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Sample records for magnesium 26 reactions

  1. Preparation of functionalized cyclic enol phosphates by halogen-magnesium exchange and directed deprotonation reactions.

    PubMed

    Piller, Fabian M; Bresser, Tomke; Fischer, Markus K R; Knochel, Paul

    2010-07-02

    Cyclic enol phosphates were magnesiated by a halogen/magnesium exchange reaction or deprotonation using TMP-derived magnesium amide bases. The resulting magnesium reagents react readily with a wide range of electrophiles like allyl bromides and acid chlorides or can be used in Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Several optically pure enol phosphates were prepared starting from readily available d-(+)-camphor derivatives.

  2. Isotopic mass fractionation laws for magnesium and their effects on 26Al-26Mg systematics in solar system materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Andrew M.; Richter, Frank M.; Mendybaev, Ruslan A.; Janney, Philip E.; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium isotope ratios are known to vary in solar system objects due to the effects of 26Al decay to 26Mg and mass-dependent fractionation, but anomalies of nucleosynthetic origin must also be considered. In order to infer the amount of enhancement of 26Mg/24Mg due to 26Al decay or to resolve small nucleogenetic anomalies, the exact relationship between 26Mg/24Mg and 25Mg/24Mg ratios due to mass-dependent fractionation, the mass-fractionation "law", must be accurately known so that the 25Mg/24Mg ratio can be used to correct the 26Mg/24Mg ratio for mass fractionation. Mass-dependent fractionation in mass spectrometers is reasonably well characterized, but not necessarily fully understood. It follows a simple power fractionation law, sometimes referred to as the "exponential law". In contrast, mass fractionation in nature, in particular that due to high temperature evaporation that likely caused the relatively large effects observed in calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), is reasonably well understood, but mass-fractionation laws for magnesium have not been explored in detail. The magnesium isotopic compositions of CAI-like evaporation residues produced in a vacuum furnace indicate that the slope on a log 25Mg/24Mg vs. log 26Mg/24Mg plot is ∼0.5128, and different from those predicted by any of the commonly used mass-fractionation laws. Evaporation experiments on forsterite-rich bulk compositions give exactly the same slope, indicating that the measured mass-fractionation law for evaporation of magnesium is applicable to a wide range of bulk compositions. We discuss mass-fractionation laws and the implications of the measured fractionation behavior of magnesium isotopes for 26Al-26Mg chronology.

  3. Reaction Mechanisms of Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Cement and its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Fei

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC) is a kind of cementitious binder in which the chemical bond is formed via a heterogeneous acid-base reaction between dead burned magnesia powder and potassium phosphate solution at room temperature. Small amount of boron compounds can be incorporated in the cement as a setting retarder. The final reaction product of MgO-KH2PO4-H 2O ternary system is identified as magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate, MgKPO4·6H2O. However, the mechanisms and procedures through which this crystalline product is formed and the conditions under which the crystallization process would be influenced are not yet clear. Understanding of the reaction mechanism of the system is helpful for developing new methodologies to control the rapid reaction process and furthermore, to adjust the phase assemblage of the binder, and to enhance the macroscopic properties. This study is mainly focused on the examination of the reaction mechanism of MKPC. In addition, the formulation optimization, microstructure characterization and field application in rapid repair are also systematically studied. The chemical reactions between magnesia and potassium dihydrogen phosphate are essentially an acid-base reaction with strong heat release, the pH and temperature variation throughout the reaction process could provide useful information to disclose the different stages in the reaction. However, it would be very difficult to conduct such tests on the cement paste due to the limited water content and fast setting. In the current research, the reaction mechanism of MKPC is investigated on the diluted MKPC system through monitoring the pH and temperature development, identification of the solid phase formed, and measurement of the ionic concentration of the solution. The reaction process can be explained as follows: when magnesia and potassium phosphate powder are mixed with water, phosphate is readily dissolved, which is instantly followed by the dissociation of

  4. Mechanism of heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Xu, Wenqing; Yu, Yunbo

    2007-05-24

    Heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) under ambient conditions was investigated by in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It reveals that OCS can be catalytically hydrolyzed by surface hydroxyl on MgO to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and then H2S can be further catalytically oxidized by surface oxygen or gaseous oxygen on MgO to form sulfite (SO3(2-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)). Hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) was found to be the crucial intermediate. Surface hydrogen sulfide (HS), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and surface sulfite (SO3(2-)) were also found to be intermediates for the formation of sulfate. Furthermore, the surface hydroxyl contributes not only to the formation of HSCO2- but also to HSCO2- decomposition. On the basis of experimental results, the heterogeneous reaction mechanism of OCS on MgO was discussed.

  5. Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Schrag, D. P.

    2010-09-01

    Magnesium concentrations in deep-sea sediment pore-fluids typically decrease down core due to net precipitation of dolomite or clay minerals in the sediments or underlying crust. To better characterize and differentiate these processes, we have measured magnesium isotopes in pore-fluids and sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program sites (1082, 1086, 1012, 984, 1219, and 925) that span a range of oceanographic settings. At all sites, magnesium concentrations decrease with depth. At sites where diagenetic reactions are dominated by the respiration of organic carbon, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values increase with depth by as much as 2‰. Because carbonates preferentially incorporate 24Mg (low δ 26Mg), the increase in pore-fluid δ 26Mg values at these sites is consistent with the removal of magnesium in Mg-carbonate (dolomite). In contrast, at sites where the respiration of organic carbon is not important and/or weatherable minerals are abundant, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values decrease with depth by up to 2‰. The decline in pore-fluid δ 26Mg at these sites is consistent with a magnesium sink that is isotopically enriched relative to the pore-fluid. The identity of this enriched magnesium sink is likely clay minerals. Using a simple 1D diffusion-advection-reaction model of pore-fluid magnesium, we estimate rates of net magnesium uptake/removal and associated net magnesium isotope fractionation factors for sources and sinks at all sites. Independent estimates of magnesium isotope fractionation during dolomite precipitation from measured δ 26Mg values of dolomite samples from sites 1082 and 1012 are very similar to modeled net fractionation factors at these sites, suggesting that local exchange of magnesium between sediment and pore-fluid at these sites can be neglected. Our results indicate that the magnesium incorporated in dolomite is 2.0-2.7‰ depleted in δ 26Mg relative to the precipitating fluid. Assuming local exchange of magnesium is minor at the rest of the

  6. Magnesium basics

    PubMed Central

    Ketteler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    As a cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions, magnesium fulfils various intracellular physiological functions. Thus, imbalance in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesaemia as it is seen more often than hypermagnesaemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Measuring total serum magnesium is a feasible and affordable way to monitor changes in magnesium status, although it does not necessarily reflect total body magnesium content. The following review focuses on the natural occurrence of magnesium and its physiological function. The absorption and excretion of magnesium as well as hypo- and hypermagnesaemia will be addressed. PMID:26069819

  7. Thermal analysis of magnesium reactions with nitrogen/oxygen gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chunmiao, Yuan; Lifu, Yu; Chang, Li; Gang, Li; Shengjun, Zhong

    2013-09-15

    The thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of magnesium powder subjected to a nitrogen-rich atmosphere was investigated in thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experiments with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures heated at rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C/min. At higher temperature increase rates, the observed oxidation or nitridation steps shifted toward higher temperatures. The comparison of mass gain and heat of reaction in different nitrogen concentrations is helpful in interpreting the inerting effect of nitrogen on magnesium powder explosion in closed vessels. Activation energies for oxidation in air calculated by the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method are generally consistent with previously published reports, but the method was not successful for the entire nitridation process. The change of activation energy with temperature was related to protective properties of the corresponding coating layer at particle surfaces. Two main coating layer growth processes were found in magnesium oxidation and nitridation using a modified Dreizin method which was also employed to determine activation energy for both magnesium oxidation and nitridation. For magnesium powder oxidation, activation energy calculated by the Dreizin method was close to that by KAS. Variation in activation energies was a function of different mechanisms inherent in the two methods.

  8. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  9. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  10. Reaction pathways for hydrogen desorption from magnesium hydride/hydroxide composites: bulk and interface effects.

    PubMed

    Leardini, F; Ares, J R; Bodega, J; Fernández, J F; Ferrer, I J; Sánchez, C

    2010-01-21

    This manuscript investigates the thermal desorption behaviour of MgH(2)/Mg(OH)(2) composites by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy. Besides the H(2)O and H(2) desorption events due to Mg(OH)(2) dehydration and MgH(2) decomposition reactions, respectively, two additional H(2) desorption peaks arise at lower temperatures. These peaks are related to solid-state reactions between magnesium hydride and magnesium hydroxide through different channels. The low temperature H(2) peak ( approximately 150 degrees C) is related to reaction between a H atom diffusing from MgH(2) and a surface OH group, whereas the intermediate temperature H(2) peak ( approximately 350 degrees C) is due to an interface reaction between the hydride and the hydroxide. The present work supports the theory that the onset of the H(2) desorption coming from MgH(2) decomposition is controlled by an incubation process, consisting in the formation of catalytically active vacancies at the MgO/Mg(OH)(2) surface by dehydration. Possible ways to improve the H(2) desorption kinetics from MgH(2) are discussed in the light of the results obtained.

  11. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  12. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Ma, Qingxin

    2008-04-03

    The experimental determination of rate constants for atmospheric reactions and how these rate constants vary with temperature remain a crucially important part of atmosphere science. In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (COS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) has been investigated using a Knudsen cell reactor and a temperature-programmed reaction apparatus. We found that the adsorption and the heterogeneous reaction are sensitive to temperature. The initial uptake coefficients (gammat(Ini)) of COS on MgO decrease from 1.07 +/- 0.71 x 10-6 to 4.84 +/- 0.60 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 228 to 300 K, and the steady state uptake coefficients (gammat(SS)) increase from 5.31 +/- 0.06 x 10-8 to 1.68 +/- 0.41 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 240 to 300 K. The desorption rate constants (kdes) were also found to increase slightly with the enhancement of temperature. The empirical formula between the uptake coefficients, desorption rate constants and temperature described in the form of Arrhenius expression were obtained. The activation energies for the heterogeneous reaction and desorption of COS on MgO were measured to be 11.02 +/- 0.34 kJ.mol-1 and 6.30 +/- 0.81 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The results demonstrate that the initial uptake of COS on MgO is mainly contributed by an adsorption process and the steady state uptake is due to a catalytic reaction. The environmental implication was also discussed.

  13. Novel palladium complex-catalyzed reaction of magnesium amides with allylic electrophiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhemilev, U.M.; Ibragimov, A.G.; Minsker, D.L.; Muslukhov, R.R.

    1987-08-20

    In order to develop an efficient method for the synthesis of higher order unsaturated tertiary amines, and also to explore a new method for the formation of C-N bonds, they have investigated the transition metal complex-catalyzed reaction of magnesium amides with electrophiles; the electrophiles selected for study included allyl ethers and esters, as well as sulfones, sulfides and quaternized allylamines. The effects of the nature and structure of the catalyst components, as well as of the reaction conditions, on product yield were examined in the case of the reaction of diethyl (bromomagnesium)amine with diallyl ether, and revealed that the highest yield of diethylallyl-amine (I) was achieved using Pd(acac)/sub 2/ (3-5 mole %) and Ph/sub 3/P (1:2) as catalyst in THF solution at 50/sup 0/C for 5 h. Other transition metal (Ni, Fe, Zr, Ti, Cu) compounds were also examined as catalysts, but the yield of (I) did not exceed 15% with these compounds. Bimetallic catalysts based on Zr (Cp/sub 2/ZrCl, Py/sub 2/ZrCl/sub 6/, (RO)/sub 4/Zr) and Ni (Ni(acac)/sub 2/ and NiCl/sub 2/) were successful in forming (I) from diethyl (bromomagnesium)amine and diallyl ether in 60% yield.

  14. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,/sup 26/Mg,/sup 56/Fe(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/)/sup 13,14/O,/sup 26/Si,/sup 56/Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub ..pi../ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to /sup 14/O(0/sup +/, 5.92 MeV), /sup 14/O(2/sup +/, 7.77 MeV), /sup 56/Ni(gs), /sup 13/O(gs), and /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup ..pi../ = 1/2/sup -/. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the ..delta../sub 33/ resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub ..pi../ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references.

  15. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrogen thiocarbonate for heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2009-04-09

    In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy combined with derivative spectroscopy analysis, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis, and quantum chemical calculations were used to investigate the infrared absorbance assignment and the molecular structure of hydrogen thiocarbonate on magnesium oxide. The bands at 1283 and 1257 cm(-1), which had the typical characteristic of intermediate, were observed in experiments for the heterogeneous reaction of COS on MgO. On the basis of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis and quantum chemical calculations, the band at 1283 cm(-1) was assigned to the v(s) band of bridged thiocarbonate which formed on the two neighboring Mg atoms in the (100) face of MgO crystal, and the band at 1257 cm(-1) was the v(s) band of monodentate thiocarbonate on MgO. The v(as)(OCO) band of thiocarbonates was invisible in the experiment due to their weak absorbance and the interruption of surface carbonate. The formation mechanism of thiocarbonates is proposed, which occurred through a nucleophilic attack of preadsorbed COS by surface -OH groups followed by hydrogen atom transfer from the -OH group to the sulfur atom of preadsorbed COS. The activation energy for the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction of bridged thiocarbonate was calculated to be 18.52 kcal x mol(-1) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory.

  16. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, A.F.; Howard, J.B.; Modestino, A.J.; Peters, W.A.

    1998-07-21

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400 C or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products. 12 figs.

  17. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Alexander F.; Howard, Jack B.; Modestino, Anthony J.; Peters, William A.

    1998-01-01

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400.degree. C. or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products.

  18. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unidentified nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): II. Heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the early Solar System inferred from in situ high-precision magnesium-isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with isotopic mass fractionation effects and unidentified nuclear isotopic anomalies (FUN CAIs) have been studied for more than 40 years, but their origins remain enigmatic. Here we report in situ high precision measurements of aluminum-magnesium isotope systematics of FUN CAIs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual minerals were analyzed in six FUN CAIs from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Axtell (compact Type A CAI Axtell 2271) and Allende (Type B CAIs C1 and EK1-4-1, and forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs BG82DH8, CG-14, and TE). Most of these CAIs show evidence for excess 26Mg due to the decay of 26Al. The inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] and the initial magnesium isotopic compositions (δ26Mg0) calculated using an exponential law with an exponent β of 0.5128 are (3.1 ± 1.6) × 10-6 and 0.60 ± 0.10‰ (Axtell 2271), (3.7 ± 1.5) × 10-6 and -0.20 ± 0.05‰ (BG82DH8), (2.2 ± 1.1) × 10-6 and -0.18 ± 0.05‰ (C1), (2.3 ± 2.4) × 10-5 and -2.23 ± 0.37‰ (EK1-4-1), (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10-5 and -0.42 ± 0.08‰ (CG-14), and (5.3 ± 0.9) × 10-5 and -0.05 ± 0.08‰ (TE) with 2σ uncertainties. We infer that FUN CAIs recorded heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the CAI-forming region(s). Comparison of 26Al-26Mg systematics, stable isotope (oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium) and trace element studies of FUN and non-FUN igneous CAIs indicates that there is a continuum among these CAI types. Based on these observations and evaporation experiments on CAI-like melts, we propose a generic scenario for the origin of igneous (FUN and non-FUN) CAIs: (i) condensation of isotopically normal solids in an 16O-rich gas of approximately solar composition; (ii) formation of CAI precursors by aggregation of these solids together with variable abundances of isotopically anomalous grains-possible carriers of unidentified nuclear (UN) effects; and (iii) melt evaporation of these precursors

  19. Magnesium absorption in human subjects from leafy vegetables, intrinsically labeled with stable /sup 26/Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.; Spencer, H.; Welsh, J.J.

    1984-04-01

    Collards, turnip greens, leaf lettuce, and spinach, grown in nutrient solution so that their Mg content was 80 to 90% /sup 26/Mg, were tested in ambulant male volunteers stabilized on a constant metabolic diet. The freeze-dried vegetables were incorporated in bran muffins in which the vegetables replaced part of the bran. Bran muffins without vegetables were consumed for breakfast each day. They were also used as a standard test meal to which the vegetable muffins were compared. All subjects participated in three consecutive isotope absorption tests: one of the standard test meal and two of the vegetables. The standard test was carried out after at least 30 days on the controlled diet. Subsequent tests of vegetables followed at 4-wk intervals. Each test meal contained 30 microCi /sup 28/MgCl2 and 50 mg stable /sup 26/Mg, the latter either as the intrinsic label of a test vegetable or as /sup 26/MgCl/sub 2/ in solution taken with the standard bran muffins. Net absorption of both isotopes was measured to establish exchangeability and to determine relative Mg absorption from the vegetables. Exchangeability was 90% or higher from all meals tested. Relative Mg absorption was highest from collards and least from the standard test meal. Net absorption values ranged from 40 to 60%.

  20. Kinetics of intercalation of fluorescent probes in magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxide within a multiscale reaction-diffusion framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Daniel; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-11-01

    We report the synthesis of magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) using a reaction-diffusion framework (RDF) that exploits the multiscale coupling of molecular diffusion with chemical reactions, nucleation and growth of crystals. In an RDF, the hydroxide anions are allowed to diffuse into an organic gel matrix containing the salt mixture needed for the precipitation of the LDH. The chemical structure and composition of the synthesized magnesium-aluminium LDHs are determined using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR), Fourier transform infrared and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This novel technique also allows the investigation of the mechanism of intercalation of some fluorescent probes, such as the neutral three-dimensional rhodamine B (RhB) and the negatively charged two-dimensional 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS), using in situ steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The incorporation of these organic dyes inside the interlayer region of the LDH is confirmed via fluorescence microscopy, solid-state lifetime, SSNMR and PXRD. The activation energies of intercalation of the corresponding molecules (RhB and HPTS) are computed and exhibit dependence on the geometry of the involved probe (two or three dimensions), the charge of the fluorescent molecule (anionic, cationic or neutral) and the cationic ratio of the corresponding LDH. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  1. The 28Si(p,t)26Si*(p) reaction and implications for the astrophysical 25Al(p,gamma)26Si reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Chipps, K.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Chae, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott

    2010-10-01

    Several resonances in 25Al(p, )26Si have been studied via the 28Si(p,t)26Si reaction. Triton energies and angular distributions were measured using a segmented annular detector array. An additional silicon detector array was used to simultaneously detect the coincident protons emitted from the decay of states in 26Si above the proton threshold, in order to determine branching ratios. A resonance at 5927 4 keV has been experimentally confirmed as the first = 0 state above the proton threshold, with a proton branching ratio consistent with one.

  2. REACTION MECHANISMS OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES WITH CARBON DIOXIDE IN MICROWAVE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    William B. White; Michael R. Silsbee; B. Joe Kearns

    2004-02-18

    The objective of the investigation was to determine whether microwave fields would enhance the reactions of CO{sub 2} with silicates that are relevant to the sequestration of carbon dioxide. Three sets of experiments were conducted. (1) Serpentine and CO{sub 2} were reacted directly at one atmosphere pressure in a microwave furnace. Little reaction was observed. (2) Serpentine was dehydroxylated in a microwave furnace. The reaction was rapid, reaching completion in less than 30 minutes. A detailed investigation of this reaction produced an S-shaped kinetics curve, similar to the kinetics from dehydroxylating serpentine in a resistance furnace, but offset to 100 C lower temperature. This set of experiments clearly demonstrates the effect of microwaves for enhancing reaction kinetics. (3) Reactions of serpentine with alkaline carbonates and in acid solution were carried out in a microwave hydrothermal apparatus. There was a greatly enhanced decomposition of the serpentine in acid solution but, at the temperature and pressure of the reaction chamber (15 bars; 200 C) the carbonates did not react. Overall, microwave fields, as expected, enhance silicate reaction kinetics, but higher CO{sub 2} pressures are needed to accomplish the desired sequestration reactions.

  3. Elastic scattering and neutron transfer of the 26Mg + 13C reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleskey, Matthew; Alharby, A.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2013-10-01

    Direct proton capture on 26Si is of interest for its role in the destruction of 26Si that would otherwise be available to β+ decay into 26mAl. This is part of the network of reactions that influence the production and destruction of the important astrophysical observable 26Al. The 13C(26Mg,27Mg)12C reaction at 12 MeV/nucleon has been measured at Texas A &M University Cyclotron Institute with the aim to determine ANC for 27P <--> p + 26Si via mirror symmetry. Details of the experiment as well as preliminary results will be presented. Present address: Faculty of Sciences, Physics Department, Princess Nora University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

  4. High-precision (p,t) reaction to determine {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Since the identification of ongoing {sup 26}Al production in the universe, the reaction sequence {sup 24}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 25}Al({beta}{sup +{nu}}){sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Al has been studied intensively. At temperatures where the radiative capture on {sup 25}Al (t{sub 1/2}=7.2 s) becomes faster than the {beta}{sup +} decay, the production of {sup 26}Al can be reduced due to the depletion of {sup 25}Al. To determine the resonances relevant for the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si bypass reaction, we measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with high-energy precision using the Grand Raiden spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Several new energy levels were found above the p threshold and for known states excitation energies were determined with smaller uncertainties. The calculated stellar rates of the bypass reaction agree well with previous results, suggesting that these rates are well established.

  5. Comment on ``Properties of 26Mg and 26Si in the sd shell model and the determination of the 25Al(p,γ)26Si reaction rate''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Matei, C.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Smith, M. S.

    2011-11-01

    A recent discussion of theoretical work on the 25Al(p,γ)26Si astrophysical reaction rate [W.A. Richter, B. Alex Brown, A. Signoracci and M. Wiescher, Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.83.065803 83, 065803 (2011)] omits some current and relevant experimental information in forming its scientific conclusions. Accounting for this new information has the potential to significantly alter the reaction rate derived in the paper.

  6. Experimental study of the astrophysically important 23Na(α ,p )26Mg and 23Na(α ,n )26Al reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, M. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Dickerson, C.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Pardo, R. C.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Talwar, R.; Ugalde, C.

    2016-12-01

    The 23Na(α ,p )26Mg and 23Na(α ,n )26Al reactions are important for our understanding of the 26Al abundance in massive stars. The aim of this work is to report on a direct and simultaneous measurement of these astrophysically important reactions using an active target system. The reactions were investigated in inverse kinematics using 4He as the active target gas in the detector. We measured the excitation functions in the energy range of about 2 to 6 MeV in the center of mass. We have found that the cross sections of the 23Na(α ,p )26Mg and the 23Na(α ,n )26Al reactions are in good agreement with previous experiments and with statistical-model calculations. The astrophysical reaction rate of the 23Na(α ,n )26Al reaction has been reevaluated and it was found to be larger than the recommended rate.

  7. ortho-Lithium/magnesium carboxylate-driven aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions on unprotected naphthoic acids.

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Regadia; Nourry, Arnaud; Coquel, Ariane; Dao, Thi Thanh Hà; Derdour, Aicha; Helesbeux, Jean-Jacques; Duval, Olivier; Castanet, Anne-Sophie; Mortier, Jacques

    2012-01-06

    Substitution of an ortho-fluoro or methoxy group in 1- and 2-naphthoic acids furnishing substituted naphthoic acids occurs in good to excellent yields upon reaction with alkyl/vinyl/aryl organolithium and Grignard reagents, in the absence of a metal catalyst without the need to protect the carboxyl (CO(2)H) group. This novel nucleophilic aromatic substitution is presumed to proceed via a precoordination of the organometallic with the substrate, followed by an addition/elimination.

  8. Nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of aryl fluorides and chlorides with grignard reagents under nickel/magnesium bimetallic cooperation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikai, Naohiko; Mashima, Hiroko; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2005-12-28

    Nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling of Grignard reagents with aryl (poly)fluorides or (poly)chlorides can be achieved efficiently in the presence of a new triarylphosphine ligand bearing a nearby hydroxy group. The high reactivity and the unique chemoselectivity (ArF > ArOTf > ArSR) of the catalysis have been attributed to synergy of nickel and magnesium atoms preorganized on the ligand, as has been surmised on the basis of theoretical modeling of the reaction mechanism.

  9. 23Na (α,p )26Mg Reaction Rate at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. M.; Munch, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Laursen, K. L.; Diget, C. Aa.; Hubbard, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of 26Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23Na (α,p )26Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of ˜40 . We present here differential cross sections for the 23Na (α,p )26Mg reaction measured in the energy range Ec .m .=1.7 - 2.5 MeV . Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalizations that are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions are measured for both p0 and p1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates by a factor of 40, impacting the 26Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of 3.

  10. Ultrasound-assisted activation of zero-valent magnesium for nitrate denitrification: identification of reaction by-products and pathways.

    PubMed

    Ileri, Burcu; Ayyildiz, Onder; Apaydin, Omer

    2015-07-15

    Zero-valent magnesium (Mg(0)) was activated by ultrasound (US) in an aim to promote its potential use in water treatment without pH control. In this context, nitrate reduction was studied at batch conditions using various doses of magnesium powder and ultrasound power. While neither ultrasound nor zero-valent magnesium alone was effective for reducing nitrate in water, their combination removed up to 90% of 50 mg/L NO3-N within 60 min. The rate of nitrate reduction by US/Mg(0) enhanced with increasing ultrasonic power and magnesium dose. Nitrogen gas (N2) and nitrite (NO2(-)) were detected as the major reduction by-products, while magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH)2 and hydroxide ions (OH(-)) were identified as the main oxidation products. The results from SEM-EDS measurements revealed that the surface oxide level decreased significantly when the samples of Mg(0) particles were exposed to ultrasonic treatment. The surface passivation of magnesium particles was successfully minimized by mechanical forces of ultrasound, which in turn paved the way to sustain the catalyst activity toward nitrate reduction.

  11. Magnesium hydrides and the dearomatisation of pyridine and quinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hill, Michael S; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; MacDougall, Dugald J; Mahon, Mary F; Weetman, Catherine

    2011-12-14

    Reactions of the β-diketiminato n-butyl magnesium complex, [HC{(Me)CN(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))}(2)Mg(n)Bu], with a range of substituted pyridines and fused-ring quinolines in the presence of PhSiH(3) has been found to result in dearomatisation of the N-heterocyclic compounds. This reaction is proposed to occur through the formation of an unobserved N-heterocycle-coordinated magnesium hydride and subsequent hydride transfer via the C2-position of the heterocycle prior to hydride transfer to the C4-position and formation of thermodynamically-favoured magnesium 1,4-dihydropyridides. This reaction is kinetically suppressed for 2,6-dimethylpyridine while the kinetic product, the 1,2-dihydropyridide derivative, was isolated through reaction with 4-methylpyridine (4-methylpyridine), in which case the formation of the 1,4-dihyropyridide is prevented by the presence of the 4-methyl substituent. X-ray structures of the products of these reactions with 4-methylpyridine, 3,5-dimethylpyridine and iso-quinoline comprise a pseudo-tetrahedral magnesium centre while the regiochemistry of the particular dearomatisation reaction is determined by the substitution pattern of the N-heterocycle under observation. The compounds are all air-sensitive and exposure of the magnesium derivatives of dearomatised pyridine and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) to air resulted in ligand rearomatisation and the formation of dimeric μ(2)-η(2)-η(2)-peroxomagnesium compounds which have also been subject to analysis by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. An unsuccessful extension of this chemistry to N-heterocycle hydrosilylation is suggested to be a consequence of the low basicity of the silane reagent in comparison to the pyridine substrates which effectively impedes any further interaction with the magnesium centres.

  12. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect.

  13. Analysis of longitudinal momentum distribution data of 26-29P isotopes in stripping reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Singh, Pardeep; Kumar, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    The orbital occupancy of the stripped proton in the phosphors isotopes with mass number 26-29 have been determined through the analysis of longitudinal momentum distributions (LMDs) of 25-28Si core fragments coming from 9Be(26-28P,25-27Si)X and 12C(29P,28Si)Y stripping reactions at high energies. It has been found that the probability of occupying d-orbital by the stripped proton is 40-60%, 30-50%, 30-50% and 0-20% in 26-29P isotopes, respectively. The effects of Coulomb barrier for the possibility of halo structure in proton-rich nuclei has also been examined and found that it decreases the chance of possessing halo structure in proton-rich nuclei.

  14. Magnesium and magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Avedesian, M.; Baker, H.

    1998-12-31

    This new handbook is the most comprehensive publication of engineering information on commercial magnesium alloys under one cover in the last sixty years. Prepared with the cooperation of the International Magnesium Association, it presents the industrial practices currently used throughout the world, as well as the properties of the products critical to their proper application. Contents include: general characteristics; physical metallurgy; melting, refining, alloying, recycling, and powder production; casting; heat treatment; forging, rolling, and extrusion; semisolid processing; forming; joining; cleaning and finishing; selection, application, and properties of grades and alloys; design considerations; mechanical behavior and wear resistance; fatigue and fracture-mechanics; high-temperature strength and creep; corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking; specification.

  15. Neutron induced reactions on aluminum-26, chloride-36 and calcium-41 and their astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Smet, Liesbeth Paula

    In this work (n,p) and (n,a) reactions on 26 A1, 36 Cl and 41 Ca are studied as a function of the neutron energy. The measurements were performed at the high resolution GELINA time-of-flight facility of the IRMM in Geel, Belgium. Besides the nuclear physics information obtained from the resonance analysis of the reaction cross sections, these reactions are of importance in the understanding of the observed 36 S and 26 Al solar abundances. In the case of 26 Al, the 26 A1(n,a) 23 Na cross section up to 45 keV has been determined. Six resonances are observed. For three of them, the total level width and the spin could be calculated. For most of the resonances the obtained resonance parameters are in agreement with previous data. The calculated Maxwellian Averaged Cross Section values (MACS) used in stellar model calculations confirm that 26 Al is indeed severely depleted by neutron captures in AGB stars. In the (n,p) and (n,a) measurements on 36 Cl, eighteen resonances are observed in the energy region up to 250 keV, whereas eight were identified before. Only the lowest energy resonance shows a significant (n,(x)-contribution of (76±7)%, which is in perfect agreement with the value reported before. Furthermore, for four resonances, the resonance strength, spin, total and partial width G p could be determined. They are in good agreement with previous data, but the achieved accuracy is better. The calculated MACS values are used in stellar model calculations to trace the origin of 36 S and reveal that the weak component of the s-process occurring in massive stars accounts for almost the entire production of solar 36 S. The 41 Ca(n,a) 3 8Ar measurement is the first ever reported in the resonance region and affects the 36 S abundance through 41 Ca(n,a) 38 Ar(n,g) 39 Ar(n,a) 36 S. Twelve resonances are observed in the energy region up to 45 keV. For most of them the area, the total width, the spin and a value for G n /G p could be determined. After extension of the energy

  16. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-09-23

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status-primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia-might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium's many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  17. The 26gAl(p,g)27Si reaction in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Chris; Parikh, A.; José, J.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Chen, A. A.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, H.; Davids, B.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C.; Deibel, C.; Erikson, L.; Fogarty, L.; Frekers, D.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Huyse, M.; Jewett, C.; Laird, A. M.; Lewis, R.; Mumby-Croft, P.; Olin, A.; Ottewell, D. F.; Ouellet, C. V.; Parker, P.; Pearson, J.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wrede, C.

    The 26gAl(p,γ)27Si Reaction in Novae PoS(NIC-IX)004 1 TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3, Canada 2 Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Conneticut 06520-8124, USA 3 Dept. de Física í Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain 4 Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Barcelona, Spain 5 McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 481, Canada 6 Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada 7 Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA 8 National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland 9 Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Willhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster, Germany 10 University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada 11 Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium 12 Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom The 184 keV resonance strength in the 26gAl(p,γ)27Si reaction was measured in inverse kinematics using the DRAGON facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. We obtain a value of ωγ=35±7 μeV for the strength and ER=184±1 keV for the resonance energy. These values are consistent with p-wave capture into the 7652(3) keV state in 27Si. We discuss the implications of these results for 26gAl nucleosynthesis in a typical O-Ne white dwarf nova.

  18. Role of magnesium ions in the reaction mechanism at the interface between Tm1631 protein and its DNA ligand.

    PubMed

    Ogrizek, Mitja; Konc, Janez; Bren, Urban; Hodošček, Milan; Janežič, Dušanka

    2016-01-01

    A protein, Tm1631 from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermotoga maritima belongs to a domain of unknown function protein family. It was predicted that Tm1631 binds with the DNA and that the Tm1631-DNA complex is an endonuclease repair system with a DNA repair function (Konc et al. PLoS Comput Biol 9(11): e1003341, 2013). We observed that the severely bent, strained DNA binds to the protein for the entire 90 ns of classical molecular dynamics (MD) performed; we could observe no significant changes in the most distorted region of the DNA, where the cleavage of phosphodiester bond occurs. In this article, we modeled the reaction mechanism at the interface between Tm1631 and its proposed ligand, the DNA molecule, focusing on cleavage of the phosphodiester bond. After addition of two Mg(2+) ions to the reaction center and extension of classical MD by 50 ns (totaling 140 ns), the DNA ligand stayed bolted to the protein. Results from density functional theory quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations suggest that the reaction is analogous to known endonuclease mechanisms: an enzyme reaction mechanism with two Mg(2+) ions in the reaction center and a pentacovalent intermediate. The minimum energy pathway profile shows that the phosphodiester bond cleavage step of the reaction is kinetically controlled and not thermodynamically because of a lack of any energy barrier above the accuracy of the energy profile calculation. The role of ions is shown by comparing the results with the reaction mechanisms in the absence of the Mg(2+) ions where there is a significantly higher reaction barrier than in the presence of the Mg(2+) ions.Graphical abstractA protein, Tm1631 from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermotoga maritima belongs to a domain of unknown function protein family. We modeled the reaction mechanism at the interface between Tm1631 and its proposed ligand, the DNA molecule, focusing on cleavage of the phosphodiester bond.

  19. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  20. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  1. Investigation on the thermo-chemical reaction mechanism between yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong-Bo; Wang, Bin-Yi; Cao, Jian; Song, Guan-Yu; Liu, Juan-Bo

    2015-03-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) top coat play a very important role in advanced turbine blades by considerably increasing the engine efficiency and improving the performance of highly loaded blades. However, at high temperatures, environment factors result in the failure of TBCs. The influence of calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) is one of environment factors. Although thermo-physical effect is being paid attention to, the thermo-chemical reaction becomes the hot-spot in the research area of TBCs affected by CMAS. In this paper, traditional twolayered structured TBCs were prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) as the object of study. TBCs coated with CMAS were heated at 1240°C for 3 h. Additionally, 15 wt.% simulated molten CMAS powder and YSZ powder were mixed and heated at 1240°C or 1350°C for 48 h. SEM and EDS were adopted to detect morphology and elements distribution. According to XRD and TEM results, it was revealed that CMAS react with YSZ at high temperature and form ZrSiO4, Ca0.2Zr0.8O1.8 and Ca0.15Zr0.85O1.85 after reaction, as a result, leading to the failure of TBCs and decreasing the TBC lifetime.

  2. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals.

  3. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium’s many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26404370

  4. High-precision {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction to determine {sup 22}Mg({alpha},p){sup 25}Al reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Beard, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.

    2011-08-15

    The rise time of stellar x-ray bursts is a signature of thermonuclear runaway processes in the atmosphere of neutron stars and is highly sensitive to a series of ({alpha},p) reactions via high-lying resonances in sd-shell nuclei. Lacking data for the relevant resonance levels, the stellar reaction rates have been calculated using statistical, Hauser-Feshbach models, assuming a high-level density. This assumption may not be correct in view of the selectivity of the ({alpha},p) reaction to natural parity states. We measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with a high-resolution spectrometer to identify resonance levels in {sup 26}Si above the {alpha}-emission threshold at 9.164 MeV excitation energy. These resonance levels are used to calculate the stellar reaction rate of the {sup 22}Mg({alpha},p){sup 25}Al reaction and to test the validity of the statistical assumption.

  5. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  6. Solvent Influences on the Molecular Aggregation of Magnesium Aryloxides

    SciTech Connect

    ZECHMANN,CECILIA A.; BOYLE,TIMOTHY J.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; KEMP,RICHARD A.

    2000-07-14

    Magnesium aryloxides were prepared in a variety of solvents through the reaction of dibutyl magnesium with sterically varied aryl alcohols: 2,6-dimethylphenol (H-DMP), 2,6-diisopropylphenol (H-DIP), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (H-TCP). Upon using a sufficiently strong Lewis-basic solvent, the monomeric species Mg(DMP){sub 2}(py){sub 3} (1, py = pyridine), Mg(DIP){sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, (2a, THF = tetrahydrofuran) Mg(TCP){sub 2}(THF){sub 3} (3) were isolated. Each of these complexes possesses a five-coordinate magnesium that adopts a trigonal bipyramidal geometry. In the absence of a Lewis base, the reaction with H-DIP yields a soluble trinuclear complex, [Mg(DIP){sub 2}]{sub 3} (2b). The Mg metal centers in 2b adopt a linear arrangement with a four-coordinate central metal while the outer metal centers are reduced to just three-coordinate. Solution spectroscopic methods suggest that while 2b remains intact, the monomeric species (1, 2a, and 3) are involved in equilibria, which facilitate intermolecular ligand transfer.

  7. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  8. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  9. Reactions Involving Calcium and Magnesium Sulfates as Potential Sources of Sulfur Dioxide During MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Knudson, C. A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analyzed several subsamples of <150 micron fines from ten sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform (RN) and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). One was drilled from the Windjana (WJ) site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation. Four were drilled from sites Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP) and Buckskin (BK) of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp. Two were drilled from sandstones of the Stimson formation targeting relatively unaltered (Big Sky, BY) and then altered (Greenhorn, GH) material associated with a light colored fracture zone. CheMin analyses provided quantitative sample mineralogy. SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases. This contribution will focus on evolved SO2. All samples evolved SO2 above 500 C. The shapes of the SO2 evolution traces with temperature vary between samples but most have at least two "peaks' within the wide high temperature evolution, from approx. 500-700 and approx. 700-860 C (Fig. 1). In many cases, the only sulfur minerals detected with CheMin were Ca sulfates (e.g., RN and GH), which should thermally decompose at temperatures above those obtainable by SAM (>860 C). Sulfides or Fe sulfates were detected by CheMin (e.g., CB, MJ, BK) and could contribute to the high temperature SO2 evolution, but in most cases they are not present in enough abundance to account for all of the SO2. This additional SO2 could be largely associated with x-ray amorphous material, which comprises a significant portion of all samples. It can also be attributed to trace S phases present below the CheMin detection limit, or to reactions which lower the temperatures of SO2 evolution from sulfates that are typically expected to thermally decompose

  10. Magnesium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... too much. Deficiencies are typically seen with: Low dietary intake (seen in the elderly, malnourished , and with alcoholism ) Gastrointestinal disorders (such as Crohn's disease) Uncontrolled ... blood levels of magnesium are rarely due to dietary sources but are usually the result of an ...

  11. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  12. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  13. Heterogeneous-phase reactions of nitrogen dioxide with vermiculite-supported magnesium oxide (as applied to the control of jet engine test cell emissions). Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kimm, L.T.

    1995-11-01

    Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) from a non-steady-state stationary source like a jet engine test cell (JETC) requires a method that is effective over a wide range of conditions. A heterogeneous, porous, high surface area sorbent material comprised of magnesium oxide powder attached to a vermiculite substrate has been commercially developed for this purpose. Data from extensive laboratory testing of this material in a packed-bed flow system are presented. NO2 removal efficiencies, kinetics, and proposed NO2 removal mechanisms over a range of representative JETC exhaust gas characteristics are described. Exhaust gas variables evaluated included: NO2 concentration, temperature, flow rate (retention time), oxygen content, and moisture content. Availability of water and oxygen were found to be important variables. It is probable that water is necessary for the conversion of MgO to Mg(OH)2, which is a more reactive compound having thermal stability over the range of temperatures evaluated. Gaseous oxygen serves to oxidize NO to NO2, the latter being more readily removed from the gas stream. The presence of oxygen also serves to offset thermal decomposition of NO2 or surface nitrite/nitrate. Effective `lifetime` and regenerability of the exposed sorbent material were also evaluated. NO2 removal efficiencies were found to greatly exceed those for NO, with a maximum value greater than 90 percent. The effective conversion of NO to NO2 is a crucial requirement for removal of the former. The reaction between NO2 and MgO-vermiculite is first-order with respect to NO2.

  14. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  16. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  17. Magnesium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... sources of magnesium: Fruits or vegetables (such as bananas, dried apricots, and avocados) Nuts (such as almonds ... Supplements, National Institutes of Health. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Magnesium . ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-Consumer . ...

  18. Low magnesium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low magnesium level is a condition in which the amount of magnesium in the blood is lower than normal. The medical ... that convert or use energy ( metabolism ). When the level of magnesium in the body drops below normal, ...

  19. Laser-induced magnesium production from magnesium oxide using reducing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M. S.; Yabe, T.; Baasandash, C.; Sato, Y.; Mori, Y.; Shi-Hua, Liao; Sato, H.; Uchida, S.

    2008-12-01

    Experiments for laser induced production of magnesium (Mg) from magnesium oxide (MgO) using reducing agents (R) were conducted. In these experiments, continuous wave CO2 focused laser is focused on a mixture of magnesium oxide and reducing agent. High power density of focused laser leads to high temperature and the reduction reaction resulting in Mg production. The resultant vapor is collected on a copper plate and analyzed in terms of magnesium deposition efficiency. Deposition efficiencies with various reducing agents such as Zr, C, and Si have been measured to be 60, 9.2, and 12.1 mg/kJ respectively. An excess addition of reducing agent over their corresponding reaction stoichiometric amounts is found to be optimum condition for the most of performed laser induced reactions. In addition, utilizing solar-pumped laser in Mg production with reducing agent will reduce CO2 emission and produce magnesium with high-energy efficiency and large throughput.

  20. IWTS metal-water reaction rate evaluation (Fauske and Associates report 99-26)

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-29

    The report presents a thermal stability analysis of partially metallic particulate in two IWTS components, the knock out pot and settlers. Particulate in the knock out pot is thermally stable for combinations of average particle size and metal mass fraction which appear realistic. Particulate in the settlers is thermally stable when a realistic account of particle reactions over time, metal fraction, and size distribution is considered.

  1. Early irradiation of matter in the solar system - Magnesium /proton, neutron/ scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.

    1976-01-01

    The occurrence of positive and negative Mg-26 anomalies in inclusions of the Allende meteorite is explained in terms of proton bombardment of a gas of solar composition. A significant fraction of Mg-26 in the irradiated gas is stored temporarily in the form of radioactive Al-26 by the reaction Mg-26(p, n)Al-26. Proton fluxes of 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 19th power protons per square centimeter per year at 1 million electron volts are inferred. Aluminum-rich materials condensing from the gas phase have positive Mg-26 anomalies, whereas magnesium-rich materials have negative Mg-26 anomalies. The proton flux required to account for the observed magnesium anomalies is used to investigate possible isotopic anomalies in the elements from oxygen to argon. Detectable isotopic anomalies are predicted only for neon. The anomalous neon is virtually pure Ne-22 from Na-22 decay. The predicted amount of anomalous Ne-22 is about 10 to the -8th power cubic centimeter (at standard temperature and pressure) per milligram of sodium.

  2. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  3. Absolute Determination for the Sodium-22(p,gamma)Magnesium-23 Reaction Rate: Consequences for Nucleosynthesis of Sodium-22 in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, Anne L.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of classical novae on ONe white dwarfs predict substantial production of 22Na. Observation of 22Na decay should be correlated with the corresponding nova because the half life of 22Na is only 2.6 years. The 1275-keV gamma ray from the beta decay of 22Na is, therefore, an excellent diagnostic for the nova phenomenon and a long-sought target of gamma-ray telescopes. Nova simulations determine the maximum 22Na-detection distance to be < 1 kpc for the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, consistent with its non-observation to date. However, model estimates are strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Na(p, gamma)23Mg reaction, which is the main destruction mechanism of 22Na in novae. The 22Na(p,gamma)23Mg rate is expected to be dominated by narrow, isolated resonances with Ep < 300 key. The currently employed rate is based on a single set of absolute resonance-strength measurements with Ep ≥ 290 keV, and one relative measurement of resonances with Ep ≥ 214 keV. Recently, a new level has been found in 23Mg which would correspond to a resonance at Ep = 198 keV that might dominate the reaction rate at nova temperatures. We have measured the 22Na(p, gamma) 23Mg resonance strengths directly and absolutely, in addition to resonance energies and branches. Proton beams were produced at the University of Washington and delivered to a specially designed beam line that included rastering and cold vacuum protection of the 22Na-implanted targets (fabricated at TRIUMF-ISAC). Two high-purity germanium detectors were employed and surrounded by anticoincidence shields to reduce cosmic backgrounds. Measurements were made on known 22Na+p resonances, which we observed at laboratory energies Ep = 213, 288, 454, 610 keV and on proposed resonances at Ep = 198, 209, and 232 key. The proposed resonances were not observed, and the upper limit placed on the 198-keV resonance strength indicates that the resonance at Ep = 213 keV still dominates the reaction rate

  4. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    MedlinePlus

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis ... painful shoulder. It is also used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in ...

  5. B-side electron transfer promoted by absorbance of multiple photons in Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Jackson, J.A.; Taguchi, A.K.W.; Woodbury, N.W.

    1999-06-03

    Femtosecond transient absorbance spectra of quinone-depleted Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers in the Q{sub X} transition region have been measured at 15 K under various excitation conditions. This study focuses on the excitation wavelength dependence and excitation intensity dependence of the formation of charge-separated states on the A- and B-side of the reaction center, judging from the bleaching of the 533 nm (B-side) and 544 nm (A-side) ground-state transitions of the reaction center bacteriopheophytins (H{sub A} and H{sub B}). Upon low-intensity selective excitation directly into the bacteriopheophytin Q{sub Y} transitions (near 760 nm), bleaching of both ground-state bacteriopheophytin Q{sub X} transitions appeared immediately, showing that initially either the A- or B-side bacteriopheophytin could be excited. However, both excited states ultimately resulted in P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} formation under these conditions. Low-intensity excitation at any of the various wavelengths showed no difference in the kinetics of the A-side charge separation forming P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} and no substantial formation of the B-side charge-separated state, P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}}. In contrast, high-intensity 595 nm excitation resulted in substantial long-lived bleaching of the B-side bacteriopheophytin ground-state transition at 533 nm. This 533 nm bleaching was formed with essentially the same time constant as the bleaching at 544 nm due to A-side charge separation. Both bleaching bands persisted at the longest times measured in quinone-removed reaction centers. The long-lived bleaching at 533 nm using high-intensity excitation most likely represents the formation of P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}} with a relative yield of nearly 40%. One possible mechanism for B-side electron transfer is that two-photon excitation of the reaction center resulting in the state P{sup *}B{sub B}{sup *} makes P{sup +}B{sub B}{sup {minus}} thermodynamically

  6. Magnesium and Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  7. Magnesium and Space Flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Zwart, Sara R

    2015-12-08

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4-6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4-6-month space missions.

  8. Monitoring Biodegradation of Magnesium Implants with Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daoli; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Xuefei; Kuhlmann, Julia; Doepke, Amos; Dong, Zhongyun; Shanov, Vesselin N.; Heineman, William R.

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys exhibit properties such as high strength, light weight, and in vivo corrosion that make them promising candidates for the development of biodegradable metallic implant materials for bone repair, stents and other medical applications. Sensors have been used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium and its alloys by measuring the concentrations of the following corrosion products: magnesium ions, hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. The corrosion characterization system with home-made capillary pH and Mg2+ microsensors has been developed for real-time detection of magnesium corrosion in vitro. A hydrogen gas sensor was used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium by measuring the concentration of the hydrogen gas reaction product in vivo. The high permeability of hydrogen through skin allows transdermal monitoring of the biodegradation of a magnesium alloy implanted beneath the skin by detecting hydrogen gas at the skin surface. The sensor was used to map hydrogen concentration in the vicinity of an implanted magnesium alloy.

  9. Measurement of double differential charged-particle emission cross sections for reactions induced by 26 MeV protons and FKK model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Aoto, A.; Kashimoto, H.

    1994-06-01

    Double differential charged-particle emission cross sections of proton-induced reactions have been measured for {sup nat}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Si, {sup 98}Mo, {sup 106}Pd, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 181}Ta at energies around 26 MeV. Several (p,p{prime}) and (p,n) data for {sup 98}Mo and {sup 106}Pd in the incident energy range from 12 to 26 MeV are analysed in terms of the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model, in order to study preequilibrium nucleon emission from nucleon-induced reactions.

  10. Enhanced Bacterial α(2,6)-Sialyltransferase Reaction through an Inhibition of Its Inherent Sialidase Activity by Dephosphorylation of Cytidine-5'-Monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji-Yeon; Lim, Se-Jong; Kwon, Ohsuk; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Ha Hyung; Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α(2,6)-sialyltransferases (STs) from Photobacterium damsela, Photobacterium sp. JT-ISH-224, and P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and their ST activities were compared directly using a galactosylated bi-antennary N-glycan as an acceptor substrate. In all ST reactions, there was an increase of sialylated glycans at shorter reaction times and later a decrease in prolonged reactions, which is related with the inherent sialidase activities of bacterial STs. These sialidase activities are greatly increased by free cytidine monophosphate (CMP) generated from a donor substrate CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) during the ST reactions. The decrease of sialylated glycans in prolonged ST reaction was prevented through an inhibition of sialidase activity by simple treatment of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which dephosphorylates CMP to cytidine. Through supplemental additions of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac to the reaction using the recombinant α(2,6)-ST from P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 (P145-ST), the content of bi-sialylated N-glycan increased up to ~98% without any decrease in prolonged reactions. This optimized P145-ST reaction was applied successfully for α(2,6)-sialylation of asialofetuin, and this resulted in a large increase in the populations of multi-sialylated N-glycans compared with the reaction without addition of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac. These results suggest that the optimized reaction using the recombinant P145-ST readily expressed from E. coli has a promise for economic glycan synthesis and glyco-conjugate remodeling.

  11. Enhanced Bacterial α(2,6)-Sialyltransferase Reaction through an Inhibition of Its Inherent Sialidase Activity by Dephosphorylation of Cytidine-5'-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Yeon; Lim, Se-Jong; Kwon, Ohsuk; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Ha Hyung; Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α(2,6)-sialyltransferases (STs) from Photobacterium damsela, Photobacterium sp. JT-ISH-224, and P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and their ST activities were compared directly using a galactosylated bi-antennary N-glycan as an acceptor substrate. In all ST reactions, there was an increase of sialylated glycans at shorter reaction times and later a decrease in prolonged reactions, which is related with the inherent sialidase activities of bacterial STs. These sialidase activities are greatly increased by free cytidine monophosphate (CMP) generated from a donor substrate CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) during the ST reactions. The decrease of sialylated glycans in prolonged ST reaction was prevented through an inhibition of sialidase activity by simple treatment of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which dephosphorylates CMP to cytidine. Through supplemental additions of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac to the reaction using the recombinant α(2,6)-ST from P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 (P145-ST), the content of bi-sialylated N-glycan increased up to ~98% without any decrease in prolonged reactions. This optimized P145-ST reaction was applied successfully for α(2,6)-sialylation of asialofetuin, and this resulted in a large increase in the populations of multi-sialylated N-glycans compared with the reaction without addition of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac. These results suggest that the optimized reaction using the recombinant P145-ST readily expressed from E. coli has a promise for economic glycan synthesis and glyco-conjugate remodeling. PMID:26231036

  12. Temperature dependent phase transformation in nano sized magnesium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumangala T., P.; Mahender, C.; Venkataramani, N.; Prasad, Shiva

    2015-06-01

    The phase transformation in nanosized stoichiometric magnesium ferrite is being discussed. It was shown by TGA/DSC that there exist two reactions (shown by exothermic peaks) in nano sized magnesium ferrite when synthesized by sol gel combustion synthesis. First one of these reactions resulted in the precipitation of α-Fe2O3 and a resultant spinel. The second reaction resulted in stoichiometric spinel from this two phase system.

  13. Oxalate metabolism in magnesium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Rattan, V; Thind, S K; Jethi, R K; Sidhu, H; Nath, R

    1993-06-01

    Male weanling rats were maintained on magnesium-deficient diet for 30 d and compared with pair-fed control rats fed magnesium-supplemented diet. Magnesium deficiency led to slow growth and finally to a significant decrease in body weight (P < 0.001) accompanied by a significant hypomagnesaemia, hypomagnesuria and hyperoxaluria (P < 0.001 in each case) in experimental rats as compared to the control rats. Magnesium deficiency altered the glyoxylate metabolism in the liver and kidney mitochondria by significantly decreasing glyoxylate oxidation (by 26 per cent in liver and 17 per cent in kidney) and activity of alpha-ketoglutarate:glyoxylate carboligase enzyme (by 35 per cent in liver and 27 per cent in kidney) in the experimental animals. A significant increase in the specific activities of glycolic acid oxidase (P < 0.001) and glycolic acid dehydrogenase (P < 0.01) and a significant decrease in alanine transaminase (P < 0.01) was also observed in magnesium-deficient rats. No change in liver and kidney lactate dehydrogenase was observed. Thus magnesium deficiency in rats leads to accumulation of glyoxylate in the tissues, a part of which is converted into oxalate, thereby promoting hyperoxaluria.

  14. Regioselective synthesis of isotopically labeled Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A-D3) by reaction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D3 with magnesium methyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Roth, Nadine; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Müller, Michael; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-10-10

    For the reliable quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in biological matrices by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS(/MS), an isotopically labeled internal standard was synthesized starting from Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D(3) (THC-D(3)). Synthesis strategy was based on a method reported by Mechoulam et al. in 1969 using magnesium methyl carbonate (MMC) as carboxylation reagent for the synthesis of cannabinoid acids. Preliminary experiments with THC to optimize yield of the product (THCA-A) resulted in the synthesis of the positional isomer tetrahydrocannabinolic acid B (THCA-B) as a byproduct. Using the optimized conditions for the desired isomer, THCA-A-D(3) was prepared and isolated with a yield of approx. 10% after two synthesis cycles. Isotope purity was estimated to be >99% by relative abundance of the molecular ions. The synthesized compound proved to be suitable as an internal standard for quantification of THCA-A in serum and hair samples of cannabis consumers.

  15. Study of the 27Al(n,2n)26Al reaction and its potential for ion-temperature measurements (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Chuvaev, S. V.; Filatenkov, A. A.; Ikeda, Y.; Kutschera, W.; Vonach, H.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed measurement of the 27Al(n,2n)26Al reaction cross sections was performed in the near-threshold region (Eth=13.54 MeV), and its possible applicability for ion temperature measurements was investigated. The production of the long-lived radionuclide 26Al (t1/2=7.2×105 a) is of considerable interest to the fusion reactor program. Particularly long-lived radionuclides may lead to a significant long-term waste-disposal. Al-containing materials and Si carbide are candidate materials for fusion-reactor systems. The Al(n,2n) reaction and the two step process 28Si(n,np+d)27Al(n,2n) are the dominating processes for the formation of 26Al in a fusion reactor.1 The 27Al(n,2n)26Al reaction is expected to vary strongly with neutron energy above threshold. An accurate description of the excitation function is necessary to estimate the production of 26Al in a typical D-T fusion environment. From the existing data on cross sections it was not possible to produce an unambiguous excitation function. We started therefore a project to determine this excitation function more accurately. It has been pointed out by Smither and Greenwood2 that the 27Al(n,2n)26Al reaction can be used as a monitor to determine the ion temperature in a D-T fusion plasma. This method makes use of the neutron energy distribution as a sensitive function of the plasma ion temperature. The temperature sensitivity is most pronounced if the excitation function is strongly nonlinear and if the threshold falls within the energy region of the emitted neutrons: For the 27Al(n,2n)26Al reaction the threshold lies at 13.54 MeV and the (n,2n) reaction is expected to a strongly varying function of the neutron energy near threshold. Al samples were irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons generated via the T(d,n)4He reaction at three different laboratories under different conditions. The produced 26Al was measured using the extremely sensitive method of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 26Al/27Al isotope ratios as low as

  16. Magnesium degradation products: effects on tissue and human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seitz, J-M; Eifler, R; Bach, Fr-W; Maier, H J

    2014-10-01

    Owing to their mechanical properties, metallic materials present a promising solution in the field of resorbable implants. The magnesium metabolism in humans differs depending on its introduction. The natural, oral administration of magnesium via, for example, food, essentially leads to an intracellular enrichment of Mg(2+) . In contrast, introducing magnesium-rich substances or implants into the tissue results in a different decomposition behavior. Here, exposing magnesium to artificial body electrolytes resulted in the formation of the following products: magnesium hydroxide, magnesium oxide, and magnesium chloride, as well as calcium and magnesium apatites. Moreover, it can be assumed that Mg(2+) , OH(-) ions, and gaseous hydrogen are also present and result from the reaction for magnesium in an aqueous environment. With the aid of physiological metabolic processes, the organism succeeds in either excreting the above mentioned products or integrating them into the natural metabolic process. Only a burst release of these products is to be considered a problem. A multitude of general tissue effects and responses from the Mg's degradation products is considered within this review, which is not targeting specific implant classes. Furthermore, common alloying elements of magnesium and their hazardous potential in vivo are taken into account.

  17. Superplasticity in Thermomechanically Processed High Magnesium Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    California DTIC EECTE JL I 1984 THESIS SUPERPLASTICITY IN THERMOMECHANICALLY PROCESSED HIGH MAGNESIUM ALUMINUM-MAGNESIUM ALLOYS C:L by CD) John J. Becker...High Magnesium Aluminum- March 1984 Magnesium Alloys S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(@) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) John J. Becker 9...magnesium, aluminum-magnesium alloys were investigated. The thermomechanical processing itself included warm rolling at 300°C to 94% reduction

  18. IMPACT OF A REVISED {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al REACTION RATE ON THE OPERATION OF THE Mg-Al CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Imbriani, G.; DiLeva, A.; Limata, B.; Strieder, F.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Lemut, A.; Formicola, A.; Gustavino, C.; Junker, M.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; and others

    2013-02-15

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H-burning regions. In particular, low-energy nuclear resonances in the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al reaction affect the production of radioactive {sup 26}Al{sup gs} as well as the resulting Mg/Al abundance ratio. Reliable estimations of these quantities require precise measurements of the strengths of low-energy resonances. Based on a new experimental study performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics, we provide revised rates of the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup gs} and the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} reactions with corresponding uncertainties. In the temperature range 50-150 MK, the new recommended rate of {sup 26}Al {sup m} production is up to five times higher than previously assumed. In addition, at T = 100 MK, the revised total reaction rate is a factor of two higher. Note that this is the range of temperature at which the Mg-Al cycle operates in a H-burning zone. The effects of this revision are discussed. Due to the significantly larger {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} rate, the estimated production of {sup 26}Al{sup gs} in H-burning regions is less efficient than previously obtained. As a result, the new rates should imply a smaller contribution from Wolf-Rayet stars to the galactic {sup 26}Al budget. Similarly, we show that the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) extra-mixing scenario does not appear able to explain the most extreme values of {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, i.e., >10{sup -2}, found in some O-rich presolar grains. Finally, the substantial increase of the total reaction rate makes the hypothesis of self-pollution by massive AGBs a more robust explanation for the Mg-Al anticorrelation observed in globular-cluster stars.

  19. Magnesium Ethylenediamine Borohydride as Solid-State Electrolyte for Magnesium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Roedern, Elsa; Kühnel, Ruben-Simon; Remhof, Arndt; Battaglia, Corsin

    2017-01-01

    Solid-state magnesium ion conductors with exceptionally high ionic conductivity at low temperatures, 5 × 10−8 Scm−1 at 30 °C and 6 × 10−5 Scm−1 at 70 °C, are prepared by mechanochemical reaction of magnesium borohydride and ethylenediamine. The coordination complexes are crystalline, support cycling in a potential window of 1.2 V, and allow magnesium plating/stripping. While the electrochemical stability, limited by the ethylenediamine ligand, must be improved to reach competitive energy densities, our results demonstrate that partially chelated Mg2+ complexes represent a promising platform for the development of an all-solid-state magnesium battery. PMID:28387305

  20. Laser-induced Magnesium Production from Magnesium Oxide for Renewable Magnesium Energy Cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shi-Hua; Yabe, Takashi; Baasandash, Choijil; Sato, Yuji; Ichikawa, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Masashi; Fukushima, Chika; Uchida, Shigeaki; Ohkubo, Tomomasa

    2010-10-01

    We succeeded in reducing magnesium [Mg] from magnesium oxide [MgO] by laser irradiation. The laser-induced vapor temperature was measured to be approximately 5000 K on the irradiating spot, where MgO separated into Mg and oxygen [O] atoms through thermal dissociation. The Mg vapor was intercepted a cooper plate, forming solid deposits on it. However, the presence of oxygen, resulting from MgO dissociation, leads to Mg oxidization in the course of vapor cooling. The deoxidization process results in lower Mg fraction in the deposits and degrades energy recovery efficiency from laser irradiation. To quench this recombination, we also employed silicon as reducing agents to capture oxygen in favor of Mg extraction. In these experiments, the molar ratio effect (MgO:Si = 1:0-1) on the magnesium fractions and energy efficiencies were measured by means of a chemical reaction. The maximal energy efficiency, %, was obtained at the ratio of MgO:Si = 1:0.5. This ratio is lower than that of the Pidgeon process with Mg:Si = 1:1 resulting in a lower energy efficiency of %. This implies laser-induced Mg production is a economical process of using reducing agents with large throughput. The usage of laser radiation generated from solar energy for Mg metallurgy will significantly reduce CO2 emission.

  1. Direct total cross section measurement of the 16O(α,γ)20Ne reaction at Ec.m.=2.26 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Brown, J. R.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Erikson, L.; Fallis, J.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2011-08-01

    In stellar helium burning, 16O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne at Ec.m.=2.26MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

  2. Magnesium(I) Dimers Bearing Tripodal Diimine-Enolate Ligands: Proficient Reagents for the Controlled Reductive Activation of CO2 and SO2.

    PubMed

    Boutland, Aaron J; Pernik, Indrek; Stasch, Andreas; Jones, Cameron

    2015-10-26

    The first examples of magnesium(I) dimers bearing tripodal ligands, [(Mg{κ(3) -N,N',O-(ArNCMe)2 (OCCPh2 )CH})2 ] [Ar=2,6-iPr2 C6 H3 (Dip) 7, 2,6-Et2 C6 H3 (Dep) 8, or mesityl (Mes) 9] have been prepared by post-synthetic modification of the β-diketiminato ligands of previously reported magnesium(I) systems, using diphenylketene, OCCPh2 . In contrast, related reactions between β-diketiminato magnesium(I) dimers and the isoelectronic ketenimine, MesNCCPh2 , resulted in reductive insertion of the substrate into the MgMg bond of the magnesium(I) reactant, and formation of [{(Nacnac)Mg}2 {μ-κ(2) -N,C-(Mes)NCCPh2 }] (Nacnac=[(ArNCMe)2 CH](-) ; Ar=Dep 10 or Mes 11). Reactions of the four-coordinate magnesium(I) dimer 8 with excess CO2 are readily controlled, and cleanly give carbonate [(LMg)2 (μ-κ(2) :κ(2) -CO3 )] 12 (L=[κ(3) -N,N',O-(DepNCMe)2 (OCCPh2 )CH](-) ; thermodynamic product), or oxalate [(LMg)2 (μ-κ(2) :κ(2) -C2 O4 )] 13 (kinetic product), depending on the reaction temperature. Compound 12 and CO are formed by reductive disproportionation of CO2 , whereas 13 results from reductive coupling of two molecules of the gas. Treatment of 8 with an excess of N2 O cleanly gives the μ-oxo complex [(LMg)2 (μ-O)] 14, which reacts facilely with CO2 to give 12. This result presents the possibility that 14 is an intermediate in the formation of 12 from the reaction of 8 and CO2 . In contrast to its reactions with CO2 , 8 reacts with SO2 over a wide temperature range to give only one product; the first example of a magnesium dithionite complex, [(LMg)2 (μ-κ(2) :κ(2) -S2 O4 )] 16, which is formed by reductive coupling of two molecules of SO2 , and is closely related to f-block metal dithionite complexes derived from similar SO2 reductive coupling processes. On the whole, this study strengthens previously proposed analogies between the reactivities of magnesium(I) systems and low-valent f-block metal complexes, especially with respect to small

  3. Chiral 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)pyridine-rare earth metal complexes as catalysts for highly enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of 2-benzopyrylium-4-olates.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kei; Inoue, Shuichi; Kakehi, Akikazu; Shiro, Motoo

    2005-01-07

    Significant levels of enantioselectivity were obtained in 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of 2-benzopyrylium-4-olate generated from the Rh(2)(OAc)(4)-catalyzed decomposition of o-methoxycarbonyl-alpha-diazoacetophenone. This reaction utilized chiral 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)pyridine (Pybox)--rare earth metal triflate complexes as chiral Lewis acid catalysts. The reactions with several benzyloxyacetaldehyde derivatives catalyzed by a Sc(III)--Pybox-i-Pr complex (10 mol %) proceeded smoothly to yield endo-adducts selectively with high enantioselectivity (up to 93% ee). For the reaction with benzyl pyruvate, the Sc(III)-Pybox-i-Pr complex (10 mol %) catalyzed the reaction effectively in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid (10 mol %) to yield an exo-adduct with both high diastereo- and enantioselectivity (94% ee). This catalytic system was efficiently applied to the reactions with several other alpha-keto esters with high exo- and enantioselectivities (up to 95% ee). In contrast to the reaction with carbonyl compounds, Yb(III)--Pybox-Ph complex (10 mol %) was found to be effective to obtain high enantioselectivity (96% ee) of diastereoselectively produced exo-cycloadduct in the reaction with 3-acryloyl-2-oxazolidinone.

  4. Superior catalytic activity derived from a two-dimensional Ti3C2 precursor towards the hydrogen storage reaction of magnesium hydride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfeng; Du, Hufei; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-01-14

    The superior catalytic effects derived from a 2D Ti3C2 (MXene), synthesized by the exfoliation of Ti3AlC2 powders, towards the hydrogen storage reaction of MgH2 were demonstrated. The 5 wt% Ti3C2-containing MgH2 releases 6.2 wt% H2 within 1 min at 300 °C and absorbs 6.1 wt% H2 within 30 s at 150 °C, exhibiting excellent dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics.

  5. High power rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Huajun; Gao, Tao; Li, Xiaogang; Wang, Xiwen; Luo, Chao; Fan, Xiulin; Yang, Chongyin; Suo, Liumin; Ma, Zhaohui; Han, Weiqiang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted considerable attention because of their potential high energy density and low cost. However, their development has been severely hindered because of the lack of appropriate cathode materials. Here we report a rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery, in which the soluble iodine reacts with Mg2+ to form a soluble intermediate and then an insoluble final product magnesium iodide. The liquid-solid two-phase reaction pathway circumvents solid-state Mg2+ diffusion and ensures a large interfacial reaction area, leading to fast reaction kinetics and high reaction reversibility. As a result, the rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery shows a better rate capability (180 mAh g-1 at 0.5 C and 140 mAh g-1 at 1 C) and a higher energy density (~400 Wh kg-1) than all other reported rechargeable magnesium batteries using intercalation cathodes. This study demonstrates that the liquid-solid two-phase reaction mechanism is promising in addressing the kinetic limitation of rechargeable magnesium batteries.

  6. High power rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Huajun; Gao, Tao; Li, Xiaogang; ...

    2017-01-10

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted considerable attention because of their potential high energy density and low cost. However, their development has been severely hindered because of the lack of appropriate cathode materials. Here we report a rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery, in which the soluble iodine reacts with Mg2+ to form a soluble intermediate and then an insoluble final product magnesium iodide. The liquid–solid two-phase reaction pathway circumvents solid-state Mg2+ diffusion and ensures a large interfacial reaction area, leading to fast reaction kinetics and high reaction reversibility. As a result, the rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery shows a better rate capability (180 mAh g–1more » at 0.5 C and 140 mAh g–1 at 1 C) and a higher energy density (~400 Wh kg–1) than all other reported rechargeable magnesium batteries using intercalation cathodes. As a result, this study demonstrates that the liquid–solid two-phase reaction mechanism is promising in addressing the kinetic limitation of rechargeable magnesium batteries.« less

  7. High power rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Huajun; Gao, Tao; Li, Xiaogang; Wang, Xiwen; Luo, Chao; Fan, Xiulin; Yang, Chongyin; Suo, Liumin; Ma, Zhaohui; Han, Weiqiang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted considerable attention because of their potential high energy density and low cost. However, their development has been severely hindered because of the lack of appropriate cathode materials. Here we report a rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery, in which the soluble iodine reacts with Mg2+ to form a soluble intermediate and then an insoluble final product magnesium iodide. The liquid–solid two-phase reaction pathway circumvents solid-state Mg2+ diffusion and ensures a large interfacial reaction area, leading to fast reaction kinetics and high reaction reversibility. As a result, the rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery shows a better rate capability (180 mAh g−1 at 0.5 C and 140 mAh g−1 at 1 C) and a higher energy density (∼400 Wh kg−1) than all other reported rechargeable magnesium batteries using intercalation cathodes. This study demonstrates that the liquid–solid two-phase reaction mechanism is promising in addressing the kinetic limitation of rechargeable magnesium batteries. PMID:28071666

  8. Recent data on the evaluation of magnesium bioavailability in humans.

    PubMed

    Benech, H; Grognet, J M

    1995-09-01

    Assessment of the bioavailability of exogenous ions present in a large amounts in the body, such as magnesium, cannot be performed by the conventional measurement of plasma levels after intravenous and/or oral administration. In the case of magnesium, this is emphasized by the fact that plasma levels are quickly regulated, mainly by the kidney and in storage compartments such as bone, after exogenous administration. Magnesium bioavailability and absorption are studied by indirect methods or by using radioactive or stable isotopes as tracers. Indirect methods are the metabolic balance method and comparison of urinary excretion between a treatment and a placebo period, often after magnesium load. However, the former only measures magnesium absorption and the latter is subject to the fragile balance of magnesium urinary excretion. Isotope studies, in particular with stable isotope probes, have benefited from the developments in mass spectrometry, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It is possible to follow exogenous magnesium in plasma after oral and intravenous administrations using 25Mg and 26Mg as tracers, and to calculate the absolute bioavailability of magnesium.

  9. Magnesium battery disposal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Louis; Atwater, Terrill

    1994-12-01

    This study assesses the disposal characteristics of U.S. Army procured military magnesium batteries under current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste identification regulations administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Magnesium batteries were tested at 100, 50, 10 and 0 percent remaining state of charge. Present findings indicate that magnesium batteries with less than 50 percent remaining charge do not exceed the federal regulatory limit of 5.0 mg/L for chromium. All other RCRA contaminates were below regulatory limits at all levels of remaining charge. Assay methods, findings, disposal requirements and design implications are discussed.

  10. Magnesium toxicosis in two horses.

    PubMed

    Henninger, R W; Horst, J

    1997-07-01

    Magnesium sulfate, a saline laxative, is often used for treatment of intestinal impactions in horses. Clinical signs of hypermagnesemia are an uncommon complication following oral administration of magnesium sulfate. Overdose of magnesium sulfate in combination with renal insufficiency, hypocalcemia, or compromise of intestinal integrity may predispose horses to magnesium toxicosis. Establishment of diuresis with fluids and IV administration of calcium may provide successful treatment of magnesium toxicosis in horses.

  11. Magnesium inhibition of calcite dissolution kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Arvidson, Rolf S.; Collier, Martin; Davis, Kevin J.; Vinson, Michael D.; Amonette, James E.; Luttge, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    We present evidence of inhibition of calcite dissolution by dissolved magnesium through direct observations of the (104) surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and vertical scanning interferometry (VSI). Far from equilibrium, the pattern of magnesium inhibition is dependent on solution composition and specific to surface step geometry. In CO2-free solutions (pH 8.8), dissolved magnesium brings about little inhibition even at concentrations of 0.8 x 10-3 molal. At the same pH, magnesium concentrations of less than 0.05 x 10-3 molal in carbonate-buffered solutions generate significant inhibition, although no changes in surface and etch pit morphology are observed. As concentrations exceed magnesite saturation, the dissolution rate shows little additional decrease; however, selective pinning of step edges results in unique etch-pit profiles, seen in both AFM and VSI datasets. Despite the decreases in step velocity, magnesium addition in carbonated solutions also appears to activate the surface by increasing the nucleation rate of new defects. These relationships suggest that the modest depression of the bulk rate measured by VSI reflects a balance between competing reaction mechanisms that simultaneously depress the rate through selective inhibition of step movement, but also enhance reactivity on terraces by lowering the energy barrier to new etch-pit formation.

  12. Thermal Stability of Magnesium Silicide/Nickel Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boor, J.; Droste, D.; Schneider, C.; Janek, J.; Mueller, E.

    2016-10-01

    Magnesium silicide-based materials are a very promising class of thermoelectric materials with excellent potential for thermoelectric waste heat recovery. For the successful application of magnesium silicide-based thermoelectric generators, the development of long-term stable contacts with low contact resistance is as important as material optimization. We have therefore studied the suitability of Ni as a contact material for magnesium silicide. Co-sintering of magnesium silicide and Ni leads to the formation of a stable reaction layer with low electrical resistance. In this paper we show that the contacts retain their low electrical contact resistance after annealing at temperatures up to 823 K for up to 168 h. By employing scanning electron microscope analysis and time-of-flight (ToF)-secondary ion mass spectrometry, we can further show that elemental diffusion is occurring to a very limited extent. This indicates long-term stability under practical operation conditions for magnesium silicide/nickel contacts.

  13. Magnesium isotopic composition of achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghatpour, Fatemeh; Teng, Fang-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium isotopic compositions of 22 well-characterized differentiated meteorites including 7 types of achondrites and pallasite meteorites were measured to estimate the average Mg isotopic composition of their parent bodies and evaluate Mg isotopic heterogeneity of the solar system. The δ26Mg values are -0.236‰ and -0.190‰ for acapulcoite-lodranite and angrite meteorites, respectively and vary from -0.267‰ to -0.222‰ in the winonaite-IAB-iron silicate group, -0.369‰ to -0.292‰ in aubrites, -0.269‰ to -0.158‰ in HEDs, -0.299‰ to -0.209‰ in ureilites, -0.307‰ to -0.237‰ in mesosiderites, and -0.303‰ to -0.238‰ in pallasites. Magnesium isotopic compositions of most achondrites and pallasite meteorites analyzed here are similar and reveal no significant isotopic fractionation. However, Mg isotopic compositions of D‧Orbigny (angrite) and some HEDs are slightly heavier than chondrites and the other achondrites studied here. The slightly heavier Mg isotopic compositions of angrites and some HEDs most likely resulted from either impact-induced evaporation or higher abundance of clinopyroxene with the Mg isotopic composition slightly heavier than olivine and orthopyroxene. The average Mg isotopic composition of achondrites (δ26Mg = -0.246 ± 0.082‰, 2SD, n = 22) estimated here is indistinguishable from those of the Earth (δ26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.07‰; 2SD, n = 139), chondrites (δ26Mg = -0.28 ± 0.06‰; 2SD, n = 38), and the Moon (δ26Mg = -0.26 ± 0.16‰; 2SD, n = 47) reported from the same laboratory. The chondritic Mg isotopic composition of achondrites, the Moon, and the Earth further reflects homogeneity of Mg isotopes in the solar system and the lack of Mg isotope fractionation during the planetary accretion process and impact events.

  14. Magnesium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  15. Preparation and hydriding behavior of magnesium metal clusters formed in low-temperature cocondensation: application of magnesium for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, H.; Nobunaga, T.; Kawahigashi, M.; Tsuchiya, S.

    1984-08-01

    Magnesium metal clusters formed in low-temperature matrices were investigated with a view to forming the metal hydride. In practice, magnesium readily absorbed large amounts of hydrogen under more moderate conditions (P/sub H/sub 2// = 460 torr, T = 200-250/sup 0/C) when it had been transformed into tetrahydrofuran- (THF-) solvated small particles formed by the cocondensation reaction of magnesium atoms with THF molecules at -196/sup 0/C. To elucidate the characteristics of hydrogen sorption of Mg-THF, a comparative study with pure magnesium powder was carried out. It is believed from the H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ isotope scrambling measurements that the high activity of the present Mg-THF system for hydrogen absorption is due to a rapid surface process in comparison with the case of the pure magnesium. This identification is reinforced by the employment of surface modification. 19 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Luminescence properties of cerium-doped di-strontium magnesium di-silicate phosphor by the solid-state reaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Sahu, Ishwar

    2016-05-01

    A series of Sr2MgSi2O7:xCe3+ (x = 1.0%, 2.0%, 3.0%, 4.0% and 5.0%) phosphors were synthesized by the solid-state reaction method. The phosphor with optimum thermoluminescence, photoluminescence and mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity was characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared techniques. The trapping parameters (i.e. activation energy, frequency factor and order of the kinetics) of each synthesized phosphor have been calculated using the peak shape method and the results have been discussed. Under ultraviolet excitation (325 nm), Sr2MgSi2O7:xCe3+ phosphors were composed of a broad band peaking at 385 nm, belonging to the broad emission band which emits violet-blue color. Commission International de I'Eclairage coordinates have been calculated for each sample and their overall emission is near violet-blue light. In order to investigate the suitability of the samples for industrial uses, color purity and color rendering index were calculated. An ML intensity of optimum [Sr2MgSi2O7:Ce3+ (3.0%)] phosphor increases linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston which suggests that these phosphors can be used as fracto-ML-based devices. The time of the peak ML intensity and the decay rate did not change significantly with respect to increasing impact velocity of the moving piston.

  17. Interstellar magnesium abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, M. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Hibbert, A.; York, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An improved evaluation of the Mg II 1240 A doublet oscillator strength is used in conjunction with recently published Copernicus observations to derive accurate Mg II column densities toward 74 stars. These imply an average of 40 percent of interstellar magnesium is in the gaseous phase. Magnesium depletion is examined as a function of various interstellar extinction and density parameters, and the results are briefly discussed in terms of current depletion theories.

  18. Rechargeable Magnesium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Orsini, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Rechargeable power cells based on magnesium anodes developed as safer alternatives to high-energy-density cells like those based on lithium and sodium anodes. At cost of some reduction in energy density, magnesium-based cells safer because less susceptible to catastrophic meltdown followed by flames and venting of toxic fumes. Other advantages include ease of handling, machining, and disposal, and relatively low cost.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium oxide supported catalysts with a meso-macropore structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Inho; Moon, Dong Ju

    2013-08-01

    Nanostructured magnesium oxide catalyst support materials with controlled morphology and size were synthesized from a supercritical carbon dioxide/ethanol solution via chemical reaction of soluble precursors and subsequent thermal decomposition. Leaf-like magnesium hydroxide precursors with high specific surface area were formed by a low-temperature chemical reaction at below 140 degrees C, while magnesium carbonate cubes with a very low surface area less than 3.3 m2/g were formed by temperature-induced phase transition from a loose to a dense structure during carbonation reaction at above 150 degrees C. The specific surface area has significantly increased higher than 90 m2/g due to the creation of highly porous MgO cubes with mesopore structure formed after thermal decomposition of the magnesium carbonate precursors. Ni-magnesium oxide catalysts with bimodal pore structure were finally formed by the consequence of packing heterogeneity of the porous magnesium oxides with different morphologies and sizes.

  20. Magnesium for Future Autos

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Luo, Alan A.; Sadayappan, Kumar; Shi, Wenfang

    2008-10-01

    In the quest for better fuel economy and improved environmental performance, magnesium may well become a metal of choice for constructing lighter, more efficient vehicles. Magnesium is the lightest structural metal, yet it has a high strength-to-weight ratio makes it comparable to steel in many applications. The world’s automakers already use magnesium for individual components. But new alloys and processing methods are needed before the metal can become economically and technologically feasible as a major automotive structural material. This article will explore the formation, challenges and initial results of an international collaboration—the Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project—that is leveraging the expertise and resources of Canada, China and the United States to advance the creation of magnesium-intensive vehicles. The MFERD project aims to develop the enabling technologies and knowledge base that will lead to a vehicles that are 50-60 percent lighter, equally affordable, more recyclable and of equal or better quality when compared to today’s vehicles. Databases of information also will be captured in models to enable further alloy and manufacturing process optimization. Finally, a life-cycle analysis of the magnesium used will be conducted.

  1. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1988-01-01

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  2. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  3. Magnesium and metabolic syndrome: The role of magnesium in health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of conditions associated with elevated risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Magnesium, the fourth most abundant cation in the human body and required in over 300 enzymatic reactions, has been shown in experimental, observational, and clinical studies to ...

  4. Magnesium hydroxide extracted from a magnesium-rich mineral for CO{sub 2} sequestration in a gas-solid system

    SciTech Connect

    Pao-Chung Lin; Cheng-Wei Huang; Ching-Ta Hsiao; Hsisheng Teng

    2008-04-15

    Magnesium hydroxide extracted from magnesium-bearing minerals is considered a promising agent for binding CO{sub 2} as a carbonate mineral in a gas-solid reaction. An efficient extraction route consisting of hydrothermal treatment on serpentine in HCl followed by NaOH titration for Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation was demonstrated. The extracted Mg(OH){sub 2} powder had a mean crystal domain size as small as 12 nm and an apparent surface area of 54 m{sup 2}/g. Under one atmosphere of 10 vol% CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, carbonation of the serpentine-derived Mg(OH){sub 2} to 26% of the stoichiometric limit was achieved at 325{sup o}C in 2 h; while carbonation of a commercially available Mg(OH){sub 2}, with a mean crystal domain size of 33 nm and an apparent surface area of 3.5 m{sup 2}/g, reached only 9% of the stoichiometric limit. The amount of CO{sub 2} fixation was found to be inversely proportional to the crystal domain size of the Mg(OH){sub 2} specimens. The experimental data strongly suggested that only a monolayer of carbonates was formed on the crystal domain boundary in the gas-solid reaction, with little penetration of the carbonates into the crystal domain. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Oxygenation Chemistry of Magnesium Alkyls Incorporating β-Diketiminate Ligands Revisited.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Tomasz; Kubisiak, Marcin; Justyniak, Iwona; Zelga, Karolina; Bojarski, Emil; Tratkiewicz, Ewa; Ochal, Zbigniew; Lewiński, Janusz

    2016-12-05

    Despite the fact that extensive research has been carried out, the oxygenation of alkyl magnesium species still remains a highly unexplored research area and significant uncertainties concerning the mechanism of these reactions and the composition of the resulting products persist. This case study compares the viability of the controlled oxygenation of alkylmagnesium complexes supported by β-diketiminates. The structural tracking of the reactivity of (N,N)MgR-type complexes towards O2 at low temperature showed that their oxygenation led exclusively to the formation of magnesium alkylperoxides (N,N)MgOOR. The results also highlight significant differences in the stability of the resulting alkylperoxides in solution and demonstrate that [(BDI)Mg(μ-η(2) :η(1) -OOBn)]2 (in which BDI=[(ArNCMe)2 CH](-) and Ar=C6 H3 iPr2 -2,6) can be easily transformed to the corresponding magnesium alkoxide [(BDI)MgOBn]2 at ambient temperature, whilst [((F3) BDI)Mg(μ-OOtBu)]2 (in which (F3) BDI=[(ArNCMe)2 CH](-) and Ar=C6 H2 F3 -2,4,6) is stable under similar conditions. The observed selective oxygenation of (N,N)MgR-type complexes to the corresponding (N,N)MgOOR alkylperoxides strongly contradicts the widely accepted radical-chain mechanism for the oxygenation of the main-group-metal alkyls. Furthermore, either the observed transformation of the alkylperoxide [(BDI)MgOOBn]2 to the alkoxide [(BDI)MgOBn]2 as well as the formation of an intractable mixture of products in the control reaction between the alkylperoxide [((F3) BDI)MgOOtBu]2 and the parent alkylmagnesium [((F3) BDI)MgtBu] complex are not in line with the common wisdom that magnesium alkoxide complexes' formation results from the metathesis reaction between MgOOR and Mg-R species. In addition, a high catalytic activity of well-defined magnesium alkylperoxides, in combination with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as an oxygen source, in the epoxidation of trans-chalcone is presented.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic (MgHPO4·3H2O, CAS Reg. No....

  9. PIGE analysis of magnesium and beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, M.; Jesus, A. P.; Luís, H.; Mateus, R.; Cruz, J.; Gasques, L.; Galaviz, D.; Ribeiro, J. P.

    2010-06-01

    In this work, we present an alternative method for PIGE analysis of magnesium and beryllium in thick samples. This method is based on the ERYA - Emitted Radiation Yield Analysis - code, which integrates the nuclear reaction excitation function along the depth of the sample. For this purpose, the excitations functions of the 25Mg(p,p'γ) 25Mg ( Eγ = 585 keV) and 9Be(p,γ) 10B ( Eγ = 718 keV) reactions were employed. Calculated gamma-ray yields were compared, at several proton energy values, with experimental yields for thick samples made of inorganic compounds containing magnesium or beryllium. The agreement is better than 5%. Taking into consideration the experimental uncertainty of the measured yields and the errors related to the stopping power values, this agreement shows that effects as the beam energy straggling, ignored in the calculation, seem to play a minor role.

  10. Chemistry and photochemistry of 2,6-bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone. An example of a compound following the anthocyanins network of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Moro, Artur J; Pana, Ana-Maria; Cseh, Liliana; Costisor, Otilia; Parola, Jorge; Cunha-Silva, L; Puttreddy, Rakesh; Rissanen, Kari; Pina, Fernando

    2014-08-14

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the 2,6-bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone chemical reactions network was studied at different pH values using NMR, UV-vis, continuous irradiation, and flash photolysis. The chemical behavior of the system partially resembles anthocyanins and their analogue compounds. 2,6-Bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone exhibits a slow color change from yellow to red styrylflavylium under extreme acidic conditions. The rate constant for this process (5 × 10(-5) s(-1)) is pH independent and controlled by the cis-trans isomerization barrier. However, the interesting feature is the appearance of the colorless compound, 7,8-dihydro-6H-chromeno[3,2-d]xanthene, isolated from solutions of acid to neutral range, characterized by (1)H NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Light absorption by 2,6-bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone solutions immediately after preparation exclusively results in cis-isomer as photoproduct, which via hemiketal formation yields (i) red styrylflavylium by dehydration under extremely acidic solutions (pH < 1) and (ii) colorless 7,8-dihydro-6H-chromeno[3,2-d]xanthene by cyclization in solutions of acid to neutral range.

  11. Corrosion in Magnesium and a Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akavipat, Sanay

    Magnesium and a magnesium alloy (AZ91C) have been ion implanted over a range of ions energies (50 to 150 keV) and doses (1 x 10('16) to 2 x 10('17) ions/cm('2)) to modify the corrosion properties of the metals. The corrosion tests were done by anodic polarization in chloride -free and chloride-containing aqueous solutions of a borated -boric acid with a pH of 9.3. Anodic polarization measurements showed that some implantations could greatly reduce the corrosion current densities at all impressed voltages and also increased slightly the pitting potential, which indicated the onset of the chloride attack. These improvements in corrosion resistance were caused by boron implantations into both types of samples. However, iron implantations were found to improve only the magnesium alloy. To study the corrosion in more detail, Scanning Auger Microprobe Spectrometer (SAM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an X-ray Energy Spectrometry (XES) attachment, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) measurements were used to analyze samples before, after, and at various corrosion stages. In both the unimplanted pure magnesium and AZ91C samples, anodic polarization results revealed that there were three active corrosion stages (Stages A, C, and E) and two passivating stages (Stages B and D). Examination of Stages A and B in both types of samples showed that only a mild, generalized corrosion had occurred. In Stage C of the TD samples, a pitting breakdown in the initial oxide film was observed. In Stage C of the AZ91C samples, galvanic and intergranular attack around the Mg(,17)Al(,12) intermetallic islands and along the matrix grain boundaries was observed. Stage D of both samples showed the formation of a thick, passivating oxygen containing, probably Mg(OH)(,2) film. In Stage E, this film was broken down by pits, which formed due to the presence of the chloride ions in both types of samples. Stages A through D of the unimplanted samples were not seen in the boron or iron

  12. Magnesium Metabolism and its Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, R

    2003-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and plays an important physiological role in many of its functions. Magnesium balance is maintained by renal regulation of magnesium reabsorption. The exact mechanism of the renal regulation is not fully understood. Magnesium deficiency is a common problem in hospital patients, with a prevalence of about 10%. There are no readily available and easy methods to assess magnesium status. Serum magnesium and the magnesium tolerance test are the most widely used. Measurement of ionised magnesium may become more widely available with the availability of ion selective electrodes. Magnesium deficiency and hypomagnesaemia can result from a variety of causes including gastrointestinal and renal losses. Magnesium deficiency can cause a wide variety of features including hypocalcaemia, hypokalaemia and cardiac and neurological manifestations. Chronic low magnesium state has been associated with a number of chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and osteoporosis. The use of magnesium as a therapeutic agent in asthma, myocardial infarction, and pre-eclampsia is also discussed. Hypermagnesaemia is less frequent than hypomagnesaemia and results from failure of excretion or increased intake. Hypermagnesaemia can lead to hypotension and other cardiovascular effects as well as neuromuscular manifestations. Causes and management of hypermagnesaemia are discussed. PMID:18568054

  13. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  14. Magnesium balance in adolescent females consuming a low- or high-calcium diet.

    PubMed

    Andon, M B; Ilich, J Z; Tzagournis, M A; Matkovic, V

    1996-06-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed on optimizing calcium intake during growth as a way to enhance peak bone mass. Although some studies in adults have shown that high calcium intake may negatively affect magnesium utilization, few data are available regarding the interaction of calcium and magnesium in healthy children. The purpose of our study was to measure the effect of calcium intake on magnesium balance in 26 adolescent girls (mean age 11.3 y) during a 14-d period. Subjects ate a controlled basal diet containing 667 mg Ca and 176 mg Mg. In addition to the basal diet, subjects were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to consume 1000 mg elemental Ca/d as calcium citrate malate or a placebo. Magnesium use did not differ between the low-calcium and high-calcium groups as measured by absorption (50% compared with 55%), urinary excretion (70 compared with 74 mg/d), and fecal excretion (88 compared with 79 mg/d). Accordingly, magnesium balance was not different in subjects consuming 667 or 1667 mg Ca/d and averaged 21 mg Mg/d for the whole study group. Magnesium balance was significantly correlated with magnesium intake (r = 0.511, P = 0.008) and magnesium absorption (r = 0.723, P < 0.001). Prediction intervals from the regression of magnesium balance on intake indicated that the current recommended dietary allowance of magnesium would result in magnesium balance > or = 8.5 mg/d in 95% of the girls. This value appears consistent with long-term accretion rates needed to account for the expansion of the total-body magnesium pool during growth. In summary, our observations support the adequacy of the current recommended dietary allowance for magnesium and indicate that alterations in magnesium utilization should not be anticipated in adolescent females consuming a high-calcium diet.

  15. Magnesium Research and Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joost, William; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-30

    The Magnesium Research and Technical Development (MR&TD) project supports efforts to increase using magnesium in automotive applications, including improving technology, lowering costs and increasing the knowledge needed to enable alloy and manufacturing process optimization. MR&TD supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project in collaboration with China and Canada. The MR&TD projects also maintains the magnesium bibliographic database at magnesium.pnl.gov.

  16. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Orosco, Pablo; Barbosa, Lucía; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl{sub 2} atmosphere of the MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C.

  17. Redox Reactions of Reduced Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN), Riboflavin (RBF), and Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Ferrihydrite and Lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-09-17

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ± 3.5 M-1∙s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ± 61 M-1∙s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ± 22 M-1∙s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 μmoles∙m-2∙s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  18. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  19. Nondestructive spot test method for magnesium and magnesium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method for spot test identification of magnesium and various magnesium alloys commonly used in aerospace applications is described. The spot test identification involves color codes obtained when several drops of 3 M hydrochloric acid are placed on the surface to be tested. After approximately thirty seconds, two drops of this reacted acid is transferred to each of two depressions in a spot plate for additions of other chemicals with subsequent color changes indicating magnesium or its alloy.

  20. Highly Soluble Alkoxide Magnesium Salts for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Jiang, Deen; Custelcean, Radu; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A unique class of air-stable and non-pyrophoric magnesium electrolytes has been developed based on alkoxide magnesium compounds. The crystals obtained from this class of electrolytes exhibit a unique structure of tri-magnesium cluster, [Mg3Cl3(OR)2(THF)6]+ [(THF)MgCl3] . High reversible capacities and good rate capabilities were obtained in Mg-Mo6S8 batteries using these new electrolytes at both 20 and 50 oC.

  1. The dynamics of the O(1D) + HCl --> OH + Cl reaction at a 0.26 eV collision energy: a comparison between theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, P; Jambrina, P G; Alvariño, J M; Hernández, M L; Aoiz, F J; Menéndez, M; Verdasco, E; González-Lezana, T

    2009-12-31

    The dynamics of the O((1)D) + HCl(v = 0, j = 0) --> Cl + OH reaction at a 0.26 eV collision energy has been investigated by means of a quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and statistical quantum and quasiclassical methods. State-resolved cross sections and Cl atom velocity distributions have been calculated on two different potential energy surfaces (PESs): the H2 surface (Martinez et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2000, 2, 589) and the latest surface by Peterson, Bowman, and co-workers (PSB2) (J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 113, 6186). The comparison with recent experimental results reveals that the PSB2 PES manages to describe correctly differential cross sections and the velocity distributions of the departing Cl atom. The calculations on the H2 PES seem to overestimate the OH scattering in the forward direction and the fraction of Cl at high recoil velocities. Although the comparison of the corresponding angular distributions is not bad, significant deviations with a statistical description are found, thus ruling out a complex-forming mechanism as the dominant reaction pathway. However, for the ClO + H product channel, the QCT and statistical predictions are found to be in good agreement.

  2. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  3. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-10-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack.

  4. Serpentine ore microtextures occurring in the magnola magnesium process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. T.; Dutrizac, J. E.; White, Carl

    2000-04-01

    Serpentine ore was leached at 95°C and 100°C in 7.0 M HCl media to study the reactions occurring in Noranda’s Magnola magnesium process. Magnesium leaches rapidly from the serpentine Mg3Si2O5(OH)4, and the silicon remains in-situ as an amorphous silica pseudomorph after the original serpentine particles. Negligible silica dissolution occurs, and silica gelation was never observed. The reaction interface extends over 300 400 µm; as a consequence, fine grinding does not significantly accelerate the rate of magnesium dissolution. Associated inclusions of brucite Mg(OH)2, awaruite Ni8Fe3, and magnetite Fe3O4 dissolve rapidly; whereas, chromite FeCr2O4 and a chromium-rich spinel (Cr,Fe,Al,Mg)3O4 remain largely unaffected.

  5. Production and Refining of Magnesium Metal from Turkey Originating Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Yeliz; Yücel, Onuralp

    2012-06-01

    In this study crown magnesium produced from Turkish calcined dolomite by the Pigeon Process was refined and corrosion tests were applied. By using factsage thermodynamic program metalothermic reduction behavior of magnesium oxide and silicate formation structure during this reaction were investigated. After thermodynamic studies were completed, calcination of dolomite and it's metalothermic reduction at temperatures of 1473 K, 1523 K and within a vacuum (varied from 20 to 200 Pa) and refining of crown magnesium was studied. Different flux compositions consisting of MgCl2, KCl, CaCl2, MgO, CaF2, NaCl, and SiO2 with and without B2O3 additions were selected for the refining process. These tests were carried out at 963 K for 15, 30 and 45 minutes setting time. Considerable amount of iron was transferred into the sludge phase and its amount decreased from 0.08% to 0.027%. This refined magnesium was suitable for the production of various magnesium alloys. As a result of decreasing iron content, minimum corrosion rate of refined magnesium was obtained 2.35 g/m2/day. The results are compared with previous studies.

  6. Sol - Gel synthesis and characterization of magnesium peroxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaison, J.; Ashok raja, C.; Balakumar, S.; Chan, Y. S.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium peroxide is an excellent source of oxygen in agriculture applications, for instance it is used in waste management as a material for soil bioremediation to remove contaminants from polluted underground water, biological wastes treatment to break down hydrocarbon, etc. In the present study, sol-gel synthesis of magnesium peroxide (MgO2) nanoparticles is reported. Magnesium peroxide is odourless; fine peroxide which releases oxygen when reacts with water. During the sol-gel synthesis, the magnesium malonate intermediate is formed which was then calcinated to obtain MgO2 nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using Thermo gravimetric -Differential Thermal Analysis (TG- DTA), X-Ray Diffraction studies (XRD) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM). Our study provides a clear insight that the formation of magnesium malonate during the synthesis was due to the reaction between magnesium acetate, oxalic acid and ethanol. In our study, we can conclude that the calcination temperature has a strong influence on particle size, morphology, monodispersity and the chemistry of the particles.

  7. [Magnesium disorder in metabolic bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akira; Imanishi, Yasuo

    2012-08-01

    Magnesium is abundantly distributed among the body. The half of the magnesium exists in the bone. In addition, magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation in vertebrates and essential for maintaining physiological function of the cells. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that magnesium deficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. The mechanism of bone fragility caused by magnesium deficiency has been intensely studied using animal models of magnesium deficiency. Magnesium deficiency causes decreased osteoblastic function and increased number of osteoclasts. Magnesium deficiency also accelerates mineralization in bone. These observations suggest that disturbed bone metabolic turnover and mineralization causes bone fragility.

  8. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-20

    In the system MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, three compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10}(also expressed as-Mg{sub 0.4}Al{sub 2.4}O{sub 4}) and MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} were formed in a single step, while MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} by rare earth ions like Ce{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} and ns{sup 2} ion Pb{sup 2+} could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  9. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  10. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  11. Magnesium reduction of uranium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.B.

    1985-08-13

    A method and apparatus are provided for reducing uranium oxide with magnesium to form uranium metal. The reduction is carried out in a molten-salt solution of density greater than 3.4 grams per cubic centimeter, thereby allowing the uranium product to sink and the magnesium oxide byproduct to float, consequently allowing separation of product and byproduct.

  12. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    irritation study. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate and Sodium Magnesium Silicate caused minimal eye irritation in a Draize eye irritation test. Bentonite caused severe iritis after injection into the anterior chamber of the eyes of rabbits and when injected intralamellarly, widespread corneal infiltrates and retrocorneal membranes were recorded. In a primary eye irritation study in rabbits, Hectorite was moderately irritating without washing and practically nonirritating to the eye with a washout. Rats tolerated a single dose of Zeolite A without any adverse reaction in the eye. Calcium Silicate had no discernible effect on nidation or on maternal or fetal survival in rabbits. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate had neither a teratogenic nor adverse effects on the mouse fetus. Female rats receiving a 20% Kaolin diet exhibited maternal anemia but no significant reduction in birth weight of the pups was recorded. Type A Zeolite produced no adverse effects on the dam, embryo, or fetus in either rats or rabbits at any dose level. Clinoptilolite had no effect on female rat reproductive performance. These ingredients were not genotoxic in the Ames bacterial test system. In primary hepatocyte cultures, the addition of Attapulgite had no significant unscheduled DNA synthesis. Attapulgite did cause significant increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat pleural mesothelial cells, but no significant increase in sister chromosome exchanges were seen. Zeolite particles (<10 microm) produced statistically significant increase in the percentage of aberrant metaphases in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and cells collected by peritoneal lavage from exposed mice. Topical application of Magnesium Aluminum Silicate to human skin daily for 1 week produced no adverse effects. Occupational exposure to mineral dusts has been studied extensively. Fibrosis and pneumoconiosis have been documented in workers involved in the mining and processing of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate

  13. Study of the e+e-→K+K- reaction in the energy range from 2.6 to 8.0 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The e+e-→K+K- cross section and charged-kaon electromagnetic form factor are measured in the e+e- center-of-mass energy range (E ) from 2.6 to 8.0 GeV using the initial-state radiation technique with an undetected photon. The study is performed using 469 fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II2 e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The form factor is found to decrease with energy faster than 1 /E2 and approaches the asymptotic QCD prediction. Production of the K+K- final state through the J /ψ and ψ (2 S ) intermediate states is observed. The results for the kaon form factor are used together with data from other experiments to perform a model-independent determination of the relative phases between electromagnetic (single-photon) and strong amplitudes in J /ψ and ψ (2 S )→K+K- decays. The values of the branching fractions measured in the reaction e+e-→K+K- are shifted relative to their true values due to interference between resonant and nonresonant amplitudes. The values of these shifts are determined to be about ±5 % for the J /ψ meson and ±15 % for the ψ (2 S ) meson.

  14. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ(aq) 26 Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  15. Preparation of plate-shape nano-magnesium hydroxide from asbestos tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao-xiang, Du; Shui-lin, Zheng

    2009-09-01

    To prepare magnesium hydroxide is one of the effective methods to the comprehensive utilization of asbestos tailings. Nano-scale magnesium hydroxide was prepared and mechanisms of in-situ surface modification were characterized in the paper. Process conditions of preparation of magnesium hydroxide from purified hydrochloric acid leachate of asbestos tailings were optimized and in-situ surface modification of the product was carried out. Results showed that optimum process conditions for preparing nano-scale magnesium hydroxide were as follows: initial concentration of Mg2+ in the leachate was 22.75g/L, precipitant was NaOH solution (mass concentration 20%), reaction temperature was 50°C, and reaction time was 5min. The diameter and thickness of the plate nano-scale magnesium hydroxide powder prepared under optimal conditions were about 100 nm and 10 nm, respectively. However, particle agglomeration was obvious, the particle size increased to micron-grade. Dispersity of the magnesium hydroxide powder could be elevated by in-situ modification by silane FR-693, titanate YB-502 and polyethylene glycol and optimum dosages were 1.5%, 1.5% and 0.75% of the mass of magnesium hydroxide, respectively. All of the modifiers adsorbed chemically on surfaces of magnesium hydroxide particles, among which Si-O-Mg bonds formed among silane FR-693 and the particle surfaces and Ti-O-Mg among titanate YB-502 and the surfaces.

  16. Ignition Temperature of Magnesium Powder and Pyrotechnic Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen-Guang; Wang, Hai-Zhen; Min, Li

    2014-07-01

    Using potassium nitrate, strontium nitrate, and potassium perchlorate as the oxidizing agents, the ignition and combustion behaviors of magnesium powders with different specific surface area were studied. The ignition temperature (Te) was extrapolated using a differential thermal analyzer, and the pyrotechnic spontaneous reaction temperature (Ts) was inferred from the temperature curve by inflection point analysis. The results showed that Ts has much better reproducibility than the extrapolated Te in characterizing the ignition of the pyrotechnic formulations. Increasing the specific surface area of the magnesium powder resulted in decreased Ts of the pyrotechnics.

  17. Synthesis of micromesoporous magnesium oxide cubes with nanograin structures in a supercritical carbon dioxide/ethanol solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Deok; Kim, Young Do; Kim, Sang Woo

    2011-07-01

    Micromesoporous magnesium oxide architectures with cubic morphologies were prepared via the chemical reaction of magnesium hydroxide in a supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2)-ethanol system, and via the sequential thermal combustion of the reaction products. The morphological change to the cube shape from an irregular form was induced by the dehydoxylation-carbonation reaction of magnesium hydroxide with supercritical CO2 at a reaction temperature of 150 degrees C, which leads to the greatly improved carbonation efficiency of magnesium hydroxide to magnesium carbonate. The precursor cubes with 3-5 microm sizes were decarbonized and transformed into the nanocrystalline MgO phase with pore sizes of 1.3-6 nm after calcining at 600 degrees C. The micromesoporous cube with high surface area of 117.5 m2/g was obtained by the thermal decarbonation with phase transition from rhombohedral to cubic phase. As a result, nanograined magnesium oxide cubes with micromesoporous structures and high specific surface areas were formed by the carbonation reaction of the magnesium hydroxide with the supercritical CO2, and the subsequent thermal decomposition of the magnesium carbonate cubes.

  18. Magnesium and calcium sulfate stabilities and the water budget of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Seal, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate probably plays a dominant role in the water cycle of Mars away from the polar ice caps through hydration and dehydration reactions. This prominence is due to its abundance, its occurrence in numerous hydration states, and its ability to hydrate and dehydrate rapidly. New experimental studies on the metastable reaction between hexahydrite (MgSO4??6H2O) and starkeyite (MgSO4-4H2O) as a function of temperature and relative humidity, supplemented by recent investigations of the stable reaction between epsomite (MgSO4??7H2O) and hexahydrite and by phase equilibrium calculations, suggest that the most important magnesium sulfate phases involved in the Martian water cycle are MgSO4??11 H2O, epsomite, starkeyite, and possibly kieserite (MgSO4??H2O). Hexahydrite is not predicted to be stable on the surface of Mars. During diurnal variations in temperature and relative humidity, 1 kg of MgSO4 can release or remove from the atmosphere 1.5 kg of H2O by cycling between kieserite and MgSO4??11 H2O. Despite subequal abundances of calcium sulfate, calcium sulfates are not likely to be important in the water cycle of the planet because of sluggish rates of hydration and dehydration and a more limited range of H2O concentrations per kilogram of CaSO4 (0.00 to 0.26 kg kg-1). Modern or recent erosion on Mars attributed to liquid water may be due to the dehydration Of MgSO4??11 H2O because of the inferred abundance and likelihood of occurrence of this phase and its limited stability relative to known variations in temperature and relative humidity.

  19. Synthesis of magnesium diboride by magnesium vapor infiltration process (MVIP)

    DOEpatents

    Serquis, Adriana C.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Mueller, Frederick M.; Peterson, Dean E.; Liao, Xiao Zhou

    2003-01-01

    A process of preparing superconducting magnesium diboride powder by heating an admixture of solid magnesium and amorphous boron powder or pellet under an inert atmosphere in a Mg:B ratio of greater than about 0.6:1 at temperatures and for time sufficient to form said superconducting magnesium diboride. The process can further include exposure to residual oxygen at high synthesis temperatures followed by slow cooling. In the cooling process oxygen atoms dissolved into MgB.sub.2 segregated to form nanometer-sized coherent Mg(B,O) precipitates in the MgB.sub.2 matrix, which can act as flux pinning centers.

  20. Dietary magnesium and urolithiasis in growing calves.

    PubMed

    Kallfelz, F A; Ahmed, A S; Wallace, R J; Sasangka, B H; Warner, R G

    1987-01-01

    The effect of high levels of dietary magnesium (1.4%) alone or in combination with elevated calcium (1.8%) or phosphorus (1.6%) on growth and health of male calves was evaluated during a nine week feeding trial after weaning. Twenty calves were randomly divided into 4 feeding groups consisting of controls, high magnesium, high magnesium and calcium or high magnesium and phosphorus. Elevated dietary minerals caused decreased feed intake and growth rate. Blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels were greatly elevated in calves fed high magnesium or magnesium and phosphorus and serum urea nitrogen was moderately elevated in calves fed high magnesium and calcium. These elevations suggested the occurrence of renal damage as a result of microcrystalline obstruction of renal tubules. Serum magnesium levels were three times normal in calves fed high magnesium or magnesium and phosphorus, but only twice normal in calves fed high magnesium and calcium. High dietary magnesium resulted in a significant depression in blood calcium level. This effect was somewhat overcome by additional dietary calcium Three calves fed the high magnesium diet and two calves fed the high magnesium and phosphorus diet developed urinary tract obstruction. The chemical composition of uroliths recovered from these calves was calcium apatite. Elevated dietary magnesium has been shown to be a cause of urolithiasis in growing male calves. Additional dietary calcium, but not phosphorus, appears to protect calves against urolithiasis induced by elevated dietary magnesium.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  4. Mineral resource of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium is the eighthmost abundant element in Earth’s crust, and the second-most abundant metal ion in seawater. Although magnesium is found in more than 60 minerals, only brucite, dolomite, magnesite and carnallite are commercially important for their magnesium content. Magnesium and its compounds also are recovered from seawater, brines found in lakes and wells, and bitterns (salts).

  5. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS... a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS Reg. No. 1309-42-8) occurs... addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or by hydration of reactive grades...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4) occurs naturally as... a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or carbonate. Heating...

  17. Magnesium deficiency: What is our status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low magnesium intake has been implicated in a broad range of cardiometabolic conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Dietary magnesium and total body magnesium status have a widely-used but imperfect biomarker in serum magnesium. Despite serum magnesium’s limitation...

  18. [Magnesium: a kardio-renal viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Vincent Matthias; Kaesler, Nadine; Kramann, Rafael; Floege, Jürgen; Marx, Nikolaus

    2016-10-01

    Disturbances in magnesium homeostasis are frequent clinical conditions, particularly the prevalence of hypomagnesaemia is high. However, it remains an open question which laboratory method is optimal to assess the magnesium level in the body. Most frequently physicians measure total magnesium in serum. Many associative data from observational studies point towards an association between low magnesium levels and increased cardiovascular risk as well as increased mortality. Vice versa, normal-to-high magnesium levels in patients with advanced renal failure translate to a better outcome. The present review summarizes our knowledge on protective effects of magnesium. Additionally, we address the limited evidence supporting targeted magnesium supplementation.

  19. Confession of a Magnesium Battery.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Claudiu B; Gregory, Thomas; Oliver, Allen G; Muldoon, John

    2015-09-17

    Magnesium is an ideal metal anode that has nearly double the volumetric capacity of lithium metal with a very negative reduction potential of -2.37 vs SHE. A significant advantage of magnesium is the apparent lack of dendrite formation during charging, which overcomes major safety and performance challenges encountered with using lithium metal anodes. Here, we highlight major recent advances in nonaqueous Mg electrochemistry, notably the development of electrolytes and cathodes, and discuss some of the challenges that must be overcome to realize a practical magnesium battery.

  20. Magnesium: Engineering the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. B.; Yang, H. Y.; Abbott, T. B.; Easton, M. A.; Birbilis, N.

    2012-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys provide numerous benefits as lightweight materials; however, industrial deployment of Mg in most instances requires anticorrosion coatings. Engineering the Mg surface is an area that has been undergoing intense research recently. Surface engineering commences with the "pretreatment" step, which can be used to modify the surface composition and morphology, resulting in surface enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Following this, electrochemical plating (including electro- and electroless plating) and conversion coatings have emerged as common means of coating Mg. In this study, we present the key aspects relating to the science and technology associated with pretreatment, electrochemical plating, and conversion coatings. This is followed by experimental examples of engineered surfaces of industrial relevance.

  1. In defense of magnesium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John P; Lewis, David F; Morrison, John C; Garite, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    Magnesium sulfate has been used by obstetricians for more than 25 years to treat preterm labor. Magnesium sulfate is effective in delaying delivery for at least 48 hours in patients with preterm labor when used in higher dosages. There do not seem to be any harmful effects of the drug on the fetus, and indeed there is a neuroprotective effect in reducing the incidence of cerebral palsy in premature newborns weighing less than 1,500 g.

  2. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    were conducted using microstructural analysis, hardness, bond strength, and corrosion testing. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cold spray, magnesium, aluminum ... corrosion pitting are the primary causes for removing the components from service. In addition, any repair must be confined to nonstructural areas of...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The U.S. Army has experienced significant corrosion problems with magnesium alloys that are used to

  3. Liberation of hydrogen from gastric acid following administration of oral magnesium.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Stephensen, C B

    1985-12-01

    We are in the process of developing a noninvasive test for gastric acid secretion based on the reaction of orally administered magnesium metal with gastric acid: Mg + 2HCl in equilibrium with MgCl2 + H2. We hypothesized that the hydrogen gas thus evolved could be detected in exhaled air and belches and that the amount of hydrogen released could be related to the amount of acid in the stomach. To validate this hypothesis, we gave magnesium to two groups of young adult volunteers following either betazole stimulation or cimetidine inhibition of acid secretion. In group I we gave subcutaneous betazole and gave magnesium in doses from 10 to 200 mg. In group II we gave oral betazole and used a constant dose of 150 mg of magnesium. In both groups we consistently detected significant increases in breath and belch hydrogen following magnesium in the betazole-stimulated volunteers. This response was blocked by cimetidine. The magnitude of the response was related to the magnesium dose, with 150 mg appearing to induce a maximum response. Administration of oral magnesium up to 200 mg was not associated with any untoward effects. We conclude that magnesium led to the release of hydrogen gas in vivo and that the quantity of hydrogen gas recovered was related to the amount of gastric acid. With further development, this principle might be used to develop a simple noninvasive test for gastric acid secretion.

  4. The role of ammonium citrate washing on the characteristics of mechanochemical-hydrothermal derived magnesium-containing apatites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Suchanek, Wojciech L; Shuk, Pavel; Byrappa, Kullaiah; Oakes, Charles; Riman, Richard E; Brown, Kelly; Tenhuisen, Kevor S; Janas, Victor F

    2007-07-01

    The role of citrate washing on the physical and chemical characteristics of magnesium-substituted apatites (HAMgs) was performed. HAMgs were synthesized by a mechanochemical-hydrothermal route at room temperature in as little as 1 h, which is five times faster than our previous work. Magnesium-substituted apatites had concentrations as high as 17.6 wt% Mg with a corresponding specific surface area (SSA) of 216 m(2)/g. A systematic study was performed to examine the influence of increasing magnesium content on the physical and chemical characteristics of the reaction products. As the magnesium content increased from 0 to 17.6 wt%, magnesium-doped apatite crystallite size decreased from 12 to 8.8 nm. The Mg/(Mg + Ca) ratio in the product was enriched relative to that used for the reacting precursor solution. During mechanochemical-hydrothermal reaction, magnesium doped apatites co-crystallize with magnesium hydroxide. Citrate washing serves to remove the magnesium hydroxide phase. The concomitant increase in surface area results because of the removal of this phase. Possible mechanisms for magnesium hydroxide leaching are discussed to explain the measured trends.

  5. Magnesium and Dialysis: The Neglected Cation.

    PubMed

    Alhosaini, Mohamad; Leehey, David J

    2015-09-01

    Disorders of magnesium homeostasis are very common in dialysis patients but have received scant attention. In this review, we address measurement of plasma magnesium, magnesium balance and the factors that affect magnesium flux during dialysis, the prevalence of hypo- and hypermagnesemia in dialysis patients, and the potential clinical significance of hypo- and hypermagnesemia in dialysis patients. Many factors can affect plasma magnesium concentration, including diet, nutritional status (including plasma albumin level), medications (such as proton pump inhibitors), and dialysis prescription. Further interventional studies to determine the effect of normalization of plasma magnesium concentration on clinical outcomes are needed. At the present time, we recommend that predialysis plasma magnesium be measured on a regular basis, with the dialysate magnesium concentration adjusted to maintain plasma magnesium concentration within the normal range.

  6. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  7. [Exploitation of the chemistry of magnesium carbenoids and their use in organic synthesis].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tsuyoshi

    2009-09-01

    Synthetic organic chemistry is a base of medicinal chemistry and the exploitation of new methods for carbon-carbon bond formation is of most importance in synthetic organic chemistry. Carbenes and carbenoids have long been known to be highly reactive carbon species that show a variety of unique reactivity. However, those reactive species are not fully used in organic synthesis. The reasons are as follows: one is the precursors for the generation of carbenes and carbenoids are quite limited and the other is that the reactivity of the species is too high to control. In order to solve the problem mentioned above, we used alpha-haloalkyl (or alkenyl) aryl sulfoxides as the precursors and used sulfoxide-magnesium exchange reaction for generation of much mild magnesium carbenoids. alpha-Haloalkyl (or alkenyl) aryl sulfoxides are quite easily synthesized in high overall yields. Magnesium carbenoids, cyclopropylmagnesium carbenoids, cyclobutylmagnesium carbenoids, magnesium beta-oxido carbenoids, and magnesium alkylidene carbenoids are generated at low temperature from the corresponding sulfoxides with a Grignard reagent in quantitative yields. They were found to be stable usually at below -60 degrees C for at least 30 min. The each magnesium carbenoids have their own unique reactivities and we could find many unprecedented reactions from these reactive species. Recent results for the developments of new synthetic methods based on the chemistry of magnesium carbenoids are described.

  8. On the role of magnesium and silicon in the formation of alumina from aluminum alloys by means of DIMOX processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Zhu, Degui; Xu, Changqing; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Jian

    1996-08-01

    This article deals with the reaction mechanisms of the DIMOX (Directed Melt Oxided) processing of aluminum alloys. An orthogonalized experimental procedure was introduced to stipulate the effects of the reaction temperature, reaction time, and additional metallic elements, magnesium and silicon, on the oxidation process of aluminum alloys. Emphasis is placed on the distribution of magnesium and silicon in the products so that the behaviors of these two crucial elements for the formation of alumina from directed oxidation of aluminum alloys could be revealed. Alterative methods, including optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probing, and wave spectrum analysis were applied to specify the microstructure characters of the products and locate the position of both magnesium and silicon in the reaction products. Judged by the weight gain after reaction, the results indicated that the temperature is the most influential factor in controlling the oxidation kinetics. Silicon is more effective than magnesium in accelerating the process, although magnesium is indispensable for the process to take place. While judged by the morphology of the reaction products, an excessive amount of silicon is harmful to the DIMOX process in that the final products consist of a large amount of porosity. Both magnesium and silicon are rather concentrated in specific regions than homogeneously distributed in the whole products. The contents of magnesium and silicon in the surface region are not as high as expected, with most of the magnesium being concentrated in the region directly neighboring the bulky metals and most of the Si in the residual bulky metals, although the contents of these two elements in the surface region are a little higher than the regions next to the surface. These characteristics, combined with other investigations, suggest that the decisive role of the slight amount of magnesium and silicon in the nucleation and growth of Al2O3 could be explained by

  9. Measurements of the {sup 25}Mg({sup 11}B,{sup 12}C){sup 24}Na and {sup 25}Mg({sup 11}B,{sup 10}Be){sup 26}Al proton transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, P. N. de; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Benjamim, E. A.; Lima, G. F.; Moro, A. M.

    2006-08-15

    Angular distributions for the {sup 11}B+{sup 25}Mg elastic scattering, {sup 25}Mg({sup 11}B,{sup 12}C){sup 24}Na proton pickup, and {sup 25}Mg({sup 11}B,{sup 10}Be){sup 26}Al stripping reactions have been measured at E{sub {sup 11}B}=35 MeV. The angular distributions have been analyzed by the distorted-waves Born approximation calculations using the code fresco. The spectroscopic factors for the overlaps <{sup 25}Mg|{sup 26}Al>,<{sup 25}Mg|{sup 24}Na> for the ground state and excited states of {sup 26}Al and {sup 24}Na have been obtained and compared to previous measurements and shell-model calculations.

  10. Magnesium and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Veronese, Nicola; Zanforlini, Bruno Micael; Manzato, Enzo; Sergi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is relatively stable in the intracellular compartment, although decreases linearly with advancing age. This begs the question as to whether Mg could be used as biomarker of aging. A biomarker of aging is a biological parameter of an organism that, in the absence of disease, better predicts functional capability at a later age than the chronological age. Bone and muscle Mg content might be useful biomarkers, but the need for biopsies and the heterogeneous distribution of Mg in bones and muscles strongly limit the application of these methods in clinical practice. Similar considerations can be made for urinary Mg assessment, particularly after a loading test. Markers of Mg in blood seem fairly unreliable as biomarkers of aging since they are strongly dependent upon renal function, do not reflect the intracellular Mg status, and, in some investigations, are within normal ranges although other Mg parameters are not. Other investigations (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance with fluorescent probes) seem to be promising, but their availability remains limited.

  11. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  12. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  13. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    DOE PAGES

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nmmore » to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.« less

  14. The development of lightweight hydride alloys based on magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Bauer, W.

    1996-02-01

    The development of a magnesium based hydride material is explored for use as a lightweight hydrogen storage medium. It is found that the vapor transport of magnesium during hydrogen uptake greatly influences the surface and hydride reactions in these alloys. This is exploited by purposely forming near-surface phases of Mg{sub 2}Ni on bulk Mg-Al-Zn alloys which result in improved hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior. Conditions were found where these near-surface reactions yielded a complex and heterogeneous microstructure that coincided with excellent bulk hydride behavior. A Mg-Al alloy hydride is reported with near atmospheric plateau pressures at temperatures below 200{degrees}C. Additionally, a scheme is described for low temperature in-situ fabrication of Mg{sub 2}Ni single phase alloys utilizing the high vapor pressure of Mg.

  15. System and process for production of magnesium metal and magnesium hydride from magnesium-containing salts and brines

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Peter B.; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Adint, Tyler T.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian

    2016-11-22

    A system and process are disclosed for production of consolidated magnesium metal products and alloys with selected densities from magnesium-containing salts and feedstocks. The system and process employ a dialkyl magnesium compound that decomposes to produce the Mg metal product. Energy requirements and production costs are lower than for conventional processing.

  16. [Development of biodegradable magnesium-based biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengfa; Xu, Li; Huang, Nan

    2009-04-01

    Magnesium is a macroelement which is indispensable to human bodies. As a lightweight metal with high specific strength and favorable biocompatibility, magnesium and its alloys have been introduced in the field of biomedical materials research and have a broad application prospect. It is possible to develop new type of biodegradable medical magnesium alloys by use of the poor corrosion resistance of magnesium. Bioabsorbable magnesium stents implanted in vivo could mechanically support the vessel in a short term, effectly prevent the acute coronary occlusion and in-stent restenosis, and then be gradully biodegraded and completely absorbed in a long term. Osteoconductive bioactivity in magnesium-based alloys could promote the apposition growth of bone tissue. This paper reviews the progress of magnesium and its alloys applied in bone tissue and cardiovascular stents, and the prospect of the future research of magnesium-based biomaterials is discussed.

  17. Magnesium/Calcium Competition at Excitable Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Bill; Fry, Panni

    1998-01-01

    Considers some consequences of altering intracellular calcium supply by magnesium concentration changes. Focuses on using this procedure as an exercise with allied health students as they witness therapeutic uses of magnesium and other calcium entry inhibitors. (DDR)

  18. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  19. Dislocation structure of the magnesium nanocrystal in uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, A. M.; Nikonov, A. Yu.; Zhuravlev, A. K.; Kesarev, A. G.

    2016-11-01

    We report on molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of compression loading of nanocrystalline magnesium modeled by the embedded-atom method (EAM) potential. It is shown that plastic deformation is by basal slip and (102) twinning. The formation of stable configurations of dislocation grids is observed. Some dislocation reactions are suggested to explain the occurrence of grids. The structure of the dislocation core is shown with the Burgers vector 1 /18 [0 4 ¯43 ] .

  20. Solid-state rechargeable magnesium battery

    DOEpatents

    Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Tianbiao; Li, Guosheng

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of a solid-state electrolyte comprising magnesium borohydride, polyethylene oxide, and optionally a Group IIA or transition metal oxide are disclosed. The solid-state electrolyte may be a thin film comprising a dispersion of magnesium borohydride and magnesium oxide nanoparticles in polyethylene oxide. Rechargeable magnesium batteries including the disclosed solid-state electrolyte may have a coulombic efficiency .gtoreq.95% and exhibit cycling stability for at least 50 cycles.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by the addition of...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10034-99-8) occurs naturally as the mineral epsomite. It is prepared by neutralization of magnesium oxide, hydroxide,...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425... GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium carbonate hydroxide. It is a...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7786-30-3) is a... prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution...

  10. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  11. Synthesis of superconducting magnesium diboride objects

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Canfield, Paul C.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Petrovic, Cedomir; Cunningham, Charles E.; Lapertot, Gerard

    2003-08-15

    A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

  12. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide... is prepared as a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide... is prepared as a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble...

  20. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  11. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  12. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide... is prepared as a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. Synthesis Of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Objects.

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Canfield, Paul C.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Petrovic, Cedomir; Cunningham, Charles E.; Lapertot, Gerard

    2003-07-08

    A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

  16. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  5. ReaxFF(MgH) reactive force field for magnesium hydride systems.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Sam; Deng, Wei-Qiao; van Duin, Adri C T; Goddard, William A

    2005-02-10

    We have developed a reactive force field (ReaxFF(MgH)) for magnesium and magnesium hydride systems. The parameters for this force field were derived from fitting to quantum chemical (QM) data on magnesium clusters and on the equations of states for condensed phases of magnesium metal and magnesium hydride crystal. The force field reproduces the QM-derived cell parameters, density, and the equations of state for various pure Mg and MgH(2) crystal phases as well as and bond dissociation, angle bending, charge distribution, and reaction energy data for small magnesium hydride clusters. To demonstrate one application of ReaxFF(MgH), we have carried out MD simulations on the hydrogen absorption/desorption process in magnesium hydrides, focusing particularly on the size effect of MgH(2) nanoparticles on H(2) desorption kinetics. Our results show a clear relationship between grain size and heat of formation of MgH(2); as the particle size decreases, the heat of formation increases. Between 0.6 and 2.0 nm, the heat of formation ranges from -16 to -19 kcal/Mg and diverges toward that of the bulk value (-20.00 kcal/Mg) as the particle diameter increases beyond 2 nm. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that Mg nanoparticles formed by ball milling (20-100 nm) do not exhibit any significant change in thermochemical properties.

  6. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  7. Effects of proton irradiation on a gas phase in which condensation takes place. I Negative Mg-26 anomalies and Al-26. [applied to solar and meteoritic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.; Walker, A.; Huss, G.; Morgan, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, isotopic effects in magnesium generated in a proton-irradiated gas phase are examined, taking only (p,n), (p,d), and (p, alpha) reactions in magnesium, aluminum, and silicon into consideration. In the presence of proton radiation, the three elements are 'removed' from the gas phase by condensation. It is required that a value of Al-26/Al-27 greater than 6 times 10 to the -5th must be reached, consistent with the value deduced by Lee Papanastassiou, and Wasserburg (1976) from their studies of the Allende meteorite. The calculations show that fast aluminum condensation reduces the required proton fluence substantially, that a significant fraction of aluminum remains uncondensed when the above value of the Al-26/Al-27 ratio is reached, that a detectable MG-24 excess is very likely to occur, that detectable negative MG-28 anomalies can be generated, and that proton fluxes and irradiation times can be varied simultaneously, and over a wide range of values, without significant changes in the required proton fluence.

  8. Major Minerals - Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium, magnesium and phosphorus are essential elements critically important for the function of the musculoskeletal system, including the formation and transduction of energy and the maintenance of healthy bone. The major calcium concern for physically active healthy middle-aged adults is to consu...

  9. Quantitatively Predict the Potential of MnO2 Polymorphs as Magnesium Battery Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Zhang, Ruigang; Mizuno, Fuminori

    2016-02-01

    Despite tremendous efforts denoted to magnesium battery research, the realization of magnesium battery is still challenged by the lack of cathode candidate with high energy density, rate capability and good recyclability. This situation can be largely attributed to the failure to achieve sustainable magnesium intercalation chemistry. In current work we explored the magnesiation of distinct MnO2 polymorphs using first-principles calculations, focusing on providing quantitative analysis about the feasibility of magnesium intercalation. Consistent with experimental observations, we predicted that ramsdellite-MnO2 and α-MnO2 are conversion-type cathodes while nanosized spinel-MnO2 and MnO2 isostructual to CaFe2O4 are better candidates for Mg intercalation. Key properties that restrict Mg intercalation include not only sluggish Mg migration but also stronger distortion that damages structure integrity and undesirable conversion reaction. We demonstrate that by evaluating the reaction free energy, structural deformation associated with the insertion of magnesium, and the diffusion barriers, a quantitative evaluation about the feasibility of magnesium intercalation can be well established. Although our current work focuses on the study of MnO2 polymorphs, the same evaluation can be applied to other cathode candidates, thus paving the road to identify better cathode candidates in future.

  10. A Study of Magnesium-Base Metallic Systems and Development of Principles for Creation of Corrosion-Resistant Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhina, I. Yu.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of 26 alloying elements on the corrosion resistance of high-purity magnesium in a 0.5-n solution of sodium chloride and in a humid atmosphere (0.005 n) is studied. The Mg - Li, Mg - Ag, Mg - Zn, Mg - Cu, Mg - Gd, Mg - Al, Mg - Zr, Mg - Mn and other binary systems, which present interest as a base for commercial or perspective castable magnesium alloys, are studied. The characteristics of corrosion resistance of the binary alloys are analyzed in accordance with the group and period of the Mendeleev's periodic law. The roles of the electrochemical and volume factors and of the factor of the valence of the dissolved element are determined.

  11. A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerst, S. M.; Brown, M. E.

    2013-02-20

    Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

  12. Thermodynamics and high-pressure kinetics of a fast carbon dioxide fixation reaction by a (2,6-pyridinedicarboxamidato-hydroxo)nickel(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Troeppner, O; Huang, D; Holm, R H; Ivanović-Burmazović, I

    2014-04-14

    The previously reported carbon dioxide fixation reaction by the planar terminal hydroxide complex [Ni(pyN2(Me2))(OH)](1-) in DMF has been further characterized by determination of the equilibrium constants K(eq)²⁹⁸ = 2.4 ± 0.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(eq)²²³ = 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10(7) M(-1), as well as the volume of activation for the CO2 binding (ΔV(on)(≠223) = -21 ± 3 cm(3) mol(-1)) and back decarboxylation (ΔV(off)(≠223) = -13 ± 1 cm(3) mol(-1)) by high-pressure kinetics. The data are consistent with an earlier DFT computation, including the probable nature of the transition state, and support designating the reaction as one of the most completely investigated carbon dioxide fixation reactions of any type.

  13. ATP sulfurylase-dependent assays for inorganic pyrophosphate: applications to determining the equilibrium constant and reverse direction kinetics of the pyrophosphatase reaction, magnesium binding to orthophosphate, and unknown concentrations of pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Daley, L A; Renosto, F; Segel, I H

    1986-09-01

    A continuous, coupled, spectrophotometric assay is described in which the enzyme ATP sulfurylase is employed to measure the concentration of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) at equilibrium with known concentrations of inorganic orthophosphate (Pi) in the presence of excess inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPitase). In agreement with previous reports, the apparent equilibrium constant (Keq,app) of the PPi hydrolysis reaction was shown to decrease as the concentration of Mg2+ is increased. At pH 7.3, 30 degrees C, in the presence of 150 mM NaCl and 1 mM free Mg2+, Keq,app (calculated as [Pi]t2/[PPi]t) was 1950. Measurements of Keq,app at different total concentrations of Mg2+ and Pi permitted the determination of K0, the dissociation constant of the Mg-Pi complex. In 0.05 M Tris-Cl, pH 8.0, at 30 degrees C, K0 was 3.6 mM. In the presence of excess ATP sulfurylase, yeast PPitase catalyzed PPi formation from Pi with a specific activity (Vmax) of 9 units X mg protein-1 at pH 8.0, 30 degrees C, and 1 mM free Mg2+. Half-maximum reverse reaction velocity was observed at a total Pi concentration of 18 mM. (Under the same conditions, Vmax of the PPi hydrolysis reaction was 530 units X mg protein-1.) A radiochemical end point ("reaction-to-completion") assay for measuring unknown concentrations of PPi was devised. In the presence of excess 35S-adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate ([35S]APS) as the cosubstrate, 35SO2-4 formation was stoichiometric with added PPi. (The 35SO2-4 and [35S]APS are separated by adsorption of the latter onto charcoal.) The sensitivity of the assay can be adjusted by varying the specific radioactivity of the [35S]APS. In the absence of interfering substances, as little as 2 pmol of PPi per 1.0 ml assay volume can be measured. The sensitivity of the assay is reduced in the presence of ATP plus perchlorate (which synergistically inhibit the enzyme). However, if the bulk of the ATP is removed from perchloric acid extracts of tissues with glucose and hexokinase, initial

  14. Sol gel-fluorination synthesis of amorphous magnesium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Groß, Udo; Rüdiger, Stephan; Kemnitz, Erhard; Winfield, John M.

    2006-03-01

    The sol-gel fluorination process is discussed for the reaction of magnesium alkoxides with HF in non-aqueous solvents to give X-ray amorphous nano-sized magnesium fluoride with high surface areas in the range of 150-350 m 2/g (HS-MgF 2). The H2 type hysteresis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption BET-isotherms is indicative for mesoporous solids. A highly distorted structure causes quite high Lewis acidity, shown by NH 3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH 3-TPD) and catalytic test reactions. XPS data of amorphous and conventionally crystalline MgF 2 are compared, both show octahedral coordination at the metal site. Thermal analysis, F-MAS NMR- and IR-spectroscopy give information on composition and structure of the precursor intermediate as well as of the final metal fluoride. The preparation of complex fluorides, M +MgF 3-, by the sol-gel route is reported. From the magnesium fluoride gel of the above process thin films for optical application are obtained by, e.g., spin coating.

  15. Evaluation of the skin sensitizing potential of biodegradable magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank; Abeln, Inken; Switzer, Elinor; Kaese, Volker; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea; Windhagen, Henning

    2008-09-15

    Corroding metals made of magnesium alloys represent a new class of degradable implants for musculoskeletal surgery. These implants may be associated with skin sensitizing reactions because of the release of metal ions. This study was conducted to compare the sensitizing potential of four different magnesium alloys (AZ31, AZ91, WE43, and LAE442) to current implant materials such as titanium (TiAl6V4) and a degradable polymer (SR-PLA96). Solutions and solid chips of these materials were prepared and tested in 156 guinea pigs according to the Magnusson-Kligman test. A standard allergen (hydroxy-cinnamon-aldehyde) causing allergic erythema was used as positive control and a standard irritant (sodium-lauryl-sulfate) causing local skin irritation for less than 24 h was used as negative control. All erythema were graded immediately and 24 h after patch removal by three independent observers. Histomorphological analyses were performed on skin biopsies taken 24 h after patch removal. We found that initial erythema in animals treated with solid chips diminished within 24 h and were caused by local skin irritation. Local skin irritation was also determined in erythema remaining for 24 h after patch removal in animals treated with dissolved test materials. No allergenic reactions according to the histomorphological criteria were observed in skin biopsies. We conclude that no skin sensitizing potential were detected for standard materials as well as for all tested magnesium alloys by the used methods.

  16. Observation of the 3n Evaporation Channel in the Complete Hot-Fusion Reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm Leading to the New Superheavy Nuclide {sup 271}Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, J.; Dvorakova, Z.; Kruecken, R.; Nebel, F.; Perego, R.; Schuber, R.; Tuerler, A.; Wierczinski, B.; Yakushev, A.; Bruechle, W.; Jaeger, E.; Schaedel, M.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Chelnokov, M.; Kuznetsov, A.; Yeremin, A.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Nagame, Y.

    2008-04-04

    The analysis of a large body of heavy ion fusion reaction data with medium-heavy projectiles (6{<=}Z{<=}18) and actinide targets suggests a disappearance of the 3n exit channel with increasing atomic number of the projectile. Here, we report a measurement of the excitation function of the reaction {sup 248}Cm({sup 26}Mg,xn){sup 274-x}Hs and the observation of the new nuclide {sup 271}Hs produced in the 3n evaporation channel at a beam energy well below the Bass fusion barrier with a cross section comparable to the maxima of the 4n and 5n channels. This indicates the possible discovery of new neutron-rich transactinide nuclei using relatively light heavy ion beams of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes and actinide targets.

  17. Magnesium: its role in nutrition and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, Urszula; Duda-Chodak, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) plays a key role in many essential cellular processes such as intermediary metabolism, DNA replication and repair, transporting potassium and calcium ions, cell proliferation together with signalling transduction. Dietary sources rich in magnesium are whole and unrefined grains, seeds, cocoa, nuts, almonds and green leafy vegetables. Hard water is also considered to be an important source of magnesium beneficial to human health. The daily dietary intake of magnesium is however frequently found to be below that recommended in Western countries. Indeed, it is recognised that magnesium deficiency may lead to many disorders of the human body, where for instance magnesium depletion is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of the following; cardiovascular disease (including thrombosis, atherosclerosis, ishaemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, hypertension, arrhythmias and congestive heart failure in human), as well as diabetes mellitus, gastrointestinal (GI) tract disease, liver cirrhosis and diseases of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. Insufficient dietary intake of magnesium may also significantly affect the development and exacerbation ofADHD (Attention Deficit- Hyperactivity Disorder) symptoms in children. The known links between magnesium and carcinogenesis still remain unclear and complex, with conflicting results being reported from many experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies; further knowledge is thus required. Mg2+ ions are enzyme cofactors involved in DNA repair mechanisms that maintain genomic stability and fidelity. Any magnesium deficiencies could thereby cause a dysfunction of these systems to occur leading to DNA mutations. Magnesium deficiency may also be associated with inflammation and increased levels of free radicals where both inflammatory mediators and free radicals so arising could cause oxidative DNA damage and therefore tumour formation. The presented review article now provides a summary

  18. Method for magnesium sulfate recovery

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; Grantham, LeRoy F.

    1987-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium sulfate substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is then contacted with a concentrated sulfuric acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a solid product. The particulate solid product and a minor amount of the liquid is then treated to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium sulfate substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the initial acid treatment and a final solid residue has a radioactivity level of less than about 50 pCi/gm.

  19. Method for magnesium sulfate recovery

    DOEpatents

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.

    1987-08-25

    A method is described for obtaining magnesium sulfate substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is then contacted with a concentrated sulfuric acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a solid product. The particulate solid product and a minor amount of the liquid is then treated to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium sulfate substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than 1,000 pCi/gm. In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the initial acid treatment and a final solid residue has a radioactivity level of less than about 50 pCi/gm.

  20. Synthesis of rutherfordium isotopes in the 238U(26Mg, xn)264-xRf reaction and study of their decay properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Jacklyn M; Gates, J.M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Dragojevic, I.; Dvorak, J.; Eichler, R.; Folden III, C.M.; Loveland, W.; Nelson, S.L.; Pang, G.K.; Stavsetra, L.; Sudowe, R.; Turler, A.; Nitsche, H.

    2008-01-15

    Isotopes of rutherfordium (258-261Rf) were produced in irradiations of 238U targets with 26Mg beams. Excitation functions were measured for the 4n, 5n and 6n exit channels. Production of 261Rf in the 3n exit channel with a cross section of 28+92-26 pb was observed. Alpha decay of 258Rf was observed for the first time with an alpha-particle energy of 9.05+-0.03 MeV and an alpha/total decay branching ratio of 0.31+-0.11. In 259Rf, the electron capture/total decay branching ratio was measured to be 0.15+-0.04. The measured half-lives for 258Rf, 259Rf and 260Rf were 14.7+1.2-1.0 ms, 2.5+0.4-0.3 s and 22.2+3.0-2.4 ms, respectively, in agreement with literature data. The systematics of the alpha decay Q values and of the partial spontaneous fission half-lives were evaluated for even-even nuclides in the region of the N = 152, Z = 100 deformed shell. The influence of the N = 152 shell on the alpha decay Q values for rutherfordium was observed to be similar to that of the lighter elements (96<_ Z<_ 102). However, the N = 152 shell does not stabilize the rutherfordium isotopes against spontaneous fission, as it does in the lighter elements (96<_ Z<_102).

  1. [Magnesium deficiency and therapy in cardiac arrhythmias: recommendations of the German Society for Magnesium Research].

    PubMed

    Vierling, W; Liebscher, D-H; Micke, O; von Ehrlich, B; Kisters, K

    2013-05-01

    Aim of the recommendations of the German Society for Magnesium Research: Recognition and compensation of magnesium deficiency in patients with risk factors for cardiac arrhythmias or manifest rhythm disturbances. Prevention of arrhythmias by administration of magnesium. Therapeutic administration of magnesium in patients with arrhythmias with and without magnesium deficiency. The current state of knowledge claims for considering the status of magnesium and the possibility of a therapeutic intervention with magnesium within the concept of the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The use of magnesium as single agent or as an adjunct to other therapeutic actions in the prevention and therapy of cardiac arrhythmias can be effective and, in case of oral administration, very safe. In case of parenteral administration, it is important to use adequate doses, monitor cardiovascular and neuromuscular parameters and to consider contraindications.

  2. Substrate and method for the formation of continuous magnesium diboride and doped magnesium diboride wire

    DOEpatents

    Suplinskas, Raymond J.; Finnemore, Douglas; Bud'ko, Serquei; Canfield, Paul

    2007-11-13

    A chemically doped boron coating is applied by chemical vapor deposition to a silicon carbide fiber and the coated fiber then is exposed to magnesium vapor to convert the doped boron to doped magnesium diboride and a resultant superconductor.

  3. Microstructural Effects on the Spall Properties of ECAE Magnesium and Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Cyril

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium and magnesium alloys are light weight materials and hence, are being increasingly employed as light armor in military applications. However, because of its limited slip systems (HCP) magnesium and magnesium alloys are relatively brittle as compared to FCC and BCC lattice structures. For this study, the effects of microstructure on the spall properties of magnesium and magnesium alloys processed using Equi-Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE) were investigated using a 51 mm and 105 mm bore gas guns. Symmetric spall and recovery plate impact experiments were performed at impact velocities ranging from approximately 100 m/s and 400 m/s. Free surface velocity profiles of the shocked samples were obtained using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The spall strength and Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) were extracted from the free surface velocity profiles. In addition, the microstructures of the pre-shocked and post-shocked magnesium and magnesium alloys were acquired using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM).

  4. Crystal structure of a dimeric β-diketiminate magnesium complex

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Connor S.; Johnson, Kevin R. D.; Hayes, Paul G.; Boeré, René T.

    2016-01-01

    The solid-state structure of a dimeric β-diketiminate magnesium(II) complex is discussed. The compound, di-μ-iodido-bis­[(­{4-amino-1,5-bis­[2,6-bis­(propan-2-yl)phen­yl]pent-3-en-2-yl­idene}aza­nido-κ2 N,N′)magnesium(II)] toluene sesquisolvate, [Mg2(C29H41N2)2I2]·1.5C7H8, crystallizes as two independent mol­ecules, each with 2/m crystallographic site symmetry, located at Wyckoff sites 2c and 2d. These have symmetry-equivalent magnesium atoms bridged by μ-iodide ligands with very similar Mg—I distances. The two Mg atoms are located slightly below (∼0.5 Å) the least-squares plane defined by N–C—C–N atoms in the ligand scaffold, and are approximately tetra­hedrally coordinated. One and one-half toluene solvent mol­ecules are disordered with respect to mirror-site symmetry at Wyckoff sites 4i and 2a, respectively. In the former case, two toluene mol­ecules inter­act in an off-center parallel stacking arrangement; the shortest C to C′ (π–π) distance of 3.72 (1) Å was measured for this inter­action. PMID:27980823

  5. Lightweight Heat Pipes Made from Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John N.; Zarembo, Sergei N.; Eastman, G. Yale

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium has shown promise as a lighter-weight alternative to the aluminum alloys now used to make the main structural components of axially grooved heat pipes that contain ammonia as the working fluid. Magnesium heat-pipe structures can be fabricated by conventional processes that include extrusion, machining, welding, and bending. The thermal performances of magnesium heat pipes are the same as those of equal-sized aluminum heat pipes. However, by virtue of the lower mass density of magnesium, the magnesium heat pipes weigh 35 percent less. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, magnesium heat pipes could also be attractive as heat-transfer devices in terrestrial applications in which minimization of weight is sought: examples include radio-communication equipment and laptop computers.

  6. Magnesium alloy applications in automotive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Mark; Beer, Aiden; Barnett, Matthew; Davies, Chris; Dunlop, Gordon; Durandet, Yvonne; Blacket, Stuart; Hilditch, Tim; Beggs, Peter

    2008-11-01

    The use of magnesium alloys in structural applications has great potential for the lightweighting of transportation vehicles. Research within the CAST Cooperative Research Centre has tackled some of the important issues related to the use of magnesium in structural applications. To this end, a new alloy with extrudability and properties similar to 6000 series aluminum alloys has been developed. Furthermore, a method of laser heating magnesium alloys before self-piercing riveting has enabled high-integrity joining between magnesium components or between magnesium and dissimilar metals. In this paper, new technologies and improved understanding of the deformation behavior of wrought magnesium alloys are discussed in light of key metallurgical features such as alloy composition, grain size, and work hardening rate.

  7. Catalysts comprising magnesium and a transition metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bujadoux, K.

    1984-10-09

    A catalyst comprising the product obtained by bringing into contact a compound of magnesium comprising at least one species selected from the group consisting of magnesium monohalides (MgX), halo-magnesium hydrides (HMgX) and magnesium hydride (MgH/sub 2/), X being a halogen and the said species MgX or HMgX being obtained by thermal decomposition of a powdery organo-magnesium halide R/sub 1/MgX wherein R/sub 1/ is an organic radical; and at least one halide of a transistion metal selected from the group consisting of titanium and vanadium, the valency of said metal in said halide being lower than or equal to 3, the quantities being such that the atomic ratio of magnesium to said transistion metal is between 1 and 25, and a catalyst system including the catalyst that is suitable for use in the polymerization of olefins and particularly ethylene.

  8. Nanotechnology Corrosion Pretreatment for Magnesium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-29

    Pretreatment for Magnesium Alloys AMS-SAE-M-3171, Type IV Replacement on AZ91D Glycolic Nitrate Pickle (GNP) (1 min) PT-60 (3 min) 0 hr SST 1 4 3 2...Nanotechnology Corrosion Pretreatment for Magnesium Alloys Mr. Jules F. Senske and Mr. Daniel Schmidt Army Research Development and...SUBTITLE Nanotechnology Corrosion Pretreatment for Magnesium Alloys 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  9. IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

    1963-12-31

    A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

  10. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as...

  13. Analysis of Different Inhibitors for Magnesium Investment Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Dorca, N.; Sarriegi Etxeberria, H.; Hurtado, I.; Andres, U.; Rodriguez, P.; Arruebarrena, G.

    2012-01-01

    Investment casting of magnesium is a well suited process for the production of aeronautic and automotive components. But still, this process has not been properly developed. One reason for that are the reactions between the Mg melt and the ceramics of the mould that produce a non-desired oxide layer on the part surface. These reactions can be inhibited by the use of silica-free slurries with a higher stability than conventional ones. Another way is using inhibitors, chemical compounds based in fluorides that react with the melt, creating a protective surface layer in the casting. With the aim of developing a reaction-free process, alumina moulds with a stepped geometry have been constructed. These provide different interface conditions. Conventional SF6, non-conventional KBF4 and NaBF4 and environmentally friendly FK inhibitors have been tested on. As a result, KBF4 has been identified as the most suitable inhibitor for magnesium investment casting. Furthermore, the analysis of the cooling curve of different interfaces has provided essential information about the reaction mechanism of the inhibitors.

  14. A facile magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterial as potential bone graft.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Xiumei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-12-01

    The calcium carbonate is the main composition of coral which has been widely used as bone graft in clinic. Herein, we readily prepared novel magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterials (MCCs) under the low-temperature conditions based on the dissolution-recrystallization reaction between unstable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and metastable vaterite-type calcium carbonate with water involved. The content of magnesium in MCCs was tailored by adjusting the proportion of ACC starting material that was prepared using magnesium as stabilizer. The phase composition of MCCs with various amounts of magnesium was composed of one, two or three kinds of calcium carbonates (calcite, aragonite, and/or magnesian calcite). The different MCCs differed in topography. The in vitro degradation of MCCs accelerated with increasing amount of introduced magnesium. The MCCs with a certain amount of magnesium not only acquired higher compressive strength, but also promoted in vitro cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the facile MCCs shed light on their potential as bone graft.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels...

  20. Evidence for bicarbonate-dependent magnesium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Langberg, H; Dibona, G; Kiil, F

    1983-01-01

    During ethacrynic acid administration about 50% of the filtered load of magnesium is reabsorbed. To examine whether the remaining component of magnesium reabsorption is bicarbonate-dependent, i.e. varies with factors known to alter passive reabsorption, experiments were performed in anesthetized dogs. During ethacrynic acid administration MgCl2 infusion raised the plasma concentration of magnesium (PMg) from 0.64 +/- 0.05 to 3.06 +/- 0.27 mM and doubled magnesium reabsorption. The infusion of acetazolamide at high PMg reduced bicarbonate reabsorption by 41 +/- 3% and magnesium reabsorption by 31 +/- 16%. When plasma pH was reduced to 7.04 +/- 0.02 and increased to 7.83 +/- 0.02 by altering PCO2 at a constant plasma bicarbonate concentration of 31.2 +/- 0.8 mM, magnesium and bicarbonate reabsorption were correlated (r = 0.82). The infusion of mannitol, which acts by reducing passive solute transport without affecting bicarbonate reabsorption, halved magnesium reabsorption. By combining mannitol and acetazolamide infusions, only 6 +/- 4% of the filtered magnesium was still reabsorbed. These results indicate that the reabsorption of magnesium remaining after the infusion of ethacrynic acid and after raising PMg varies with changes in PCO2 and is inhibited by the infusion of acetazolamide and mannitol as expected for bicarbonate-dependent passive reabsorption.

  1. On the role of magnesium and silicon in the formation of alumina from aluminum alloys by means of DIMOX processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Zhu, D.; Xu, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.

    1996-08-01

    This article deals with the reaction mechanisms of the DIMOX (Directed Melt Oxided) processing of aluminum alloys. An orthogonalized experimental procedure was introduced to stipulate the effects of the reaction temperature, reaction time, and additional metallic elements, magnesium and silicon, on the oxidation process of aluminum alloys. Emphasis is placed on the distribution of magnesium and silicon in the products so that the behaviors of these two crucial elements for the formation of alumina from directed oxidation of aluminum alloys could be revealed. Alterative methods, including optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probing, and wave spectrum analysis were applied to specify the microstructure characters of the products and locate the position of both magnesium and silicon in the reaction products. Judged by the weight gain after reaction, the results indicated that the temperature is the most influential factor in controlling the oxidation kinetics. Both magnesium and silicon are rather concentrated in specific regions than homogeneously distributed in the whole products. The contents of magnesium and silicon in the surface region are not as high as expected, and most of the magnesium being concentrated in the region directly neighboring the bulky metals and most of the Si in the residual bulky metals, although the contents of these two elements in the surface region are a little higher than the regions next to the surface. These characteristics, combined with other investigations, suggest that the decisive role of the slight amount of magnesium and silicon in the nucleation and growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} could be explained by the proposed circulated reaction.

  2. Addressing fluorogenic real-time qPCR inhibition using the novel custom Excel file system 'FocusField2-6GallupqPCRSet-upTool-001' to attain consistently high fidelity qPCR reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss fluorogenic real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) inhibition and to introduce/define a novel Microsoft Excel-based file system which provides a way to detect and avoid inhibition, and enables investigators to consistently design dynamically-sound, truly LOG-linear qPCR reactions very quickly. The qPCR problems this invention solves are universal to all qPCR reactions, and it performs all necessary qPCR set-up calculations in about 52 seconds (using a pentium 4 processor) for up to seven qPCR targets and seventy-two samples at a time – calculations that commonly take capable investigators days to finish. We have named this custom Excel-based file system "FocusField2-6GallupqPCRSet-upTool-001" (FF2-6-001 qPCR set-up tool), and are in the process of transforming it into professional qPCR set-up software to be made available in 2007. The current prototype is already fully functional. PMID:17033699

  3. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, S.; Buhl, D.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Richter, D. K.; Vonhof, H. B.; Wassenburg, J. A.; Geske, A.; Spötl, C.; Immenhauser, A.

    2012-11-01

    Here we explore the potential of magnesium26Mg) isotope time-series data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco), the warm-temperate (Germany), the equatorial-humid (Peru) and the cold-humid (Austria) climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are compared against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and disequilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rainwater or snow as well as soil and host rock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: -4.26 ± 0.07‰ and HK3: -4.17 ± 0.15‰), and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value of all stalagmites (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: -3.96 ± 0.04‰) but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is consistent with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: -4.01 ± 0.07‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: -4.20 ± 0.10‰) suggest changes in outside air temperature was the principal driver rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: -3.00 ± 0.73‰; SPA 59: -3.70 ± 0.43‰) are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature affecting soil zone activity and weathering balance. Several δ26Mg values of the Austrian and two

  4. Interdiffusion of magnesium and iron dopants in gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Tomonobu; Kitatani, Takeshi; Terano, Akihisa; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-01

    The interdiffusion of magnesium and iron in gallium nitride (GaN), i.e., magnesium-iron interdiffusion, was investigated using magnesium-doped GaN layers on iron-doped GaN substrates. The investigation confirms that the magnesium-iron interdiffusion strongly depends on the concentrations of magnesium and iron, that is, it occurs when the iron and magnesium concentrations are high (magnesium: 2 × 1020 cm-3 iron: 2 × 1019 cm-3). It also confirms that diffused iron in the magnesium-doped GaN layer acts as a nonradiative recombination center in GaN.

  5. Experimental determination of magnesium isotope fractionation during higher plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolou-Bi, Emile B.; Poszwa, Anne; Leyval, Corinne; Vigier, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    Two higher plant species (rye grass and clover) were cultivated under laboratory conditions on two substrates (solution, phlogopite) in order to constrain the corresponding Mg isotope fractionations during plant growth and Mg uptake. We show that bulk plants are systematically enriched in heavy isotopes relative to their nutrient source. The Δ 26Mg plant-source range from 0.72‰ to 0.26‰ for rye grass and from 1.05‰ to 0.41‰ for clover. Plants grown on phlogopite display Mg isotope signatures (relative to the Mg source) ˜0.3‰ lower than hydroponic plants. For a given substrate, rye grass display lower δ 26Mg (by ˜0.3‰) relative to clover. Magnesium desorbed from rye grass roots display a δ 26Mg greater than the nutrient solution. Adsorption experiments on dead and living rye grass roots also indicate a significant enrichment in heavy isotopes of the Mg adsorbed on the root surface. Our results indicate that the key processes responsible for heavy isotope enrichment in plants are located at the root level. Both species also exhibit an enrichment in light isotopes from roots to shoots (Δ 26Mg leaf-root = -0.65‰ and -0.34‰ for rye grass and clover grown on phlogopite respectively, and Δ 26Mg leaf-root of -0.06‰ and -0.22‰ for the same species grown hydroponically). This heavy isotope depletion in leaves can be explained by biological processes that affect leaves and roots differently: (1) organo-Mg complex (including chlorophyll) formation, and (2) Mg transport within plant. For both species, a positive correlation between δ 26Mg and K/Mg was observed among the various organs. This correlation is consistent with the link between K and Mg internal cycles, as well as with formation of organo-magnesium compounds associated with enrichment in heavy isotopes. Considering our results together with the published range for δ 26Mg of natural plants and rivers, we estimate that a significant change in continental vegetation would induce a change of

  6. Towards a better understanding of magnesium-isotope ratios from marine skeletal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Buhl, Dieter; Witbaard, Rob; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    This study presents magnesium stable-isotope compositions of various biogenic carbonates of several marine calcifying organisms and an algae species, seawater samples collected from the western Dutch Wadden Sea, and reference materials. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of mineralogy, taxonomy and environmental factors (e.g., seawater isotopic composition, temperature, salinity) on magnesium-isotopic (δ 26Mg) ratios of skeletal carbonates. Using high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we observed that the magnesium-isotopic composition of seawater from the semi-enclosed Dutch Wadden Sea is identical to that of open marine seawater. We further found that a considerable component of the observed variability in δ 26Mg values of marine skeletal carbonates can be attributed to differences in mineralogy. Furthermore, magnesium-isotope fractionation is species-dependent, with all skeletal carbonates being isotopically lighter than seawater. While δ 26Mg values of skeletal aragonite and high-magnesium calcite of coralline red algae indicate the absence or negligibility of metabolic influences, the δ 26Mg values of echinoids, brachiopods and bivalves likely result from a taxon-specific level of control on Mg-isotope incorporation during biocalcification. Moreover, no resolvable salinity and temperature effect were observed for coralline red algae and echinoids. In contrast, Mg-isotope data of bivalves yield ambiguous results, which require further validation. The data presented here, point to a limited use of Mg isotopes as temperature proxy, but highlight the method's potential as tracer of seawater chemistry through Earth's history.

  7. Antimicrobial properties and dentin bonding strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Mestres, G; Abdolhosseini, M; Bowles, W; Huang, S-H; Aparicio, C; Gorr, S-U; Ginebra, M-P

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) when NH4H2PO4 was used or an amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate when NaH2PO4 was used. The MPC had appropriate setting times for hard tissue applications, high early compressive strengths and higher strength of bonding to dentin than commercial mineral trioxide aggregate cement. Bacteriological studies were performed with fresh and aged cements against three bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (planktonic and in biofilm) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. These bacteria have been associated with infected implants, as well as other frequent hard tissue related infections. Extracts of different compositions of MPC had bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties against the three bacterial strains tested. This was associated mainly with a synergistic effect between the high osmolarity and alkaline pH of the MPC. These intrinsic antimicrobial properties make MPC preferential candidates for applications in dentistry, such as root fillers, pulp capping agents and cavity liners.

  8. Regulation of Chloroplast Photosynthetic Activity by Exogenous Magnesium 1

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Steven C.

    1978-01-01

    Magnesium was most inhibitory to photosynthetic reactions by intact chloroplasts when the magnesium was added in the dark before illumination. Two millimolar MgCl2, added in the dark, inhibited CO2-dependent O2 evolution by Hordeum vulgare L. and Spinacia oleracea L. (C3 plants) chloroplasts 70 to 100% and inhibited (pyruvate + oxaloacetate)-dependent O2 evolution by Digitaria sanguinalis L. (C4 plant) mesophyll chloroplasts from 80 to 100%. When Mg2+ was added in the light, O2 evolution was reduced only slightly. O2 evolution in the presence of phosphoglycerate was less sensitive to Mg2+ inhibition than was CO2-dependent O2 evolution. Magnesium prevented the light activation of several photosynthetic enzymes. Two millimolar Mg2+ blocked the light activation of NADP-malate dehydrogenase in D. sanguinalis mesophyll chloroplasts, and the light activation of phosphoribulokinase, NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase in barley chloroplasts. The results suggest that Mg2+ inhibits chloroplast photosynthesis by preventing the light activation of certain enzymes. PMID:16660509

  9. Magnesium stress signaling in plant: Just a beginning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wanli; Chen, Shaoning; Hussain, Nazim; Cong, Yuexi; Liang, Zongsuo; Chen, Kunming

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important nutrients, involves mainly in plant growth and development. However, the signaling pathways response to magnesium stresses (MgSs) is known little, but several studies lately may improve the research development. Several phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, auxins, and their factors were found responding to MgSs, and there may be some signal pathways linking these hormones and downstream reactions together, e.g., carbon fixation and transfer, starch and sugar metabolism, ion uptaking and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increasing. Consequently, Arabidopsis morphogenesis is remodeled. In this review, we mainly discussed recent literatures involving in plant response to MgSs (Mg deficiency (MgD) and Mg toxicity (MgT)), including plant morphogenesis remodeling, magnesium transporters and signaling transductions. Moreover, the future study challenges related to the responding signalings to MgSs in plants are also presented. Regardless, the iceberg of signal transduction of MgSs in plants is appeared. PMID:25806908

  10. The TMS Magnesium Committee: Committed to the Advancement of Global Magnesium Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sillekens, Wim H.; Nyberg, Eric A.

    2011-04-21

    The TMS Magnesium Committee was established in the year 2000 as a spin-off of the Reactive Metals Committee, triggered by the strong global growth of magnesium being used in a variety of structural lightweight applications since the mid-1990’s. Since then the committee has seen a distinct development in terms of size, participation and focus. The article at hand outlines this development by recapitulating the output of its two main activities: the annual Magnesium Technology Symposia and the JOM Special Issues dedicated to magnesium research and development. Further records on the Magnesium Committee are available from the committee homepage (accessible through http://members.tms.org).

  11. Involvement of the antiplatelet activity of magnesium sulfate in suppression of protein kinase C and the Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, George; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chen, Tzeng-Fu; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate is widely used to prevent seizures in pregnant women with hypertension. The aim of this study was to examine the inhibitory mechanisms of magnesium sulfate in platelet aggregation in vitro. In this study, magnesium sulfate concentration-dependently (0.6-3.0 mM) inhibited platelet aggregation in human platelets stimulated by agonists. Magnesium sulfate (1.5 and 3.0 mM) also concentration-dependently inhibited phosphoinositide breakdown and intracellular Ca+2 mobilization in human platelets stimulated by thrombin. Rapid phosphorylation of a platelet protein of M(r) 47,000 (P47), a marker of protein kinase C activation, was triggered by phorbol-12-13-dibutyrate (PDBu, 50 nM). This phosphorylation was markedly inhibited by magnesium sulfate (3.0 mM). Magnesium sulfate (1.5 and 3.0 mM) further inhibited PDBu-stimulated platelet aggregation in human platelets. The thrombin-evoked increase in pHi was markedly inhibited in the presence of magnesium sulfate (3.0 mM). In conclusion, these results indicate that the antiplatelet activity of magnesium sulfate may be involved in the following two pathways: (1) Magnesium sulfate may inhibit the activation of protein kinase C, followed by inhibition of phosphoinositide breakdown and intracellular Ca+2 mobilization, thereby leading to inhibition of the phosphorylation of P47. (2) On the other hand, magnesium sulfate inhibits the Na+/H+ exchanger, leading to reduced intracellular Ca+2 mobilization, and ultimately to inhibition of platelet aggregation and the ATP-release reaction.

  12. The influence of magnesium supplementation on concentrations of chosen bioelements and toxic metals in adult human hair. Magnesium and chosen bioelements in hair.

    PubMed

    Kozielec, Tadeusz; Sałacka, Anna; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2004-09-01

    The basic functions of bioelements in biological systems is widely known. Depletion of bioelements and excess of toxic elements lead to impairment of metabolism in the living organism. The existence of magnesium deficiencies in the adult and pediatric populations may cause increased accumulation of toxic metals including lead and cadmium. Prevention of adverse effects of toxic metals may include supplementation with some bioelements and vitamins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of magnesium supplementation on concentrations of chosen bioelements and toxic metals in hair in the adult human population. The research was performed on 124 individuals (53 males and 71 females aged 19-72 years), inhabitants of the city of Szczecin. The concentrations of magnesium, zinc, copper, lead and cadmium were studied in hair. Measurements were performed using the inversion volt-amperometry method with application of an EDD-Tribo PC ETP volt-amperometer. Finally, the supplementation study enrolled 65 individuals with an increased concentration of lead. The studied individuals were divided into two groups: one treated group that enrolled 50 patients who were supplemented with magnesium and the control group that enrolled 15 persons receiving placebo. Finally, supplementation was completed by 32 individuals from the treated group and 10 individuals from the control group. Supplementation was performed using Slow-Mag-B6 preparation at the total daily dose of five tablets divided into 2-3 doses. One tablet contains 535 mg of magnesium chloride i.e. 64 mg of magnesium ions (5.26 mEgMg2) and 5 mg of vitamin B6. Supplementation was performed for a period of 3 months. The remaining individuals did not complete the supplementation due to various reasons; however, none of them resulted from the poor tolerance of the preparation or its adverse events. The results achieved underwent statistical analysis. The results of the study revealed a positive influence of

  13. Nickel/magnesium-lanthanum mixed oxide catalyst in the Kumada-coupling.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Arpád; Hell, Zoltán; Bálint, Mária

    2010-01-21

    A new, heterogeneous, magnesium-lanthanum mixed oxide solid base-supported nickel(ii) catalyst was developed. The catalyst was used successfully in the Kumada coupling of aryl halides, especially aryl bromides. The optimal reaction conditions of the coupling were determined.

  14. Magnesium nitride as a convenient source of ammonia: preparation of dihydropyridines.

    PubMed

    Bridgwood, Katy L; Veitch, Gemma E; Ley, Steven V

    2008-08-21

    Magnesium nitride (Mg 3N 2) has been investigated for the preparation of dihydropyridines. This is a commercially available, bench-stable solid that generates ammonia upon treatment with protic solvents. The main features of the process are the facile reaction setup and good yields obtained in the majority of cases.

  15. Determination of phosphorus fertilizer soil reactions by Raman and synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Christian; Adam, Christian; Sekine, Ryo; Schiller, Tara; Lipiec, Ewelina; McNaughton, Don

    2013-10-01

    The reaction mechanisms of phosphate-bearing mineral phases from sewage sludge ash-based fertilizers in soil were determined by Raman and synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy. Different reaction mechanisms in wet soil were found for calcium and magnesium (pyro-) phosphates. Calcium orthophosphates were converted over time to hydroxyapatite. Conversely, different magnesium phosphates were transformed to trimagnesium phosphate. Since the magnesium phosphates are unable to form an apatite structure, the plant-available phosphorus remains in the soil, leading to better growth results observed in agricultural pot experiments. The pyrophosphates also reacted very differently. Calcium pyrophosphate is unreactive in soil. In contrast, magnesium pyrophosphate quickly formed plant-available dimagnesium phosphate.

  16. Comparison of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hee, Ay Ching; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mehrali, Mohammad; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-12-01

    Ferrite is an important ceramic material with magnetic properties that are useful in many types of electronic devices. In this study, structure and magnetic properties of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion were compared. Both ferrites samples demonstrated similar weight loss characteristics in TGA. The magnesium copper zinc ferrite showed a crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 13.5 nm. However, nickel zinc ferrite showed an amorphous phase. Transmission electron micrographs showed agglomerated nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 26.6 nm for magnesium copper zinc ferrite and 22.7 nm for nickel zinc ferrite. Magnesium copper zinc ferrite exhibited soft ferromagnetic bahaviour whereas nickel zinc ferrite showed superparamagnetic nature.

  17. Structurally characterized 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine solvated magnesium aryloxide complexes: [Mg(mu-OEt)(DBP)(H-TMG)]2, [Mg(mu-OBc)(DBP)(H-TMG)]2, [Mg(mu-TMBA)(DBP)(H-TMG)]2, [Mg(mu-DPP)(DBP)(H-TMG)]2, [Mg(BMP)2(H-TMG)2], [Mg(O-2,6-Ph2C6H3)2 (H-TMG)2].

    PubMed

    Monegan, Jessie D; Bunge, Scott D

    2009-04-06

    The synthesis and structural characterization of several 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine (H-TMG) solvated magnesium aryloxide complexes are reported. Bu(2)Mg was successfully reacted with H-TMG, HOC(6)H(3)(CMe(3))(2)-2,6 (H-DBP), and either ethanol, a carboxylic acid, or diphenyl phosphate in a 1:1 ratio to yield the corresponding [Mg(mu-L)(DBP)(H-TMG)](2) where L = OCH(2)CH(3) (OEt, 1), O(2)CC(CH(3))(3) (OBc, 2), O(2)C(C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(CH(3))(3)) (TMBA, 3), or O(2)P(OC(6)H(5))(2) (DPP, 4). Bu(2)Mg was also reacted with two equivalents of H-TMG and HOC(6)H(3)(CMe(3))-2-(CH(3))-6 (BMP) or HO-2,6-Ph(2)C(6)H(3) to yield [Mg(BMP)(2)(H-TMG)(2)] (5) and [Mg(O-2,6-Ph(2)C(6)H(3))(2)(H-TMG)(2)] (6). Compounds 1-6 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Polymerization of l- and rac-lactide with 1 was found to generate polylactide (PLA). A discussion concerning the relevance of compounds 2 - 4 to the structure of Mg-activated phosphatase enzymes is also provided. The bulk powders for all complexes were found to be in agreement with the crystal structures based on elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, and (1)H, (13)C and (31)P NMR studies.

  18. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product....

  19. Magnesium: Is It a Viable Option?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    strike - High alkalinity • Magnesium strike – High alkalinity • Electroless Nickel - formulated to prevent attach of magnesium. Success Stories...ionic palladium, palladium reducer, electroless copper and electroless nickel. The initial results were encouraging: We were able to Get the parts

  20. Magnesium in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Kutlesic, Marija S; Kutlesic, Ranko M; Mostic-Ilic, Tatjana

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium, one of the essential elements in the human body, has numerous favorable effects that offer a variety of possibilities for its use in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care. Administered as a single intravenous bolus dose or a bolus followed by continuous infusion during surgery, magnesium attenuates stress response to endotracheal intubation, and reduces intraoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic requirements, while at the same time preserving favorable hemodynamics. Applied as part of an intrathecal or epidural anesthetic mixture, magnesium prolongs the duration of anesthesia and diminishes total postoperative analgesic consumption with no adverse maternal or neonatal effects. In obstetric intensive care, magnesium represents a first-choice medication in the treatment and prevention of eclamptic seizures. If used in recommended doses with close monitoring, magnesium is a safe and effective medication.

  1. Comparison of magnesium status using X-ray dispersion analysis following magnesium oxide and magnesium citrate treatment of healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Michael; Saad, Tomer; Shechter, Alon; Koren-Morag, Nira; Silver, Burton B; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2012-03-01

    The magnesium content in food consumed in the Western world is steadily decreasing. Hypomagnesemia is associated with increased incidence of diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, all-cause and coronary artery disease mortality. We investigated the impact of supplemental oral magnesium citrate versus magnesium oxide on intracellular magnesium levels ([Mg2+]i) and platelet function in healthy subjects with no apparent heart disease. In a randomized, prospective, double-blind, crossover study, 41 (20 women) healthy volunteers [mean age 53±8 (range 31-75) years] received either magnesium oxide monohydrate tablets (520 mg/day of elemental magnesium) or magnesium citrate tablets (295.8 mg/day of elemental magnesium) for one month (phase 1), followed by a four-week wash-out period, and then crossover treatment for one month (phase 2). [Mg2+]i was assessed from sublingual cells through x-ray dispersion (normal values 37.9±4.0 mEq/L), serum magnesium levels, platelet aggregation, and quality-of-life questionnaires were assessed before and after each phase. Oral magnesium oxide, rather than magnesium citrate, significantly increased [Mg2+]i (34.4±3 versus 36.3±2 mEq/L, p<0.001 and 34.7±2 versus 35.4±2 mEq/L, p=0.097; respectively), reduced total cholesterol (201±37 versus 186±27 mg/dL, p=0.016 and 187±28 versus 187±25 mg/dL, p=0.978; respectively) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (128±22 versus 120±25 mg/dL, p=0.042 and 120±23 versus 121±22 mg/dL, p=0.622; respectively). Noteworthy is that both treatments significantly reduced epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation (78.9±16% versus 71.7±23%, p=0.013 and 81.3±15% versus 73.3±23%, p=0.036; respectively). Thus, oral magnesium oxide treatment significantly improved [Mg2+]i, total and LDL cholesterol compared with magnesium citrate, while both treatments similarly inhibited platelet aggregation in healthy subjects with no apparent heart disease.

  2. Interactions between magnesium and psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Mihai

    2008-06-01

    Psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, antimanic drugs, antipsychotics, analgesic opioids, and others) are among the most frequently used medicines. Between these drugs and magnesium there are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Erythrocyte magnesium is decreased in patients with severe major depression (MD) vs normal subjects (44 +/- 2.7 mg/L in MD group vs 59.1 +/- 3.2 mg/L in control group, p < 0.01). Therapy with sertraline, 150 mg/day p.o. -21 days or with amitryptiline 3 x 25 mg/day p.o. 28 days increases significantly erythrocyte concentration of magnesium (56.9 +/- 5.22 mg/L after sertraline vs 44 +/- 2.7 mg/L before sertraline, p < 0.01). In patients with acute paranoid schizophrenia, erythrocyte magnesium concentration is decreased vs healthy subjects. Haloperidol, 8 mg/day, p.o. for 21 days or risperidone, 6 mg/day p.o. for 21 days have increased significantly erythrocyte magnesium concentration (46.21 +/- 3.1 mg/L before haloperidol and 54.6 +/- 2.7 mg/L after haloperidol, p < 0.05). Antimanic drugs (mood stabilizers) as carbamazepine, 600 mg/day, p.o., 4 weeks and sodium valproate, 900 mg/day p.o., 4 weeks, increased significantly magnesium in patients with bipolar disorder type I. Increased magnesium status positively correlated with enhancement of the clinical state. The existent data sustain the idea that an increase of erythrocyte magnesium is involved in the mechanism of action of some psychotropic drugs. Magnesium supply decreased the intensity of morphine-induced physical drug dependence. In heroin addicts, the plasma magnesium concentration is decreased.

  3. The Phase Stabilities of Magnesium Hydroxychlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bakker, Jan; LaMarre, Joshua; Peacey, John; Davis, Boyd

    2012-08-01

    This work presents experimental determinations of oxide phase stabilities in the MgCl2-MgO-H2O system. Magnesium hydroxychlorides are compounds with the overall stoichiometry xMgO· yMgCl2· zH2O, which form from the reaction of MgO with MgCl2 brines. They have historically been of importance as the components of Sorel cements; they also have a central role in proposed flowsheets for chloride leaching of laterite nickel ores (among others) and treatment of waste liquors from carnallite processing. A phase diagram of the MgCl2-MgO-H2O system is presented, incorporating both this investigation's results and the values from the literature. Thermochemical values of the 2-form and 3-form hydroxychlorides are estimated from the phase diagram. In addition, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph of the hydroxychloride precipitate is presented. The highlights of this article are as follows: Precipitates of stoichiometry xMgO· yMgCl2· zH2O were obtained by adding MgO to MgCl2 solutions.

  4. The magnesium chelation step in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The biogenesis of energy transducing membranes requires the coordinate synthesis of prosthetic groups, proteins and lipids. Two of the major prosthetic groups, chlorophyll and heme, share a common biosynthetic pathway that diverges at the point of metal insertion into protoporphyrin IX. Insertion of iron leads to heme, while insertion of magnesium leads to chlorophyll. The Mg-chelatase from intact cucumber chloroplasts has been characterized with regard to substrate specificity, regulation, ATP requirement, and a requirement for intact chloroplasts. Mg-chelatase was isolated from maize, barley and peas and characterized in order to circumvent the intact chloroplast requirement of cucumber Mg-chelatase. Pea Mg-chelatase activity is higher than cucumber Mg-chelatase activity, and lacks the requirement for intact chloroplasts. Studies on isolated pea Mg-chelatase have shown more cofactors are required for the reaction than are seen with ferrochelatase, indicating a greater opportunity for regulatory control of this pathway. Two of the cofactors are proteins, and there appears to be a requirement for a protease-sensitive component which is outside the outer envelope. We are developing a continuous spectrophotometric assay for Mg-chelatase activity, and an assay for free heme which has shown heme efflux from intact chloroplasts. 18 refs. (MHB)

  5. Status of Research on Magnesium Oxide Backfill

    SciTech Connect

    PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BYNUM,R. VANN; WANG,YIFENG; KELLY,JOHN W.; ANDERSON,HOWARD; NOWAK,E. JAMES

    2000-07-31

    For the WIPP, chemical and physical characteristics of MgO suggest it to be the most beneficial backfill choice, particularly because it has the ability to buffer the aqueous chemical conditions to control actinide volubility. In the current experimental program, the authors are developing a technical basis for taking credit for the complete set of attributes of MgO in geochemical, hydrogeological, and geomechanical technical areas, resulting in an improved conceptual model for the WIPP such as the following. Water uptake by MgO will delay the development of mobile actinides and gas generation by microbes and corrosion. Reduced gas generation will reduce or even eliminate spallings releases. As MgO hydrates, it swells, reducing porosity and permeability, which will inhibit gas flow in the repository, in turn reducing spallings releases. Hydration will also result in a self-sealing mechanism by which water uptake and swelling of MgO adjacent to a groundwater seep cuts off further seepage. Reaction with some groundwaters will produce cementitious materials, which will help to cement waste particles or produce a cohesive solid mass. Larger particles are less likely to be entrained in a spallings release. If sufficient water eventually accumulates in a repository to support microbial gas generation, magnesium carbonate cements will form; also producing good cohesion and strength.

  6. Massive magnesium depletion and isotope fractionation in weathered basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Rudnick, Roberta L.; McDonough, William F.; Cummings, Michael L.

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium isotopes have been shown to fractionate significantly during continental weathering, however, the degree and direction of fractionation varies from one study to the next, and the main factors that control Mg isotope fractionation during weathering have yet to be delineated. Here, we report Mg contents and isotopic compositions for two ∼10 m deep drill cores through bauxites developed on Columbia River Basalts (CRBs). Samples from these two drill cores have very low MgO contents (0.12-0.25 wt.%) and variable but high δ26Mg values (from -0.1 to up to +1.8, the heaviest isotopic composition ever reported for Mg) relative to the average values of fresh CRBs (δ26Mg = -0.23 ± 0.07 and MgO = 5.9 wt.%). These features reflect the near complete loss of Mg in the isotopically heavy regolith. The most highly weathered bauxites at the tops of the profiles have the lowest δ26Mg values, reflecting the addition of isotopically light eolian dust. Excluding these samples, δ26Mg in bauxites displays a weak, positive correlation with gibbsite abundance, suggesting that gibbsite preferentially retains 26Mg in the bauxites. The integrated Mg isotopic fractionation factors between bauxite and fluid (Δ26Mgbauxite-fluid), inferred from Rayleigh fractionation calculations, vary from 0.05‰ to 0.4‰, which is similar to the range inferred from previous studies of igneous rock weathering profiles, though none of these previous studies found the extremely heavy δ26Mg and massive Mg depletion seen here. Collectively, studies of weathering profiles suggest loss of isotopically light Mg from the continents, which must contribute to the very light δ26Mg seen in river water and seawater.

  7. Analysis Methods of Magnesium Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmann, Sven; Ditze, André; Scharf, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The quality of recycled magnesium from chips depends strongly on their exposure to inorganic and organic impurities that are added during the production processes. Different kinds of magnesium chips from these processes were analyzed by several methods. In addition, the accuracy and effectiveness of the methods are discussed. The results show that the chips belong either to the AZ91, AZ31, AM50/60, or AJ62 alloy. Some kinds of chips show deviations from the above-mentioned normations. Different impurities result mainly from transition metals and lime. The water and oil content does not exceed 25%, and the chip size is not more than 4 mm in the diameter. The sieve analysis shows good results for oily and wet chips. The determination of oil and water shows better results for the application of a Soxhlet compared with the addition of lime and vacuum distillation. The most accurate values for the determination of water and oil are obtained by drying at 110°C (for water) and washing with acetone (for oil) by hand.

  8. Identifying acid salts of magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Plumb, R.; Thivierge, R.F. Jr.; Xu, W.W.

    1987-11-05

    In preliminary work they found that significant quantities of certain nitrogen oxides and of sulfuric acid were absorbed by lower hydrates of magnesium sulfate. It appeared that acid salts were being formed but the known chemistry of group IIA (group 2) sulfates and acid sulfates which was worked out many years ago did not provide an explanation of their observations. They developed a new technique for delineating the solidus boundary of ternary mixtures using friability tests and applied it to the systems of interest. Magnesium acid salt hydrates with compositions on the solidus boundary could be readily identified. X-ray powder patterns confirmed the existence of two previously unknown ternary compounds, Mg/sub 2/(HSO/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ x 4H/sub 2/O and Mg(HSO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ x H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ x 3H/sub 2/O. Mixed acid sulfate-nitrate-hydrates could be detected but fuming at room temperatures interfered with quantitative determinations of the solidus boundary and X-ray measurements.

  9. Tape casting of magnesium oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.

    2008-02-01

    A tape casting procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape casting technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the casting slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape casting operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.

  10. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, S.; Buhl, D.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Richter, D. K.; Vonhof, H. B.; Wassenburg, J. A.; Geske, A.; Spötl, C.; Immenhauser, A.

    2012-05-01

    Here we explore the potential of time-series magnesium26Mg) isotope data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco), the warm-temperate (Germany), the equatorial-humid (Peru) and the cold-humid (Austria) climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are placed against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rain water or snow as well as soil and hostrock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: -4.26 ± 0.07 ‰ and HK3: -4.17 ± 0.15 ‰) and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: -3.96 ± 0.04 ‰) but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is in concert with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: -4.01 ± 0.07 ‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: -4.20 ± 0.10 ‰) record changes in outside air temperature as driving factor rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: -3.00 ± 0.73 ‰; SPA 59: -3.70 ± 0.43 ‰) are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature affecting soil zone activity and weathering balance. Several data points in the Austrian and two data points in the

  11. Spectrophotometric study on the proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in methanol, acetonitrile and the binary mixture 50% methanol + 50% acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M.; Habeeb, Moustafa M.; Al-Obidan, Areej H.

    2016-02-01

    Proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (2AMP) as the proton acceptor with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) as the proton donor has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile (AN) and a binary mixture composed of 50% MeOH and 50% AN (AN-Me). The composition of the complex has been investigated utilizing Job's and photometric titration methods to be 1:1. Minimum-maximum absorbance equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant of the proton transfer reaction (KPT) where it reached high values in the investigated solvent confirming its high stability. The formation constant recorded higher value in AN compared with MeOH and mixture of AN-Me. Based on the formation of stable proton transfer complex, a sensitive spectrophotometric method was suggested for quantitative determination of 2AMP. The Lambert-Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.5-8 μg mL- 1 with small values of limits of detection and quantification. The solid complex between 2AMP with DCNP has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis to be 1:1 in concordant with the molecular stoichiometry in solution. Further analysis of the solid complex was carried out using infrared and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Spectrophotometric study on the proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in methanol, acetonitrile and the binary mixture 50% methanol+50% acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M; Habeeb, Moustafa M; Al-Obidan, Areej H

    2016-02-05

    Proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (2AMP) as the proton acceptor with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) as the proton donor has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile (AN) and a binary mixture composed of 50% MeOH and 50% AN (AN-Me). The composition of the complex has been investigated utilizing Job(')s and photometric titration methods to be 1:1. Minimum-maximum absorbance equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant of the proton transfer reaction (K(PT)) where it reached high values in the investigated solvent confirming its high stability. The formation constant recorded higher value in AN compared with MeOH and mixture of AN-Me. Based on the formation of stable proton transfer complex, a sensitive spectrophotometric method was suggested for quantitative determination of 2AMP. The Lambert-Beer(')s law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.5-8 μg mL(-1) with small values of limits of detection and quantification. The solid complex between 2AMP with DCNP has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis to be 1:1 in concordant with the molecular stoichiometry in solution. Further analysis of the solid complex was carried out using infrared and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Magnesium status and the effect of magnesium supplementation in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, L M; Brown, D J; Smith, F W; Rush, J E

    1997-01-01

    Magnesium deficiency has been associated with the development of cardiovascular disease in several species. Cats may be predisposed to alterations in magnesium status because of recent changes in the composition of commercial feline diets. The purposes of this study were 1) to examine the dietary history of cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 2) to study magnesium status of cats with HCM compared to normal cats, and 3) to determine the effects of magnesium supplementation in cats with HCM. In part 1 of the study, diets of 65 cats with HCM were examined retrospectively. Forty of the 45 cats for which diets could be determined (89%) ate a diet designed to be magnesium-restricted and/or to produce an acidic urine. In part 2 of the study, 10 cats with HCM were compared to 10 healthy control cats for serum creatinine and magnesium; urine creatinine and magnesium, urine specific gravity and pH, and fractional excretion of magnesium. Urine creatinine and specific gravity were higher in control cats than in cats with HCM. No other differences were found between the 2 groups. In part 3, cats with HCM were supplemented with either 210 mg magnesium chloride (n = 15) or 210 mg lactose (n = 15) for 12 wk. No differences between the 2 groups were found for changes in either magnesium status or echocardiographic parameters. However, the 30 cats with HCM, as a group, did show significant improvements in measures of cardiac hypertrophy over the 12-week period. This was likely the result of treatment with other medications, rather than the magnesium supplementation. The results of this study suggest that cats with HCM are likely to be fed magnesium-restricted diets, but that they do not appear to have altered magnesium status compared to healthy controls. PMID:9243004

  14. Magnesium isotope fractionation in silicate melts by chemical and thermal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Frank M.; Watson, E. Bruce; Mendybaev, Ruslan A.; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Janney, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    Two types of laboratory experiments were used to quantify magnesium isotopic fractionations associated with chemical and thermal (Soret) diffusion in silicate liquids. Chemical diffusion couples juxtaposing a molten natural basalt (SUNY MORB) and a molten natural rhyolite (Lake County Obsidian) were run in a piston cylinder apparatus and used to determine the isotopic fractionation of magnesium as it diffused from molten basalt to molten rhyolite. The thermal diffusion experiments were also run in a piston cylinder apparatus but with a sample made entirely of molten SUNY MORB displaced from the hotspot of the assembly furnace so that the sample would have a temperature difference of about 100-200 °C from one end to the other. The chemical diffusion experiments showed fractionations of 26Mg/ 24Mg by as much as 7‰, which resulted in an estimate for the mass dependence of the self-diffusion coefficients of the magnesium isotopes corresponding to D/D=(24/26)β with β = 0.05. The thermal diffusion experiments showed that a temperature difference of about 100 °C resulted in the MgO, CaO, and FeO components of the basalt becoming slightly enriched by about 1 wt% in the colder end while SiO 2 was enriched by several wt% in the hotter end. The temperature gradient also fractionated the magnesium isotopes. A temperature difference of about 150 °C produced an 8‰ enrichment of 26Mg/ 24Mg at the colder end relative to the hotter end. The magnesium isotopic fractionation as a function of temperature in molten basalt corresponds to 3.6 × 10 -2‰/°C/amu.

  15. Silicone-covered biodegradable magnesium-stent insertion in the esophagus: a comparison with plastic stents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yue-Qi; Yang, Kai; Edmonds, Laura; Wei, Li-Ming; Zheng, Reila; Cheng, Ruo-Yu; Cui, Wen-Guo; Cheng, Ying-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: We determined the feasibility of, and tissue response to silicone-covered biodegradable magnesium- and plastic-stent insertion into the esophagus in rabbits. Methods: The mechanical compression–recovery characteristics and degradation behaviors of the magnesium stent were investigated in vitro. A total of 45 rabbits were randomly divided into a magnesium- (n = 15) and a plastic- (n = 15) stent group, and underwent stent insertion into the lower third of the esophagus under fluoroscopic guidance; a control group (n = 15) did not undergo the intervention. Esophagography was performed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Five rabbits in each group were euthanized at each time point for histological examination. Results: Silicone-covered magnesium stents showed similar radial force to plastic stents (p > 0.05). The magnesium stents degraded rapidly in an acidic solution, but 90.2% ± 3.1% of the residual mass was maintained after a 2-week degradation in a solution with a pH of 4.0. All stent insertions were well tolerated. Magnesium stents migrated in six rabbits (one at 1 week, one at 2 weeks and four at 4 weeks), and plastic stents migrated in three rabbits (one at 2 weeks and two at 4 weeks; p > 0.05). Esophageal wall remodeling (thinner epithelial and smooth muscle layers) was similar in both stented groups (p > 0.05), and the esophagus wall was found to be significantly thinner in the stented groups than in the control group (p < 0.05). Esophageal injury and collagen deposition following stent insertion were similar and did not differ from the control group (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Esophageal silicone-covered magnesium stents provided reliable support for at least 2 weeks, with acceptable migration rates and without causing severe injury or tissue reaction compared with plastic stents. PMID:28286555

  16. Study of second phase in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys: Phase stability evaluation via Dmol{sup 3} calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huazhe; Liu, Chen; Wan, Peng; Tan, Lili; Yang, Ke

    2013-11-01

    Thermodynamical stabilities of four conventional second phases as well as magnesium matrix in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys were investigated theoretically via computer calculation method. Model of individual phase and systems including phase and four water molecular (phase-4H{sub 2}O) were established to simulate the in vitro and in vivo environment. Local orbital density functional theory approach was applied to calculate the total energy for the individual phase and phase-4H{sub 2}O system. The results demonstrated that all the second phases possessed higher phase stability compared with magnesium matrix, but the phase stability was quite different for different types of second phases or second phase-4H{sub 2}O systems. Furthermore, a schematic process of inflammation reaction caused by magnesium alloy implants was proposed for the further evaluation on biocompatibility of different second phases.

  17. Structure and compatibility of a magnesium electrolyte with a sulphur cathode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Soo; Arthur, Timothy S; Allred, Gary D; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Newman, John G; Rodnyansky, Alexander E; Oliver, Allen G; Boggess, William C; Muldoon, John

    2011-08-09

    Magnesium metal is an ideal rechargeable battery anode material because of its high volumetric energy density, high negative reduction potential and natural abundance. Coupling Mg with high capacity, low-cost cathode materials such as electrophilic sulphur is only possible with a non-nucleophilic electrolyte. Here we show how the crystallization of the electrochemically active species formed from the reaction between hexamethyldisilazide magnesium chloride and aluminum trichloride enables the synthesis of a non-nucleophilic electrolyte. Furthermore, crystallization was essential in the identification of the electroactive species, [Mg(2)(μ-Cl)(3)·6THF](+), and vital to improvements in the voltage stability and coulombic efficiency of the electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the sulphur electrode confirmed that the electrochemical conversion between sulphur and magnesium sulfide can be successfully performed using this electrolyte.

  18. Effect of magnesium addition on the wetting of alumina by aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangghaleh, Ali; Halali, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    In this report the wetting behaviour between polycrystalline alumina substrates and molten aluminium doped with magnesium as a wetting agent has been studied using the sessile drop technique. The time required for equilibrium attainment is investigated. To explore the formation of possible phases at the interface, electron microscopic studies along with EDX analysis have been employed. It is found that magnesium reduces the time and temperature required for equilibrium in the Al/Al 2O 3 system. The Al-7 wt% Mg and Al-10 wt% Mg alloys can wet alumina at temperatures as low as 900 °C. It is also found that molten aluminium doped with magnesium can wet polycrystalline alumina at temperatures below 1000 °C. A thin reaction layer was observed at the Al-Mg/Al 2O 3 interface in the present study.

  19. Structure and compatibility of a magnesium electrolyte with a sulphur cathode

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Soo; Arthur, Timothy S.; Allred, Gary D.; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Newman, John G.; Rodnyansky, Alexander E.; Oliver, Allen G.; Boggess, William C.; Muldoon, John

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium metal is an ideal rechargeable battery anode material because of its high volumetric energy density, high negative reduction potential and natural abundance. Coupling Mg with high capacity, low-cost cathode materials such as electrophilic sulphur is only possible with a non-nucleophilic electrolyte. Here we show how the crystallization of the electrochemically active species formed from the reaction between hexamethyldisilazide magnesium chloride and aluminum trichloride enables the synthesis of a non-nucleophilic electrolyte. Furthermore, crystallization was essential in the identification of the electroactive species, [Mg2(μ-Cl)3·6THF]+, and vital to improvements in the voltage stability and coulombic efficiency of the electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the sulphur electrode confirmed that the electrochemical conversion between sulphur and magnesium sulfide can be successfully performed using this electrolyte. PMID:21829189

  20. Room temperature magnesium electrorefining by using non-aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesik; Jung, Yeojin; Kusumah, Priyandi; Dilasari, Bonita; Ku, Heesuk; Kim, Hansu; Kwon, Kyungjung; Lee, Churl Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    The increasing usage of magnesium inevitably leads to a fast increase in magnesium scrap, and magnesium recycling appears extremely beneficial for cost reduction, preservation of natural resources and protection of the environment. Magnesium refining for the recovery of high purity magnesium from metal scrap alloy (AZ31B composed of magnesium, aluminum, zinc, manganese and copper) at room temperature is investigated with a non-aqueous electrolyte (tetrahydrofuran with ethyl magnesium bromide). A high purity (99.999%) of electrorefined magneisum with a smooth and dense surface is obtained after potentiostatic electrolysis with an applied voltage of 2 V. The selective dissolution of magnesium from magnesium alloy is possible by applying an adequate potential considering the tolerable impurity level in electrorefined magnesium and processing time. The purity estimation method suggested in this study can be useful in evaluating the maximum content of impurity elements.

  1. Magnesium modulates the expression levels of calcification-associated factors to inhibit calcification in a time-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinsheng; Bai, Yaling; Jin, Jingjing; Zhang, Junxia; Zhang, Shenglei; Cui, Liwen; Zhang, Huiran

    2015-03-01

    Vascular calcification, a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease, involves a variety of mechanisms associated with the regulation of calcification-associated factors. Previous clinical studies have indicated that magnesium is involved in the reduction of vascular calcification; however, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of magnesium on β-glycerophosphate (β-GP)-induced calcification and the underlying mechanisms. Primary rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were exposed to 10 mM β-GP in medium with or without the addition of 3 mM magnesium or 2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate (2-APB; an inhibitor of magnesium transport), for a 14-day period. Calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were measured by Alizarin red staining, quantification of calcium and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression levels of core-binding factor α-1 (Cbfα1), matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteopontin (OPN) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction or western blot analysis, following incubation for 0, 3, 6, 10 and 14 days with the different media. VSMC calcification and ALP activity was reduced significantly in the high-magnesium medium compared with the calcification medium, during the 14-day incubation. The magnesium-induced changes in the VSMCs included a β-GP-induced downregulation of Cbfα1 by day 3 of incubation, an effect that was gradually enhanced over the 14-day period. By contrast, magnesium produced notable increases in MGP and OPN expression levels, with an opposite pattern to that observed in the Cbfα1 expression levels. However, the addition of 2-APB appeared to inhibit the protective effect of magnesium on the VSMCs. Therefore, magnesium was able to effectively reduce β-GP-induced calcification in rat VSMCs by regulating the expression levels of calcification-associated factors in a time-dependent manner.

  2. Three separate proteins constitute the magnesium chelatase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Willows, R D; Gibson, L C; Kanangara, C G; Hunter, C N; von Wettstein, D

    1996-01-15

    The insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX is the first step unique to chlorophyll production and is catalyzed by magnesium chelatase. The Rhodobacter sphaeroides genes, bchI and bchD together, and bchH alone, were cloned and expressed with the pET3a vector in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The 40-kDa BchI protein was synthesized in greater abundance compared to the 70-kDa BchD protein when both were expressed together from the same plasmid. The production of large amounts of the 140-kDa BchH protein in E. coli was accompanied by an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. The accumulated protoporphyrin IX was bound specifically to BchH in an approximate molar ratio of 1:1. All three recombinant proteins were soluble; BchH was monomeric, Bchl was dimeric, while BchD appeared to be polymeric with a molecular mass of approximately 550 kDa. The BchH and BchI proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity while BchD was separated from BchI and partially purified. Magnesium was inserted into protoporphyrin IX and deuteroporphyrin by combining these three proteins in the presence of ATP. One monomer of BchH to one dimer of BchI gave the optimal magnesium chelatase activity and the activity was dependent on the amount of partially purified BchD added to the assay at the optimum BchH:BchI ratio. The reaction was dissected into two parts with an activation step requiring BchI, BchD, and Mg2+-ATP, and a metal-insertion step which in addition requires Mg2+, protoporphyrin IX, and BchH. The stoichiometric binding of protoporphyrin IX to BchH in vitro is direct evidence for BchH carrying out such a role in vivo whereas the other two proteins are involved in ATP activation and magnesium insertion.

  3. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ44Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ26Mg, δ13C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ26Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this 26Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a 26Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ26Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ26Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages.

  4. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeremy E; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-13

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ(44)Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ(26)Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ(26)Mg, δ(13)C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ(26)Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this (26)Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a (26)Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ(26)Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ(26)Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages.

  5. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ44Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ26Mg, δ13C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ26Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this 26Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a 26Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ26Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ26Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages. PMID:25535375

  6. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, S. B. Little, B. K.; Xin, Y.; Ridge, C. J.; Lindsay, C. M.; Buszek, R. J.; Boatz, J. A.; Boyle, J. M.

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structure at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.

  7. Increased anthocyanin accumulation in aster flowers at elevated temperatures due to magnesium treatment.

    PubMed

    Shaked-Sachray, Liat; Weiss, David; Reuveni, Moshe; Nissim-Levi, Ada; Oren-Shamir, Michal

    2002-04-01

    Temperature is one of the main external factors affecting anthocyanin accumulation in plant tissues: low temperatures cause an increase and elevated temperatures cause a decrease in anthocyanin concentration. Several metals have been shown to increase the half-life time of anthocyanins, by forming complexes with them. We studied the combined effect of elevated temperatures and increased metal concentrations on the accumulation of anthocyanins in aster 'Sungal' flowers. It has been found that magnesium treatment of aster plants or detached flower buds, partially prevents colour fading at elevated temperatures. Anthocyanin concentration of aster 'Sungal' flowers grown at 29 degrees C/21 degrees C day/night, respectively, was about half that of flowers grown at 17 degrees C/9 degrees C. The activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and chalcone isomerase (CHI) decreased as the temperature increased. Treatment of both whole plants and detached flower buds grown at elevated temperatures in the presence of magnesium salts, increased flower anthocyanin concentration by up to 80%. Measurement of magnesium following these treatments revealed an increased level of the metal in the petals, suggesting a direct effect. Magnesium treatment does not seem to cause increased synthesis of anthocyanin through a stress-related reaction, since the activities of both PAL and CHI did not increase due to this treatment. The results of this study show that increasing magnesium levels in aster petals prevents the deleterious effect of elevated temperatures on anthocyanin accumulation, thus enhancing flower colour.

  8. Formation and evaluation of protective layer over magnesium melt under various gaseous atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Samar

    Molten magnesium exposed to an atmosphere of air will oxidize rapidly, resulting in burning on the metal surface, melt loss and handling difficulties. If magnesium is to be used as a casting metal, the melt must be protected from this severe oxidation. The objective of this work was to study the oxidation of molten magnesium in various protective atmospheres to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on the rate and mechanism of protection. Measurements of the kinetics of the protective layer formation in various atmospheres, additive gas concentrations in air and temperatures were made by monitoring the weight gain of the samples with time. To obtain knowledge of magnesium melt protection and to find the best practical protection condition, samples were examined in atmospheres of SF6/air, CO2/air, SO2/air, and SF6/CO2/air. Experiments were performed using a thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) unit in the temperature range of 670 - 770°C (943 - 1043K). Reaction times of 2, 3 and 7 minutes were selected to have the closest condition to that of industry. The morphology, chemical composition and thickness of the surface films were studied using SEM/EDS and a kinetic model for the process was developed. Results showed that all the additives contributed to protection of molten magnesium. Among them, SF6 and SO2 showed best protection by forming a denser and more uniform surface film. However, the use of SO 2 is not recommended due to the violent behavior observed at longer times and higher temperatures. In addition, there are some drawbacks due to its high toxicity and corrosiveness, which demand additional handling and ventilation procedures. Despite the requirement of a higher concentration in air, CO2 showed the lowest protection capabilities among all. However, addition of small amount of CO2 to a mixture of SF 6 and air revealed a high inhibiting effect to molten magnesium. The effects of additive concentration, temperature and reaction time were further

  9. Magnesium isotope fractionation during continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, F. Z.; Huang, K. J.; Li, W.; Liu, X. M.; Ma, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continental weathering links the atmosphere, hydrosphere and continents as it regulates the CO2 content of the atmosphere, shifts the composition of the continental crust from basaltic to andesitic, and ultimately controls the chemical composition of river waters and seawater. Magnesium is a water-soluble major element in the hydrosphere, continental crust and the mantle, and has three stable isotopes (24Mg, 25Mg and 26Mg). Studies of Mg isotopes during continental weathering may help to document the interactions between hydrosphere, crust and mantle. Previous studies have shown that the continental crust has a heterogeneous but on average heavier Mg isotopic composition than the mantle, whereas the hydrosphere is isotopically light. The complementary characteristics of Mg isotopic compositions between continental and hydrosphere have been attributed to continental weathering, with light Mg isotopes partitioned into water, leaving heavy Mg isotopes behind in the crustal residue. Here we summarize our studies of Mg isotope fractionation in four weathering profiles under various climate conditions. We show that large Mg isotope fractionation can occur during continental weathering. Although the weathered residue is usually enriched in heavier Mg isotopes than unaltered parent rocks, some heavily weathered products can be quite light in Mg isotopic composition. The complicated behaviors of Mg isotopes reflect different control factors during weathering such as parent rock lithology, primary mineral dissolution, secondary mineral formation, ion exchange, vegetation uptake etc. Though studies of natural samples can provide direct evidence on isotope fractionation, more well-controlled laboratory experiments on Mg isotope fractionation between fluids and minerals are needed in order to fully understand the behaviors of Mg isotopes during weathering, which ultimately lays the foundation for making Mg isotope geochemistry an important tool for studying different geological

  10. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaofei Guan; Peter A. Zink; Uday B. Pal; Adam C. Powell

    2012-01-01

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.% Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the magnesium content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium.

  11. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap Through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter; Pal, Uday

    2012-03-11

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.%Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the Mg content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapors in a separate condenser. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium; could not collect and weigh all of the magnesium recovered.

  12. Highly specific spectrophotometric method for palladium(II) determination with 3-(5'-tetrazolylazo)-2,6-Diaminotoluene in the presence of chlorides. Kinetic and equilibrium study of reactions.

    PubMed

    Hernández, O; Jiménez, A I; Jiménez, F; Arias, J J; Havel, J

    1994-05-01

    3-(5'-tetrazolylazo)-2,6-Diaminotoluene (TEADAT, H(3)L(2+)) forms stable 1:1 and 1:2 (metal:ligand) pink-red complexes (lambda(max) 506 and 536 nm) with palladium(II). The apparent molar absorptivity of 1:2 complex is 5.2 x 10(4) 1.mol(-1). cm(-1) at 536 nm. Equilibrium constants beta*(nl) for reactions PdCl(2-)(4) + nH(3)L(2+) right harpoon over left harpoonright harpoon over left harpoon PdCl(4-n) (H(2)L)(2n-2)(n) + n Cl(-) + n H(+) were determined: logbeta*(1) = 4.09 +/- 0.05, logbeta*(2) = 8.40 +/- 0.02, corresponding stability conditional constants of PdCl(3)(H(2)L) and PdCl(2)(H(2)L)(2+)(2) were log beta(1) = 19.03, log beta(2) = 26.74. The formation of complexes was rather slow but could be speeded up considerably by the catalytic effect of trace amounts of thiocyanate. Constant absorbance values were thus reached in 2-5 min. A rapid, sensitive and highly specific method for the determination of palladium(II) at pH 1.42 in 0.25M NACl has been worked out with a detection limit of 0.54 mug. Interference of precious and common metal ions have been studied and the method has been applied for the determination of palladium in Pd asbestos, oakay alloys and various catalysts and for the determination of palladium in precious metals.

  13. Mystery #26

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-22

    article title:  MISR Mystery Image Quiz #26     View Larger Image ... You may use any reference materials you like to answer the quiz. From the statements below, please indicate which ones are True or ...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 179, which is incorporated by reference. Magnesium phosphate, tribasic, meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 180, which...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 179, which is incorporated by reference. Magnesium phosphate, tribasic, meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 180, which...

  16. Prolonged high-dose intravenous magnesium therapy for severe tetanus in the intensive care unit: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tetanus rarely occurs in developed countries, but it can result in fatal complications including respiratory failure due to generalized muscle spasms. Magnesium infusion has been used to treat spasticity in tetanus, and its effectiveness is supported by several case reports and a recent randomized controlled trial. Case presentations Three Caucasian Greek men aged 30, 50 and 77 years old were diagnosed with tetanus and admitted to a general 12-bed intensive care unit in 2006 and 2007 for respiratory failure due to generalized spasticity. Intensive care unit treatment included antibiotics, hydration, enteral nutrition, early tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. Intravenous magnesium therapy controlled spasticity without the need for additional muscle relaxants. Their medications were continued for up to 26 days, and adjusted as needed to control spasticity. Plasma magnesium levels, which were measured twice a day, remained in the 3 to 4.5 mmol/L range. We did not observe hemodynamic instability, arrhythmias or other complications related to magnesium therapy in these patients. All patients improved, came off mechanical ventilation, and were discharged from the intensive care unit in a stable condition. Conclusion In comparison with previous reports, our case series contributes the following meaningful additional information: intravenous magnesium therapy was used on patients already requiring mechanical ventilation and remained effective for up to 26 days (significantly longer than in previous reports) without significant toxicity in two patients. The overall outcome was good in all our patients. However, the optimal dose, optimal duration and maximum safe duration of intravenous magnesium therapy are unknown. Therefore, until more data on the safety and efficacy of magnesium therapy are available, its use should be limited to carefully selected tetanus cases. PMID:20356376

  17. Magnesium-titanium alloys for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ilona

    Magnesium has been identified as a promising biodegradable implant material because it does not cause systemic toxicity and can reduce stress shielding. However, it corrodes too quickly in the body. Titanium, which is already used ubiquitously for implants, was chosen as the alloying element because of its proven biocompatibility and corrosion resistance in physiological environments. Thus, alloying magnesium with titanium is expected to improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium. Mg-Ti alloys with a titanium content ranging from 5 to 35 at.-% were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. Spark plasma sintering was identified as a processing route to consolidate the alloy powders made by ball-milling into bulk material without destroying the alloy structure. This is an important finding as this metastable Mg-Ti alloy can only be heated up to max. 200C° for a limited time without reaching the stable state of separated magnesium and titanium. The superior corrosion behavior of Mg 80-Ti20 alloy in a simulated physiological environment was shown through hydrogen evolution tests, where the corrosion rate was drastically reduced compared to pure magnesium and electrochemical measurements revealed an increased potential and resistance compared to pure magnesium. Cytotoxicity tests on murine pre-osteoblastic cells in vitro confirmed that supernatants made from Mg-Ti alloy were no more cytotoxic than supernatants prepared with pure magnesium. Mg and Mg-Ti alloys can also be used to make novel polymer-metal composites, e.g., with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to avoid the polymer's detrimental pH drop during degradation and alter its degradation pattern. Thus, Mg-Ti alloys can be fabricated and consolidated while achieving improved corrosion resistance and maintaining cytocompatibility. This work opens up the possibility of using Mg-Ti alloys for fracture fixation implants and other biomedical applications. KEYWORDS: Magnesium, titanium, corrosion

  18. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  19. Associations of dietary magnesium intake with mortality from cardiovascular disease: the JACC study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Iso, Hiroyasu; Ohira, Tetsuya; Date, Chigusa; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2012-04-01

    The authors sought to investigate the relationship between dietary magnesium intake and mortality from cardiovascular disease in a population-based sample of Asian adults. Reported findings are based on dietary magnesium intake in 58,615 healthy Japanese aged 40-79 years, in the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study. Dietary magnesium intake was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire administered between 1988 and 1990. During the median 14.7-year follow-up, we documented 2690 deaths from cardiovascular disease, comprising 1227 deaths from strokes and 557 deaths from coronary heart disease. Dietary magnesium intake was inversely associated with mortality from hemorrhagic stroke in men and with mortality from total and ischemic strokes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and total cardiovascular disease in women. The multivariable hazard ratio (95% CI) for the highest vs. the lowest quintiles of magnesium intake after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factor and sodium intake was 0.49 (0.26-0.95), P for trend = 0.074 for hemorrhagic stroke in men, 0.68 (0.48-0.96), P for trend = 0.010 for total stroke, 0.47 (0.29-0.77), P for trend < 0.001 for ischemic stroke, 0.50 (0.30-0.84), P for trend = 0.005 for coronary heart disease, 0.50 (0.28-0.87), P for trend = 0.002 for heart failure and 0.64 (0.51-0.80), P for trend < 0.001 for total cardiovascular disease in women. The adjustment for calcium and potassium intakes attenuated these associations. In conclusion, dietary magnesium intake was associated with reduced mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japanese, especially for women.

  20. Immunological Response to Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Karin; Fischerauer, Stefan; Ferlic, Peter; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Brezinsek, Hans-Peter; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Löffler, Jörg F.; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2014-04-01

    The use of biodegradable magnesium implants in pediatric trauma surgery would render surgical interventions for implant removal after tissue healing unnecessary, thereby preventing stress to the children and reducing therapy costs. In this study, we report on the immunological response to biodegradable magnesium implants—as an important aspect in evaluating biocompatibility—tested in a growing rat model. The focus of this study was to investigate the response of the innate immune system to either fast or slow degrading magnesium pins, which were implanted into the femoral bones of 5-week-old rats. The main alloying element of the fast-degrading alloy (ZX50) was Zn, while it was Y in the slow-degrading implant (WZ21). Our results demonstrate that degrading magnesium implants beneficially influence the immune system, especially in the first postoperative weeks but also during tissue healing and early bone remodeling. However, rodents with WZ21 pins showed a slightly decreased phagocytic ability during bone remodeling when the degradation rate reached its maximum. This may be due to the high release rate of the rare earth-element yttrium, which is potentially toxic. From our results we conclude that magnesium implants have a beneficial effect on the innate immune system but that there are some concerns regarding the use of yttrium-alloyed magnesium implants, especially in pediatric patients.

  1. Low-temperature electron irradiation and annealing in pure magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Simester, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    In this study of magnesium after 1.0 MeV electron irradiations at 1.55/sup 0/K, it has been observed that the damage production rate in Mg is (3.57 +- 0.03) x 10/sup -26/ ..cap omega..cm/(e/sup -/ cm/sup 2/). There is no evidence for thermal annealing up to 4/sup 0/K. The low temperature recovery in magnesium is found to consist of two broad substages between 4 to 14/sup 0/K, both of which exhibit evidence for correlated and uncorrelated recovery processes. The two substages are found to have very different frequency factors for annealing, and there is evidence that the recovery processes in the second substage are influenced by those in the first. A model for recovery is proposed using the split configuration in the plane which explains the first substage as being due to interstitial migration in the basal plane and the second to migration perpendicular to the plane.

  2. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Thakre, Dilip; Rayalu, Sadhana; Kawade, Raju; Meshram, Siddharth; Subrt, J; Labhsetwar, Nitin

    2010-08-15

    Low cost bentonite clay was chemically modified using magnesium chloride in order to enhance its fluoride removal capacity. The magnesium incorporated bentonite (MB) was characterized by using XRD and SEM techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study and optimize various operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, effect of co-ions and initial fluoride concentration. It was observed that the MB works effectively over wide range of pH and showed a maximum fluoride removal capacity of 2.26 mgg(-1) at an initial fluoride concentration of 5 mg L(-1), which is much better than the unmodified bentonite. The experimental data fitted well into Langmuir adsorption isotherm and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Thermodynamic study suggests that fluoride adsorption on MB is reasonably spontaneous and an endothermic process. MB showed significantly high fluoride removal in synthetic water as compared to field water. Desorption study of MB suggest that almost all the loaded fluoride was desorbed ( approximately 97%) using 1M NaOH solution however maximum fluoride removal decreases from 95.47 to 73 (%) after regeneration. From the experimental results, it may be inferred that chemical modification enhances the fluoride removal efficiency of bentonite and it works as an effective adsorbent for defluoridation of water.

  3. The Effect of Adding Corrosion Inhibitors into an Electroless Nickel Plating Bath for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Su, Yongyao; Liu, Hongdong; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Xin; Shao, Zhongcai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, corrosion inhibitors were added into an electroless nickel plating bath to realize nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coating deposition on magnesium alloy directly. The performance of five corrosion inhibitors was evaluated by inhibition efficiency. The results showed that only ammonium hydrogen fluoride (NH4HF2) and ammonium molybdate ((NH4)2MoO4) could be used as corrosion inhibitors for magnesium alloy in the bath. Moreover, compounding NH4HF2 and (NH4)2MoO4, the optimal concentrations were both at 1.5 ~ 2%. The deposition process of Ni-P coating was observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed corrosion inhibitors inhibited undesired dissolution of magnesium substrate during the electroless plating process. In addition, SEM observation indicated that the corrosion inhibition reaction and the Ni2+ replacement reaction were competitive at the initial deposition time. Both electrochemical analysis and thermal shock test revealed that the Ni-P coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion properties in protecting the magnesium alloy.

  4. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono-and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  5. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  6. Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-09-23

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  7. Gestational magnesium deficiency is deleterious to fetal outcome.

    PubMed

    Almonte, R A; Heath, D L; Whitehall, J; Russell, M J; Patole, S; Vink, R

    1999-07-01

    A number of recent epidemiological findings have implicated magnesium as being essential to fetal well-being. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between maternal requirements for dietary magnesium and subsequent mortality and morbidity in offspring. The present study uses a rodent model of dietary-induced hypomagnesemia to investigate the effects of magnesium deficiency prior to and during gestation on neonatal morbidity and mortality. Magnesium deficiency during gestation significantly increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. Such increases were associated with a reduced free magnesium concentration in both maternal and offspring blood and an increased incidence of periventricular hemorrhage and edema in newborn pups as observed by magnetic resonance imaging and histology. Animals fed a magnesium-deficient diet before mating but given magnesium supplementation during gestation did not demonstrate a significant change in neonatal mortality and morbidity when compared to control animals. The significant improvement in fetal outcome with dietary magnesium supports the concept of magnesium supplementation during pregnancy.

  8. An in vitro study on the biocompatibility of WE magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shuping; Wang, Yi; Tian, Jie; Lei, Daoxi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium alloys are being actively studied for intravascular stent applications because of their good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. To rule out the high allergenicity of nickel and neurotoxicity of aluminum element, four kinds of WE magnesium alloys (where "W" represents the metallic element Y and "E" represents mixed rare earth (RE) elements; Y: 2.5, 5.0, 6.5, and 7.5 wt %; Nd: 1.0, 2.6, 2.5, and 4.2 wt %; Zr: 0.8 wt %) were chosen for in vitro investigation of their biocompatibility using cell culture. The results showed that, with the increase of rare earth elements in WE magnesium alloys, fibrinogen adsorption decreased and coagulation function was improved. It was also found that WE magnesium alloys promoted the adhesion of endothelial cells. With the increase of adhesion time, adhered cell numbers increased gradually. With 25% extracts, all the WE alloys promoted cell migration, while 100% extracts were not conducive to cell migration. Based on the above results, WE magnesium alloys 5.0WE (5.0Y-2.6Nd-0.8Zr) and 6.5WE (6.5Y-2.5Nd-0.8Zr) have better biocompatibility as compared with that with 2.5WE (2.5Y-1.0Nd-0.8Zr) and 7.5WE (7.5Y-4.2Nd-0.8Zr), and could be as the promising candidate materials for medical stent applications.

  9. Serum Magnesium Status in Patients Subjects with Depression in the City of Yazd in Iran 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Rajizadeh, Afsaneh; Mozaffari-Khosravi, Hassan; Yassini-Ardakani, Mojtaba; Dehghani, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder and involves many factors. The regulatory effects of magnesium on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels make it a factor in the treatment of depression. The present study investigated the level of serum magnesium in subjects diagnosed with depression in the city of Yazd in Iran. This cross-sectional study was done from January 2013 to January 2014 on 650 patients with depression who agreed to participate in this study. Diagnosis was made using the Beck Depression Inventory test (BDI-II); those scoring higher than 11 were sent to the medical school laboratory for further testing of serum magnesium levels. The mean age of the patients was 34.16 ± 9.12 years. Of the 650 subjects, 195 were male (30 %) and 455 were female (70 %). The total mean serum magnesium was 2.1 ± 0.26 mg/dl. The prevalence of hypomagnesemia 13.7 %, hypermagnesemia 8.3 %, and sub-optimal magnesium levels was 26.5 %. Sub-optimal prevalence in women (28.1 %) was higher than in men (26.2 %). A significant relationship was observed between depression and serum magnesium level (p = 0.02). The results indicated that the prevalence of hypomagnesemia in subjects diagnosed with depression is high compared to non-depressed individuals. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between hypomagnesemia and intensity of depression that suggests a role for this element in the pathogenesis of the disorder. The high sub-optimal prevalence among women indicates that increased attention should be paid to this group.

  10. Isotopically pure magnesium isotope-24 is prepared from magnesium-24 oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellew, N. R.; Schilb, J. D.; Steunenberg, R. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus is used to prepare isotopically pure magnesium isotope-24, suitable for use in neutron scattering and polarization experiments. The apparatus permits thermal reduction of magnesium-24 oxide with aluminum and calcium oxide, and subsequent vaporization of the product metal in vacuum. It uses a resistance-heated furnace tube and cap assembly.

  11. Application of alkaline phosphatases from different sources in pharmaceutical and clinical analysis for the determination of their cofactors; zinc and magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    Muginova, Svetlana V; Zhavoronkova, Anna M; Polyakov, Alexei E; Shekhovtsova, Tatyana N

    2007-03-01

    Prospects of using different alkaline phosphatases bearing zinc and magnesium ions in their catalytic and allosteric sites, respectively, in pharmaceutical and clinical analysis were demonstrated. Also their application for the determination of zinc in insulin to control injection quality and magnesium in human urine for the diagnosis and treatment of magnesium deficiency was shown. The reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis was chosen as an indicator. The choice of appropriate alkaline phosphatase was substantiated, the influence of the nature of buffer solutions on the behavior of the enzyme-metal systems was studied, and the conditions of the indicator reaction proceeding in the presence of sample matrixes were optimized. Simple, rapid, sensitive, and selective enzymatic procedures for determining zinc and magnesium based on their inhibiting and activating effects on the catalytic activity of alkaline phosphatases from seal and chicken intestine, respectively, were developed.

  12. 40 CFR 461.60 - Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... magnesium subcategory. 461.60 Section 461.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Magnesium Subcategory § 461.60 Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory. This subpart applies... treatment works from the manufacturing of magnesium anode batteries....

  13. 40 CFR 461.60 - Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... magnesium subcategory. 461.60 Section 461.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Magnesium Subcategory § 461.60 Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory. This subpart applies... treatment works from the manufacturing of magnesium anode batteries....

  14. 40 CFR 461.60 - Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... magnesium subcategory. 461.60 Section 461.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Magnesium Subcategory § 461.60 Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory. This subpart applies... treatment works from the manufacturing of magnesium anode batteries....

  15. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeet, Suninder Pandey, O. P.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-05-15

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}:Eu{sup 2+}) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f{sup 6} 5d → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  16. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeet, Suninder; Sharma, Manoj; Pandey, O. P.

    2015-05-01

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl10O17(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl2O4(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f6 5d → 4f7 transition of Eu2+ which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  17. Production of Magnesium by Vacuum Aluminothermic Reduction with Magnesium Aluminate Spinel as a By-Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaowu; You, Jing; Peng, Jianping; Di, Yuezhong

    2016-06-01

    The Pidgeon process currently accounts for 85% of the world's magnesium production. Although the Pidgeon process has been greatly improved over the past 10 years, such production still consumes much energy and material and creates much pollution. The present study investigates the process of producing magnesium by employing vacuum aluminothermic reduction and by using magnesite as material and obtaining magnesium aluminate spinel as a by-product. The results show that compared with the Pidgeon process, producing magnesium by vacuum aluminothermic reduction can save materials by as much as 50%, increase productivity up to 100%, and save energy by more than 50%. It can also reduce CO2 emission by up to 60% and realize zero discharge of waste residue. Vacuum aluminothermic reduction is a highly efficient, low-energy-consumption, and environmentally friendly method of producing magnesium.

  18. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  19. Grosnaja ABCs: Magnesium isotope compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Srinivasan, G.; Ulyanov, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Three CAI's from the Grosnaja CV3 chondrite were analyzed for their magnesium isotopic compositions by the ion microprobe. The selected CAI's represent three distinct types: GR4(compact Type A), GR7(Type B) and GR2(Type C). Petrographic studies indicate that all three Grosnaja inclusions were subjected to secondary alterations. The Type A CAI GR4 is primarily composed of melilite with spinel and pyroxene occurring as minor phases. The rim of the inclusion does not exhibit distinct layered structure and secondary alteration products (garnet, Fe-rich olivine and Na-rich plagioclase) are present in some localized areas near the rim region. The average major element compositions of different mineral phases in GR4 are given. Preliminary REE data suggest a depletion of HREE relative to LREE by about a factor of 3 without any clear indication of interelement fractionation. The CAI GR7 has textural and minerological characteristics similar to Type B inclusions. The REE data show a pattern that is similar to Group 6 with enrichment in Eu and Yb. In addition, a depletion of HREE compared to LREE is also evident in this object. Melilite composition shows a broad range of akermanite content (Ak(sub 15-55)). Detailed petrographic study is in progress. GR2 is a anorthite-rich Type C inclusion with large plagioclase laths intergrown with Ti-rich pyroxene. The average plagioclase composition is close to pure anorthite (An99).

  20. Phase composition, mechanical performance and in vitro biocompatibility of hydraulic setting calcium magnesium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Klammert, Uwe; Reuther, Tobias; Blank, Melanie; Reske, Isabelle; Barralet, Jake E; Grover, Liam M; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-04-01

    Brushite (CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O)-forming calcium phosphate cements are of great interest as bone replacement materials because they are resorbable in physiological conditions. However, their short setting times and low mechanical strengths limit broad clinical application. In this study, we showed that a significant improvement of these properties of brushite cement could be achieved by the use of magnesium-substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate with the general formula Mg(x)Ca((3-x))((PO(4))(2) with 0 < x < 3 as cement reactants. The incorporation of magnesium ions increased the setting times of cements from 2 min for a magnesium-free matrix to 8-11 min for Mg(2.25)Ca(0.75)(PO(4))(2) as reactant. At the same time, the compressive strength of set cements was doubled from 19 MPa to more than 40 MPa after 24h wet storage. Magnesium ions were not only retarding the setting reaction to brushite but were also forming newberyite (MgHPO(4) x 3H(2)O) as a second setting product. The biocompatibility of the material was investigated in vitro using the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. A considerable increase of cell proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating an osteoblastic differentiation, could be noticed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the scaffolds. Analysis of the culture medium showed minor alterations of pH value within the physiological range. The concentrations of free calcium, magnesium and phosphate ions were altered markedly due to the chemical solubility of the scaffolds. We conclude that the calcium magnesium phosphate (newberyite) cements have a promising potential for their use as bone replacement material since they provide a suitable biocompatibility, an extended workability and improved mechanical performance compared with brushite cements.

  1. Implementation of an antenatal magnesium sulfate protocol for fetal neuroprotection in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Baisson, Anne-Laure; Courtay, Véronique; Gascoin-Lachambre, Géraldine; Lasocki, Sigismond; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2015-09-29

    The aim of our study was to assess the feasibility of implementing a protocol for the use of magnesium sulfate to prevent cerebral palsy. This retrospective single-center study included all women with fetuses of gestational age <33 weeks of gestation whose birth was planned or expected within 24 hours from September 2011 to December 2012. They were to receive magnesium sulfate, administered intravenously as a 4-g bolus followed by a constant infusion of 1 g per hour. If delivery had not occurred after 12 hours and was no longer considered imminent, the infusion was to be discontinued. The study included 119 women, 81 (68.1%) of whom received magnesium sulfate. Among the latter, 71 (87.5%) gave birth within 24 hours. The reasons treatment was not given were: omission by medical team (19/38, 50%), urgent delivery (18/38, 47.4%), and contraindication to treatment (1/38, 2.6%). The mean gestational age at protocol implementation was 29.6 +/- 2.1 weeks. Maternal monitoring, especially at the onset of infusion, appeared suboptimal. No major maternal side effects were observed. Our study shows that implementing a protocol for prevention of cerebral palsy by magnesium sulfate is feasible in a tertiary obstetric center.

  2. Implementation of an antenatal magnesium sulfate protocol for fetal neuroprotection in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Baisson, Anne-Laure; Courtay, Véronique; Gascoin-Lachambre, Géraldine; Lasocki, Sigismond; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the feasibility of implementing a protocol for the use of magnesium sulfate to prevent cerebral palsy. This retrospective single-center study included all women with fetuses of gestational age <33 weeks of gestation whose birth was planned or expected within 24 hours from September 2011 to December 2012. They were to receive magnesium sulfate, administered intravenously as a 4-g bolus followed by a constant infusion of 1 g per hour. If delivery had not occurred after 12 hours and was no longer considered imminent, the infusion was to be discontinued. The study included 119 women, 81 (68.1%) of whom received magnesium sulfate. Among the latter, 71 (87.5%) gave birth within 24 hours. The reasons treatment was not given were: omission by medical team (19/38, 50%), urgent delivery (18/38, 47.4%), and contraindication to treatment (1/38, 2.6%). The mean gestational age at protocol implementation was 29.6 +/− 2.1 weeks. Maternal monitoring, especially at the onset of infusion, appeared suboptimal. No major maternal side effects were observed. Our study shows that implementing a protocol for prevention of cerebral palsy by magnesium sulfate is feasible in a tertiary obstetric center. PMID:26415713

  3. Parenteral magnesium load testing with /sup 28/Mg in weanling and young adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Caddell, J.L.; Calhoun, N.R.; Howard, M.P.; Patterson, K.Y.; Smith, J.C. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    A sound diagnostic test for Mg deficiency is needed. This is a report of the parenteral Mg load test conducted in weanling and young adult rats fed a purified basal diet containing 3 mg magnesium/100 g with 150 mg of added magnesium/100 g (control) or 0 added magnesium (deficient). Weanlings were studied at about 1 week of dietary treatment and young adults at 2 weeks. The protocol included: a) a 6-hour preload urinary collection; b) an intraperitoneal load of 15 mg of magnesium/kg (weanlings) or 12 mg/kg (young adults) with 2 microCi 28Mg given simultaneously with each load; c) a 6-hour postload urinary collection; d) chemical analysis of selected tissues and urine for Mg; and e) 28Mg counting 6 and 24 hours postload. Controls all excreted large amounts of Mg pre- and postload, retaining less than 26% of nonradioactive loads. They had high urinary 28Mg counts. In Mg-deficient animals, the concentration of Mg in bone more than halved. These animals avidly conserved Mg and retained over 85% of nonradioactive Mg loads. Their 28Mg activity in vital organs was 3--6 times greater than in controls. We concluded that the parenteral Mg load test reliably identifies severe Mg deficiency.

  4. MAGNESIUM PRECIPITATION AND DIFUSSION IN Mg+ ION IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-02

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. Calculations by Sawan et al. predict that at a dose of ~100 dpa (displacements per atom), there is ~0.5 at.% Mg generated in SiC. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <100> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C–SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C–SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4E-19 m2/s.

  5. Fabrication and cytocompatibility of spherical magnesium ammonium phosphate granules.

    PubMed

    Christel, Theresa; Geffers, Martha; Klammert, Uwe; Nies, Berthold; Höß, Andreas; Groll, Jürgen; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Magnesium phosphate compounds, as for example struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O), have comparable characteristics to calcium phosphate bone substitutes, but degrade faster under physiological conditions. In the present work, we used a struvite forming calcium doped magnesium phosphate cement with the formulation Ca0.75Mg2.25(PO4)2 and an ammonium phosphate containing aqueous solution to produce round-shaped granules. For the fabrication of spherical granules, the cement paste was dispersed in a lipophilic liquid and stabilized by surfactants. The granules were characterized with respect to morphology, size distribution, phase composition, compressive strength, biocompatibility and solubility. In general, it was seen that small granules can hardly be produced by means of emulsification, when the raw material is a hydraulic paste, because long setting times promote coalescence of initially small unhardened cement droplets. Here, this problem was solved by using an aqueous solution containing both the secondary (NH4)2HPO4 and primary ammonium phosphates NH4H2PO4 to accelerate the setting reaction. This resulted in granules with 97 wt.% having a size in the range between 200 and 1,000 μm. The novel solution composition doubled the compressive strength of the cement to 37 ± 5 MPa without affecting either the conversion to struvite or the cytocompatibility using human fetal osteoblasts.

  6. Development of magnesium calcium phosphate biocement for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Junfeng; Zhou, Huanjun; Wei, Jie; Jiang, Xin; Hua, Hong; Chen, Fangping; Wei, Shicheng; Shin, Jung-Woog; Liu, Changsheng

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium calcium phosphate biocement (MCPB) with rapid-setting characteristics was fabricated by using the mixed powders of magnesium oxide (MgO) and calcium dihydrogen phosphate (Ca(H2PO4)2·H2O). The results revealed that the MCPB hardened after mixing the powders with water for about 7 min, and the compressive strength reached 43 MPa after setting for 1 h, indicating that the MCPB had a short setting time and high initial mechanical strength. After the acid–base reaction of MCPB containing MgO and Ca(H2PO4)2·H2O in a molar ratio of 2 : 1, the final hydrated products were Mg3(PO4)2 and Ca3(PO4)2. The MCPB was degradable in Tris–HCl solution and the degradation ratio was obviously higher than calcium phosphate biocement (CPB) because of its fast dissolution. The attachment and proliferation of the MG63 cells on the MCPB were significantly enhanced in comparison with CPB, and the alkaline phosphatase activity of MG63 cells on the MCPB was significantly higher than on the CPB at 7 and 14 days. The MG63 cells with normal phenotype spread well on the MCPB surfaces, and were attached in close proximity to the substrate, as seen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrated that the MCPB had a good ability to support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation, and exhibited good cytocompatibility. PMID:20181560

  7. Characterization of three homologs of the large subunit of the magnesium chelatase from Chlorobaculum tepidum and interaction with the magnesium protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ethan T; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2008-10-10

    Green bacteria synthesize several types of (bacterio)chlorophylls for the assembly of functional photosynthetic reaction centers and antenna complexes. A distinctive feature of green bacteria compared with other photosynthetic microbes is that their genomes contain multiple homologs of the large subunit (BchH) of the magnesium chelatase which is a three-subunit enzyme complex (BchH, BchD, and BchI) that inserts magnesium into protoporphyrin IX as the first committed step of (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthesis. There is speculation that the additional BchH homologs may regulate the biosynthesis of each type of chlorophyll, although the biochemical properties of the different magnesium chelatase complexes from a single species of green bacteria have not yet been compared. In this study, we investigated the activities of all three chelatase complexes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum and interactions with the next enzyme in the pathway, magnesium protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase (BchM). Although all three chelatase complexes insert magnesium into protoporphyrin IX, the activities range by a factor of 10(5). Further, there are differences in the interactions between the BchH homologs and BchM; two of the subunits increase the methyltransferase activity by 30-60%, and the third decreases it by 30%. Expression of the chelatase complexes alone and together with BchM in Escherichia coli overproducing protoporphyrin IX suggests that the chelatase is the rate-limiting enzyme. We observed that BchM uses protoporphyrin IX without bound metal as a substrate. Our results conflict with expectations generated by previous gene inactivation studies and suggest a complex regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis in green bacteria.

  8. Effect of Magnesium as Substitute Material in Enzyme-Mediated Calcite Precipitation for Soil-Improvement Technique.

    PubMed

    Putra, Heriansyah; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Neupane, Debendra; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation was evaluated as a soil-improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca(2+) to precipitate with [Formula: see text] as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and treated with concentration-controlled solutions composed of urea, urease, calcium, and magnesium chloride. The mechanical properties of the treated soil specimens were examined through unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests. A precipitation ratio of the carbonate up to 90% of the maximum theoretical precipitation was achieved by adding a small amount of magnesium chloride. Adding magnesium chloride as a delaying agent was indeed found to reduce the reaction rate of the precipitation, which may increase the volume of the treated soil if used in real fields because of the slower precipitation rate and the resulting higher injectivity. A mineralogical analysis revealed that magnesium chloride decreases the crystal size of the precipitated materials and that another carbonate of aragonite is newly formed. Mechanical test results indicated that carbonate precipitates within the soils and brings about a significant improvement in strength. A maximum UCS of 0.6 MPa was obtained from the treated samples.

  9. Effect of Magnesium as Substitute Material in Enzyme-Mediated Calcite Precipitation for Soil-Improvement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Putra, Heriansyah; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Neupane, Debendra; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation was evaluated as a soil-improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32− as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and treated with concentration-controlled solutions composed of urea, urease, calcium, and magnesium chloride. The mechanical properties of the treated soil specimens were examined through unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests. A precipitation ratio of the carbonate up to 90% of the maximum theoretical precipitation was achieved by adding a small amount of magnesium chloride. Adding magnesium chloride as a delaying agent was indeed found to reduce the reaction rate of the precipitation, which may increase the volume of the treated soil if used in real fields because of the slower precipitation rate and the resulting higher injectivity. A mineralogical analysis revealed that magnesium chloride decreases the crystal size of the precipitated materials and that another carbonate of aragonite is newly formed. Mechanical test results indicated that carbonate precipitates within the soils and brings about a significant improvement in strength. A maximum UCS of 0.6 MPa was obtained from the treated samples. PMID:27200343

  10. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  11. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen ( 1O 2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  12. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: geochemical modeling and experimental results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  13. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: Geochemical modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-07-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  14. Alkalization is responsible for antibacterial effects of corroding magnesium.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Eifler, Rainer; Rais, Bushra; Mueller, Peter P

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium alloys are presently investigated as potential medical implant materials for temporary applications. Magnesium has been reported to have antibacterial activities and could therefore be used to prevent antibiotic treatment-resistant bacterial implant infections. For characterizing the effects of magnesium on infectious bacteria, bioluminescent S. aureus or P. aeruginosa were employed. The proliferation of both types of bacteria was suppressed in the presence of metallic magnesium and also in aqueous magnesium corrosion extracts. Of the two soluble corrosion products, magnesium ions were well tolerated while antibacterial activities correlated with increased pH levels of the supernatants. The alkaline pH alone was sufficient for the antibacterial effects which were completely abolished when the pH of the corrosion supernatants was neutralized. These results demonstrate that pH increases are necessary and sufficient for the antibacterial activity of metallic magnesium. In an animal model magnesium implants showed an enhanced but variable resistance to bacterial colonization.

  15. NANOSIZED MAGNESIUM OXIDE AS CATALYST FOR THE RAPID AND GREEN SYNTHESIS OF SUBSTITUTED 2-AMINO-2-CHROMENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A nanosized magnesium oxide catalyzed three-component condensation reaction of aldehyde, malononitrile and ¿-naphthol proceeded rapidly in water/PEG to afford corresponding 2-amino-2-chromenes in high yields at room temperature. The greener protocol was found to be fairly general...

  16. Effects of temperature and purity of magnesium sulfate during extraction of pesticides residues using the QuEChERS method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite its many documented advantages, the QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) sample preparation approach has problems with a few unstable pesticides, partly due to the exothermic reaction generated by the use of anhydrous magnesium sulfate during extraction. These pesticide...

  17. Directed precipitation of hydrated and anhydrous magnesium carbonates for carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Edward J; Fricker, Kyle J; Sun, Michael; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2014-11-14

    Magnesite is the most desirable phase within the magnesium carbonate family for carbon storage for a number of reasons: magnesium efficiency, omission of additional crystal waters and thermodynamic stability. For large-scale carbonation to be a viable industrial process, magnesite precipitation must be made to occur rapidly and reliably. Unfortunately, the formation of metastable hydrated magnesium carbonate phases (e.g. MgCO3·3H2O and Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O) interferes with the production of anhydrous magnesite under a variety of reaction conditions because magnesite crystals are slower to both nucleate and grow compared to the hydrated carbonate phases. Furthermore, the reaction conditions required for the formation of each magnesium carbonate phases have not been well understood with conflicting literature data. In this study, the effects of both magnesite (MgCO3) and inert (Al2O3) seed particles on the precipitation of magnesium carbonates from a Mg(OH)2 slurry were explored. It was interesting that MgCO3 seeding was shown to accelerate anhydrous magnesite growth at temperatures (80-150 °C), where it would normally not form in short time scale. Since the specific surface areas of MgCO3 and Al2O3 seeding particles were similar, this phenomenon was due to the difference in the surface chemistry of two seeding particles. By providing a template with similar chemistry for the growth of magnesite, the precipitation of anhydrous magnesite was demonstrated. The effect of temperature on seeded carbonation was also investigated. A comparison with published MgCO3 precipitation rate laws indicated that the precipitation of magnesite was limited by either CO2 adsorption from the gas phase or the dissolution rate of Mg(OH)2.

  18. Water soluble graphene as electrolyte additive in magnesium-air battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saminathan, K.; Mayilvel Dinesh, M.; Selvam, M.; Srither, S. R.; Rajendran, V.; Kaler, Karan V. I. S.

    2015-02-01

    Magnesium-air (Mg-air) batteries are an important energy source used to power electronic equipment and automobiles. Metal-air batteries give more energy density due to surplus air involved in reduction reaction at air cathode. In this study, the scope of improvements in the efficiency of Metal-air batteries is investigated through addition of water soluble graphene (WSG) as inhibitor in NaCl electrolyte. The discharge performance, corrosion behaviour and electrochemical impedance are studied for (i) the conventional Mg-air battery using 3.5% NaCl and (ii) Mg-air battery with WSG-based 3.5% NaCl electrolyte. X-ray diffraction analysis for WSG is carried out and it shows the crystalline nature of WSG by an intense sharp peak at 26.3°. Scanning electron microscope study is also performed and shows the flake-like structure of WSG denoted by thin layers of carbon. The immersion of WSG in 3.5% NaCl electrolyte increased the current density from 13.24 to 19.33 mA cm-2. Meanwhile, the WSG-based Mg-air battery was found to hold specific discharge capacity of 1030.71 mAh g-1, which was higher than that obtained in 3.5% NaCl electrolyte (i.e., 822.85 mAh g-1). The WSG-based Mg-air battery shows good self-discharge capacity and higher electrochemical activity during discharge.

  19. Magnesium hydrogen carbonate natural mineral water enriched with K(+)-citrate and vitamin B6 improves urinary abnormalities in patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Bren, A; Kmetec, A; Kveder, R; Kaplan-Pavlovcic, S

    1998-01-01

    The influence of drinking magnesium hydrogen carbonate natural mineral water enriched with potassium citrate on urinary metabolic abnormalities was prospectively studied in 27 patients with recurrent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The mean 24-hour urinary pH shifted from 6.34 to 6.93 (p < 0.01), the mean urinary magnesium/urinary creatinine ratio rose from 0.47 to 0.67 (p < 0.01), the mean urinary citrate/urinary creatinine ratio increased from 0.26 to 0.35 (p NS), and the mean 24-hour urinary calcium decreased from 7.98 to 6.05 mmol (p < 0.05). The effects of magnesium hydrogen carbonate natural mineral water enriched with potassium citrate were found to be favorable on urinary calcium, urinary magnesium/urinary creatinine ratio and urinary pH in patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

  20. Magnesium for automotive applications: Primary production cost assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sujit

    2003-11-01

    Production technologies must be cost effective for primary magnesium to become an economically viable alternative material for wide spread automotive applications. In this article, the prices at which magnesium becomes competitive with aluminum and steel are examined, including magnesium production cost estimates for current and future scenarios using electrolytic and thermal processes. The economic viability of the industry for automotive applications is also examined in the context of magnesium market price, taking into consideration the dynamics of its supply and demand as well.

  1. Simulating the dynamic response of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Jeffrey; Becker, Richard

    Unlike several conventional metals, the mechanical response of magnesium is severely anisotropic for quasistatic and dynamic loading conditions. In this work we present a crystal-based strength model that is the same order of magnitude in computational cost as rate-dependent isotropic strength models, yet is able to capture essential features exhibited by textured magnesium polycrystals. The model demarcates plastic deformation into contributions from basal slip, extension twinning, and non-basal slip mechanisms. Comparisons are made between model predictions and experiments for two magnesium alloys with differing processing histories. The model is then used to explore and quantify the dependence of metallurgical and processing variations for several dynamic experiments that probe propensity for localization and failure under complex loading conditions.

  2. Solubility of magnesium carbonate in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.

    1915-01-01

    (1) Under atmospheric conditions it appears possible to attain practically the same state in a solution saturated with MgCO33H2O, whether one starts with a solution containing an excess of magnesium bicarbonate or with the pure trihydrate and water, but the adjustment occurs very slowly. The solution finally contains 0.36 g. magnesium and 1.01 g. carbon dioxide per liter at 20??. (2) The solubility found for magnesite, however, is much smaller, viz., 0.02 g. magnesium and 0.07 g. carbon dioxide per liter. (3) Certain natural waters, freely exposed to the atmosphere, appear to be supersaturated with respect to magnesite but none approaches very closely to the point of saturation of the trihydrate MgCO3.3H2O.

  3. Controlled morphological structure of magnesium oxide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradita, T.; Aji, B. B.; Shih, S. J.; Sudibyo

    2017-03-01

    Magnesium Oxide (MgO) based material have been widely used as catalyst, paints, flame retardants, semiconductors, additives in refractory and solid adsorbent. Morphology of a particle has significant influence towards their application. MgO particles were prepared from Magnesium Acetate (MgAc) and Magnesium Nitrate (MgN) precursors using ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method (SP). The MgO particles were characterized by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), X-Ray Diffraction Analysis (XRD), Field Emission-Secondary Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This experimental study results each precursor could have more than one morphologies. It also suggests that the morphology of the MgO particles were controlled by the selection of the precursor, each precursor possess different particle formation characteristic, including the different crystallization rate and also related from the different decomposition behavior during the heating process of SP.

  4. 75 FR 9252 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Magnesium From China and Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ] ACTION: Institution of five-year reviews concerning the antidumping duty orders on magnesium from China and Russia... antidumping duty orders on magnesium from China and Russia would be likely to lead to continuation...

  5. 75 FR 35086 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Magnesium From China and Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... orders on magnesium from China and Russia. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will...)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on magnesium from China and...

  6. 77 FR 59979 - Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on pure magnesium (granular) from China would be likely to lead to continuation or...), entitled Pure Magnesium (Granular) from China: Investigation No.731-TA- 895 (Second Review)....

  7. 75 FR 48360 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... COMMISSION Magnesium From China and Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling of full five-year reviews concerning the antidumping duty orders on alloy magnesium from China and...) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on alloy magnesium from China and...

  8. Micronized Organic Magnesium Salts Enhance Opioid Analgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Kulik, Kamila; Ordak, Michał; Sasinowska-Motyl, Małgorzata; Gąsińska, Emilia; de Corde, Anna; Kowalczyk, Agnieszka; Sacharczuk, Mariusz; Naruszewicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose As previously reported, magnesium sulphate administered parenterally significantly increased an opioid antinociception in different kinds of pain. Since the typical form of magnesium salts are poorly and slowly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract we examined whether their micronized form could increase opioids induced antinociception. Methods In behavioural studies on rats morphine, tramadol and oxycodone together with magnesium (lactate dihydrate, hydroaspartate, chloride) in micronized (particles of size D90 < 50 μm) and conventional forms were used. Changes in pain thresholds were determined using mechanical stimuli. The intestinal absorption of two forms of magnesium lactate dihydrate (at the doses of 7.5 or 15 mg ions) in the porcine gut sac model were also compared. Results Micronized form of magnesium lactate dihydrate or hydroaspartate but not chloride (15 mg of magnesium ions kg-1) enhanced the analgesic activity of orally administered opioids, significantly faster and more effective in comparison to the conventional form of magnesium salts (about 40% for oxycodone administered together with a micronized form of magnesium hydroaspartate). Moreover, in vitro studies of transport across porcine intestines of magnesium ions showed that magnesium salts administered in micronized form were absorbed from the intestines to a greater extent than the normal form of magnesium salts. Conclusions The co-administration of micronized magnesium organic salts with opioids increased their synergetic analgesic effect. This may suggest an innovative approach to the treatment of pain in clinical practice. PMID:27792736

  9. Preparation of petaloid microspheres of basic magnesium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Suzuki, Sei; Mitsuhashi, Kohei; Ogura, Taku; Iwanaga, Shinichi; Sakai, Hideki; Koishi, Masumi; Abe, Masahiko

    2007-05-22

    The synthesis of basic magnesium carbonate was examined under ultrasonic irradiation and was performed by the soda ash method using magnesium sulfate and sodium carbonate as starting materials. The particulate product was evaluated using SEM observations. Ultrasonic irradiation in the preparation of basic magnesium carbonate was found to give fine petaloid microspheres of about 3 mum in primary particle size.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10504 - Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface modified magnesium hydroxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10504 Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic). (a) Chemical... as surface modified magnesium hydroxide (PMN P-06-682) is subject to reporting under this section...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10504 - Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface modified magnesium hydroxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10504 Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic). (a) Chemical... as surface modified magnesium hydroxide (PMN P-06-682) is subject to reporting under this section...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. ATPases and phosphate exchange activities in magnesium chelatase subunits of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hansson, M; Kannangara, C G

    1997-11-25

    Three separate proteins, BchD, BchH, and BchI, together with ATP, insert magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. An analysis of ATP utilization by the subunits revealed the following: BchH catalyzed ATP hydrolysis at the rate of 0.9 nmol per min per mg of protein. BchI and BchD, tested individually, had no ATPase activity but, when combined, hydrolyzed ATP at the rate of 117.9 nmol/min per mg of protein. Magnesium ions were required for the ATPase activities of both BchH and BchI+D, and these activities were inhibited 50% by 2 mM o-phenanthroline. BchI additionally catalyzed a phosphate exchange reaction from ATP and ADP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis by BchI+D is required for an activation step in the magnesium chelatase reaction, whereas ATPase activity of BchH and the phosphate exchange activity of BchI participate in subsequent reactions leading to the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX.

  18. Magnesium alloy ingots: Chemical and metallographic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, John M.; Swartz, Robert E.; Bentz, Rodney L.; Howard, Jane H.

    2001-11-01

    The quality of a magnesium die casting is likely dependent on the quality of the feed stockingot material. Therefore, both Daimler-Chrysler and General Motors have established quality assurance measures that include analysis of magnesium ingots. These processes include chemical analysis, corrosion testing, fast neutron activation analysis, and metallography. Optical emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, and gravimetric analysis are several methods for determining the chemical composition of the material. Fast neutron activation analysis, image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are used to quantify ingot cleanliness. These experimental techniques are described and discussed in this paper, and example case studies are presented for illustration.

  19. SOLID STATE JOINING OF MAGNESIUM TO STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Field, David P.; Yu, Hao; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Santella, M. L.

    2012-06-04

    Friction stir welding and ultrasonic welding techniques were applied to join automotive magnesium alloys to steel sheet. The effect of tooling and process parameters on the post-weld microstructure, texture and mechanical properties was investigated. Static and dynamic loading were utilized to investigate the joint strength of both cast and wrought magnesium alloys including their susceptibility and degradation under corrosive media. The conditions required to produce joint strengths in excess of 75% of the base metal strength were determined, and the effects of surface coatings, tooling and weld parameters on weld properties are presented.

  20. Silicon and magnesium in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. P.; Marionni, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The IUE satellite spectra of some planetary nebulae show features due to silicon and magnesium: Si III wavelengths 1883, 1892; Si IV wavelengths 1394, 1403; Mg II wavelengths 2796, 2804 and Mg V wavelengths 2784, 2929. With the aid of modeling techniques, the corresponding elemental abundances are found. In addition to previous observations of NGC 7662 and IC 418, data were found for NGC 2440, Hu 1-2, IC 2003 and IC 2165. Silicon appears depleted by up to an order of magnitude relative to the sun. Large variations of magnesium abundance are found, which are likely to reflect differing degrees of depletion due to grain formation.

  1. Chemically Prepared Lead Magnesium Niobate Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Olson, W.R.; Goy, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    A chemical solution powder synthesis technique has been developed that produces fine uniform powders of lead magnesium niobate (PMN) with 60 to 80 nm crystallite size. The synthesis technique was based on the dissolution of lead acetate and alkoxide precursors in acetic acid followed by precipitation with oxalic acid/propanol solutions. Lead magnesium niobate ceramics fabricated from these chemically derived powders had smaller, more uniform grain size and higher dielectric constants than ceramics fabricated from mixed oxide powders that were processed under similar thermal conditions.

  2. Crystallization and precipitation of phosphate from swine wastewater by magnesium metal corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiming; Liu, Jiahui; Jiang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a unique approach for magnesium dosage in struvite precipitation by Mg metal corrosion. The experimental results showed that using an air bubbling column filled with Mg metal and graphite pellets for the magnesium dosage was the optimal operation mode, which could significantly accelerate the corrosion of the Mg metal pellets due to the presence of graphite granules. The reaction mechanism experiments revealed that the solution pH could be used as the indicator for struvite crystallization by the process. Increases in the Mg metal dosage, mass ratio of graphite and magnesium metal (G:M) and airflow rate could rapidly increase the solution pH. When all three conditions were at 10 g L-1, 1:1 and 1 L min-1, respectively, the phosphate recovery efficiency reached 97.5%. To achieve a high level of automation for the phosphate recovery process, a continuous-flow reactor immersed with the graphite-magnesium air bubbling column was designed to harvest the phosphate from actual swine wastewater. Under conditions of intermittently supplementing small amounts of Mg metal pellets, approximately 95% of the phosphate could be stably recovered as struvite of 95.8% (±0.5) purity. An economic analysis indicated that the process proposed was technically simple and economically feasible.

  3. Crystallization and precipitation of phosphate from swine wastewater by magnesium metal corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiming; Liu, Jiahui; Jiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a unique approach for magnesium dosage in struvite precipitation by Mg metal corrosion. The experimental results showed that using an air bubbling column filled with Mg metal and graphite pellets for the magnesium dosage was the optimal operation mode, which could significantly accelerate the corrosion of the Mg metal pellets due to the presence of graphite granules. The reaction mechanism experiments revealed that the solution pH could be used as the indicator for struvite crystallization by the process. Increases in the Mg metal dosage, mass ratio of graphite and magnesium metal (G:M) and airflow rate could rapidly increase the solution pH. When all three conditions were at 10 g L–1, 1:1 and 1 L min–1, respectively, the phosphate recovery efficiency reached 97.5%. To achieve a high level of automation for the phosphate recovery process, a continuous-flow reactor immersed with the graphite-magnesium air bubbling column was designed to harvest the phosphate from actual swine wastewater. Under conditions of intermittently supplementing small amounts of Mg metal pellets, approximately 95% of the phosphate could be stably recovered as struvite of 95.8% (±0.5) purity. An economic analysis indicated that the process proposed was technically simple and economically feasible. PMID:26558521

  4. Free and total magnesium in lymphocytes of migraine patients - effect of magnesium-rich mineral water intake.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Millot, J M; Sebille, S; Delabroise, A M; Thomas, E; Manfait, M; Arnaud, M J

    2000-05-01

    Dietary surveys performed in Western countries show magnesium intakes lower than the recommended dietary allowances, suggesting a large prevalence of magnesium deficiency. Low brain magnesium as well as impaired magnesium metabolism have also been reported in various diseases such as migraine. To detect these deficiencies, a non-invasive and sensitive test assessing magnesium status is needed. Because magnesium is an intracellular cation, either total or ionized magnesium (Mg(2+)) of blood cells were suggested as the most adequate tests. Total magnesium levels in plasma, erythrocytes and lymphocytes and Mg(2+) in lymphocytes were analyzed in a group of 29 migraine patients and 18 control subjects. Results show significantly lower concentrations of total magnesium in erythrocytes (50.7+/-4.7 vs. 53.5+/-2.9 mg/l; P<0.01) and of Mg(2+) in lymphocytes (12.0+/-3.5 vs. 14.2+/-3.8 mg/l; P<0.05) in migraine patients as compared to controls. While a significant difference of mean values was noted between migraine patients and controls, an overlap of individual values was observed. These analyses were repeated on migraine patients before and after a 2-week intake of a mineral water containing 110 mg/l magnesium, and a significant increase in all intracellular magnesium concentrations with no effect on plasma magnesium was observed. These increased intracellular magnesium concentrations demonstrate the bioavailability of magnesium from this mineral water. Among the analyzed parameters, Mg(2+) in lymphocytes appears to be the most sensitive index of magnesium deficiency with a 15% decrease in migraine patients when compared to controls and a 16% increase after 2 weeks of a magnesium-rich mineral water intake.

  5. Serum Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc and Copper Levels in Sudanese Women with Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Elmugabil, Abdelmageed; Hamdan, Hamdan Z.; Elsheikh, Anas E.; Rayis, Duria A.; Gasim, Gasim I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not fully understood, several elemental micronutrient abnormalities have been suggested to play a contributory role in preeclampsia. Aims To investigate the levels of calcium, magnesium, zinc and copper in women with preeclampsia. Subjects and Methods A case—control study was conducted in Omdurman Maternity Hospital, Sudan, during the period of September through December 2014. The cases were women with preeclampsia while healthy pregnant women were the controls. The medical and obstetrics history was gathered using questionnaires. The serum levels of calcium, magnesium, zinc and copper were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results There was no significant difference between the two groups in their age, gestational age, parity and body mass index. Zinc and copper levels were not significantly different between the two groups. In comparison with the controls, women with preeclampsia had a significantly lower median (inter-quartile) serum calcium [7.6 (4.0─9.6) vs. 8.1 (10.6─14.2), mg/dl, P = 0.032] and higher levels of magnesium [1.9 (1.4─2.5) vs. 1.4 (1.0─1.9) mg/dl; P = 0.003]. In binary logistic regression, lower calcium (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.56 ─ 0.95, P = 0.021) and higher magnesium (OR = 5.724, 95% CI = 1.23 ─ 26.50, P = 0.026) levels were associated with preeclampsia. There were no significant correlations between levels of hemoglobin and these trace elements. Conclusion The current study showed significant associations between preeclampsia and serum levels of calcium and magnesium. PMID:27911936

  6. Chiral magnesium BINOL phosphate-catalyzed phosphination of imines: access to enantioenriched α-amino phosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Gajendrasingh K; Liang, Yuxue; Mormino, Michael G; Li, Guilong; Fronczek, Frank R; Antilla, Jon C

    2011-04-15

    A new method to synthesize chiral α-amino phosphine oxides is reported. The reaction combines N-substituted imines and diphenylphosphine oxide and is catalyzed by a chiral magnesium phosphate salt. A wide variety of aliphatic and aromatic aldimines substituted by electron-neutral benzhydryl or dibenzocycloheptene groups were excellent substrates for the addition reaction. The dibenzocycloheptene protected imines afforded improved enantioselectivity in the resulting products. Substituted diphenylphosphine oxide nucleophiles also showed good reactivity.

  7. Magnesium for treatment-resistant depression: a review and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Eby, George A; Eby, Karen L

    2010-04-01

    Sixty percent of cases of clinical depression are considered to be treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Magnesium-deficiency causes N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) coupled calcium channels to be biased towards opening, causing neuronal injury and neurological dysfunction, which may appear to humans as major depression. Oral administration of magnesium to animals led to anti-depressant-like effects that were comparable to those of strong anti-depressant drugs. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) magnesium has been found low in treatment-resistant suicidal depression and in patients that have attempted suicide. Brain magnesium has been found low in TRD using phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, an accurate means for measuring brain magnesium. Blood and CSF magnesium do not appear well correlated with major depression. Although the first report of magnesium treatment for agitated depression was published in 1921 showing success in 220 out of 250 cases, and there are modern case reports showing rapid terminating of TRD, only a few modern clinical trials were found. A 2008 randomized clinical trial showed that magnesium was as effective as the tricyclic anti-depressant imipramine in treating depression in diabetics and without any of the side effects of imipramine. Intravenous and oral magnesium in specific protocols have been reported to rapidly terminate TRD safely and without side effects. Magnesium has been largely removed from processed foods, potentially harming the brain. Calcium, glutamate and aspartate are common food additives that may worsen affective disorders. We hypothesize that - when taken together - there is more than sufficient evidence to implicate inadequate dietary magnesium as the main cause of TRD, and that physicians should prescribe magnesium for TRD. Since inadequate brain magnesium appears to reduce serotonin levels, and since anti-depressants have been shown to have the action of raising brain magnesium, we further hypothesize that

  8. Magnesium substitution in the structure of orthopedic nanoparticles: A comparison between amorphous magnesium phosphates, calcium magnesium phosphates, and hydroxyapatites.

    PubMed

    Nabiyouni, Maryam; Ren, Yufu; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-01-01

    As biocompatible materials, magnesium phosphates have received a lot of attention for orthopedic applications. During the last decade multiple studies have shown advantages for magnesium phosphate such as lack of cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, strong mechanical properties, and high biodegradability. The present study investigates the role of Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) ions in the structure of magnesium phosphate and calcium phosphate nanoparticles. To directly compare the effect of Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) ions on structure of nanoparticles and their biological behavior, three groups of nanoparticles including amorphous magnesium phosphates (AMPs) which release Mg(+2), calcium magnesium phosphates (CMPs) which release Mg(+2) and Ca(+2), and hydroxyapatites (HAs) which release Ca(+2) were studied. SEM, TEM, XRD, and FTIR were used to evaluate the morphology, crystallinity, and chemical properties of the particles. AMP particles were homogeneous nanospheres, whereas CMPs were combinations of heterogeneous nanorods and nanospheres, and HAs which contained heterogeneous nanosphere particles. Cell compatibility was monitored in all groups to determine the cytotoxicity effect of particles on studied MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts. AMPs showed significantly higher attachment rate than the HAs after 1 day and both AMPs and CMPs showed significantly higher proliferation rate when compared to HAs after 7days. Gene expression level of osteoblastic markers ALP, COL I, OCN, OPN, RUNX2 were monitored and they were normalized to GAPDH housekeeping gene. Beta actin expression level was monitored as the second housekeeping gene to confirm the accuracy of results. In general, AMPs and CMPs showed higher expression level of osteoblastic genes after 7 days which can further confirm the stimulating role of Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) ions in increasing the proliferation rate, differentiation, and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts.

  9. The Effect of Alloy Additions on Superplasticity in Thermomechanically Processed High Magnesium Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    AD-Ri55 142 THE EFFECT OF ALLOY ADDITIONS ON SUPERPLASTICITY IN I/2 THERMOMECHANICALLY PR-.(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL UNCLSSIIED MONTEREY CA R J...Ln Monterey, California DTr J U N 1985 * THESIS THE EFFECT OF ALLOY ADDITIONS ON SUPERPLASTICITY IN THERMOMECHANICALLY PROCESSED HIGH MAGNESIUM *0...ALUMINUM-MAGNESIUM ALLOYS >by 0 (Richard J. Self December 1984 C-31 Thesis Advisor: Terry McNelley Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  10. Solvent dependence of the solid-state structures of salicylaldiminate magnesium amide complexes.

    PubMed

    Rood, Jeffrey A; Landis, Ashley M; Forster, Daniel R; Goldkamp, Timothy; Oliver, Allen G

    2016-12-01

    There are challenges in using magnesium coordination complexes as reagents owing to their tendency to adopt varying aggregation states in solution and thus impacting the reactivity of the complexes. Many magnesium complexes are prone to ligand redistribution via Schlenk equilibrium due to the ionic character within the metal-ligand interactions. The role of the supporting ligand is often crucial for providing stability to the heteroleptic complex. Strategies to minimize ligand redistribution in alkaline earth metal complexes could include using a supporting ligand with tunable sterics and electronics to influence the degree of association to the metal atom. Magnesium bis(hexamethyldisilazide) was reacted with salicylaldimines [(1)L = N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)salicylaldimine and (2)L = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)salicylaldimine] in either nondonor (toluene) or donor solvents [tetrahydrofuran (THF) or pyridine]. The structures of the magnesium complexes were studied in the solid state via X-ray diffraction. In the nondonor solvent, i.e. toluene, the heteroleptic complex bis{μ-2-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)iminomethyl]phenolato}-κ(3)N,O:O;κ(3)O:N,O-bis[(hexamethyldisilazido-κN)magnesium(II)], [Mg2(C19H22NO)2(C6H18NSi2)2] or [(1)LMgN(SiMe3)2]2, (1), was favored, while in the donor solvent, i.e. pyridine (pyr), the formation of the homoleptic complex {2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)iminomethyl]phenolato-κ(2)N,O}bis(pyridine-κN)magnesium(II) toluene monosolvate, [Mg(C27H38NO)2(C5H5N)2]·C5H5N or [{(2)L2Mg2(pyr)2}·pyr], (2), predominated. Heteroleptic complex (1) was crystallized from toluene, while homoleptic complexes (2) and the previously reported [(1)L2Mg·THF] [Quinque et al. (2011). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 3321-3326] were crystallized from pyridine and THF, respectively. These studies support solvent-dependent ligand redistribution in solution. In-situ (1)H NMR experiments were carried out to further probe the solution behavior of

  11. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  6. Constitutive Modeling of Magnesium Alloy Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M. G.; Piao, K.; Wagoner, R. H.; Lee, J. K.; Chung, K.; Kim, H. Y.

    2007-05-17

    Magnesium alloy sheets have unique mechanical properties: high in-plane anisotropy/asymmetry of yield stress and hardening response, which have not been thoroughly studied. The unusual mechanical behavior of magnesium alloys has been understood by the limited symmetry crystal structure of h.c.p metals and thus by deformation twinning. In this paper, the phenomenological continuum plasticity models considering the unusual plastic behavior of magnesium alloy sheet were developed for a finite element analysis. A new hardening law based on two-surface model was developed to consider the general stress-strain response of metal sheets such as Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and the unusual asymmetry. Three deformation modes observed during the continuous tension/compression tests were mathematically formulated with simplified relations between the state of deformation and their histories. In terms of the anisotropy and asymmetry of the initial yield stress, the Drucker-Prager's pressure dependent yield surface was modified to include the anisotropy of magnesium alloys. Also, characterization procedures of material parameters for the constitutive equations were presented and finally the correlation of simulation with measurements was performed to validate the proposed theory.

  7. Calcium, magnesium, and potassium in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biochemical and physiological functions and consequences of deficient intakes, which show the nutritional importance of calcium, magnesium and potassium for humans, are reviewed. The dietary recommendations and food sources for these essential mineral elements for humans are presented. Factors t...

  8. Friction Stir & Ultrasonic Solid State Joining Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Glenn J.; Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.

    2009-12-30

    Solid state joining between automotive sheet steel and magnesium alloys was investigated. Both friction stir welding and ultrasonic welding were utilized to study the potential for creating structural bonds between these dissimilar materials. A detailed investigation into the joint characteristics was undertaken including an evaluation of joint strength, microstructure, chemical structures, and alloy formation.

  9. Preparation of thorium magnesium-zinc reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, A. V.; Knighton, J. B.; Steunenberg, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Magnesium-zinc reduction of thorium dioxide is used for the preparation of thorium metal. Potential economic advantages of this technique include use of relatively inexpensive reagents for the metal and flux phases, and production of metal of acceptable quality in good yield.

  10. Nanostructured magnesium has fewer detrimental effects on osteoblast function

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lucy; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Efforts have been made recently to implement nanoscale surface features on magnesium, a biodegradable metal, to increase bone formation. Compared with normal magnesium, nanostructured magnesium has unique characteristics, including increased grain boundary properties, surface to volume ratio, surface roughness, and surface energy, which may influence the initial adsorption of proteins known to promote the function of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells). Previous studies have shown that one way to increase nanosurface roughness on magnesium is to soak the metal in NaOH. However, it has not been determined if degradation of magnesium is altered by creating nanoscale features on its surface to influence osteoblast density. The aim of the present in vitro study was to determine the influence of degradation of nanostructured magnesium, created by soaking in NaOH, on osteoblast density. Our results showed a less detrimental effect of magnesium degradation on osteoblast density when magnesium was treated with NaOH to create nanoscale surface features. The detrimental degradation products of magnesium are of significant concern when considering use of magnesium as an orthopedic implant material, and this study identified a surface treatment, ie, soaking in NaOH to create nanoscale features for magnesium that can improve its use in numerous orthopedic applications. PMID:23674891

  11. Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

    1981-02-01

    At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

  12. Possible role of water structure in biological magnesium systems.

    PubMed

    Theophanides, T; Angiboust, J F; Polissiou, M; Anastassopoulou, J; Manfait, M

    1990-03-01

    Magnesium chloride-water solutions have been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the near infrared region, 5000-10,000 cm-1. The effect of the concentration of magnesium chloride and temperature on the solutions has been studied from the spectra and it is concluded that magnesium chloride modifies the structure of the bulk water. The important absorption bands of water at 5200 and 7020 cm-1 may be assigned to combination vibrations and overtones. They are shifted either by increasing the magnesium chloride concentration or the temperature. The hydrated magnesium ions, [Mg(H2O)6]2+, will most probably break important hydrogen bonds in the clusters of water (H2O)n, where n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.../forming new hydrogen bonds in the presence of hexa-aquated magnesium cations. FAB mass spectra also suggest the formation of hydrated magnesium cations, Mg (H2O)6(2+).

  13. Fabrication and characterization of AZ91/CNT magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Ha; Park, Yong-Ho; Park, Ik-Min; Oak, Jeong-jung; Kimura, Hisamichi; Cho, Kyung-Mox

    2008-12-01

    Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) reinforced AZ91 metal matrix composites (MMC) were fabricated by the squeeze infiltrated method. Properties of magnesium alloys have been improved by impurity reduction, surface treatment and alloy design, and thus the usage for the magnesium alloys has been extended recently. However there still remain barriers for the adaption of magnesium alloys for engineering materials. In this study, we report light-weight, high strength heat resistant magnesium matrix composites. Microstructural study and tensile test were performed for the squeeze infiltrated magnesium matrix composites. The wear properties were characterized and the possibility for the application to automotive power train and engine parts was investigated. It was found that the squeeze infiltration technique is a proper method to fabricate magnesium matrix composites reducing casting defects such as pores and matrix/reinforcement interface separation etc. Improved tensile and mechanical properties were obtained with CNT reinforcing magnesium alloys

  14. THE HYDROLYSIS AND OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDE AND MAGNESIUM HYDRIDE DETERMINED BY CALORIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K; Donald Anton, D; Joshua Gray, J; Bruce Hardy, B

    2008-03-13

    Lithium borohydride, magnesium hydride and the 2:1 'destabilized' ball milled mixtures (2LiBH{sub 4}:MgH{sub 2}) underwent liquid phase hydrolysis, gas phase hydrolysis and air oxidation reactions monitored by isothermal calorimetry. The experimentally determined heats of reaction and resulting products were compared with those theoretically predicted using thermodynamic databases. Results showed a discrepancy between the predicted and observed hydrolysis and oxidation products due to both kinetic limitations and to the significant amorphous character of observed reaction products. Gas phase and liquid phase hydrolysis were the dominant reactions in 2LiBH{sub 4}:MgH{sub 2} with approximately the same total energy release and reaction products; liquid phase hydrolysis displayed the maximum heat flow for likely environmental exposure with a peak energy release of 6 (mW/mg).

  15. Magnesium intake and depression: the SUN cohort.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena

    2016-03-01

    A higher magnesium intake may reduce the risk of depression. We analyzed this association in the SUN Mediterranean cohort with an expanded sample size (n = 15,836) and a long follow-up (median = 10.2 y). We followed 9,289 women (age = 34.8, SD = 10.4) and 6,547 men (age = 42.8, SD = 13.1) initially free of any history of depression for a new-onset of medically diagnosed depression (maximum follow-up = 15.9 y). All participants in this cohort were university educated. We systematically reviewed previous studies relating magnesium to depression. We observed 837 incident cases of depression during 147,915 person-years of follow-up in the SUN cohort. No significant association of magnesium intake with the risk of depression was found, with a fully-adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85 (95% confidence interval = 0.60-1.22, for fifth versus first quintile). When we used a more restrictive definition for depression (both a medical diagnosis and habitual use of antidepressants), this HR was 0.63 (0.35-1.14). No significant association was found in our systematic review. No conclusive evidence for an association between magnesium dietary intake and depression incidence was found. Further longitudinal studies with a larger sample size and a better assessment of confounders and of depression cases are needed to try to identify potential protection against depression by magnesium.

  16. Eco-Materials Processing of Magnesium Hydroxide Recovered from Seawater for Protein Complex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Yoon, C.; Chung, K.

    2009-12-01

    The recovery of valuable elements from seawater and their application had garnered considerable attention as a sustainable resources and a maintainable green technology not only for scientific interest but for economic purposes. Now days along with U, Li, B, Sr, and Mg earth elements also has gains great attention for their safe supplies through mining or recycling process. We have been developed recovery process of Mg from seawater and seawater bitterns for many years. The separation processes applied for recovery of magnesium were precipitation and separation with using CaOH, NaOH as those for the precipitation inducing chemicals. For each step the resulting precipitates were carefully examined by x-ray diffraction method along with chemical analysis for Ca, K, Na, and Mg contents along with other minor impurities including toxic elements like Hg, As and U. We achieved high purity in magnesium hydroxide precipitate even higher than 99.9%. Impurity controlled precipitation, and removing elements of harming was accomplished by the application of ion exchange columns along with cartridge for removing cations. Testing the reliability and the analytical techniques achieved had become a major interest and achieving low-level detection limits is requested before launching the commercial pilot plant. The resulting high purity magnesium hydroxide was tested for forming magnesium protein complexes for the eco-materials processing. In order to overcome low reaction yield, temperature controlled vessel was used throughout. Final product of magnesium and protein was examined by ICP-AES and ICP-MS for the trace and major ions analysis. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by a grant from the Development of Technology for Extraction of Resources Dissolved in Sea Water Program funded by Ministry of Land Transport and Maritime Affairs in Korean Government (2009).

  17. Thermal Stability Study from Room Temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C) in Magnesium Silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanaki, Eleni-Chrysanthi; Hatzikraniotis, Euripides; Vourlias, George; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Kitis, George; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M.; Polymeris, George S.

    2016-10-01

    Doped magnesium silicide has been identified as a promising and environmentally friendly advanced thermoelectric material in the temperature range between 500 K and 800 K (227 °C and 527 °C). Besides the plethora of magnesium silicide thermoelectric advantages, it is well known for its high sensitivity to oxidation. Oxidation is one of the primary instability mechanisms of degradation of high-temperature Mg2Si thermoelectric devices, as in the presence of O2, Mg2Si decomposes to form MgO and Si. In this work, commercial magnesium silicide in bulk form was used for thermal stability study from room temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C). Various techniques such as DTA-TG, PXRD, and FTIR have been applied. Moreover, the application of thermoluminescence (TL) as an effective and alternative probe for the study of oxidation and decomposition has been exploited. The latter provides qualitative but very helpful hints toward oxidation studies. The low-detection threshold of thermoluminescence, in conjunction with the chemical composition of the oxidation byproducts, consisting of MgO, Mg2SiO4, and SiO2, constitute two powerful motivations for further investigating its viable use as proxy for instability/decomposition studies of magnesium silicide. The partial oxidation reaction has been adopted due to the experimental fact that magnesium silicide is monitored throughout the heating temperature range of the present study. Finally, the role of silicon dioxide to the decomposition procedure, being in amorphous state and gradually crystallizing, has been highlighted for the first time in the literature. Mg2Si oxidation takes place in two steps, including a mild oxidation process with temperature threshold of 573 K (300 °C) and an abrupt one after 773 K (500 °C). Implications on the optimum operational temperature range for practical thermoelectric (TE) applications have also been briefly discussed.

  18. Poly(L-lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite/collagen composite coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Lin; Yan, Yu-Hua; Wan, Tao; Yang, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Surface modification of biomedical magnesium alloy using composite coating shows an attemptable approach for the development of Mg-based biomaterials with excellent cytocompatibility. Hydroxyapatite/collagen composite was preliminarily fabricated by biomineralization, the bioactive poly(l-lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite/collagen composite coatings were spin coated on AZ31 magnesium alloy using poly(l-lactic acid) solution mixed with hydroxyapatite/collagen particles, and the resultant materials and coatings were characterized in structure and related properties; furthermore, the in vitro degradation behavior of modified magnesium alloy in 1.5-fold Hank's solution was investigated. The results show that hydroxyapatite/collagen composite achieved chemical bonding between hydroxyapatite and collagen similar to natural bone; composite coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy retained the bioactive functional groups of the componential materials and improved the corrosion resistance of Mg alloy; the mass fraction of hydroxyapatite/collagen particles incorporated into the composite affected the porous structure, interfacial adhesion and thus the corrosion resistance of the composite coating due to phase separation as well as volume concentration effects of polymer solution. Composite coatings suppressed the sharp rising of pH value and the released Mg(2+) from substrate to extensive degree, and the degradation behavior of the modified magnesium alloy was supposed to be correlated to microstructure of the coating as well as the synergistic reactions among alkaline- and acidic-degraded products.

  19. Ascorbic acid, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium intake variations: effects on calcium, phosphorus and magnesium utilization by human adults

    SciTech Connect

    Kies, C.; Brennan, M.A.; Parks, S.K.; Stauffer, D.J.; Wang, H.Y.; Young, S.F.; Fox, H.M.

    1986-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding two levels of ascorbic acid, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and ascorbic acid on the apparent utilization of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium by healthy, human adult subjects. During 4 randomly-arranged experimental periods of 7 days each, a laboratory-controlled diet alone or with supplements of ascorbic acid, dicalcium phosphate or magnesium oxide was fed to the 18 subjects. Results indicated that ascorbic acid supplementation tended to reduce urinary phosphorus loss and to slightly increase fecal phosphorus loss so that overall phosphorus balances became more positive. Conversely, under these conditions, urinary calcium losses were little affected but fecal calcium losses were increased resulting in an overall decrease in calcium balance with ascorbic acid supplementation. Ascorbic acid supplementation resulted in decreased urine and fecal losses of magnesium and more positive magnesium balances. Magnesium supplementation resulted in more positive calcium and phosphorus balances as did calcium phosphate supplementation on magnesium balance.

  20. Experimental Study of Magnesium Production with Laser for Clean Energy Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Yabe, T.; Sakurai, Y.; Mohamed, M. S.; Uchida, S.; Baasandash, C.; Ohkubo, T.; Mori, Y.; Sato, H.

    2008-04-01

    A new scheme of generating power called magnesium injection cycle [MAGIC] engine was developed. Magnesium [Mg] and water are put into the chamber and ignited at 500 degree Celsius. Mg reaction with water produces hydrogen [H2] gas. The hydrogen blows out and reacts with oxygen [O2] gas to generate H2O and energy at the exit nozzle. These reactions occur simultaneously and generate thrust. In order to reproduce Mg, the residual MgO is irradiated by focused cw CO2 laser (1000 W) at 20 Pa. Then, high temperature (over 4000 degree Celsius) is exerted in tiny spot thus MgO reduction in equilibrium is achievable. Spectroscopic analysis was conducted on the Mg/MgO vapor under atmospheric condition. The Mg line at 518 nm, MgO line at 500 nm and O+ line were confirmed. This proves that the MgO is dissociated by laser irradiation These experiments confirm that the scheme can be used for magnesium energy cycle system with practical efficiency and large throughput.

  1. Systematic Study of Inherent Antibacterial Properties of Magnesium-based Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hongqing; Wang, Guomin; Jin, Weihong; Zhang, Xuming; Huang, Yifan; Gao, Ang; Wu, Hao; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K

    2016-04-20

    Magnesium-based materials are preferred in temporary orthopedic implants because of their biodegradability, mechanical properties, and intrinsic antibacterial properties. However, the fundamental mechanism of bacteria killing and roles of various factors are not clearly understood. In this study, we performed a systematic study of the antibacterial properties of two common Mg-based materials using a biofilm forming bacterium. Complete annihilation of the initial 3 × 10(4) bacteria is achieved with both materials in 0.1 mL LB medium in 24 h, whereas in the control, they proliferate to 10(10). The bacteria are killed more effectively in the solution than on the surface, and the bacteria killing efficiency depends more on the concentrations of the magnesium ions and hydroxyl ions than the corrosion rate. The killing process is reproduced using formula solutions, and killing is revealed to stem from the synergetic effects of alkalinity and magnesium ions instead of either one of them or Mg(OH)2 precipitate. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are detected from the bacteria during the killing process but are not likely produced by the redox reaction directly, because they are detected at least 3 h after the reaction has commenced. The average cell size increases during the killing process, suggesting that the bacteria have difficulty with normal division which also contributes to the reduced bacteria population.

  2. The Association Between Calcium, Magnesium, and Ratio of Calcium/Magnesium in Seminal Plasma and Sperm Quality.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hong; Miao, Maohua; Chen, Jianping; Chen, Kanglian; Wu, Bin; Dai, Qi; Wang, Jian; Sun, Fei; Shi, Huijuan; Yuan, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to examine the relationships between calcium, magnesium, and calcium/magnesium ratio in semen plasma and sperm quality. It was a cross-sectional study based on a program aiming at promoting the reproductive health in less-developed areas. A total of 515 men aged between 18 and 55 years provided semen specimens at family planning clinics in Sandu County, Guizhou Province, China. Total calcium and magnesium concentrations in semen plasma were measured with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Sperm quality, including sperm motility and concentration, was evaluated by using a computer-assisted sperm analysis method. The medians of seminal plasma calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were 9.61, 4.41, and 2.23 mmol/l, respectively. Calcium concentration and calcium/magnesium ratio were negatively associated with sperm concentrations (β = -0.47, P = 0.0123 for calcium; β = -0.25, P = 0.0393 for calcium/magnesium ratio) after adjusting for zinc and other covariates. In stratified analyses, the association between calcium and sperm concentrations only persisted among subjects with a calcium/magnesium ratio of ≤2.5 (β = -0.71, P = 0.0268). In the same stratum, magnesium was associated with increased sperm concentration (β = 0.73, P = 0.0386). Among subjects with a calcium/magnesium ratio of >2.5, neither calcium nor magnesium was associated with sperm concentration. In conclusion, total calcium and magnesium concentrations were associated with sperm concentration among subjects with a lower calcium/magnesium ratio. The calcium and magnesium ratio had a modifying effect on the associations of calcium and magnesium with sperm concentration.

  3. Al-26-Mg-26 ages of iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Souzis, A. E.; Xue, S.; Klein, J.; Juenemann, D.; Middleton, R.

    1993-01-01

    An exposure age for an iron meteorite can be calculated from measurements of a radioactive nuclide and a stable nuclide that are produced by similar sets of nuclear reactions, provided that the stable nuclide is present with low initial abundance. The standard methods rely on either K-40 (t(sub 1/2) = 1.26 Gy), K-39, and K-41 or on a shorter-lived radionuclide and a stable, noble gas isotope. Widely used pairs of this type include Cl-36/Ar-36 and Al-26/Ne-21. Other pairs that may serve the purpose for iron meteorites contain many stable isotopes besides those of K and the noble gases that are produced partly by cosmic rays. We consider here the calculation of exposure ages, t(sub 26), from measurements of Al-26 (t(sub 1/2) = 0.7 My) and (stable) Mg-26. Ages based on Al-26/Mg-26 ratios, like those based on Cl-36/Ar-36 ratios, are 'buffered' against changes in relative production rates due to shielding because decay of the radioactive nuclide accounts for a good part of the inventory of the stable nuclide.

  4. Magnesium adsorption and ion exchange in marine sediments: A multi-component model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Breymann, Marta T.; Collier, Robert; Suess, Erwin

    1990-12-01

    The observed distribution of dissolved magnesium in the pore water of rapidly accumulating sediments shows significant deviations from the seawater value. We have shown that deviations during early diagenesis can be explained by reactions occurring at the surface of sediment particles. In anoxic pore water environments with high levels of dissolved total carbon dioxide the formation of Mg +2·CO 3-2 complexes significantly reduces the concentration of the free Mg +2 ion. This decrease in the Mg +2 activity results in desorption of magnesium from the solid surfaces due to the re-equilibration of the adsorbed Mg +2 with the dissolved species. The effect of increasing carbonate complexation of Mg +2 in anoxic environments is initially compensated by the loss of sulfate, which is also a strong Mg +2 ligand. Therefore, significant changes in free Mg +2 concentration and thus in the magnesium desorption from solid surfaces by ligand competition for Mg +2 are more pronounced in sulfate-depleted systems undergoing methanogenesis. Such conditions are characteristic of most continental margin sediments. Another consequence of the decomposition of organic matter in hemipelagic sediments is the accumulation of high levels of ammonium ions which also displace Mg +2 from sediment-particle surfaces by ion exchange. These equilibria in the pore water-sediment systems can be described by empirical parameters, which were experimentally obtained. A computer model was used to determine the equilibrium conditions for solid-solution reactions as a function of changes in the pore-water composition in organicrich hemipelagic environments. This model includes complex formation, competition for Mg +2 between dissolved ligands and exchange sites and Mg +2/NH +4 exchange reactions. The relative proportion of desorbed and displaced Mg +2 from the solid surface depends on the characteristics of the sediment and on the ΣCO 2:NH +4 regenerative ratio in the pore waters. In sediments from

  5. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David

    2013-05-20

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  6. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  7. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes.

  8. Bioresorbable drug-eluting magnesium-alloy scaffold for treatment of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos M; Muramatsu, Takashi; Iqbal, Javaid; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Haude, Michael; Lemos, Pedro A; Warnack, Boris; Serruys, Patrick W

    2013-12-16

    The introduction of metallic drug-eluting stents has reduced the risk of restenosis and widened the indications of percutaneous coronary intervention in treatment of coronary artery disease. However, this medical device can induce hypersensitive reaction that interferes with the endothelialization and healing process resulting in late persistent or acquired malapposition of the permanent metallic implant. Delayed endotheliaization and malapposition may lead to late and very late stent thrombosis. Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) have been introduced to potentially overcome these limitations, as they provide temporary scaffolding and then disappear, liberating the treated vessel from its cage. Magnesium is an essential mineral needed for a variety of physiological functions in the human body and its bioresorbable alloy has the strength-to-weight ratio comparable with that of strong aluminum alloys and alloy steels. The aim of this review is to present the new developments in Magnesium BRS technology, to describe its clinical application and to discuss the future prospects of this innovative therapy.

  9. Formation and structure of cubic particles of sodium magnesium fluoride (neighborite).

    PubMed

    Sevonkaev, Igor; Goia, Dan V; Matijević, Egon

    2008-01-01

    Uniform cubic particles of neighborite (NaMgF3) were prepared by mixing solutions of magnesium chloride and sodium fluoride, followed by aging for extended periods of time (up to 3 h). Such particles could be obtained directly either by using sodium fluoride in sufficient excess, or by first producing spherical particles of magnesium fluoride and converting them into neighborite cubes by admixing sodium fluoride. It was shown that both MgF2 and NaMgF3 particles so prepared are polycrystalline and that in both procedures to form neighborite a two stage reaction takes place. In the first stage nanosize subunits of MgF2 are formed, which are subsequently converted in the presence of excess sodium fluoride to neighborite crystallites. The latter are then reorganized into larger subunits that constitute colloidal cubes.

  10. Struvite precipitation from urine with electrochemical magnesium dosage.

    PubMed

    Hug, Alexandra; Udert, Kai M

    2013-01-01

    When magnesium is added to source-separated urine, struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4)·6H(2)O) precipitates and phosphorus can be recovered. Up to now, magnesium salts have been used as the main source of magnesium. Struvite precipitation with these salts works well but is challenging in decentralized reactors, where high automation of the dosage and small reactor sizes are required. In this study, we investigated a novel approach for magnesium dosage: magnesium was electrochemically dissolved from a sacrificial magnesium electrode. We demonstrated that this process is technically simple and economically feasible and thus interesting for decentralized reactors. Linear voltammetry and batch experiments at different anode potentials revealed that the anode potential must be higher than -0.9 V vs. NHE (normal hydrogen electrode) to overcome the strong passivation of the anode. An anode potential of -0.6 V vs. NHE seemed to be suitable for active magnesium dissolution. For 13 subsequent cycles at this potential, we achieved an average phosphate removal rate of 3.7 mg P cm(-2) h(-1), a current density of 5.5 mA cm(-2) and a current efficiency of 118%. Some magnesium carbonate (nesquehonite) accumulated on the anode surface; as a consequence, the current density decreased slightly, but the current efficiency was not affected. The energy consumption for these experiments was 1.7 W h g P(-1). A cost comparison showed that sacrificial magnesium electrodes are competitive with easily soluble magnesium salts such as MgCl(2) and MgSO(4), but are more expensive than dosing with MgO. Energy costs for the electrochemical process were insignificant. Dosing magnesium electrochemically could thus be a worthwhile alternative to dosing magnesium salts. Due to the simple reactor and handling of magnesium, this may well be a particularly interesting approach for decentralized urine treatment.

  11. Effects of magnesium salts in preventing experimental oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Yamaguchi, K; Morozumi, M

    1990-08-01

    Magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium sulfate, magnesium trisilicate, and magnesium citrate were added to a calcium-oxalate lithogenic diet in order to determine their effects in preventing lithogenesis. Male Wistar-strain rats which had been fed the glycolic-acid diet developed marked urinary calculi within four weeks. Rats in the magnesium-hydroxide, magnesium-citrate, and magnesium-trisilicate groups, however, had almost no stones in the urinary system. Rats in the magnesium-oxide and magnesium-sulfate groups showed significantly less effect than those in the former three groups. During the experimental period, the 24-hour urinary oxalate excretion and concentration were higher in the glycolic-acid group than in the other groups. The urinary citrate excretion and concentration were the highest in the magnesium-hydroxide and magnesium-citrate groups and higher in the magnesium-trisilicate and magnesium-oxide groups than in the magnesium-sulfate and glycolic-acid groups. Similar trends were observed in the urinary magnesium excretion and in its concentration. The urinary calcium excretion and concentration were higher in the experimental groups than in the glycolic-acid group. The urinary calcium/magnesium ratio remained mostly unchanged. Therefore, it can be concluded that alkaline magnesium salts increase the urinary calcium and magnesium concentrations, without changing the calcium/magnesium ratio, and inhibit urinary calculi formation, most likely by increasing the urinary citrate concentration.

  12. 76 FR 72172 - Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order: Pure Magnesium From the People's Republic of China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ..., zirconium and rare earths. Excluded from the scope of the order are alloy primary magnesium (that meets... order. Pure magnesium is a metal or alloy containing by weight primarily the element magnesium and produced by decomposing raw materials into magnesium metal. Pure primary magnesium is used primarily as...

  13. 26 CFR 26.2642-2 - Valuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Valuation. 26.2642-2 Section 26.2642-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-2 Valuation. (a)...

  14. 26 CFR 26.2642-2 - Valuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Valuation. 26.2642-2 Section 26.2642-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-2 Valuation. (a)...

  15. 26 CFR 26.2642-2 - Valuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Valuation. 26.2642-2 Section 26.2642-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-2 Valuation. (a)...

  16. 26 CFR 26.2642-2 - Valuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Valuation. 26.2642-2 Section 26.2642-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-2 Valuation. (a)...

  17. Dose-Response Relationship between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xin; Han, Hedong; Li, Mei; Liang, Chun; Fan, Zhongjie; Aaseth, Jan; He, Jia; Montgomery, Scott; Cao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence for a dose-response relationship between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is sparse. The aim of the study was to summarize the evidence for the association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of T2D and evaluate the dose-response relationship. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that reported dietary magnesium intake and risk of incident T2D. We identified relevant studies by searching major scientific literature databases and grey literature resources from their inception to February 2016. We included cohort studies that provided risk ratios, i.e., relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs), for T2D. Linear dose-response relationships were assessed using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated using restricted cubic splines. A total of 25 studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies comprised 637,922 individuals including 26,828 with a T2D diagnosis. Compared with the lowest magnesium consumption group in the population, the risk of T2D was reduced by 17% across all the studies; 19% in women and 16% in men. A statistically significant linear dose-response relationship was found between incremental magnesium intake and T2D risk. After adjusting for age and body mass index, the risk of T2D incidence was reduced by 8%–13% for per 100 mg/day increment in dietary magnesium intake. There was no evidence to support a nonlinear dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium intake and T2D risk. The combined data supports a role for magnesium in reducing risk of T2D, with a statistically significant linear dose-response pattern within the reference dose range of dietary intake among Asian and US populations. The evidence from Europe and black people is limited and more prospective studies are needed for the two subgroups. PMID:27869762

  18. Catalytic turnover triggers exchange of subunits of the magnesium chelatase AAA+ motor unit.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Joakim; Braumann, Ilka; Kurowska, Marzena; Müller, André H; Hansson, Mats

    2013-08-16

    The ATP-dependent insertion of Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX is the first committed step in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The reaction is catalyzed by magnesium chelatase, which consists of three gene products: BchI, BchD, and BchH. The BchI and BchD subunits belong to the family of AAA+ proteins (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) and form a two-ring complex with six BchI subunits in one layer and six BchD subunits in the other layer. This BchID complex is a two-layered trimer of dimers with the ATP binding site located at the interface between two neighboring BchI subunits. ATP hydrolysis by the BchID motor unit fuels the insertion of Mg(2+) into the porphyrin by the BchH subunit. In the present study, we explored mutations that were originally identified in semidominant barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mutants. The resulting recombinant BchI proteins have marginal ATPase activity and cannot contribute to magnesium chelatase activity although they apparently form structurally correct complexes with BchD. Mixing experiments with modified and wild-type BchI in various combinations showed that an exchange of BchI subunits in magnesium chelatase occurs during the catalytic cycle, which indicates that dissociation of the complex may be part of the reaction mechanism related to product release. Mixing experiments also showed that more than three functional interfaces in the BchI ring structure are required for magnesium chelatase activity.

  19. Biocompatibility of rapidly solidified magnesium alloy RS66 as a temporary biodegradable metal.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Kalla, Katharina; Bartsch, Ivonne; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Remennik, Sergei; Shechtman, Dan; Nellesen, Jens; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Vogt, Carla; Witte, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-based alloys are very promising materials for temporary implants. However, the clinical use of magnesium-based alloys is often limited by rapid corrosion and by insufficient mechanical stability. Here we investigated RS66, a magnesium-based alloy with extraordinary physicochemical properties of high tensile strength combined with a high ductility and a homogeneous grain size of ~1 μm which was obtained by rapid solidification processing and reciprocal extrusion. Using a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments, we analyzed the biodegradation behavior and the biocompatibility of this alloy. In vitro, RS66 had no cytotoxic effects in physiological concentrations on the viability and the proliferation of primary human osteoblasts. In vivo, RS66 cylinders were implanted into femur condyles, under the skin and in the muscle of adult rabbits and were monitored for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 weeks. After explantation, the RS66 cylinders were first analyzed by microtomography to determine the remaining RS66 alloy and calculate the corrosion rates. Then, the implantation sites were examined histologically for healing processes and foreign body reactions. We found that RS66 was corroded fastest subcutaneously followed by intramuscular and bony implantation of the samples. No clinical harm with transient gas cavities during the first 6 weeks in subcutaneous and intramuscular implantation sites was observed. No gas cavities were formed around the implantation site in bone. The corrosion rates in the different anatomical locations correlated well with the local blood flow prior to implantation. A normal foreign body reaction occurred in all tissues. Interestingly, no enhanced bone formation could be observed around the corroding samples in the condyles. These data show that RS66 is biocompatible, and due to its interesting physicochemical properties, this magnesium alloy is a promising material for biodegradable implants.

  20. Processing, microstructure, and mechanical behavior of cast magnesium metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, A.

    1995-09-01

    Magnesium metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been receiving attention in recent years as an attractive choice for aerospace and automotive applications because of their low density and superior specific properties. This article presents a liquid mixing and casting process that can be used to produce SiC particulate-reinforced magnesium metal matrix composites via conventional foundry processes. Microstructural features, such as SiC particle distribution, grain refinement, and particle/matrix interfacial reactions of the cast magnesium matrix composites, are investigated, and the effects of solidification-process parameters and matrix alloys (pure Mg and Mg-9 pct Al-1 pct Zn alloy AZ91) on the microstructure are established. The results of this work suggest that in the solidification processing of MMCs, it is important to optimize the process parameters both to avoid excessive interfacial reactions and simultaneously achieve wetting, so that a good particle distribution and interfacial bonding are obtained. The tensile properties, strain hardening, and fracture behavior of the AZ91/SiC composites are also studied and the results are compared with those of the unreinforced AZ91 alloy. The strengthening mechanisms for AZ91/SiC composite, based on the proposed SiC particle/matrix interaction during deformation, are used to explain the increased yield strength and elastic modulus of the composite over the magnesium matrix alloy. The low ductility found in the composites is due to the early appearance of localized damages, such as particle cracking, matrix cracking, and occasionally interface debonding, in the fracture process of the composite.

  1. Synthesis and Structural Studies of Calcium and Magnesium Phosphinate and Phosphonate Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoh, Victoria Naa Kwale

    The work presented herein describes synthetic methodologies leading to the design of a wide array of magnesium and calcium based phosphinate and phosphonates with possible applications as bone scaffolding materials or additives to bone cements. The challenge to the chemistry of the alkaline earth phosphonate target compounds includes poor solubility of compounds, and poorly understood details on the control of the metal's coordination environment. Hence, less is known on phosphonate based alkaline earth metal organic frameworks as compared to transition metal phosphonates. Factors governing the challenges in obtaining crystalline, well-defined magnesium and calcium solids lie in the large metal diameters, the absence of energetically available d-orbitals to direct metal geometry, as well as the overall weakness of the metal-ligand bonds. A significant part of this project was concerned with the development of suitable reaction conditions to obtain X-ray quality crystals of the reaction products to allow for structural elucidation of the novel compounds. Various methodologies to aid in crystal growth including hydrothermal methods and gel crystallization were employed. We have used phosphinate and phosphonate ligands with different number of phosphorus oxygen atoms as well as diphosphonates with different linker lengths to determine their effects on the overall structural features. An interesting correlation is observed between the dimensionality of products and the increasing number of donor oxygen atoms in the ligands as we progress from phosphinic acid to the phosphorous acids. As an example, monophosphinate ligand only yielded one-dimensional compounds, whereas the phosphonates crystallize as one and two-dimensional compounds, and the di- and triphosphonate based compounds display two or three-dimensional geometries. This thesis provides a selection of calcium and magnesium compounds with one-dimensional geometry, as represented in a calcium phosphinate to novel

  2. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings.

  3. The Corrosion of Magnesium and of the Magnesium Aluminum Alloys Containing Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, J A

    1927-01-01

    The extensive use of magnesium and its alloys in aircraft has been seriously handicapped by the uncertainties surrounding their resistance to corrosion. This problem has been given intense study by the American Magnesium Corporation and at the request of the Subcommittee on Materials for Aircraft of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics this report was prepared on the corrosion of magnesium. The tentative conclusions drawn from the experimental facts of this investigation are as follows: the overvoltage of pure magnesium is quite high. On immersion in salt water the metal corrodes with the liberation of hydrogen until the film of corrosion product lowers the potential to a critical value. When the potential reaches this value it no longer exceeds the theoretical hydrogen potential plus the overvoltage of the metal. Rapid corrosion consequently ceases. When aluminum is added, especially when in large amounts, the overvoltage is decreased and hydrogen plates out at a much lower potential than with pure magnesium. The addition of small amount of manganese raises the overvoltage back to practically that of pure metal, and the film is again negative.

  4. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5

  5. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  6. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Charles D.; Bergum, John W.

    1994-01-01

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated.

  7. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, C.D.; Bergum, J.W.

    1994-10-25

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated. 3 figs.

  8. Chemically prepared lead magnesium niobate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Olson, W.R.; Goy, D.M.

    1998-11-01

    A chemical solution powder synthesis technique has been developed that produces first, uniform powders of lead magnesium niobate (PMN) with 60 to 80 nm crystallite size. The synthesis technique was based on the dissolution of lead acetate and alkoxide precursors in acetic acid followed by precipitation with oxalic acid/propanol solutions. Lead magnesium niobate ceramics fabricated from these chemically derived powders had smaller, more uniform grain size and higher dielectric constants than ceramics fabricated from mixed oxide powders that were processed under similar thermal conditions. Chem-prep PMN dielectrics with peak dielectric constants greater than 22,000 and polarizations in excess of 29 {micro}C/cm{sup 2} were obtained for 1,100 C firing treatments. Substantial decreases in dielectric constant and polarization were measured for chemically prepared PMN ceramics fired at lower temperatures, consistent with previous work on mixed oxide materials.

  9. A Study on Factors Affecting the Degradation of Magnesium and a Magnesium-Yttrium Alloy for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ian; Liu, Huinan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling degradation of magnesium or its alloys in physiological saline solutions is essential for their potential applications in clinically viable implants. Rapid degradation of magnesium-based materials reduces the mechanical properties of implants prematurely and severely increases alkalinity of the local environment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effects of three interactive factors on magnesium degradation, specifically, the addition of yttrium to form a magnesium-yttrium alloy versus pure magnesium, the metallic versus oxide surfaces, and the presence versus absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution. In the immersion solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the slowest, followed by pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface degraded the fastest. However, in deionized (DI) water, the degradation rate showed a different trend. Specifically, pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces degraded the slowest, followed by the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the fastest. Interestingly, only magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded slower in PBS than in DI water, while all the other samples degraded faster in PBS than in DI water. Clearly, the results showed that the alloy composition, presence or absence of surface oxide layer, and presence or absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution all influenced the degradation rate and mode. Moreover, these three factors showed statistically significant interactions. This study revealed the complex interrelationships among these factors and their respective contributions to degradation for the first time. The results of this study not only improved our understanding of magnesium degradation in physiological environment, but also presented the key

  10. A study on factors affecting the degradation of magnesium and a magnesium-yttrium alloy for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ian; Liu, Huinan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling degradation of magnesium or its alloys in physiological saline solutions is essential for their potential applications in clinically viable implants. Rapid degradation of magnesium-based materials reduces the mechanical properties of implants prematurely and severely increases alkalinity of the local environment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effects of three interactive factors on magnesium degradation, specifically, the addition of yttrium to form a magnesium-yttrium alloy versus pure magnesium, the metallic versus oxide surfaces, and the presence versus absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution. In the immersion solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the slowest, followed by pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface degraded the fastest. However, in deionized (DI) water, the degradation rate showed a different trend. Specifically, pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces degraded the slowest, followed by the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the fastest. Interestingly, only magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded slower in PBS than in DI water, while all the other samples degraded faster in PBS than in DI water. Clearly, the results showed that the alloy composition, presence or absence of surface oxide layer, and presence or absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution all influenced the degradation rate and mode. Moreover, these three factors showed statistically significant interactions. This study revealed the complex interrelationships among these factors and their respective contributions to degradation for the first time. The results of this study not only improved our understanding of magnesium degradation in physiological environment, but also presented the key

  11. Isotopic Exchange in Porous and Dense Magnesium Borohydride.

    PubMed

    Zavorotynska, Olena; Deledda, Stefano; Li, Guanqiao; Matsuo, Motoaki; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Hauback, Bjørn C

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH4)2) is one of the most promising complex hydrides presently studied for energy-related applications. Many of its properties depend on the stability of the BH4(-) anion. The BH4(-) stability was investigated with respect to H→D exchange. In situ Raman measurements on high-surface-area porous Mg(BH4 )2 in 0.3 MPa D2 have shown that the isotopic exchange at appreciable rates occurs already at 373 K. This is the lowest exchange temperature observed in stable borohydrides. Gas-solid isotopic exchange follows the BH4(-) +D˙ →BH3D(-) +H˙ mechanism at least at the initial reaction steps. Ex situ deuteration of porous Mg(BH4)2 and its dense-phase polymorph indicates that the intrinsic porosity of the hydride is the key behind the high isotopic exchange rates. It implies that the solid-state H(D) diffusion is considerably slower than the gas-solid H→D exchange reaction at the surface and it is a rate-limiting steps for hydrogen desorption and absorption in Mg(BH4)2.

  12. Al2O3 Nanoparticle Addition to Commercial Magnesium Alloys: Multiple Beneficial Effects

    PubMed Central

    Paramsothy, Muralidharan; Chan, Jimmy; Kwok, Richard; Gupta, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects of Al2O3 nanoparticle addition to cast magnesium based systems (followed by extrusion) were investigated, constituting either: (a) enhanced strength; or (b) simultaneously enhanced strength and ductility of the corresponding magnesium alloys. AZ31 and ZK60A nanocomposites containing Al2O3 nanoparticle reinforcement were each fabricated using solidification processing followed by hot extrusion. Compared to monolithic AZ31 (tension levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited higher yield strength (0.2% tensile yield strength (TYS)), ultimate strength (UTS), failure strain and work of fracture (WOF) (+19%, +21%, +113% and +162%, respectively). Compared to monolithic AZ31 (compression levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited higher yield strength (0.2% compressive yield strength (CYS)) and ultimate strength (UCS), lower failure strain and higher WOF (+5%, +5%, −4% and +11%, respectively). Compared to monolithic ZK60A (tension levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited lower 0.2% TYS and higher UTS, failure strain and WOF (−4%, +13%, +170% and +200%, respectively). Compared to monolithic ZK60A (compression levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited lower 0.2% CYS and higher UCS, failure strain and WOF (−10%, +7%, +15% and +26%, respectively). The capability of Al2O3 nanoparticles to enhance the properties of cast magnesium alloys in a way never seen before with micron length scale reinforcements is clearly demonstrated.

  13. Natural variation of magnesium isotopes in mammal bones and teeth from two South African trophic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Isotopic fractionations accompanying element transfer through terrestrial ecosystems have the potential to shed light on ecological interactions between primary producers and consumers, but with the exception of carbon and nitrogen this potential has barely been exploited. Here, the magnesium stable isotope composition of bones and teeth of extant mammals from Kruger National Park (KNP) and Western Cape (WC), South Africa was measured for the first time. The nature of the geological substrate proves to be a major determinant of the ecosystem isotope baseline, as indicated by the lighter magnesium isotope ratios measured in WC mammals (ranging from -1.58‰ to -0.79‰) compared to those from KNP mammals (ranging from -1.01‰ to -0.04‰). Therefore, comparisons between the isotope signatures of taxa must be restricted to a pre-defined geographic area with a homogeneous substrate. In both parks, Mg shows slight enrichment in heavier isotopes from herbivores to carnivores. Plant remains trapped in the dentition of herbivores provide direct evidence of dietary source and, when available, were measured. In KNP only, δ26Mg of plant remains is systematically lighter than the values for herbivore teeth. These results invite further exploration of the variability of Mg isotopes in vertebrate ecosystems in order to test whether magnesium, a bio-essential element present in relatively large proportions in bone and teeth apatite, may serve as an additional trophic tracer to nitrogen, which is a constituent of collagen that rapidly degrades after burial.

  14. Thermal analysis, phase equilibria, and superconducting properties in magnesium boride and carbon doped magnesium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, Scot David

    In this work, the low temperature synthesis of MgB2 from Mg/B and MgH2/B powder mixtures was studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). For the Mg/B powder mixture, two exothermic reaction events were observed and the first reaction event was initiated by the decomposition of Mg(OH)2 on the surface of the magnesium powder. For the MgH 2/B powder mixture, there was an endothermic event at ˜375 °C (the decomposition of MgH2 into H2 and Mg) and an exothermic event ˜600 °C (the reaction of Mg and B). The Kissinger analysis method was used to estimate the apparent activation energy of the Mg and B reaction using DSC data with different furnace ramp rates. The limitations of MgB2 low temperature synthesis led to the development of a high pressure induction furnace that was constructed using a pressure vessel and an induction heating power supply. The purpose was to not only synthesize more homogeneous MgB2 samples, but also to determine whether MgB2 melts congruently or incongruently. A custom implementation of the Smith Thermal Analysis method was developed and tested on aluminum and AlB2, the closest analogue to MgB2. Measurements on MgB2 powder and a high purity Mg/B elemental mixture confirmed that MgB2 melts incongruently and decomposes into a liquid and MgB4 at ˜1445 °C at 10 MPa via peritectic decomposition. Another measurement using a Mg/B elemental mixture with impure boron suggested that ˜0.7 wt% carbon impurity in the boron raised the incongruent melting temperature to ˜1490-1500 °C. Lastly, the solubility limit for carbon in MgB2 was studied by making samples from B4C and Mg at 1530 °C, 1600 °C and 1700 °C in the high pressure furnace. All three samples had three phases: Mg, MgB2C2, and carbon doped MgB2. The MgB 2C2 and carbon doped MgB2 grain size increased with temperature and the 1700 °C sample had needle-like grains for both phases. The presence of the ternary phase, MgB2C2, suggested that the maximum doping limit for carbon in

  15. Serum ionized magnesium in post-traumatic headaches.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J C; Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    2001-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the values of serum ionized magnesium, total magnesium, and ionized calcium/ionized magnesium ratios in children with headaches. One hundred thirty-five children with primary complaints of headaches were classified according to the criteria of the International Headache Society. Blood samples were obtained and tested for ionized magnesium (IMg(2+)), total magnesium, ionized calcium (ICa(2+)), and pH. The ICa(2+)/IMg(2+) ratio was calculated. Nine children were given a diagnosis of post-traumatic headache. Six of them had statistically significant (P <.05) lowered IMg(2+) levels and high ICa(2+)/IMg(2+) ratios. Abnormalities in serum IMg(2+) concentrations and ICa(2+)/IMg(2+) ratios were found in children with post-traumatic headaches, but total magnesium levels were normal.

  16. Adsorption of β-carotene on modified magnesium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Guo, Ning; Fu, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Modified flocculation magnesium silicate is prepared by a hydrothermal process at 120°C for 18 h after adding Al2(SO4)3 into the magnesium silicate gel. Compared with standard magnesium silicate with 328.116 m2 g-1 surface area, this modified magnesium silicate has a bigger BET surface area of 536.803 m2 g-1 and a lower interlayer water content. Modified magnesium silicate exhibits high β-carotene adsorption with a maximum adsorption capacity of 364.96 mg g-1. It is shown that when suspended in organic solvent, this material can be used effectively for carotenoid separation. Furthermore, our results suggest that modified magnesium silicate may be a promising candidate as an absorbent in the decoloring of oil.

  17. Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to Magnesium Triborane in the Solid State Under Moderate Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Marina; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jalisatgi, Satish; Jensen, Craig M.

    2011-02-17

    Thermal decomposition of magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2, in the solid state was studied by a combination of PCT, TGA/MS and NMR spectroscopy. Dehydrogenation of Mg(BH4)2 at 200 °C, results in the highly selective formation of magnesium triborane, Mg(B3H8)2. This process is reversible at 250 °C under 120 atm H2. Dehydrogenation at higher temperature, > 300 °C, produces a complex mixture of polyborane species. Solution phase 11B NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed decomposition products reveals the formation of the B3H8 anion, boric acid from hydrolysis of the unstable polyboranes (BnHx) (n = 3-11, x >8), and the closoborane B12H12 dianion as a minor product. A BH condensation mechanism involving metal hydride formation is proposed to explain the limited reversible hydrogen storage in magnesium borohydride.

  18. Design Considerations of a Condensing System for Vaporized Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, Walter R; Prok, George M; Keller, Thomas A

    1955-01-01

    The effect of the design characteristics of various condensing chambers on magnesium build-up at the chamber inlet was investigated. The condensing chambers are used in the vapor-condensation process for making magnesium slurries. A complete description of the various chamber designs and the procedure used in testing the chambers is given. The results are evaluated on the basis of clogging and total magnesium distilled per run. Orifice design was also considered.

  19. A New Coating Process for Production of Coated Magnesium Powders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-16

    TGA data for magnesium hydroxide content. TGA analysis of the as-coated powders is a reproducible and accurate method for the determination of... TGA analysis of the as-coated powder, there is approximately 3wt% magnesium hydroxide present in the material due to the process variation compared...11: Magnesium hydroxide content as measured by TGA analysis for the 1-lb batches of as-coated ground powder Figure 12: Nitrometer analysis of

  20. Mechanical Properties of Several Magnesium and Aluminum Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    34AD-A262 481 ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Mechanical Properties of Several Magnesium and Aluminum Composites Nikos Tsangarakis and Barmac Taleghani ARL...ESJEI L .PwmOM N.ajmns Mechanical Properties of Several Magnesium and Aluminum Composites 2.AUIwORU Nikos Tsangarakis and Barmac Taleghani 7. PERONUMMN...Several composites of magnesiumn and aluminum alloys were tested In order to assess and evaluate their mechanical properties . The magnesium alloys were

  1. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  2. Development of Rolling Schedules for AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    received AZ31B, a magnesium (Mg) alloy that contains approximately 3% aluminum and 1% zinc. In particular, we investigated the ability to roll AZ31B to...ARL-TR-7277 ● JUNE 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Development of Rolling Schedules for AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets by...7277 ● JUNE 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Development of Rolling Schedules for AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets by Laszlo Kecskes, Heidi

  3. Initial observations on using magnesium metal in peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Vennemeyer, J J; Hopkins, T; Hershcovitch, M; Little, K D; Hagen, M C; Minteer, D; Hom, D B; Marra, K; Pixley, S K

    2015-03-01

    Biodegradable magnesium metal filaments placed inside biodegradable nerve conduits might provide the physical guidance support needed to improve the rate and extent of regeneration of peripheral nerves across injury gaps. In this study, we examined basic issues of magnesium metal resorption and biocompatibility by repairing sub-critical size gap injuries (6 mm) in one sciatic nerve of 24 adult male Lewis rats. Separated nerve stumps were connected with poly(caprolactone) nerve conduits, with and without magnesium filaments (0.25 mm diameter, 10 mm length), with two different conduit filler substances (saline and keratin hydrogel). At 6 weeks after implantation, magnesium degradation was examined by micro-computed tomography and histological analyses. Magnesium degradation was significantly greater when the conduits were filled with an acidic keratin hydrogel than with saline (p < 0.05). But magnesium filaments in some animals remained intact for 6 weeks. Using histological and immunocytochemical analyses, good biocompatibility of the magnesium implants was observed at 6 weeks, as shown by good development of regenerating nerve mini-fascicles and only mild inflammation in tissues even after complete degradation of the magnesium. Nerve regeneration was not interrupted by complete magnesium degradation. An initial functional evaluation, determination of size recovery of the gastrocnemius muscle, showed a slight improvement due to magnesium with the saline but not the keratin filler, compared with respective control conduits without magnesium. These results suggest that magnesium filament implants have the potential to improve repair of injured peripheral nerve defects in this rodent model.

  4. Influence of the consumption pattern of magnesium from magnesium-rich mineral water on magnesium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, Magalie; Grandvuillemin, Antoine; Kastenmayer, Peter; Aeschliman, Jean-Marc; Bouisset, Florilène; Arnaud, Maurice J; Dumoulin, Gilles; Berthelot, Alain

    2011-08-01

    It is generally considered that the absorption of Mg is inversely related to the ingested dose. The objective of the present study was to determine if the mode of administration (bolus v. consumption throughout the day) could influence Mg bioavailability from Mg-rich natural mineral water comparing the same nutritional Mg amount (126 mg). Using a 2 d cross-over design, twelve healthy men were asked to drink 1·5 litres Mg-rich mineral water either as 2 × 750 ml or 7 × 212 ml throughout the day. Two stable isotopes ((25)Mg and (26)Mg) were used to label the water in order to distinguish both regimens. Fractional apparent Mg absorption was determined by faecal monitoring and Mg retention was determined by measuring urinary excretion of Mg isotopes. Higher Mg absorption (50·7 (SD 12·7) v. 32·4 (SD 8·1) %; P = 0·0007) and retention (47·5 (SD 12·9) v. 29·0 (SD 7·5) %; P = 0·0008) from Mg-rich mineral water were observed when it was consumed in seven servings compared with larger servings. Thus, regular water consumption throughout the day is an effective way to increase Mg bioavailability from Mg-rich mineral water.

  5. Polymorphism of new rubidium magnesium monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Benhamou, Rajia; Wallez, Gilles; Loiseau, Pascal; Viana, Bruno; Elaatmani, Mohamed; Daoud, Mohamed; Zegzouti, Abdelwahed

    2010-09-15

    Novel phase RbMgPO{sub 4}, synthesized by solid state reaction, sustains phase transitions at 169 and 184 {sup o}C. The medium ({beta})- and high- ({gamma}) temperature forms (orthorhombic, respectively Pna2{sub 1} and Pnma, Z=4) are typical stuffed tridymites but the ambient form ({alpha}) exhibits an unusual three-fold Pna2{sub 1} superstructure that results from the change of coordination of one third of the Mg atoms. Cell parameters are as follows: for {alpha}: a=26.535(1) A, b=9.2926(3) A, c=5.3368(2) A; for {beta}: a=8.7938(3) A, b=9.3698(3) A, c=5.3956(1) A; for {gamma}: a=8.7907(3) A, b=5.4059(1) A, c=9.3949(3) A. - Graphical abstract: Superstructure h k l, h{ne}3n diffraction peaks of low-temperature RbMgPO{sub 4} results of the transformation of 1/3 of the MgO{sub 4} tetrahedra into MgO{sub 5} pyramids.

  6. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Marzik, James, V.

    2005-10-13

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  7. 40 CFR 461.60 - Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... magnesium subcategory. 461.60 Section 461.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS BATTERY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Magnesium Subcategory § 461.60 Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory. This subpart applies...

  8. 40 CFR 461.60 - Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... magnesium subcategory. 461.60 Section 461.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS BATTERY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Magnesium Subcategory § 461.60 Applicability; description of the magnesium subcategory. This subpart applies...

  9. Role of magnesium on the biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Bimal K.; Sarma, Bikash

    2016-10-01

    Biomimetic depositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) are carried out using simulated body fluid (SBF), calcifying solution and newly developed magnesium containing calcifying solution. Calcium phosphate has a rich phase diagram and is well known for its excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. The most common phase is hydroxyapatite (HAp), an integral component of human bone and tooth, widely used in orthopedic and dental applications. In addition, calcium phosphate nanoparticles show promise for the targeted drug delivery. The doping of calcium phosphate by magnesium, zinc, strontium etc. can change the protein uptake by CaP nanocrystals. This work describes the role of magnesium on the nucleation and growth of CaP on Ti and its oxide substrates. X-ray diffraction studies confirm formation of HAp nanocrystals which closely resemble the structure of bone apatite when grown using SBF and calcifying solution. It has been observed that magnesium plays crucial role in the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate. A low magnesium level enhances the crystallinity of HAp while higher magnesium content leads to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase. Interestingly, the deposition of ACP phase is rapid when magnesium ion concentration in the solution is 40% of calcium plus magnesium ions concentration. Moreover, high magnesium content alters the morphology of CaP films.

  10. Improved biological performance of magnesium by micro-arc oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have recently been used in the development of lightweight, biodegradable implant materials. However, the corrosion properties of magnesium limit its clinical application. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the degradation behavior and biomechanical properties of magnesium materials treated with micro-arc oxidation (MAO), which is a new promising surface treatment for developing corrosion resistance in magnesium, and to provide a theoretical basis for its further optimization and clinical application. The degradation behavior of MAO-treated magnesium was studied systematically by immersion and electrochemical tests, and its biomechanical performance when exposed to simulated body fluids was evaluated by tensile tests. In addition, the cell toxicity of MAO-treated magnesium samples during the corrosion process was evaluated, and its biocompatibility was investigated under in vivo conditions. The results of this study showed that the oxide coating layers could elevate the corrosion potential of magnesium and reduce its degradation rate. In addition, the MAO-coated sample showed no cytotoxicity and more new bone was formed around it during in vivo degradation. MAO treatment could effectively enhance the corrosion resistance of the magnesium specimen and help to keep its original mechanical properties. The MAO-coated magnesium material had good cytocompatibility and biocompatibility. This technique has an advantage for developing novel implant materials and may potentially be used for future clinical applications. PMID:25517917

  11. Magnesium Modulates Doxorubicin Activity through Drug Lysosomal Sequestration and Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Valentina; Luongo, Francesca; Arduini, Daniela; Wolf, Federica I

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium is directly involved in the control of cell growth and survival, but its role in cancer biology and therapy is multifaceted; in particular, it is highly controversial whether magnesium levels can affect therapy outcomes. Here we investigated whether magnesium availability can modulate cellular responses to the widely used chemotherapeutic doxorubicin. We used an in vitro model consisting of mammary epithelial HC11 cells and found that high magnesium availability was correlated with diminished sensitivity both in cells chronically adapted to high magnesium concentrations and in acutely magnesium-supplemented cells. This decrease in sensitivity resulted from reduced intracellular doxorubicin accumulation in the face of a similar drug uptake rate. We observed that high-magnesium conditions caused a decrease in intracellular drug retention by altering drug lysosomal sequestration and trafficking. In our model, magnesium supplementation correspondingly modulated expression of the TRPM7 channel, which is known to control cytoskeletal organization and dynamics and may be involved in the proposed mechanism. Our findings suggest that magnesium supplementation in hypomagnesemic cancer patients may hinder response to therapy.

  12. Magnesium, aluminum and lead in various brain areas

    SciTech Connect

    Zumkley, H.; Bertram, H.P.; Brandt, M.; Roedig, M.; Spieker, C.

    1986-01-01

    Whereas the lead concentrations were increased in brain tissue of patients with chronic alcoholism, the aluminum concentrations remained within the normal range. The magnesium concentrations were found decreased in patients with chronic alcoholism compared to normal controls. The sources for the elevated lead levels seem to be the increased intake of alcohol. The decreased magnesium levels are probably caused by an increased loss of magnesium with the urine, malnutrition, malabsorption, hormonal factors and drugs. Various neurological disorders which often accompanied chronic alcoholism may be caused or aggravated by lead encephalopathy and hypomagnesemia. Therapeutical implications may be the early substitution of magnesium deficiency in chronic alcoholism. 10 references, 5 figures.

  13. Variability in magnesium, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, and trace element contents of brachiopod shells: implications for paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Saulnier, Ségolène; Vigier, Nathalie; Schumacher, Aimryc; Chaussidon, Marc; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium content in the ocean is ≈ 1290 ppm and is one of the most abundant elements. It is involved in the carbon cycle via the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates, especially Mg-rich carbonates as dolomites. The Mg/Ca ratio of the ocean is believed to have changed through time. The causes of these variations, i.e. hydrothermal activity change or enhanced precipitation of dolomite, could be constrained using the magnesium isotope composition (δ26Mg) of carbonates. Brachiopods, as marine environmental proxies, have the advantage to occur worldwide in a depth range from intertidal to abyssal, and have been found in the geological record since the Cambrian. Moreover, as their shell is in low-Mg calcite, they are quite resistant to diagenetic processes. Here we report δ26Mg, δ18O, δ13C values along with trace element contents of one modern brachiopod specimen (Terebratalia transversa) and one fossil specimen (Terebratula scillae, 2.3 Ma). We combined δ26Mg values with oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and trace element contents to look for possible shell geochemical heterogeneities in order to investigate the processes that control the Mg isotope composition of brachiopod shells. We also evaluate the potential of brachiopods as a proxy of past seawater δ26Mg values. The two investigated brachiopod shells present the same range of δ26Mg variation (up to 2 ‰)). This variation cannot be ascribed to changes in environmental parameters, i.e. temperature or pH. As previously observed, the primary layer of calcite shows the largest degree of oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibrium relative to seawater. In contrast, the δ26Mg value of this layer is comparable to that of the secondary calcite layer value. In both T. scillae and T. transversa, negative trends are observable between magnesium isotopic compositions and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions. These trends, combined to linear relationships between δ26Mg values and REE contents, are best

  14. Assay of calcium borogluconate veterinary medicines for calcium gluconate, boric acid, phosphorus, and magnesium by using inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, D.J.; Spann, K.P.

    1985-03-01

    An inductively coupled plasma spectrometric method is described for the determination of 4 elements (Ca, B, P, and Mg) in calcium borogluconate veterinary medicines. Samples are diluted, acidified, and sprayed directly into the plasma. Reproducibility relative confidence intervals for a single sample assay are +/- 1.4% (calcium), +/- 1.8% (boron), +/- 2.6% (phosphorus), and +/- 1.4% (magnesium). The total element concentrations for each of 4 elements compared favorably with concentrations determined by alternative methods. Formulation estimates of levels of calcium gluconate, boric acid, phosphorus, and magnesium salts can be made from the analytical data.

  15. [The role of alimentary magnesium deficiency in development of nephrolithiasis and its correction with magnesium salts in rats].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Iezhitsa, I N; Kharitonova, M V; Kravchenko, M S; Snigur, G L

    2008-01-01

    Aims of our work were to appraise the quantity and nature of renal calcifications and mineral metabolism in the magnesium-deficient rats; and to find out whether the combination of pyridoxine with Mg L-aspartate or Mg chloride will reduce the length of the treatment needed to recover rats from magnesium deficient condition and urolithiasis state. To induce hypomagnesemia, fifty rats were placed on a magnesium-deficient diet (magnesium content < or = 15 mg/kg) and demineralized water for 10 weeks. On the forty-ninth day of magnesium-deficient diet, rats were treated one of the six supplementations: MgCl2, Mg-L-Asp or their combinations with pyridoxine hydrochloride, magnesium sulfate, magne B6.

  16. Recent advances in research on magnesium alloys and magnesium-calcium phosphate composites as biodegradable implant materials.

    PubMed

    Kuśnierczyk, Katarzyna; Basista, Michał

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium alloys are modern biocompatible materials suitable for orthopaedic implants due to their biodegradability in biological environment. Many studies indicate that there is a high demand to design magnesium alloys with controllable in vivo corrosion rates and required mechanical properties. A solution to this challenge can be sought in the development of metal matrix composites based on magnesium alloys with addition of relevant alloying elements and bioceramic particles. In this study, the corrosion mechanisms along with corrosion protection methods in magnesium alloys are discussed. The recently developed magnesium alloys for biomedical applications are reviewed. Special attention is given to the newest research results in metal matrix composites composed of magnesium alloy matrix and calcium phosphates, especially hydroxyapatite or tricalcium phosphate, as the second phase with emphasis on the biodegradation behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties in view of potential application of these materials in bone implants.

  17. SON68 glass dissolution driven by magnesium silicate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Benjamin; Godon, Nicole; Ayral, André; Gin, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    concentrations in solution for the experiment with 100 mg L-1 of Mg at t = 0, the most representative cases are 10% gel for the period between 3 h and 6 days, 30% for 3 h-10 days, and 50% for 3 h-16 days. Sampling losses are taken into account. All the results indicate that the magnesium phase which precipitated during the experiments had a Mg/Si molar ratio of about 0.2-0.4. Although the ratio was not exactly the same in each case, it is likely that the phase was of the same structural type. The Mg/Si ratio of 0.2-0.4 is low compared with the values above 0.6 expected for a phyllosilicate structure [22,25,26]. However, the structure of phyllosilicates can accommodate many elements, and it is possible that Mg was replaced in the structure by other elements of the system [22,25,26] such as Ni, Co, Zn, Al and Fe (these elements are present in the glass composition and their concentrations in solution are under the limits of quantification of ICP-AES). The precipitation kinetics: Mg cannot precipitate at a higher rate; in this case, adding Mg in solution would not accelerate the precipitation rate. The availability of Mg, which may be limited by the glass alteration rate and/or the gel dissolution rate; in this case, adding Mg in solution would accelerate the precipitation rate. The same two assumptions, but for another element than Mg incorporated in the structure of the secondary phase. Through other series of experiments [30], Advocat showed that the larger the quantity of Mg added to the composition of R7T7 and M7 glass (compensating the difference in composition by adjusting all the other elements) the greater the quantity of altered glass — probably because of a larger quantity of precipitated secondary phases. This raises another question: why did Mg contribute to a larger quantity of secondary phases in this case, although it was retained in the gel in Curti's experiments?A study published in 2012 by Thien et al. [29] provides answers, because it demonstrates two

  18. Contrasting lithium and magnesium isotope fractionation during continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, F.; Li, W.; Rudnick, R. L.; Gardner, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Magnesium isotopic compositions of a profile through saprolites developed on a diabase dike from South Carolina have been measured in order to study the behavior of Mg isotopes during continental weathering. As weathering progresses, Mg isotopes are strongly fractionated and are correlated with Mg concentration, clay mineral proportions and density of the saprolites. δ26Mg values increase from -0.22 in the unweathered diabase to +0.65 in the most weathered saprolite. These observations are consistent with release of light Mg to the hydrosphere and formation of isotopically heavy Mg in the weathered products. The process can be modeled by Rayleigh distillation with an apparent fractionation factor between the saprolite and fluid (α) of 1.00005 to 1.00043, i.e., up to 0.43‰ fractionation in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio between the rocks and fluid during weathering. Like Mg isotopes, Li isotopes in the saprolite profile are also greatly fractionated, with δ7Li values as low as -20. The large Li isotope fractionation and variation in Li concentration, as well as irregularities in the δ7Li profile with depth, however, cannot be explained by Rayleigh distillation alone. Instead, Li can be modeled by a two-step process: (1) equilibrium isotope fractionation during weathering, which lowered δ7Li and Li concentrations and produced a Li concentration gradient in the saprolites like that seen in Mg isotopes, 2) subsequent kinetic isotope fractionation produced by diffusion of Li in the saprolites, possibly across a paleo water table. The results presented here suggest that continental weathering will shift the Mg isotopic composition of the continental crust to values higher than the mantle value, whereas crustal recycling over the history of the Earth will have no discernible effect on the Mg isotopic composition of the mantle.

  19. Microwave assisted synthesis and characterization of magnesium substituted calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nida Iqbal; Ijaz, Kashif; Zahid, Muniza; Khan, Abdul S; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Hussain, Rafaqat; Anis-Ur-Rehman; Darr, Jawwad A; Ihtesham-Ur-Rehman; Chaudhry, Aqif A

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite is used extensively in hard tissue repair due to its biocompatibility and similarity to biological apatite, the mineral component of bone. It differs subtly in composition from biological apatite which contains other ions such as magnesium, zinc, carbonate and silicon (believed to play biological roles). Traditional methods of hydroxyapatite synthesis are time consuming and require strict reaction parameter control. This paper outlines synthesis of magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite using simple microwave irradiation of precipitated suspensions. Microwave irradiation resulted in a drastic decrease in ageing times of amorphous apatitic phases. Time taken to synthesize hydroxyapatite (which remained stable upon heat treatment at 900°C for 1h) reduced twelve folds (to 2h) as compared to traditionally required times. The effects of increasing magnesium concentration in the precursors on particle size, surface area, phase-purity, agglomeration and thermal stability, were observed using scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction and photo acoustic Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Porous agglomerates were obtained after a brief heat-treatment (1h) at 900°C.

  20. High performance magnesium anode in paper-based microfluidic battery, powering on-chip fluorescence assay

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Youngmi; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-01-01

    A high power density and long-lasting stable/disposable magnesium battery anode was explored for a paper-based fluidic battery to power on-chip functions of various Point of Care (POC) devices. The single galvanic cell with magnesium foil anode and silver foil cathode in Origami cellulose chip provided open circuit potential, 2.2 V, and power density, 3.0 mW/cm2. A paper-based fluidic galvanic cell was operated with one drop of water (80 μl) and continued to run until it was dry. To prove the concept about powering on-chip POC devices, two-serial galvanic cells are developed and incorporated with a UV-light emitting diode (λ = 365 nm) and fluorescence assay for alkaline phosphatase reaction. Further, detection using smart phones was performed for quantitative measurement of fluorescent density. To conclude, a magnesium-based fluidic battery paper chip was extremely low-cost, required minute sample volumes, was easy to dispose of, light weight, easy to stack, store and transport, easy to fabricate, scalable, and has faster analysis times. PMID:25332741

  1. Groundwater chemistry and cation budgets of tropical karst outcrops, Peninsular Malaysia, I. Calcium and magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, J.

    1989-05-01

    The discharge and chemical properties of 217 autogenic groundwaters were monitored over a 1-yr period in the tower karsts of central Selangor and the Kinta Valley, and in the Setul Boundary Range. Because of differences in soil PCO 2, calcium concentrations are significantly higher in the Boundary Range (mean, 82.5 mg l -1) than in the tower karst terrain (44.6 mg l -1). Local differences in both source area PCO 2 and amounts of secondary deposition underground cause marked intersite variability, particularly in the tower karst. Dilution occurs during flood peaks in certain conduit and cave stream waters. Generally, however, calcium correlates positively with discharge, since the amount of secondary deposition per unit volume of water decreases at higher flows. Magnesium concentrations and Mg:Ca + Mg ratios of groundwaters are strongly influenced by bedrock composition, though bedrock heterogeneity and the kinetics and equilibria of carbonate dissolution reactions preclude extremely low or high Mg:Ca + Mg values. Net chemical denudation rates range from 56.6 to 70.9 m 3km 2yr -1. The results are considered in relation to cation fluxes in surface runoff, soil throughflow and nutrient cycling. Preliminary calcium and magnesium budgets show that (1) dissolutional activity is largely confined to the near-surface zone; and (2) the annual uptake of calcium and magnesium by tropical limestone forests is similar in magnitude to the net solute output in groundwaters.

  2. Sol-gel synthesis of magnesium oxide-silicon dioxide glass compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    MgO-SiO2 glasses containing up to 15 mol pct MgO, which could not have been prepared by the conventional glass melting method due to the presence of stable liquid-liquid immiscibility, were synthesized by the sol-gel technique. Clear and transparent gels were obtained from the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) and magnesium nitrate hexahydrate when the water/TEOS mole ratio was four or more. The gelling time decreased with increase in magnesium content, water/TEOS ratio, and reaction temperature. Magnesium nitrate hexahydrate crystallized out of the gels containing 15 and 20 mol pct MgO on slow drying. This problem was partially alleviated by drying the gels quickly at higher temperatures. Monolithic gel samples were prepared using glycerol as the drying control additive. The gels were subjected to various thermal treatments and characterized by several methods. No organic groups could be detected in the glasses after heat treatments to approx. 800 C, but trace amounts of hydroxyl groups were still present. No crystalline phase was found from X-ray diffraction in the gel samples to approx. 890 C. At higher temperatures, alpha quartz precipitated out as the crystalline phase in gels containing up to 10 mol pct MgO. The overall activation energy for gel formation in 10MgO-90SiO2 (mol pct) system for water/TEOS mole ratio of 7.5 was calculated to be 58.7 kJ/mol.

  3. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 26

    SciTech Connect

    Basunia, M.S.; Hurst, A.M.

    2016-05-15

    Evaluated spectroscopic data and level schemes from radioactive decay and nuclear reaction studies are presented for {sup 26}O, {sup 26}F, {sup 26}Ne, {sup 26}Na, {sup 26}Mg, {sup 26}Al, {sup 26}Si, {sup 26}P, and {sup 26}S. This evaluation for A = 26 supersedes the earlier one by P. M. Endt (1998En04) and updates for some nuclides in ENSDF. Highlights of this evaluation are the following: This evaluation includes search results for {sup 26}S nuclide and its proton–decay mode (2011Fo08). An isomeric state (2.2 ms) in {sup 26}F has been discovered by 2013Le03. The state is proposed at 643.4 keV 1 from γ–ray measurements. Internal-transition and beta-decay branches for the state are also determined. New excited levels in {sup 26}Ne have been identified from {sup 26}F β{sup −} decay (2.2 ms). For some {sup 26}Si resonance states conflicting spin-parity assignments exist in the literature. These are identified by footnotes. 2015Do07 ({sup 3}He,nγ) propose the first 0+ state above proton separation energy at an excitation energy of 5890 keV and suggested for additional independent measurements to confirm or refute the existence of 5946 keV 4. 2016Ch09 consider 5946 keV level as a distinct excited state in their reanalysis of the literature data with possible spin-parity assignment of 0+ or 4+ This evaluation also includes discovery of an isomeric state, at 164.1 keV 1, in {sup 26}P by 2014NiZZ.

  4. Cryogenic Thermoelectric Properties of the Bismuth-Magnesium and Bismuth-Antimony-Magnesium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orovets, Christine; Jin, Hyungyu; Wiendlocha, Bartlomiej; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2012-02-01

    There is a need to increase the Figure of Merit of thermoelectric materials used in low temperature cooling applications. Band structure calculations show that substitutional magnesium in bismuth can form sharp density of states peaks, suggesting the presence of a resonant level. Single crystal samples of (Bi1-xSbx)1-yMgy (0 <= x <= 12% and 0 <= y <= 0.7% nominally) were synthesized in evacuated ampoules. The composition of each ingot was analyzed using x-ray diffraction, and transport properties were measured using a Thermal Transport Option (TTO) in a Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS) from 300K to 2K. It is apparent that the addition of magnesium strongly influences thermopower; the data for Bi90Sb10Mg0.7 shows a second minimum in thermopower at 20K, in addition to the expected minimum at approximately 50-60K. This could be due to the resonant scattering at the cryogenic temperatures which arises from the excess density of states. The addition of magnesium also appears to decrease thermal conductivity below 30K. We present systematic experimental approaches and the results to elucidate the role of magnesium in bismuth and bismuth-antimony systems.

  5. Performance characteristics of magnesium/para-nitrophenol cells in 2:1 magnesium electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, G.; Sivashanugam, A.; Sridharan, R. )

    1993-11-01

    1 V/1 Ah magnesium/para-nitrophenol (PNP) reserve cells were fabricated and their performance was evaluated in different electrolytes [2M aqueous solutions of Mg(C1O[sub 4])[sub 2], MgCl[sub 2], and MgBr[sub 2

  6. Magnesium dependence of the measured equilibrium constants of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Airas, R Kalervo

    2007-12-01

    The apparent equilibrium constants (K') for six reactions catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from Escherichia coli were measured, the equations for the magnesium dependence of the equilibrium constants were derived, and best-fit analyses between the measured and calculated values were used. The K' values at 1 mM Mg(2+) ranged from 0.49 to 1.13. The apparent equilibrium constants increased with increasing Mg(2+) concentrations. The values were 2-3 times higher at 20 mM Mg(2+) than at 1 mM Mg(2+), and the dependence was similar in the class I and class II synthetases. The main reason for the Mg(2+) dependence is the existence of PP(i) as two magnesium complexes, but only one of them is the real product. AMP exists either as free AMP or as MgAMP, and therefore also has some effect on the measured equilibrium constant. However, these dependences alone cannot explain the measured results. The measured dependence of the K' on the Mg(2+) concentration is weaker than that caused by PP(i) and AMP. Different bindings of the Mg(2+) ions to the substrate tRNA and product aminoacyl-tRNA can explain this observation. The best-fit analysis suggests that tRNA reacts as a magnesium complex in the forward aminoacylation direction but this given Mg(2+) ion is not bound to aminoacyl-tRNA at the start of the reverse reaction. Thus Mg(2+) ions seem to have an active catalytic role, not only in the activation of the amino acid, but in the posttransfer steps of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase reaction, too.

  7. Magnesium Battery Electrolytes in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Tylan Strike

    A lack of adequate energy storage technologies is arguably the greatest hindrance to a modern sustainable energy infrastructure. Chemical energy storage, in the form of batteries, is an obvious solution to the problem. Unfortunately, today's state of the art battery technologies fail to meet the desired metrics for full scale electric grid and/or electric vehicle role out. Considerable effort from scientists and engineers has gone into the pursuit of battery chemistries theoretically capable of far outperforming leading technologies like Li-ion cells. For instance, an anode of the relatively abundant and cheap metal, magnesium, would boost the specific energy by over 4.6 times that of the current Li-ion anode (LiC6). The work presented here explores the compatibility of magnesium electrolytes in TFSI---based ionic liquids with a Mg anode (TFSI = bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide). Correlations are made between the Mg2+ speciation conditions in bulk solutions (as determined via Raman spectroscopy) and the corresponding electrochemical behavior of the electrolytes. It was found that by creating specific chelating conditions, with an appropriate Mg salt, the desired electrochemical behavior could be obtained, i.e. reversible electrodeposition and dissolution. Removal of TFSI -- contact ion pairs from the Mg2+ solvation shell was found to be essential for reversible electrodeposition. Ionic liquids with polyethylene glycol chains pendent from a parent pyrrolidinium cation were synthesized and used to create the necessary complexes with Mg 2+, from Mg(BH4)2, so that reversible electrodeposition from a purely ionic liquid medium was achieved. The following document discusses findings from several electrochemical experiments on magnesium electrolytes in ionic liquids. Explanations for the failure of many of these systems to produce reversible Mg electrodeposition are provided. The key characteristics of ionic liquid systems that are capable of achieving reversible Mg

  8. Comparative study for the removal and destruction of pentachlorophenol using activated magnesium treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Garbou, Amel M; Clausen, Christian A; Yestrebsky, Cherie L

    2017-01-01

    Chlorophenols are highly toxic, environmentally-persistent compounds which have been classified as probable human carcinogens by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Due to the high toxicity of these compounds, it is necessary to treat water and soils with concentrations of chlorophenols above the detection limit set by regulatory agencies. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the capabilities of using ball-milled magnesium for the dechlorination of PCP. Comparison of dechlorination processes were performed in an attempt to determine the most effective system for degradation of PCP to phenol. Three systems with powerful capabilities of treatment were studied: ball-milled zero-valent magnesium (ZVMg), ball-milled zero-valent magnesium carbon (ZVMg/C), and ball-milled zero-valent magnesium with palladium (ZVMg/Pd). In addition to measuring PCP disappearance, all byproducts were identified and quantified for each degradation system. The results of these studies indicate that all three of the systems degrade PCP within 30 min. The most rapid and complete PCP dechlorination is achieved using ball-milled Mg/Pd and a matrix consisting of at least 0.02 g Mg0/mL ethanol, and 10 μL acetic acid/mL ethanol, in which case 20 ng/μL of PCP was dechlorinated to chlorophenols in approximately 15 min with complete dechlorination achieved in six days. Carbon mass balances of 90.16% for Mg, 94.76% (Mg/C) and 97.05% (Mg/Pd) verify dechlorination was responsible for declining concentrations of PCP. The reactions of PCP degradation and phenol formation were found to follow pseudo-first order kinetics for all systems. Further work will consist of optimization and development of field-scale applications.

  9. An Open and Shut Case: The Interaction of Magnesium with MST Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The shikimate pathway of bacteria, fungi, and plants generates chorismate, which is drawn into biosynthetic pathways that form aromatic amino acids and other important metabolites, including folates, menaquinone, and siderophores. Many of the pathways initiated at this branch point transform chorismate using an MST enzyme. The MST enzymes (menaquinone, siderophore, and tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes) are structurally homologous and magnesium-dependent, and all perform similar chemical permutations to chorismate by nucleophilic addition (hydroxyl or amine) at the 2-position of the ring, inducing displacement of the 4-hydroxyl. The isomerase enzymes release isochorismate or aminodeoxychorismate as the product, while the synthase enzymes also have lyase activity that displaces pyruvate to form either salicylate or anthranilate. This has led to the hypothesis that the isomerase and lyase activities performed by the MST enzymes are functionally conserved. Here we have developed tailored pre-steady-state approaches to establish the kinetic mechanisms of the isochorismate and salicylate synthase enzymes of siderophore biosynthesis. Our data are centered on the role of magnesium ions, which inhibit the isochorismate synthase enzymes but not the salicylate synthase enzymes. Prior structural data have suggested that binding of the metal ion occludes access or egress of substrates. Our kinetic data indicate that for the production of isochorismate, a high magnesium ion concentration suppresses the rate of release of product, accounting for the observed inhibition and establishing the basis of the ordered-addition kinetic mechanism. Moreover, we show that isochorismate is channeled through the synthase reaction as an intermediate that is retained in the active site by the magnesium ion. Indeed, the lyase-active enzyme has 3 orders of magnitude higher affinity for the isochorismate complex relative to the chorismate complex. Apparent negative-feedback inhibition by ferrous

  10. 76 FR 11813 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... COMMISSION Magnesium From China and Russia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of... China and Russia: Investigation Nos.731-TA- 1071-1072 (Review). By order of the Commission....

  11. Mechanisms of magnesium-induced vasodilation in cerebral penetrating arterioles.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takahiro; Dietrich, Hans H; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Dacey, Ralph G

    2016-06-01

    We investigated in cerebral penetrating arterioles the signaling mechanisms and dose-dependency of extracellular magnesium-induced vasodilation and also its vasodilatory effects in vessels preconstricted with agonists associated with delayed cerebral vasospasm following SAH. Male rat penetrating arterioles were cannulated. Their internal diameters were monitored. To investigate mechanisms of magnesium-induced vasodilation, inhibitors of endothelial function, potassium channels and endothelial impairment were tested. To simulate cerebral vasospasm we applied several spasmogenic agonists. Increased extracellular magnesium concentration produced concentration-dependent vasodilation, which was partially attenuated by non-specific calcium-sensitive potassium channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium, but not by other potassium channel inhibitors. Neither the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NNA nor endothelial impairment induced by air embolism reduced the dilation. Although the magnesium-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated by the spasmogen ET-1, neither application of PF2α nor TXA2 analog effect the vasodilation. Magnesium induced a concentration- and smooth muscle cell-dependent dilation in cerebral penetrating arterioles. Calcium-sensitive potassium channels of smooth muscle cells may play a key role in magnesium-induced vasodilation. Magnesium also dilated endothelium-impaired vessels as well as vessels preconstricted with spasmogenic agonists. These results provide a fundamental background for the clinical use of magnesium, especially in treatment against delayed cerebral ischemia or vasospasm following SAH.

  12. Corrosion-Mitigating, Bondable, Fluorinated Barrier Coating for Anodized Magnesium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    isopropyl alcohol (Sigma-Aldrich, ≥99.5%), and sodium chloride (NaCl) (VWR, 99%–100.5%). Water was purified to 18 MΩ cm using a Millipore system. Magnesium...spectroscopy HV high voltage Mg magnesium NaCl sodium chloride OD outer diameter PEO plasma electrolytic oxidation SAM self-assembled monolayer SCE

  13. Association of Cord Blood Magnesium Concentration and Neonatal Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lynn H.; Mapp, Delicia C.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Mercer, Brian M.; Leveno, Kenneth J.; Varner, Michael W.; Iams, Jay D.; Sorokin, Yoram; Ramin, Susan M.; Miodovnik, Menachem; O'Sullivan, Mary J.; Peaceman, Alan M.; Caritis, Steve N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Assess the relationship between umbilical cord blood magnesium concentration and level of delivery room resuscitation received by neonates. Study design Secondary analysis of a controlled fetal neuroprotection trial that enrolled women at imminent risk for delivery between 24 and 31 weeks’ gestation and randomly allocated them to receive intravenous magnesium sulfate or placebo. The cohort included 1507 infants for whom total cord blood magnesium concentration and delivery room resuscitation information were available. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association between cord blood magnesium concentration and highest level of delivery room resuscitation, using the following hierarchy: none, oxygen only, bag-mask ventilation with oxygen, intubation or chest compressions. Results There was no relationship between cord blood magnesium and delivery room resuscitation (odds ratio [OR] 0.92 for each 1.0 mEq/L increase in magnesium; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83-1.03). Maternal general anesthesia was associated with increased neonatal resuscitation (OR 2.51; 95% CI: 1.72-3.68). Each 1-week increase in gestational age at birth was associated with decreased neonatal resuscitation (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.60 – 0.66). Conclusion Cord blood magnesium concentration does not correlate with the level of delivery room resuscitation of infants exposed to magnesium sulfate for fetal neuroprotection. PMID:22056282

  14. Absence of correlation between magnesium and riboflavin status.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, J; Clairet, D; Brue, F; Ayavou, T

    1993-06-01

    Erythrocyte magnesium and glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGR-AC), reflecting vitamin B-2 status, were assessed in 11 athletes, 20 patients with fibromyalgia, 18 patients with hypothyroidism, and 13 controls. No correlation was demonstrated between erythrocyte magnesium and EGR-AC.

  15. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... titanium oxide (PMN P-01-764; CAS No. 39290-90-9) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... titanium oxide (PMN P-01-764; CAS No. 39290-90-9) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... titanium oxide (PMN P-01-764; CAS No. 39290-90-9) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... titanium oxide (PMN P-01-764; CAS No. 39290-90-9) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... titanium oxide (PMN P-01-764; CAS No. 39290-90-9) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.