus should thus be comprised of diogenite, a plutonic vestan material. Teia crater impacts Brumalia Tholus and likely samples Brumalia's core material. FC data indicates that Teia ejecta have a smeared, flow-like texture and a distinct compostion. VIR analysis has shown that while background VT material is howarditic [5], these Teia ejecta are more diogenitic. VIR also detected small diogenite deposits on top of Brumalia Tholus. The identification of diogenite on the top of Brumalia Tholus and in the Teia ejecta is consistent with the hill being the surface representation of a magmatic intrusion. We present a possible sequence of events. Global equatorial fracturing and faulting occurred, resulting in sub-surface faulting of VT. The surface of VT was covered by

  1. Fluid Dynamic Experiments on Mush Column Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan-Brown, R. E.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    A vertically extensive stack of sills interconnected by pipe-like conduits extending from the mantle through the lithosphere and capped by a volcanic center is a magmatic mush column. At any instant at various locations it contains fractionated and primitive melts as pools of nearly crystal-free magma, pools of crystal-rich magma, thick beds of cumulates, open conduits, and conduits congested by cognate and wall debris. All boundaries of the system are sheathed by solidification fronts. With the wide range of local, characteristic length scales there is a commensurate range of solidification time scales. This creates a complicated series of resistances to magma flow and provides a variety of distinct local physical environments for the chemical modification of magma. The system is driven by over-pressure from the addition of new melt from below. The over-pressure propagates upward by moving magma which flushes conduits, disrupts cumulate beds, and pools or purges sills. A critical aspect of this process is the entrainment, transport, and deposition of crystals throughout the system. Picritic lavas charges with entrained (tramp) olivine of a wide compositional range erupted at many systems (e.g. Jan Mayen, Kilauea, Reunion, etc.) are the final expression of this process. That the size and abundance of these crystals is correlated with eruptive flux (Murata & Richter, AJS, 1966) suggests an important indicator of the overall dynamics of the mush column. A mush column of this basic nature is observed is observed in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica and is inferred beneath Hawaii and the ocean ridges. We have attempted to model this process by studying the entrainment, transport, and deposition of particles in a vertical stack of sills (Plexiglas tanks) connected by resistive conduits (check valves), over-pressured from the base, and open at the top. The system is about two meters in height with water and oil as fluids and particles with Reynolds numbers

  2. The evolution of the magmatic arc of Southern Peru (200-60 Ma), Arequipa area: insight from geochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouy, S.; Benoit, M.; De Saint Blanquat, M.; Brunet, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cordilleran-type batholiths are built by prolonged arc activity along continental margins and may provide detailed magmatic records of the subduction system evolution. The magmas produced in subduction context involve both mantellic and crustal end members and are subject to various petrological processes. The MASH zones (Hildreth and Moorbath, 1988), at the basis of the continental crust, are the best places for the genesis of such hybrid magmas. The various geochemical signatures observed in the plutonic rocks, may also be attributed to source heterogeneities or generated by subsequent petrological processes. This study has focused in the Arequipa section of the Coastal Batholith of Southern Peru (200-60 Ma), in an area extending over 80x40 km. Major and trace elements as well as Sr and Nd isotopic analyses were performed in a set of 100 samples ranging from gabbro to granite. The obtained data highlight the wide heterogeneity of the geochemical signatures that is not related to the classification of the rocks. In first step, Rb/Sr systematic was used to isolate a set of samples plotting along a Paleocene isochron and defining a cogenetic suite. This suite appears to have evolved by simple fractional crystallization. By using reverse modeling, the parameters controlling the fractional crystallization process were defined, as partition coefficients, initial concentrations and amount of fractional crystallization. The other magmatic suites display a wide range of isotopic and geochemical signatures. To explain this heterogeneity, a model involving competition between fractional crystallization and magma mixing into MASH zones was proposed. A large range of hybrid magma types is potentially generated during the maturation of the system, but this range tends to disappear as fractionation and mixing occurs. Finally the model predicts the genesis of a homogeneous reservoir created at depth, from which magmas may evolve only by fractional crystallization. Therefore

  3. Mineralogy and geochemistry of granitoids from Kinnaur region, Himachal Higher Himalaya, India: Implication on the nature of felsic magmatism in the collision tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Brajesh; Kumar, Santosh; Ban, Masao; Nakashima, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Felsic magmatism in the southern part of Himachal Higher Himalaya is constituted by Neoproterozoic granite gneiss (GGn), Early Palaeozoic granitoids (EPG) and Tertiary tourmaline-bearing leucogranite (TLg). Magnetic susceptibility values (<3 ×10-3 SI), molar Al2 O 3/(CaO + Na2 O + K 2O) (≥1.1), mineral assemblage (bt-ms-pl-kf-qtz ± tur ± ap), and the presence of normative corundum relate these granitoids to peraluminous S-type, ilmenite series (reduced type) granites formed in a syncollisional tectonic setting. Plagioclase from GGn (An10-An31) and EPG (An15-An33) represents oligoclase to andesine and TLg (An2-An15) represents albite to oligoclase, whereas compositional ranges of K-feldspar are more-or-less similar (Or88 to Or95 in GGn, Or86 to Or97 in EPG and Or87 to Or94 in TLg). Biotites in GGn (Mg/Mg + Fet= 0.34-0.45), EPG (Mg/Mg + Fet= 0.27-0.47), and TLg (Mg/Mg + Fet= 0.25-0.30) are ferribiotites enriched in siderophyllite, which stabilised between FMQ and HM buffers and are characterised by dominant 3Ferightleftharpoons 2Al, 3Mgrightleftharpoons 2Al substitutions typical of peraluminous (S-type), reducing felsic melts. Muscovite in GGn (Mg/Mg + Fet=0.58-0.66), EPG (Mg/Mg + Fet=0.31-0.59), and TLg (Mg/Mg + Fet=0.29-0.42) represent celadonite and paragonite solid solutions, and the tourmaline from EPG and TLg belongs to the schorl-elbaite series, which are characteristics of peraluminous, Li-poor, biotite-tourmaline granites. Geochemical features reveal that the GGn and EPG precursor melts were most likely derived from melting of biotite-rich metapelite and metagraywacke sources, whereas TLg melt appears to have formed from biotite-muscovite rich metapelite and metagraywacke sources. Major and trace elements modelling suggest that the GGn, EPG and TLg parental melts have experienced low degrees (˜13, ˜17 and ˜13%, respectively) of kf-pl-bt fractionation, respectively, subsequent to partial melting. The GGn and EPG melts are the results of a pre

  4. Felsic Magmatism through Intracrustal Melting of Previously Formed Volcanic-Arc Crust: Implications for Differentiation and Secular Evolution of the Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G R, R. K.; C, S.

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental challenge in understanding the origin and evolution of the continental crust is to recognize how primary mantle source, and oceanic crust, which are essentially mafic to ultramafic in composition, could differentiate into a more or less felsic compositions. It is possible to understand growth and differentiation of the continental crust by constraining the interplay of magmatism, deformation, and high-grade metamorphism in the lower crust. Here, we apply this knowledge on the lower crustal granitoids of southern India and speculate on the variations in geochemistry as a consequence of differentiation and secular evolution of the continental crust.The major groups of granitoids of southern India are classified as metatonalites, comparable to typical Archaean TTGs with pronounced calc-alkaline affinity, and metagranites which are magmatic fractionation produced by reworking of early crust. Metatonalites are sodic-trondhjemites with slightly magnesian, moderate LREE (average LaN = 103) and low HREE (average YbN = 2) characerestics, where as metagranites are calc-alkaline ferroan types with enriched LREE (average LaN = 427) and HREE (average YbN = 23). Petrogenetic characteristics of granitoids illustrate continuous evolution of a primary crust into diverse magmatic units by multiple stages of intracrustal differentiation processes attributed to following tectonic scenarios: (1) formation of tonalitic magma by low- to moderate-degree partial melting of hydrated basaltic crust at pressures high enough to stabilize garnet-amphibole residue and (2) genesis of granite in a continental arc-accretion setting by an episode of crustal remelting of the tonalitic crust, within plagioclase stability field. The first-stage formed in a flat-subduction setting of an volcanic-arc, leading to the formation of tonalites. The heat budget required is ascribed to the upwelling of the mantle and/or basaltic underplating. Progressive decline in mantle potential temperature

  5. Pre-collisional, Tonian (ca. 790 Ma) continental arc magmatism in southern Mantiqueira Province, Brazil: Geochemical and isotopic constraints from the Várzea do Capivarita Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martil, Mariana Maturano Dias; de Fátima Bitencourt, Maria; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll; Koester, Edinei; Pimentel, Márcio Martins

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on the pre-collisional mature arc magmatism (ca. 790 Ma) recorded in orthogneisses from the Várzea do Capivarita Complex (VCC), southern Mantiqueira Province (PM), Brazil. The complex comprises ortho- and paragneisses tectonically interleaved during a transpressive high grade regime (ca. 650 Ma), possibly related to oblique collision. The VCC orthogneisses are metaluminous to peraluminous calc-alkaline rocks, with high 87Sr/86Sr(i) ratios from 0.71628 to 0.72509 and εNd(790) values from - 7.19 to - 10.06. The VCC magmatism is correlated with other ca. 800 Ma arc sequences from southern PM, as the Porongos Metamorphic Complex (PMC) metavolcanic rocks and the orthogneisses from Cerro Bori (CB), Uruguay. All associations show signatures typical of accretionary orogens, TDM and Meso to Paleoproteroic inheritance ages, and strong evidence of crustal assimilation/contamination. Their high K contents, and the tendency to move toward the post-collisional field in geotectonic diagrams suggest that they were generated in thick-crust, mature arc environments. In contrast, the CB sequence exhibits a less mature continental-arc character, suggestive of thinner crust or shorter distance to the active margin. VCC and CB orthogneisses, and part of the PMC metavolcanic rocks may be interpreted as part of the same magmatism, or at least as fragments of similar magmatic arcs. However, VCC magmatism is distinct from continental arc sequences in the São Gabriel Block (ca. 700-750 Ma). Isotope signatures for this younger magmatism indicate major contribution of Neoproterozoic juvenile sources, with only little amounts of reworked, old continental crust. Geochemical and Sr-Nd signatures presented in this paper suggest that at least part of the PMC metavolcanic rocks are the protoliths of the VCC orthogneisses. This, together with the isotope evidence of similarity between VCC and PMC igneous and sedimentary fractions, corroborates the hypothesis that the VCC and PMC

  6. Identification of Bloodmeal Sources and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Triatomine Bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) From Residential Settings in Texas, the United States

    PubMed Central

    KJOS, SONIA A.; MARCET, PAULA L.; YABSLEY, MICHAEL J.; KITRON, URIEL; SNOWDEN, KAREN F.; LOGAN, KATHLEEN S.; BARNES, JOHN C.; DOTSON, ELLEN M.

    2014-01-01

    The host–vector–parasite interactions in Chagas disease peridomestic transmission cycles in the United States are not yet well understood. Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) infection prevalence and bloodmeal sources were determined for adult and immature triatomine (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) specimens collected from residential settings in central Texas. Sequenced cytochrome b DNA segments obtained from triatomine digestive tract identified nine vertebrate hosts and one invertebrate host in four triatomine species (Triatoma gerstaeckeri, Triatoma indictiva, Triatoma protracta, and Triatoma sanguisuga). The broad range of wild and domestic host species detected in triatomine specimens collected from residential sites indicates high host diversity and potential movement between the sylvatic and peridomestic settings. Domestic dogs appear to be key in the maintenance of the peridomestic transmission cycle as both a blood host for the triatomine vectors and a potential reservoir for the parasite. The high rate of T. cruzi infection among triatomine specimens that were collected from inside houses, outside houses, and dog kennels (69, 81, and 82%, respectively) suggests a current risk for Chagas disease vector-borne transmission for humans and domestic animals in residential settings in Texas because of overlap with the sylvatic cycle. PMID:24180119

  7. Contrasting magmatic structures between small plutons and batholiths emplaced at shallow crustal level (Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Lucio P.; D'Eramo, Fernando J.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Demartis, Manuel; Tubía, José María; Coniglio, Jorge E.; Radice, Stefania; Maffini, M. Natalia; Aragón, Eugenio

    2016-11-01

    Processes like injection, magma flow and differentiation and influence of the regional strain field are here described and contrasted to shed light on their role in the formation of small plutons and large batholiths their magmatic structures. The final geometric and compositional arrangement of magma bodies are a complex record of their construction and internal flow history. Magma injection, flow and differentiation, as well as regional stresses, all control the internal nature of magma bodies. Large magma bodies emplaced at shallow crustal levels result from the intrusion of multiple magma batches that interact in a variety of ways, depending on internal and external dynamics, and where the early magmatic, growth-related structures are commonly overprinted by subsequent history. In contrast, small plutons emplaced in the brittle-ductile transition more likely preserve growth-related structures, having a relatively simple cooling history and limited internal magma flow. Outcrop-scale magmatic structures in both cases record a rich set of complementary information that can help elucidate their evolution. Large and small granitic bodies of the Sierra Pampeanas preserve excellent exposures of magmatic structures that formed as magmas stepped through different rheological states during pluton growth and solidification. These structures reveal not only the flow pattern inside magma chambers, but also the rheological evolution of magmas in response to temperature evolution.

  8. Geochemical modeling of mixing between magmatic and hydrothermal gases: the case of Vulcano Island, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuccio, P. M.; Paonita, A.; Sortino, F.

    1999-04-01

    In this study we present a geochemical approach to model the mixing of magmatic and hydrothermal gases. Our model is based on a rigorous formulation of a perfectly dimensioned system of mass and energy balance equations. Inputs of the equation set are the H 2O and CO 2 content and gas emission temperature at the surface, together with some constraints gained from the chemical-physical features of the hydrothermal system. The output data give the composition of magmatic gas, mixing fractions and temperatures of gas mixtures in the mixing zone. The comparison of the emission temperature of fumarolic gases with their calculated mixing temperatures provides valuable indications on the expansion process that gases undergo during their ascent towards the surface. Our mixing model is exemplified by the fumarolic system of Vulcano Island, Italy. We calculate the thermodynamic parameters of the hydrothermal system by means of an H 2O-CO 2-NaCl equation of state, while the thermo-baric conditions of the magma have been assessed by previous geophysical and petrologic investigations. The obtained results show that, during volcanic crises at Vulcano Island and in agreement with magma degassing processes, both the CO 2 and the He contents of magmatic gas display peaks with a progressively declining amplitude, suggesting a progressive magmatic impoverishment of volatiles strongly partitioned in the gas phase. Mixing fractions of various fumaroles are normally variable, while they display almost homogeneous values during periods of increased volcanic activity. On the basis of results gained, some implications regarding the hazard of phreato-magmatic explosions are also discussed. The high temperature reached by fumarolic gases strongly constrains their probable expansion process during the ascent towards the surface. A comparison between the temperature of the fumarolic gas and the calculated mixing temperature at depth indicates that the expansion process can be reasonably

  9. Devonian magmatism in the Timan Range, Arctic Russia - subduction, post-orogenic extension, or rifting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, V.; Scarrow, J. H.; Silva, I. G. Nobre; Cambeses, A.

    2016-11-01

    Devonian mafic magmatism of the northern East European Craton (EEC) has been variously linked to Uralian subduction, post-orogenic extension associated with Caledonian collision, and rifting. New elemental and isotopic analyses of Devonian basalts from the Timan Range and Kanin Peninsula, Russia, in the northern EEC constrain magma genesis, mantle source(s) and the tectonic process(es) associated with this Devonian volcanism to a rift-related context. Two compositional groups of low-K2O tholeiitic basalts are recognized. On the basis of Th concentrations, LREE concentrations, and (LREE/HREE)N, the data suggest two distinct magma batches. Incompatible trace elements ratios (e.g., Th/Yb, Nb/Th, Nb/La) together with Nd and Pb isotopes indicate involvement of an NMORB to EMORB 'transitional' mantle component mixed with variable amounts of a continental component. The magmas were derived from a source that developed high (U,Th)/Pb, U/Th and Sm/Nd over time. The geochemistry of Timan-Kanin basalts supports the hypothesis that the genesis of Devonian basaltic magmatism in the region resulted from local melting of transitional mantle and lower crust during rifting of a mainly non-volcanic continental rifted margin.

  10. The Lesser Antilles volcanic chain: a study in arc magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, R.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Heath, E.

    2000-03-01

    magmatic water contents, using direct and indirect methods, give conflicting results. Generalisations, based on melt inclusion data, are that water contents increased from 1-2 wt.% in primary/parental magmas to 5-6 wt.% in dacitic and rhyolitic melts. Primary magmas were generated in normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB)-type mantle, modified by the addition of a fluid component derived mainly from subducted basaltic crust and a component derived from partial melting of subducted sediment. The proportions of each component in the different magma types are still debated, as is the importance of crustal contamination in producing their trace-element and isotopic characteristics. Compositional variations in the magmatic suites are a result mainly of polybaric fractional crystallisation, accompanied, particularly in some central islands, by crustal contamination, and by minor magma mixing. The amount of contamination may be related to volumetric volcanic production. The influence of the sediment component relative to that of hydrous fluids generally increases towards the south. However, neighbouring islands, and different centres within islands, may show different fractionation histories, indicating that the factors which controlled magma compositions, such as water concentrations in the source rocks and magma ascent rates, vary on the scale of tens of kilometers. The presence in individual centres on Grenada of two series with differing major- and trace-element and isotopic characteristics implies mantle sources which are heterogeneous on the scale of single plumbing systems.

  11. Provenance, tectonic setting and source-area weathering of the lower Cambrian sediments of the Parahio valley in the Spiti basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shivani; Parcha, Suraj K.

    2017-03-01

    The geochemical study of siliciclastic rocks from the Lower Cambrian of Parahio Valley has been studied to describe the provenance, chemical weathering and tectonic setting. The K2O/Al2O3 ratio and positive correlation of Co ( r=0.85), Ni ( r=0.86), Zn ( r=0.82), Rb ( r=0.98) with K2O reflects that the presence of clay minerals control the abundances of these elements and suggests a warm and humid climate for this region. The chondrite normalized REE pattern of the samples is equivalent to upper continental crust, which reflects enriched LREE and flat HREE with negative Eu anomaly. The tectonic setting discriminant diagram log[K2O/Na2O] vs. SiO2; [SiO2/Al2O3] vs. log[K2O/Na2O]; [SiO2/20] - [K2O+Na2O] - [TiO2+Fe2O3+MgO] indicates transitional tectonic setting from an active continental margin to a passive margin. The discriminant function plot indicates quartzose sedimentary provenance, and to some extent, the felsic igneous provenance, derived from weathered granite, gneissic terrain and/or from pre-existing sedimentary terrain. The CIA value indicates low to moderate degree of chemical weathering and the average ICV values suggests immature sediments deposited in tectonically active settings. The A-CN-K diagram indicates that these sediments were generated from source rocks of the upper continental crust.

  12. Application of near real-time radial semblance to locate the shallow magmatic conduit at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.; Whilldin, D.; Chouet, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radial Semblance is applied to broadband seismic network data to provide source locations of Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic energy in near real time. With an efficient algorithm and adequate network coverage, accurate source locations of VLP energy are derived to quickly locate the shallow magmatic conduit system at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. During a restart in magma flow following a brief pause in the current eruption, the shallow magmatic conduit is pressurized, resulting in elastic radiation from various parts of the conduit system. A steeply dipping distribution of VLP hypocenters outlines a region extending from sea level to about 550 m elevation below and just east of the Halemaumau Pit Crater. The distinct hypocenters suggest the shallow plumbing system beneath Halemaumau consists of a complex plexus of sills and dikes. An unconstrained location for a section of the conduit is also observed beneath the region between Kilauea Caldera and Kilauea Iki Crater.

  13. Modelling Subduction Zone Magmatism Due to Hydraulic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, R.; Davies, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this project is to test the hypothesis that subduction zone magmatism involves hydraulic fractures propagating from the oceanic crust to the mantle wedge source region (Davies, 1999). We aim to test this hypothesis by developing a numerical model of the process, and then comparing model outputs with observations. The hypothesis proposes that the water interconnects in the slab following an earthquake. If sufficient pressure develops a hydrofracture occurs. The hydrofracture will expand in the direction of the least compressive stress and propagate in the direction of the most compressive stress, which is out into the wedge. Therefore we can calculate the hydrofracture path and end-point, given the start location on the slab and the propagation distance. We can therefore predict where water is added to the mantle wedge. To take this further we have developed a thermal model of a subduction zone. The model uses a finite difference, marker-in-cell method to solve the heat equation (Gerya, 2010). The velocity field was prescribed using the analytical expression of cornerflow (Batchelor, 1967). The markers contained within the fixed grid are used to track the different compositions and their properties. The subduction zone thermal model was benchmarked (Van Keken, 2008). We used the hydrous melting parameterization of Katz et.al., (2003) to calculate the degree of melting caused by the addition of water to the wedge. We investigate models where the hydrofractures, with properties constrained by estimated water fluxes, have random end points. The model predicts degree of melting, magma productivity, temperature of the melt and water content in the melt for different initial water fluxes. Future models will also include the buoyancy effect of the melt and residue. Batchelor, Cambridge UP, 1967. Davies, Nature, 398: 142-145, 1999. Gerya, Cambridge UP, 2010. Katz, Geochem. Geophys. Geosy, 4(9), 2003 Van Keken et.al. Phys. Earth. Planet. In., 171:187-197, 2008.

  14. The link between Hawaiian mantle plume composition, magmatic flux, and deep mantle geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Lauren N.; Weis, Dominique; Garcia, Michael O.

    2017-04-01

    Oceanic island basalts sample mantle reservoirs that are isotopically and compositionally heterogeneous. The Hawaiian-Emperor chain represents ∼85 Myr of volcanism supplied by a deep mantle plume. Two geographically and geochemically delineated trends, Kea and Loa, are well documented within the Hawaiian Islands. Enriched Loa compositions originate from subduction recycled or primordial material stored in deep mantle reservoirs such as the large low shear velocity province (LLSVP) below Hawai'i. Loa compositions have not been observed along the Emperor Seamounts (>50 Ma), whereas lavas on the Hawaiian Islands (<6.5 Ma) sample both Kea and Loa sources. Lead isotopes in shield lavas along the Northwest Hawaiian Ridge (NWHR) spanning ∼42 Myr between the bend in the chain and the Hawaiian Islands record the geochemical evolution of the Hawaiian mantle plume over a time period when many geophysical parameters (volcanic propagation rate, magmatic flux, mantle potential temperature) increased significantly. Along the NWHR, the Loa geochemical component appears ephemerally, which we link to the sampling of different lower mantle compositional domains by the Hawaiian mantle plume. The plume initially sampled only the deep Pacific mantle (Kea component) from outside the LLSVP during the formation of the Emperor Seamounts. Southward migration and anchoring of the plume on the LLSVP led to entrainment of increasing amounts of LLSVP material (Loa component) along the NWHR as documented by an increase in 208Pb*/206Pb* with decreasing age. The correlation between 208Pb*/206Pb* and magmatic flux suggests source composition affects the magmatic flux, and explains why the Hawaiian mantle plume has dramatically strengthened through time.

  15. Formation of non-magmatic iron-meteorite group IIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation (INAA) data for metal in 22 nonmagmatic IIE meteorites show narrow ranges in Ir and other refractory siderophiles; the Ir range is a factor of 2.6, a factor of ∼2 smaller than in nonmagmatic IAB-MG, and orders of magnitude smaller than in the large magmatic groups. Siderophile data show no evidence of fractional crystallization. IIE irons can be split into two sets, a larger main-set and a set of 6 Cu- (or FeS) rich irons. Elemental concentrations in metal from veins in H5 chondrite Portales Valley fall within the IIE range with the exceptions of Co (high) and Ga (low). H-group-chondrite and Au-normalized IIE abundances for siderophiles show that IIE irons are ∼30% higher than H in refractory siderophiles Re, Ir and W and are about 30% lower than H chondrites in the volatiles Ga and Sb, inconsistent with proposals that IIE irons formed from H chondrites. The IIE fractionations contrast with those in L chondrites which are about 15% lower than H in the three refractory elements and 40% higher than H in volatiles indicating that IIE irons did not form from H chondrites but from a more reduced and siderophile-rich kind of ordinary chondrite ("HH" chondrites). Most O-isotope data support a close relationship between IIE irons and H or HH chondrites; lower Δ17O in primitive (chondritic) silicates support an HH classification. Literature isotopic data for Ru and Mo also show that IIE metal formed from an ordinary chondrite parent; it appears that the silicates and metal were formed by melting of a single asteroid. There is no evidence for radiogenic (26Al) heating; this, the rapid cooling recorded in the sizes of parental gamma crystal in the metal and the absence of fractional crystallization strongly support the hypothesis that IIE melting was the result of impacts. To summarize, the weight of the evidence favors the conclusion that IIE meteorites were formed by one or more impacts on an HH asteroid. The target probably had a

  16. Arabian Shield magmatic cycles and their relationship with Gondwana assembly: Insights from zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, F. A.; Foden, J. D.; Collins, A. S.; Payne, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Shield preserves a protracted magmatic record of amalgamated juvenile terranes that host a diverse range of early Neoproterozoic to Cambrian granitoids intruding volcanosedimentary basin assemblages that have corollaries in other parts of the East African Orogen. New zircon U-Pb geochronology of 19 granitoids intruding eight Arabian Shield terranes, define four discrete magmatic events: island arc (∼845 Ma), syncollisional (∼710 Ma), post-tectonic (∼620 Ma) and anorogenic (∼525 Ma). Zircon Lu-Hf isotopic analyses indicate that all studied granitoids are juvenile with typical εHf values of >+5 to +10 and Stenian-Tonian (∼1100-900 Ma) model ages, regardless of their precise intrusive ages or spatial relationship. Subtle changes in isotopic signatures between ∼850 and 600 Ma, suggest the result from changes in granite source materials brought about by; basaltic underplating, limited crustal interaction with Palaeoproterozoic basement and a change to lithospheric delamination/subduction roll-back processes driving juvenile ANS crustal growth. The cycle of granite intrusion reflects accretionary cycles initiated during Mozambique Ocean closure and during Gondwana amalgamation and final assembly. Post-tectonic magmatism is divided into a ∼636-600 Ma phase and post 600 Ma event that reflects first subduction and then within-plate related processes. The identification of magmatism at ∼525 Ma is now the youngest granitoid identified so far in the Saudi Arabian Shield and may change the identified age of the regional, basal Palaeozoic unconformity. This late magmatism may be generated by the Najd Fault reactivation correlating with the Malagasy/Kunnga Orogeny that marked the final stages of Gondwana assembly.

  17. Effects of magmatic intrusion on mineralogy and geochemistry of coals from the Fengfeng-Handan Coalfield, Hebei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Shifeng Dai; Deyi Ren

    2007-06-15

    This paper describes the effects of magmatic intrusions on petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of the late Palaeozoic coals from the Fengfeng-Handan coalfield, Hebei, China. The narrowly zoned coals of variable ranks, from high-volatile A bituminous (hvAb), through medium-volatile bituminous (mvb), low-volatile bituminous (lvb), semianthracite (sa), and anthracite (an), to meta-anthracite (ma) in the coalfield, were found to be best explained by magmatic inputs. The minerals derived from magmatic thermal alteration consist of pyrite, calcite, and ankerite, which mainly occur as fracture or vesicle fillings in the thermally altered high-rank coals. The variation in element concentrations with coal ranks (enrichment, depletion, and no variation) and mineralogical affinity were used to classify elements in coals into six groups, groups A-F. Elements in group A (B, F, Cl, Br, and Hg), group B (As, Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb), group C (Sr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and Zn), and Group D (U) were enriched in the altered coals, indicating that the magmatic inputs are the source of these elements. Group A elements are volatile elements that probably came from the hydrothermal solutions, then deposited or were driven off from an organic component in coal by magmatic heat, and then redeposited in the coal. Group B elements mainly distribute in the fracture or vesicle fillings of pyrites. The dominant carriers of group C elements are thermally altered calcite and ankerite. Uranium in group D occurs in organic-bonded and silicate associations. Group E elements, including Sb, Sc, and V, have a depletion trend in the altered coals, and the remaining elements in group F do not clearly vary in the unaltered, slightly altered, or altered coals. The element concentrations independent of coal ranks in groups E and F may suggest that these elements are inherent to the coal. 44 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Use of diverse geochemical data sets to determine sources and sinks of nitrate and methane in groundwater, Garfield County, Colorado, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Thomas, J.C.; Hunt, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous water-quality assessments reported elevated concentrations of nitrate and methane in water from domestic wells screened in shallow zones of the Wasatch Formation, Garfield County, Colorado. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, analyzed samples collected from 26 domestic wells for a diverse set of geochemical tracers for the purpose of determining sources and sinks of nitrate and methane in groundwater from the Wasatch Formation. Nitrate concentrations ranged from less than 0.04 to 6.74 milligrams per liter as nitrogen (mg/L as N) and were significantly lower in water samples with dissolved-oxygen concentrations less than 0.5 mg/L than in samples with dissolved-oxygen concentrations greater than or equal to 0.5 mg/L. Chloride/bromide mass ratios and tracers of groundwater age (tritium, chlorofluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride) indicate that septic-system effluent or animal waste was a source of nitrate in some young groundwater (less than 50 years), although other sources such as fertilizer also may have contributed nitrate to the groundwater. Nitrate and nitrogen gas (N2) concentrations indicate that denitrification was the primary sink for nitrate in anoxic groundwater, removing 99 percent of the original nitrate content in some samples that had nitrate concentrations greater than 10 mg/L as N at the time of recharge. Methane concentrations ranged from less than 0.0005 to 32.5 mg/L and were significantly higher in water samples with dissolved-oxygen concentrations less than 0.5 mg/L than in samples with dissolved-oxygen concentrations greater than or equal to 0.5 mg/L. High methane concentrations (greater than 1 mg/L) in some samples were biogenic in origin and appeared to be derived from a relatively deep source on the basis of helium concentrations and isotopic data. One such sample had water-isotopic and major-ion compositions similar to that of produced water from the

  19. Magmatism at the Eurasian–North American modern plate boundary: Constraints from alkaline volcanism in the Chersky Belt (Yakutia)

    PubMed Central

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Bizimis, Michael; Schneider, David; Akinin, Vyacheslav V.; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2011-01-01

    The Chersky seismic belt (NE-Russia) forms the modern plate boundary of the Eurasian−North American continental plate. The geodynamic evolution of this continent−continent setting is highly complex and remains a matter of debate, as the extent and influence of the Mid-Arctic Ocean spreading center on the North Asian continent since the Eocene remains unclear. The progression from a tensional stress regime to a modern day transpressional one in the Chersky seismic belt, makes the understanding even more complicated. The alkaline volcanism that has erupted along the Chersky range from Eocene through to the Recent can provide constraints on the geodynamic evolution of this continental boundary, however, the source and petrogenetic evolution of these volcanic rocks and their initiating mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied basanites of the central Chersky belt, which are thought to represent the first alkaline volcanic activity in the area, after initial opening of the Arctic Ocean basin. We present mineral and bulk rock geochemical data as well as Sr–Nd–Pb–Hf isotopes of the alkaline suite of rocks combined with new precise K–Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating, and discuss an integrated tectono-magmatic model for the Chersky belt. Our findings show that the basanites were generated from a homogeneous asthenospheric mantle reservoir with an EM-1 isotopic flavor, under relatively ‘dry’ conditions at segregation depths around 110 km and temperatures of ~ 1500 °C. Trace element and isotope systematics combined with mantle potential temperature estimates offer no confirmation of magmatism related to subduction or plume activity. Mineral geochemical and petrographical observations together with bulk geochemical evidence indicate a rapid ascent of melts and high cooling rates after emplacement in the continental crust. Our preferred model is that volcanism was triggered by extension and thinning of the lithosphere combined with adiabatic upwelling of the

  20. The belt of metagabbros of La Pampa: Lower Paleozoic back-arc magmatism in south-central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernicoff, Carlos J.; Zappettini, Eduardo O.; Villar, Luisa M.; Chemale, Farid, Jr.; Hernández, Laura

    2009-12-01

    Combined geological, geochronological, geochemical and geophysical studies have led to identification of a large (˜300 km long, ˜5 km wide) N-S trending belt of metagabbros in the province of La Pampa, south-central Argentina. This belt, though only poorly exposed in the localities of Valle Daza and Sierra de Lonco Vaca, stands out in the geophysical data (aeromagnetics and gravity). Modeling of the aeromagnetic data permits estimation of the geometry of the belt of metagabbros and surrounding rocks. The main rock type exposed is metagabbros with relict magmatic nucleii where layering is preserved. A counterclockwise P-T evolution affected these rocks, i.e., during the Middle Ordovician the protolith reached an initial granulite facies of metamorphism (M1), evolving to amphibolite facies (M2). During the Upper Devonian, a retrograde, greenschist facies metamorphism (M3) partially affected the metagabbros. The whole-rock Sm-Nd data suggest a juvenile source from a depleted mantle, with model ages ranging from 552 to 574 Ma, and positive Epsilon values of 6.51-6.82. A crystallization age of 480 Ma is based on geological considerations, i.e. geochronological data of the host rocks as well as comparisons with the Las Aguilas mafic-ultramafic belt of Sierra de San Luis (central Argentina). The geochemical studies indicate an enriched MORB and back-arc signature. The La Pampa metagabbros are interpreted to be originated as a result of the extension that took place in a back-arc setting coevally with the Famatinian magmatic arc (very poorly exposed in the western part of the study area). The extensional event was 'aborted' by the collision of the Cuyania terrane with Pampia-Gondwana in the Middle Ordovician, causing deformation and metamorphism throughout the arc-back-arc region. The similarities between the La Pampa metagabbros and the mafic-ultramafic Las Aguilas belt of the Sierra de San Luis are very conspicuous, for example, the age (Lower Paleozoic), geochemical

  1. Magmatism at the Eurasian-North American modern plate boundary: Constraints from alkaline volcanism in the Chersky Belt (Yakutia).

    PubMed

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Bizimis, Michael; Schneider, David; Akinin, Vyacheslav V; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2011-07-01

    The Chersky seismic belt (NE-Russia) forms the modern plate boundary of the Eurasian-North American continental plate. The geodynamic evolution of this continent-continent setting is highly complex and remains a matter of debate, as the extent and influence of the Mid-Arctic Ocean spreading center on the North Asian continent since the Eocene remains unclear. The progression from a tensional stress regime to a modern day transpressional one in the Chersky seismic belt, makes the understanding even more complicated. The alkaline volcanism that has erupted along the Chersky range from Eocene through to the Recent can provide constraints on the geodynamic evolution of this continental boundary, however, the source and petrogenetic evolution of these volcanic rocks and their initiating mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied basanites of the central Chersky belt, which are thought to represent the first alkaline volcanic activity in the area, after initial opening of the Arctic Ocean basin. We present mineral and bulk rock geochemical data as well as Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes of the alkaline suite of rocks combined with new precise K-Ar and (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating, and discuss an integrated tectono-magmatic model for the Chersky belt. Our findings show that the basanites were generated from a homogeneous asthenospheric mantle reservoir with an EM-1 isotopic flavor, under relatively 'dry' conditions at segregation depths around 110 km and temperatures of ~ 1500 °C. Trace element and isotope systematics combined with mantle potential temperature estimates offer no confirmation of magmatism related to subduction or plume activity. Mineral geochemical and petrographical observations together with bulk geochemical evidence indicate a rapid ascent of melts and high cooling rates after emplacement in the continental crust. Our preferred model is that volcanism was triggered by extension and thinning of the lithosphere combined with adiabatic upwelling of the underlying

  2. Petrology and geochemistry of ultrapotassic rocks from the Montefiascone Volcanic Complex (Central Italy): magmatic evolution and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Battistini, G.; Montanini, A.; Vernia, L.; Bargossi, G. M.; Castorina, F.

    1998-07-01

    The Montefiascone Volcanic Complex belongs to the Roman Magmatic Province of Central Italy; the volcanic activity took place in an extensional, post-collisional setting during Late Pleistocene, giving rise to lava flows and pyroclastic deposits. The extrusive products consist of moderately to strongly undersaturated K-rich lavas ranging in composition from trachybasalts through leucite basanites and leucititic tephrites to tephritic leucitites. They show the typical geochemical and isotopic characters of the Roman potassic magmas, i.e., low TiO 2, low K 2O/Al 2O 3, strong enrichment in LILE, high LILE/HFSE ratios, highly radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.71005-0.71112) and unradiogenic 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.51209-0.51229, corresponding to ɛNd=-10.7 to -6.8). Large chemical variations have been recognized within the Montefiascone volcanics, resulting both from the occurrence of different primary magmas and shallow-level fractionation processes. The differentiation mainly took place by means of closed-system fractional crystallisation with local influence of crustal assimilation. The leucite basanites represent primary mantle magmas which did not yield derivative products, whereas the leucititic tephrites, tephritic leucitites and trachybasalts comprise highly differentiated rocks strongly depleted in compatible elements and enriched in LILE. Fractional crystallisation dominated respectively by clinopyroxene+leucite and clinopyroxene+plagioclase yielded the most evolved tephritic leucitites and trachybasalts. In contrast, assimilation of metamorphic basement rocks characterized by highly radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr is needed to explain the moderate increase of the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio within the leucititic tephrites. The geochemical and isotopic signatures shown by the Montefiascone primary magmas require a clinopyroxene- and phlogopite-rich mantle source; in particular, partial melting of a veined lithospheric mantle can account for the occurrence of different primary magmas

  3. The Capilla del Monte pluton, Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina: the easternmost Early Carboniferous magmatism in the pre-Andean SW Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, Juan A.; Pankhurst, Robert J.; Rapela, Carlos W.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Alasino, Pablo H.; Saavedra, Julio; Baldo, Edgardo G.; Murra, Juan A.; da Costa Campos Neto, Mario

    2016-07-01

    New geochronological, geochemical, and isotopic data are reported for the Capilla del Monte two-mica granite pluton in the northeastern Sierras de Córdoba. An Early Carboniferous age is established by a U-Pb zircon concordia (336 ± 3 Ma) and a Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron (337 ± 2 Ma). Zircon saturation geothermometry indicates relatively high temperatures (735-800 °C). The granites have high average SiO2 (74.2 %), Na2O + K2O (7.8 %), and high field-strength elements, high K2O/Na2O (1.7) and FeO/MgO ratios (5.1), with low CaO content (0.71 %). REE patterns with marked negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* 0.14-0.56) indicate crystal fractionation, dominantly of plagioclase and K-feldspar, from a peraluminous magma enriched in F. Isotope data (87Sr/86Srinitial = 0.7086, ɛ Nd336 = -5.5 to -4.4 with T DM = 1.5 Ga, zircon ɛ Hf336 +0.8 to -6.1; mean T DM = 1.5 Ga) suggest a Mesoproterozoic continental source, albeit with some younger or more juvenile material indicated by the Hf data. The pluton is the easternmost member of a Carboniferous A-type magmatic suite which shows an increase in juvenile input toward the west in this part of the pre-Andean margin. The petrological and geochemical data strongly suggest a similar intraplate geodynamic setting to that of the nearby but much larger, Late Devonian, Achala batholith, although Hf isotope signatures of zircon suggest a more uniformly crustal origin for the latter. Further studies are required to understand whether these bodies represent two independent magmatic episodes or more continuous activity.

  4. Magmatism, mantle evolution and geodynamics at the converging plate margins of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, M. L.; Peccerillo, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Plio-Quaternary magmatism in the Tyrrhenian Sea area exhibits wide compositional variations, which cover almost entirely those observed for volcanic rocks worldwide. Some volcanoes (Etna, Iblei, Sardinia, etc.) range from tholeiitic to Na-alkaline, and display elemental and isotope signatures typical of FOZO and EM-1 ocean-island basalts (OIB). Other volcanoes (Aeolian Arc, Italian peninsula) range from calc-alkaline-shoshonitic to K-alkaline, exhibit typical 'subduction-related' trace element signatures (low Ta-Nb, high Rb-Cs-REE), and show a large range of radiogenic isotope ratios, from mantle-like in the Aeolian Arc to crustal-like in central Italy. Geochemical data suggest that OIB-type magmatism originated in lithosphere-sthenosphere sources that were unaffected by recent subduction. In contrast, subduction-related magmas come from mantle sources that underwent Eocene to present mixing with various amounts and types of subducted crustal components. Fluxing of the mantle wedge by water-rich fluids from a mid-ocean ridge basalt-type slab ± sediments occurred in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, whereas interaction between peridotite and various types of sediments occurred in central Italy. These contrasting styles of mantle contaminations relate to the nature (oceanic or continental) of the foreland, slab geometry and pre-metasomatic mantle compositions, which vary greatly along the Apennine arc and are the reason for the formation of the wide variety of orogenic magmas in Italy.

  5. Igneous geology of the Carlin trend, Nevada: The importance of Eocene magmatism in gold mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressel, Michael Walter, Jr.

    not to magmatism, metamorphism, and/or large-scale extension. A recently established Eocene age for major gold introduction narrows the possibilities, and two principal models have emerged: one involving Eocene magmatism as the heat source to drive shallow hydrothermal circulation and the other advocating deeply sourced metamorphic fluids released into the upper crust during regional extension. Critical to the latter argument is the temporal association of extension to gold mineralization, which as yet, is not demonstrated. We argue that Eocene magmatism in the form of large underlying plutons, was the major recognized process that affected the Carlin trend during gold mineralization. These plutons supplied the heat that drove discrete hydrothermal systems. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field magmatism in the context of the Jemez Lineament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Pontbriand, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field (RCVF) was active from 9 Ma to approximately 50 Ka and stretches from Raton, New Mexico in the west to Clayton, New Mexico in the east. The field occurs in the Great Plains at the northeastern end of the Jemez Lineament, a major crustal feature and focus of volcanism that extends southwest to the Colorado Plateau in Arizona and encompasses five other major volcanic fields. Jemez Lineament magmatism is temporally related to Rio Grande Rift magmatism, though it extends NE and SW from the rift itself, and it has been suggested that it represents an ancient crustal suture that serves as a conduit for magmatism occurring beneath the larger region of north and central New Mexico (Magnani et al., 2004, GEOL SOC AM BULL, 116:7/8, pp. 1-6). This study extends our work into the RCVF from prior and ongoing work in the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, where we identified different mantle sources with varying degrees of subduction alteration and we determined some of the crustal processes that contribute to the diversity of magma chemistry and eruptive styles there (e.g., AGU Fall Meeting, abst. #V43D-2884 and #V43D-2883). In the RCVF, we are analyzing multiple phases by electron microprobe and plagioclase phenocrysts and glomerocrysts by LA-ICPMS for Sr isotopes and trace elements. We are undertaking this investigation with the following goals: (1) to evaluate previous magma mixing and crustal assimilation models for Sierra Grande andesites (Zhu, 1995, unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Rice University; Hesse, 1999, unpublished M.S. thesis, Northern Arizona University); (2) to evaluate subduction-modified mantle as the source for RCVF basanites (specifically those at Little Grande); and (3) to assess the possible role of deep crustal cumulates in buffering transitional basalts. In the larger context, these data will be used to evaluate the varying degree of subduction-modification and the effect of crustal thickness on magmatism along the Jemez

  7. Controls on Calcite Solubility in Metamorphic and Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Eguchi, J.; Galvez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Calcite is an important hydrothermal alteration product in a wide range of environments. The role of calcite in hydrothermal alteration depends on its solubility in geologic fluids, especially H2O. At ambient T and P, calcite solubility is low and it exhibits well-known declining, or "reverse", solubility with rising T. However, experimental and theoretical studies show that increasing P yields higher solubility and restricts the region of reverse solubility behavior to higher temperature. At 0.2 GPa the reverse solubility region lies at T>600°C; at 0.5 GPa, >800°C. Thus, whereas calcite possesses relatively low solubility in pure H2O in shallow hydrothermal systems (typically <10 ppm C), it is substantially more soluble at conditions of middle and lower crustal metamorphism and magmatism, reaching concentrations ≥1000 ppm. At the higher P of subduction zones, aragonite solubility in H2O is even greater. Thus, neglecting other solubility controls, calcite precipitation is favored as crustal fluids cool and/or decompress. However, the solubility of calcite in H2O also depends strongly on other solutes, pH, and fO2. Sources of alkalinity decrease calcite solubility. In contrast, sources of acidity such as CO2 and Cl increase solubility. Crustal fluids can be enriched in alkali halides such as NaCl. Calcite solubility increases with increasing salt content at a given P and T. From approximately seawater salinity to salt saturation, the fluid behaves as a dilute molten salt and calcite solubility increases as the square of the salt mole fraction regardless of the alkali (Li, Na, K, Cs) or halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) considered. Similar behavior is seen in mixed salt solutions. At lower salinities, solubility behavior is as expected in dilute electrolyte solutions. The transition from dilute electrolyte to molten salt is fundamental to the properties of crustal fluids. Reduction of carbonate species or CO2 in the fluid to CH4, which is common during serpentinization of

  8. Orogenic plateau magmatism of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Kheirkhah, M.; van Hunen, J.; Davidson, J. P.; Meliksetian, Kh.; Emami, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    Magmatism is a common feature of high plateaux created during continental collision, but the causes remain enigmatic. Here we study Pliocene-Quaternary volcanics from the active Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, to determine the chemistry of these rocks and their relations to faulting and deeper lithospheric structure. The great majority of the centres lie within the overriding Eurasian plate in Iran, eastern Turkey and Armenia , implying that mantle fertilised by pre-collision subduction processes plays a significant role in magma generation. The composition of the Pliocene-Quaternary centres is extremely variable, ranging from OIB-like alkali basalts, to intermediate types resembling mature continental arc lavas, to potassic and even ultrapotassic lavas. These centres are erupted across a mosaic of pre-Cenozoic suture zones and heterogeneous lithospheric blocks. The chemical diversity implies a range of partial melting conditions operating on lithospheric and perhaps sub-lithospheric sources. Published data show a thick (>200 km) lithospheric keel beneath the Arabia-Eurasia suture, thinning to near normal thicknesses (~120 km) across much of central and northern Iran. Thin mantle lithosphere under eastern Turkey (max. ~30 km) may relate to the region's juvenile, accretionary lithosphere. These variable thicknesses are constraints on the cause of the melting in each area, and the degree of variation suggests that no one mechanism applies across the plateau. Various melting models have been suggested. Break-off of the subducted Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab is supported by tomographic data, which may have permitted melting related to adiabatic ascent of hot asthenosphere under areas where the lithosphere is thin. This seems a less plausible mechanism where the lithosphere is at normal or greater than normal thickness. The same problem applies to postulated lower lithosphere delamination. Isolated pull-aparts may account for the location of some centres, but are not

  9. Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation and the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng; Savage, Paul S.; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Helz, Rosalind T.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    The zinc stable isotope system has been successfully applied to many and varied fields in geochemistry, but to date it is still not completely clear how this isotope system is affected by igneous processes. In order to evaluate the potential application of Zn isotopes as a proxy for planetary differentiation and volatile history, it is important to constrain the magnitude of Zn isotopic fractionation induced by magmatic differentiation. In this study we present high-precision Zn isotope analyses of two sets of chemically diverse, cogenetic samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, and Hekla volcano, Iceland, which both show clear evidence of having undergone variable and significant degrees of magmatic differentiation. The Kilauea Iki samples display small but resolvable variations in Zn isotope composition (0.26‰<δ66Zn<0.36‰; δ66Zn defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 66Zn/64Zn compositional ratio from the JMC-Lyon standard), with the most differentiated lithologies exhibiting more positive δ66Zn values. This fractionation is likely a result of the crystallization of olivine and/or Fe-Ti oxides, which can both host Zn in their crystal structures. Samples from Hekla have a similar range of isotopic variation (0.22‰<δ66Zn<0.33‰), however, the degree of fractionation caused by magmatic differentiation is less significant (only 0.07‰) and no correlation between isotope composition and degree of differentiation is seen. We conclude that high temperature magmatic differentiation can cause Zn isotope fractionation that is resolvable at current levels of precision, but only in compositionally-evolved lithologies. With regards to primitive (ultramafic and basaltic) material, this signifies that the terrestrial mantle is essentially homogeneous with respect to Zn isotopes. Utilizing basaltic and ultramafic sample analyses, from different geologic settings, we estimate that the average Zn isotopic composition of Bulk Silicate Earth is δ66Zn=0.28

  10. The alkali basaltic and picritic Magmatism in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin, geochemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Andrei; Ashchepkov, Igor; Rikhvanov, Leonid; Wald, Alexandr

    2015-04-01

    The alkali basalts and picrites are widely distributed within the Minusa depressions. They manifest quite different episodes of the magmatic activity and plumes. Some of them relate to late Devonian which are parallel to magmatism in Vilyui rift and Tungus basin as well as to Agul basaltic plateau in Sayan Foothills and in Kuznetsk Alatau (385 -360 Ma) and are mainly represented by the alkali basalts (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The others are close in time to the Late Devonian kimberlitic basaltic magmatism and camptonite dykes in West Sayan. The Early stage of the Permian -Triassic super plume in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin 250 -254 Ma (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The major pulse of magmatic activity at 248 -245 MA was not appeared in southern margin. But the latest which is represented in Meimecha province Northern Siberia But the late or new Early Triassic stage at 230 -240 Ma was again manifested by the appearance of the alkali picrite ankaratrite dykes. The later alkaline magmatism in Late Jurassic - Cretaceaus stages which was appeared in the Northern Siberian provinces appeared in Southern Siberia were much less pronounced. The Latest episode of the Mezo- Cenozoic activity (Kutolin, Frolova, 1970; Ashchepkov et al., 1995) in the Kopiev uplift with the abundant mantle xenoliths in magma manifest another stages which possibly is related to the hydrous plumes. The trace elements of the magmas in the Minusa depression show rather high concentration if the incompatible elements in all stages which suggest primary enrichment in the metasomatic components probably due to the ancient subducted related magmatism starting from the Devonian stage (Vorontsov et al., 2013) which had the model ages of about 0.9 Ga (Vrublevskii et al., 2014 ). The high melting stages which should be followed by the depletion and homogenization of the source mantle at the Superplume stage and the erupted volcanic still demonstrated rather high La/Yb rations. An thus the alkali picrite volcanic of

  11. Tomographic Imaging of the Magmatic System at Mount St. Helens with the iMUSH Broadband Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Schmandt, B.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.; Denlinger, R. P.; Williams, M. C. B.

    2015-12-01

    We deployed 70 broadband seismometers in the summer of 2014 to image the velocity structure beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington, USA as part of a collaborative project called imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH). Our goal is to illuminate the MSH magmatic system, using active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics and petrology. Details of the velocity structure, coupled with other geophysical and geologic data, can help constrain the geometry and physical state of any bodies of melt beneath the volcano. The broadband array has a diameter of ~100 km centered on MSH with an average station spacing of 10 km, and will remain deployed through summer 2016. It is augmented by dozens of permanent stations in the area. We determine P-wave arrival times using Antelope software and incorporate permanent network picks for the region. We use the program struct3DP to invert travel times to obtain a 3-D seismic velocity model and relocate hypocenters, computing travel times using a 3-D eikonal-equation solver. There were more than 500 useable local events during the first year of iMUSH broadband recording, which to date have provided 5000 arrival times, with the number growing rapidly. The local events include 23 active shots that were set off in the summer of 2014 as part of the iMUSH experiment, which recorded with good signal-to-noise ratios across the entire array. The absolute P times will be augmented by differential times calculated by cross-correlation between observations at the same station for nearby event pairs. These will be incorporated into our model using double-difference tomography. We anticipate that our 3D velocity model will provide the highest resolution image of volcanic plumbing at MSH thus far. Our model interpretation will incorporate results from active-source and ambient noise tomography, receiver functions, magnetotellurics, and petrology.

  12. The age and petrogenesis of alkaline magmatism in the Ampasindava Peninsula and Nosy Be archipelago, northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, C.; Tucker, R. D.; Jourdan, F.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.

    2016-04-01

    The Ampasindava alkaline province consists of a series of circular and elliptical intrusions, lava flows, dyke swarms and plugs of Cenozoic age emplaced into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Antsiranana basin (NW Madagascar) and above the crystalline basement. The magmatism in the Ampasindava region is linked to a NW-SE trending extensional tectonic setting. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on feldspar separate of alkali granites and basaltic dykes yielded ages of 18.01 ± 0.36 Ma and 26 ± 7 Ma, respectively. Alkali basalts and basanites, nepheline syenites and phonolites, and silica saturated-to-oversaturated syenites, trachytes, granites and rhyolites are the main outcropping lithologies. These rocks have sodic affinity. The felsic rocks are dominant, and range from peraluminous to peralkaline. The mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns of the mafic lavas match those of Na-alkaline lavas in within-plate rift settings. The patterns are identical in shape and absolute concentrations to those of the Bobaomby (Cap d'Ambre) and Massif d'Ambre primitive volcanic rocks. These geochemical features are broadly compatible with variable degrees of partial melting of incompatible element-enriched mantle sources. The mineralogical and geochemical variations are consistent with fractional crystallization processes involving removal of olivine, feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, Fe-Ti oxides and apatite. Removal of small amount of titanite explains the concave upward lanthanide pattern in the evolved nepheline syenites and phonolites, which are additionally rich in exotic silicates typical of agpaitic magmas (eudialyte, F-disilicates).

  13. Constraints on the depth of generation and emplacement of a magmatic epidote-bearing quartz diorite pluton in the Coast Plutonic Complex, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, J.M.; Andronicos, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Petrology and P-T estimates indicate that a magmatic epidote-bearing quartz diorite pluton from Mt. Gamsby, Coast Plutonic Complex, British Columbia, was sourced at pressures below ???1.4 GPa and cooled nearly isobarically at ???0.9 GPa. The P-T path indicates that the magma was within the stability field of magmatic epidote early and remained there upon final crystallization. The pluton formed and crystallized at depths greater than ???30 km. REE data indicate that garnet was absent in the melting region and did not fractionate during crystallization. This suggests that the crust was less than or equal to ???55 km thick at 188 Ma during the early phases of magmatism in the Coast Plutonic Complex. Late Cretaceous contractional deformation and early Tertiary extension exhumed the rocks to upper crustal levels. Textures of magmatic epidote and other magmatic phases, combined with REE data, can be important for constraining the P-T path followed by magmas. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Foreland-forearc collisional granitoid and mafic magmatism caused by lower-plate lithospheric slab breakoff: The Acadian of Maine, and other orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoonmaker, A.; Kidd, W.S.F.; Bradley, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    During collisional convergence, failure in extension of the lithosphere of the lower plate due to slab pull will reduce the thickness or completely remove lower-plate lithosphere and cause decompression melting of the asthenospheric mantle; magmas from this source may subsequently provide enough heat for substantial partial melting of crustal rocks under or beyond the toe of the collisional accretionary system. In central Maine, United States, this type of magmatism is first apparent in the Early Devonian West Branch Volcanics and equivalent mafic volcanics, in the slightly younger voluminous mafic/silicic magmatic event of the Moxie Gabbro-Katahdin batholith and related ignimbrite volcanism, and in other Early Devonian granitic plutons. Similar lower-plate collisional sequences with mafic and related silicic magmatism probably caused by slab breakoff are seen in the Miocene-Holocene Papuan orogen, and the Hercynian-Alleghenian belt. Magmatism of this type is significant because it gives evidence in those examples of whole-lithosphere extension. We infer that normal fault systems in outer trench slopes of collisional orogens in general, and possibly those of oceanic subduction zones, may not be primarily due to flexural bending, but are also driven by whole-lithosphere extension due to slab pull. The Maine Acadian example suggests that slab failure and this type of magmatism may be promoted by pre-existing large margin-parallel faults in the lower plate. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  15. Mantle refertilization and magmatism in old orogenic regions: The role of late-orogenic pyroxenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Chazot, Gilles; Kornprobst, Jacques; Dallai, Luigi; Vannucci, Riccardo; Grégoire, Michel; Bertrand, Hervé; Boivin, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pyroxenites and garnet pyroxenites are mantle heterogeneities characterized by a lower solidus temperature than the enclosing peridotites; it follows that they are preferentially involved during magma genesis. Constraining their origin, composition, and the interactions they underwent during their subsequent evolution is therefore essential to discuss the sources of magmatism in a given area. Pyroxenites could represent either recycling of crustal rocks in mantle domains or mantle originated rocks (formed either by olivine consuming melt-rock reactions or by crystal fractionation). Petrological and geochemical (major and trace elements, Sr-Nd and O isotopes) features of xenoliths from various occurrences (French Massif-Central, Jordan, Morocco and Cameroon) show that these samples represent cumulates crystallized during melt percolation at mantle conditions. They formed in mantle domains at pressures of 1-2 GPa during post-collisional magmatism (possibly Hercynian for the French Massif-Central, and Panafrican for Morocco, Jordan and Cameroon). The thermal re-equilibration of lithospheric domains, typical of the late orogenic exhumation stages, is also recorded by the samples. Most of the samples display a metasomatic overprint that may be either inherited or likely linked to the recent volcanic activity that occurred in the investigated regions. The crystallization of pyroxenites during late orogenic events has implications for the subsequent evolution of the mantle domains. The presence of large amounts of mantle pyroxenites in old orogenic regions indeed imparts peculiar physical and chemical characteristics to these domains. Among others, the global solidus temperature of the whole lithospheric domain will be lowered; in turn, this implies that old orogenic regions are refertilized zones where magmatic activity would be enhanced.

  16. Magmatic-hydrothermal molybdenum isotope fractionation and its relevance to the igneous crustal signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greber, Nicolas D.; Pettke, Thomas; Nägler, Thomas F.

    2014-03-01

    We analysed the Mo isotope composition of a comprehensive series of molybdenite samples from the porphyry-type Questa deposit (NM, USA), as well as one rhyolite and one granite sample, directly associated with the Mo mineralization. The δ98Mo of the molybdenites ranges between - 0.48‰ and + 0.40‰, with a median at - 0.05‰. The median Mo isotope composition increases from early magmatic (- 0.29‰) to hydrothermal (- 0.05‰) breccia mineralization (median bulk breccia = - 0.17‰) to late stockwork veining (+ 0.22‰). Moreover, variations of up to 0.34‰ are found between different molybdenite crystals within an individual hand specimen. The rhyolite sample with 0.12 μg g- 1 Mo has δ98Mo = - 0.57‰ and is lighter than all molybdenites from the Questa deposit, interpreted to represent the igneous leftover after aqueous ore fluid exsolution. We recognize three Mo isotope fractionation processes that occur between about 700 and 350 °C, affecting the Mo isotope composition of magmatic-hydrothermal molybdenites. ∆1Mo: Minerals preferentially incorporate light Mo isotopes during progressive fractional crystallization in subvolcanic magma reservoirs, leaving behind a melt enriched in heavy Mo isotopes. ∆2Mo: Magmatic-hydrothermal fluids preferentially incorporate heavy Mo isotopes upon fluid exsolution. ∆3Mo: Light Mo isotopes get preferentially incorporated in molybdenite during crystallization from an aqueous fluid, leaving behind a hydrothermal fluid that gets heavier with progressive molybdenite crystallization. The sum of all three fractionation processes produces molybdenites that record heavier δ98Mo compositions than their source magmas. This implies that the mean δ98Mo of molybdenites published so far (~ 0.4‰) likely represents a maximum value for the Mo isotope composition of Phanerozoic igneous upper crust.

  17. Mafic magmatism and associated tectonism of the central high Cascade Range, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.S. )

    1990-11-10

    Volcanism in the central High Cascade Range has been dominated since late Miocene time by the construction of a malif platform of coalescent shield volcanoes within an intra-arc graben that developed in response to extensional plate tectonics. Lithospheric extension along the central Cascade arc is attributed to a decrease in the convergence rate of the Farallon-North American plate system since early Tertiary time. Geochemical variations, compiled from new and existing and basaltic andesites (SiO{sub 2} = 53-60 wt %): (1) early High Cascade high-alumina olivine tholeiitic (HAOT) basalts, (2) normal High Cascade HAOT basalts, (3) Mount Washington (MW) type basaltic andesites, and (4) North Sister (NS) type basaltic andesites. The implication of oceanic mantle beneath the central Cascades is consistent with the existence of the Columbia embayment into which a segment of oceanic lithosphere was compressed and thickened. Relatively high mobile large ion lithophile element and somewhat depleted high field strength elements in the basaltic andesites, considered to be secondary effects to OIB/MORB mantle evolution, are believed to believed to result from interaction of aqueous subduction-derived fluids with evolving magmas or their sources in lower crustal or upper mantle regions. The preponderance of HAOT basalts that exhibit within-plate chemical signatures argues for less input, relative to typical calc-alkaline magmatic arcs, of aqueous fluids due to subduction processes. The petrologic significance of a subduction zone beneath the Cascade arc may be restricted to the tectonic overprinting of an extensional system, caused by a reduction in convergence rate, on a waning of calc-alkaline magmatism. Physical models of the High Cascade subduction system are presented to explain the apparent chemical decoupling between calc-alkaline and tholeiitic magmatism.

  18. The thermal regime of the Campi Flegrei magmatic system reconstructed through 3D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Renzo, Valeria; Wohletz, Kenneth; Civetta, Lucia; Moretti, Roberto; Orsi, Giovanni; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We illustrate a quantitative conductive/convective thermal model incorporating a wide range of geophysical, petrological, geological, geochemical and isotopical observations that constrain the thermal evolution and present state of the Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc) magmatic system. The proposed model has been computed on the basis of the current knowledge of: (1) the volcanic and magmatic history of the volcano over the last 44 ka, (2) its underlying crustal structure, and (3) the physical properties of the erupted magmas. 3D numerical simulations of heat conduction and convection within heterogeneous rock/magma materials with evolving heat sources and boundary conditions that simulate magma rise from a deep (≥ 8 km depth) to shallow (2-6 km) reservoirs, magma chamber formation, magma extrusion, caldera collapse, and intra-caldera hydrothermal convection, have been carried out. The evolution of the CFc magmatic system through time has been simulated through different steps related to its changes in terms of depth, location and size of magma reservoirs and their replenishment. The thermal modeling results show that both heat conduction and convection have played an important role in the CFc thermal evolution, although with different timing. The simulated present heat distribution is in agreement with the measured geothermal profiles (Agip, 1987), reproduces the thermal gradient peaks at the CFc margins in correspondence to the anomalies in surface gradients (Corrado et al., 1998), and suggests temperatures of 700 °C at depth of 4 km in the central portion of the caldera, in agreement with the estimated temperature for the brittle-ductile transition (Hill, 1992).

  19. Absence of molybdenum isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Siebert, Christopher; Barling, Jane; Savage, Paul; Liang, Yu-Hsuan; Halliday, Alex N.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the behaviour of molybdenum (Mo) isotopes during magmatic differentiation. Molybdenum isotope compositions, as well as concentrations of rare earth elements and a selection of trace elements, have been determined for a well characterised sequence of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, covering a compositional range from basalt to rhyolite (46-72 wt.% SiO2), and thought to have developed by differentiation and mixing of melts derived from a cogenetic source. All samples have identical Mo isotopic compositions with an average δ98Mo of -0.15 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.d.; n = 23). There is therefore no resolvable Mo isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation at Hekla. This finding is supported by the fact that Mo remains highly incompatible in Hekla lavas, increasing from 1.3 to 4.6 μg/g from basalt to rhyolite, indicating that the crystallising phases are extracting only limited amounts of Mo from the magma and therefore that significant fractionation of Mo isotopes is unlikely. It has previously been proposed that cerium (Ce) and Mo have similar bulk distribution coefficients and are equally incompatible during mantle melting. While both Ce and Mo remain incompatible in Hekla lavas, the Ce/Mo ratio decreases from 50 to 36 during magmatic differentiation indicating that Mo is more incompatible than Ce. Comparison of Mo with other incompatible trace elements indicates that Mo is as incompatible as La and slightly less incompatible than K. Sulphur (S) decreases strongly from ∼200 to as low as ∼2 μg/g from basalt to andesite and more evolved compositions, yet this has no effect on the Mo isotopes. Therefore, Mo does not exhibit significant chalcophile behaviour in Hekla magmas. The Mo isotopic signature therefore may be used as an indicator of parent magma composition and a potential discriminant of assimilation processes.

  20. The felsic magmatic province in East Gondwana: implications for Pan-African tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, H. M.; Santosh, M.; Yoshida, M.

    The East Gondwana crustal fragments, namely southern India, Sri Lanka, Madagascar, East Antarctica and Western Australia, preserve evidence for a prominent Pan-African felsic magmatic event represented by feldspathoidal syenites, alkali granites and syenites emplaced proximal to fault lineaments. In Peninsular India, late or post-kinematic alkaline plutons ranging in age from 864 to 600 Ma characterize the Eastern Ghats belt, whereas a strong Pan-African imprint is provided by 550-750 Ma alkali granites and syenites in the southern granulite segment. In Sri Lanka, alkali granites occur in all major geologic units, with radiometric ages in the range of 550-760 Ma. In Madagascar, alkali granites and syenites with late Proterozoic to Palaeozoic ages are reported. Felsic magmatic activity in East Antarctica is characterized by post-tectonic granitic and syenitic plutons in Enderby Land and Queen Maud Land, showing an age range of 550-770 Ma. Pan-African felsic plutons in Western Australia define ages of 550-570 Ma. This paper summarizes the petrologic, geochemical and geochronologic characteristics of felsic plutons in the various East Gondwana fragments. Many of the intrusives represent anorogenic A-type magmas generated in rift-related environments of high heat flow and abundant volatile activity, correlative with an extensional tectonic regime and probably including melts generated from both upper mantle and lower crustal sources. This paper identifies a major Pan-African felsic magmatic province in East Gondwana, which, in association with their petrogenetic significance, is considered to be suggestive of a geodynamic signature of East Gondwana during the Pan-African period.

  1. Subduction Initiation and Forearc Magmatism as Recorded in Suprasubduction Zone Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilek, Yildirim

    2013-04-01

    The internal structure-stratigraphy and geochemical signatures of most suprasubduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites indicate a seafloor spreading origin in forearc-incipient arc settings during the early stages of subduction. In general, there is a well developed magmatic stratigraphy in the extrusive sequences of these ophiolites from older MORB-like lavas at the bottom towards younger island arc tholeiite (IAT) and boninitic lavas in the upper parts. A similar progression of the lava chemistry also occurs in crosscutting dike swarms and sheeted dikes, indicating increased subduction influence in the evolution of ophiolitic magmas through time. Lherzolitic peridotites in structurally lower parts of the upper mantle sequences of these ophiolites represent the residue after MORB melt extraction. Harzburgite and harzburgite-dunite associations higher up in the mantle sequences and below the mafic-ultramafic cumulates (transitional Moho) are crosscut by networks of orthopyroxenite (opxt) veins, which include hydrous minerals (amphibole). These orthopyroxenite veins represent a reaction product between the host harzburgite (depleted, residual peridotite) and the migrating Si-rich (boninitic) melt. The harzburgite-dunite-opxt suites characterize melt-residue relationships and melt migration patterns in the mantle wedge during the initial stages of subduction and incipient arc construction. Thus, the SSZ ophiolites that we have examined display a lateral and vertical progression of melt evolution in their crustal and upper mantle components that traces different stages of subduction initiation-related magmatism, reminiscent of the forearc magmatism in some of the modern arc-trench rollback systems as in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec subduction factories. The along-strike continuity for more than 1500 km of this well-documented chemostratigraphy and geochemical progression in different ophiolite belts is strong evidence for contemporaneous subduction initiation

  2. Os and U-Th isotope signatures of arc magmatism near Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankney, Meagan E.; Shirey, Steven B.; Hart, Garret L.; Bacon, Charles R.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of mantle melts with the continental crust can have significant effects on the composition of the resulting melts as well as on the crust itself, and tracing this interaction is key to our understanding of arc magmatism. Lava flows and pyroclastic deposits erupted from ∼50 to 7.7 ka at Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake, Oregon) were analyzed for their Re/Os and U-Th isotopic compositions. Mafic lavas from monogenetic vents around Mt. Mazama that erupted during the buildup to its climactic eruption have lower 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1394 to 0.1956) and high 230Th excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 1.180 to 1.302), whereas dacites and rhyodacites tend to have higher 187Os/188Os ratios (0.2292 to 0.2788) and significant 238U excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 0.975 to 0.989). The less radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the mafic lavas can be modeled by assimilation of young (∼2.5 to 7 Ma), mafic lower crust that was modified during regional extension, whereas the more radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the dacites and rhyodacites can be attributed to assimilation of older (∼10 to 16 Ma), mid to upper crust that acquired its composition during an earlier period of Cascade magmatism. Production of Th excesses in the lower crust requires very young garnet formation accompanying dehydration melting in the lower crust at less than a few 100 ka by heat from recent basaltic magma injection. The results from this study suggest that the combination of Os and Th isotopes may be used to provide insights into the timescales of evolution of the continental crust in arc settings, as well as the influence of the crust on erupted magmas, and suggest a link between the age and composition of the lower and upper crust to regional tectonic extension and/or earlier Cascade magmatism.

  3. Apatite as a Tool for Tracking Magmatic CO2 Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, J.; Humphreys, M.; Brooker, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 plays a fundamental role in the evolution of magmatic and volcanic systems, but its low solubility in silicate melts means that direct records of magmatic CO2 concentrations remain elusive. The phosphate mineral apatite is unique among igneous minerals in its capacity to accommodate all major magmatic volatiles (H2O, F, Cl, CO2 and S). Although interest in apatite as a tool for tracking magmatic volatile contents (namely H2O, F, and Cl) has increased in recent years, its potential as a record of magmatic CO2contents remains untapped. We present the results of high-temperature, high-pressure experiments investigating the partitioning behaviour of CO2 between apatite and basaltic melt. Experiments were run in piston cylinder apparatus at 1 GPa and 1250 °C, with a slow initial cooling ramp employed to facilitate crystal growth. Each charge contained the starting basaltic powder doped with Ca-phosphate and variable proportions of H2O, CO2, and F. Run products are glass-rich charges containing 15-25 vol% large, euhedral apatite crystals (± cpx and minor biotite). Experimental apatites and glasses have been characterised by BSE imaging, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe. Apatites range in composition from near-endmember fluorapatite (3.0 wt% F), to near-endmember hydroxyapatite (1.7 wt% H2O), to carbon-rich apatite containing up to 1.6 wt% CO2. Apatite compositions are stoichiometric if all anions (F-, OH-, and CO32—) lie in the channel site, suggesting an "A-type" substitution under these conditions (i.e. CO32— + [] = 2X—, where X is another channel anion and [] is a vacancy; e.g. Fleet et al. 2004). Importantly, CO2 partitions readily into apatite at all fluid compositions considered here. CO2 is also more compatible in apatite than water at our run conditions, with calculated H2O-CO2 exchange coefficients close to or greater than 1. Our results indicate that when channel ions are primarily occupied by H2O and CO2 (i.e. F- and Cl-poor magmatic systems

  4. The Role of Karoo-Maud and Kerguelen Mantle Plumes in the Geochemical Evolution of Indian Ocean Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, N. M.; Belyatsky, B. V.; Leitchenkov, G. L.

    2008-12-01

    The study of plume-related magmatism within Antarctica proves the spreading of the Karoo-Maud plume, which determined the split of the Gondwana continent and formation of the Indian Ocean, to the east - from Queen Maud Land towards Schirmacher Oasis during a period of ~10 Myr. Isotopic compositions of Schirmacher Oasis dolerites demonstrate clearly radiogenic signatures - 87Sr/86Sr: 0.7045 - 0.7047, 208Pb/204Pb: 37.98 - 38.2; 207Pb/204Pb: 15.45 - 15.52; and reflect crustal contamination processes, which took place during plume upwelling and emplacement into the continental crust. The process of Indian Ocean opening started ~160 Myr ago and took place in a very specific manner - in the presence of non-spreading lithospheric blocks of different thickness and with the formation of intraplate volcanic rises fixed in the sea bottom relief around Antarctica [Leitchenkov et al., 2007]. The similarity of geochemical characteristics of Schirmacher Oasis magmas with the lavas from the Indian Ocean rises (Afanasy Nikitin and the central part of Kerguelen plateau (Ocean Drilling Program Site 749)) points out that in both cases the source of their enrichment is the ancient material of the Gondwana continent. Magmatism, developed 40 Myr after the main phase of Karoo-Maud volcanism at the margins of the neighboring continents of Australia (Bunberry basalts) and India (Rajmakhal traps), could be initiated by the Karoo-Maud plume which was moving along the nascent spreading zone, later it was replaced and located in the Kerguelen plateau region, where it remains as an active hot spot. On the other hand, the role of a mantle plume in the break-up of Gondwana (as well as other supercontinents) is still not definite. Thus, emplacement of the Karoo-Maud plume under the South Africa and East Antarctica lithosphere about 180 Myr ago was at least 20 Myr earlier than the beginning of plate separation, while the Kerguelen plume, manifested as a LIP at Kerguelen Plateau ~115 Myr ago

  5. Jurassic silicic volcanism in the Transantarctic Mountains: Was it related to plate margin processes or to Ferrar magmatism?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliot, D.H.; Fleming, T.H.; Foland, K.A.; Fanning, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Silicic volcanism in the Transantarctic Mountains, represented by rhyolitic tuff that mainly precedes emplacement of the Ferrar Large Igneous Province, is important in interpretation of the tectonic evolution of the Antarctic sector of Gondwana. Sr and Nd isotope data indicate that the tuffs are not directly related to Ferrar magmatism nor to melting of the underlying Ross orogen crust yet zircon gives a U-Pb age of 182.7±1.8 Ma, similar to the U/Pb age for the Ferrar. Distribution of the silicic tuffs along 1400 km of the Transantarctic Mountains suggests, alternatively, a relationship to the Gondwana plate margin. Although West Antarctica comprises Mesoproterozoic crustal terrains, few analyzed rocks are compatible isotopically with the Lower Jurassic tuffs. The source of the tuffs must lie in unexposed Early Jurassic magmatic centers in West Antarctica or an unexposed crustal terrain beneath the Transantarctic Mountains.

  6. Accelerated uplift and magmatic intrusion of the Yellowstone caldera, 2004 to 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, W.-L.; Smith, R.B.; Wicks, C.; Farrell, J.M.; Puskas, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Yellowstone caldera began a rapid episode of ground uplift in mid-2004, revealed by Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements, at rates up to 7 centimeters per year, which is over three times faster than previously observed inflation rates. Source modeling of the deformation data suggests an expanding volcanic sill of ???1200 square kilometers at a 10-kilometer depth beneath the caldera, coincident with the top of a seismically imaged crustal magma chamber. The modeled rate of source volume increase is 0.1 cubic kilometer per year, similar to the amount of magma intrusion required to supply the observed high heat flow of the caldera. This evidence suggests magma recharge as the main mechanism for the accelerated uplift, although pressurization of magmatic fluids cannot be ruled out.

  7. Accelerated uplift and magmatic intrusion of the Yellowstone caldera, 2004 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wu-Lung; Smith, Robert B; Wicks, Charles; Farrell, Jamie M; Puskas, Christine M

    2007-11-09

    The Yellowstone caldera began a rapid episode of ground uplift in mid-2004, revealed by Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements, at rates up to 7 centimeters per year, which is over three times faster than previously observed inflation rates. Source modeling of the deformation data suggests an expanding volcanic sill of approximately 1200 square kilometers at a 10-kilometer depth beneath the caldera, coincident with the top of a seismically imaged crustal magma chamber. The modeled rate of source volume increase is 0.1 cubic kilometer per year, similar to the amount of magma intrusion required to supply the observed high heat flow of the caldera. This evidence suggests magma recharge as the main mechanism for the accelerated uplift, although pressurization of magmatic fluids cannot be ruled out.

  8. Evolution of the Cretaceous magmatism in the Apuseni-Timok-Srednogorie metallogenic belt and implications for the geodynamic reconstructions: new insight from geochronology, geochemistry and isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Quadt, A.; Peytcheva, I.; Heinrich, C. A.; Frank, M.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2003-04-01

    Most major Cu-Au (-PGE) deposits in the Carpathian Balkan orogen are related to a 1500 km long belt of Upper Cretaceous magmatism extending from southern Romania through Yugoslavia to Bulgaria, with a likely continuation southeast of the Black Sea into Turkey, known as the Apuseni Banat Timok Srednogorie (ABTS) belt (Popov et al., 2000). In the frame of ABTS belt a new investigation was started to reveal the relation between Cretaceous magmatism and the Cu-Au-PGE deposits across the belt in East Serbia (Yugoslavia) and the Panagyurishte district (Bulgaria). The Late Cretaceous (Palaeogene?) magmatism of East Serbia developed along the Timok Magmatic Complex (TMC) in the east and the Ridanj Krepoljin Zone (RKZ) in the west. High precision U-Pb single zircon dating and a combination of isotope tracing, geochronological data as well as petrological data were used to provide additional data for the geodynamic evolution. A maximum life span of 2.5 Ma could be calculated for the first phase of volcanic activity in TMC, starting with the Amf-andesites of Veliki Kravelj (86.29 ± 0.32 Ma) and finishing with the Timozites (84.66 ± 0.5 Ma). Ore bearing magmatism in a single deposit (Veliki Kravelj) extended a maximum of 0.6 Ma ("pre-ore": 86.29 ± 0.32 Ma, "post-ore": 86.17 ± 0.15 Ma). Preliminary data for the dacites (70.3 ± 3.5 Ma) outcropping near Krepoljin give evidence for a shifting of the volcanic activity from TMC to RKZ together with changing the ore-deposit type from Cu-Au-PGE (TMC) to Pb-Zn-Cu (RKZ). Isotope tracing give evidence for mantle dominated source with increasing of crustal contamination in the same direction: (87Sr/86Sr ratios: 0.70388 to 0.706050, e-Hf-zircon data: +12 in TMC to +4.5 in RKZ). The Panagyurishte district (Bulgaria) show a duration time of the magmatic activity of 14 Ma, starting in the north at 92 Ma and finishing in the south at 78 Ma. Ore-related magmatism becomes younger in the same direction but finishes with 86 Ma. Multiple short

  9. Major and Trace Element Geochemistry of the Mafic Magmatic Rocks from the Betul Mobile Belt, Central Indian Tectonic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A.; Ghatak, A.

    2015-12-01

    Peninsular shield of India is composed of several Archaean cratons bordered by Proterozoic mobile belts which amalgamated the Archaean cratons and helped in the growth of the Indian subcontinent. The ENE-WSW trending Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) is one such important mobile belt which sutures the Bundelkhand and the Aravalli craton in the north and Bastar, Singhbhum and Dharwar cratons in the south. The CITZ is a collection of lithotectonic terranes ranging in age from Archaean to recent and comprises supracrustal belts, granulite belts, shear zones and felsic-mafic magmatic rocks. The Betul belt is characterized by a litho-package of plutonic magmatic rocks, volcano-sedimentary rocks, bimodal volcanics and associated base metal sulphide mineralization. The petrological, geochemical and geochronological evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks has significance in our understanding of Proterozoic crustal evolution in central India. Here we report major and trace element concentrations of 14 mafic samples (basaslts, gabbors, pyroxenites and dolerites) in an attempt to classify, characterise and suggest a spatial and temporal evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks of the Betul mobile belt vis-à-vis CITZ. Traditionally these rocks have been classified as being calc-alkaline rocks, related to arc volcanism and rift tectonics. We have divided these rocks into those have a positive Europium anomaly and those having a negative Europium anomaly to better understand the source and the contaminant for these rocks. We find characterisitic difference specifically in the trace element ratios and concentrations of the rocks with +Eu anomaly [La=10.69ppm; LaN/YbN=3.65] and those with -Eu anomaly [La=27.59; LaN/YbN=8.86]. Based on these data we propose that the Betul mafic rocks may have been derived from an enriched mantle source that experienced contamination from the lower continental crust or sub-continental lithosphere prior to eruption.

  10. The influence of magmatic differentiation on the oxidation state of Fe in a basaltic arc magma

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2012-05-09

    Subduction zone basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings (e.g., higher Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe), and this contrast may play a central role in the unique geochemical processes that generate arc and continental crust. The processes generating oxidized arc magmas, however, are poorly constrained, although they appear inherently linked to subduction. Near-surface differentiation processes unique to arc settings might drive oxidation of magmas that originate in equilibrium with a relatively reduced mantle source. Alternatively, arc magmas could record the oxidation conditions of a relatively oxidized mantle source. Here, we present new measurements of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a single eruption of Agrigan volcano, Marianas, in order to test the influence of differentiation processes vs. source conditions on the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio, a proxy for system oxygen fugacity (fO{sub 2}). We determined Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in glass inclusions using {mu}-XANES and couple these data with major elements, dissolved volatiles, and trace elements. After correcting for post-entrapment crystallization, Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in the Agrigan melt inclusions (0.219 to 0.282), and their modeled fO{sub 2}s ({Delta}QFM + 1.0 to + 1.8), are uniformly more oxidized than MORB, and preserve a portion of the evolution of this magma from 5.7 to 3.2 wt.% MgO. Fractionation of olivine {+-} clinopyroxene {+-} plagioclase should increase Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe as MgO decreases in the melt, but the data show Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios decreasing as MgO decreases below 5 wt.% MgO. The major element trajectories, taken in combination with this strong reduction trend, are inconsistent with crystallization of common ferromagnesian phases found in the bulk Agrigan sample, including magnetite. Rather, decreasing Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios correlate with decreasing S concentrations, suggesting that electronic exchanges associated with SO{sub 2} degassing may

  11. Fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant finite control set-model predictive control of a multiphase voltage-source inverter supplying BLDC motor.

    PubMed

    Salehifar, Mehdi; Moreno-Equilaz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Due to its fault tolerance, a multiphase brushless direct current (BLDC) motor can meet high reliability demand for application in electric vehicles. The voltage-source inverter (VSI) supplying the motor is subjected to open circuit faults. Therefore, it is necessary to design a fault-tolerant (FT) control algorithm with an embedded fault diagnosis (FD) block. In this paper, finite control set-model predictive control (FCS-MPC) is developed to implement the fault-tolerant control algorithm of a five-phase BLDC motor. The developed control method is fast, simple, and flexible. A FD method based on available information from the control block is proposed; this method is simple, robust to common transients in motor and able to localize multiple open circuit faults. The proposed FD and FT control algorithm are embedded in a five-phase BLDC motor drive. In order to validate the theory presented, simulation and experimental results are conducted on a five-phase two-level VSI supplying a five-phase BLDC motor.

  12. Crustal processes cause adakitic chemical signatures in syn-collision magmatism from SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark; Kheirkhah, Monireh; Neill, Iain

    2015-04-01

    Dehaj magmatism may have developed its geochemical signature during deep fractionation as the ascent of the magmas was impeded by thick orogenic crust. The rocks may be seen as just another part of the widespread syn-collision magmatism that has affected widespread areas of Turkey, Iran, Armenia and neighbouring countries in the last ~10-15 Ma, and need not be used as markers for debateable geodynamic events such as break-off. Adakites are also present in NE Iran without any obvious association with subduction processes. We argue that magmatism across much of the plateau is linked at least in part to mantle upwelling following Miocene slab break-off, but also to small-scale convection beneath the collision zone, as predicted by numerical modelling. Particular compositions such as those at Dehaj are influenced by local sources and differentiation processes, but there is no need for independent triggers for initial melting across disparate locations.

  13. Controls on the Mobilization and Transport of Hfse in Ore-Forming Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Valle, C.; Louvel, M.

    2015-12-01

    The genesis of economical rare metals (Zr, Nb, REE) ore deposits in largegranitic complexes (e.g., Strange Lake and Thor Lake Nechalacho deposit, Canada; Galineiro complex, Spain) is related to the intrusion of alkaline halogen-rich magmatic bodies. Although the role of exolved magmatic fluids in the mobilization and transport of HFSE is widely recognized, the physico-chemical conditions and atomic-scale mechanisms that control the formation of the ore deposits remain poorly understood. We present new experimental constraints on behavior of HFSE during the exsolution of aqueous fluids from peralkaline granitic magmas at crustal conditions. In situ partitioning and speciation studies of Zr in the haplogranite-(F)-H2O systems using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopies provide evidence for large controls of fluid chemistry and temperature on the mobilization and transport of HFSE in crustal settings. At shallow crustal pressure conditions (> 800 °C and 0.3 GPa), Zr preferentially partitions into the exolved aqueous fluid in the presence of fluorine (Df/mZr = 1.40 ± 0.10) as previously reported for Nb in F- (and Cl-) bearing metaluminous granitic systems at similar conditions. The reverse partitioning of HFSE (Zr and Nb) into the aqueous phase at temperature above 800 °C contrast with the behavior observed at lower temperatures, where the Df/mZr remain lower than 1 at all pressures. The enrichment of the aqueous phase in HFSE (Zr, Nb) in the earlier stages of the magmatic evolution is likely related to the enhanced peralkalinity of low pressure (< 0.4 GPa), F-bearing aqueous fluid coexisting with granitic melts as temperature increases. This particular fluid chemistry provides the favorable conditions for the mobilization of HFSE via the formation of HFSE-O-Si/Na clusters in the fluid as shown by the in situ Zr speciation data. Our results show that the exsolution of highly alkaline early magmatic fluid at pressures below 0.4 GPa has the potential to extract HFSE from F

  14. Crustal Strain Patterns in Magmatic and Amagmatic Early Stage Rifts: Border Faults, Magma Intrusion, and Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Roecker, S. W.; Tiberi, C.; Aman, M.; Weinstein, A.; Lambert, C.; Drooff, C.; Oliva, S. J. C.; Peterson, K.; Bourke, J. R.; Rodzianko, A.; Gallacher, R. J.; Lavayssiere, A.; Shillington, D. J.; Khalfan, M.; Mulibo, G. D.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Palardy, A.; Albaric, J.; Gautier, S.; Muirhead, J.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    Rift initiation in thick, strong continental lithosphere challenges current models of continental lithospheric deformation, in part owing to gaps in our knowledge of strain patterns in the lower crust. New geophysical, geochemical, and structural data sets from youthful magmatic (Magadi-Natron, Kivu), weakly magmatic (Malawi, Manyara), and amagmatic (Tanganyika) sectors of the cratonic East African rift system provide new insights into the distribution of brittle strain, magma intrusion and storage, and time-averaged deformation. We compare and contrast time-space relations, seismogenic layer thickness variations, and fault kinematics using earthquakes recorded on local arrays and teleseisms in sectors of the Western and Eastern rifts, including the Natron-Manyara basins that developed in Archaean lithosphere. Lower crustal seismicity occurs in both the Western and Eastern rifts, including sectors on and off craton, and those with and without central rift volcanoes. In amagmatic sectors, lower crustal strain is accommodated by slip along relatively steep border faults, with oblique-slip faults linking opposing border faults that penetrate to different crustal levels. In magmatic sectors, seismicity spans surface to lower crust beneath both border faults and eruptive centers, with earthquake swarms around magma bodies. Our focal mechanisms and Global CMTs from a 2007 fault-dike episode show a local rotation from ~E-W extension to NE-SE extension in this linkage zone, consistent with time-averaged strain recorded in vent and eruptive chain alignments. These patterns suggest that strain localization via widespread magma intrusion can occur during the first 5 My of rifting in originally thick lithosphere. Lower crustal seismicity in magmatic sectors may be caused by high gas pressures and volatile migration from active metasomatism and magma degassing, consistent with high CO2 flux along fault zones, and widespread metasomatism of xenoliths. Volatile release and

  15. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Farrar, C.D.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Hausback, B.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source (??13C = -4.5 to -5???, 3He/4He = 4.5 to 6.7 RA) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO2 discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills are associated with CO2 concentrations of 30-90% in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 g m-2 d-1 at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO2 discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO2 flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30-50 t/d of CO2 are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO2 and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N2/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values

  16. Volatiles and the tempo of flood basalt magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Manga, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Individual flood basalt lavas often exceed 103 km3 in volume, and many such lavas erupt during emplacement of flood basalt provinces. The large volume of individual flood basalt lavas implies correspondingly large magma reservoirs within or at the base of the crust. To erupt, some fraction of this magma must become buoyant and overpressure must be sufficient to encourage failure and dike propagation. The overpressure associated with a new injection of magma is inversely proportional to the total reservoir volume, and as a large magma body heats the surrounding rocks thermally activated creep will relax isotropic overpressure more rapidly. Here, we examine the viability of buoyancy overpressure as a trigger for continental flood basalt eruptions. We employ a new one-dimensional model that combines volatile exsolution, bubble growth and rise, assimilation, and permeable fluid escape from Moho-depth and crustal chambers. We investigate the temporal evolution of degassing and the eruptibility of magmas using the Siberian Traps flood basalts as a test case. We suggest that the volatile inventory set during mantle melting and redistributed via bubble motion controls ascent of magma into and through the crust, thereby regulating the tempo of flood basalt magmatism. Volatile-rich melts from low degrees of partial melting of the mantle are buoyant and erupt to the surface with little staging or crustal interaction. Melts with moderate volatile budgets accumulate in large, mostly molten magma chambers at the Moho or in the lower crust. These large magma bodies may remain buoyant and poised to erupt-triggered by volatile-rich recharge or external stresses-for ∼106 yr. If and when such chambers fail, enormous volumes of magma can ascend into the upper crust, staging at shallow levels and initiating substantial assimilation that contributes to pulses of large-volume flood basalt eruption. Our model further predicts that the Siberian Traps may have released 1019-1020 g of CO2

  17. Magmatism evolution in the Nori'lsk region (Siberian trap province)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutskaya, Nadezhda

    2010-05-01

    /Yb is 2.7-3.2) demonstrates the most dramatic changes in its thickness (from 450 m on the west to 12 m on the east Lake Lama) and compositions (degree of contamination downs in this destination) [3]. The next overlapping Gd basalts, Hakanchansky and Low Nadezhdinsky suits (widespread on the West) consist of very similar tholeiitic basalts. It is important to emphasize that Hk volcanic rocks are analogous to Nd1 tholeiits ones in terms of high HLE and LREE. In contrast them Tk basalts (TiO2=2-4 mas. %; Gd/Yb=1.3) contain normal LREE concentrations. The latter widespread to the west from Khantajsko-Rybninsky swell separated from Hk and Nd1 suits. Perhaps, during this period two types of magma flowed from different sources were separated in space. The first magma type (Nd) is close to average crust composition and differs significantly from other basalts (Tk-Sm). During the late period of magmatism all surface of plateau Putorana was covered by very similar low-Ti lavas and tuffs. Thus, according to the geological setting and geochemical features, 4 cycles of volcanism in the Noril'sk region can be distinguished: 1) Iv-Sv, 2) Gd, 3) Hk-Nd, 4) Tk, 5) Mr-Sm . What is a place of ore-bearing intrusions in this scenario? Due to the elevated weighted mean MgO content (10-12 mas.%) in the ore-bearing intrusions ( it is believed that the massifs with sulfide mineralization are comagmatic with high-Mg effusive rocks Gd, Tk or Nd suits. But their mineralogo-geochemical features are very different. An additional noril'sk type massifs intrude not only rocks of these suits but Nd and Mr too[2]. So they crystallized from an own portion of magma. They might have been formed after the formation of all volcanic sequences. References 1.Lightfoot P.C. et al. // Contrib.Mineral.Petrology. 1993. V.114. P.171-188. 2.Krivolutskaya N.A., Rudakova A.V. // Geochemistry International. 2009. Vol. 47. No. 7. P. 635-656. 3.Sobolev A.V., Krivolutskaya N.A., Kuzmin D.V. // Petrology. 2009. V. 17. No. 3

  18. Characteristic Time Scales of Characteristic Magmatic Processes and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2004-05-01

    Every specific magmatic process, regardless of spatial scale, has an associated characteristic time scale. Time scales associated with crystals alone are rates of growth, dissolution, settling, aggregation, annealing, and nucleation, among others. At the other extreme are the time scales associated with the dynamics of the entire magmatic system. These can be separated into two groups: those associated with system genetics (e.g., the production and transport of magma, establishment of the magmatic system) and those due to physical characteristics of the established system (e.g., wall rock failure, solidification front propagation and instability, porous flow). The detailed geometry of a specific magmatic system is particularly important to appreciate; although generic systems are useful, care must be taken to make model systems as absolutely realistic as possible. Fuzzy models produce fuzzy science. Knowledge of specific time scales is not necessarily useful or meaningful unless the hierarchical context of the time scales for a realistic magmatic system is appreciated. The age of a specific phenocryst or ensemble of phenocrysts, as determined from isotopic or CSD studies, is not meaningful unless something can be ascertained of the provenance of the crystals. For example, crystal size multiplied by growth rate gives a meaningful crystal age only if it is from a part of the system that has experienced semi-monotonic cooling prior to chilling; crystals entrained from a long-standing cumulate bed that were mechanically sorted in ascending magma may not reveal this history. Ragged old crystals rolling about in the system for untold numbers of flushing times record specious process times, telling more about the noise in the system than the life of typical, first generation crystallization processes. The most helpful process-related time scales are those that are known well and that bound or define the temporal style of the system. Perhaps the most valuable of these

  19. Magmatic consequences of the transition from orthogonal to oblique subduction in Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Tyrone O.; Morell, Kristin D.; Hidalgo, Paulo; Fraceschi, Pastora

    2015-12-01

    The closure of the Central American Seaway is linked with tectonic and magmatic processes that have controlled the evolution of the Isthmus of Panama. We focus on the terminal stages of arc activity in the Central Panama region, and present new geochemical data from ˜9 Ma explosive silicic volcanism preserved in three syngenetic tuff beds from the Gatun. The magmatic evolution of the Gatun Formation is controlled by a series of magma mushes where pyroxene is the dominant early forming mafic mineral, with amphibole appearing only relatively late in the fractionation sequence. Our data show Gatun lavas exhibit a strong subduction signature, consistent with plate reconstruction models showing arc-normal subduction from Costa Rica to Panama pre-8.5 Ma. However, large ion lithophile elements are depleted in the Gatun Formation in comparison to other regional suites, indicative of a lower flux of subduction fluid to the Gatun Formation mantle source, which is explained by a shift toward magma generation by decompression following the collision of the arc with South America. Oblique subduction commencing ˜8.5 Ma resulted in the shutdown of normal arc activity throughout Panama. We interpret subsequent regional Quaternary adakitic volcanism as a response to this oblique subduction. The now more refractory mantle wedge required greater fluid flux in order to melt. The resultant volatile-rich melts were more prone to deep fractionation of amphibole and garnet cumulates forming adakites. Deep fractionation was potentially enhanced by changing stress regimes on the upper plate caused by oblique subduction.

  20. Forest-killing diffuse CO2 emission at Mammoth Mountain as a sign of magmatic unrest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.; Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Howle, J.F.; Kerr, B.D.; Kennedy, B.M.; King, C.-Y.; Southon, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    MAMMOTH Mountain, in the western United States, is a large dacitic volcano with a long history of volcamsm that began 200 kyr ago1 and produced phreatic eruptions as recently as 500 ?? 200 yr BP (ref. 2). Seismicity, ground deformation and changes in fumarole gas composition suggested an episode of shallow dyke intrusion in 1989-90 (refs 3, 4). Areas of dying forest and incidents of near asphyxia in confined spaces, first reported in 1990, prompted us to search for diffuse flank emissions of magmatic CO2, as have been described at Mount Etna5 and Vulcano6. Here we report the results of a soil-gas survey, begun in 1994, that revealed CO2 concentrations of 30-96% in a 30-hectare region of killed trees, from which we estimate a total CO2 flux of ???1,200 tonnes per day. The forest die-off is the most conspicuous surface manifestation of magmatic processes at Mammoth Mountam, which hosts only weak fumarolic vents and no summit activity. Although the onset of tree kill coincided with the episode of shallow dyke intrusion, the magnitude and duration of the CO2 flux indicates that a larger, deeper magma source and/or a large reservoir of high-pressure gas is being tapped.

  1. Magmatic history of mt. Vesuvius on the basis of new geochemical and isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienzo, I.; Civetta, L.; D'Antonio, M.; di Renzo, V.; di Vito, M. A.; Giordano, F.; Orsi, G.

    2003-04-01

    Mt. Vesuvius is an active volcano famous for the AD 79 eruption that destroyed Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae. Because of the intense urbanization around and on the volcano itself, volcanic risk is very high. Therefore, the knowledge of the structure and behaviour of the magmatic system is fundamental for both interpretation of any change in the dynamics of the volcano and eruption forecasting. We have produced new geochemical and isotopic data on rocks from a 240-m deep core drilled along the southern slope of the volcano. The investigated portion of the core includes lava flows aged between 39 and 20 ka. The obtained results, together with those already available for the younger than 20 ka activity, have allowed us to reconstruct the complex history of the magmatic system. Mt. Vesuvius magmas, originated in a mantle source variably contaminated by slab derived components, stagnate in a deep complex reservoir, located between 10 and 20 km of depth, where they differentiate and contaminate with continental crust. From the deep reservoir magmas discontinuously rise up to shallow reservoirs, where they differentiate, mingle and mix, feeding the volcanic activity. The shallow reservoirs are located at depth of about 3-5 km before Plinian eruptions, and of less than 1 km before strombolian activity.

  2. Mt. St. Helens: Influence of Magmatic Activity on the Biogeochemistry of Thermal Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montross, S. N.; Skidmore, M.; Abrahamson, I. S.

    2005-12-01

    Mt St. Helens erupted explosively in 1980, and the intense heat of this event effectively sterilized the crater. The crater is filled with significant ash and volcanic debris and the crater environment has limited vegetation despite relatively abundant water, from rainfall and snowmelt. However, microorganisms thrive in the hot springs that have developed in the crater since the 1980 eruption in this otherwise biologically hostile environment. Channelized drainages exiting the crater contain numerous hot spring sources which result from thermal heating of meteoric water and gain solutes from water-rock interactions. These solutes are important inputs for the microbial communities found within the crater thermal systems. Water samples collected in August 2004 and August 2005 from thermal springs in Step Canyon allow the opportunity to assess the effects of recent magmatic activity in the crater since September 2004, on the aqueous chemistry and microbiology of thermal spring water. We have investigated the composition of microbial communities in crater hot spring ecosystems by identifying small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences amplified directly from extracted genomic DNA. Initial screening of cloned DNA (16S rRNA gene sequence) by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing indicates moderate microbial diversity in this environment with representatives from the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The presentation will examine relationships between the aqueous geochemistry and the microbial communities and temporal changes in these related to the recent magmatic activity.

  3. Trace element and isotopic constraints on magmatic evolution at Lassen volcanic center

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, T.D.; Clynne, M.A. )

    1990-11-10

    Magmatic evolution at the Lassen volcanic center (LVC) is characterized by a transition from predominantly andesitic to predominantly silicic volcanism with time. Magmas of the adesitic, or Brokeoff phase of volcanism range in composition from basaltic andesite to dacite, whereas those of silicic, or Lassen phase range in composition from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. The distinctive mixing-dominated arrays for each volcanic phase manifest the generation and evolution of two physically distinct, but genetically related magma systems. The LVC magmas have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics that approximate two-component mixing arrays. One isotopic component is similar in composition to that of NE Pacific Ocean ridge and seamount basalts (MORB component), the other to mafic Mesozoic granitoids sampled from the neighboring Klamath and Sierra Nevada provinces (KSN component). The lack of a correlation between the major element and isotopic compositions of LVC magmas seriously limits any model for magmatic evolution that relies on assimilation of old middle to upper crust by isotopically homogeneous mafic magmas during their ascent through the crust. Alternatively, the isotopic and geochemical uniformity of the most silicic magmas of the Brokeoff and Lassen phases suggests that they are well-homogenized partial melts. The likely source region for these silicic melts is the lower crust, which the authors envision to consist primarily of mafic igneous rocks that are similar in geochemical and isotopic diversity to the regional mafic lavas.

  4. Tectonic transition associated with Kazakhstan Orocline in the Late Paleozoic: magmatic archives of western Chinese Tianshan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Keda

    2016-04-01

    Kazakhstan accretionary system was a principle component of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) that is one of the largest accretionary orogens on earth. The Kazakhstan composite continent could have been established in the Early Paleozoic by the Kazakhstan accretionary system in the form of progressively amalgamations of diverse tectonic units, such as continental ribbon, accretionary prim, oceanic remnant and arc material. Subsequently, the composite continent was bended to form a spectacular U-shaped architecture that probably occurred in the Late Paleozoic. The western Chinese Tianshan is situated on the south wing of the Kazakhstan Orocline, featured by extensive magmatim, intense deformation and voluminous mineralization. Our new geochronological and geochemical data suggest a noticeable magmatic gap between Late Devonian and Early carboniferous and contrasting magma sources of these magmatic rocks. The significant shifts correspond to the tectonic transition from terrane amalgamation to mountain bending in the Early Paleozoic. This study was financially supported by the Major Basic Research Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2014CB448000), Xinjiang outstanding youth scientific grant (2013711003) and the Talent Awards to KDC from the China Government under the 1000 Talent Plan.

  5. Jurassic magmatism in Dronning Maud Land: synthesis of results of the MAMOG project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leat, P.T.; Curtis, M.L.; Riley, T.R.; Ferraccioli, F.

    2007-01-01

    The Jurassic Karoo large igneous province (LIP) of Antarctica, and its conjugate margin in southern Africa, is critical for investigating important questions about the relationship of basaltic LIPs to mantle plumes. Detailed aerogeophysical, structural, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), geochronological and geochemical investigations completed under the British Antarctic Survey’s MAMOG project have provided some of the answers. Across most of the area, magma volumes were small compared to those in southern Africa. Jurassic dikes intruding the Archean craton are sparse and the Jutulstraumen trough, a Jurassic rift, is interpreted, from aerogeophysical data, as largely amagmatic. The largest volumes of magma were emplaced along the margin of the craton and close to the Africa-Antarctica rift. Although dikes were emplaced by both vertical and horizontal flow, overwhelmingly magmas in Dronning Maud Land were locally derived, and not emplaced laterally from distant sources. Basaltic magmatism was protracted in Dronning Maud Land (several dike emplacement episodes between ~206 and 175 Ma), and the small magma volumes resulted in highly diverse magma compositions, including picrites and ferropicrites interpreted to have been derived from hot mantle in a mantle plume. The protracted magmatism before the locally ~177 Ma flood lava eruptions, and evidence for a radiating dike swarm, favor a model of mantle plume incubation for 20-30 million years before flood lava eruption.

  6. Geochemical characteristics of Antarctic magmatism connected with Karoo-Maud and Kerguelen mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, Nadezhda; Krymsky, Robert; Belyatsky, Boris; Antonov, Anton; Migdisova, Natalya

    2013-04-01

    dykes of the Schirmacher Oasis and basalts and dolerites of the Queen Maud Land (180 Ma) are identical in petrology and geochemistry terms and supposedly could be interpreted as the manifestation of the Karoo-Maud plume activity in Antarctica [Sushchevskaya et al., 2012]. The spatial distribution of the dikes indicates the eastward spreading of the plume material from DML to the Schirmacher Oasis within at least 10 Ma (up to ~35 Ma, taking into account the uncertainty of age determination). On the other hand, the considerable duration and multistage character of plume magmatism related to the activity of the Karoo-Maud plume in Antarctica and Africa [Leat et al., 2007; Luttinen et al., 2002] may indicate that the Mesozoic dikes of the oasis correspond to a single stage of plume magmatism. On the basis of obtained isotopic data it has been determined two magmatic melt evolution trends for basalts from: Queen Maud Land - Kerguelen Archipelago - Afanasy Nikitin Rise (Indian Ocean) and Jetty - Schirmacher oasises which mantle sources are quite different. Thus the Jetty - Schirmacher oasises magmatic melt sources are characterized by prevalence of the matter of moderately enriched or primitive chondritic mantle source and lithospheric mantle of Proterozoic ages but the substances of depleted mantle source similar to MORB-type and ancient mantle are absent. New data obtained on Nd, Sr, Pb isotopic and lithophile elements compositions of the alkaline-ultrabasic rocks from the Jetty oasis and Gaussberg volcano completed imagine of the Kerguelen-plume evolution. It has been confirmed unique character of the alkaline lamproiites of the Gaussberg volcano enrichments. Highly radiogenic Sr and Pb isotope ratios of these lamproiites reflect melting of the ancient sublithospheric depleted mantle which was stored from the Archean till nowadays unaffected by metasomatic-enrichment processes. During modern melting of this mantle part there is input of additional substances (crustal fluid

  7. Liquid carbon dioxide of magmatic origin and its role in volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chivas, A.R.; Barnes, I.; Evans, William C.; Lupton, J.E.; Stone, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    Natural liquid carbon dioxide is produced commercially from a 2.5-km-deep well near the 4,500-yr-old maar volcano, Mount Gambier, South Australia. The carbon dioxide has accumulated in a dome that is located on the extension of a linear chain of volcanic activity. A magmatic origin for the fluid is suggested by the geological setting, ??13CPDB of -4.0???, for the CO2 (where PDB represents the carbon-isotope standard), and a relatively high 3He component of the contained helium and high 3He/C ratio (6.4 x 10-10). The 3He/ 4He and He/Ne ratios are 3.0 and > 1,370 times those of air, respectively. The CO2, as collected at the Earth's surface at 29.5 ??C and 75 bar, expands more than 300-fold to form a gas at 1 atm and 22 ??C. We suggest that liquid CO2 or high-density CO2 fluid (the critical point is 31.1 ??C, 73.9 bar) of volcanic origin that expands explosively from shallow levels in the Earth's crust may be a major contributor to 'phreatic' volcanic eruptions and maar formation. Less violent release of magmatic CO2 into crater lakes may cause gas bursts with equally disastrous consequences such as occurred at Lake Nyos, Cameroon, in August 1986. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation and the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Heng; Savage, Paul S.; Teng, Fang-Zehn; Helz, Rosalind T.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    he zinc stable isotope system has been successfully applied to many and varied fields in geochemistry, but to date it is still not completely clear how this isotope system is affected by igneous processes. In order to evaluate the potential application of Zn isotopes as a proxy for planetary differentiation and volatile history, it is important to constrain the magnitude of Zn isotopic fractionation induced by magmatic differentiation. In this study we present high-precision Zn isotope analyses of two sets of chemically diverse, cogenetic samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, and Hekla volcano, Iceland, which both show clear evidence of having undergone variable and significant degrees of magmatic differentiation. The Kilauea Iki samples display small but resolvable variations in Zn isotope composition (0.26‰66Zn66Zn defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 66Zn/64Zn compositional ratio from the JMC-Lyon standard), with the most differentiated lithologies exhibiting more positive δ66Zn values. This fractionation is likely a result of the crystallization of olivine and/or Fe–Ti oxides, which can both host Zn in their crystal structures. Samples from Hekla have a similar range of isotopic variation (0.22‰66Zn66Zn=0.28±0.05‰ (2s.d.).

  9. The volcaniclastic series from the Luang Prabang Basin, Laos: A witness of a triassic magmatic arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Camille; Bourquin, Sylvie; Poujol, Marc; Hallot, Erwan; Dabard, Marie-Pierre; Nalpas, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of South East Asia (SEA) during the early Mesozoic is still poorly understood and a number of models have recently been put forward to account for the geodynamic evolution of SEA. The Luang Prabang Basin (north Laos), located in the core of a "paleogeographic jigsaw" in SEA, recorded a long lasting volcanism that spanned for ∼ 35 my from the earliest Triassic up to Late Triassic as evidenced by combined stratigraphic and geochronological (U-Pb/zircon) analyses performed on both volcanic and volcaniclastic series. The volcanic rocks are arc tholeiites and calk-alkaline andesites to dacites. The volcaniclastic rocks contain, in part, volcaniclasts produced contemporaneously with sedimentation. Both the volcanic and volcaniclastic series display geochemical features characteristic of a subduction related volcanism. Therefore, the Luang Prabang Basin documents a magmatic arc in a good agreement with the recent recognition of neighboring ophiolitic rocks in the Luang Prabang area. Following a passive margin setting that prevailed from the late Carboniferous to the late Permian, an active margin then initiated along the western margin of the Indochina Block. This active magmatic arc developed as the result of an east-dipping subduction below the Indochina Block during most of the Triassic, at least from ca. 250 to 215 Ma. Subsequently, this oceanic subduction episode must have been followed by a continental collision of the Indochina Block with the eastern Simao Block, at a period that remains to be defined.

  10. Age of the Emeishan flood magmatism and relations to Permian-Triassic boundary events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ching-Hua; Chung, Sun-Lin; Lee, Tung-Yi; Wu, Genyao

    2002-05-01

    The Permian-Triassic (P-T) mass extinction, the greatest biological mortality event in the Earth's history, was probably caused by dramatic and global forcing mechanisms such as the Siberian flood volcanism. Here we present the first set of high-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar dating results of volcanic and intrusive rocks from the Emeishan Traps, South China, which define a main stage of the flood magmatism at ˜251-253 Ma and a subordinate precursory activity at ˜255 Ma. This time span is generally coeval with, or slightly older than, the age of the P-T boundary estimated by the ash beds in the Meishan stratotype section and the main eruption of the Siberian Traps. Our data reinforces the notion that the eruption of the Emeishan Traps, rather than eruption of the Siberian Traps, accounted for the formation of the P-T boundary ash beds in South China. The Emeishan flood magmatism, which occurred in the continental margin comprising thick marine limestone formations, moreover, may have triggered rapid release of large volumes of methane and carbon dioxide that could have been responsible for the global δ 13C excursion and associated environmental crisis leading to the mass extinction at the P-T boundary.

  11. Two Distinct Sets of Magma Sources in Cretaceous Rocks From Magnet Cove, Prairie Creek, and Other Igneous Centers of the Arkansas Alkaline Province, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Eby, G. N.

    2008-12-01

    Two distinct sets of magma sources from the Arkansas alkaline province (~106-89 Ma) are revealed by Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of olivine lamproites vs. other alkalic rock types, including carbonatite, ijolite, lamprophyres, tephrite, malignite, jacupirangite, phonolite, trachyte, and latite. Isotopic compositions of diamond-bearing olivine lamproites from Prairie Creek and Dare Mine Knob point to Proterozoic lithosphere as an important source, and previous Re-Os isotopic data indicate derivation from subcontinental mantle lithosphere. Both sources were probably involved in lamproite generation. Magnet Cove carbonatites and other alkalic magmas were likely derived from an asthenospheric source. Lamproite samples are isotopically quite different from other rock types in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic space. Although three lamproite samples from Prairie Creek have a large range of SiO2 contents (40-60 wt %), initial values of ɛNd (-10 to -13), 206Pb/204Pb (16.61-16.81), 207Pb/204Pb (15.34-15.36), and 208Pb/204Pb (36.57-36.76) are low and similar. Only 87Sr/86Sr(i) displays a wide range in the Prairie Creek lamproites (0.70627-0.70829). A fourth lamproite from Dare Mine Knob has the most negative ɛNd(i) of -19. Lamproite isotope values show a significant crustal component and isotopically overlap subalkalic rhyolites from the Black Hills (SD), which assimilated Proterozoic crust. Six samples of carbonatite, ijolite, and jacupirangite from Magnet Cove and Potash Sulphur Springs exhibit the most depleted Sr-Nd isotopic signatures of all samples. For these rock types, 87Sr/86Sr(i) is 0.70352 - 0.70396, and ɛNd(i) is +3.8 - +4.3