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Sample records for magnet residual gas

  1. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  2. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M.

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  3. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  4. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  5. Gas dynamics in residual gas analyzer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Santeler, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers are used for measuring partial flow rates as well as for measuring partial pressures. The required calibration may also be obtained with either known flow rates or known pressures. The calibration and application procedures are straightforward when both are of the same type; however, substantial errors may occur if the two types are mixed. This report develops the basic equations required to convert between partial pressure calibrations and partial flow rate calibrations. It also discusses the question of fractionating and nonfractionating gas flow in various gas inlet and pumping systems.

  6. Automating a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrie, W. F.; Westfall, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA), a device for measuring the amounts and species of various gases present in a vacuum system is discussed. In a recent update of the RGA, it was shown that the use of microprocessors could revolutionize data acquisition and data reduction. This revolution is exemplified by the Inficon 1Q200 RGA which was selected to meet the needs of this update. The Inficon RGA and the Zilog microcomputer were interfaced in order the receive and format the digital data from the RGA. This automated approach is discussed in detail.

  7. Characterization of flue gas residues from municipal solid waste combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Forestier, L.L. |; Libourel, G. |

    1998-08-01

    Solid residues recovered from treatment of flue gas resulting from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) are of particular concern because of ever-increasing worldwide production rates and their concentrations of potentially hazardous transition elements and heavy metals. Three main residue types have been studied in this study: electrostatic precipitator ashes, wet filter cakes, and semidry scrubber residues. Using a large number of residues from two French MSW combustion (MSWC) facilities, the aim of this work is to determine their chemistry and mineralogy in order to shed light on their potential toxicity. The authors find that pollutant concentrations are dependent not only on the composition of MSW but also on the size of particles and flue gas treatment process. Using a procedure based on leaching, grain-size, density, and magnetic separations, the authors present a detailed description of the mineralogy of MSWC solid residues. These residues consist of a very heterogeneous assemblage of glasses, metals, and other crystals in which polluting elements are distributed. The results of this characterization will therefore help to contribute to the development of adequate waste management strategies.

  8. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  9. Utility pump truck; Residual gas problems reduced with innovative equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    Residual natural gas trapped in the ground after the repair of a distribution-system leak can be a headache for utility employees and customers. The pump truck, a unique approach to removing residual gas, is described in this paper. Natural gas is lighter than air and naturally tends to rise upward and dissipate in the atmosphere. However, pavement, buildings or soil conditions around a leaking pipe often cause gas to be trapped in the ground. In addition to removing trapped gas, the pump truck is used to help pinpoint leaks where the source is difficult to locate because of soil conditions.

  10. In situ ultrahigh vacuum residual gas analyzer 'calibration'

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, O. B.; Middleman, K. J.

    2008-11-15

    Knowing the residual gas spectrum is essential for many applications and research in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Residual gas analyzers (RGAs) are used for both qualitative and quantitative gas analyses, where the quadrupole mass analyzers are now the most popular. It was found that RGAs supplied by different manufacturers are not necessarily well calibrated for quantitative gas analysis. A procedure applied for in situ RGA 'calibration' against a calibrated UHV total pressure gauge is described in this article. It was found that special attention should be paid to H{sub 2} calibration, as RGAs are usually much more sensitive to H{sub 2} than ionization gauges. The calibration coefficients are quite reproducible in Faraday cup mode, however, using the secondary electron multiplier requires frequent checks of the calibration coefficients. The coefficients obtained for the RGA allow the use of the RGA as an accurate device for gas spectrum analysis.

  11. The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D.; Nevins, W. M.

    2013-11-15

    The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

  12. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyser Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1996-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGAs are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. A method was devised by the authors to present RGA data in a three-axis format, plotting atomic mass unit (AMU), ion concentration as a function of AMU, and time, to provide a clear graphic visualization ot trends in gas concentration changes and to initiate a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal-vacuum testing.

  13. Residual magnetism holds solenoid armature in desired position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. P.

    1967-01-01

    Holding solenoid uses residual magnetism to hold its armature in a desired position after excitation current is removed from the coil. Although no electrical power or mechanical devices are used, the solenoid has a low tolerance to armature displacement from the equilibrium position.

  14. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1997-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGA's are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. This ion concentration information can be interpreted to be representative of the composition of the residual gas in the chamber at the instant of analysis. Typically, test personnel are most interested in tracking the time history of changes in the composition of chamber residual gas to determine the relative cleanliness and the clean-up rate of the test article under vacuum. However, displays of instantaneous RGA data cannot provide test personnel with the preferred time history information. In order to gain an understanding of gas composition trends, a series of plots of individual data snapshots must be analyzed. This analysis is cumbersome and still does not provide a very satisfactory view of residual gas composition trends. A method was devised by the authors to present RCA data in a three-axis format, plotting Atomic Mass Unit (AMU), the Ionization Signal Response (ISR) as amps/torr as a function of AMU, and Time, to provide a clear graphic visualization of trends of changes in ISR with respect to time and AMU (representative of residual gas composition). This graphic visualization method provides a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal vacuum tests. Raw RGA data was extracted from a series of delimited ASCII files and then converted to a data array in a spreadsheet. Consequently, using the 3-D plotting functionality provided by the spreadsheet program, 3-D plots were produced. After devising the data format conversion process, the authors began developing a program to provide real-time 3-D

  15. Residual gas pressures in sealed fused silica glass ampoules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosz, Witold; Wiedemeier, Heribert

    1993-07-01

    The residual gas pressures in sealed and annealed ampoules made from silica glass have been determined using different methods including a McLeod gauge. It has been found that the gas build-up in the ampoule is mainly the result of the ampoule heat treatment; the amount of gas released and trapped during sealing the ampoule under vacuum is much less. The pressures in the ampoules after heat treatment range from a few mTorr to a few Torr, depending on the silica glass and on the outgassing and annealing procedures.

  16. Chloroxyanion Residue Quantification in Cantaloupes Treated with Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Smith, David J; Morgan, Mark T

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/liter for 10 min results in a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6- and 4.3-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, respectively. However, this treatment could result in the presence of chloroxyanion residues, such as chloride (Cl(-)), chlorite (ClO2(-)), chlorate (ClO3(-)), and perchlorate (ClO4(-)), which, apart from chloride, are a toxicity concern. Radiolabeled chlorine dioxide ((36)ClO2) gas was used to describe the identity and distribution of chloroxyanion residues in or on cantaloupe subsequent to fumigation with ClO2 gas at a mean concentration of 5.1 ± 0.7 mg/liter for 10 min. Each treated cantaloupe was separated into rind, flesh, and mixed (rind and flesh) sections, which were blended and centrifuged to give the corresponding sera fractions. Radioactivity detected, ratio of radioactivity to mass of chlorite in initial ClO2 gas generation reaction, and distribution of chloroxyanions in serum samples were used to calculate residue concentrations in flesh, rind, and mixed samples. Anions detected on the cantaloupe were Cl(-) (∼ 90%) and ClO3(-) (∼ 10%), located primarily in the rind (19.3 ± 8.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of rind and 4.8 ± 2.3 μg of ClO3(-)/g of rind, n = 6). Cantaloupe flesh (∼ 200 g) directly exposed to(36)ClO2 gas treatment showed the presence of only Cl(-) residues (8.1 ± 1.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of flesh, n = 3). Results indicate chloroxyanion residues Cl(-) and ClO3(-) are only present on the rind of whole cantaloupes treated with ClO2 gas. However during cutting, residues may be transferred to the fruit flesh. Because Cl(-) is not toxic, only ClO3(-) would be a toxicity concern, but the levels transferred from rind to flesh are very low. In the case of fruit flesh directly exposed to ClO2 gas, only nontoxic Cl(-) was detected. This

  17. Chloroxyanion Residue Quantification in Cantaloupes Treated with Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Smith, David J; Morgan, Mark T

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/liter for 10 min results in a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6- and 4.3-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, respectively. However, this treatment could result in the presence of chloroxyanion residues, such as chloride (Cl(-)), chlorite (ClO2(-)), chlorate (ClO3(-)), and perchlorate (ClO4(-)), which, apart from chloride, are a toxicity concern. Radiolabeled chlorine dioxide ((36)ClO2) gas was used to describe the identity and distribution of chloroxyanion residues in or on cantaloupe subsequent to fumigation with ClO2 gas at a mean concentration of 5.1 ± 0.7 mg/liter for 10 min. Each treated cantaloupe was separated into rind, flesh, and mixed (rind and flesh) sections, which were blended and centrifuged to give the corresponding sera fractions. Radioactivity detected, ratio of radioactivity to mass of chlorite in initial ClO2 gas generation reaction, and distribution of chloroxyanions in serum samples were used to calculate residue concentrations in flesh, rind, and mixed samples. Anions detected on the cantaloupe were Cl(-) (∼ 90%) and ClO3(-) (∼ 10%), located primarily in the rind (19.3 ± 8.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of rind and 4.8 ± 2.3 μg of ClO3(-)/g of rind, n = 6). Cantaloupe flesh (∼ 200 g) directly exposed to(36)ClO2 gas treatment showed the presence of only Cl(-) residues (8.1 ± 1.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of flesh, n = 3). Results indicate chloroxyanion residues Cl(-) and ClO3(-) are only present on the rind of whole cantaloupes treated with ClO2 gas. However during cutting, residues may be transferred to the fruit flesh. Because Cl(-) is not toxic, only ClO3(-) would be a toxicity concern, but the levels transferred from rind to flesh are very low. In the case of fruit flesh directly exposed to ClO2 gas, only nontoxic Cl(-) was detected. This

  18. Coarse-fine residual gravity cancellation system with magnetic levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salcudean, S. E.; Davis, H.; Chen, C. T.; Goertz, D. E.; Tryggvason, B. V.

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft flight along parabolic trajectories have been proposed and executed in order to achieve low cost, near free fall conditions of moderate duration. This paper describes a six degree of freedom experiment isolation system designed to cancel out residual accelerations due to mechanical vibrations and errors in aircraft trajectory. The isolation system consists of a fine motion magnetic levitator whose stator is transported by a conventional coarse motion stage. The levitator uses wide gap voice coil actuators and has the dual purpose of isolating the experiment platform from aircraft vibrations and actively cancelling residual accelerations through feedback control. The course motion stage tracks the levitated platform in order to keep the levitator's coils centered within their matching magnetic gaps. Aspects of system design, an analysis of the proposed control strategy and simulation results are presented. Feasibility experiments are also discussed.

  19. Minimizing Residual Pressure within a Windowless Gas Target System - JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Orlando; Browne, Justin; Kontos, Antonios; Montes, Fernando; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear reactions between light gases and radioactive isotope beams are essential to address open questions in nuclear structure and astrophysics. Pure light gas targets are critical for the measurements of proton- and alpha-induced reactions. J _ et E _ xperiments in N _ uclear S _ tructure and A _ strophysics (JENSA) is the world's most dense (~ 1019 atoms/cm2) windowless gas target system. Most of the gas flow is localized; however, escaping gas creates a pressure gradient which degrades experimental measurements and contaminates the beam line. JENSA contains a differential pumping system to maintain a vacuum. The previous design configuration was not optimized for experiments (pressure measurements 70 cm downstream from the jet were ~ 10-3 torr; optimal is less than 10-4 torr). We have altered the current differential pumping system to minimize the residual pressure profile. Several configurations of two gas-receiving catchers were tested, and the most efficient ones identified using Enhanced Pirani and Cold Cathode gauges. We have determined the 30 mm outer and 20 mm inner gas-receiving cones minimize JENSA central chamber pressure to 200 millitorr at 16,000 torr of discharge pressure. Altering the tubing configuration has additionally lowered the pressure 70 cm downstream to 10-5 torr. The new residual pressure allows operation of JENSA with planned expansion of a recoil mass separator SECAR.

  20. Magnetic separation as a plutonium residue enrichment process

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; McFarlan, J.T.; Gallegos, U.F.

    1989-01-01

    We have subjected several plutonium contaminated residues to Open Gradient Magnetic Separation (OGMS) on an experimental scale. Separation of graphite, bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, slag, and crucible, resulted in a plutonium rich fraction and a plutonium lean fraction. The lean fraction varied between about 20% to 85% of the feed bulk. The plutonium content of the lean fraction can be reduced from about 2% in the feed to the 0.1% to 0.5% range dependent on the portion of the feed rejected to this lean fraction. These values are low enough in plutonium to meet economic discard limits and be considered for direct discard. Magnetic separation of direct oxide reduction and electrorefining pyrochemical salts gave less favorable results. While a fraction very rich in plutonium could be obtained, the plutonium content of the lean fraction was to high for direct discard. This may still have chemical processing applications. OGMS experiments at low magnetic field strength on incinerator ash did give two fractions but the plutonium content of each fraction was essentially identical. Thus, no chemical processing advantage was identified for magnetic separation of this residue. The detailed results of these experiments and the implications for OGMS use in recycle plutonium processing are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Venous gas embolism - Time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Luehr, S.; Katz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles after embolization with known amounts of venous air, using an N2O challenge technique. Attention was also given to the length of time that the venous gas emboli remained as discrete bubbles in the lungs with 100 percent oxygen ventilation. The data indicate that venous gas emboli can remain in the pulmonary vasculature as discrete bubbles for periods lasting up to 43 + or - 10.8 min in dogs ventilated with oxygen and nitrogen. With 100 percent oxygen ventilation, these values are reduced significantly to 19 + or - 2.5 min.

  2. Three-dimensional graphene aerogel-supported iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction of organophosphorus pesticide residues in fruit juices followed by gas chromatographic determination.

    PubMed

    Mahpishanian, Shokouh; Sereshti, Hassan

    2016-04-22

    In this research, a magnetic three dimensional-graphene nanocomposite (3D-G-Fe3O4) was prepared, characterized and used as an effective nanoadsorbent in magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from juice samples prior to gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection (GC-NPD). The properties and morphology of 3D-G-Fe3O4 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The main experimental parameters affecting extraction recoveries including extraction time, amount of adsorbent, pH of sample solution, salt concentration and desorption conditions were carefully studied and optimized. The results showed wide linear concentration ranges with determination coefficients between 0.9973 and 0.9999. The limits of detection (S/N=3) of the method and limits of quantification (S/N=10) were from 1.2 to 5.1 ng L(-1) and 3.4-17.0 ng L(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 2.6-5.1% and 3.5-6.9%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of OPPs in fruit juices (apple, orange, grape, sour-cherry and apricot) with recoveries in range of 86.6-107.5%. The GC-NPD results were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results demonstrated that with combination of highly interconnected 3D network structure and magnetism property of adsorbent, 3D-G-Fe3O4 aerogel exhibited exceptional extraction ability towards the OPPs. PMID:27018186

  3. Three-dimensional graphene aerogel-supported iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction of organophosphorus pesticide residues in fruit juices followed by gas chromatographic determination.

    PubMed

    Mahpishanian, Shokouh; Sereshti, Hassan

    2016-04-22

    In this research, a magnetic three dimensional-graphene nanocomposite (3D-G-Fe3O4) was prepared, characterized and used as an effective nanoadsorbent in magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from juice samples prior to gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection (GC-NPD). The properties and morphology of 3D-G-Fe3O4 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The main experimental parameters affecting extraction recoveries including extraction time, amount of adsorbent, pH of sample solution, salt concentration and desorption conditions were carefully studied and optimized. The results showed wide linear concentration ranges with determination coefficients between 0.9973 and 0.9999. The limits of detection (S/N=3) of the method and limits of quantification (S/N=10) were from 1.2 to 5.1 ng L(-1) and 3.4-17.0 ng L(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 2.6-5.1% and 3.5-6.9%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of OPPs in fruit juices (apple, orange, grape, sour-cherry and apricot) with recoveries in range of 86.6-107.5%. The GC-NPD results were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results demonstrated that with combination of highly interconnected 3D network structure and magnetism property of adsorbent, 3D-G-Fe3O4 aerogel exhibited exceptional extraction ability towards the OPPs.

  4. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER.

    PubMed

    Younkin, T R; Biewer, T M; Klepper, C C; Marcus, C

    2014-11-01

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  5. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-15

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  6. User's guide to the Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Artman, S.A.

    1988-08-04

    The Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA), a Model 100C UTI quadrupole mass spectrometer, measures the concentrations of selected masses in the Fusion Energy Division's (FED) Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The RGA software is a VAX FORTRAN computer program which controls the experimental apparatus, records the raw data, performs data reduction, and plots the data. The RGA program allows data to be collected from an RGA on ATF or from either of two RGAs in the laboratory. In the laboratory, the RGA diagnostic plays an important role in outgassing studied on various candidate materials for fusion experiments. One such material, graphite, is being used more often in fusion experiments due to its ability to withstand high power loads. One of the functions of the RGA diagnostic is aid in the determination of the best grade of graphite to be used in these experiments and to study the procedures used to condition it. A procedure of particular interest involves baking the graphite sample in order to remove impurities that may be present in it. These impurities can be studied while in the ATF plasma or while being baked and outgassed in the laboratory. The Residual Gas Analyzer is a quadrupole mass spectrometer capable of scanning masses ranging in size from 1 atomic mass unit (amu) to 300 amu while under computer control. The procedure for collecting data for a particular mass is outlined.

  7. Residual gas analysis for long-pulse, advanced tokamak operation.

    PubMed

    Klepper, C C; Hillis, D L; Bucalossi, J; Douai, D; Oddon, P; Vartanian, S; Colas, L; Manenc, L; Pégourié, B

    2010-10-01

    A shielded residual gas analyzer (RGA) system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This "diagnostic RGA" has been used in long-pulse (up to 6 min) discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H(2)/D(2) isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H(2) injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses (>4 min) absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H(2) could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components.

  8. Residual gas analysis for long-pulse, advanced tokamak operation

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C. C.; Hillis, D. L.; Bucalossi, J.; Douai, D.; Oddon, P.; Vartanian, S.; Colas, L.; Manenc, L.; Pegourie, B.

    2010-10-15

    A shielded residual gas analyzer (RGA) system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This ''diagnostic RGA'' has been used in long-pulse (up to 6 min) discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H{sub 2} injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses (>4 min) absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H{sub 2} could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components.

  9. Residual Gas Analysis for Long-Pulse, Advanced Tokamak Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Hillis, Donald Lee; Bucalossi, J.; Douai, D.; OddonCEA, IRFM, P.; VartanianCEA-Cadarach, S.; Colas, L.; Manenc, L.; Pegourie, B.

    2010-01-01

    A shielded residual gas analyzer RGA system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This diagnostic RGA has been used in long-pulse up to 6 min discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H2 /D2 isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H2 injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses 4 min absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H2 could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Residual gas analysis for long-pulse, advanced tokamak operationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepper, C. C.; Hillis, D. L.; Bucalossi, J.; Douai, D.; Oddon, P.; Vartanian, S.; Colas, L.; Manenc, L.; Pégourié, B.

    2010-10-01

    A shielded residual gas analyzer (RGA) system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This "diagnostic RGA" has been used in long-pulse (up to 6 min) discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H2/D2 isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H2 injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses (>4 min) absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H2 could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components.

  11. Residual-gas-ionization beam profile monitors in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Fite, J.; Jao, S.; Trabocchi, C.

    2010-05-02

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) are in RHIC to measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings. These work by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last two years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  12. Study of Residual Gas Analyser (RGA) Response towards Known Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, Firozkhan S.; Khan, Ziauddin; Semwal, Pratibha; George, Siju; Raval, Dilip C.; Thankey, Prashant L.; Manthena, Himabindu; Yuvakiran, Paravastu; Dhanani, Kalpesh R.

    2012-11-01

    Helium leak testing is the most versatile form of weld qualification test for any vacuum application. Almost every ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system utilizes this technique for insuring leak tightness for the weld joints as well as demountable joints. During UHV system under operational condition with many other integrated components, in-situ developed leaks identification becomes one of the prime aspect for maintaining the health of such system and for continuing the experiments onwards. Since online utilization of leak detector (LD) has many practical limitations, residual gas analyser (RGA) can be used as a potential instrument for online leak detection. For this purpose, a co-relation for a given leak rate between Leak Detector and RGA is experimentally established. This paper describes the experimental aspect and the relationship between leak detector and RGA.

  13. Plasma Impurity Estimations Using Residual Gas Analysis at MCX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Young, W. C.; Taylor, G.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Teodorescu, C.

    2009-11-01

    A methodology to characterize impurity concentrations created during plasma shots is being tested at the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) [R.F. Ellis, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055704 (2005)]. The methodology consists of measurements every 2 seconds of mass spectra with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) before, during, and after plasma shots (10 ms), and fitting the measured signals to the heat load equation for a fixed volume and time varying pressure. An extrapolation of this equation is then made to the plasma time in order to find the maximum pressure, which is otherwise too high and short-lived for reliable RGA measurements. Ratios of hydrogen or helium to impurities are then estimated and used in MCX theory models, in tracking effects of new instruments installed in the MCX vessel, and in assessing the efficacy of cleaning campaigns on plasma shots.

  14. The emission of fluorine gas during incineration of fluoroborate residue.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuheng; Jiang, Xuguang; Chen, Dezhen

    2016-05-01

    The emission behaviors of wastes from fluorine chemical industry during incineration have raised concerns because multiple fluorine products might danger human health. In this study, fluorine emission from a two-stage incineration system during the combustion of fluoroborate residue was examined. In a TG-FTIR analysis BF3, SiF4 and HF were identified as the initial fluorine forms to be released, while fluorine gases of greenhouse effect such as CF4 and SF6 were not found. Below 700 °C, NaBF4 in the sample decomposed to generate BF3. Then part of BF3 reacted with SiO2 in the system to form SiF4 or hydrolyzed to HF. At higher temperatures, the NaF left in the sample was gradually hydrolyzed to form HF. A lab-scale two-stage tube furnace is established to simulate the typical two-stage combustion chamber in China. Experimental tests proved that HF was the only fluorine gas in the flue gas, and emissions of BF3 and SiF4 can be negligible. Thermodynamic equilibrium model predicted that all SiF4 would be hydrolyzed at 1100 °C in the secondary-chamber, which agreed well with the experimental results. PMID:26808247

  15. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Ramakrishnan; Kota, Arun; Anand, Gaurav

    2004-01-01

    Our long term goal has been to make detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Thus, the objective of the current project was to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. Our focus was on the influence of oxygen on indium antimonide on clean silica ("quartz"). The research was performed by three chemical engineering graduate students, the third of whom will complete his research in the summer of 2005. Originally, we had planned to use a sealed silica cell containing a zirconia electrochemical element to control the oxygen partial pressure. However, zirconia requires an operating temperature above the 530 C melting point of InSb and is difficult to form a gas-tight seal with silica. Thus, we decided instead to flow an oxygen-containing gas through the cell. A special apparatus was designed, built and perfected. A piece of InSb was placed on a horizontal silica plate in a quartz cell. High purity argon, helium or hydrogen-containing gas is passed continuously through the cell while the oxygen concentration in the effluent gas is measured. The shape of the resulting drop was used to determine contact angle and surface tension of Ga-doped and high purity InSb. Oxygen appeared to decrease the contact angle, and definitely did not increase it. The following section gives the background for the research. Section 2 summarizes the results obtained on Ga-doped InSb with relatively high oxygen concentrations. Section 3 describes recent improvements made to the apparatus and methods of analysis. Section 4 gives recent results for high-purity InSb at low oxygen concentrations. Final results will be obtained only this summer (2005). Each section

  16. A cryogenic quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Richard; Naides, Matthew; Lai, Ruby; Disciacca, Jack; Lev, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated and topologically non-trivial systems open the path to a better fundamental understanding of these materials as well as the possibility for predictive design of new materials. We are working to demonstrate atom chip trapping of quantum gases to enable single-shot, large area imaging of electronic transport through these materials via detection of magnetic flux at the 10- 7 flux quantum level and below. Using the exquisite sensitivity of ultracold atoms in the form of either an atomic clock or Bose-Einstein condensate, the cryogenic atom chip technology we have recently demonstrated will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques while allowing sample temperatures spanning < 10 K to room temperature. We will report on experimental progress toward developing this novel quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope and describe our recent proposal to image topologically protected transport through a non-ideal topological insulator in a relatively model-independent fashion.

  17. A cryogenic quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Richard; Naides, Matthew; Lai, Ruby; Disciacca, Jack; Lev, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated and topologically non-trivial systems open the path to a better fundamental understanding of these materials as well as the possibility for predictive design of new materials. We are working to demonstrate atom chip trapping of quantum gases to enable single-shot, large area imaging of electronic transport through these materials via detection of magnetic flux at the 10-7 flux quantum level and below. Using the exquisite sensitivity of ultracold atoms in the form of either an atomic clock or Bose-Einstein condensate, the cryogenic atom chip technology we have recently demonstrated will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques while allowing sample temperatures spanning < 10 K to room temperature. We will report on experimental progress toward developing this novel quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope and describe our recent proposal to image topologically protected transport through a non-ideal topological insulator in a relatively model-independent fashion.

  18. A cryogenic quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disciacca, Jack; Naides, Matthew; Turner, Richard; Lai, Ruby; Lev, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated and topologically non-trivial systems open the path to a better fundamental understanding of these materials as well as the possibility for predictive design of new materials. We are working to demonstrate atom chip trapping of quantum gases to enable single-shot, large area imaging of electronic transport through these materials via detection of magnetic flux at the 10-7 flux quantum level and below. Using the exquisite sensitivity of ultracold atoms in the form of either an atomic clock or Bose-Einstein condensate, the cryogenic atom chip technology we have recently demonstrated will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques while allowing sample temperatures spanning <10 K to room temperature. We will report on experimental progress toward developing this novel quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope and describe our recent proposal to image topologically protected transport through a non-ideal topological insulator in a relatively model-independent fashion.

  19. A cryogenic quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naides, Matthew; Turner, Richard; Lai, Ruby; Disciacca, Jack; Lev, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    Atom chip trapping of quantum gases will enable single-shot, large area imaging of transport through strongly correlated and topologically non-trivial materials via detection of magnetic flux at the 10-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology we have recently demonstrated [1] will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques, while allowing sample temperatures spanning <10 K to room temperature. We report on experimental progress toward developing this novel quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope [1] and describe our recent proposal [2] to image topologically protected transport through a non-ideal topological insulator in a relatively model-independent fashion. U.S. DOE, BES, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under award #DE-SC0001823.

  20. Chloroxyanion residues in cantaloupe and tomatoes after chlorine dioxide gas sanitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but few data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tom...

  1. Hubble space telescope component qualification utilizing a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    An approach is described for integrating an automated residual gas analyzer (RGA) into the thermal vacuum outgas process. The RGA has the capability of detailed analysis over a 200 amu range with monitoring of each peak as the test progresses. The NASA criterion of either a 50% reduction of each peak over 44 amu or less than an 0.1% amplitude of the 28 amu base peak for all amu's above 44 amu is satisfied. A computer sorts, reports which peaks do not satisfy the criterion, and reports test completion. The computer plots amplitudes of all the peaks from 1 amu through 200 amu for each scan. This RGA real time approach is unique in that it provides sufficient detail to highlight a problem as it occurs. By comparison, a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) or a thermoelectric quartz crystal microbalance (TQCM) indicates to the operator when changes occur, but not what has happened. Optical witness samples indicate whether a test was satisfactory within a few days after the test was completed.

  2. Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Doughty, C.A.

    2010-09-01

    Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the entire system.

  3. Central peaking of magnetized gas dischargesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2013-05-01

    Partially ionized gas discharges used in industry are often driven by radiofrequency (rf) power applied at the periphery of a cylinder. It is found that the plasma density n is usually flat or peaked on axis even if the skin depth of the rf field is thin compared with the chamber radius a. Previous attempts at explaining this did not account for the finite length of the discharge and the boundary conditions at the endplates. A simple 1D model is used to focus on the basic mechanism: the short-circuit effect. It is found that a strong electric field (E-field) scaled to electron temperature Te, drives the ions inward. The resulting density profile is peaked on axis and has a shape independent of pressure or discharge radius. This "universal" profile is not affected by a dc magnetic field (B-field) as long as the ion Larmor radius is larger than a.

  4. Percolation Pore Network Study on the Residue Gas Saturation of Dry Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Tang, Y. B.; Zou, G. Y.; Jiang, K.; Li, M.

    2014-12-01

    We tried to model the effect of pore size heterogeneity and pore connectivity on the residue gas saturation for dry gas reservoir rocks. If we consider that snap-off does not exist and only piston displacement takes place in all pores with the same size during imbibition process, in the extreme case, the residue gas saturation will be equal to zero. Thus we can suppose that the residue gas saturation of dry rocks is mainly controlled by the pore size distribution. To verify the assumption, percolation pore networks (i.e., three-dimensional simple cubic (SC) and body-center cubic (BCC)) were used in the study. The connectivity and the pore size distribution in percolation pore network could be changed randomly. The concept of water phase connectivity zw(i.e., water coordination number) and gas phase connectivity zg (i.e., gas coordination number) was introduced here. zw and zg will change during simulation and can be estimated numerically from the results of simulations through gradually saturated networks by water. The Simulation results show that when zg less than or equal to 1.5 during water quasi - static imbibition, the gas will be trapped in rock pores. Network simulation results also shows that the residue gas saturation Srg follows a power law relationship (i.e.,Srg∝σrα, where σr is normalized standard deviation of the pore radius distribution, and exponent α is a function of coordination number). This indicates that the residue gas saturation has no explicit relationship with porosity and permeability as it should have in light of previous study, pore radius distribution is the principal factor in determining the residue gas saturation of dry reservoir rocks.

  5. Magnetic separation, thermo- and magnetochemical properties of coal liquid residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, E.; Kelland, D. R.

    1981-02-01

    Iron sulfides in the form of ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite have been removed from solvent refined coal by the use of high gradient magnetic separation. The results of such separations have been correlated with those of studies of the thermochemical and magnetochemical properties of the undissolved solids present in the product of coal liquefaction. Complete inorganic desulfurization was achieved at the same temperatures at which the solids exhibit a maximum magnetization, at about 230 °C. The preferred form for the highest magnetization is a monoclinic structure with a composition of Fe0.875S. Where the sulfides do not occur in this form, it has been possible to convert them to the high magnetization state by exposure to a hydrogen sulfide atmosphere at an elevated temperature. To approximate the temperature cycle experienced by the liquid coal coming from the reactor toward the filter, samples were heated above the Curie point to destroy the magnetization and then cooled to about 260 °C for H2S treatment. Measurements on the solids subsequently extracted showed a striking increase in the magnetization compared to the untreated material.

  6. Dependence of the Perpendicular Residual Leakage Magnetic Flux Density on Fatigue Damage in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.; Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.

    2003-03-01

    In order to estimate the amount of plane bending fatigue damage in an austenitic stainless steel (SUS304), we were investigating the relationship between plane bending fatigue damage and the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density caused by martensitic structure induced by plane bending fatigue. A specimen such as SUS304 had been excited in a constant external magnetic field perpendicularly to measure dependence of the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density on plane bending fatigue damage accurately. The Z component of the magnetic flux density at 1 mm above a specimen is measured by using a thin-film flux-gate (FG) magnetic sensor. Residual magnetization is caused by partial martensitic structure in an austenitic stainless steel induced by cyclic bending stress. From our experiments, we can evaluate dependence of the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density on plane bending fatigue damage and know the relationship between growth of a crack and the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density.

  7. Residual gas pressure profile in the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krish Gounder; John Marriner; Shekhar Mishra

    2003-05-27

    We simulate the pressure profile of residual gases from basic principles using detailed beam pipe geometry and the relevant physical parameters. These profiles are compared with the actual ion gauge measurements and is being used to predict the vacuum contribution to the Recycler Ring beam lifetime.

  8. Residual solvent testing: a review of gas-chromatographic and alternative techniques.

    PubMed

    B'Hymer, Clayton

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to describe and discuss some of the current analytic procedures including gas-chromatographic and alternative techniques for residual solvent testing. Residual solvents, or organic volatile impurities, are a potential toxic risk for pharmaceutic products and have been a concern of manufacturers for many years. Residual solvents have had official limits in the United States as set in USP XXV and by the FDA in 1997 and have been monitored by most pharmaceutical manufacturers extensively for more than two decades in both bulk and finished products. The chief method of analysis for residual solvents is gas chromatography, which is generally considered the preferred methodology. Sample introduction techniques include both static and dynamic headspace analysis, solid-phase microextraction, and direct injection of solution containing bulk drug substance or drug product into the gas chromatograph. Also, some alternative methodologies for residual solvent testing are discussed in this review. In conclusion, gas chromatograph-based procedures will continue to dominate residual solvent testing because of its specificity for identification of the solvent, but the use of alternative sample introduction techniques into a gas chromatograph will continue to expand in the near future.

  9. Speciation, Characterization, And Mobility Of As, Se and Hg In Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue...

  10. Residual Gas Noise in the Test-mass Module for DECIGO Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutomi, K.; Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Nikaido, M.; Tanaka, N.; Torii, Y.; Sato, S.; Izumi, K.; Chen, D.

    2015-05-01

    DECIGO Pathfinder is the first milestone mission for DECIGO, a future gravitational wave antenna. In DPF, residual gas noise acting on the test mass is estimated to increase and exceed the requirement for force noise of 1 × 10-15 N/√Hz due to geometry of the test-mass module. We performed a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the residual gas noise and found that the engineering model of the test-mass module cannnot satisfy the requirement. To reduce the gas noise, we present revised geometry of the test-mass module using comb-like electrodes.

  11. Characteristics and performance study of mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results obtained included absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to ten gases (hydrogen, helium, neon, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, krypton, and xenon), and cracking patterns for these gases.

  12. Trap-depth determination from residual gas collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dongen, J.; Zhu, C.; Clement, D.; Dufour, G.; Madison, K. W.; Booth, J. L.

    2011-08-15

    We present a method for determining the depth of an atomic or molecular trap of any type. This method relies on a measurement of the trap loss rate induced by collisions with background gas particles. Given a fixed gas composition, the loss rate uniquely determines the trap depth. Because of the ''soft'' long-range nature of the van der Waals interaction, these collisions transfer kinetic energy to trapped particles across a broad range of energy scales, from room temperature to the microkelvin energy scale. The resulting loss rate therefore exhibits a significant variation over an enormous range of trap depths, making this technique a powerful diagnostic with a large dynamic range. We present trap depth measurements of a Rb magneto-optical trap using this method and a different technique that relies on measurements of loss rates during optical excitation of colliding atoms to a repulsive molecular state. The main advantage of the method presented here is its large dynamic range and applicability to traps of any type requiring only knowledge of the background gas density and the interaction potential between the trapped and background gas particles.

  13. In-orbit offline estimation of the residual magnetic dipole biases of the POPSAT-HIP1 nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seriani, S.; Brama, Y. L.; Gallina, P.; Manzoni, G.

    2016-05-01

    The nanosatellite POPSAT-HIP1 is a Cubesat-class spacecraft launched on the 19th of June 2014 to test cold-gas based micro-thrusters; it is, as of April 2015, in a low Earth orbit at around 600 km of altitude and is equipped, notably, with a magnetometer. In order to increment the performance of the attitude control of nanosatellites like POPSAT, it is extremely useful to determine the main biases that act on the magnetometer while in orbit, for example those generated by the residual magnetic moment of the satellite itself and those originating from the transmitter. Thus, we present a methodology to perform an in-orbit offline estimation of the magnetometer bias caused by the residual magnetic moment of the satellite (we refer to this as the residual magnetic dipole bias, or RMDB). The method is based on a genetic algorithm coupled with a simplex algorithm, and provides the bias RMDB vector as output, requiring solely the magnetometer readings. This is exploited to compute the transmitter magnetic dipole bias (TMDB), by comparing the computed RMDB with the transmitter operating and idling. An experimental investigation is carried out by acquiring the magnetometer outputs in different phases of the spacecraft life (stabilized, maneuvering, free tumble). Results show remarkable accuracy with an RMDB orientation error between 3.6 ° and 6.2 ° , and a module error around 7 % . TMDB values show similar coherence values. Finally, we note some drawbacks of the methodologies, as well as some possible improvements, e.g. precise transmitter operations logging. In general, however, the methodology proves to be quite effective even with sparse and noisy data, and promises to be incisive in the improvement of attitude control systems.

  14. Condensation and magnetization of the relativistic Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmfors, Per; Liljenberg, Per; Persson, David; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

    1995-02-01

    We show that the relativistic charged scalar boson gas exhibits a genuine Meissner-Ochsenfeld effect of the Schafroth form at fixed supercritical density. As in the well-known non-relativistic case, this total expulsion of a magnetic field is caused by the condensation of the Bose gas at vanishing magnetic field. In the course of these considerations, we present alternative proofs of the absence of Bose-Einstein condensation of a relativistic scalar boson gas, in any finite local magnetic field in less than five dimensions. The results are discussed in the context of kaon condensation in neutron stars.

  15. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Harder, N.; Schram, D. C.; Goedheer, W. J.; De Blank, H. J.; Van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1-5 × 1020 m-3) low temperature (˜3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center, vibrational temperatures reached 1 eV. Rotational temperatures obtained from the Q(v = 1) branch were systematically ˜0.1 eV lower than the Q(v = 0) branch temperatures, which were in the range of 0.4-0.8 eV, typically 60% of the translational temperature (determined from the width of the same spectral lines). The latter is attributed to preferential excitation of translational degrees of freedom in collisions with ions on the timescale of their in-plasma residence time. Doppler shifts revealed co-rotation of the molecules with the plasma at an angular velocity an order of magnitude lower, confirming that the Fulcher emission connects to background molecules. A simple model estimated a factor of 90 rarefaction of the molecular density at the center of the plasma column compared to the residual gas density. Temperature and density information was combined to conclude that ion-conversion molecular assisted recombination dominates plasma recombination at a rate of 1 × 10-15 m3 s-1. The observations illustrate the general significance of rapid molecule heating in high density hydrogen plasma for estimating molecular processes and how this affects Fulcher spectroscopy.

  16. Chloroxyanion residue quantification in cantaloupes treated with chlorine dioxide gas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/L for 10 minutes, results in a significant reduction (p<0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6 and 4.3 log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monoc...

  17. Autoresonant-spectrometric determination of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Little, A.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Turner, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Isaac, C. A.; Madsen, N.; Napoli, S. C.; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2013-06-15

    Knowledge of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus is important in our studies of antihydrogen and nonneutral plasmas. A technique based on autoresonant ion extraction from an electrostatic potential well has been developed that enables the study of the vacuum in our trap. Computer simulations allow an interpretation of our measurements and provide the residual gas composition under operating conditions typical of those used in experiments to produce, trap, and study antihydrogen. The methods developed may also be applicable in a range of atomic and molecular trap experiments where Penning-Malmberg traps are used and where access is limited.

  18. Autoresonant-spectrometric determination of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; Turner, M; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus is important in our studies of antihydrogen and nonneutral plasmas. A technique based on autoresonant ion extraction from an electrostatic potential well has been developed that enables the study of the vacuum in our trap. Computer simulations allow an interpretation of our measurements and provide the residual gas composition under operating conditions typical of those used in experiments to produce, trap, and study antihydrogen. The methods developed may also be applicable in a range of atomic and molecular trap experiments where Penning-Malmberg traps are used and where access is limited.

  19. Low outgassing residual gas analyzer with a beryllium--copper-alloy-flanged ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, F.; Kasai, A.

    1995-03-01

    By using a newly developed beryllium--copper (BeCu)-alloy ConFlat flange to house the hot-cathode ion source, a remarkable decrease in the outgassing from a quadrupole residual gas analyzer (RGA) has been achieved. The reduction in outgassing between the new BeCu-flanged RGA and an ordinary stainless-steel RGA of otherwise similar design was a factor of 60 or more in the 10{sup {minus}9} Pa total pressure range. From these results, the possibility of high accuracy residual gas analysis below 10{sup {minus}9} Pa is introduced. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  20. Residual Gas X-ray Beam Position Monitor Development for PETRA III

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Hahn, U.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Degenhardt, M.

    2007-01-19

    The development effort is driven by the need for a new type of x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM), which will detect the centre of gravity of the undulator beam. XBPMs based on the ionization of a residual gas are considered being the candidate for this future ''white'' undulator beam XBPMs. A number of residual gas XBPM prototypes for the PETRA III storage ring were developed and tested. Tests were performed at DESY and the ESRF, resolution of beam position up to 5 {mu}m is reported. The further development of the RGXBPMs will be focused on improvements of resolution, readout speed and reliability.

  1. Low outgassing residual gas analyzer with a beryllium-copper-alloy-flanged ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Fumio; Kasai, Akinari

    1995-03-01

    By using a newly developed beryllium-copper (BeCu)-alloy ConFlat flange to house the hot-cathode ion source, a remarkable decrease in the outgassing from a quadrupole residual gas analyzer (RGA) has been achieved. The reduction in outgassing between the new BeCu-flanged RGA and an ordinary stainless-steel RGA of otherwise similar design was a factor of 60 or more in the 10(exp -9) Pa total pressure range. From these results, the possibility of high accuracy residual gas analysis below 10(exp -9) Pa is introduced.

  2. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We pursued advanced technology development of laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This new multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation-as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 129Xe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We pursued two technology development specific aims: (1) development of low-field (less than 0.01 T) noble gas MRI of humans; and (2) development of functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized noble gas and related techniques.

  3. Regeneration of magnetic biochar derived from eucalyptus leaf residue for lead(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-ye; Tang, Yan-kui; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Jin-tao; Huang, Zhining; Mo, Ya-yuan; Zhang, Kai-xuan; Chen, Ji-bo

    2015-06-01

    Regeneration of Pb-loaded magnetic biochar prepared with eucalypts leaf residue was studied by using EDTA-2Na as a regenerant. The desorption efficiency was found to be 84.1% in 120 min with iron leaching amount of 1.1 mg g(-1). Higher SBET and pore volume were observed in regenerated magnetic biochars and no significant band shifts occurred in FTIR spectra during 6 regeneration cycles. The decrease of Pb(II) adsorption capacity (from 52.4 to 41.5 mg g(-1)) was only found in the first regeneration cycle. Magnetic separation performance of adsorbents was not significantly affected by multiple regeneration cycles.

  4. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  5. Effect and mechanism of coking residual ammonia water treating by flue gas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z J; Yin, G J; Yang, L Q; Wang, W; Cheng, D D

    2001-04-01

    The treatment of coking residual ammonia water has been a big difficult problem at home and abroad, and there is no breakthrough research achievement in the past. The invention patent "The method of treating all coking wastewater or treating coking residual ammonia water by flue gas" has been successfully used in Huaian Steel Works for high concentration and organic industry wastewater treatment. Not only can it realize the wastewater zero discharge, but also the wastewater treatment has an effect of de-sulfur and de-nitrogen for flue gas. So that the flue gas exhaust can meet the requirement of emission standard. The mass transfer and heat transfer, fly ash absorption and coagulation, acid and alkali neutralization reaction, catalysis oxidation and reduction reaction in flue gas would be the major factors.

  6. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields and the distribution of tight sandstone gas in the eastern Ordos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bingqiang; Zhang, Huaan; Zhang, Chunguan; Xu, Haihong; Yan, Yunkui

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform gas exploration and determine the distribution pattern of gas in the Yanchang Oil Field in the eastern part of the North Shaanxi Slope, Ordos Basin, China, gravity and magnetic survey data were systemically collated, processed and interpreted in combination with the drilling data and recent seismic data. The genesis of gravity and magnetic anomalies and the relationship between the characteristics of the gravity and magnetic fields and known gas distribution were explored in order to predict the favourable exploration targets for gas. Gravity anomalies resulted both from the lateral variation in density of the basement rock and lateral lithologic transformation in the sedimentary cover. The regional magnetic anomalies were mainly caused by the basement metamorphic rocks and the residual magnetic anomalies may reflect the amount and general location of the volcanic materials in the overlying strata. The residual gravity and magnetic anomalies generated by high-density sandstone and high content of volcanics in the gas reservoir of the upper Paleozoic distorted and deformed the anomaly curves when they were stacked onto the primary background anomaly. The gas wells were generally found to be located in the anomaly gradient zones, or the distorted part of contour lines, and the flanks of high and low anomalies, or the transitional zones between anomaly highs and lows. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields provide significant information that can be used for guidance when exploring the distribution of gas. Based on these characteristics, five favourable areas for gas exploration were identified; these are quasi-equally spaced like a strip extending from the southeast to the northwest.

  7. Gas chromatographic determination of pesticide residues in white mustard.

    PubMed

    Słowik-Borowiec, Magdalena; Szpyrka, Ewa; Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2015-04-15

    A new analytical method employing gas chromatography coupled to electron capture and nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-ECD/NPD) has been developed and validated for the screening and quantification of 51 pesticides in a matrix of high chlorophyll content - white mustard (Sinapis alba L.). For preparation of the sample extract, the citrate buffered QuEChERS procedure was followed. However certain changes were made to adapt the method to our needs and available laboratory resources. The sample size was reduced to 5 g, 10 mL water was added and exchange of solvent before GC analysis was done. The samples spiked with the target pesticides at the concentration level 0.01 mg/kg and a higher level (depending on the compound) yielded average recoveries in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) 0-19% except for HCB, S-metolachlor and teflubenzuron, and displayed very good linearity (R(2)>0.99) for nearly all the analytes. Limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg for the majority of the analytes. The expanded measurement uncertainties were estimated employing a "top-down" empirical model as being between 6% and 32% and yielding an average value of 18% (coverage factor k=2, confidence level 95%). PMID:25466117

  8. A Three Dimensional Beam Profile Monitor Based on Residual Gas Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.A.; Shapira, D.

    1998-11-04

    A three-dimensional beam profile monitor based on tracking the ionization of the residual gas molecules in the evacuated beam pipe is described. Tracking in position and time of the ions and electrons produced in the ionization enables simultaneous position sampling in three dimensions. Special features which make it possible to sample very low beam currents were employed.

  9. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (e.g., of lung ventilation) as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (He-3 and Xe-129) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We are pursuing two specific aims in this research. The first aim is to develop a low-field (< 0.01 T) instrument for noble gas MRI of humans, and the second aim is to develop functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized Xe-129 and related techniques.

  10. The magnetic field of Mars - Implications from gas dynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1984-05-01

    On January 21, 1972, the Mars 3 spacecraft observed a variation in the magnetic field during its periapsis passage over the dayside of Mars that was suggestive of entry into a Martian magnetosphere. Original data and trajectory of the spacecraft have been obtained (Dolginov, 1983) and an attempt is made to simulate the observed variation of the magnetic field by using a gas dynamic simulation. In the gas dynamic model a flow field is generated and this flow field is used to carry the interplanetary magnetic field through the Martian magnetosheath. The independence of the flow field and magnetic field calculation makes it possible to converge rapidly on an IMF orientation that would result in a magnetic variation similar to that observed by Mars 3. There appears to be no need to invoke an entry into a Martian magnetosphere to explain these observations.

  11. The magnetic field of Mars - Implications from gas dynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    On January 21, 1972, the Mars 3 spacecraft observed a variation in the magnetic field during its periapsis passage over the dayside of Mars that was suggestive of entry into a Martian magnetosphere. Original data and trajectory of the spacecraft have been obtained (Dolginov, 1983) and an attempt is made to simulate the observed variation of the magnetic field by using a gas dynamic simulation. In the gas dynamic model a flow field is generated and this flow field is used to carry the interplanetary magnetic field through the Martian magnetosheath. The independence of the flow field and magnetic field calculation makes it possible to converge rapidly on an IMF orientation that would result in a magnetic variation similar to that observed by Mars 3. There appears to be no need to invoke an entry into a Martian magnetosphere to explain these observations.

  12. Residual stress evaluation in martensitic stainless steel as a function of gas quenching pressure using thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Edward D.; Wong, Yat Choy; Ripley, Maurice I.

    2006-11-01

    The distribution of bulk residual stress was evaluated for two modified grades of martensitic stainless steels. Residual stress levels generated in the two steels were evaluated as a function of quenching gas pressure in vacuum heat treatment using neutron diffraction. It was observed that the levels of residual stress increased with increasing gas pressure, with the high hardenability grade showing the greater increase. However, quenching at 6 bar gas pressure resulted in a significant drop in the levels of residual stress, an observation that is interpreted in terms of the accommodation of high levels of strain by the presence of high levels of interlath retained austenite.

  13. The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

  14. An assessment of radiolytic gas generation: Impacts from Rocky Flats Plant residue elimination alternatives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-26

    This report evaluates the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque analytical model that is used to support present wattage limit decisions for various matrix forms from the Residue Elimination Project for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste acceptability. This study includes (1) a comparison of the SNL-A model to Rocky Flats Plant models for consistency of assumptions and the phenomena considered in the models, and (2) an evaluation of the appropriateness of the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque model to Rocky Flats Plant residues, considering that the original intent was to model wastes rather than residues. The study draws the following conclusions: (1) only real-time gas generation testing of specific waste streams may provide a sound basis for an increase in the transportation wattage limit of specific waste streams, and (2) the radiolytic gas generation rate from Residue Elimination Project waste emplaced at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, under worst-case conditions, is not a significant factor in comparison to the total gas generation rate due to radiolysis, microbial degradation, and corrosion.

  15. Analysis of catalytic gas products using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis for operando transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin K; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-06-01

    Operando transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of catalytic reactions requires that the gas composition inside the TEM be known during the in situ reaction. Two techniques for measuring gas composition inside the environmental TEM are described and compared here. First, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, both in the low-loss and core-loss regions of the spectrum was utilized. The data were quantified using a linear combination of reference spectra from individual gasses to fit a mixture spectrum. Mass spectrometry using a residual gas analyzer was also used to quantify the gas inside the environmental cell. Both electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis were applied simultaneously to a known 50/50 mixture of CO and CO2, so the results from the two techniques could be compared and evaluated. An operando TEM experiment was performed using a Ru catalyst supported on silica spheres and loaded into the TEM on a specially developed porous pellet TEM sample. Both techniques were used to monitor the conversion of CO to CO2 over the catalyst, while simultaneous atomic resolution imaging of the catalyst was performed.

  16. Magnetized gas clouds can survive acceleration by a hot wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCourt, Michael; O'Leary, Ryan M.; Madigan, Ann-Marie; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-05-01

    We present three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetized gas clouds accelerated by hot winds. We initialize gas clouds with tangled internal magnetic fields and show that this field suppresses the disruption of the cloud: rather than mixing into the hot wind as found in hydrodynamic simulations, cloud fragments end up comoving with the external medium and in pressure equilibrium with their surroundings. We also show that a magnetic field in the hot wind enhances the drag force on the cloud by a factor {˜ } (1+vA^2/v_{wind}^2), where vA is the Alfvén speed in the wind and vwind measures the relative speed between the cloud and the wind. We apply this result to gas clouds in several astrophysical contexts, including galaxy clusters, galactic winds, the Galactic Centre, and the outskirts of the Galactic halo. Our results can help explain the prevalence of cool gas in galactic winds and galactic haloes, and how this cool gas survives in spite of its interaction with hot wind/halo gas. We also predict that drag forces can lead to a deviation from Keplerian orbits for gas clouds in the galactic center.

  17. Evaluation of low cost residual gas analyzers for ultrahigh vacuum applications

    SciTech Connect

    M. Rao; D. Dong

    1996-10-01

    In recent years several low cost computer controlled residual gas analyzers (RGAs) have been introduced into the market place. It would be very useful to know the performance characteristics of these RGAs in order to make an informed selection for UHV applications. The UHV applications include extreme sensitivity helium leak detection and monitoring of the residual gas spectra in UHV systems. In this article, the sensitivity and linearity data for nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium are presented in the pressure range 10{sup {minus}8}---10{sup {minus}1} Pa. Further, the relationships between focus voltage and ion currents, relative sensitivity, and fragmentation factor are also included. A direct comparison method is used in obtaining this data. Spinning rotor and extractor gauges are the transfer standard gauges used in Jefferson Lab's vacuum calibration facility, with which all the reported measurements here were carried out.

  18. Gas chromatography with flame photometric detection of 31 organophosphorus pesticide residues in Alpinia oxyphylla dried fruits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangsheng; Kong, Weijun; Wei, Jianhe; Yang, Meihua

    2014-11-01

    A simple, rapid and effective gas chromatography-flame photometric detection method was established for simultaneous multi-component determination of 31 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) residues in Alpinia oxyphylla, which is widely consumed as a traditional medicine and food in China. Sample preparation was completed in a single step without any clean-up procedure. All pesticides expressed good linear relationships between 0.004 and 1.0 μg/mL with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9973. The method gave satisfactory recoveries for most pesticides. The limits of detection varied from 1 to 10 ng/mL, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 4 and 30 ng/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to 55 commercial samples purchased from five different areas. Five pesticide residues were detected in four (7.27%) samples. The positive samples were confirmed by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

  19. Speciation, characterization, and mobility of As, Se, and Hg in flue gas desulphurization residues.

    PubMed

    Al-Abed, Souhail R; Jegadeesan, Gautham; Scheckel, Kirk G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2008-03-01

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue. With increasing reuse of the FGD residues in beneficial applications, it is important to determine metal speciation and mobilityto understand the environmental impact of its reuse. In this paper, we report the solid phase speciation of As, Se, and Hg in FGD residues using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and sequential chemical extraction (SCE) techniques. The SCE results combined with XRF data indicated a strong possibility of As association with iron oxides, whereas Se was distributed among all geochemical phases. Hg appeared to be mainly distributed in the strong-complexed phase. XRF images also suggested a strong association of Hg with Fe oxide materials within FGD residues. XAS analysis indicated that As existed in its oxidized state (As(V)), whereas Se and Hg was observed in primarily reduced states as selenite (Se(IV)) and Hg(I), respectively. The results from the SCE and variable pH leaching tests indicated that the labile fractions of As, Se, and Hg were fairly low and thus suggestive of their stability in the FGD residues. However, the presence of a fine fraction enriched in metal content in the FGD residue suggested that size fractionation is important in assessing the environmental risks associated with their reuse.

  20. Speciation, characterization, and mobility of As, Se, and Hg in flue gas desulphurization residues

    SciTech Connect

    Souhail R. Al-Abed; Gautham Jegadeesan; Kirk G. Scheckel; Thabet Tolaymat

    2008-03-01

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue. With increasing reuse of the FGD residues in beneficial applications, it is important to determine metal speciation and mobility to understand the environmental impact of its reuse. In this paper, we report the solid phase speciation of As, Se, and Hg in FGD residues using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and sequential chemical extraction (SCE) techniques. The SCE results combined with XRF data indicated a strong possibility of As association with iron oxides, whereas Se was distributed among all geochemical phases. Hg appeared to be mainly distributed in the strong-complexed phase. XRF images also suggested a strong association of Hg with Fe oxide materials within FGD residues. XAS analysis indicated that As existed in its oxidized state (As(V)), whereas Se and Hg was observed in primarily reduced states as selenite (Se(IV)) and Hg(I), respectively. The results from the SCE and variable pH leaching tests indicated that the labile fractions of As, Se, and Hg were fairly low and thus suggestive of their stability in the FGD residues. However, the presence of a fine fraction enriched in metal content in the FGD residue suggested that size fractionation is important in assessing the environmental risks associated with their reuse. 34 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Speciation, Characterization and Mobility of As, Se and Hg in Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Abed, S.R.; Jegadeesan, G.; Scheckel, K.G.; Tolaymat, T.

    2008-06-23

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue. With increasing reuse of the FGD residues in beneficial applications, it is important to determine metal speciation and mobility to understand the environmental impact of its reuse. In this paper, we report the solid phase speciation of As, Se, and Hg in FGD residues using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and sequential chemical extraction (SCE) techniques. The SCE results combined with XRF data indicated a strong possibility of As association with iron oxides, whereas Se was distributed among all geochemical phases. Hg appeared to be mainly distributed in the strong-complexed phase. XRF images also suggested a strong association of Hg with Fe oxide materials within FGD residues. XAS analysis indicated that As existed in its oxidized state (As(V)), whereas Se and Hg was observed in primarily reduced states as selenite (Se(IV)) and Hg(I), respectively. The results from the SCE and variable pH leaching tests indicated that the labile fractions of As, Se, and Hg were fairly low and thus suggestive of their stability in the FGD residues. However, the presence of a fine fraction enriched in metal content in the FGD residue suggested that size fractionation is important in assessing the environmental risks associated with their reuse.

  2. Implications of Depth Determination from Second Moving Average Residual Magnetic Anomalies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, K. S.; Kletetschka, G.

    2014-12-01

    Mars total magnetic data obtained by Mars Global Surveyor mission from 400 km altitude were processed using a second moving average method (SMAM) to estimate the depth of the buried sources. Five profiles were chosen across major magnetic areas. Each profile was subjected to a separation technique using the SMAM. Second moving average residual anomalies (SMARA) were obtained from magnetic data using filters of successive spacing. The depth estimate is monitored by the standard deviation of the depths determined from all SMARA for various value of the shape factor (SF) that includes dike, cylinder, and sphere. The standard deviation along with depth estimate is considered to be a new criterion for determining the correct depth and shape of the buried structures on Mars.

  3. Dating and sourcing fuel ash residues from Cladh Hallan, South Uist, Scotland, using magnetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.; Batt, C. M.

    Mineral magnetic and archaeomagnetic measurements have been carried out on fire ash deposits from a central hearth within a circular dwelling at the Late Bronze/Early Iron Age settlement site of Cladh Hallan on South Uist, Scotland. Archaeomagnetic methods date the hearths to 560-700 BC and 650-850 BC, the earliest archaeomagnetic dates produced for the Western Isles of Scotland. A range of mineral magnetic measurements have been carried out on a continually sampled profile through the hearths/ash build-ups displaying differences between the two main ash build-ups and floors. The mineral magnetic results have also been used to assess fuel sources through the application of techniques based on modern ash residues. The results show a marked change in fuel source from well-humified peat to a more mixed fuel, with a high proportion of fibrous-upper peat/peat turf.

  4. Oxidation of methionine residues in polypeptide ions via gas-phase ion/ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O](+)), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O](+) product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H](+)). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to 'label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  5. Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Polypeptide Ions Via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O]+), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O]+ product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H]+). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to `label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  6. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of phosphine residues in stored products and processed foods.

    PubMed

    Norman, K N; Leonard, K

    2000-09-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was used for the quantitative confirmation of phosphine residues in stored products and processed foods. An established extraction technique was utilized for the preparation of headspace samples, which were analyzed by GC-MS and gas chromatography-nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC-NPD). Wheat, oats, maize, white rice, brown rice, cornflakes, tortilla cornchips, groundnuts, and raisins were validated, showing excellent agreement between detectors when spiked at levels equivalent to 0.001 and 0.01 mg/kg phosphine and for samples containing incurred residues. The GC-MS method was reproducible and accurate when compared to the GC-NPD method and allowed five samples to be quantified in a working day. Subambient GC-MS oven temperatures were most suitable for phosphine residues ranging from 0.001 to 0.005 mg/kg, and a GC oven temperature of 100 degrees C was appropriate for residues >0.005 mg/kg. The method was sufficiently robust to be evaluated for other similar commodities as the need arises.

  7. Thermal Photon and Residual Gas Scattering of the Electrons in the ILC RTML

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.M.; /SLAC

    2006-08-16

    The scattering of the primary beam electrons off of thermal photons and residual gas molecules in the projected International Linear Collider (ILC) is a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated downstream of the linac. In this report we give the analytic estimations of the individual input that each of the main scattering processes makes in the production of off-energy and large amplitude particles in the Damping Ring to Main Linac region (RTML).

  8. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fernando Barbosa V; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  9. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Fernando Barbosa V. da; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  10. [Simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus by headspace gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Chi, Shuyao; Wu, Dike; Sun, Jinhong; Ye, Ruhan; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    A headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents (petroleum ether (60-90 degrees C), acetone, ethyl acetate, methanol, methylene chloride, ethanol and butyl acetate) in bovis calculus artifactus. The DB-WAX capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) were used for the separation and detection of the residual solvents, and the internal standard method was used for the quantification. The chromatographic conditions, such as equilibrium temperature and equilibrium time, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, all of the seven residual solvents showed good linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (not less than 0.999 3) in the prescribed concentration range. At three spiked levels, the recoveries for the seven residual solvents were 94.7%-105.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3.5%. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were 0.43-5.23 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 1.25-16.67 mg/L. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and is suitable for the simultaneous determination of the seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus. PMID:25185320

  11. An Overview of Magnetic Bearing Technology for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Daniel J.; Jansen, Mark J.; Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of the magnetic bearing and its use in exotic applications has been conceptualized for many years, over a century, in fact. Patented, passive systems using permanent magnets date back over 150 years. More recently, scientists of the 1930s began investigating active systems using electromagnets for high-speed ultracentrifuges. However, passive magnetic bearings are physically unstable and active systems only provide proper stiffness and damping through sophisticated controllers and algorithms. This is precisely why, until the last decade, magnetic bearings did not become a practical alternative to rolling element bearings. Today, magnetic bearing technology has become viable because of advances in micro-processing controllers that allow for confident and robust active control. Further advances in the following areas: rotor and stator materials and designs which maximize flux, minimize energy losses, and minimize stress limitations; wire materials and coatings for high temperature operation; high-speed micro processing for advanced controller designs and extremely robust capabilities; back-up bearing technology for providing a viable touchdown surface; and precision sensor technology; have put magnetic bearings on the forefront of advanced, lubrication free support systems. This paper will discuss a specific joint program for the advancement of gas turbine engines and how it implies the vitality of magnetic bearings, a brief comparison between magnetic bearings and other bearing technologies in both their advantages and limitations, and an examination of foreseeable solutions to historically perceived limitations to magnetic bearing.

  12. Evaluation of residue management practices effects on corn productivity, soil quality, and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Jose German

    The removal of crop residues left after harvest is being considered as a potential feedstock source for bioethanol production which can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel use and net greenhouse gas (GHG). The objectives of this study were to: (i) examine how tillage, N fertilization rates, residue removal, and their interactions affect crop productivity, (ii) SOC and soil physical properties, and (iii) GHG emissions, and (iv) calculated a soil C budget to determine how much crop residue can be sustainably be removed in Central and Southwest Iowa. After three years of residue removal under different management practices, the findings of this study suggest that a portion of the corn residue that is left on the soil surface after harvest can be removed, with no negative impacts in the short term continuous corn yield in sites at Central and Southwest Iowa. However, significant decreases in SOC sequestration rates, microbial biomass-C, bulk density, soil penetration resistance, wet aggregate stability, and infiltration rates were observed, but varied with soil type and management practices. Additionally, soil surface CO2 and N2O emissions were responsive to management practices; primarily by altering soil temperature, soil water content, soil mineral N, and crop growth. Results from soil C budget show that in 2010 when corn growth was not water stressed (lack of moisture), approximately 35 and 30% of the residue could be sustainably removed in the Central and Southwest sites, respectively. In 2011, drier soil conditions resulted in approximately 2 and 49% of the residue could be sustainably removed in the Central and Southwest sites, respectively.

  13. Brake Failure from Residual Magnetism in the Mars Exploration Rover Lander Petal Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jandura, Louise

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, two Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft arrived at Mars. Each safely delivered an identical rover to the Martian surface in a tetrahedral lander encased in airbags. Upon landing, the airbags deflated and three Lander Petal Actuators opened the three deployable Lander side petals enabling the rover to exit the Lander. Approximately nine weeks prior to the scheduled launch of the first spacecraft, one of these mission-critical Lander Petal Actuators exhibited a brake stuck-open failure during its final flight stow at Kennedy Space Center. Residual magnetism was the definitive conclusion from the failure investigation. Although residual magnetism was recognized as an issue in the design, the lack of an appropriately specified lower bound on brake drop-out voltage inhibited the discovery of this problem earlier in the program. In addition, the brakes had more unit-to-unit variation in drop-out voltage than expected, likely due to a larger than expected variation in the magnetic properties of the 15-5 PH stainless steel brake plates. Failure analysis and subsequent rework of two other Lander Petal Actuators with marginal brakes was completed in three weeks, causing no impact to the launch date.

  14. Magnetic coupling in the disks around young gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T. E-mail: mhlee@hku.hk

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior 'dead zone'. Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  15. Magnetic Coupling in the Disks around Young Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior "dead zone." Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  16. Measurement of partial pressures in extremely high vacuum region using a modified residual gas analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shu; Oyama, Hitoshi; Kato, Shigeki; Aono, Masakazu

    1999-03-01

    The measurement of partial pressures using a residual gas analyzer (RGA) in an extremely high vacuum (XHV) region has several problems, including the influence of electron stimulated desorption ions and the outgassing rate from the ion source of the RGA. In order to measure partial pressures in the XHV, a commercial RGA was modified as follows: an electrostatic analyzer was used to only measure gas phase ions; a low work function material, thoria, was used as a filament of the ion source to lower temperature of the filament and Cu wires connected the filament and releasing the heat around the ion source to atmosphere. After these modifications, the RGA could measure only gas phase ions and, at the same time the outgassing rate from the RGA was reduced. Partial pressures and total pressure in the XHV could be measured by the RGA.

  17. Sequestration of flue gas CO₂ by direct gas-solid carbonation of air pollution control system residues.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo

    2012-12-18

    Direct gas-solid carbonation reactions of residues from an air pollution control system (APCr) were conducted using different combinations of simulated flue gas to study the impact on CO₂ sequestration. X-ray diffraction analysis of APCr determined the existence of CaClOH, whose maximum theoretical CO₂ sequestration potential of 58.13 g CO₂/kg APCr was calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The reaction mechanism obeyed a model of a fast kinetics-controlled process followed by a slow product layer diffusion-controlled process. Temperature is the key factor in direct gas-solid carbonation and had a notable influence on both the carbonation conversion and the CO₂ sequestration rate. The optimal CO₂ sequestrating temperature of 395 °C was easily obtained for APCr using a continuous heating experiment. CO₂ content in the flue gas had a definite influence on the CO₂ sequestration rate of the kinetics-controlled process, but almost no influence on the final carbonation conversion. Typical concentrations of SO₂ in the flue gas could not only accelerate the carbonation reaction rate of the product layer diffusion-controlled process, but also could improve the final carbonation conversion. Maximum carbonation conversions of between 68.6% and 77.1% were achieved in a typical flue gas. Features of rapid CO₂ sequestration rate, strong impurities resistance, and high capture conversion for direct gas-solid carbonation were proved in this study, which presents a theoretical foundation for the applied use of this encouraging technology on carbon capture and storage.

  18. Quantification of residual solvents in antibody drug conjugates using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Medley, Colin D; Kay, Jacob; Li, Yi; Gruenhagen, Jason; Yehl, Peter; Chetwyn, Nik P

    2014-11-19

    The detection and quantification of residual solvents present in clinical and commercial pharmaceutical products is necessary from both patient safety and regulatory perspectives. Head-space gas chromatography is routinely used for quantitation of residual solvents for small molecule APIs produced through synthetic processes; however residual solvent analysis is generally not needed for protein based pharmaceuticals produced through cultured cell lines where solvents are not introduced. In contrast, antibody drug conjugates and other protein conjugates where a drug or other molecule is covalently bound to a protein typically use solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N,N‑dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or propylene glycol (PG) to dissolve the hydrophobic small molecule drug for conjugation to the protein. The levels of the solvent remaining following the conjugation step are therefore important to patient safety as these parental drug products are introduced directly into the patients bloodstream. We have developed a rapid sample preparation followed by a gas chromatography separation for the detection and quantification of several solvents typically used in these conjugation reactions. This generic method has been validated and can be easily implemented for use in quality control testing for clinical or commercial bioconjugated products.

  19. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise and Neutron Diffraction Techniques for the Study of Intergranular Residual Strains in Mild Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hutanu, Roxana; Clapham, Lynann; Rogge, Ronald

    2004-02-26

    Intergranular residual stresses (IS) are microscopic residual stresses which have been found to accumulate along the <100> direction in steels. The <100> direction is also the magnetic easy axis direction in steel. This work involved Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) studies on steel samples, deformed uniaxially to increasing levels of strain. The MBN results indicated that a bulk magnetic easy axis was produced by the deformation process, and neutron diffraction experiments showed that this easy axis was correlated with the tensile strain in grains oriented in the <100> direction.

  20. Determination of pyrethroid residues in tobacco and cigarette smoke by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jibao; Liu, Baizhan; Zhu, Xiaolan; Su, Qingde

    2002-07-26

    The extraction of fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and deltamethrin from tobacco (Nicotina tobaccum) and cigarette smoke condensate with acetone, followed by partition of resulting acetone mixture with petroleum ether, was investigated and found suitable for capillary gas chromatography (GC) residue analysis. Florisil column clean-up was found to provide clean-up procedure for tobacco and cigarette smoke condensate permitting analysis to < or = 0.01 microgram.g-1 for most of the pyrethroids by GC with a 63Ni electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Quantitative determination was obtained by the method of external standards. Cigarettes made from flue-cured tobacco spiked with different amounts of pyrethroids were used and the pyrethroid levels in mainstream smoke were determined. For all the pyrethroid residues, 1.51-15.50% were transferred from tobacco into cigarette smoke.

  1. Natural Gas Residual Fluids: Sources, Endpoints, and Organic Chemical Composition after Centralized Waste Treatment in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Getzinger, Gordon J; O'Connor, Megan P; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Drollette, Brian D; Karatum, Osman; Deshusses, Marc A; Ferguson, P Lee; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-07-21

    Volumes of natural gas extraction-derived wastewaters have increased sharply over the past decade, but the ultimate fate of those waste streams is poorly characterized. Here, we sought to (a) quantify natural gas residual fluid sources and endpoints to bound the scope of potential waste stream impacts and (b) describe the organic pollutants discharged to surface waters following treatment, a route of likely ecological exposure. Our findings indicate that centralized waste treatment facilities (CWTF) received 9.5% (8.5 × 10(8) L) of natural gas residual fluids in 2013, with some facilities discharging all effluent to surface waters. In dry months, discharged water volumes were on the order of the receiving body flows for some plants, indicating that surface waters can become waste-dominated in summer. As disclosed organic compounds used in high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) vary greatly in physicochemical properties, we deployed a suite of analytical techniques to characterize CWTF effluents, covering 90.5% of disclosed compounds. Results revealed that, of nearly 1000 disclosed organic compounds used in HVHF, only petroleum distillates and alcohol polyethoxylates were present. Few analytes targeted by regulatory agencies (e.g., benzene or toluene) were observed, highlighting the need for expanded and improved monitoring efforts at CWTFs.

  2. Effect of argon gas pressure on residual stress, microstructure evolution and electrical resistivity of beryllium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bing-Chi; Li, Kai; Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Wu, Wei-Dong; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2016-02-01

    The residual stress in beryllium films fabricated on K9 substrates by using magnetron sputtering deposition is measured by using a curvature method and is theoretically estimated by using the Nix and Clemens (NC) model. The experimental results indicate that the 1.3-μm-thick film is always in a tensile state for pressure variations in the range from 0.4 to 1.2 Pa. When the sputtering gas pressure is increased, the average stress increases at first, after which it decreases by a remarkable amount. The observed descending trend of the tensile stress when the sputtering gas pressure is beyond 0.6 Pa is mainly attributed to the grain size in the film being larger than that in the film when the pressure is below 0.6 Pa. The maximal residual stress of 552 MPa at a sputtering gas pressure of 0.6 Pa is close to the tensile strength (550 MPa) of the corresponding beryllium bulk material and is about 8 times smaller than that calculated by using the N-C model. In addition, the surface morphologies of the as-fabricated films reveal fibrous grains while the cross-sectional morphologies are characterized by a coarsening of columnar grains. The measured electric resistivity of each film strongly depends on its porosity and the sizes of its grains.

  3. Natural Gas Residual Fluids: Sources, Endpoints, and Organic Chemical Composition after Centralized Waste Treatment in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Getzinger, Gordon J; O'Connor, Megan P; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Drollette, Brian D; Karatum, Osman; Deshusses, Marc A; Ferguson, P Lee; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-07-21

    Volumes of natural gas extraction-derived wastewaters have increased sharply over the past decade, but the ultimate fate of those waste streams is poorly characterized. Here, we sought to (a) quantify natural gas residual fluid sources and endpoints to bound the scope of potential waste stream impacts and (b) describe the organic pollutants discharged to surface waters following treatment, a route of likely ecological exposure. Our findings indicate that centralized waste treatment facilities (CWTF) received 9.5% (8.5 × 10(8) L) of natural gas residual fluids in 2013, with some facilities discharging all effluent to surface waters. In dry months, discharged water volumes were on the order of the receiving body flows for some plants, indicating that surface waters can become waste-dominated in summer. As disclosed organic compounds used in high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) vary greatly in physicochemical properties, we deployed a suite of analytical techniques to characterize CWTF effluents, covering 90.5% of disclosed compounds. Results revealed that, of nearly 1000 disclosed organic compounds used in HVHF, only petroleum distillates and alcohol polyethoxylates were present. Few analytes targeted by regulatory agencies (e.g., benzene or toluene) were observed, highlighting the need for expanded and improved monitoring efforts at CWTFs. PMID:26147419

  4. Hematite nanoplates: Controllable synthesis, gas sensing, photocatalytic and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hongying; Sun, Dandan; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Guoying; Sun, Yaqiu; Gao, Dongzhao

    2016-01-15

    Uniform hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoplates exposing {001} plane as basal planes have been prepared by a facile solvothermal method under the assistance of sodium acetate. The morphological evolution of the nanoplates was studied by adjusting the reaction parameters including the solvent and the amount of sodium acetate. The results indicated that both the adequate nucleation/growth rate and selective adsorption of alcohol molecules and acetate anions contribute to the formation of the plate-like morphology. In addition, the size of the nanoplates can be adjusted from ca. 180nm to 740nm by changing the reaction parameters. Three nanoplate samples with different size were selected to investigate the gas sensing performance, photocatalytic and magnetic properties. As gas sensing materials, all the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates exhibited high gas sensitivity and stability toward n-butanol. When applied as photocatalyst, the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates show high photodegradation efficiency towards RhB. Both the gas sensing performance and the photocatalytic property of the products exhibit obvious size-dependent effect. Magnetic measurements reveal that the plate-like α-Fe2O3 particles possess good room temperature magnetic properties. PMID:26476200

  5. Hematite nanoplates: Controllable synthesis, gas sensing, photocatalytic and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hongying; Sun, Dandan; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Guoying; Sun, Yaqiu; Gao, Dongzhao

    2016-01-15

    Uniform hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoplates exposing {001} plane as basal planes have been prepared by a facile solvothermal method under the assistance of sodium acetate. The morphological evolution of the nanoplates was studied by adjusting the reaction parameters including the solvent and the amount of sodium acetate. The results indicated that both the adequate nucleation/growth rate and selective adsorption of alcohol molecules and acetate anions contribute to the formation of the plate-like morphology. In addition, the size of the nanoplates can be adjusted from ca. 180nm to 740nm by changing the reaction parameters. Three nanoplate samples with different size were selected to investigate the gas sensing performance, photocatalytic and magnetic properties. As gas sensing materials, all the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates exhibited high gas sensitivity and stability toward n-butanol. When applied as photocatalyst, the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates show high photodegradation efficiency towards RhB. Both the gas sensing performance and the photocatalytic property of the products exhibit obvious size-dependent effect. Magnetic measurements reveal that the plate-like α-Fe2O3 particles possess good room temperature magnetic properties.

  6. Capillary gas chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-cheng; Li, Qi-wan; Tang, Li-bin

    2007-01-01

    Simple procedures for extraction and chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco are described. The determination was carried out by capillary gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD) and confirmed by GC-MS. The mean recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 93.2%~112.9% and 3.5%~6.7%, respectively at levels ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg. The limit of determination was 0.001 mg/kg. Tobacco samples in routine check were successfully analyzed using the proposed method. PMID:17444603

  7. Magnetic resonance direct thrombus imaging differentiates acute recurrent ipsilateral deep vein thrombosis from residual thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Melanie; Mol, Gerben C; van Rooden, Cornelis J; Klok, Frederikus A; Westerbeek, Robin E; Iglesias Del Sol, Antonio; van de Ree, Marcel A; de Roos, Albert; Huisman, Menno V

    2014-07-24

    Accurate diagnostic assessment of suspected ipsilateral recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major clinical challenge because differentiating between acute recurrent thrombosis and residual thrombosis is difficult with compression ultrasonography (CUS). We evaluated noninvasive magnetic resonance direct thrombus imaging (MRDTI) in a prospective study of 39 patients with symptomatic recurrent ipsilateral DVT (incompressibility of a different proximal venous segment than at the prior DVT) and 42 asymptomatic patients with at least 6-month-old chronic residual thrombi and normal D-dimer levels. All patients were subjected to MRDTI. MRDTI images were judged by 2 independent radiologists blinded for the presence of acute DVT and a third in case of disagreement. The sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver reliability of MRDTI were determined. MRDTI demonstrated acute recurrent ipsilateral DVT in 37 of 39 patients and was normal in all 42 patients without symptomatic recurrent disease for a sensitivity of 95% (95% CI, 83% to 99%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 92% to 100%). Interobserver agreement was excellent (κ = 0.98). MRDTI images were adequate for interpretation in 95% of the cases. MRDTI is a sensitive and reproducible method for distinguishing acute ipsilateral recurrent DVT from 6-month-old chronic residual thrombi in the leg veins.

  8. Design of a diagnostic residual gas analyzer for the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Biewer, T. M.; Graves, Van B; Andrew, P.; Marcus, Chris; Shimada, M.; Hughes, S.; Boussier, B.; Johnson, D. W.; Gardner, W. L.; Hillis, D. L.; Vayakis, G.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the ITER diagnostics having reached an advanced design stage is a diagnostic RGA for the divertor, i.e. residual gas analysis system for the ITER divertor, which is intended to sample the divertor pumping duct region during the plasma pulse and to have a response time compatible with plasma particle and impurity lifetimes in the divertor region. Main emphasis is placed on helium (He) concentration in the ducts, as well as the relative concentration between the hydrogen isotopes (H2, D2, T2). Measurement of the concentration of radiative gases, such as neon (Ne) and nitrogen (N2), is also intended. Numerical modeling of the gas flow from the sampled region to the cluster of analysis sensors, through a long (~8m long, ~110mm diameter) sampling pipe terminating in a pressure reducing orifice, confirm that the desired response time (~1s for He or D2) is achieved with the present design.

  9. Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

    1983-01-01

    Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

  10. A magnonic gas sensor based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, D; Kolokoltsev, O V; Qureshi, N; Mejía-Uriarte, E V; Saniger, J M

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative, simple and inexpensive gas sensor based on the variation in the magnetic properties of nanoparticles due to their interaction with gases. To measure the nanoparticle response a magnetostatic spin wave (MSW) tunable oscillator has been developed using an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) epitaxial thin film as a delay line (DL). The sensor has been prepared by coating a uniform layer of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles on the YIG film. The unperturbed frequency of the oscillator is determined by a bias magnetic field, which is applied parallel to the YIG film and perpendicularly to the wave propagation direction. In this device, the total bias magnetic field is the superposition of the field of a permanent magnet and the field associated with the layer of magnetic nanoparticles. The perturbation produced in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle layer due to its interaction with gases induces a frequency shift in the oscillator, allowing the detection of low concentrations of gases. In order to demonstrate the ability of the sensor to detect gases, it has been tested with organic volatile compounds (VOCs) which have harmful effects on human health, such as dimethylformamide, isopropanol and ethanol, or the aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene and xylene more commonly known by its abbreviation (BTX). All of these were detected with high sensitivity, short response time, and good reproducibility.

  11. Superconductivity of the magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.

    2008-10-15

    A microscopic theory of superconductivity is developed for the magnetized electron gas on a cylindrical surface. The Gibbs free energy is calculated for the superconducting system. A gap equation is derived that determines the critical temperature as a function of the quantum-cylinder dimensions and the Aharonov-Bohm parameter. It is shown that the gap not only exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, but also oscillates with varying curvature of the cylindrical surface.

  12. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starsich, Fabian H. L.; Hirt, Ann M.; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2014-12-01

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  13. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Starsich, Fabian H L; Hirt, Ann M; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2014-12-19

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields. PMID:25422410

  14. Gas chromatographic method for the determination of hexaconazole residues in black tea*

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Chinnachamy; Sachin, Paul James

    2008-01-01

    A highly reliable, quantitative and sensitive analytical method for determining the residues of the fungicide, hexaconazole in black tea is described. The proposed method is based on liquid-liquid extraction followed by gas chromatographic determination, using nitrogen phosphorus detector (GC-NPD) for the identification and quantitation of hexaconazole. The most appropriate solvent mixture for extracting hexaconazole residues from black tea was n-hexane:acetone at 1:1 (v/v). The extract was cleaned up by adsorption column chromatography using activated florisil. Performance of the method was assessed by evaluating quality parameters such as recovery value, repeatability, reproducibility, linearity and limits of detection and quantitation. When the method was assessed for repeatability, the percentage of recovery ranged between 86% and 96% while the relative standard deviation was between 0.30% and 2.35%. In studies on reproducibility the recovery ranged from 81% to 85% and relative standard deviation from 1.68% to 5.13%, implying that the method was reliable. A field trial was conducted to verify the application of this method with real samples. Results prove that the validated method was suitable for extracting hexaconazole residues. PMID:18257139

  15. [Determination of 132 pesticide residues in tobacco by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoshui; Bian, Zhaoyang; Tang, Gangling; Hu, Qingyuan

    2012-10-01

    A simple method for the determination of 132 pesticide residues in tobacco by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was established. The influences of different extraction solvents, different buffer systems and different purifying agents on the recoveries of pesticides were investigated. The tobacco sample was extracted with acetonitrile, then cleaned up by the mixed sorbents of primary secondary amine (PSA) and octadecylsilane (C18E). After dried by nitrogen, the extract residue was reconstituted with n-hexane-acetone (9:1, v/v). GC-MS/MS in multi-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used as the detection method and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) as the internal standard. All of the 132 pesticides had good linear relationships (r2 > 0.99) between 20 microg/kg and 2 000 microg/kg. At the three spiked levels of 50, 200 and 500 microg/kg in the tobacco extract, the average recoveries of all the pesticides were in the range of 68.10% to 123.15% except for mirex and hexachlorobenzene; moreover, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of them were between 1.79% and 19.88%. We participated in the CORESTA (Cooperation Centre for Scientific Research Relative to Tobacco) 2012's co-experiment. The results of our method and the existed standard methods had good consistency. The accurate, reliable and sensitive method can be applied to the determination of the 132 pesticide residues in tobacco for rapid screening and quantitative analysis.

  16. [Determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ghengyun; Zhang, Weiya; Li, Lixia; Shen, Yalei; Lin, Junfeng; Xie, Tangtang; Chu, Naiqing

    2014-08-01

    An effective method was established for the simultaneous determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Glycol ethers in leather and leather products were ultrasonically extracted at 45 °C, using ethyl acetate as the extraction solvent. The extracts were purified by solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and then analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode. The content of each analyte was calibrated by external standard method. The limit of detection of ethylene glycol ethyl ether (EGEE) was 0. 10 mg/kg under the condition of signal to noise (S/N) of 3 and the limits of the other 11 glycol ethers were all less than 0.05 mg/kg. The spiked recoveries varied from 81. 2% to 95. 5% at three different spiked levels with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 1.4% to 6. 6%. The proposed method is simple, rapid and accurate, with the limits of detection much less than the requirements of the Regulation Concerning Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) of European Union. It is applicable to the determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products, and provides a reference for the relevant testing standards.

  17. Pressurised gasification of wet ethanol fermentation residue for synthesis gas production.

    PubMed

    Koido, Kenji; Hanaoka, Toshiaki; Sakanishi, Kinya

    2013-03-01

    Pressurised steam gasification of wet biomass in a fixed-bed downdraft gasifier was implemented to identify reaction conditions yielding the highest synthesis gas concentration and efficiency, and to examine the generation of sulphur compounds. The gasification of lignin-rich fermentation residue derived from a bench-plant for bioethanol production from woody biomass was investigated at p=0.99MPa and T=750-900°C for steam to biomass ratios (S/B) of 3.4-17 and equivalence ratios (φ) of 3.3-∞. The results showed that the highest concentration of around 70mol% was obtained at T⩾850°C, φ=13 and S/B=3.4, the highest efficiency of 0.26 was obtained at T=900°C, φ=3.3 and S/B=3.4, and sulphur compounds were H2S and COS. For the production of BTL synthesis gas, pressurised gasification has the potential to convert the wet residue below 77.3wt.% moisture contents.

  18. Detection of residual krypton in xenon gas for WIMP dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobi, Attila

    2011-04-01

    The next generation of WIMP dark matter searches using liquid xenon as a target medium will require unprecedented rejection of residual krypton contamination. Krypton contains the beta emitting isotope 85 Kr, with a relative abundance of about 10-11 (85 Kr /nat Kr), and this beta decay can be an important source of background for these experiments. Krypton is typically present in commercially produced xenon at the level of tens of parts-per-billion, about four orders of magnitude too large for present day dark matter experiments such as XENON, LUX, and XMASS. Additional processing via gas chromatography and distillation are used to separate krypton from xenon, but measuring the remaining krypton level at the part-per-trillion (ppt) level is challenging. Recently we have developed a highly sensitive and simple technique to measure residual krypton contamination in xenon gas using an RGA mass spectrometer and a liquid nitrogen cold trap. We describe here the results of our calibration experiments to determine the ultimate limit of detection of the method, and we discuss the implications for the next generation of WIMP dark matter experiments. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  19. Numerical studies of the behavior of ionized residual gas in an energy recovering linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula; Meseck, Atoosa

    2015-04-01

    Next generation light sources such as energy recovering linacs (ERLs) are highly sensitive to instabilities due to ionized residual gas, which must be mitigated for successful operation. Vacuum pumps are insufficient for removal of the ions, as the ions are trapped by the beam's electrical potential. Two effective measures are (i) introducing clearing gaps in the bunch train, and (ii) installing clearing electrodes which pull out the trapped ions from the electrical potential of the beam. In this paper, we present numerical studies on the behavior of ion clouds that interact with bunch trains in an ERL taking into account the effects of the clearing gaps and clearing electrodes. We present simulations with different compositions of the residual gas. Simulations are done using the MOEVE PIC Tracking software package developed at Rostock University, which has been upgraded to include the behavior of ion clouds in the environment of additional electromagnetic fields, such as generated by clearing electrodes. The simulations use the parameters of the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (bERLinPro) to allow for the deduction of appropriate measures for bERLinPro 's design and operation.

  20. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A. A.; Chaudhuri, P.; Khirwadkar, S.; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Reddy, D. Chenna; Saxena, Y. C.

    2008-05-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles.

  1. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Kuchler, F.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Sharma, S.; Burghoff, M.; Fan, I.; and others

    2014-07-15

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  2. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H]4+ ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 446 Å2; the [M + 3H]3+ ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å2 and 367 Å2. Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H]3+ ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H]4+ ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H]4+ ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  3. The influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure of non-oriented silicon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hao, Linpo; Yi, Jingwen; Zhang, Xianglin; Luo, Zhonghan; Chen, Shenglin; Li, Rongfeng

    2016-05-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure. The residual stress in non-oriented silicon steel after punching process was measured by nanoindentation. The maximum depth was kept constant as 300 nm during nanoindentation. The material around indentation region exhibited no significant pile-up deformation. The calculation of residual stress was based on the Suresh theoretical model. Our experimental results show that residual compressive stress was generated around the sheared edge after punching. The width of residual stress affected zone by punching was around 0.4-0.5 mm. After annealing treatment, the residual stress was significantly decreased. Magnetic domain structure was observed according to the Bitter method. The un-annealed sample exhibited complicated domain patterns, and the widths of the magnetic domains varied between 3 μm and 8 μm. Most of the domain patterns of the annealed sample were 180°-domains and 90°-domains, and the widths of the domains decreased to 1-3 μm.

  4. Strongly magnetized cold degenerate electron gas: Mass-radius relation of the magnetized white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-08-01

    We consider a relativistic, degenerate electron gas at zero temperature under the influence of a strong, uniform, static magnetic field, neglecting any form of interactions. Since the density of states for the electrons changes due to the presence of the magnetic field (which gives rise to Landau quantization), the corresponding equation of state also gets modified. In order to investigate the effect of very strong magnetic field, we focus only on systems in which a maximum of either one, two, or three Landau level(s) is/are occupied. This is important since, if a very large number of Landau levels are filled, it implies a very low magnetic field strength which yields back Chandrasekhar’s celebrated nonmagnetic results. The maximum number of occupied Landau levels is fixed by the correct choice of two parameters, namely, the magnetic field strength and the maximum Fermi energy of the system. We study the equations of state of these one-level, two-level, and three-level systems and compare them by taking three different maximum Fermi energies. We also find the effect of the strong magnetic field on the mass-radius relation of the underlying star composed of the gas stated above. We obtain an exciting result that it is possible to have an electron-degenerate static star, namely, magnetized white dwarfs, with a mass significantly greater than the Chandrasekhar limit in the range 2.3-2.6M⊙, provided it has an appropriate magnetic field strength and central density. In fact, recent observations of peculiar type Ia supernovae—SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg—seem to suggest super-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs with masses up to 2.4-2.8M⊙ as their most likely progenitors. Interestingly, our results seem to lie within these observational limits.

  5. DID THE INFANT R136 AND NGC 3603 CLUSTERS UNDERGO RESIDUAL GAS EXPULSION?

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-02-10

    Based on kinematic data observed for very young, massive clusters that appear to be in dynamical equilibrium, it has recently been argued that such young systems are examples of where the early residual gas expulsion did not happen or had no dynamical effect. The intriguing scenario of a star cluster forming through a single starburst has thereby been challenged. Choosing the case of the R136 cluster of the Large Magellanic Cloud, the most cited one in this context, we perform direct N-body computations that mimic the early evolution of this cluster including the gas-removal phase (on a thermal timescale). Our calculations show that under plausible initial conditions which are consistent with observational data, a large fraction (>60%) of a gas-expelled, expanding R136-like cluster is bound to regain dynamical equilibrium by its current age. Therefore, the recent measurements of velocity dispersion in the inner regions of R136, which indicate that the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium, are consistent with an earlier substantial gas expulsion of R136 followed by a rapid re-virialization (in Almost-Equal-To 1 Myr). Additionally, we find that the less massive Galactic NGC 3603 Young Cluster (NYC), with a substantially longer re-virialization time, is likely to be found to have deviated from dynamical equilibrium at its present age ( Almost-Equal-To 1 Myr). The recently obtained stellar proper motions in the central part of the NYC indeed suggest this and are consistent with the computed models. This work significantly extends previous models of the Orion Nebula Cluster which already demonstrated that the re-virialization time of young post-gas-expulsion clusters decreases with increasing pre-expulsion density.

  6. Did the Infant R136 and NGC 3603 Clusters Undergo Residual Gas Expulsion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-02-01

    Based on kinematic data observed for very young, massive clusters that appear to be in dynamical equilibrium, it has recently been argued that such young systems are examples of where the early residual gas expulsion did not happen or had no dynamical effect. The intriguing scenario of a star cluster forming through a single starburst has thereby been challenged. Choosing the case of the R136 cluster of the Large Magellanic Cloud, the most cited one in this context, we perform direct N-body computations that mimic the early evolution of this cluster including the gas-removal phase (on a thermal timescale). Our calculations show that under plausible initial conditions which are consistent with observational data, a large fraction (>60%) of a gas-expelled, expanding R136-like cluster is bound to regain dynamical equilibrium by its current age. Therefore, the recent measurements of velocity dispersion in the inner regions of R136, which indicate that the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium, are consistent with an earlier substantial gas expulsion of R136 followed by a rapid re-virialization (in ≈1 Myr). Additionally, we find that the less massive Galactic NGC 3603 Young Cluster (NYC), with a substantially longer re-virialization time, is likely to be found to have deviated from dynamical equilibrium at its present age (≈1 Myr). The recently obtained stellar proper motions in the central part of the NYC indeed suggest this and are consistent with the computed models. This work significantly extends previous models of the Orion Nebula Cluster which already demonstrated that the re-virialization time of young post-gas-expulsion clusters decreases with increasing pre-expulsion density.

  7. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and coordination with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used--resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a hightemperature (as high as 1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator are a series of electrical wire coils that form a series of electric magnets around the circumference. The magnets exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it in the center of the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and case form a flexible structure that contains a large number of modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system. Cobalt steel has a curie point greater than 1700 F, and copper wire has a melting point beyond that. Therefore, practical limitations associated with the maximum magnetic field strength in the cobalt steel and the stress in the rotating components limit the temperature to about 1200 F. The objective of this effort is to determine the limits in temperature and speed of a magnetic bearing operating in an engine. Our approach is to use our in

  8. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Mao, S. A.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of Hα from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ≈100 rad m{sup –2} which are generally well correlated with decelerated Hα emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ≈8 μG along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or Hα at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth Hα morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (≈1 Rayleigh) Hα intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas.

  9. The Yale Gas-Filled Split Pole Magnetic Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata-Danil, G.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Chen, A.; Chubrich, N.; Cooper, J. R.; Krücken, R.; Liu, B.; Novak, J. R.; Visser, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1998-10-01

    Design and construction of a gas-filled recoil separator is underway at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. By filling the magnetic field region of the existing Enge Split-Pole magnet with N2 or He2 gases in the 1 to 15 mbar pressure range a gradual focussing of discrete charge states has been measured. The incident ions were ^16O and ^35,37Cl with 49 MeV and 95 MeV energies, respectively. The process is understood as a result of coalescing of trajectories of different charge states around a trajectory defined by the mean charge state (q¯) of the ion in gas. Because q¯ depends on the atomic number Z and is roughly proportional with the ion velocity, the average magnetic rigidity (B¯ρ=Av/q¯) is almost independent of the velocity distribution of the incident ions. The ion trajectories will be therefore be mainly determined by the mass number A and the atomic number Z of the ion. Monte Carlo simulations with the code RAYTRACE closely reproduce the experimental behavior. We plan to use the Yale Mass Separator (YaMS) for nuclear structure studies in conjunction with high efficency gamma detectors (clover detectors) for enhancing weak reaction channels and fission background reduction. Work supported by the US-DOE under contract numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  10. New insights into the experimental behavior of magnetized gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.

    2012-10-01

    Helicon discharges have been extensively researched for over 25 years, and over 700 papers have been published on this subject in that time. Helicons are different from other gas discharges because they exist in a dc magnetic field and depend on energy deposition from waves driven by an external radiofrequency (rf) antenna. They produce higher plasma densities than other rf plasmas, but the physics of how they do that turns out to be very complicated. This research has been like peeling an onion. Each layer reveals another layer deeper down. Though the properties of coupled helicon and Trivelpiece-Gould waves have been known for a long time, there has been no theory of the equilibrium profiles of density, electron temperature Te, and neutral density. In tackling this problem, we found that the sheaths on the endplates are important. They allow electrons to cross the magnetic field via the Simon short-circuit effect. A radial electric field is then set up which drives the ions radially outward at a speed scaled to Te. For fixed Te, the density profile follows a ``universal'' profile which is independent of discharge radius and pressure. A physical reason is given for this universality. From this point forward, the theory goes into many details which give insights to the physics of all cylindrical gas discharges, with or without a magnetic field.

  11. Design, fabrication, assembly and delivery of a laboratory prototype of a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreisman, W. S.; Torney, F. L.; Roehrig, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a wide mass range residual gas analyzer which will be one component of an integrated real time contamination monitor system are described. The instrument has been developed and tested to the laboratory prototype phase, demonstrating the performance that can be expected from a flight instrument of similar design. The instrument's analyzer is of the quadrupole type and a cold cathode ion source is employed as the ionizer. The associated electronics supply all necessary operating and mass sweep voltages for the ionizer, analyzer and electron multiplier ion detector. The instrument features a very fast linear electrometer with automatic range changing. The full mass range of 2 to 300 amu is automatically and repetitively scanned every sixty seconds and suitable telemetry outputs are provided for intensity and mass identification as well as a digital identification of the electrometer range.

  12. Application of sedimentary carbohydrate residues in a study of organic facies and natural gas occurrences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, F. M.

    Recent aquatic environments and resulting organic facies can be characterized by types and amounts of carbohydrate residues. Characteristics are based on source organisms, degree and type of degradation, and reactions with associated compounds in the mineral-kerogen-humus complex. Selected modern environments are typified by the following presently known carbohydrate suites: (1) deep sea, mid-Pacific, mid-Atlantic Oceans—glucose, galactose, furfurals, low total carbohydrates (TC); (2) deep gulf, Gulf of California—glu, gal, xylose, mannose, furfurals, moderate to high TC; (3) continental shelf, eastern North America—glu, xyl, gal, furfurals, high TC; (5) oligotrophic lake, Minnesota—furfurals, low TC; (6) eutrophic lake, Minnesota—glu, xyl, arabinose, gal, rhamnose, man, ribose, furfurals, glucuronic acid, high TC; (7) bog, Minnesota—glu, ara, xyl, gal, man, rib, very high TC. Polysaccharides are rare to absent in modern deep sea deposits but have been found in Lower Quaternary and younger deep gulf sediments. Cellulose, alpha- and beta-amylose and laminaran are common in shallow marine and lacustrine sediments. Methane, derived from both terrestrial and aquatic higher plant residues is high in yield in freshwater marshes and bogs and in eutrophic lake sediments, moderate in salt-water marshes and estuaries and relatively low in offshore marine sediments. Nitrogen and carbon dioxide are the commonest non-hydrocarbon gases. In many samples studied, xylans appear to predominate over other plant polysaccharide as methane sources. Carbohydrate residues in ancient rocks, based on examples from North America, show a tentative, but as yet poorly investigated, relationship to environmental organic facies and should prove to be useful in natural gas exploration.

  13. [Determination of residual cyclohexanone in disposable infusion set by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wen, Yan; He, Tao; Wang, Minzhu; Xu, Pinghua

    2014-09-01

    An effective GC method was established for contents determination of the residual solvent of cyclohexanone in infusion sets for single use. The cyclohexanone in infusion sets for single use products were extracted with circular pump, using ethylalcohol as the extraction solven, then the extract followed by analysis of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, Cyclohexanone showed good linearity in the range of (5.5-190.9) μg/mL, the correlation coefficient was 0.999 0, the detection limit (S/N = 3) was 0.133 μg/mL and limits of quantitation (S/N = 10) was 1.33 μg/mL. The spiked average recoveries ranged from 98% to 99%. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the method ranged from 1.03% to 1.98%. The method was simple, fast, sensitive and accurate, and may serve as a mass control method for residual cyclohexanone in disposable infusion sets for single use.

  14. Induction of benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells by manufactured gas residues

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, R.; Levine, G.; Leadon, S.A.; Chaloupka, K.; Safe, S.

    1994-12-31

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the non-genotoxic effects of manufactured gas plant residues which present complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The effect of these residues on benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells was studied. Cells were preincubated with hexane-extractable coal tar material for 16 hr, then incubated with {sup 3}H-BaP for 2 hr and the amount of BaP metabolites in cell extracts was determined by HPLC. An up to 5-fold increase over control in BaP metabolites was seen after preincubation with 0.2 {mu}g/ml coal tar material (a oncytotoxic dose). Coal tar extracts were equally effective as pure BaP in inducing BaP metabolism. As BaP constitutes less than 1% of the coal tar, other components in the coal tar mixtures appear to be even more potent than BaP in inducing the enzyme system responsible for BaP metabolism. The increase in BaP metabolites was accompanied by a proportional increase in P4501A1 mRNA as measured by Northern blotting, and resulted in an increase of BaP adducts to DNA. These results show that coal tars and other P450-inducting compounds can act as cocarcinogens by enhancing the genotoxic effects of compounds metabolized by the P4501A1 enzyme.

  15. New Measurement Method of Outgassing Speed with a Sealed off Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Fumio

    The new measurement method of outgassing speed with a sealed off quadrupole residual gas analyzer (RGA) has been proposed. The unique feature of this method is that the high vacuum can be maintained by the self-pumping effect of the ultra low outgassing RGA. The newly-developed mass analyzer combined with BA-gauge is the key for this method. The pressure of chamber can be maintained below 2~5×10-7 Pa for a year without any pumping system. The majority of residual gases in the chamber were found to be hydrogen, methane and carbon-monoxide. In order to measure the outgassing speed of the RGA, the pumping speeds were measured by the self-pumping effect of RGA for hydrogen, deuterium, methane, nitrogen, carbon-monoxide, carbon-dioxide, oxygen and argon. When the pumping speed of RGA is balanced for outgassing from the RGA itself, we can calculate its value from the partial pressure in the spectrum. Then, we obtain the outgassing speeds for hydrogen=8.8×10-13 Pa m3/s, methane=1.2×10-13 Pa m3/s, carbon-monoxide=1.0×10-13 Pa m3/s.

  16. Feasibility of magnetic bearings for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, David; Rosado, Lewis

    1992-01-01

    The application of active magnetic bearings to advanced gas turbine engines will provide a product with major improvements compared to current oil lubricated bearing designs. A rethinking of the engine rotating and static structure design is necessary and will provide the designer with significantly more freedom to meet the demanding goals of improved performance, increased durability, higher reliability, and increased thrust to weight ratio via engine weight reduction. The product specific technology necessary for this high speed, high temperature, dynamically complex application has been defined. The resulting benefits from this approach to aircraft engine rotor support and the complementary engine changes and improvements have been assessed.

  17. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer coupled with the Lohengrin spectrometer for fission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessedjian, G.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2013-03-01

    The accurate knowledge of the fission of actinides is necessary for studies of innovative nuclear reactor concepts. The fission yields have a direct influence on the evaluation of the fuel inventory or the reactor residual power after shutdown. A collaboration between the ILL, LPSC and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at ILL in order to measure the isotopic and isomeric yields. The method is illustrated using the 233U(n,f)98Y reaction. However, the extracted beam from the Lohengrin spectrometer is not isobaric ions which limits the low yield measurements. Presently, the coupling of the Lohengrin spectrometer with a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM) is studied at the ILL in order to define and validate the enhanced purification of the extracted beam. This work will present the results of the spectrometer characterisation, along with a comparison with a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation especially developed for this purpose.

  18. Studies on the practical application of producer gas from agricultural residues as supplementary fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, I.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gasification of various agricultural residues in down-draft, fixed bed gas producers and the utilization of the gas in small diesel engines converted for dual-fuel operation were studied at the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines. Such agricultural residues as coconut shells, wood waste, rice hulls and corn cobs were readily gasified in gas producers of simple design. Cleaning of the gas before its use in diesel engines presented some problems. Use of charcoal in the gas producers to provide gas to a 5-brake horsepower single cylinder engine and a 65-brake horsepower six cylinder engine proved satisfactory. With charcoal as fuel, the percentage of the total energy from diesel oil replaced by producer gas and utilized in the single cylinder engine was higher (79%) compared to that in the six cylinder engine (73%). The thermal efficiency of the bigger gas producer, however was significantly better (85%) compared to the smaller gas producer (70%). The total gasification rate of the bigger reactor (20 kg/h) was 8 times that (2.5 kg/h) of the smaller reactor.

  19. Status of the design of the Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer System for ITER first plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Devan, B.; Graves, V.; Marcus, C.; Younkin, T.; Andrew, P.; Johnson, D. W.

    2013-10-01

    Among the ITER procurements awarded to the US ITER Domestic Agency, and subsequently to the ORNL Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, is the design and fabrication of the Diagnostc Residual Gas Analyzer (DRGA) system. The DRGA system reached the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in Spring 2013, and has transitioned into the Final Design phase. As a result of the PDR, and ITER systems design evolutions, several design changes have been incorporated into the DRGA system. The design effort has focused on the vacuum and mechanical interface of the DRGA gas sampling tube with the ITER vacuum vessel and cyrostat. Moreover, R&D tasks to demonstrate the 3-sensor instrumentation design (quadrupole mass spectrometer, ion-trap mass spectrometer, and optical Penning gauge) are maturing through the construction and testing of a DRGA prototype at ORNL. Results will be presented at this poster along with the DRGA design overview. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  20. Initial velocity of secondary ions from XY-TOF technique, simultaneous calibration by residual gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalowy, T.; Weber, Th; Dörner, R.; Farenzena, L.; Collado, V. M.; da Silveira, E. F.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Groeneveld, K. O.

    2004-01-01

    A crucial parameter to distinguish the prompt secondary ion emission from surfaces after particle impact from the delayed one is T0(m/q), the time-of-flight (TOF) of ions with a given mass m and charge q "emitted" with zero velocity. This quantity is also an important reference for the measurement of prompt ion emission velocity distribution. Presented is a novel and accurate method to determine T0(m/q), based on position sensitive XY-TOF analysis of residual gas ionization along the projectile trajectory, which is a low-pressure version of the traditional cloud chamber technique. Measurements using a mixture of He, Ne and Ar gases at low pressure (10-5 mbar) were performed to illustrate this new T0-gas target calibration method. Secondary ion emission of Hn+, CnHn+ and Li+ ions from C, Al and LiF targets, bombarded by MeV Ar0 and N0 projectiles, is analyzed. It is found that, in contrast to Li+, hydrogen and hydrocarbon ions are always promptly emitted. The initial velocity distribution of H2+ is determined and discussed.

  1. Selective Gas-Phase Oxidation and Localization of Alkylated Cysteine Residues in Polypeptide Ions via Ion/Ion Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    The thiol group in cysteine residues is susceptible to several post-translational modifications (PTMs), including prenylation, nitrosylation, palmitoylation, and the formation of disulfide bonds. Additionally, cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds are commonly reduced and alkylated prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Several of these cysteine modifications, specifically S-alkyl modifications, are susceptible to gas-phase oxidation via selective ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Multiply protonated peptides containing modified cysteine residues undergo complex formation upon ion/ion reaction with periodate anions. Activation of the ion/ion complexes results in oxygen transfer from the reagent to the modified sulfur residue to create a sulfoxide functionality. Further activation of the sulfoxide derivative yields abundant losses of the modification with the oxidized sulfur as a sulfenic acid (namely, XSOH) to generate a dehydroalanine residue. This loss immediately indicates the presence of an S-alkyl cysteine residue, and the mass of the loss can be used to easily deduce the type of modification. An additional step of activation can be used to localize the modification to a specific residue within the peptide. Selective cleavage to create c- and z-ions N-terminal to the dehydroalanine residue is often noted. As these types of ions are not typically observed upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), they can be used to immediately indicate where in the peptide the PTM was originally located. PMID:27476698

  2. Selective Gas-Phase Oxidation and Localization of Alkylated Cysteine Residues in Polypeptide Ions via Ion/Ion Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    The thiol group in cysteine residues is susceptible to several post-translational modifications (PTMs), including prenylation, nitrosylation, palmitoylation, and the formation of disulfide bonds. Additionally, cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds are commonly reduced and alkylated prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Several of these cysteine modifications, specifically S-alkyl modifications, are susceptible to gas-phase oxidation via selective ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Multiply protonated peptides containing modified cysteine residues undergo complex formation upon ion/ion reaction with periodate anions. Activation of the ion/ion complexes results in oxygen transfer from the reagent to the modified sulfur residue to create a sulfoxide functionality. Further activation of the sulfoxide derivative yields abundant losses of the modification with the oxidized sulfur as a sulfenic acid (namely, XSOH) to generate a dehydroalanine residue. This loss immediately indicates the presence of an S-alkyl cysteine residue, and the mass of the loss can be used to easily deduce the type of modification. An additional step of activation can be used to localize the modification to a specific residue within the peptide. Selective cleavage to create c- and z-ions N-terminal to the dehydroalanine residue is often noted. As these types of ions are not typically observed upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), they can be used to immediately indicate where in the peptide the PTM was originally located.

  3. Novel processing of Barkhausen noise signal for assessment of residual stress in surface ground components exhibiting poor magnetic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashista, M.; Paul, S.

    2011-11-01

    The Barkhausen Noise Analysis (BNA) technique has been utilised to assess surface integrity of steels. But the BNA technique is not very successful in evaluating surface integrity of ground steels that exhibit poor micro-magnetic response. A new approach has been proposed for the processing of BN signal and two newly proposed parameters, namely 'count' and 'event', have been shown to correlate linearly with the residual stress upon grinding, with judicious choice of user defined 'threshold', even when the micro-magnetic response of the work material is poor. In the present study, residual stress induced upon conventional plunge surface grinding of hardened bearing steel has been investigated along with unhardened bearing steel for benchmarking. Moreover, similar correlation has been established, when primarily compressive stress is induced upon high speed grinding using cBN wheel with moderately deep cut suppressing the micro-magnetic response from the ground medium carbon steel as the work material.

  4. The modification of residual gas analyzers to produce mass-selected ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have constructed an instrument designed to trap mass-selected ions at low temperatures within a solid inert gas matrix for spectroscopic analysis. The goal was to construct a flexible instrument that would permit the study of a wide variety of mass-selected positive ions, and which could also be used to investigate the role that counterions play in the effective trapping of ionic species in inert cryogenic hosts. The instrument was designed to utilize both laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies to identify and investigate the structure of the trapped species. The sources employed in this experiment must produce high current ion beams for extended periods to allow the accumulation of a significant number of absorbers in the optical beam for FTIR investigation. Residual gas analyzers (RGAs) were selected as the basis for the mass-selected ion sources for this instrument. This dissertation focuses on the modification of two RGAs to produce controlled beams of mass-selected positive and negative ions that can be directed onto a remote surface for matrix isolation experiments. The discussion includes descriptions of the modifications made to the RGA ion sources and to a commercially available chemical ionization source to produce ions by surface emission, chemical ionization, and negative surface ionization. The mass-selected beams produced by the RGA quadrupoles were focused and deflected using a series of electrostatic optics. The design of these elements was optimized using computer modeling and ion beam visualization techniques. The modifications have allowed these RGAs to produce mass-selected ion beams that have been effectively used in the isolation of mass-selected ions within solid inert gas matrices.

  5. Gas-liquid chromatographic and gas-liquid-mass spectometric determination of fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissue samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Kolbe, E.J.; Stafford, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for determining fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissues. Samples are Soxhlet-extracted with hexane and cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography with an in-line alumina column. Samples are analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography with electron capture detection, and confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The average recovery from fortified tissues was 97%.

  6. Magnetic Field Generation and Zonal Flows in the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, L.; Wicht, J.; Gastine, T.

    2013-12-01

    The surface dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn is dominated by a banded system of fierce zonal winds. The depth of these winds remains unclear but they are thought to be confined to the very outer envelopes where hydrogen remains molecular and the electrical conductivity is negligible. The dynamo responsible for the dipole dominated magnetic fields of both Gas Giants, on the other hand, likely operates in the deeper interior where hydrogen assumes a metallic state. We present numerical simulations that attempt to model both the zonal winds and the interior dynamo action in an integrated approach. Using the anelastic version of the MHD code MagIC, we explore the effects of density stratification and radial electrical conductivity variations. The electrical conductivity is assumed to remain constant in the thicker inner metallic region and decays exponentially towards the outer boundary throughout the molecular envelope. Our results show that the combination of stronger density stratification (Δρ≈55) and a weaker conducting outer layer is essential for reconciling dipole dominated dynamo action and a fierce equatorial zonal jet. Previous simulations with homogeneous electrical conductivity show that both are mutually exclusive, with solutions either having strong zonal winds and multipolar magnetic fields or weak zonal winds and dipole dominated magnetic fields. The particular setup explored here allows the equatorial jet to remain confined to the weaker conducting region where is does not interfere with the deeper seated dynamo action. The equatorial jet can afford to remain geostrophic and reaches throughout the whole shell. This is not an option for the additional mid to higher latitude jets, however. In dipole dominated dynamo solutions, appropriate for the Gas Giants, zonal flows remain very faint in the deeper dynamo region but increase in amplitude in the weakly conducting outer layer in some of our simulations. This suggests that the mid to high latitude jets

  7. Compact permanent magnet H⁺ ECR ion source with pulse gas valve.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Y; Tongu, H; Fuwa, Y; Ichikawa, M

    2016-02-01

    Compact H(+) ECR ion source using permanent magnets is under development. Switching the hydrogen gas flow in pulse operations can reduce the gas loads to vacuum evacuation systems. A specially designed piezo gas valve chops the gas flow quickly. A 6 GHz ECR ion source equipped with the piezo gas valve is tested. The gas flow was measured by a fast ion gauge and a few ms response time is obtained. PMID:26931936

  8. Residual Gas Analysis of Samples Formed from the UV Irradiation of Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materese, C. K.; Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of complex organics, including nucleic acids, amino acids, sugars, and other molecules of prebiotic interest, in an interstellar environment is an important field of modern astrochemistry research. In a typical experiment, we perform a controlled deposition of a known mixture of gas onto a cold finger while irradiating the sample to simulate the conditions of cold interstellar grains (Bernstein et al., 1995, 2002; Muñoz Caro et al., 2002; Nuevo et al., 2008, 2009, 2010). After the deposition is complete, the sample is warmed and recovered for analysis. Our traditional analysis methods have made extensive use of HPLC with UV-visible detection, GC-MS, and IR spectroscopy when appropriate. While these techniques provide significant insight into the photo-processing of our ices, they invariably lead to the loss of some volatiles during the warm-up, which may be of interest. In order to learn more about the volatiles lost during the warm-up we have installed a residual gas analyzer (RGA) mass spec device on one of our vacuum systems. With this tool, we can perform controlled warm-ups of our samples and monitor the composition of outgassing volatiles as a function of temperature change. Knowledge of the composition of these volatiles could prove invaluable in two ways. First, we may observe important chemical species, which we are unable to detect with our other methods because they are either lost during the warm-up, or cannot be detected using our GC-MS protocol. Second, even compounds which are mundane in and of themselves, may provide important clues about the type of chemistry occurring within the rest of the ice. We are currently using the RGA to study the formation of pyrimidine-based nucleobases from in interstellar ice analogs. In the future we will expand our studies to purines-based nucleic acids, amino acids, and other prebiotic organics.

  9. Magnetic tunnel junctions on magnetic shield smoothed by gas cluster ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. J.; Shimazawa, K.; Kasahara, N.; Sato, K.; Kagami, T.; Saruki, S.; Araki, S.; Matsuzaki, M.

    2001-06-01

    In this work, a technique, gas cluster ion beam (GCIB), was introduced to smooth the bottom NiFe magnetic shield for magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) read heads. The GCIB treatment can bring the surface roughness of the shield from 15 to 20 Aa to around 5 Aa, and the most of scratch marks can be removed. The efficiency of the GCIB process is dependent on the initial surface morphology. The MTJs grown on the magnetic shield smoothed by the GCIB show that the resistance area product RA is increased from 60 to {similar_to}100 {Omega}{mu}m2 with the GCIB dose up to 1{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, arising from a smooth insulating layer, meanwhile, the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is almost constant or slightly decreases. This GCIB process can also improve breakdown voltage (approximately 0.019 V per 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) of the MTJs, and slightly increase the ferromagnetic coupling mainly due to the change of the surface morphology. Using this technology, an RA as low as 3.5{endash}6.5 {Omega}{mu}m2 together with a TMR of 14%{endash}18% can be obtained for MTJs grown on the GCIB treated NiFe magnetic shield. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Tunable Circularly Polarized Terahertz Radiation from Magnetized Gas Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-06-26

    It is shown, by simulation and theory, that circularly or elliptically polarized terahertz radiation can be generated when a static magnetic (B) field is imposed on a gas target along the propagation direction of a two-color laser driver. The radiation frequency is determined by √[ω(p)(2)+ω(c)(2)/4]+ω(c)/2, where ω(p) is the plasma frequency and ω(c) is the electron cyclotron frequency. With the increase of the B field, the radiation changes from a single-cycle broadband waveform to a continuous narrow-band emission. In high-B-field cases, the radiation strength is proportional to ω(p)(2)/ω(c). The B field provides a tunability in the radiation frequency, spectrum width, and field strength.

  11. Assessing Atmospheric CO2 Entrapped in Clay Nanotubes using Residual Gas Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Maity, Abhijit; Pradhan, Manik; Jana, Subhra

    2016-02-16

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA) coupled with a high-vacuum chamber has been explored to measure atmospheric CO2 entrapped in aminosilane-modified clay nanotubes. Ambient CO2 uptake efficacy together with stability of these novel adsorbents composed of both primary and/or secondary amine sites has been demonstrated at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy of the RGA-based mass spectrometry technique toward atmospheric CO2 measurement has been substantiated with a laser-based optical cavity-enhanced integrated cavity output spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of atmospheric CO2 on amine-functionalized clay nanotubes followed the fractional-order kinetic model compared to that of the pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order rate equations. The efficiency along with stability of these novel adsorbents has also been demonstrated by their repetitive use for CO2 capture in the oxidative environment. Our findings thus point to a fundamental study on the atmospheric CO2 adsorption by amine-loaded adsorbents using an easy handling and low-cost benchtop RGA-based mass spectrometer, opening a new strategy for CO2 capture and sequestering study. PMID:26790755

  12. Removal of element mercury by medicine residue derived biochars in presence of various gas compositions.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoliang; Shen, Boxiong; Li, Yongwang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Fumei; He, Chuan; Wang, Yinyin; Zhang, Min

    2015-11-15

    Pyrolyzed biochars from an industrial medicinal residue waste were modified by microwave activation and NH4Cl impregnation. Mercury adsorption of different modified biochars was investigated in a quartz fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg(0) occurred on the surface of M6WN5 which was modified both microwave and 5wt.% NH4Cl loading, and exothermic chemisorption process was a dominant route for Hg(0) removal. Microwave activation improved pore properties and NH4Cl impregnation introduced good active sites for biochars. The presence of NO and O2 increased Hg(0) adsorption whereas H2O inhibited Hg(0) adsorption greatly. A converse effect of SO2 was observed on Hg(0) removal, namely, low concentration of SO2 promoted Hg(0) removal obviously whereas high concentration of SO2 suppressed Hg(0) removal. The Hg(0) removal by M6WN5 was mainly due to the reaction of the C−Cl with Hg(0) to form HgCl2, and the active state of C−Cl(*) groups might be an intermediate group in this process. Thermodynamic analysis showed that mercury adsorption by the biochars was exothermic process and apparent adsorption energy was 43.3 kJ/mol in the range of chemisorption. In spite of low specific surface area, M6WN5 proved to be a promising Hg(0) sorbent in flue gas when compared with other sorbents.

  13. Assessing Atmospheric CO2 Entrapped in Clay Nanotubes using Residual Gas Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Maity, Abhijit; Pradhan, Manik; Jana, Subhra

    2016-02-16

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA) coupled with a high-vacuum chamber has been explored to measure atmospheric CO2 entrapped in aminosilane-modified clay nanotubes. Ambient CO2 uptake efficacy together with stability of these novel adsorbents composed of both primary and/or secondary amine sites has been demonstrated at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy of the RGA-based mass spectrometry technique toward atmospheric CO2 measurement has been substantiated with a laser-based optical cavity-enhanced integrated cavity output spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of atmospheric CO2 on amine-functionalized clay nanotubes followed the fractional-order kinetic model compared to that of the pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order rate equations. The efficiency along with stability of these novel adsorbents has also been demonstrated by their repetitive use for CO2 capture in the oxidative environment. Our findings thus point to a fundamental study on the atmospheric CO2 adsorption by amine-loaded adsorbents using an easy handling and low-cost benchtop RGA-based mass spectrometer, opening a new strategy for CO2 capture and sequestering study.

  14. Characterization of Residual Stresses in Ferrous Components by Magnetic Anisotropy Measurements Using a Hall Effect Sensor Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.

    2011-06-01

    A new surface sensor probe comprising an angular array of Hall effect sensors has been developed for characterization of residual stresses in ferrous materials by means of stress-induced magnetic anisotropy measurements. The sensor probe applies a radially spreading ac magnetic field to a test sample, and detects stray fields in different directions simultaneously to determine the principal stress axes. In situ measurements were conducted on a annealed steel plate under four-point bending stresses to evaluate the probe performance. The ratio of stray field signals measured along and perpendicular to the stress axis varies linearly with the surface stress, indicating the possibility of characterizing residual stresses in ferrous components using the sensor array probe.

  15. Quantum-mechanical calculations of residual current density excited during gas ionisation by an intense two-colour laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Romanov, A. A.; Silaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    By solving analytically and numerically the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we have studied the excitation of a residual current density during gas ionisation by a two-colour laser pulse containing a field at the fundamental frequency and an additional field at the doubled frequency. We have found the dependences of the residual current density on the phase shift between the components of the field and on the intensity of the fundamental harmonic. It is shown that the strong-field approximation taking into account the interaction of freed electrons with the parent ion yields a good quantitative agreement with the results of direct numerical simulation.

  16. Characterization and comparative study of coal combustion residues from a primary and additional flue gas secondary desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Evrard, O.; Pellissier, C.

    1998-11-01

    An extensive characterization and comparative study was done on two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residues derived from the same coal. LR residues (originated from Loire/Rhone in the south of Lyon, France) are obtained after a primary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is trapped by reaction with CaO at a temperature of about 1100 C), and LM residues (originating from La Maxe, near Metz in the east of France) are obtained after an additional secondary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is removed further by reaction with Ca(OH){sub 2} at a temperature of about 120 C). Various and complementary investigation methods were used to determine their chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties: x-ray fluorescence and diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry analysis, granulometric distribution, pycnometric density, BET specific surface area and pH, conductivity measurements, and chemical analysis of their insoluble fraction. The FGD residues contain basically two main components: a silico-aluminous fly ash part and calcic FGD phases. In the LR residues the two components can be considered as independent, whereas they are linked in the LM residues because chemical reactions have occurred, leading to the formation of silico-calcic gel CSH, hydrated aluminate AFm, and AFt phases.

  17. Synchrotron X-ray measurement and finite element analysis of residual strain in tungsten inert gas welded aluminum alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R. V.; Shercliff, H. R.; Withers, P. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Smith, S. D.; Webster, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    Residual strains have been measured in a tungsten inert gas (TIG) butt-welded 2024 aluminum alloy plate using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Novel two-dimensional strain maps spanning the entire plate reveal steep gradients in residual stress and provide detailed validation data for finite element (FE) analysis. Two variants of a FE model have been used to predict the residual strain distributions, incorporating different levels of plate constraint. The model uses decoupled thermal and elastic-plastic mechanical analyses and successfully predicts the longitudinal and transverse residual strain field over the entire weld. For butt weld geometries, the degree of transverse constraint is shown to be a significant boundary condition, compared to simpler bead-on-plate analyses. The importance of transverse residual strains for detailed model validation is highlighted, together with the need for care in selecting the location for line scans. The residual stress is largest in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), being equal to the local postweld yield stress, though the strength increases subsequently by natural aging. In addition, a halving of the diffraction line width has been observed local to the weld, and this correlates with the microstructural changes in the region.

  18. Exchange interaction and oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.; Al'pern, A. V.; Sal'nikov, N. V.

    2006-10-15

    The exchange energy of the electron gas on a cylindrical surface in a constant magnetic field has been calculated. Analytical formulas describing the contribution of the exchange interaction into oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder have been obtained. It is shown that the magnetic response of the system exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases.

  19. Finite-element analysis of a magnetic sensor to detect permeability changes due to residual stresses in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, Madhav R.; Katragadda, Gopichand; Wallace, John L.

    1998-03-01

    High strength steel alloys (such as 300 M) used in naval aircraft engine and landing gear components are subjected to cyclic loading in service and found to be highly susceptible to fatigue cracking. There is a critical need for nondestructive evaluation techniques which can detect both cracking and potential crack nucleation sites within these components. An innovative electromagnetic technology called the stress induced-magnetic-anisotropy (SMA) technique has been proposed to be used to detect and evaluate residual stresses. SMA measures residual stresses by sensing the changes in magnetic flux induced in directions parallel and perpendicular to the stress. A novel probe and instrumentation is being developed to simultaneously detect both subsurface residual stresses and stress-induced cracking in coated and uncoated ferromagnetic structures. Finite element analysis has been used to determine the distribution of magnetic flux density and inductance of the probe under varying AC fields. Using ANSYSTM EMAG, the effect of varying frequency of the excitation field, permeability and dimensions of the core have been analyzed. The paper describes how finite element analysis can be used in design and development of the probe and in understanding its behavior.

  20. Greenhouse gas reductions through enhanced use of residues in the life cycle of Malaysian palm oil derived biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sune Balle; Olsen, Stig Irving; Ujang, Zaini

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, which can be achieved by optimizing the use of residues in the life cycle of palm oil derived biodiesel. This is done through compilation of data on existing and prospective treatment technologies as well as practical experiments on methane potentials from empty fruit bunches. Methane capture from the anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent was found to result in the highest GHG reductions. Among the solid residues, energy extraction from shells was found to constitute the biggest GHG savings per ton of residue, whereas energy extraction from empty fruit bunches was found to be the most significant in the biodiesel production life cycle. All the studied waste treatment technologies performed significantly better than the conventional practices and with dedicated efforts of optimized use in the palm oil industry, the production of palm oil derived biodiesel can be almost carbon neutral.

  1. MECHANISM FOR EXCITING PLANETARY INCLINATION AND ECCENTRICITY THROUGH A RESIDUAL GAS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuanyuan; Liu Huigen; Zhao Gang; Zhou Jilin E-mail: zhoujl@nju.edu.cn

    2013-05-20

    According to the theory of Kozai resonance, the initial mutual inclination between a small body and a massive planet in an outer circular orbit is as high as {approx}39. Degree-Sign 2 for pumping the eccentricity of the inner small body. Here we show that with the presence of a residual gas disk outside two planetary orbits, the inclination can be reduced to as low as a few degrees. The presence of the disk changes the nodal precession rates and directions of the planet orbits. At the place where the two planets achieve the same nodal processing rate, vertical secular resonance (VSR) occurs so that the mutual inclination of the two planets will be excited, which might further trigger the Kozai resonance between the two planets. However, in order to pump an inner Jupiter-like planet, the conditions required for the disk and the outer planet are relatively strict. We develop a set of evolution equations, which can fit the N-body simulation quite well but can be integrated within a much shorter time. By scanning the parameter spaces using the evolution equations, we find that a massive planet (10 M{sub J} ) at 30 AU with an inclination of 6 Degree-Sign to a massive disk (50 M{sub J} ) can finally enter the Kozai resonance with an inner Jupiter around the snowline. An inclination of 20 Degree-Sign of the outer planet to the disk is required for flipping the inner one to a retrograde orbit. In multiple planet systems, the mechanism can happen between two nonadjacent planets or can inspire a chain reaction among more than two planets. This mechanism could be the source of the observed giant planets in moderate eccentric and inclined orbits, or hot Jupiters in close-in, retrograde orbits after tidal damping.

  2. The influence of spin orbit coupling and a current dependent potential on the residual resistivity of disordered magnetic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, H.; Vernes, A.; Banhart, J.

    1999-11-01

    It has been shown recently, for a number of various magnetic disordered alloy systems, that the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) may have an important influence on the isotropic residual resistivity and that it is the primary source of the galvano-magnetic properties spontaneous magnetoresistance anisotropy (SMA) and anomalous Hall resistivity (AHR). Here it is demonstrated that—in contrast to many other spin-orbit induced phenomena—all these findings stem from the part of the spin-orbit coupling that gives rise to a mixing of the two spin sub-systems. In line with this result it is shown that inclusion of a current dependent potential within a calculation of the underlying electronic structure hardly affects the transport properties if the corresponding magnetic vector potential does not lead to a mixing of the spin sub-systems.

  3. Onsager's symmetry relation and the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a magnetized plasma with electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yang Wang, Shaojie

    2014-09-15

    The physics of the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a rotating plasma with electrostatic turbulence is explicitly identified by using the transport formulation of the gyrokinetic turbulence. It is clarified that the residual stress consists of four terms, among which are the cross terms due to the pressure gradient and the temperature gradient and the terms related to the turbulent acceleration impulse and the turbulent heating rate. The last two terms are identified for the first time, and are shown to cause analogous residual term in the heat flux. Meanwhile, the transport matrix reveals diffusion in the phase space. The transport matrix is demonstrated to satisfy the Onsager's symmetry relation.

  4. Green house gas emissions from open field burning of agricultural residues in India.

    PubMed

    Murali, S; Shrivastava, Rajnish; Saxena, Mohini

    2010-10-01

    In India, about 435.98 MMT of agro-residues are produced every year, out of which 313.62 MMT are surplus. These residues are either partially utilized or un-utilised due to various constraints. To pave the way for subsequent season for agriculture activity, the excess crop residues are burnt openly in the fields, unmindful of their ill effects on the environment. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the severity of air pollution through emission of green house gases (GHGs) due to open field burning of agro-residues in India. Open field burning of surplus agro-residues in India results in the emission of GHG. Emissions of CH4 and N2O in 1997-98 and 2006-07 have been 3.73 and 4.06 MMT CO2 equivalent, which is an increase of 8.88% over a decade. About three-fourths of GHG emissions from agro-residues burning were CH4 and the remaining one-fourth were N2O. Burning of wheat and paddy straws alone contributes to about 42% of GHGs. These GHG emissions can be avoided once the agro-residues are employed for sustainable, cost-effective and environment- friendly options like power generation.

  5. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, H.; Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-01

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T2/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  6. (210)Pb content in natural gas pipeline residues ("black-powder") and its correlation with the chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Godoy, José Marcus; Carvalho, Franciane; Cordilha, Aloisio; Matta, Luiz Ernesto; Godoy, Maria Luiza

    2005-01-01

    The present work was carried out to assess the (210)Pb content in "black-powder" found in pigging operations on gas pipelines in Brazil, in particular, on the Campos Basin gas pipeline. Additionally, the chemical composition of such deposits was determined and an eventual correlation with (210)Pb concentration evaluated. Typical "black-powder" generated in the natural gas pipeline from Campos Basin oilfield contains mainly iron oxide ( approximately 81%) and residual organic matter ( approximately 9%). The (210)Pb content ranges from 4.9 to 0.04k Bqkg(-1) and seems to be inversely correlated with the distance to the platforms. On the other hand, (226)Ra concentration is higher on the pipeline branch between the platform and the onshore installations. (228)Ra was only observed in few samples, in particular, in the samples with the highest (226)Ra content.

  7. RESIDUAL GAS MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM AND BIAS IN HYDROSTATIC MEASUREMENTS OF MASS PROFILES OF CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Erwin T.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2009-11-10

    We present analysis of bulk and random gas motions in the intracluster medium using high-resolution Eulerian cosmological simulations of 16 simulated clusters, including both very relaxed and unrelaxed systems and spanning a virial mass range of 5 x 10{sup 13} - 2 x 10{sup 15} h{sup -1} M-odot. We investigate effects of the residual subsonic gas motions on the hydrostatic estimates of mass profiles and concentrations of galaxy clusters. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the gas motions contribute up to approx5%-15% of the total pressure support in relaxed clusters with contribution increasing with the cluster-centric radius. The fractional pressure support is higher in unrelaxed systems. This contribution would not be accounted for in hydrostatic estimates of the total mass profile and would lead to systematic underestimate of mass. We demonstrate that total mass can be recovered accurately if pressure due to gas motions measured in simulations is explicitly taken into account in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Given that the underestimate of mass is increasing at larger radii, where gas is less relaxed and contribution of gas motions to pressure is larger, the total density profile derived from hydrostatic analysis is more concentrated than the true profile. This may at least partially explain some high values of concentrations of clusters estimated from hydrostatic analysis of X-ray data.

  8. Application of low-pressure gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry to the determination of pesticide residues in tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Fernández Moreno, José Luis; Arrebola Liébanas, Francisco Javier; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2007-01-01

    A multiresidue method has been developed for determining pesticide residues in the tropical fruits kiwi, custard apple, and mango. The intended purpose of the method is for regulatory analyses of commodities for pesticides that have established maximum residue limits. A fast and simple extraction method with cyclohexane-ethyl acetate (1 + 1, v/v) and a high-speed homogenizer was optimized. Pressurized liquid extraction was evaluated as an alternative automated extraction technique. The pesticide residues were determined by using low-pressure gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed methodology was validated for each matrix. Pesticide recoveries ranged from 70 to 110%, with repeatability relative standard deviations of < or = 18% at spiking levels of 12 and 50 microg/kg. The limits of quantitation were in the range of 0.03-6.17 microg/kg, and the limits of detection were between 0.01 and 3.75 microg/kg. Mango can be selected as a representative matrix for calibration on the basis of the results of a potential matrix effect study. The method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in real samples in Spain.

  9. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor.

  10. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor. PMID:25940479

  11. On the possibility of magnetic nano-markers use for hydraulic fracturing in shale gas mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Jaroslaw; Bogacki, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Recently shale gas production became essential for the global economy, thanks to fast advances in shale fracturing technology. Shale gas extraction can be achieved by drilling techniques coupled with hydraulic fracturing. Further increasing of shale gas production is possible by improving the efficiency of hydraulic fracturing and assessing the spatial distribution of fractures in shale deposits. The latter can be achieved by adding magnetic markers to fracturing fluid or directly to proppant, which keeps the fracture pathways open. After that, the range of hydraulic fracturing can be assessed by measurement of vertical and horizontal component of earth's magnetic field before and after fracturing. The difference in these components caused by the presence of magnetic marker particles may allow to delineate spatial distribution of fractures. Due to the fact, that subterranean geological formations may contain minerals with significant magnetic properties, it is important to provide to the markers excellent magnetic properties which should be also, independent of harsh chemical and geological conditions. On the other hand it is of great significance to produce magnetic markers at an affordable price because of the large quantities of fracturing fluids or proppants used during shale fracturing. Examining the properties of nano-materials, it was found, that they possess clearly superior magnetic properties, as compared to the same structure but having a larger particle size. It should be then possible, to use lower amount of magnetic marker, to obtain the same effect. Although a research on properties of new magnetic nano-materials is very intensive, cheap magnetic nano-materials are not yet produced on a scale appropriate for shale gas mining. In this work we overview, in detail, geological, technological and economic aspects of using magnetic nano-markers in shale gas mining. Acknowledgment This work was supported by the NCBiR under Grant "Electromagnetic method to

  12. Development, validation and determination of multiclass pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zainudin, Badrul Hisyam; Salleh, Salsazali; Mohamed, Rahmat; Yap, Ken Choy; Muhamad, Halimah

    2015-04-01

    An efficient and rapid method for the analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed, validated and applied to imported and domestic cocoa beans samples collected over 2 years from smallholders and Malaysian ports. The method was based on solvent extraction method and covers 26 pesticides (insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides) of different chemical classes. The recoveries for all pesticides at 10 and 50 μg/kg were in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations of less than 20%. Good selectivity and sensitivity were obtained with method limit of quantification of 10 μg/kg. The expanded uncertainty measurements were in the range of 4-25%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the routine analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans via a monitoring study where 10% of them was found positive for chlorpyrifos, ametryn and metalaxyl. PMID:25442595

  13. Development, validation and determination of multiclass pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zainudin, Badrul Hisyam; Salleh, Salsazali; Mohamed, Rahmat; Yap, Ken Choy; Muhamad, Halimah

    2015-04-01

    An efficient and rapid method for the analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed, validated and applied to imported and domestic cocoa beans samples collected over 2 years from smallholders and Malaysian ports. The method was based on solvent extraction method and covers 26 pesticides (insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides) of different chemical classes. The recoveries for all pesticides at 10 and 50 μg/kg were in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations of less than 20%. Good selectivity and sensitivity were obtained with method limit of quantification of 10 μg/kg. The expanded uncertainty measurements were in the range of 4-25%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the routine analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans via a monitoring study where 10% of them was found positive for chlorpyrifos, ametryn and metalaxyl.

  14. Estimation of quizalofop ethyl residues in black gram (Vigna mungo L.) by gas liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kousik; Sahoo, Sanjay Kumar; Battu, R S; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-01-01

    Quizalofop ethyl, a phenoxy propionate herbicide is used for post emergence control of annual and perennial grass weeds in broad-leaved crops in India. The experiments were designed to study the harvest time residues of quizalofop ethyl in black gram for two seasons. At harvest time, the residues of quizalofop ethyl on black gram seed, foliage and soil were found to be below the determination limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1) following a single application of the herbicide at 50 and 100 g a.i. ha(-1) for both the periods. Application of the herbicide is quite safe from a consumer and environmental point of view.

  15. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J. H.; Endoh, T.; Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O.

    2014-05-07

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50 s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5 kΩ to 39 kΩ. Moreover, an additional 500 s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5 kΩ to 13.9 kΩ. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8 nm and 12.8 nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20 nm.

  16. The Evolution of Gas Clouds Falling in the Magnetic Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, R. L.

    2007-12-01

    In the Galactic fountain scenario, supernovae and/or super bubbles propel material into the Galactic halo. As the material cools, it condenses into clouds. By using the 3-D magneto-hydrodynamic simulations, we modeled and studied the dynamical evolution of these gas clouds. In our simulations, we assume that the gas clouds have already formed in the process of the Galactic fountain and start to fall from the stationary state. We considered various magnetic field configurations of the Galactic halo given the current uncertainties. We also investigated how the evolution of the gas clouds is affected by the different initial masses of the gas clouds. A gas cloud is more likely to reach close to the Galactic plane and maintain its original shape if the cloud's initial density is high and if the component of the magnetic field that is parallel to the cloud's motion is strong while the component that is perpendicular is weak. With more realistic magnetic field configurations (combinations of parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields, and nonuniform magnetic field strength), the gas cloud falls down along the magnetic field lines with the morphology as a result of the combined effect of the parallel and perpendicular magnetic field lines. Among the various morphologies that developed during the dynamical evolution, a worm or filament shaped cloud is formed when the perpendicular component of the magnetic field is strong and dominant. Comparing the cloud morphologies and column densities from our simulations with those of observations (such as high and intermediate velocity clouds, HVCs and IVCs) would provide better information about the magnetic field of the Galactic halo together with the mass of the cloud.

  17. The Residual Gas Ionization Profile Monitor in the J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Shinichi

    The residual gas Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM) is developed in the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS. The IPM is a non-destructive beam profile monitor to observe a circulating transverse beam profile in the ring. It is very important to observe the beam profile turn-by-turn in the ring for identification of the beam loss and emittance growth source because beam loss is always issue in increasing the beam power in terms of keeping hands on maintenance. The IPM has been continuously upgraded since 2008. The recent progress of the IPM is reported together with the outline of IPM system.

  18. Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas. Detailed economic feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    An economic evaluation of the application of the multi-solid fluid reactor design to wood gasification was completed. The processing options examined include plant capacity, production of a high-Btu (1006 Btu/SCF HHV) gas versus an intermediate-Btu gas (379 Btu/SCF HHV), and operating pressure. 9 figs., 29 tabs.

  19. Speciation, Characterization, And Mobility Of As, Se, and Hg In Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile elements, such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg), which could lead to serious environmental health risks. The capture of these toxic elements in the scrubber with a flue gas desulphurization (FGD...

  20. Pyrethroid residue determination in organic and conventional vegetables using liquid-solid extraction coupled with magnetic solid phase extraction based on polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xi; Yang, Hongshun

    2017-02-15

    A detection method using polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles based extraction technique coupled to HPLC was developed for trace amount of pyrethroids residue detection in vegetable matrixes. The recoveries for five kinds of commonly used pyrethroids were in the range of 91.6%-116.2%. The sensitivity and precision of the method were satisfactory with the limits of detection and limits of quantification in the range of 0.0200-0.0392ngg(-1) and 0.072-0.128ngg(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations for the recoveries of the analytes were lower than 6.8% and 10.7%, respectively. The nanoparticles can be washed and recycled after use. The results indicate that the developed method was efficient, fast, economical and environmentally friendly. The method was successfully applied to detect the pyrethroids residue in ten pairs of commonly consumed organic and conventional fresh vegetables in Singapore. Pyrethroids residue was detected in four kinds of conventional vegetables and one kind of organic vegetable.

  1. Pyrethroid residue determination in organic and conventional vegetables using liquid-solid extraction coupled with magnetic solid phase extraction based on polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xi; Yang, Hongshun

    2017-02-15

    A detection method using polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles based extraction technique coupled to HPLC was developed for trace amount of pyrethroids residue detection in vegetable matrixes. The recoveries for five kinds of commonly used pyrethroids were in the range of 91.6%-116.2%. The sensitivity and precision of the method were satisfactory with the limits of detection and limits of quantification in the range of 0.0200-0.0392ngg(-1) and 0.072-0.128ngg(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations for the recoveries of the analytes were lower than 6.8% and 10.7%, respectively. The nanoparticles can be washed and recycled after use. The results indicate that the developed method was efficient, fast, economical and environmentally friendly. The method was successfully applied to detect the pyrethroids residue in ten pairs of commonly consumed organic and conventional fresh vegetables in Singapore. Pyrethroids residue was detected in four kinds of conventional vegetables and one kind of organic vegetable. PMID:27664638

  2. Detection of poly(ethylene glycol) residues from nonionic surfactants in surface water by1h and13c nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, P.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1991-01-01

    ??? Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) residues were detected in organic solute isolates from surface water by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), 13C NMR spectrometry, and colorimetric assay. PEG residues were separated from natural organic solutes in Clear Creek, CO, by a combination of methylation and chromatographic procedures. The isolated PEG residues, characterized by NMR spectrometry, were found to consist of neutral and acidic residues that also contained poly(propylene glycol) moieties. The 1H NMR and the colorimetric assays for poly(ethylene glycol) residues were done on samples collected in the lower Mississippi River and tributaries between St. Louis, MO, and New Orleans, LA, in July-August and November-December 1987. Aqueous concentrations for poly(ethylene glycol) residues based on colorimetric assay ranged from undetectable to ???28 ??g/L. Concentrations based on 1H NMR spectrometry ranged from undetectable to 145 ??g/L.

  3. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of organophosphorus pesticide residues using temperature modulated SnO(2) gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Pi, Zongxin; Yu, Zengliang

    2004-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of organophosphorus pesticide residues (acephate and trichlorphon) using temperature modulated SnO(2) gas sensor were studied. The testing method employed only a single SnO(2)-based gas sensor in a rectangular temperature mode to perform the qualitative analysis of pure pesticide vapor and a binary vapor mixture in the air. Experimental results showed that in the range 250-300 degrees C and at the modulating frequency of 20mHz the high selectivity of the sensor could be achieved. The quantitative analysis of the pure pesticide vapor and their mixture were performed by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). The higher harmonics of the FFT characterized the non-linear properties of the response at the sensor surface. The amplitudes of the higher harmonics exhibited characteristic variations that depend on the concentration and the kinetics of pesticide species on the sensor surface. PMID:18969637

  4. JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Patton

    2006-12-31

    The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

  5. DEPENDENCE OF THE SATURATION LEVEL OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY ON GAS PRESSURE AND MAGNETIC PRANDTL NUMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Hirose, Shigenobu; Sano, Takayoshi

    2015-07-20

    A large set of numerical simulations of MHD turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability is presented. Revisiting the previous survey conducted by Sano et al., we investigate the gas pressure dependence of the saturation level. In ideal MHD simulations, the gas pressure dependence is found to be very sensitive to the choice of numerical scheme. This is because the numerical magnetic Prandtl number varies according to the scheme as well as the pressure, which considerably affects the results. The saturation level is more sensitive to the numerical magnetic Prandtl number than the pressure. In MHD simulations with explicit viscosity and resistivity, the saturation level increases with the physical magnetic Prandtl number, and it is almost independent of the gas pressure when the magnetic Prandtl number is constant. This is indicative of the incompressible turbulence saturated by the secondary tearing instability.

  6. Impact of magnetic suspension stiffness on aeroelastic compressor rotor vibrations of gas pumping units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhonoshina, E. V.; Modorskii, V. Ya.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes simulation of oscillation modes in the elastic rotor supports with the gas-dynamic flow influence on the rotor in the magnetic suspension in the course of computational experiments. The system of engineering analysis ANSYS 15.0 was used as a numerical tool. The finite volume method for gas dynamics and finite element method for evaluating components of the stress-strain state (SSS) were applied for computation. The research varied magnetic suspension rigidity and estimated the SSS components in the system "gas-dynamic flow - compressor rotor - magnetic suspensions." The influence of aeroelastic effects on the impeller and the rotor on the deformability of vibration magnetic suspension was detected.

  7. The effects of rape residue mulching on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from no-tillage paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha(-1)) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0-20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) to 1654 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9-30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33-71% and GHGI by 35-72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China.

  8. The Effects of Rape Residue Mulching on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from No-Tillage Paddy Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha−1) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0–20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha−1 season−1 to 1654 kg C ha−1 season−1 than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9–30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33–71% and GHGI by 35–72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China. PMID:25140329

  9. [Determination of 88 pesticide residues in cranberry plant extract by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiangrui; Kong, Xianghong; Yao, Binghua; He, Qiang; Hao, Kaituo

    2011-10-01

    A method by using a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was established to analyze 88 pesticide residues in cranberry plant extract. The sample was extracted with acetone-hexane (1: 1, v/v) containing 1% acetic acid, then cleaned-up by ethylenediamine-N-propyl silyl (PSA) and graphite carbon (GCB). The extract was determined by GC-MS/MS in multi-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, and external standard method was applied to quantified the pesticides. All the 88 pesticides showed good linearity in the range of 0. 001 - 0. 2 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N > or = 10) were all less than 31. 5 microg/kg. The average recoveries of all the pesticides were in the range of 71. 4% to 116. 6% at three spiked levels of 5, 25 and 50 microg/kg in cranberry plant extract, with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2. 4% - 16. 9%. The results demonstrated that this method is simple, rapid and suitable for the determination of 88 pesticide residues in cranberry plant extract. The analytical sensitivity and accuracy can meet the requirements of multiple pesticide residue analysis.

  10. Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for residual solvent assessment in seized cocaine and heroin.

    PubMed

    Cabarcos, Pamela; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Álvarez-Freire, Iván; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2016-09-01

    A simple sample pre-treatment method based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized and validated for the assessment of 15 residual solvents (2-propanol, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, acetone, ethyl acetate, benzene, hexane, methylcyclohexane, methylcyclopentane, m-xylene, propyl acetate, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, dichloromethane, and ethylbenzene) in seized illicit cocaine and heroin. DMSO and DMF as sample diluents were found to offer the best residual solvent transference to the head space for further adsorption onto the SPME fiber, and the developed method therefore showed high sensitivity and analytical recovery. Variables affecting SPME were fully evaluated by applying an experimental design approach. Best conditions were found when using an equilibration time of 5 min at 70 °C and headspace sampling of residual solvents at the same temperature for 15 min. Method validation, performed within the requirements of international guidelines, showed excellent sensitivity, as well as intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The proposed methodology was applied to 96 cocaine samples and 14 heroin samples seized in Galicia (northwestern Spain) within 2013 and 2014. PMID:27405875

  11. Structure of dipeptides having N-terminal selenocysteine residues: a DFT study in gas and aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shilpi; Das, Gunajyoti

    2013-06-01

    Over the last few decades, dipeptides as well as their analogues have served as important model systems for the computational studies concerning the structure of protein and energetics of protein folding. Here, we present a density functional structural study on a set of seven dipeptides having N-terminal selenocysteine residues (the component in the C-terminus is varied with seven different combinations viz. Ala, Phe, Glu, Thr, Asn, Arg and Sec) in gas and simulated aqueous phase using a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The molecular geometries of the dipeptides are fully optimized at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level and subsequent frequency calculations confirm them as true minima. The effects of solvation and identity of the varying C-terminal residue on the energetics, structural features of the peptide planes, values of the ψ and ф dihedrals, geometry around the α-carbon atoms and theoretically predicted vibrational spectra of the dipeptides are investigated. Two types of intramolecular H-bonds, namely N…H-N and O…H-C, are found to play important roles in influencing the planarity of the peptide planes and geometry around the α-carbon atoms of the dipeptides. The identity of the varying C-terminal residue influences the values of ф, planarity of the peptide planes and geometry around the C₇ α-carbon atoms while the solvation effects are evident on the values of bond lengths and bond angles of the amide planes.

  12. Pesticide residues determination in Polish organic crops in 2007-2010 applying gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Walorczyk, Stanisław; Drożdżyński, Dariusz; Kowalska, Jolanta; Remlein-Starosta, Dorota; Ziółkowski, Andrzej; Przewoźniak, Monika; Gnusowski, Bogusław

    2013-08-15

    A sensitive, accurate and reliable multiresidue method based on the application of gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) has been established for screening, identification and quantification of a large number of pesticide residues in produce. The method was accredited in compliance with PN-EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard and it was operated under flexible scope as PB-11 method. The flexible scope of accreditation allowed for minor modifications and extension of the analytical scope while using the same analytical technique. During the years 2007-2010, the method was used for the purpose of verification of organic crop production by multiresidue analysis for the presence of pesticides. A total of 528 samples of differing matrices such as fruits, vegetables, cereals, plant leaves and other green parts were analysed, of which 4.4% samples contained pesticide residues above the threshold value of 0.01 mg/kg. A total of 20 different pesticide residues were determined in the samples. PMID:23561134

  13. Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Seggiani, Maurizia; Puccini, Monica; Raggio, Giovanni

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogasification of sewage sludge with wood pellets in updraft gasifier was analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of sewage sludge content on the gasification process were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sewage sludge addition up to 30 wt.% reduces moderately the process performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high sewage sludge content slagging and clinker formation occurred. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid residues produced resulted acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous waste. - Abstract: In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH{sub 3}, HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H{sub 2}S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was

  14. Determination of pesticide residues in honey by single-drop microextraction and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tsiropoulos, Nikolaos G; Amvrazi, Elpiniki G

    2011-01-01

    A novel, simple, and rapid single-drop microextraction (SDME) procedure combined with GC has been developed, validated, and applied for the determination of multiclass pesticide residues in honey samples. The SDME was optimized using a Plackett-Burman screening design considering all parameters that may influence an SDME procedure and a consequent central composite design to control the parameters that were found to significantly influence the pesticide determination. The developed analytical method required minimal volumes of organic solvents and exhibited good analytical characteristics with enrichment factors ranging from 3 for alpha-endosulfan to 10 for lindane, procymidone, and captan and method quantification limits ranging from 0.03 microg/kg for phosalone to 10.6 microg/kg for diazinon. The relative recoveries obtained ranged from 70.8% for captan to 120% for fenarimol, and the precision (RSD) ranged from 3 to 15%. The proposed SDME procedure followed by GC with an electron capture detector for quantification and GC/MS for identification was applied with success to the analysis of 17 honey samples. Monitoring results indicated a low level of honey contamination by diazinon, chlorpyrifos-ethyl, procymidone, bromopropylate, and endosulfan (alpha-, beta-, and endosulfan sulfate) residues that were far below the maximum residue limit values specified by the European Union for endosulfan (10 microg/kg) and bromopropylate (100 microg/kg) in honey samples. PMID:21563700

  15. Validation of a QuEChERS-based gas chromatographic method for analysis of pesticide residues in Cassia angustifolia (senna).

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Vandana; Saha, Ajoy; Patel, Dilipkumar J; Basak, B B; Shah, Paresh G; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-08-01

    A simple multi-residue method based on modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach was established for the determination of 17 organochlorine (OC), 15 organophosphorous (OP) and 7 synthetic pyrethroid (SP) pesticides in an economically important medicinal plant of India, Senna (Cassia angustifolia), by gas chromatography coupled to electron capture and flame thermionic detectors (GC/ECD/FTD) and confirmation of residues was done on gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The developed method was validated by testing the following parameters: linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), matrix effect, accuracy-precision and measurement uncertainty; the validation study clearly demonstrated the suitability of the method for its intended application. All pesticides showed good linearity in the range 0.01-1.0 μg mL(-1) for OCs and OPs and 0.05-2.5 μg mL(-1) for SPs with correlation coefficients higher than 0.98. The method gave good recoveries for most of the pesticides (70-120%) with intra-day and inter-day precision < 20% in most of the cases. The limits of detection varied from 0.003 to 0.03 mg kg(-1), and the LOQs were determined as 0.01-0.049 mg kg(-1). The expanded uncertainties were <30%, which was distinctively less than a maximum default value of ±50%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine pesticide residues in 12 commercial market samples obtained from different locations in India. PMID:27153296

  16. Temporal Behavior of the Pump Pulses, Residual Pump Pulses, and THz Pulses for D2O Gas Pumped by a TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Lijie; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhai, Yusheng; Su, Yuling; Zhou, Fanghua; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-08-01

    Temporal behavior of the pump pulses, residual pump pulses, and THz pulses for optically pumped D2O gas molecules was investigated by using a tunable TEA CO2 laser as the pumping source. The pulse profiles of pump laser pulses, residual pump pulses, and the THz output pulses were measured, simultaneously, at several different gas pressures. For THz pulse, the pulse delay between the THz pulse and the pump pulse was observed and the delay time was observed to increase from 40 to 70 ns with an increase in gas pressure from 500 to 1700 Pa. Both THz pulse broadening and compression were observed, and the pulse broadening effect transformed to the compression effect with increasing the gas pressure. For the residual pump pulse, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main pulse decreased with increasing gas pressure, and the main pulse disappeared at high gas pressures. The secondary pulses were observed at high gas pressure, and the time intervals of about 518 and 435 ns were observed between the THz output pulse and the secondary residual pump pulse at the pressure of 1400 Pa and 1700 Pa, from which the vibrational relaxation time constants of about 5.45 and 5.55 μs Torr were obtained.

  17. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  18. Hot gas and magnetic arms of NGC 6946: Indications for reconnection heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weżgowiec, M.; Ehle, M.; Beck, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The grand-design face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6946 is remarkable because of its high star formation activity, the massive northern spiral arm, and the magnetic arms, which are observed in polarized radio synchrotron emission and are located between the optical arms and possibly are magnetic reconnection regions. Aims: We used electron densities and temperatures in star-forming (active) and less active regions and compared them to findings from the analysis of the radio data to study the energy budget of NGC 6946. The hot gas above the magnetic arms between the optical arms might suggest gas heating by reconnection. We also study the population of point sources in NGC 6946, including the origin of the puzzling ultra-luminous emission complex MF16. Methods: X-ray observations of NGC 6946 performed with XMM-Newton were used to study the emission from X-ray point sources and diffuse hot gas, including the magnetic arms and the halo. Spectral fitting of the diffuse X-ray emission allowed us to derive temperatures of the hot gas. With assumptions about the emission volume, this allowed us to estimate gas densities, masses, and cooling times. Results: To explain the X-ray emission from the spiral arms of NGC 6946 two-temperature plasma models are needed to account for the disk and halo emission. The interarm regions show only one thermal component. We observe that the temperature of the hot gas in and above the magnetic arm regions increases slightly when compared to the average temperatures in the areas in and above the spiral arms. For the southwestern part of the disk, which is depolarized in the radio range by Faraday rotation, we find more efficient mixing of disk and halo gas. Conclusions: We propose magnetic reconnection in the magnetic arm regions of NGC 6946 as the possible cause of the additional heating of the gas and ordering of the magnetic fields. In the southwestern part of the galactic disk we observed indications of a possible faster outflow of the

  19. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency

  20. Design and construction of a magnetic resonance compatible multi-injector gas jet delivery system.

    PubMed

    Megias-Alguacil, David; Keller, Thierry; Lutz, Kai; Barlow, Ashley P; Ettlin, Dominik A

    2008-01-01

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a novel multi-injector gas jet delivery capable of operating in a magnetic resonance imaging environment. This apparatus is computer controlled and built with two separate pneumatic circuits enabling gas jet applications at variable sites through four independently activated injectors. Gas jet delivery is fully controllable in terms of pressure, flow rate, gas temperature, application time, and duration of interstimulus interval. We characterized these parameters, considering effects such as pressure drop by flow transport, transient effects, and delays in activation. The system offers new possibilities for use in various biomedical contexts such as, e.g., quantitative sensory testing or dental hypersensitivity assessment.

  1. Evidence for a palaeo-oil column and alteration of residual oil in a gas-condensate field: Integrated oil inclusion and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdet, Julien; Burruss, Robert C.; Chou, I.-Ming; Kempton, Richard; Liu, Keyu; Hung, Nguyen Viet

    2014-10-01

    In the Phuong Dong gas condensate field, Cuu Long Basin, Vietnam, hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz trapped a variety of petroleum fluids in the gas zone. Based on the attributes of the oil inclusion assemblages (fluorescence colour of the oil, bubble size, presence of bitumen), the presence of a palaeo-oil column is inferred prior to migration of gas into the reservoir. When a palaeo-oil column is displaced by gas, a residual volume fraction of oil remains in pores. If the gas does not completely mix with the oil, molecular partitioning between the residual oil and the new gas charge may change the composition and properties of the residual oil (gas stripping or gas washing). To simulate this phenomenon in the laboratory, we sealed small amounts of crude oil (42 and 30 °API) and excess pure gas (methane, ethane, or propane) in fused silica capillary capsules (FSCCs), with and without water. These mixtures were characterized with the same methods used to characterize the fluid inclusions, heating and cooling stage microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, synchrotron FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature, mixtures of ethane and propane with the 30 °API oil formed a new immiscible fluorescent liquid phase with colour that is visually more blue than the initial oil. The fluorescence of the original oil phase shifted to yellow or disappeared with formation of semi-solid residues. The blue-shift of the fluorescence of the immiscible phases and strong CH stretching bands in FT-IR spectra are consistent with stripping of hydrocarbon molecules from the oil. In experiments in FSCCs with water solid residues are common. At elevated temperature, reproducing geologic reservoir conditions, the fluorescence changes and therefore the molecular fractionation are enhanced. However, the precipitation of solid residues is responsible of more complex changes. Mixing experiments with the 42 °API oil do not form a new immiscible hydrocarbon liquid although the fluorescence

  2. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Storace, A.F.; Sood, D.; Lyons, J.P.; Preston, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust-to-weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies and the test hardware currently in place for verifying the performance of advanced magnetic actuators, power electronics, and digital controls. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load-carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  3. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  4. Residue placement and rate, crop species, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High variability due to soil heterogeneity and climatic conditions challenge measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as influenced by management practices in the field. To reduce this variability, we examined the effect of management practices on CO2, N2O, and CH4 fluxes and soil temperature a...

  5. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  6. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-02-12

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields.

  7. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-02-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields.

  8. Sloshing of the Magnetized Cool Gas in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray observations of many clusters of galaxies reveal the presence of edges in surface brightness and temperature, known as "cold fronts". In relaxed clusters with cool cores, these edges have been interpreted as evidence for the "sloshing" of the core gas in the cluster's gravitational potential. The smoothness of these edges has been interpreted as evidence for the stabilizing effect of magnetic fields "draped" around the front surfaces. To check this hypothesis, we perform high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetized gas sloshing in galaxy clusters initiated by encounters with subclusters. We go beyond previous works on the simulation of cold fronts in a magnetized intracluster medium by simulating their formation in realistic, idealized mergers with high resolution ((Delta)x approx. 2 kpc). Our simulations sample a parameter space of plausible initial magnetic field strengths and field configurations. In the simulations, we observe strong velocity shears associated with the cold fronts amplifying the magnetic field along the cold front surfaces, increasing the magnetic field strength in these layers by up to an order of magnitude, and boosting the magnetic pressure up to near-equipartition with thermal pressure in some cases. In these layers, the magnetic field becomes strong enough to stabilize the cold fronts against Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, resulting in sharp, smooth fronts as those seen in observations of real clusters. These magnetic fields also result in strong suppression of mixing of high and low-entropy gas in the cluster, seen in our simulations of mergers in the absence of a magnetic field. As a result, the heating of the core due to sloshing is very modest and is unable to stave off a cooling catastrophe.

  9. (129) Xe and (131) Xe nuclear magnetic dipole moments from gas phase NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2015-04-01

    (3) He, (129) Xe and (131) Xe NMR measurements of resonance frequencies in the magnetic field B0=11.7586 T in different gas phase mixtures have been reported. Precise radiofrequency values were extrapolated to the zero gas pressure limit. These results combined with new quantum chemical values of helium and xenon nuclear magnetic shielding constants were used to determine new accurate nuclear magnetic moments of (129) Xe and (131) Xe in terms of that of the (3) He nucleus. They are as follows: μ((129) Xe) = -0.7779607(158)μN and μ((131) Xe) = +0.6918451(70)μN . By this means, the new 'helium method' for estimations of nuclear dipole moments was successfully tested. Gas phase NMR spectra demonstrate the weak intermolecular interactions observed on the (3) He and (129) Xe and (131) Xe shielding in the gaseous mixtures with Xe, CO2 and SF6 .

  10. Strongly magnetized cold electron degenerate gas: Mass-radius relation of the collapsed star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-07-01

    We consider a relativistic, degenerate electron gas at zero-temperature under the influence of a strong, uniform, static magnetic field, neglecting any form of interactions. Since the density of states for the electrons changes due to the presence of the magnetic field (which gives rise to Landau quantization), the corresponding equation of state also gets modified. In order to investigate the effect of very strong magnetic field, we focus only on systems in which a maximum of either one, two or three Landau level(s) is/are occupied. This is important since, if a very large number of Landau levels are filled, it implies a very low magnetic field strength which yields back Chandrasekhar's celebrated non-magnetic results. The maximum number of Landau levels occupied is fixed by the correct choice of two parameters, namely the magnetic field strength and the maximum Fermi energy of the system. We study the equations of state of these one-level, two-level and three-level systems and compare them by taking three different maximum Fermi energies. We also find the effect of the strong magnetic field on the mass-radius relation of the underlying star composed of the gas stated above. We obtain an interesting theoretical result that, it is possible to have an electron degenerate static star with a mass significantly greater than the Chandrasekhar limit, provided it has an appropriate magnetic field strength and central density.

  11. Quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of mobile residues in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.L.; Oldfield, E.

    1988-07-12

    The authors have used quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the dynamic structure of the backbone of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R/sub 1/ and JW-3. NMR experiments were performed using an internal sucrose quantitation standard on purple membranes in which one of the following /sup 13/C'-labeled amino acids had been biosynthetically incorporated: glycine, isoleucine, lysine, phenylalanine, and valine. The results suggest that the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain backbone, and possibly one of the connecting loops, undergoes rapid, large angle fluctuations. The results are compared with previous NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic data obtained on bacteriorhodopsin.

  12. Weak and electromagnetic mechanisms of neutrino-pair photoproduction in a strongly magnetized electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. V.; Kerimov, B. K.; Sizin, P. E.

    2012-11-15

    Expressions for the power of neutrino radiation from a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field are derived for the case of neutrino-pair photoproduction via the weak and electromagnetic interaction mechanisms (it is assumed that the neutrino possesses electromagnetic form factors). It is shown that the neutrino luminosity of a medium in the electromagnetic reaction channel may exceed substantially the luminosity in the weak channel. Relative upper bounds on the effective neutrino magnetic moment are obtained.

  13. Magnetic resonance technology and its applications in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, R.

    1997-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) technology has far-reaching implications for evaluating oil and gas formations. The latest enhancement to magnetic resonance imaging logs (MRIL) not only provides a measure of total porosity, but totally measures the porosity by determining the component parts -- clay bound, capillary bound and movable (free) fluids. This first article in a 3-part series focuses on the robust measurements MR logging tools can provide.

  14. Recycling of Zinc- and Lead-Bearing Residues with Pyrolysis Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, C.; Antrekowitsch, J.

    2015-09-01

    Efforts in the metallurgical industry for an approximation to the zero waste concept has led to many different investigations. Together with the greenhouse effect, CO2 emissions have caused additional costs for different process steps in the industry. For this reason, alternative carbon carriers have been sought, and charcoal was found to be an ideal substitute, due to its CO2 neutrality. In order to use it in the metallurgical industry, an optimization of the charcoal production through a carbonization process must be carried out. Beside the charcoal, pyrolysis gas also occurs during the heating of wood or agricultural wastes under the exclusion of air. Because of combustible compounds in this gas, it is possible to use it as a reduction agent instead of fossil carbon carriers. Together with the idea of preventing landfilling of metallurgical by-products, an investigation was carried out to treat zinc- and lead-containing materials. For this issue a special process concept was designed and developed. The main aspect was to recycle the zinc- and lead-containing Waelz slag, which results from the processing of steel mill dusts, in a vertical retort. Two different sizes of facilities were constructed to perform the reaction system of the solid Waelz slag with the gaseous reduction agent of pyrolysis gas.

  15. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  16. On the equation of state for an electron gas in an intense magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Tsiang, E.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper we derive the equation of state for a relativistic electron gas imbedded in a static homogeneous magnetic field of arbitrary strength. The derivation is based on the evaluation of the energy-momentum tensor and the use of Dirac's equation for such a problem. Contrary to a derivation presented several years ago, the present derivation is completely gauge-invariant. We also show how to recover, in an exact manner, the perfect gas law for the case of weak magnetic fields.

  17. On solvability of boundary value problem of magnetic gas dynamics with cylindric and spherical symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshanov, Bakytbek D.; Smatova, Gulzhazira D.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper initial-boundary value problems for movement equation of viscous heat-conducting gas considering magnetic field are investigated. Besides, a transition from the main three-dimensional equation to an Eulerian variable and a subsequent Lagrangian coordinate is shown. For equations of the heat-conducting gas in the magnetic field, a unique solvability is proved in a case when a flow domain does not include an axis (point) of symmetry. The movements with cylindric and spherical waves are considered simultaneously.

  18. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storace, Albert F.; Sood, Devendra K.; Lyons, James P.; Preston, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault-tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust to weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first key ingredient is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  19. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storace, Albert F.; Sood, Devendra K.; Lyons, James P.; Preston, Mark A.

    1994-05-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault-tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust to weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first key ingredient is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  20. [Determination of 213 pesticide residues in milk and milk power by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ai, Lianfeng; Ma, Yusong; Zhang, Haichao; Li, Wei; Yu, Meng

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of the optimization of solid phase extraction adsorbent, eluting solvent types and amounts, a gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was established for the determination of 213 pesticide residues in milk and milk power. The samples were extracted by acetonitrile, cleaned-up with an ENVI-Carb/NH2 solid-phase extractant, and determined by GC-MS/MS using external standard method. The linear ranges were from 10 to 1 000 μg/L for 197 pesticides, from 50 to 1 000 μg/L for the other 16 pesticides with the correlation coefficients higher than 0.99. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) varied over the range of 0.03 to 7.59 μg/kg, and limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) ranged from 0.10 to 21.94 μg/kg. The average recoveries in different matrices were in the range of 66.9% - 120.1% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.23% - 17.6%. This method is simple, rapid, sensitive and reliable for meeting the requirements for the simultaneous identification and quantification of the multi-residues in milk and milk power. PMID:26939364

  1. Electronic Relaxation of the Phenylalanine Residue in Gas Phase Peptides: Role of the Neighbouring Amide Groups in the Photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loquais, Y.; Biswal, H. S.; Tardivel, B.; Brenner, V.; Mons, M.; Gloaguen, E.; Jouvet, C.; Broquier, M.; Malis, M.; Ljubic, I.; Doslic, N.

    2012-06-01

    Protein absorption in the near UV is mainly due to the presence of aromatic systems on the side chain of three residues: phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. It is generally expected that the photophysics of these UV chromophores depends on their immediate environment within the molecule and thus on the conformation of these flexible molecules. This property may in particular be used as an optical diagnostic of the conformational state of the peptide chain. The structure of peptide chains isolated in the gas phase can be characterized by UV and IR laser spectroscopy. These measurements allow us to distinguish the spectral contributions of the different conformers and thus provide us with an elegant way to address the issue of the conformational dependence on the photophysics. For this purpose, the dynamics of relaxation of the ππ* excited state of several peptides containing a phenylalanine residue have been studied using two-colour resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) in the ns time scale at CEA and ps at CLUPS and laser-induced fluorescence as well. The lifetime of the ππ* excited state is found to strongly depend on the conformation adopted by the molecule and on the excess energy in the excited state, with measured lifetimes ranging from 1 ns to 80 ns. W. Chin; F. Piuzzi; I. Dimicoli and M. Mons, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, pp 1033-1048 (2006)

  2. Performance characteristics of an analytical procedure for determining chloramphenicol residues in muscle tissue by gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Cerkvenik-Flajs, Vesna

    2006-10-01

    Validation of an analytical method for determining chloramphenicol residues in muscle tissue by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) was performed according to the latest European Union criteria for the analysis of veterinary drugs in food, laid down by Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The method using the meta isomer of chloramphenicol as an internal standard proved to be very selective, specific to other related phenicols and accurate to within +3.6% at a concentration level of 8.9 microg/kg, as present in the certified reference material available. The correlation coefficient of the calibration curve was 0.9991. At all three fortification levels studied (0.3, 0.45 and 0.6 microg/kg), repeatability and intra-laboratory reproducibility were <8 and < or =9%, respectively. The decision limit (CCalpha) and detection capability (CCbeta) were 0.07 and 0.12 microg/kg, respectively. The validation results and the results of participation in an international inter-laboratory proficiency test indicate that the method presented is completely suited for regulatory control to screen and quantify chloramphenicol residues in various muscle tissues on a routine basis.

  3. Characterization of flue gas cleaning residues from European solid waste incinerators: assessment of various Ca-based sorbent processes.

    PubMed

    Bodénan, F; Deniard, Ph

    2003-05-01

    For the first time, a set of samples of European flue gas cleaning residues, mainly from the incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW), has undergone a mineralogical study. The residues are the result of the neutralization of acid flue gases by lime, the predominant method adopted in Europe, using dry and semi-dry washing processes. The study protocol combines physico-chemical analytical techniques (XRD, FTIR, DSC/TGA) and global chemical analysis enabling identification of the chemical composition of the main constituents, particularly chlorinated Ca-based phases, as well as establishment of modal distributions of the represented phases, both crystalline and amorphous. The samples are slightly hydrated and values vary for trapped Cl, S and even CO(2). The main crystalline phases are NaCl, KCl, CaSO(4), CaCO(3), Ca(OH)(2) and calcium hydroxychloride CaOHCl. CaOHCl is the main chlorine phase, regardless of the treatment process, filtration mode, and specific surface of the Ca-based sorbent. This phase develops during neutralization of HCl by excess lime present according to the reaction Ca(OH)(2)+HCl-->CaOHCl+H(2)O, to the detriment of a complete yield involving the two lime OH groups with formation of CaCl(2).2H(2)O. In addition, it seems that gas temperatures above 150 degrees C increase competition between lime-based neutralization of HCl, SO(2) acid flue gases and CO(2) trapping, thus reducing washing efficiency. PMID:12597999

  4. Calculating the dynamics of a charged gas cloud in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysikov, Iu. I.

    1981-02-01

    The dynamics of a spinning ellipsoidal gas cloud in a longitudinal magnetic field are investigated for the case where the particles possess a small charge. The particle gas is regarded as the ideal, and the process of expansion (contraction) is considered adiabatic. It is shown that in the approach of Ovsiannikov (1956) a system of primary integrals exists that greatly simplifies the task. An exact solution is found for certain simple cases.

  5. Liquid chromatography "on-flow" 1H nuclear magnetic resonance on native glycosphingolipid mixtures together with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry on the released oligosaccharides for screening and characterisation of carbohydrate-based antigens from pig lungs.

    PubMed

    Bäcker, A E; Thorbert, S; Rakotonirainy, O; Hallberg, E C; Olling, A; Gustavsson, M; Samuelsson, B E; Soussi, B

    1999-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids were prepared from pig lung and pooled into two fractions with (i) < or = 3 sugar residues, and (ii) > or = 3 sugar residues. Oligosaccharides were prepared and used for gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The glycolipid fractions i and ii were further characterised and purified using a novel method based on high performance liquid chromatography "on-flow" proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The LC "on-flow" NMR technique showed good chromatographic separation and gave NMR spectral information which could be used as guidance for pooling of the separated mixture glycolipids. Conventional 1H NMR, thin layer immunostaining, gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry were used to characterise the glycolipids and to validate LC-NMR spectral data.

  6. An investigation of accelerating mode and decelerating mode constant-momentum mass spectrometry and their application to a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of constant momentum mass spectrometry was made. A maximum resolving power for the decelerating mode constant momentum mass spectrometer was shown theoretically to exist for a beam of ions of known energy. A vacuum system and an electron beam ionization source was constructed. Supporting electronics for a residual gas analyzer were built. Experimental investigations of various types of accelerating and decelerating impulsive modes of a constant momentum mass spectrometer as applied to a residual gas analyzer were made. The data indicate that the resolving power for the decelerating mode is comparable to that of the accelerating mode.

  7. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol residues in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Sills, J.B.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of 3-mftuormethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in fish tissues is described. Homogenized tissues are extracted with hexane-ethyl ether; the extract is cleaned up by partitioning the TFM from the extracting solvent into O.IN NaOB, acidifying the aqueous solution, and partitioning again with hexaneethyl ether. The TFM is methylated with diazomethane and analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, using electron capture detection. Recoveries ranged from 75 to 1000/., from fish muscles that were spiked with 0.01-2.00 JA#g TFM/g.

  8. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This is the first phase of a project that has the objective to develop a method of spraying materials on a substrate in a controlled manner to eliminate the waste and hazardous material generation inherent in present plating processes. The project is considering plasma spraying of metal on a substrate using magneto-hydrodynamics to control the plasma/metal stream. The process being developed is considering the use of commercially available plasma torches to generate the plasma/metal stream. The plasma stream is collimated, and directed using magnetic forces to the extent required for precise control of the deposition material. The project will be completed in phases. Phase one of the project, the subject of this grant, is the development of an analytical model that can be used to determine the feasibility of the process and to design a laboratory scale demonstration unit. The contracted time is complete, and the research is still continuing. This report provides the results obtained to date. As the model and calculations are completed those results will also be provided. This report contains the results of the computer code that have been completed to date. Results from a ASMEE Benchmark problem, flow over a backward step with heat transfer, Couette flow with magnetic forces, free jet flow are presented along with several other check calculations that are representative of the cases that were calculated in the course of the development process. The final cases that define a velocity field in the exit of a plasma spray torch with and without a magnetic field are in process. A separate program (SPRAY) has been developed that can track the plating material to the substrate and describe the distribution of the material on the substrate. When the jet calculations are complete SPRAY will be used to compare the distribution of material on the substrate with and without the effect of the magnetic focus.

  9. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  10. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  11. Optimization of closed ion source for a high-sensitivity residual gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cheolsu; Rok Ahn, Jong; Jung Ahn, Sang; Joon Park, Chang

    2014-03-15

    A closed ion source (CIS) has been optimized by investigating the effect of electron entrance slit size and the effect of mesh in the slit. A stainless steel mesh was placed on the electron entrance slits for a uniform potential distribution inside the CIS anode. Sensitivity of the closed ion sources having four different slit sizes with and without the mesh was compared using mass spectra of SF{sub 6} gas (97% He gas base) introduced into the CIS anode through a needle valve. For each CIS, isolation of anode potential with a mesh in the slit exhibited a significant sensitivity enhancement, but ion current measured directly behind each CIS showed negligible mesh effect. In order to elucidate the mesh effect, electron trajectories were simulated inside the anode. The computer simulation shows that, with mesh in the slit, more electrons are focused to a central region of the anode. This suggests ions generated in the CIS with mesh should have higher probability of passing through the quadrupole mass filter.

  12. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5-250 μg kg(-1). The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC

  13. Determination of dithiocarbamates and milneb residues in foods by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Munetomo; Noda, Satoko; Kosugi, Masaki; Ishiduka, Noriko; Mizukoshi, Kazushi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Nemoto, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    A highly sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed for dithiocarbamates (DTCs) and milneb in foods. DTCs and milneb were extracted from foods with cysteine-EDTA solution as sodium salts, and methylated with methyl iodide. Methyl derivatives of DTCs and milneb were cleaned up on a neutral alumina mini column and determined by GC-MS. The mean recoveries of DTCs and milneb were in the range of 72-120%, except for methiram. The quantification limits were 0.01 mg/kg (as CS(2)) in foods except tea (0.1 mg/kg as CS(2)). The developed method was applied to 10 compounds (4 dimethyldithiocarbamates, 3 ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, polycarbamates, propineb and milneb). PMID:21071904

  14. Operation of calorimeters based on vacuum and gas photodetectors in high intensity magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Luigi

    1984-09-01

    Recent attempts to operate counters for calorimetric use inside high intensity magnetic fields have resulted in interesting developments both in the construction of the counters and in the design of the vacuum photosensitive devices. In particular, a new one-stage photomultiplier has been developed. The present status of the development of gas photodiodes will finally be illustrated.

  15. Gas gap heat switch for a cryogen-free magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, J.; Borges de Sousa, P.; Martins, D.; Kar, S.; Bonfait, G.; Catarino, I.

    2015-12-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnet systems (CFMS) have become popular over the last two decades for the simple reason that the use of liquid helium is rather cumbersome and that helium is a scarce resource. Some available CFMS use a mechanical cryocooler as the magnet's cold source. However, the variable temperature insert (VTI) for some existing CFMS are not strictly cryogen-free as they are still based on helium gas circulation through the sample space. We designed a prototype of a gas gap heat switch (GGHS) that allows a thermal management of a completely cryogen-free magnet system, with no helium losses. The idea relies on a parallel cooling path to a variable temperature insert (VTI) of a magnetic properties measurement system under development at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. A Gifford-McMahon cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) would serve primarily as the cold source of the superconducting magnet, dedicating 1 W to this cooling, under quite conservative safety factors. The remaining cooling power (0.5 W) is to be diverted towards a VTI through a controlled GGHS that was designed and built with a 80 μm gap width. The built GGHS thermal performance was measured at 4 K, using helium as the exchange gas, and its conductance is compared both with a previously developed analytical model and a finite element method. Lessons learned lead to a new and more functional prototype yet to be reported.

  16. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  17. Fabrication of the Superferric Cyclotron Gas-stopper Magnet at NSCL at Michigan State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, S. S.; Bollen, G.; DeKamp, J.; Green, M. A.; Lawton, D.; Magsig, C.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ottarson, J.; Schwarz, S.; Zeller, A. F.

    2014-05-01

    The magnet for the cyclotron gas stopper is a newly designed, large warm-iron superconducting cyclotron sector gradient dipole. The maximum field in the centre (gap = 0.18 m) is 2.7 T. The outer diameter of magnet yoke is 4.0 m, with a pole radius of 1.1 m and B*ρ = 1.8 T m. The fabrication and assembly of the iron return yoke and twelve pole pieces is complete. Separate coils are mounted on the return yokes that have a total mass of about 167 metric tons of iron. This paper illustrates the design and the fabrication process for the cyclotron gas-stopper magnet that is being fabricated at MSU.

  18. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vernieres, Jerome Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Bobo, Jean-François; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  19. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernieres, Jerome; Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Bobo, Jean-François; Diaz, Rosa E.; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO3 phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  20. Fuel-Specific Effect of Exhaust Gas Residuals on HCCI Combustion: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P

    2008-01-01

    A modeling study was performed to investigate fuel-specific effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) components on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion at conditions relevant to the negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy using CHEMKIN-PRO. Four single-component fuels with well-established kinetic models were chosen: n-heptane, iso-octane, ethanol, and toluene. These fuels were chosen because they span a wide range of fuel chemistries, and produce a wide compositions range of complete stoichiometric products (CSP). The simulated engine conditions combined a typical spark ignition engine compression ratio (11.34) and high intake charge temperatures (500-550 K) that are relevant to NVO HCCI. It was found that over the conditions investigated, all the fuels had overlapping start of combustion (SOC) phasing, despite the wide range in octane number (RON = 0 to 120). The effect of the EGR components CO2 and H2O was to suppress the compression temperature because of their higher heat capacities, which retarded SOC. For a concentration of O2 higher than the stoichiometric amount, or excess O2, there was an effect of advancing SOC for n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene, but SOC for ethanol was not advanced. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) for n-heptane was also found to be highly dependent on excess O2, and mild endothermic reaction was observed for cases when excess O2 was not present.

  1. Characterization of MGP (manufactured gas plant) residues using proposed RCRA (Resource Conservation Recovery Act) tests. Topical report, May 1987-February 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, L.R.; Gould, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed two tests that may affect the regulation of residues associated with manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites which are not currently regulated by the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA): the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and a revised reactivity test which includes interim guidance levels for reactive cyanide and sulfide as well as methods for determining reactive levels. Atlantic Environmental Services, Inc, carried out a research project under the Gas Research Institute program for the management of MGP sites. Several samples were tested using the proposed TCLP to determine the likelihood that MGP residues would be characterized as RCRA wastes under the new procedures. The reactivity tests for cyanide and sulfide also were run on samples collected from MGP sites to determine whether these specific residues would fall based on the revised technique. The results of the study are presented.

  2. Determination of pesticide residues in animal origin baby foods by gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Graziella; Pelosi, Patrizia; Attard Barbini, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    A simple, fast and multiresidue method for the determination of pesticide residues in baby foods of animal origin has been developed in order to check the compliance with the Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) set at a general value of 0.01 mg/kg by Commission Directive 2006/125/EC for infant foods. The main classes of organochlorine, organophosphorus and pyrethroid compounds have been considered, which are mainly fat soluble pesticides. The analytical procedure consists in the extraction of baby food samples by acetonitrile (ACN) followed by a clean up using C18 solid-phase extraction column eluted with ACN. The compounds were determined by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry equipped with a Programmed Temperature Vaporizer (PTV) injection and a backflush system. In order to compensate for matrix effects PTV and matrix matched standard calibrations have been used. The method has been fully validated for 57 pesticides according to the Document SANCO/12571/2013. Accuracy and precision (repeatability) have been studied by recoveries at two spiking levels, the Limit of Quantitation (LOQ) (0.003-0.008 mg/kg) and 10 time greater (0.03-0.08 mg/kg), and the results were in the acceptable range of 70-120% with Relative Standards Deviations (RSD) ≤20%. Selectivity, linearity, LOQ and uncertainty of measurement were also determined for all the compounds. The method has been also applied for the analysis of 18 baby food animal origin samples, bought form the local market in Rome (Italy), and no pesticide in the scope of the method has been found above the MRL or the LOQ.

  3. Simultaneous multi-determination and transfer of eight pesticide residues from green tea leaves to infusion using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon-Kil; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Shim, Jae-Han

    2014-12-15

    A method for determining eight pesticide (cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, fenitrothion, EPN, bifenthrin, difenoconazole, triflumizole, and azoxystrobin) residues in made green tea as well as a tea infusion (under various brewing water temperatures; 60, 80, and 100°C) using gas chromatography (GC) micro-electron capture detector (μECD) was developed and validated. The extraction method adopted the relatively commonly used approach of solid sample hydration, with the green tea hydrated before being extracted through salting out with acetonitrile followed by a cleanup procedure. The analytes were confirmed using GC-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) with a triple quadrupole. The linearity of the calibration curves yielded determination coefficients (R(2)) >0.995. Recoveries were carried out using blank samples spiked with all analytes at two levels. The results demonstrated that all pesticides were recovered within the range of 77-116% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) ⩽14%. The quantification limits of 0.015-0.03 mg/kg were lower than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) set by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) for all analytes (0.05-10mg/kg). The infusion study indicated that cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, and bifenthrin did not infuse into the tea brew from the made tea. Increases in brewing time resulted in increased transfer of azoxystrobin, fenitrothion, and difenoconazole from the made tea to the brew; however, this was not the case with triflumizole or EPN. We conclude that transfer of pesticides appeared to be dependent on their water solubilities and drinking a cup of tea is recommended to be at a water temperature of 60°C. PMID:25038708

  4. Simultaneous multi-determination and transfer of eight pesticide residues from green tea leaves to infusion using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon-Kil; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Shim, Jae-Han

    2014-12-15

    A method for determining eight pesticide (cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, fenitrothion, EPN, bifenthrin, difenoconazole, triflumizole, and azoxystrobin) residues in made green tea as well as a tea infusion (under various brewing water temperatures; 60, 80, and 100°C) using gas chromatography (GC) micro-electron capture detector (μECD) was developed and validated. The extraction method adopted the relatively commonly used approach of solid sample hydration, with the green tea hydrated before being extracted through salting out with acetonitrile followed by a cleanup procedure. The analytes were confirmed using GC-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) with a triple quadrupole. The linearity of the calibration curves yielded determination coefficients (R(2)) >0.995. Recoveries were carried out using blank samples spiked with all analytes at two levels. The results demonstrated that all pesticides were recovered within the range of 77-116% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) ⩽14%. The quantification limits of 0.015-0.03 mg/kg were lower than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) set by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) for all analytes (0.05-10mg/kg). The infusion study indicated that cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, and bifenthrin did not infuse into the tea brew from the made tea. Increases in brewing time resulted in increased transfer of azoxystrobin, fenitrothion, and difenoconazole from the made tea to the brew; however, this was not the case with triflumizole or EPN. We conclude that transfer of pesticides appeared to be dependent on their water solubilities and drinking a cup of tea is recommended to be at a water temperature of 60°C.

  5. [Determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xia, Guanghui; Shen, Weijian; Yu, Keyao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Bian, Xiaohong; Xu, Jiyang

    2014-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The honey and royal jelly samples were treated with different preparation methods as the result of the different components. The honey sample was extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up with primary second amine, and the royal jelly sample was extracted with acetonitrile-water (1:1, v/v), and cleaned up with a C18 solid-phase extraction column. Finally, the extracts of the honey and royal jelly were analyzed by GC-NCI/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode separately. External standard calibration method was used for quantification. The linearities of calibration curves of the four insecticides were good with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99 in the range of 50-500 microg/L. The limits of the detection (LODs) of the four insecticides were in the range of 0.12- 5.0 microg/kg, and the limits of the quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.40-16.5 microg/kg. The recoveries of the four insecticides spiked in honey and royal jelly at three spiked levels (10, 15 and 20 microg/kg) were in the range of 78.2 -110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all below 14%. The sensitivity and selectivity of this method were good with no interfering peaks. The proposed method is simple quick and effective to analyze the four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly.

  6. Does gasification and biochar amendment provide a viable solution to balance greenhouse gas emissions, energy requirements and orchard residue management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Engil; Suddick, Emma; Six, Johan

    2015-04-01

    By converting biomass residue to biochar, we can generate power cleanly and sequester carbon resulting in overall greenhouse gas (GHG) savings when compared to typical fossil fuel burning and waste disposal. This on-farm research study provides a long-term and high frequency assessment of GHG emissions from biochar amended-soils in an organic walnut orchard in the Central Valley of California, USA. We also estimated the GHG offsets from the conversion of walnut residue into energy through gasification at the on-site walnut processing plant. Soil fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were monitored over 29 months in a 3.6 ha walnut orchard following management and precipitation events. We compared four treatments: control, biochar, compost, and biochar combined with compost. Events involving resource inputs such as fertilization or cover crop mowing induced the largest N2O peaks with average 0.13 kg N2O-N ha-1 day-1, while precipitation events produced the highest CO2 fluxes in average 0.124 Mg CO2-C ha-1 day-1. Biochar alone decreased N2O fluxes in two out of 23 measured events, however, not with enough significant magnitude to modify annual or seasonal totals. This indicates that biochar-induced decreases in N2O fluxes may occasionally occur without significant changes in total emissions. Additionally, biochar alone or in combination with compost did not alter annual or seasonal cumulative CO2 emissions. For this particular study, the conversion of orchard waste into energy and C sequestration through biochar amendment offset 100.3 Mg CO2-Ceq year-1. Thus, given that biochar did not alter cumulative GHG emissions from soils, we conclude that, in the scenario of this study, the use of biochar as a strategy to decrease farm-level GHG emissions is obtained through the gasification of orchard residue into energy and through biochar C sequestration, and not as a tool to decrease soil CO2 and N2O emissions.

  7. Optical Pumping Spin Exchange 3He Gas Cells for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Jung, Y.; Woo, S.; Yurov, M.; Jang, J.

    2009-08-01

    We present a device for spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of polarized noble gases for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A method and design of apparatus for pumping the polarization of noble gases is described. The method and apparatus enable production, storage and usage of hyperpolarized noble gases for different purposes, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human and animal subjects. Magnetic imaging agents breathed into lungs can be observed by the radio waves of the MRI scanner and report back physical and functional information about lung's health and desease. The technique known as spin exchange optical pumping is used. Nuclear magnetic resonance is implemented to measure the polarization of hyperpolarized gas. The cells prepared and sealed under high vacuum after handling Alkali metals into the cell and filling with the 3He-N2 mixture. The cells could be refilled. The 3He reaches around 50% polarization in 5-15 hours.

  8. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  9. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  10. Magnetic resonance evaluation of acetabular residual dysplasia in developmental dysplasia of the hip: a preliminary study of 27 patients.

    PubMed

    Douira-Khomsi, Wièm; Smida, Mahmoud; Louati, Hela; Hassine, Lilia Ben; Bouchoucha, Sami; Saied, Walid; Ladeb, Mohamed-Fethi; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Bellagha, Ibtissem

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-one hips in 27 young girls, treated for developmental dysplasia of the hip in the authors' institute since 2003, showed persistent radiographic evidence of residual acetabular dysplasia. These hips were registered as candidates for pelvic osteotomy. A prospective study was conducted and these hips were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); the average age of the patients was 5 years. MRI measurement of acetabular angle and acetabular head index in 2 different landmarks (bone and cartilage) was performed. The results were correlated with plain radiographic film evolution. MRI studies revealed sufficient cartilaginous acetabular coverage in 27 hips, cartilaginous acetabular dysplasia in 2 hips, and short acetabulum in 2 others. The 27 hips with thick cartilage of the acetabular roof were subsequently followed up by plain radiographs. The average follow-up period was 2.1 years. The authors observed a spontaneous progressive ossification of the cartilaginous acetabular roof in all the 27 cases. In 4 cases, the correction of the acetabular angle was complete. They concluded that MRI promotes more accurate selection of patients for pelvic osteotomy and aids in the choice of the most appropriate type of osteotomy. Clinical imaging examples are presented and need to be further evaluated.

  11. Gas Evolution Measurements on Reactor Irradiated Advanced Fusion Magnet Insulation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Seidl, E.; Weber, H. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Feucht, S. W.; Munshi, N. A.

    2006-03-01

    Glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) are used as insulation materials for the superconducting magnet coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The radiation environment present at the magnet location will lead to gas production, swelling and weight loss of the laminate, which may result in a pressure rise combined with undefined stresses on the magnet coil casing. Consequently, these effects are important parameters for the engineering and design criteria of superconducting magnet coil structures. In this study, newly developed epoxy and cyanate-ester (CE) based S2-glass fiber reinforced insulation systems were irradiated at ambient temperature in the TRIGA-Mark II reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 1 and 5×1021 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) prior to measurements of gas evolution, swelling and weight loss. The CE based laminates show increased radiation resistance, i.e. less gas evolution. The highest radiation hardness up to the highest dose was observed in a pure CE system. In addition, the effects of swelling and weight loss are either negligible or less pronounced for all systems. The results prove that the newly developed CE based composites are serious candidate insulation systems for ITER.

  12. Calculated Hanle transmission and absorption spectra of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line with residual magnetic field for arbitrarily polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Moon, Han Seb

    2010-09-15

    This paper reports a theoretical study on the transmission spectra of an arbitrarily polarized laser beam through a rubidium cell with or without a buffer gas in Hanle-type coherent population trapping (CPT). This study examined how laser polarization, transverse magnetic field, and collisions with buffer gas affects the spectrum. The transmission spectrum due to CPT and the absorption spectrum due to the level crossing absorption (LCA) were calculated according to the laser polarization. The results show that the LCA is strongly dependent on the transverse magnetic field and interaction time of the atoms with a laser light via collisions with the buffer gas. In addition, the spectral shape of the calculated Hanle spectrum is closely related to the direction between the (stray) transverse magnetic field and polarization of the laser.

  13. Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on the magnetic flux of a high moment write pole material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinqiu; Liu Feng; Chen Lifan; Miloslavsky, Lena

    2010-05-15

    Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on NiFe magnetic properties was investigated. Experimental data showed 40% magnetic property degradation for F-containing gas etching, 10% degradation for O-containing gas etching, and 5% degradation for Cl-containing gas etching processes. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallographic orientation remained the same upon the reactive gas etching, which is due to the low ion energy in plasma etching process as opposed to ion milling process with high input energy. It is proposed that the reported magnetic property degradation was mainly caused by the nonmagnetic dead layer formation, rather than the changes in the crystallographic orientation. The dead layer was determined by the NiFe thickness dependence of remnant magnetic flux variations between pre-etched and postetched samples. The dead layer remained nearly constant for O-containing gas etching process with increasing plasma processing time. The nonmagnetic dead layer of {approx}40-50 A formed in O-containing etching gas was observed in transmission electron microscopy cross-sectional image and was in very good agreement with the calculated value based on magnetic flux measurements. Combined magnetic and physical characterizations suggest that the dead layer thickness saturates at the initial stage of the plasma etching and magnetic property remained unchanged with increasing etching duration upon formation of the dead layer.

  14. Study of the Behaviors of Gunshot Residues from Spent Cartridges by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2015-07-01

    Gunshot residues, produced after shooting activity, have acquired their importance in analysis due to the notoriety of firearms-related crimes. In this study, solid-phase microextraction was performed to extract the headspace composition of spent cartridges using 85-μm polyacrylate fiber at 66°C for 21 min. Organic compounds, that is, naphthalene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, and dibutyl phthalate were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. Evaluation of chromatograms for diphenylamine, dibutyl phthalate, and naphthalene indicates the period after a gunshot was discharged, whether it was 1 days, 2-4 days, <5 days, 10 days, 20 days, or more than 30 days ago. This study revealed the potential effects of environmental factors such as occasional wind blow and direct sunlight on the estimation of time after spent cartridges were discharged. In conclusion, we proposed reliable alternative in analyzing the headspace composition of spent cartridges in a simulated crime scene. PMID:25771708

  15. Residue determination of captan and folpet in vegetable samples by gas chromatography/negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barreda, Mercedes; López, Francisco J; Villarroya, Mercedes; Beltran, Joaquim; García-Baudín, Jose María; Hernández, Felix

    2006-01-01

    A gas chromatography/negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/NCI-MS) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the fungicides captan and folpet in khaki (persimmon; flesh and peel) and cauliflower. Samples were extracted with acetone in the presence of 0.1 M zinc acetate solution in order to avoid degradation of fungicides and were purified using solid-phase extraction with divinylbenzene polymeric cartridges. Purified extracts were evaporated and dissolved in hexane prior to injection into the GC/NCI-MS system. Isotope-labeled captan and folpet were used as surrogate/internal standards, and quantification was performed using matrix-matched calibration. The method showed linear response in the concentration range tested (50-2500 ng/mL). The method was fully validated with untreated blank samples of khaki (flesh and peel) and cauliflower spiked at 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg. Satisfactory recoveries between 82 and 106% and relative standard deviations lower than 11% in all cases (n = 5) were obtained. The limit of detection for both compounds were estimated to be 0.01 mg/kg. The developed method has been applied to treated and untreated samples collected from residue trials.

  16. Determination of alkylphenol residues in baby-food purees by steam distillation extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Tien; Cheng, Chin-Yuan; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a simple and sensitive method for determining alkylphenols namely 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP) and the isomers of 4-nonylphenol (4-NPs) present in various types of baby-food purees. The method involves extracting a sample with n-hexane for 1h using a modified Nielson-Kryger steam distillation extraction system and then identifying and quantitating the alkylphenols using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operated in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The extraction conditions were evaluated at various values of pH of the sample solution. The limits of quantitation for this method were 0.2 ng/g from 1.0 g (wet weight) samples of 4-t-OP and the 4-NPs. The intra- and interbatch precisions and accuracies were also determined. The precision, in terms of the relative standard deviation (RSD), were less than 8%. Most of the recoveries of the alkylphenols from various spiked samples exceeded 60%, while the values of RSD ranged from 1% to 10%. Alkylphenol residues were detected in baby-food purees at concentrations of up to 19 ng/g (wet weight) for 4-t-OP and up to 21 ng/g (wet weight) for the 4-NPs.

  17. Determination of alkylphenolic residues in fresh fruits and vegetables by extractive steam distillation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Kai; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2005-09-23

    This study describes a simple and sensitive method for determining the alkylphenolic compounds, 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-nonylphenol isomers (4-NPs), and their monoethoxylates (4-t-OP1EO and 4-NP1EOs), in fresh fruits and vegetables. The method involves extracting a sample by a modified Nielson-Kryger steam distillation extraction using n-hexane for 1 h. The alkylphenolic compounds were identified and quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Various pH values and amounts of NaCl added to the sample solution were evaluated as extraction conditions. The quantitation limit of this method was less than 0.2 ng/g in 10 g (fresh weight) of sample. Recovery of alkylphenolic compounds in spiked samples exceeded 64% while R.S.D. ranged from 1.0 to 9.8%. Alkylphenolic residues were detected in fresh fruits and vegetables at concentrations of 4-NPs and 4-t-OP from n.d. to 16 ng/g and from n.d. to 4.8 ng/g (fresh weight), respectively. NP1EO and OP1EO were always below the quantitation limit.

  18. [Determination of 9 residual acrylic monomers in acrylic resins by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with microwave assisted extraction].

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying; Lin, Rui; Cai, Luxin; Ge, Xiuxiu; Huang, Changchun

    2012-01-01

    A reliable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 9 residual acrylic monomers (methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, styrene, acrylic acid and methacrylic acid) in acrylic resins. Solid resin was precipitated with methanol after microwave assisted extraction with ethyl acetate for 30 min, and liquid resin was diluted with methanol directly. The nine acrylic monomers got a good separation within 20 min on a DB-WAX column. The limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) of the method were in the range of 1-10 mg/kg for liquid resin and 3-50 mg/kg for solid resin. The calibration curves were linear within 1-500 mg/L range with correlation coefficients above 0. 995. The recoveries ranged from 84.4% to 108.6% at five spiked levels. The sensitivity, recovery and selectivity of the method can fully meet the requirements of practical work.

  19. Practical aspects in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of pesticide residues in exotic fruits.

    PubMed

    España Amórtegui, Julio César; Guerrero Dallos, Jairo Arturo

    2015-09-01

    The most relevant parameters of a multimode inlet were optimized to increase the injection volume up to 25 μL using solvent vent mode in order to improve the sensitivity of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Consequently, the implementation of a concurrent backflushing was necessary to largely prevent the expected loss of performance derived from such matrix load out of a general-purpose extraction (EN-15622-QuEChERS). Additionally, four mixtures of compounds used as analyte protectants were tested using spiked physalis to enhance the quality of signals. The chosen mixture remarkably improved sensitivity and yield better peak shapes, significantly more than others also tested. The analysis of pesticide residues in exotic fruits using instruments of limited selectivity is challenging since these complex matrices usually give notably dirty extracts. This scheme included an instrumental optimization and the addition of selected compounds that enabled to selectively reach limits of quantitation of 0.01 mg kg(-1) for most analytes. PMID:25842302

  20. Study of Fuel Ratios on the Fusion Reactivity in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device Using a Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupakar Murali, S.; Santarius, John F.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2009-09-01

    Gridded Inertial Electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices are of interest due to their flexibility in burning advanced fuels, their tuning ability of the applied voltage to the reaction cross-section. Although this device is not suitable for power production in its present form, it does have several near term applications. The number of applications of this device increases with increasing fusion reactivity. These devices are simple to operate but are inherently complicated to understand and an effort to incrementally understand the device to improve its operational efficiency is underway at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Of all the parameters under study we are focusing on the effects of flow rate and flow ratio on the fusion reactivity in the present paper. Experiments were conducted to understand the influence of fuel flow ratio on the fusion reactions. The residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to study the impurity concentration as the flow ratio was changed. It was observed that the higher flow rate resulted in reduced impurity levels and hence an increase in fusion rate. Several different species of gases were detected, some of these molecules formed inside the RGA analyzer. The flow ratio scan revealed that the optimum mixture of D2 with 3He to be D2:3He::1:2 for maximum D-3He fusion rate.

  1. [Determination of butene-fipronil residue in dry samples by multiple adsorption synchronous purification-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Liping; Guo, Jing; Zheng, Ling; Chen, Chuntian; Chen, Zhitao

    2013-08-01

    A method was developed for the determination of butene-fipronil residue in dry samples by multiple adsorption synchronous purification (MASP) -gas chromatography (GC) -mass spectrometry (MS). After extracted with 1% acetic acid-acetonitrile, the samples were pretreated with MASP method including extraction, salting-out and purification procedures, and analyzed with GC-MS under the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, and then quantified by matrix-match standard solution with external standard method. The results showed good linearity in the range of 2 - 100 microg/L with the correlation coefficients (r(2)) not less than 0.999. The average fortified recovery of butene-fipronil in samples was found in the range of 92.2% - 97.5% at three fortified levels from 2 to 10 microg/kg, with the relative standard deviations of 2.69% - 5.21% (n = 6). The limit of detection (S/N = 3) for butane-fipronil was 2 microg/kg and the limit of quantification (S/N = 10) was 6 microg/kg. The method is simple, rapid and accurate, and could be used for the routine analysis of butane-fipronil in dry samples. Meanwhile, the pyrolysis mechanism of butane-fipronil, as a new substance, is discussed. PMID:24369607

  2. Intense ion beam transport in magnetic quadrupoles: Experiments on electron and gas effects

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kireef Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Prost, L.; Vay, J-L.

    2004-12-03

    Heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics have an economic incentive to minimize the clearance between the beam edge and the aperture wall. This increases the risk from electron clouds and gas desorbed from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K{sup +} incident on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach values >100, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10{sup 4}. Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. We also discuss the results of beam transport (of 0.03-0.18 A K{sup +}) through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles in the HCX at LBNL. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. A coordinated theory and computational effort has made significant progress towards a self-consistent model of positive-ion beam and electron dynamics. We are beginning to compare experimental and theoretical results.

  3. High-speed gas sensor for chemosensory event-related potentials or magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Toda, H; Saito, S; Yamada, H; Kobayakawa, T

    2006-04-15

    The observation of odor and air exchange with high temporal accuracy is necessary to obtain strict chemosensory event-related potentials (CSERPs) or magnetic fields, as proposed by Evans et al. [Evans W, Kobal G, Lorig T, Prah J. Suggestions for collection and reporting of chemosensory (olfactory) event-related potentials. Chem Senses, 1993; 18: 751- 6]. No suitable method for real time observation of gas stimuli, however, has been available until now. We have developed a technique to measure accurately gas molecule concentrations with a high temporal resolution. We determined that attenuation of sound amplitude varies in a manner dependent on the average molecular weight through which the sound wave passes. Based on this principle, we have designed a high-speed gas concentration sensor utilizing ultrasound. We investigated the practical potential of this sensor using a chemosensory stimulator (olfactometer); we succeeded in observing rapid gas exchange between air and nitrogen with a 2 kHz sampling rate. The signal/noise ratio of the stimulus was greater than 42 dB. In a 20 min experiment we determined that, for this olfactometer, the gas onset latency was 79 ms and the rise time was 16 ms. No significant artifact to magnetic fields was observed, even when the sensor was situated near a whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. These results indicate that this sensor could be used for the observation of odor and air exchange, as well as, for real time monitoring of odor stimuli during actual experiments with a participant. PMID:16257056

  4. Liquid paraffin as new dilution medium for the analysis of high boiling point residual solvents with static headspace-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    D'Autry, Ward; Zheng, Chao; Bugalama, John; Wolfs, Kris; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin; Wang, Bochu; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2011-07-15

    Residual solvents are volatile organic compounds which can be present in pharmaceutical substances. A generic static headspace-gas chromatography analysis method for the identification and control of residual solvents is described in the European Pharmacopoeia. Although this method is proved to be suitable for the majority of samples and residual solvents, the method may lack sensitivity for high boiling point residual solvents such as N,N-dimethylformamide, N,N-dimethylacetamide, dimethyl sulfoxide and benzyl alcohol. In this study, liquid paraffin was investigated as new dilution medium for the analysis of these residual solvents. The headspace-gas chromatography method was developed and optimized taking the official Pharmacopoeia method as a starting point. The optimized method was validated according to ICH criteria. It was found that the detection limits were below 1μg/vial for each compound, indicating a drastically increased sensitivity compared to the Pharmacopoeia method, which failed to detect the compounds at their respective limit concentrations. Linearity was evaluated based on the R(2) values, which were above 0.997 for all compounds, and inspection of residual plots. Instrument and method precision were examined by calculating the relative standard deviations (RSD) of repeated analyses within the linearity and accuracy experiments, respectively. It was found that all RSD values were below 10%. Accuracy was checked by a recovery experiment at three different levels. Mean recovery values were all in the range 95-105%. Finally, the optimized method was applied to residual DMSO analysis in four different Kollicoat(®) sample batches.

  5. Evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles to serve as solid-phase extraction sorbents for the determination of endocrine disruptors in milk samples by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Synaridou, Maria-Evangelia S; Sakkas, Vasilios A; Stalikas, Constantine D; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2014-06-27

    A rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) is proposed based on C18-functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles as sorbents, for the determination of endocrine disruptors - 20 organochlorine pesticides and 6 polychlorinated biphenyls - in milk samples. Magnetic nanoparticles are characterized by several techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-Ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Fourier transform-infrared. The MSPE is performed by dispersion of the Fe3O4@SiO2@C18 nanoparticles in milk samples with sonication, after protein precipitation. Then, the sorbent is collected by applying an external magnetic field and the analytes are desorbed by n-hexane. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of target analytes by the magnetic nanoparticles are investigated, including washing and elution solvents, amount of sorbents, time of extraction and elution, sample and elution solvent volume. The proposed method is optimized by means of experimental design and response surface methodology. When coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection and under optimum extraction conditions, average recoveries of target analytes are found to be in the range of 79% to 116%. The proposed MSPE-GC-MS analytical method has a linear calibration curve for all target analytes with coefficients of determination to range from 0.9950 to 0.9999. The limits of quantification are found to be between 0.2 and 1μg/L ensuring compliance with the maximum residue limits established by European Commission and Codex Alimentarius, for OCPs and PCBs residues in milk. The proposed method is applied to the determination of target analytes in milk samples from local markets.

  6. Ion Species and Charge States of Vacuum Arc Plasma with Gas Feed and Longitudinal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim; Anders, Andre

    2010-06-23

    The evolution of copper ion species and charge state distributions is measured for a long vacuum arc discharge plasma operated in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field of several 10 mT and working gas (Ar). It was found that changing the cathode-anode distance within 20 cm as well as increasing the gas pressure did not affect the arc burning voltage and power dissipation by much. In contrast, burning voltage and power dissipation were greatly increased as the magnetic field was increased. The longer the discharge gap the greater was the fraction of gaseous ions and the lower the fraction of metal ions, while the mean ion charge state was reduced. It is argued that the results are affected by charge exchange collisions and electron impact ionization.

  7. Environmental Stress Testing of the Single Sample Cylinder: A Proven Consensus Standard for Internal Gas Analysis (IGA) or Residual Gas Analysis (RGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuessler, Philipp WH

    2010-01-01

    In August 2008, Schuessler Consulting was contracted by NASA GSFC in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program to perform two separate studies on moisture laden air in a stainless steel cylinder that had been designed to become a consensus standard for Test Method 1018. This Test Method was originally released for hybrids under Mil. Std. 883 but was quickly utilized on other microelectronic devices under the auspice of Mil. Std. 750. The cylinder had subsequently been fabricated for the 750 community. It was back-filled with moist air and subsequently analyzed over a period of time under a previous NASA contract. It had been shown that moisture in the 4000 - 5000 ppm range could be analyzed rather precisely with a mass spectrometer, commonly referred to as a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The scope of this study was to ascertain if the composition and precision varied as a function of thermal shock at sub-zero temperatures and whether there was consensus when the standard was submitted to other RGA units. It was demonstrated and published that the consensus standard would yield precise RGA data for moisture within +/- 1% when optimized for a given RGA unit. It has been subsequently shown in this study at Oneida Research Services, that sub-zero storage did not affect that precision when a well-defined protocol for the analysis was followed. The consensus standard was taken to a second facility for analysis where it was found that moisture adsorption on the transfer lines caused precision to drop to +/- 12%. The Single Sample Cylinder (SSC) is a one liter stainless steel cylinder with associated sampling valves and has considerable weight and volume. But this considerable size allows for approximately 300 gas samples of the same composition to be delivered to any RGA unit. Lastly, a smaller cylinder, approximately 75 cc, of a second consensus standard was fabricated and tested with a different mix of fixed gases where moisture was kept in the

  8. New method for gas and oil shale reservoirs characterisation using magnetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Aleksandr; Telman, Meruert; Makarova, Maria; Zhaksylyk, Zhanaim; Abirov, Rustem; Makhatova, Meruyert

    2015-04-01

    This research describes proposed method for determination of total organic content (TOC), clay typing and relative degree of maturation in shale unconventional reservoirs based on analysis of magnetic properties of shales. Experimental measurements were undertaken in shales from United Kingdom (Edinburgh shales) and Kazakhstan for comparison of their magnetic properties, including low field and high field magnetic susceptibilities, together with SEM and XRD analysis. The results showed that studied shales comprised of various clay types had different capacity in accumulation of organic matter, thus, affecting the total organic content and magnetic properties. Based on the results we proposed magnetic indicators (MI) of productive gas and oil shale intervals in order to determine relative TOC, clay typing and a degree of maturation. The set of magnetic measurements, used as a logging tool or core scanning procedure, can potentially provide data about selecting the best shale productive reservoir horizons. This can be a non-destructive and rapid method for shale reservoir characterization, being used routinely in both laboratory and field conditions.

  9. Tracing gas and magnetic field with dust : lessons from Planck & Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Dust emission is a powerful tool to measure the gas mass. Its polarization also traces the magnetic field structure. With the Planck and Herschel multi-wavelength observations, we are now able to trace the gas and magnetic field over the full sky, with a large spectrum of scales, and up to high optical depths. But a question arises : is dust a reliable tracer ?I will present the statistical properties of the dust polarized emission as observed by Planck HFI over the full sky, and show how this compares to ancillary measures of starlight polarization in the optical, and to MHD simulations. I will distinguish between what is related to the 3D structure of the magnetic field, and what is related to dust (alignement efficiency, grain shape). I will show that the main features of dust polarization observed by Planck can be explained by the magnetic field structure on the line of sight, without any need for a variation of dust alignment efficiency up to an Av of 5 to 10. Dust polarization is therefore a good and reliable tracer of the magnetic field, at least at moderate extinction.I will also discuss the caveats in deriving the gas mass or dust extinction from a fit to the dust spectral energy distribution : 1) the dust far-infrared opacity is not uniform but varies accross the diffuse ISM, and increases inside star-forming regions; 2) Radiation transfer effects must be taken into account at high optical depths. I will present estimates for the systematic errors that are made when these effects are ignored.

  10. Changes to the LANL gas-driven two-stage gun: Magnetic gauge instrumentation, etc.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Martinez, A.R.; Alcon, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    Our gas-driven two-stage gun was designed and built to do initiation studies on insensitive high explosives as well as other equation of state experiments on inert materials. Our preferred method of measuring initiation phenomena involves the use of magnetic particle velocity gauges. In order to accommodate this type of gauging in our two-stage gun, projectile velocity was sacrificed in favor of a larger experimental target area (obtained by using a 50 mm diameter launch tube). We have used magnetic gauging on our 72-mm bore diameter single-stage gun for over 15 years and it has proven a very effective technique to monitor reactive shock wave evolution. This technique has now been adapted to our gas-driven two-stage gun. We describe the method used, as well as some of the difficulties that arose while installing this technique. Several magnetic gauge experiments have been completed on plastic materials. Waveforms obtained in one experiment are given, along with the Hugoniot information that was obtained. This new technique is now working quite well, as is evidenced by the data. To our knowledge, this is the first time magnetic gauging has been used on a two-stage gun. We have also made changes to the burst diaphragm package in the transition section to ensure that the petals do not break off during the opening process and to increase the burst pressure. This will also be discussed briefly.

  11. Magnetic gauge instrumentation on the LANL gas-driven two-stage gun

    SciTech Connect

    Alcon, R.R.; Sheffield, S.A.; Martinez, A.R.; Gustavsen, R.L.

    1997-11-01

    The LANL gas-driven two-stage gun was designed and built to do initiation studies on insensitive high explosives as well as equation of state and reaction experiments on other materials. The preferred method of measuring reaction phenomena involves the use of in-situ magnetic particle velocity gauges. In order to accommodate this type of gauging in the two-stage gun, it has a 50-mm-diameter launch tube. The authors have sued magnetic gauging on the 72-mm bore diameter single-stage gun for over 15 years and it has proven a very effective technique for all types of shock wave experiments, including those on high explosives. This technique has now been installed on the gas-driven two-stage gun. They describe the method used, as well as some of the difficulties that arose during the installation. Several magnetic gauge experiments have been completed on plastic materials. Waveforms obtained in some of the experiments will be discussed. Up to 10 in-situ particle velocity measurements can be made in a single experiment. This new technique is now working quite well, as is evidenced by the data. To their knowledge, this is the first time magnetic gauging has been used on a two-stage gun.

  12. Computational studies of suppression of microwave gas breakdown by crossed dc magnetic field using electron fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pengcheng; Guo, Lixin; Shu, Panpan

    2016-08-01

    The gas breakdown induced by a square microwave pulse with a crossed dc magnetic field is investigated using the electron fluid model, in which the accurate electron energy distribution functions are adopted. Simulation results show that at low gas pressures the dc magnetic field of a few tenths of a tesla can prolong the breakdown formation time by reducing the mean electron energy. With the gas pressure increasing, the higher dc magnetic field is required to suppress the microwave breakdown. The electric field along the microwave propagation direction generated due to the motion of electrons obviously increases with the dc magnetic field, but it is much less than the incident electric field. The breakdown predictions of the electron fluid model agree very well with the particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision simulations as well as the scaling law for the microwave gas breakdown.

  13. Direct gas chromatographic determination of the two isomeric insecticides, aldicarb and butocarboxime and their toxic metabolites: application to residue analysis in crops and leaves.

    PubMed

    Aharonson, N; Muszkat, L

    1985-02-01

    A gas-chromatographic method is described for determination of residues of butocarboxime (Drawin), its structural isomer aldicarb (Temik), and their toxic sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites. These compounds were determined intact, by gas chromatography employing a thermionic specific detector (TSD). Breakdown of these relatively thermally unstable compounds was avoided by lowering the inlet temperature to 150 degrees C, by keeping column temperature as low as possible, and by using a low-load liquid phase (2% of OV-17 on Gas-Chrom Q). These compounds were determined in enriched extracts of samples of tomatoes and apples and also in the leaves of citrus and cotton. The method is suitable for the separation, differentiation and determination of the two isomers and their metabolites at an enrichment level of 0.1 micrograms/g of fresh weight. The results were confirmed by gas chromatography--chemical-ionization mass-spectrometry. PMID:3984517

  14. Trace analysis of multi-class pesticide residues in Chinese medicinal health wines using gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Tao; Kong, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qian-Zhen; Ma, Xin-Ping; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    A method is described for multi-residue, high-throughput determination of trace levels of 22 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 5 pyrethroid pesticides (PYPs) in Chinese medicinal (CM) health wines using a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) based extraction method and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Several parameters were optimized to improve preparation and separation time while still maintaining high sensitivity. Validation tests of spiked samples showed good linearities for 27 pesticides (R = 0.9909-0.9996) over wide concentration ranges. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were measured at ng/L levels, 0.06-2 ng/L and 0.2-6 ng/L for OCPs and 0.02-3 ng/L and 0.06-7 ng/L for PYPs, respectively. Inter- and intra-day precision tests showed variations of 0.65-9.89% for OCPs and 0.98-13.99% for PYPs, respectively. Average recoveries were in the range of 47.74-120.31%, with relative standard deviations below 20%. The developed method was then applied to analyze 80 CM wine samples. Beta-BHC (Benzene hexachloride) was the most frequently detected pesticide at concentration levels of 5.67-31.55 mg/L, followed by delta-BHC, trans-chlordane, gamma-BHC, and alpha-BHC. The validated method is simple and economical, with adequate sensitivity for trace levels of multi-class pesticides. It could be adopted by laboratories for this and other types of complex matrices analysis.

  15. Trace analysis of multi-class pesticide residues in Chinese medicinal health wines using gas chromatography with electron capture detection

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Tao; Kong, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qian-Zhen; Ma, Xin-Ping; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    A method is described for multi-residue, high-throughput determination of trace levels of 22 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 5 pyrethroid pesticides (PYPs) in Chinese medicinal (CM) health wines using a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) based extraction method and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Several parameters were optimized to improve preparation and separation time while still maintaining high sensitivity. Validation tests of spiked samples showed good linearities for 27 pesticides (R = 0.9909–0.9996) over wide concentration ranges. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were measured at ng/L levels, 0.06–2 ng/L and 0.2–6 ng/L for OCPs and 0.02–3 ng/L and 0.06–7 ng/L for PYPs, respectively. Inter- and intra-day precision tests showed variations of 0.65–9.89% for OCPs and 0.98–13.99% for PYPs, respectively. Average recoveries were in the range of 47.74–120.31%, with relative standard deviations below 20%. The developed method was then applied to analyze 80 CM wine samples. Beta-BHC (Benzene hexachloride) was the most frequently detected pesticide at concentration levels of 5.67–31.55 mg/L, followed by delta-BHC, trans-chlordane, gamma-BHC, and alpha-BHC. The validated method is simple and economical, with adequate sensitivity for trace levels of multi-class pesticides. It could be adopted by laboratories for this and other types of complex matrices analysis. PMID:26883080

  16. Trace analysis of multi-class pesticide residues in Chinese medicinal health wines using gas chromatography with electron capture detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Tao; Kong, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qian-Zhen; Ma, Xin-Ping; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2016-02-01

    A method is described for multi-residue, high-throughput determination of trace levels of 22 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 5 pyrethroid pesticides (PYPs) in Chinese medicinal (CM) health wines using a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) based extraction method and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Several parameters were optimized to improve preparation and separation time while still maintaining high sensitivity. Validation tests of spiked samples showed good linearities for 27 pesticides (R = 0.9909–0.9996) over wide concentration ranges. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were measured at ng/L levels, 0.06–2 ng/L and 0.2–6 ng/L for OCPs and 0.02–3 ng/L and 0.06–7 ng/L for PYPs, respectively. Inter- and intra-day precision tests showed variations of 0.65–9.89% for OCPs and 0.98–13.99% for PYPs, respectively. Average recoveries were in the range of 47.74–120.31%, with relative standard deviations below 20%. The developed method was then applied to analyze 80 CM wine samples. Beta-BHC (Benzene hexachloride) was the most frequently detected pesticide at concentration levels of 5.67–31.55 mg/L, followed by delta-BHC, trans-chlordane, gamma-BHC, and alpha-BHC. The validated method is simple and economical, with adequate sensitivity for trace levels of multi-class pesticides. It could be adopted by laboratories for this and other types of complex matrices analysis.

  17. Trace analysis of multi-class pesticide residues in Chinese medicinal health wines using gas chromatography with electron capture detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Tao; Kong, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qian-Zhen; Ma, Xin-Ping; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2016-02-01

    A method is described for multi-residue, high-throughput determination of trace levels of 22 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 5 pyrethroid pesticides (PYPs) in Chinese medicinal (CM) health wines using a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) based extraction method and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Several parameters were optimized to improve preparation and separation time while still maintaining high sensitivity. Validation tests of spiked samples showed good linearities for 27 pesticides (R = 0.9909-0.9996) over wide concentration ranges. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were measured at ng/L levels, 0.06-2 ng/L and 0.2-6 ng/L for OCPs and 0.02-3 ng/L and 0.06-7 ng/L for PYPs, respectively. Inter- and intra-day precision tests showed variations of 0.65-9.89% for OCPs and 0.98-13.99% for PYPs, respectively. Average recoveries were in the range of 47.74-120.31%, with relative standard deviations below 20%. The developed method was then applied to analyze 80 CM wine samples. Beta-BHC (Benzene hexachloride) was the most frequently detected pesticide at concentration levels of 5.67-31.55 mg/L, followed by delta-BHC, trans-chlordane, gamma-BHC, and alpha-BHC. The validated method is simple and economical, with adequate sensitivity for trace levels of multi-class pesticides. It could be adopted by laboratories for this and other types of complex matrices analysis.

  18. Multi-residue analysis of pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing; Miao, Shui; Lehotay, Steven J; Li, Wen-Ting; Zhou, Heng; Mao, Xiu-Hong; Lu, Ji-Wei; Lan, Lan; Ji, Shen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a residue analysis method for the simultaneous determination of 107 pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), Angelica sinensis, A. dahurica, Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet, Pogostemon cablin and Lonicera japonica Thunb., was developed using gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionisation mode (GC-NCI-MS/MS). NCI has advantages of high sensitivity and selectivity to chemicals with electron-withdrawing groups, and yields low background interference. For sample preparation, QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) was applied. Due to the unique characteristics of TCMs, the clean-up step was optimised by adjusting amounts of primary secondary amine, C18, graphitised carbon black and silica sorbents. Validation was mainly performed by determining analyte recoveries at four different spiking concentrations of 10, 50, 100 and 200 ng g(-1), with seven replicates at each concentration. Method trueness, precision, linearity of calibration curves, lowest calibrated levels (LCLs) and matrix effects were determined to demonstrate method and instrument performance. Among the 107 pesticides tested, approximately 80% gave recoveries from 80% to 110% and < 10% relative standard deviation (RSD). The LCLs for nearly all pesticides were 5 ng g(-1), and as low as 0.1 ng g(-1) for dichlofenthion, endosulfan sulphate, flumetralin, isofenphos-methyl, methyl-pentachlorophenyl sulphide and trifluralin. The results indicate that GC-NCI-MS/MS is an excellent technique for quantitative and qualitative analysis of targeted GC-amenable pesticides at ultra-trace levels, especially in complex matrices such as TCMs. PMID:26125677

  19. Formation of van der Waals molecules in buffer-gas-cooled magnetic traps [corrected].

    PubMed

    Brahms, N; Tscherbul, T V; Zhang, P; Kłos, J; Sadeghpour, H R; Dalgarno, A; Doyle, J M; Walker, T G

    2010-07-16

    We predict that a large class of helium-containing cold polar molecules form readily in a cryogenic buffer gas, achieving densities as high as 10(12)  cm(-3). We explore the spin relaxation of these molecules in buffer-gas-loaded magnetic traps and identify a loss mechanism based on Landau-Zener transitions arising from the anisotropic hyperfine interaction. Our results show that the recently observed strong T(-6) thermal dependence of the spin-change rate of silver (Ag) trapped in dense (3)He is accounted for by the formation and spin change of Ag(3)He van der Waals molecules, thus providing indirect evidence for molecular formation in a buffer-gas trap.

  20. Conical Magnetic Bearings Developed for Active Stall Control in Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Kascak, Albert F.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Buccieri, Carl J.

    2004-01-01

    Active stall control is a current research area at the NASA Glenn Research Center that offers a great benefit in specific fuel consumption by allowing the gas turbine to operate beyond the onset of stall. Magnetic bearings are being investigated as a new method to perform active stall control. This enabling global aviation safety technology would result in improved fuel efficiency and decreased carbon dioxide emissions, as well as improve safety and reliability by eliminating oil-related delays and failures of engine components, which account for 40 percent of the commercial aircraft departure delays. Active stall control works by perturbing the flow in front of the compressor stage such that it cancels the pressure wave, which causes the compressor to go into stall. Radial magnetic bearings are able to whirl the shaft so that variations in blade tip leakage would flow upstream causing a perturbation wave that could cancel the rotating stall cell. Axial or thrust magnetic bearings cannot be used to cancel the surge mode in the compressor because they have a very low bandwidth and thus cannot modulate at a high enough frequency. Frequency response is limited because the thrust runner cannot be laminated. To improve the bandwidth of magnetic thrust bearings, researchers must use laminations to suppress the eddy currents. A conical magnetic bearing can be laminated, resulting in increased bandwidth in the axial direction. In addition, this design can produce both radial and thrust force in a single bearing, simplifying the installation. The proposed solution combines the radial and thrust bearing into one design that can be laminated--a conical magnetic bearing. The new conical magnetic bearing test rig, funded by a Glenn fiscal year 2002 Director's Discretionary Fund, was needed because none of the existing rigs has an axial degree of freedom. The rotor bearing configuration will simulate that of the main shaft on a gas turbine engine. One conical magnetic bearing

  1. Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Preliminary Safety Information Document, Amendment 10. GCFR residual heat removal system criteria, design, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This report presents a comprehensive set of safety design bases to support the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) residual heat removal (RHR) systems. The report is structured to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to review and comment in the licensability of these design bases. This report also presents information concerning a specific plant design and its performance as an auxiliary part to assist the NRC in evaluating the safety design bases.

  2. Detecting excitation and magnetization of individual dopants in a semiconductor two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic atoms doped into a semiconductor are the building blocks for bottom up spintronic and quantum logic devices. They also provide model systems for the investigation of fundamental effects. In order to correlate the dopant's atomic structure with its magnetism magnetically sensitive techniques with atomic resolution are a prerequisite. Here, I show electrical excitation and read-out [ 1 ] of single magnetic dopant associated spins in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined to a semiconductor surface [ 2 ] using spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy [ 3 ] . I will review our real-space study of the quantum Hall transition in the 2DEG [ 2 ] and of the magnetic properties of the dopants [ 1 ] . Finally, I will demonstrate that the dopant serves as an atomic scale probe for local magnetometry of the 2DEG. This work was done in collaboration with A. A. Khajetoorians, B. Chillian, S. Schuwalow, F. Lechermann, K. Hashimoto, C. Sohrmann, T. Inaoka, F. Meier, Y. Hirayama, R. A. Römer, M. Morgenstern, and R. Wiesendanger. [ 1 ] A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Nature 467, 1084 (2010). [ 2 ] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 256802 (2008). [ 3 ] J. Wiebe et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4871 (2004). We acknowledge financial support from ERC Advanced Grant ``FURORE'', by the DFG via SFB668 and GrK1286, and by the city of Hamburg via the cluster of excellence ``Nanospintronics''.

  3. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings Being Developed for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and cooperation with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of bearing times the rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used, resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a high-temperature (1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in their Phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator's circumference are a series of electrical wire coils which form a series of electric magnets that exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it centered in the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and casing form a flexible structure with many modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system.

  4. A study of the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Zmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-12-01

    Chain reversals are often nucleation sites in protein folding. The β-hairpins of FBP28 WW domain and IgG are stable and have been proved to initiate the folding and are, therefore, suitable for studying the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin conformation. In this paper, we carried out NMR examination of the conformations in solution of two fragments from the FPB28 protein (PDB code: 1E0L) (N-terminal part) namely KTADGKT-NH2 (1E0L 12-18, D7) and YKTADGKTY-NH2 (1E0L 11-19, D9), one from the B3 domain of the protein G (PDB code: 1IGD), namely DDATKT-NH2 (1IGD 51-56) (Dag1), and three variants of Dag1 peptide: DVATKT-NH2 (Dag2), OVATKT-NH2 (Dag3) and KVATKT-NH2 (Dag4), respectively, in which the original charged residue were replaced with non-polar residues or modified charged residues. It was found that both the D7 and D9 peptides form a large fraction bent conformations. However, no hydrophobic contacts between the terminal Tyr residues of D9 occur, which suggests that the presence of a pair of like-charged residues stabilizes chain reversal. Conversely, only the Dag1 and Dag2 peptides exhibit some chain reversal; replacing the second aspartic-acid residue with a valine and the first one with a basic residue results in a nearly extended conformation. These results suggest that basic residues farther away in sequence can result in stabilization of chain reversal owing to screening of the non-polar core. Conversely, smaller distance in sequence prohibits this screening, while the presence oppositely-charged residues can stabilize a turn because of salt-bridge formation.

  5. A study of the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Zmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-12-01

    Chain reversals are often nucleation sites in protein folding. The β-hairpins of FBP28 WW domain and IgG are stable and have been proved to initiate the folding and are, therefore, suitable for studying the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin conformation. In this paper, we carried out NMR examination of the conformations in solution of two fragments from the FPB28 protein (PDB code: 1E0L) (N-terminal part) namely KTADGKT-NH2 (1E0L 12-18, D7) and YKTADGKTY-NH2 (1E0L 11-19, D9), one from the B3 domain of the protein G (PDB code: 1IGD), namely DDATKT-NH2 (1IGD 51-56) (Dag1), and three variants of Dag1 peptide: DVATKT-NH2 (Dag2), OVATKT-NH2 (Dag3) and KVATKT-NH2 (Dag4), respectively, in which the original charged residue were replaced with non-polar residues or modified charged residues. It was found that both the D7 and D9 peptides form a large fraction bent conformations. However, no hydrophobic contacts between the terminal Tyr residues of D9 occur, which suggests that the presence of a pair of like-charged residues stabilizes chain reversal. Conversely, only the Dag1 and Dag2 peptides exhibit some chain reversal; replacing the second aspartic-acid residue with a valine and the first one with a basic residue results in a nearly extended conformation. These results suggest that basic residues farther away in sequence can result in stabilization of chain reversal owing to screening of the non-polar core. Conversely, smaller distance in sequence prohibits this screening, while the presence oppositely-charged residues can stabilize a turn because of salt-bridge formation. PMID:25316116

  6. Residual stress induced stabilization of martensite phase and its effect on the magnetostructural transition in Mn-rich Ni-Mn-In/Ga magnetic shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Kushwaha, Pallavi; Scheibel, F.; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Barman, S. R.; Acet, M.; Felser, C.; Pandey, Dhananjai

    2015-07-01

    The irreversibility of the martensite transition in magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) with respect to the external magnetic field is one of the biggest challenges that limits their application as giant caloric materials. This transition is a magnetostructural transition that is accompanied with a steep drop in magnetization (i.e.,Δ M ) around the martensite start temperature (Ms) due to the lower magnetization of the martensite phase. In this Rapid Communication, we show that Δ M around Ms in Mn-rich Ni-Mn-based MSMAs gets suppressed by two orders of magnitude in crushed powders due to the stabilization of the martensite phase at temperatures well above Ms and the austenite finish (Af) temperatures due to residual stresses. Analysis of the intensities and the FWHM of the x-ray powder-diffraction patterns reveals stabilized martensite phase fractions as 97 % , 75 % , and 90 % with corresponding residual microstrains as 5.4 % , 5.6 % , and 3 % in crushed powders of the three different Mn-rich Ni-Mn alloys, namely, M n1.8N i1.8I n0.4 , M n1.75N i1.25Ga , and M n1.9N i1.1Ga , respectively. Even after annealing at 773 K, the residual stress stabilized martensite phase does not fully revert to the equilibrium cubic austenite phase as the magnetostructural transition is only partially restored with a reduced value of Δ M . Our results have a very significant bearing on the application of such alloys as inverse magnetocaloric and barocaloric materials.

  7. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold Flooding During Continuous Fuel Cell Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Majors, Paul D.; Wang, Li Q.; Rieke, Peter C.

    2006-10-27

    The methods, apparatus, and results are reported for in-situ, near real time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of MEA dehydration and gas manifold flooding in an operating PEM fuel cell. To acquire high-resolution, artifact-free images for visualizing water distribution, acquisition parameters for a standard, two-dimensional (2D), spin-echo sequence were first optimized for the measured magnetic field heterogeneity induced by fuel cell components. 2D images of water inside the fuel cell were then acquired every 128 seconds during 11.4 hours of continuous operation under constant load. Collected images revealed that MEA dehydration proceeded non-uniformly across its plane, starting from gas inlets and ending at gas outlets, and that upon completion of this dehydration process manifold flooding began. To understand these observations, acquired images were correlated to the current output and operating characteristics of the fuel cell. Results demonstrate the power of MRI for in-situ, near real-time imaging of water distribution and non-uniformity in operating PEM fuel cells, and highlight its utility for understanding PEM fuel cell operation, the causes of cell failure, and for developing new strategies of water management.

  9. Characterisation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in flue gas and residues of a full scale fluidized bed combustor combusting non-hazardous industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Van Caneghem, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies the fate of PAHs in full scale incinerators by analysing the concentration of the 16 EPA-PAHs in both the input waste and all the outputs of a full scale Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC). Of the analysed waste inputs i.e. Waste Water Treatment (WWT) sludge, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), RDF and ASR were the main PAH sources, with phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene being the most important PAHs. In the flue gas sampled at the stack, naphthalene was the only predominant PAH, indicating that the PAHs in FBC's combustion gas were newly formed and did not remain from the input waste. Of the other outputs, the boiler and fly ash contained no detectable levels of PAHs, whereas the flue gas cleaning residue contained only low concentrations of naphthalene, probably adsorbed from the flue gas. The PAH fingerprint of the bottom ash corresponded rather well to the PAH fingerprint of the RDF and ASR, indicating that the PAHs in this output, in contrast to the other outputs, were mainly remainders from the PAHs in the waste inputs. A PAH mass balance showed that the total PAH input/output ratio of the FBC ranged from about 100 to about 2600 depending on the waste input composition and the obtained combustion conditions. In all cases, the FBC was clearly a net PAH sink. PMID:25002370

  10. Characterisation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in flue gas and residues of a full scale fluidized bed combustor combusting non-hazardous industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Van Caneghem, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies the fate of PAHs in full scale incinerators by analysing the concentration of the 16 EPA-PAHs in both the input waste and all the outputs of a full scale Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC). Of the analysed waste inputs i.e. Waste Water Treatment (WWT) sludge, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), RDF and ASR were the main PAH sources, with phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene being the most important PAHs. In the flue gas sampled at the stack, naphthalene was the only predominant PAH, indicating that the PAHs in FBC's combustion gas were newly formed and did not remain from the input waste. Of the other outputs, the boiler and fly ash contained no detectable levels of PAHs, whereas the flue gas cleaning residue contained only low concentrations of naphthalene, probably adsorbed from the flue gas. The PAH fingerprint of the bottom ash corresponded rather well to the PAH fingerprint of the RDF and ASR, indicating that the PAHs in this output, in contrast to the other outputs, were mainly remainders from the PAHs in the waste inputs. A PAH mass balance showed that the total PAH input/output ratio of the FBC ranged from about 100 to about 2600 depending on the waste input composition and the obtained combustion conditions. In all cases, the FBC was clearly a net PAH sink.

  11. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans: Removal from flue gas and distribution in ash/residue of a refuse-derived fuel combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Brna, T.G.; Kilgroe, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper gives results of an early-1989 investigation of the effect of changing combustion and flue gas cleaning (FGC) system variables on the performance of these systems. Using information from earlier characterization tests at the same site (Mid-Connecticut facility in Hartford), performance data on a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) combustor and its lime spray dryer absorber/fabric filter (FGC) system were obtained under good, intermediate, and poor combustor operation and high, normal, and low sulfur dioxide (SO2) control by the FGC system. The independent combustion system variables included steam load, air supply rate, and its distribution. For the FGC system, the outlet gas temperature from the spray dryer absorber served as an easily measurable surrogate for the approach to saturation temperature, while SO2 concentration in the flue gas at the fabric filter outlet continuously represented the lime stoichiometry. Test data included acid gas, trace organic, trace metal, and particulate concentrations, as well as material collection for the determination of ash/residue composition and production rates. In addition, process data and RDF feed and ash/residue generation rates were obtained. Correlations between combustion conditions and furnace emission of organic pollutants are presented.

  12. Biochemical effects of manufactured gas plant residue following ingestion by B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, E.H.; Wu, Yun; Patel, S. ); Goldstein, L. )

    1994-01-01

    The toxic potential of manufactured gas plant residue (MGP) given in the diet to male and female B6C3F1 mice was evaluated. In addition, the bioavailability of chemical components of MGP were also investigated by monitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites in urine and DNA adduct formation in forestomach and lung tissue. Basal gel diets containing 0.05, 0.25, 0.50% benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were fed to animals for 94 and 185 d. Mice readily consumed adulterated diets without any evidence of acute toxicity. The total amount of MGP and BaP consumed by mice ranged from 118 to 2604 mg and from 12 to 29 mg, respectively. Male mice fed a control or BaP diet and female mice fed a 0.05% MGP diet had the highest body weight gains. Male and female mice fed a 0.50% MGP diet had the lowest body weight gains. the bioavailability of chemical components of MGP was evaluated by monitoring the urinary excretion of PAH metabolites by male mice fed a 0.25% MGP diet. 1-Hydroxypyrene was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis to be the major fluorescent metabolite excreted by mice throughout the 185 d of diet administration. At necropsy, no chemical-related gross lesions were detected. In addition, no treatment-related microscopic lesions were evident in tissues obtained from animals fed a 0.50% MGP- or BaP-adulterated diet. The [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay was used to evaluate MGP- and BaP-induced DNA adduct formation in lung and forestomach tissue. The level of DNA adducts formed from the chemical components of MGP paralleled the amount of material ingested by animals. Lung DNA adduct levels were considerably higher than forestomach levels when mice ingested a 0.25% or 0.50% MGP diet. These studies demonstrate that the continuous ingestion of MGP or BaP for 185 d does not result in acute toxicity or chemical-related lesions at doses up to 0.50% MGP or 0.005% BaP. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. GAS-PHASE FLAME SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF MAGNETIC IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES WITH REDUCED OXIDATION STATE

    PubMed Central

    Kumfer, Benjamin M; Shinoda, Kozo; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Kennedy, Ian M

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of reduced oxidation state, mainly in the form of magnetite, have been synthesized utilizing a new continuous, gas-phase, nonpremixed flame method using hydrocarbon fuels. This method takes advantage of the characteristics of the inverse flame, which is produced by injection of oxidizer into a surrounding flow of fuel. Unlike traditional flame methods, this configuration allows for the iron particle formation to be maintained in a more reducing environment. The effects of flame temperature, oxygen-enrichment and fuel dilution (i.e. the stoichiometric mixture fraction), and fuel composition on particle size, Fe oxidation state, and magnetic properties are evaluated and discussed. The crystallite size, Fe(II) fraction, and saturation magnetization were all found to increase with flame temperature. Flames of methane and ethylene were used, and the use of ethylene resulted in particles containing metallic Fe(0), in addition to magnetite, while no Fe(0) was present in samples synthesized using methane. PMID:20228941

  14. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer within the FIPPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Faust, H.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Méplan, O.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2016-06-01

    The Fission Product Prompt γ -ray Spectrometer, FIPPS, is under development to enable prompt γ -ray spectroscopy correlated with fission fragment identification. This will open new possibilities in the study of fission and of nuclear structure of neutron rich nuclei. FIPPS will consist of an array of γ and neutron detectors coupled with a fission fragment filter. The chosen solution for the filter is a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM). Both experimental and modeling work was performed in order to extract the key parameters of such a device and design the future GFM of the FIPPS project. Experiments performed with a GFM behind the LOHENGRIN spectrometer demonstrated the capability of additional beam purification.

  15. Use of the gas-filled-magnet technique for particle identification at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.K.; Jiang, C.L.; Paul, M.

    1995-08-01

    Reaction studies of interest to astrophysics with radioactive ion beams will be done mainly in inverse reaction kinematics, i.e., heavy particles bombarding a hydrogen target. The low energy of the outgoing heavy reaction products makes particle identification with respect to mass and nuclear charge a major challenge. For the planned {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}) experiment one expects five different types of particles in the outgoing channels: {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O (from elastic scattering of {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O on {sup 12}C), {sup 15}O and {sup 15}N (from the {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O induced (p,{alpha}) reactions) and {sup 12}C recoils from the polypropylene target. While mass determination can be achieved easily by time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, a determination of the nuclear charge presents a challenge, especially if the energy of the particles is below 500 keV/u. We studied the gas-filled magnet technique for Z-identification of light ions between Z = 6-9. In a gas-filled magnet the particles move with an average charge state {bar q} which in one parameterization is given by {bar q} = Z ln(avZ{sup {alpha}})/ln(bZ{sup {beta}}) where Z is the nuclear charge of the ions and v their velocity. Introducing into the expression for the magnetic rigidity B{rho} = mv/{bar q} results in a Z dependence of B{rho} which is valid to very low velocities. As a magnet we used the Enge split-pole spectrograph which was filled with nitrogen gas at a pressure of 0.5 Torr. The particles were detected in the focal plane with a 50 x 10 cm{sup 2} parallel-grid-avalanche counter which measured TOF and magnetic rigidity. The mass and Z separation was tested with {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O beams at energies of about 600 keV/u and recoil particles ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 19}F. The Z-separation obtained at these energies was {triangle}Z/Z = 0.28 which is sufficient to separate individual elements for Z < 10.

  16. Spin-dependent transport in a magnetic two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorchkova, I. P.; Kikkawa, J. M.; Samarth, N.; Awschalom, D. D.

    1998-07-01

    Magneto-transport and magneto-optical probes are used to interrogate spin-dependent transport in magnetic heterostructures wherein a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is exchange-coupled to local moments. At low temperatures, the significant s-d exchange-enhanced spin splitting in these “magnetic” 2DEGs is responsible for the observation of unusual transport properties such as a complete spin polarization of the gas at large Landau level filling factors and a pronounced, non-monotonic background magneto-resistance. Magneto-transport measurements of gated samples performed in a parallel field geometry are used to systematically study the variation of the magneto-resistance with sheet concentration, yielding new insights into the dependence of spin transport on the Fermi energy of the majority spin carriers.

  17. Effect of crop residue incorporation on soil organic carbon (SOC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in European agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Taru; Schlatter, Norman; Baumgarten, Andreas; Bechini, Luca; Krüger, Janine; Grignani, Carlo; Zavattaro, Laura; Costamagna, Chiara; Spiegel, Heide

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) improves soil physical (e.g. increased aggregate stability), chemical (e.g. cation exchange capacity) and biological (e.g. biodiversity, earthworms) properties. The sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) may mitigate climate change. However, as much as 25-75% of the initial SOC in world agricultural soils may have been lost due to intensive agriculture (Lal, 2013). The European Commission has described the decline of organic matter (OM) as one of the major threats to soils (COM(2006) 231). Incorporation of crop residues may be a sustainable and cost-efficient management practice to maintain the SOC levels and to increase soil fertility in European agricultural soils. Especially Mediterranean soils that have low initial SOC concentrations, and areas where stockless croplands predominate may be suitable for crop residue incorporation. In this study, we aim to quantify the effects of crop residue incorporation on SOC and GHG emissions (CO2 and N2O) in different environmental zones (ENZs, Metzger et al., 2005) in Europe. Response ratios for SOC and GHG emissions were calculated from pairwise comparisons between crop residue incorporation and removal. Specifically, we investigated whether ENZs, clay content and experiment duration influence the response ratios. In addition, we studied how response ratios of SOM and crop yields were correlated. A total of 718 response ratios (RR) were derived from a total of 39 publications, representing 50 experiments (46 field and 4 laboratory) and 15 countries. The SOC concentrations and stocks increased by approximately 10% following crop residue incorporation. In contrast, CO2 emissions were approximately six times and N2O emissions 12 times higher following crop residue incorporation. The effect of ENZ on the response ratios was not significant. For SOC concentration, the >35% clay content had significantly approximately 8% higher response ratios compared to 18-35% clay content. As the duration of the

  18. Solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the rapid screening of triazole residues in wine and strawberries.

    PubMed

    Zambonin, C G; Cilenti, A; Palmisano, F

    2002-08-23

    A solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of triazole residues, such as triadimefon, propiconazole, myclobutanil and penconazole. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of strawberries and wine samples. The procedure is solvent-free, simple and highly sensitive. Within-day and day-to-day RSDs ranged between 2-11% and 7-28%, respectively. Detection limits estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 ranged between 30 (propiconazole) and 100 ng/kg (triadimefon). Since the detection limits achieved by this method are well below the maximum residue levels for wine (or grapes) and strawberries recommended by the European legislation, it can be conveniently used as a low-cost rapid screening method for the contamination of the considered samples. PMID:12685572

  19. Trace analysis of acidic pharmaceutical residues in waters with isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry via methylation derivatization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Yang, Zhaoguang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2011-09-30

    Acidic pharmaceutical residues are pollutants of emerging concern and are generally monitored by HPLC-MS/MS. However, due to the limited separation efficiency of HPLC column and lack of suitable mass transition for confirmation analysis, some interference may not be separated completely and differentiated from ibuprofen, which may cause the results with interference, especially in sample with complex matrix. The objective of this study is to develop a sensitive and reliable method for the determination of acidic pharmaceutical residues in water samples by GC-MS with better resolution by using methylation derivatization and isotope dilution techniques. TMSDM, a mild reagent, was used as the derivatization reagent coupling with the isotope dilution technique, for the first time, to improve the precision and accuracy of the analytical method to determine the pharmaceutical residues in water. The MDLs for the five acidic organic compounds: ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac were from 0.7 to 1.1 ng/L, with recoveries ranging from 93 to 110%. Alternative to the HPLC-MS/MS method, the developed GC-MS protocols provides an additional option for the analysis of acidic pharmaceutical residues in water, with better separation efficiency in reducing interferences from complicated sample matrix, for determination of ibuprofen residues.

  20. Determination of residues of fipronil and its metabolites in cauliflower by using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duhan, Anil; Kumari, Beena; Duhan, Saroj

    2015-02-01

    Fipronil is a widely used insecticide with a well-described toxicological pathway. Recently it has been widely used in India to control vegetable pests. The present study has been carried out to observe the persistence pattern of fipronil and its metabolites-fipronil sulfone, fipronil sulfide, fipronil desulfinyl in cauliflower and soil so as to know the potential risk if any to consumers and environment. Fipronil was applied @ 56 g a.i. ha(-1). Samples of cauliflower and soil were collected periodically; processed using QuEChERS method and analyzed by GCMS/MS. In cauliflower, residues of fipronil and its metabolites reached below detectable level before 30 days of application whereas in soil about 95% of total fipronil residues got degraded within same time period. Washing and washing followed by cooking or boiling was found effective in reducing residues. A safe waiting period of 15 days is therefore suggested before consuming cauliflower.

  1. Magnetic flux leakage inspection of gas pipelines: The effects of remanent magnetization. Topical report, 1992-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B.; Davis, R.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) Technique is the most commonly used technique to inspect large diameter transmission pipelines. A typical MFL inspection system uses permanent magnets to apply an axially oriented magnetic field to the ferromagnetic pipe material. Remanent magnetization affects the applied-magnetization because pipleline steels have sufficient retentivity to influence the magnetization of subsequent inspections. The remanent magnetization affects detection and characterization of pipeline corrosion in two ways. First, remanent magnetization changes the strength of the applied field level for subsequent inspection runs. Second, the remanent magnetization changes the flux leakage from corrosion defects, which affects defect detection and characterization of the defect geometry. Experimental data obtained from the GRI Pipeline Simulation Facility are used to illustrate the effect of remanent magnetization on flux leakage inspections.

  2. Beta2-adrenergic agonist residues: simultaneous methyl- and butylboronic derivatization for confirmatory analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramos, F; Santos, C; Silva, A; da Silveira, M I

    1998-09-25

    A derivatization procedure for confirmatory residue analysis of beta2-agonists is described. Methyl (MBA) and butyl (BBA) boronic acids are simultaneously used for the derivatization of tulobuterol, mabuterol, mapenterol, salbutamol, clenproperol, clenbuterol, clenpenterol and bromobuterol by GC-MS determination. A temperature of 55 degrees C during 60 min was selected as optimal temperature-time condition for simultaneous MBA and BBA beta2-agonists derivatization. It was also observed that stability of boronic derivatives was maintained at -20 degrees C over a period of four days. The proposed methodology was tested in urine and it could be applied for confirmatory residue analysis of clenbuterol-like compounds.

  3. Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging of the animal lung: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santyr, Giles E.; Lam, Wilfred W.; Parra-Robles, Juan M.; Taves, Timothy M.; Ouriadov, Alexei V.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas (HNG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very promising noninvasive tool for the investigation of animal models of lung disease, particularly to follow longitudinal changes in lung function and anatomy without the accumulated radiation dose associated with x rays. The two most common noble gases for this purpose are H3e (helium 3) and X129e (xenon 129), the latter providing a cost-effective approach for clinical applications. Hyperpolarization is typically achieved using spin-exchange optical pumping techniques resulting in ˜10 000-fold improvement in available magnetization compared to conventional Boltzmann polarizations. This substantial increase in polarization allows high spatial resolution (<1 mm) single-slice images of the lung to be obtained with excellent temporal resolution (<1 s). Complete three-dimensional images of the lungs with 1 mm slice thickness can be obtained within reasonable breath-hold intervals (<20 s). This article provides an overview of the current methods used in HNG MR imaging with an emphasis on ventilation studies in animals. Special MR hardware and software considerations are described in order to use the strong but nonrecoverable magnetization as efficiently as possible and avoid depolarization primarily by molecular oxygen. Several applications of HNG MR imaging are presented, including measurement of gross lung anatomy (e.g., airway diameters), microscopic anatomy (e.g., apparent diffusion coefficient), and a variety of functional parameters including dynamic ventilation, alveolar oxygen partial pressure, and xenon diffusing capacity.

  4. Effect of process temperature on structure, microstructure, residual stresses and soft magnetic properties of sputtered Fe70Co30 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, Swaleha; Ramudu, M.; Raja, M. Manivel; Kamat, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of substrate and post-annealing temperatures on the structure, microstructure, residual stresses and soft magnetic properties of Fe70Co30 thin films was systematically investigated. Microstructural studies reveal that the films are continuous and undergo changes in shape of grain from plate like to spherical resulting in an increase in grain size with the increase in substrate temperature, whereas the post-annealed films show small pores and no significant grain growth till 500 °C. Coercivity (Hc) was found decreasing with both the substrate and post-annealing temperatures; however, the best Hc value of 26 Oe was obtained for the films deposited at substrate temperature of 500 °C. The post-annealed films exhibited relatively higher Hc values. A good combination of high saturation magnetization 4πMs of ~23.2 kG and low coercivity Hc of 26-65 Oe was obtained for the films deposited at substrate temperature of 450-500 °C. Residual stress analysis on films with different substrate temperatures shows the presence of tensile stress. The decrease in tensile stress is attributed to the relaxation of thermal stresses in the films.

  5. Effect of the basic residue on the energetics, dynamics, and mechanisms of gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Song, Tao; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K

    2010-11-17

    The effect of the basic residue on the energetics, dynamics, and mechanisms of backbone fragmentation of protonated peptides was investigated. Time-resolved and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of singly protonated peptides with the N-terminal arginine residue and their analogues, in which arginine is replaced with less basic lysine and histidine residues, was examined using a specially configured Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS). SID experiments demonstrated different kinetics of formation of several primary product ions of peptides with and without arginine residue. The energetics and dynamics of these pathways were determined from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental data. Comparison between the kinetics and energetics of fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides and the corresponding methyl ester derivatives provides important information on the effect of dissociation pathways involving salt bridge (SB) intermediates on the observed fragmentation behavior. Because pathways involving SB intermediates are characterized by low threshold energies, they efficiently compete with classical oxazolone and imine/enol pathways of arginine-containing peptides on a long time scale of the FTICR instrument. In contrast, fragmentation of histidine- and lysine-containing peptides is largely determined by canonical pathways. Because SB pathways are characterized by negative activation entropies, fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides is kinetically hindered and observed at higher collision energies as compared to their lysine- and histidine-containing analogues.

  6. Variation of Magnetic Fluctuation due to Gas Puffing in Edge Region of Reversed-Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2016-09-01

    We measured the variation of magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations observed during the gas puffing in the edge region of the toroidal pinch experiment-reversed experiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma. In the short period in which the electron density increased slowly just after the gas puffing, the confinement of fast electrons in the core region was maintained by the decrease in the fast radial magnetic fluctuation with the deepening of the reversal of the toroidal field. During the following period in which the electron density increased rapidly, the radial gradient of electron density decreased, and the loss of fast electrons from the core region increased owing to the increase in the toroidal and radial magnetic fluctuations in the high-frequency band, although the poloidal magnetic fluctuation decreased. Therefore, the confinement of fast electrons would be maintained by keeping the radial gradient of plasma thermal pressure with a moderate neutral particle supply of small quantity in a short time.

  7. Ion temperature and gas pressure effects on the magnetized sheath dynamics during plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoram, M.; Ghomi, H.; Navab Safa, N.

    2016-03-01

    Here, a collisional magnetized plasma with finite ion temperature is considered to examine the effects of the ion temperature and gas pressure on the plasma-sheath dynamics. We use the two-fluid model of plasma-sheath where the nonlinear equations of a dynamic sheath are solved using a full implicit scheme of finite difference method along with some convenient initial and boundary conditions at the plasma center and target. It is found that the ion temperature only has a significant effect on the characteristics of low voltage sheath, while the gas pressure (collision rate) seriously affects the dynamic characteristics of the low and high voltage plasma-sheath. One can see, increasing the ion temperature in low voltage plasma-sheath causes to increase the temporal curve of the ion dose and the ion impact energy on the target, reduces the temporal curve of the sheath width, and has no any effect on the temporal curve of the ion incident angle on the target. However, rising the gas pressure in low and high voltage plasma-sheath reduces all of these temporal curves.

  8. Improvement of saturation magnetization of Fe nanoparticles by post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kin, Masane Tanaka, Masaaki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Hasaegawa, Jun; Kura, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomoyuki

    2015-05-07

    Fe nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5} and then post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere to produce highly monodisperse Fe NPs with high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}). The as-synthesized pre-anneal Fe NPs had an expanded α-Fe structure and M{sub s} was only 39% of that for bulk Fe because of the low crystallinity and the inclusion of a surfactant. Post-annealing of the Fe NPs in a hydrogen gas atmosphere at 200 °C improved the crystallinity of the Fe NPs from an amorphous-like structure to a body centered cubic (bcc) structure without any lattice expansion. This result indicates that hydrogen gas plays a significant role in improvement of the crystallinity of Fe NPs. Accompanying the improvement in crystallinity, M{sub s} for the Fe NPs increased from 86 to 190 emu/g{sub net} at 300 K, the values of which include the weight of surfactant. This enhanced M{sub s} is almost the same as that of bulk Fe (218 emu/{sub Fe}). It was concluded that the crystallinity has a significant influence on the M{sub s} of the Fe NPs because long-range ordering of the lattice can maintain strong direct exchange interactions between Fe atoms.

  9. Cluster finds giant gas vortices at the edge of Earth's magnetic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    12 August 2004 ESA’s quartet of space-weather watchers, Cluster, has discovered vortices of ejected solar material high above the Earth. The superheated gases trapped in these structures are probably tunnelling their way into the Earth’s magnetic ‘bubble’, the magnetosphere. This discovery possibly solves a 17-year-mystery of how the magnetosphere is constantly topped up with electrified gases when it should be acting as a barrier. hi-res Size hi-res: 1446 Kb Credits: H. Hasegawa (Dartmouth College) Three-dimensional cut-away view of Earth's magnetosphere This figure shows a three-dimensional cut-away view of Earth' s magnetosphere. The curly features sketched on the boundary layer are the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices discovered by Cluster. They originate where two adjacent flows travel with different speed. In this case, one of the flows is the heated gas inside the boundary layer of the magnetosphere, the other the solar wind just outside it. The arrows show the direction of the magnetic field, in red that associated with the solar wind and in green the one inside Earth’s magnetosphere. The white dashed arrow shows the trajectory followed by Cluster. High resolution version (JPG format) 1446 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 15 365 Kb hi-res Size hi-res: 22 Kb Credits: H. Hasegawa (Dartmouth College) Electrified gas varies across the vortices along Cluster’s trajectory This computer simulation shows how the density of the electrified gas is expected to vary across the vortices along Cluster’s trajectory (white dashed line). The density is lower inside the boundary layer (blue region) and higher outside, in the region dominated by the solar wind (shown in red). The density variations measured by the instruments on board Cluster match those predicted by this model. Low resolution version (JPG format) 22 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 3438 Kb The Earth’s magnetic field is our planet’s first line of defence against the bombardment of

  10. Magnetically responsive polycaprolactone nanoparticles for progesterone screening in biological and environmental samples using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Nezhadali, Azizollah; Khatibi, Aram-Dokht

    2016-08-01

    A new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite nanocomposite was fabricated and used as a sorbent for magnetically mediated PCL microspheres solid-phase extraction (MM-PCL-SPE) followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for monitoring of progesterone (PGN) hormone in biological and environmental matrices, namely blood serum, tap water, urine, and hospital wastewater. The nanomagnetite core of the sorbent was synthesized by a co-precipitation method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were then microencapsulated with PCL microspheres using emulsion polymerization. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The magnetite sorbent can be effectively dispersed in aqueous solution and attracted to an external magnetic field. The MM-PCL-SPE process for PGN assay involved (a) dispersion of the sorbent in the donor phase aqueous solution with sonication, (b) exposure to a magnetic field to collect sorbent that had adsorbed the analyte, and (c) solvent desorption of extracted PGN for GC-FID analysis. The work demonstrates the usefulness of MM-PCL-SPE in the rapid and sensitive monitoring of trace amounts of PGN in real samples. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 1.00 and 3.30 ng/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries in real samples were adequate. Linearity was observed over a wide range of 2.2-10,000.0 ng/mL in aqueous media and urine and 0.01-70.0 μg/mL in blood serum. Graphical Abstract In this research new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite microspheres were developed as an efficient sorbent for solid-phase extraction of progesterone hormone in biological and environmental matrices. PMID:27299775

  11. Radiation, Gas and Magnetic Fields: Understanding Accretion Disks with Real Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ted

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation studies some of the fundamental physics ingredients that underlie the theory of astrophysical accretion disks. We begin by focusing on local radiation magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in static, optically thick, vertically stratified media with constant flux mean opacity. Our analysis includes the effects of vertical gradients in a horizontal background magnetic field. Assuming rapid radiative diffusion, we use the zero gas pressure limit as an entry point for investigating the coupling between the photon bubble instability and the Parker instability. We find that the two instabilities transition smoothly into each other at a characteristic wavelength that is approximately equal to the magnetic pressure scale height times the ratio of radiation to magnetic pressure gradient forces. The Parker instability exists for longer wavelengths, while photon bubbles exist for wavelengths shorter than the transition wavelength. We also consider the effects of finite gas pressure on the coupled instabilities. Finite gas pressure introduces an additional short wavelength limit to the Parker-like behavior, and also limits the growth rate of the photon bubble instability to a constant value at high wave numbers. Finally, our analytic infinite wavenumber perturbation calculation strongly suggest that magnetic pressure gradients do not modify the photon bubble growth rate in the asymptotic regime. Our results may explain why photon bubbles have not yet been observed in recent stratified shearing box accretion disk simulations. Photon bubbles may physically exist in simulations with high radiation to gas pressure ratios, but higher spatial resolution will be needed to resolve the asymptotically growing unstable wavelengths. Next, we turn to the effects of local dissipation physics on the spectra and vertical structure of high luminosity stellar mass black hole X-ray binary accretion disks. More specifically, we present spectral calculations of non-LTE accretion

  12. Design limitations on a thermal siphon 4 K helium loop for cooling-down the cyclotron gas stopper magnet coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.; Chouhan, S. S.; Zeller, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The two Cyclotron gas stopper superconducting solenoid coils will be kept cold at 4.25 to 4.6 K using three pulse tube coolers per coil. These coolers are designed to produce from 1.35 to 1.6 W per cooler when the cooler first stage is at about 45 K. The cyclotron gas stopper coils are designed so that they can be separated while cold, but unpowered. This design decision means that the coils can be kept cold while maintenance is performed on the cyclotron. MSU decided that the cyclotron gas stopper would be cooled down from 300 K to 4 K using the coolers connected to the coils using a thermal-siphon cooling loop. This decision was in part influenced by the decision to have the solenoid axis perpendicular to the direction of the gravitational acceleration. The heat exchangers connected to the cooler cold heads must be above the top of the magnet coil. Cold gas from the cooler heat exchanger must enter the bottom of the magnet cryostat. The report describes the effect of the direction of gravitational acceleration with respect to the solenoid axis and other effects that will limit the cooling and cool-down of a magnet like the MSU cyclotron gas stopper magnet.

  13. Composition, Electronic and Magnetic Investigation of the Encapsulated ZnFe2O 4 Nanoparticles in Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Containing Ni Residuals.

    PubMed

    Al Khabouri, Saja; Al Harthi, Salim; Maekawa, Toru; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Elzain, Mohamed E; Al Hinai, Ashraf; Al-Rawas, A D; Gismelseed, A M; Yousif, Ali A

    2015-12-01

    We report investigation on properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (mCNTs) containing Ni residuals before and after encapsulation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles. The pristine tubes exhibit metallic character with a 0.3 eV reduction in the work function along with ferromagnetic behavior which is attributed to the Ni residuals incorporated during the preparation of tubes. Upon encapsulation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles, 0.5 eV shift in Fermi level position and a reduction in both the π band density of state along with a change in the hybridized sp(2)/sp(3) ratio of the tubes from 2.04 to 1.39 are observed. As a result of the encapsulation, enhancement in the σ bands density of state and coating of the zinc ferrite nanoparticles by the internal layers of the CNTs in the direction along the tube axis is observed. Furthermore, Ni impurities inside the tubes are attracted to the encapsulated zinc ferrite nanoparticles, suggesting the possibility of using these particles as purifying agents for CNTs upon being synthesized using magnetic catalyst particles. Charge transfer from Ni/mCNTs to the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles is evident via reduction of the density of states near the Fermi level and a 0.3 eV shift in the binding energy of C 1 s core level ionization. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that encapsulated zinc ferrite nanoparticles in mCNTs resulted in two interacting sub-systems featured by distinct blocking temperatures and enhanced magnetic properties; i.e., large coercivity of 501 Oe and saturation magnetization of 2.5 emu/g at 4 K.

  14. Role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of post-operative residual breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yili; Du, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of postoperative residual breast cancer. A retrospective analysis was performed on 10 patients who were diagnosed with non-malignant breast lesions by preoperative clinical, ultrasound and mammography examinations and intraoperative frozen-section pathology. These patients were finally confirmed as having malignant breast lesions by paraffin-embedded tissue histology and corresponding received second surgeries. Routine MRI, enhancement MRI and echo-planar imaging-diffusion-weighted imaging were performed on the 10 patients within 1 month after the first surgery. All the cases showed a local distortion of mammary architecture revealed by routine MRI and enhancement MRI images. The enhancement characteristics of the 10 cases were as follows: 3 cases featured stippled enhancement, 2 had small nodular enhancement, 1 showed dendritic enhancement, 1 had a ring-shaped enhancement of the cystic wall and 3 had no abnormal enhancement. The lesions of 7 cases had a type-I enhancement curve (progressive enhancement pattern) and 3 cases had a type-II curve (plateau pattern). The lesions of 4 cases had a decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. In total, 4 cases of tumor residue were diagnosed by MRI and the second pathological examination, while in 1 case the tumor residue was misdiagnosed by MRI but confirmed by the second pathological examination. In conclusion, the present study suggested that short-term follow-up MRI may be of value in the diagnosis of postoperative residual breast tumors and may be helpful for surgeons to develop an accurate surgical plan. PMID:27446586

  15. Magnetic Properties of Sediments from IODP Expedition 311 - Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates: Records of Fossil Sulphate Methane Interface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkin, R. J.; Baker, J.; Esteban, L.; Mullin, A. J.; Paterson, B.; Hamilton, T. S.; Michael, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 311 sampled a transect across the Cascadia continental margin of North America to study the occurrence of gas hydrates. Magnetic properties are sensitive to the diagenetic history, and particularly the redox state associated with the transport of methane and the creation of gas hydrates. Additionally, they offer the possiblility of a remote sensing method to explore for gas hydrates deposits. Aboard the Joides Resolution, remanence and magnetic susceptibility measurement were made on recovered core and 1692 discrete samples were taken, approximately every 50 cm, for further study at the Geological Survey of Canada - Pacific laboratory. Magnetic remanence, hysteresis loops, isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves and thermomagnetic variation of susceptibility were measured to characterize the mineralogy, domain state, and direction of magnetization of the magnetic carriers. Almost all samples hold normal polarity remanence, except in two holes (1327C and 1329C) which have ~ 30m reverse polarity intervals. Cores taken with the Extended Core Barrel usually are overprinted by a large vertical remanence overprint. Throughout the collection we observe two distinct magnetic behaviors: type-A and type-B. These behaviors are relatively uniform within depth intervals of up to several 10s of meters and are apparently unrelated to present gas hydrate concentration as estimated from electric resistivity variations. Type-A samples are an order of magnitude stronger than type-B samples in saturation magnetization and magnetic susceptibility. They also have lower magnetic coercivity, multidomain coercivity ratios, little superparamagnetism, and Curie temperatures of 580°C. The type-A samples are interpreted to hold primary detrital magnetite. The type-B samples have single-domain to pseudo-single domain coercivity ratios and they readily transform to a high susceptibility mineral on heating above 400°C. We

  16. [Comparison of the performances of gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in rapid screening and confirmation of 208 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinyue; Pang, Guofang; Jin, Linghe; Kang, Jian; Hu, Xueyan; Chang, Qiaoying; Wang, Minglin; Fan, Chunlin

    2015-04-01

    The performances of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOF/MS) for the determination of 208 pesticide residues in fruit and vegetable samples, including apple, orange, tomato and cucumber, were compared comprehensively. Based on the differences of the two instruments, their respective characteristics and scopes of application in the detection of the pesticide residues were presented, which provided the reference for the analysis of pesticide residues. The performance parameters of the two instruments, such as overall recoveries, precisions, limits of detection, linear ranges, identification points and matrix effects, were evaluated according to a designed experiment. At three spiked levels (5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 µg/kg), the average recoveries for the majority of pesticides (93.0%) ranged from 70% to 120% in the four matrices with relative standard deviations below 20%. The limits of detection for most of the pesticides by GC-MS/MS and GC-Q-TOF/MS were less than 5.0 µg/kg. Compared with GC-QTOF/MS, GC-MS/MS showed relatively lower limits of detection and wider linear ranges, and its performance was more satisfactory in accurate quantitative analysis due to its superior sensitivity. On the other hand, GC-QTOF/MS provided accurate mass measurement, which was proved to be an efficient analytical tool on the rapid screening and confirmation of a large number of pesticides and non-target compounds.

  17. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of the aromatic residues in the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, N.R.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Bugg, C.E. )

    1989-02-21

    The amino acid sequence for the variant-3 (CsE-v3) toxin from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing contains eight aromatic residues. By use of 2D NMR spectroscopic methods, the resonances from the individual protons (NH, C{sup alpha}H, C{sup beta}H{prime}, H{double prime}, and the ring) for each of the individual aromatic residues have been completely assigned. The spatial arrangement of the aromatic ring systems with respect to each other has been qualitatively analyzed by 2D-NOESY techniques. The results show that Trp-47, Tyr-4, and Tyr-42 are in close spatial proximity to each other. The NOESY contacts and the ring current induced shifts in the resonances of the individual protons of Tyr-4 and Trp-47 suggest that the aromatic ring planes of these residues are in an orthogonal arrangement. A comparison with the published crystal structure suggests that there is a minor rearrangement of the aromatic rings in the solution phase. No 2D-NOESY contacts involving Phe-44 and Tyr-14 to any other aromatic ring protons have been observed. The pH dependence of the aromatic ring proton chemical shifts has also been studied. These results suggest that the Tyr-58 phenolic group is experiencing a hydrogen-bonding interaction with a positively charged group, while Tyr-4, -14, -38, and -40 are experiencing through-space interactions with proximal negatively charged groups. These studies define the microenvironment of the aromatic residues in the variant-3 neurotoxin in aqueous solution.

  18. Residual strahls in solar wind electron dropouts: Signatures of magnetic connection to the Sun, disconnection, or interchange reconnection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Pagel, C.

    2008-02-01

    A recent assessment of suprathermal electron heat flux dropouts (HFDs) in the solar wind eliminated 90% as possible signatures of field lines disconnected from the Sun at both ends (Pagel et al., 2005b). The primary reason for elimination was the presence of a residual field-aligned strahl presumably signaling field lines connected to the Sun. Using high-time-resolution data from the Wind spacecraft, this paper tests whether the residual strahls were an artifact of averaging over pitch angle distributions (PADs) with and without strahls. An automated search for PADs without strahls (flat PADs) yields an occurrence rate of only 14% within HFDs, but a detailed case study shows that these flat PADs are imbedded within intervals of nearly flat PADs, that is, PADS with residual strahls that cannot be artifacts of averaging. An attractive alternative is that the residual strahls result from intermixing of originally back-scattered fluxes (haloes) of unequal intensities on field lines that have either disconnected or interchange reconnected at the Sun. A reevaluation of reported streaming of higher-energy electrons in HFDs suggests a similar cause. While the high-time-resolution data show high variability of PAD profiles within HFDs, this paper reopens the possibility that a substantial fraction signal disconnection or interchange reconnection. Estimated occurrence rates of fields having undergone these processes based upon published HFD rates are of the same order of magnitude as the surprisingly low values of ~1-5% recently predicted by a model of a balanced heliospheric flux budget (Owens and Crooker, 2007).

  19. Residual Strahls in Solar Wind Electron Dropouts: Signatures of Magnetic Connection to the Sun, Disconnection, or Interchange Reconnection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Pagel, C.

    2008-01-01

    A recent assessment of suprathermal electron heat flux dropouts (HFDs) in the solar wind eliminated 90% as possible signatures of field lines disconnected from the Sun at both ends (Pagel et al., 2005b). The primary reason for elimination was the presence of a residual field-aligned strahl presumably signaling field lines connected to the Sun. Using high-time-resolution data from the Wind spacecraft, this paper tests whether the residual strahls were an artifact of averaging over pitch angle distributions (PADs) with and without strahls. An automated search for PADs without strahls (flat PADs) yields an occurrence rate of only 14% within HFDs, but a detailed case study shows that these flat PADs are imbedded within intervals of nearly flat PADs, that is, PADS with residual strahls that cannot be artifacts of averaging. An attractive alternative is that the residual strahls result from intermixing of originally back-scattered fluxes (haloes) of unequal intensities on field lines that have either disconnected or interchange reconnected at the Sun. A reevaluation of reported streaming of higher-energy electrons in HFDs suggests a similar cause. While the high-time-resolution data show high variability of PAD profiles within HFDs, this paper reopens the possibility that a substantial fraction signal disconnection or interchange reconnection. Estimated occurrence rates of fields having undergone these processes based upon published HFD rates are of the same order of magnitude as the surprisingly low values of 1-5% recently predicted by a model of a balanced heliospheric flux budget (Owens and Crooker, 2007).

  20. [High throuput analysis of organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in animal original foods by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Li, Heli; Miao, Hong; Zeng, Fangang; Li, Ruifeng; Chen, Huijing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2011-10-01

    A method was established for the quantitative determination of 54 organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in foods of animal origin by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection. Homogenized samples were extracted with acetone and methylene chloride, and cleaned-up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The response of each analyte showed a good linearity with a correlation coefficient not less than 0. 99. The recovery experiments were performed by a blank sample spiked at low, medium and high fortification levels. The recoveries for beef, mutton, pork, chicken were in the range of 50. 5% -128. 1% with the relative standard deviations (n = 6) of 1. 1% -25. 5%, which demonstrated the good precision and accuracy of the present method. The limits of detection for the analytes were in the range of 0. 001 -0. 170 mg/kg, and the limits of quantification were in the range of 0. 002 -0. 455 mg/kg. Animal food samples collected from markets such as meat, liver and kidney were analyzed, and the residues of dichlorovos and disulfoton-sulfoxide were found in the some samples. The established method is sensitive and selective enough to detect organophosphorus pesticide residues in animal foods. PMID:22268359

  1. Residue analysis of acephate and its metabolite methamidophos in open field and greenhouse pakchoi (Brassica campestris L.) by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chuanjiang, Tao; Dahui, Li; Xinzhong, Zhang; Shanshan, Chen; Lijuan, Fu; Xiuying, Piao; Jie, Shi; Hui, Jiang; Chongjiu, Li; Jianzhong, Li

    2010-06-01

    To analyze the dynamic degradation and final residues of acephate and its metabolite methamidophos, field-experiments with pakchoi (Brassica campestris L.) in open field and greenhouse were carried out in Beijing, China in 2004 and 2005. The degradation dynamics and final residues were determined by gas chromatography (GC) equipped with a pulsed flame photometric detector and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)/MS after acephate was applied on open field and green house pakchoi (B. campestris L.). The dynamic degradation results showed that the half-lives of acephate and methamidophos in open field pakchoi were 1.36 days with dynamic degradation equation C( t ) = 133.01e( - 0.5107t ), and 2.86 days with C( t ) = 6.5753e( - 0.2422t ), respectively. While the half-lives of acephate and methamidophos in the greenhouse were 1.07 days with C( t ) = 59.134e( - 0.4353t ) and 0.79 days with C( t ) = 0.2703e( - 0.2595t ), respectively. The final residue analysis demonstrated that >50% of total methamidophos were resulted from the degradation of acephate 7 and 18 days after it was applied on the greenhouse pakchoi, respectively. While in the open-field pakchoi, >90% of total methamidophos was found to be the metabolite of acephate.

  2. Emissions of PAHs from indoor crop residue burning in a typical rural stove: emission factors, size distributions, and gas-particle partitioning.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guofeng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yifeng; Ding, Junnan; Xue, Miao; Min, Yujia; Zhu, Chen; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu; Russell, Armistead G

    2011-02-15

    Indoor combustion of crop residues for cooking or heating is one of the most important emission sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in developing countries. However, data on PAH emission factors (EFs) for burning crop residues indoor, particularly those measured in the field, were scarce, leading to large uncertainties in the emission inventories. In this study, EFs of PAHs for nine commonly used crop residues burned in a typical Chinese rural cooking stove were measured in a simulated kitchen. The measured EFs of total PAHs averaged at 63 ± 37 mg/kg, ranging from 27 to 142 mg/kg, which were higher than those measured in chamber experiments, implying that the laboratory experiment-based emission and risk assessment should be carefully reviewed. EFs of gaseous and particulate phase PAHs were 27 ± 13 and 35 ± 23 mg/kg, respectively. Composition profiles and isomer ratios of emitted PAHs were characterized. Stepwise regressions found that modified combustion efficiency and fuel moisture were the most important factors affecting the emissions. There was 80 ± 6% of PAHs associated with PM2.5, and the mass percentage of PAHs in fine particles increased as the molecular weight increased. For freshly emitted PAHs, absorption into organic carbon, rather than adsorption, dominated the gas-particle partitioning.

  3. The Gas-Filled-Magnet at PRIME Lab: Increased Sensitivity of Cosmogenic Nuclide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Granger, D. E.; Woodruff, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), radionuclides produced either by cosmic-ray interactions or by nucleogenic means can be measured. Typical isotopic abundance ratios range from 1 x 10-10 to 1 x 10-15. The routinely measured radionuclides are 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, and 129I. Be-10, 26Al, and 36Cl have isobaric interferences that cannot be eliminated mass through mass analysis, but dE/dx techniques suppresses these isobars enough to allow successful measurements. There are compromises, the isobar for 26Al, 26Mg, precludes successful measurement of 26Al if AlO- is injected into the accelerator. Mg- doesn't form a stable negative ion so a 26Al measurement requires injection of 26Al-. But the Al- ion is formed inefficiently; secondary ion currents using Al- are ~ 10 times less than an AlO- secondary ion beam. Precision scales with count rate so precise measurement of the 26Al/Al for all but higher ratio samples is difficult. It has long been recognized that a gas-filled-magnet (GFM) could potentially improve the measurement of those radionuclides with intractable isobar interferences. A GFM works on the principle that each element of an isobar pair, e.g. 26Mg and 26Al, has a different average charge state as it traverses a gas (3-4 Torr of N2) contained within the vacuum jacket of a magnet. The magnet steers each species with its own momentum-to-charge ratio on its own distinct radius of curvature. The magnet can be tuned to allow the isotope of interest into a dE/dx detector; most of the isobar doesn't make it into the detector. Using the PRIME Lab GFM we are now able to routinely run 26Al with a precision that is comparable to that obtained with 10Be. We are also using the GFM for routine measurements of 10Be and 36Cl. Although the improvement for these nuclides is not as pronounced as it is for 26Al, the GFM has improved the detection sensitivity for both. Our 10Be background is now ~ 5 x 10-16 and for 36Cl we can now run the source more

  4. Size-controlled, magnetic, and core-shell nanoparticles synthesized by inert-gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Mark A.

    Interest in nanoparticles (2 to 100 nm in diameter) and clusters of atoms (0.5 to 2 nm in diameter) has heightened over the past two and a half decades on both fundamental and functional levels. Nanoparticles and clusters of atoms are an exciting branch of materials science because they do not behave like normal bulk matter, nor do they act like molecules. They can have shockingly different physical, chemical, optical, or magnetic properties from the same material at a larger scale. In the case of nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio can change fundamental properties like melting temperature, binding energy, or electron affinity. The definitions of markers used to distinguish between metallic, semiconducting, and insulating bulk condensed matter, such as the band gap and polarizability, can even be blurred or confused on the nanoscale. Similarly, clusters of atoms can form in structures that are only stable at finite sizes, and do not translate to bulk condensed matter. Thermodynamics of finite systems changes dramatically in nanovolumes such as wires, rods, cubes, and spheres, which can lead to complex core-shell and onion-like nanostructures. Consequently, these changes in properties and structure have led to many new possibilities in the field of materials engineering. Inert-gas condensation (IGC) is a well-established method of producing nanoparticles that condense from the gas phase. Its first use dates back to the early 1990s, and it has been used to fabricate nanoparticles both commercially and in research and development for applications in magnetism, biomedicine, and catalysts. In this dissertation, IGC was used to produce a wide variety of nanoparticles. First, control over the size distributions of Cu nanoparticles and how it relates to the plasma properties inside the nucleation chamber was investigated. Next, the formation of phase pure WFe2 nanoparticles revealed that this Laves phase is ferromagnetic instead of non-magnetic. Finally, core

  5. CO2 Biofixation by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and the Green Alga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 Grown Using Gas Effluents and Solid Residues of Thermoelectric Origin.

    PubMed

    da Silva Vaz, Bruna; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 280 to 400 ppm in the last 10 years, and the coal-fired power plants are responsible for approximately 22 % of these emissions. The burning of fossil fuel also produces a great amount of solid waste that causes serious industrial and environmental problems. The biological processes become interesting alternative in combating pollution and developing new products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO2 biofixation potential of microalgae that were grown using gaseous effluents and solid residues of thermoelectric origin. The microalgae Chlorella fusca LEB 111 presented higher rate of CO2 biofixation (42.8 %) (p < 0.01) than did Spirulina sp. LEB 18. The values for the CO2 biofixation rates and the kinetic parameters of Spirulina and Chlorella cells grown using combustion gas did not differ significantly from those of cells grown using CO2 and a carbon source in the culture media. These microalgae could be grown using ash derived from coal combustion, using the minerals present in this residue as the source of the essential metals required for their growth and the CO2 derived from the combustion gas as their carbon source.

  6. CO2 Biofixation by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and the Green Alga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 Grown Using Gas Effluents and Solid Residues of Thermoelectric Origin.

    PubMed

    da Silva Vaz, Bruna; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 280 to 400 ppm in the last 10 years, and the coal-fired power plants are responsible for approximately 22 % of these emissions. The burning of fossil fuel also produces a great amount of solid waste that causes serious industrial and environmental problems. The biological processes become interesting alternative in combating pollution and developing new products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO2 biofixation potential of microalgae that were grown using gaseous effluents and solid residues of thermoelectric origin. The microalgae Chlorella fusca LEB 111 presented higher rate of CO2 biofixation (42.8 %) (p < 0.01) than did Spirulina sp. LEB 18. The values for the CO2 biofixation rates and the kinetic parameters of Spirulina and Chlorella cells grown using combustion gas did not differ significantly from those of cells grown using CO2 and a carbon source in the culture media. These microalgae could be grown using ash derived from coal combustion, using the minerals present in this residue as the source of the essential metals required for their growth and the CO2 derived from the combustion gas as their carbon source. PMID:26453033

  7. Inert-Gas Condensed Co-W Nanoclusters: Formation, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar-Fard, Farhad Reza

    Rare-earth permanent magnets are used extensively in numerous technical applications, e.g. wind turbines, audio speakers, and hybrid/electric vehicles. The demand and production of rare-earth permanent magnets in the world has in the past decades increased significantly. However, the decrease in export of rare-earth elements from China in recent time has led to a renewed interest in developing rare-earth free permanent magnets. Elements such as Fe and Co have potential, due to their high magnetization, to be used as hosts in rare-earth free permanent magnets but a major challenge is to increase their magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K1, which largely drives the coercivity. Theoretical calculations indicate that dissolving the 5d transition metal W in Fe or Co increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The challenge, though, is in creating a solid solution in hcp Co or bcc Fe, which under equilibrium conditions have negligible solubility. In this dissertation, the formation, structure, and magnetic properties of sub-10 nm Co-W clusters with W content ranging from 4 to 24 atomic percent were studied. Co-W alloy clusters with extended solubility of W in hcp Co were produced by inert gas condensation. The different processing conditions such as the cooling scheme and sputtering power were found to control the structural state of the as-deposited Co-W clusters. For clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber, the mean size and the fraction crystalline clusters increased with increasing power, while the fraction of crystalline clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber was not as affected by the sputtering power. For the low W content clusters, the structural characterization revealed clusters predominantly single crystalline hcp Co(W) structure, a significant extension of W solubility when compared to the equilibrium solubility, but fcc Co(W) and Co3W structures were observed in very small and large clusters, respectively. At high

  8. Simple and rapid method for simultaneous gas chromatographic determination of bitertanol, metalaxyl, oxadixyl, propiconazole, and triadimefon residues in cucumbers.

    PubMed

    Lee, W O; Wong, S K

    1995-10-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of bitertanol, metalaxyl, oxadixyl, propiconazole and triadimefon residues in cucumbers has been developed. The fungicide residues were extracted from the sample with ethyl acetate and determined, after an automated gel permeation chromatographic clean-up, by GC with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. Cucumbers fortified with fungicides in the laboratory were analysed using the proposed method and that of Luke, Frooberg, Masumoto and Doose (J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem., 1981, 64, 1187). For the proposed method, mean recoveries ranged from 87.9% for bitertanol to 96.5% for oxadixyl. For the method of Luke et al. mean recoveries ranged from 79.8% for triadimefon to 97.8% for bitertanol. Cucumbers treated with the fungicides in the field were also analysed by these two methods. For the determination of all these five fungicides, no difference was observed at the 5% significance level.

  9. The centralized control of elemental mercury emission from the flue gas by a magnetic rengenerable Fe-Ti-Mn spinel.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yong; Xiong, Shangchao; Dang, Hao; Xiao, Xin; Yang, Shijian; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-12-15

    A magnetic Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was developed to adsorb gaseous Hg(0) in our previous study. However, it is currently extremely restricted in the control of Hg(0) emission from the flue gas for at least three reasons: sorbent recovery, sorbent regeneration and the interference of the chemical composition in the flue gas. Therefore, the effect of SO2 and H2O on the adsorption of gaseous Hg(0) on the Fe-Ti-Mn spinel and the regeneration of spent Fe-Ti-Mn spinel were investigated in this study. Meanwhile, the procedure of the centralized control of Hg(0) emission from the flue gas by the magnetic Fe-Ti-Mn spinel has been analyzed for industrial application. The spent Fe-Ti-Mn spinel can be regenerated by water washing followed by the thermal treatment at 450 °C with no obvious decrease of its ability for Hg(0) capture. Meanwhile, gaseous Hg(0) in the flue gas can be remarkably concentrated during the regeneration, facilitating its safe disposal. Initial pilot test demonstrated that gaseous Hg(0) in the real flue gas can be concentrated at least 100 times by the Fe-Ti-Mn spinel. Therefore, Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was a novel magnetic regenerable sorbent, which can be used for the centralized control of Hg(0) emission from the flue gas.

  10. Application of magnetic nanoparticles to residue analysis of organochlorine pesticides in water samples by GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Senar; Tor, Ali; Aydin, Mehmet Emin

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel magnetic-SPE method for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in environmental water samples by use of Fe3O4-magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with oleic acid followed by GC/MS. The chemisorption of oleic acid onto Fe3O4-MNPs provides reusability of the developed sorbent materials several times. The effects of different parameters such as pH, desorption solvent, contact time, temperature, ionic strength, and sorbent dosage on the efficiency of magnetic-SPE were investigated. The optimized SPE method involved shaking 50 mL of water sample (pH 4) with 50 mg oleic acid coated Fe3O4(-) MNPs for 1 h, isolating the sorbent with an Nd-Fe-B magnet, and eluting the OCPs with methanol. An ionic strength of 0.1 M and temperature of 15 degrees C provided the maximum extraction efficiency. The LOQs were in the range of 0.006 to 0.048 microg/L. For three fortification levels, recoveries were in the range of 44-108%, with RSD <5%. The developed SPE method was successfully applied to real water samples, and it is viable, rapid, and easy to use for analysis of OCPs in water samples.

  11. Synthesis, magnetic and ethanol gas sensing properties of semiconducting magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Al-Hazmi, Faten; Al-Tuwirqi, R. M.; Alnowaiser, F.; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.; El-Tantawy, Farid; Yakuphanoglu, F.

    2013-05-01

    The superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with an average size of 7 nm were synthesized using a rapid and facile microwave hydrothermal technique. The structure of the magnetite nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction (X-ray), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The prepared Fe3O4 was shown to have a cubic phase of pure magnetite. Magnetization hysteresis loop shows that the synthesized magnetite exhibits no hysteretic features with a superparamagnetic behavior. The ethanol gas sensing properties of the synthesized magnetite were investigated, and it was found that the responsibility time is less than 10 s with good reproducibility for ethanol sensor. Accordingly, it is evaluated that the magnetite nanoparticles can be effectively used as a solid state ethanol sensor in industrial commercial product applications.

  12. Screening of the Coulomb field in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A.

    2009-05-15

    The quantum theory is constructed for screening of the Coulomb field of a point charge in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder. The asymptotics of the screened potential are calculated for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases. It is demonstrated that, in the degenerate case, apart from the known quasi-classical monotonic part, the result contains the quantum oscillating part, which corresponds to Friedel oscillations. The Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the screened Coulomb interaction of electrons on a cylindrical surface are described analytically. It is shown that the Friedel oscillations can be represented as a superposition of oscillations with different frequencies which are determined by the macroscopic properties of the nanotube.

  13. Electric instability in a two-dimensional electron gas system under high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Ping; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of electric instability in a two-dimensional electron gas system under high magnetic fields. As the applied dc electric current exceeds a threshold value It h, we find that the longitudinal magnetoresistance Rx x fluctuates and exhibits negative differential resistivity (NDR). The observed instability occurs only in well-separated low-lying Landau levels (LLs) with a filling factor ν ≤2 , and the onset of NDR can be described by the theory of Andreev et al. We find that It h increases with increasing magnetic field B and the lattice temperature TL. In contrast, NDR becomes more pronounced at higher B , but gradually diminishes with increasing TL. Data analysis suggests that NDR is actuated by the suppression of Rx x with increasing electric field, which can be understood in terms of the capability of the spectral diffusion of electrons and of electron transfer to higher levels via inelastic inter-LLs scattering in the limit of one-occupied LL.

  14. Numerical analysis of spin-orbit-coupled one-dimensional Fermi gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the density-matrix renormalization group and the infinite time-evolving block decimation methods we study the interacting spin-orbit-coupled 1D Fermi gas in a transverse magnetic field. We find that the system with an attractive interaction can have a polarized insulator phase, a superconducting (SC) phase, a Luther-Emery (LE) phase, and a band insulator phase as we vary the chemical potential and the strength of the magnetic field. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the triplet pairing order at zero momentum in both the SC and the LE phase, which leads to an algebraically decaying correlation with the same exponent as that of the singlet pairing one. In contrast to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase found in the spin imbalanced system without SOC, pairings at finite momentum in these two phases have larger exponents hence do not dictate the long-range behavior. We also test for the presence of Majorana fermions in this system. Unlike results from the mean-field study, we do not find positive evidence of Majorana fermions.

  15. Influence of a magnetic field on the viscosity of a dilute gas consisting of linear molecules.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Robert; Vesovic, Velisa

    2015-12-01

    The viscomagnetic effect for two linear molecules, N2 and CO2, has been calculated in the dilute-gas limit directly from the most accurate ab initio intermolecular potential energy surfaces presently available. The calculations were performed by means of the classical trajectory method in the temperature range from 70 K to 3000 K for N2 and 100 K to 2000 K for CO2, and agreement with the available experimental data is exceptionally good. Above room temperature, where no experimental data are available, the calculations provide the first quantitative information on the magnitude and the behavior of the viscomagnetic effect for these gases. In the presence of a magnetic field, the viscosities of nitrogen and carbon dioxide decrease by at most 0.3% and 0.7%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the viscomagnetic effect is dominated by the contribution of the jj¯ polarization at all temperatures, which shows that the alignment of the rotational axes of the molecules in the presence of a magnetic field is primarily responsible for the viscomagnetic effect.

  16. Organic Rankine Cycle for Residual Heat to Power Conversion in Natural Gas Compressor Station. Part I: Modelling and Optimisation Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaczykowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Basic organic Rankine cycle (ORC), and two variants of regenerative ORC have been considered for the recovery of exhaust heat from natural gas compressor station. The modelling framework for ORC systems has been presented and the optimisation of the systems was carried out with turbine power output as the variable to be maximized. The determination of ORC system design parameters was accomplished by means of the genetic algorithm. The study was aimed at estimating the thermodynamic potential of different ORC configurations with several working fluids employed. The first part of this paper describes the ORC equipment models which are employed to build a NLP formulation to tackle design problems representative for waste energy recovery on gas turbines driving natural gas pipeline compressors.

  17. ACCRETION OF GAS ONTO GAP-OPENING PLANETS AND CIRCUMPLANETARY FLOW STRUCTURE IN MAGNETIZED TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, A. L.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2013-06-01

    We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar accretion disks, using the PLUTO code, and studied the accretion of gas onto a Jupiter-mass planet and the structure of the circumplanetary gas flow after opening a gap in the disk. We compare our results with simulations of laminar, yet viscous disks with different levels of an {alpha}-type viscosity. In all cases, we find that the accretion flow across the surface of the Hill sphere of the planet is not spherically or azimuthally symmetric, and is predominantly restricted to the mid-plane region of the disk. Even in the turbulent case, we find no significant vertical flow of mass into the Hill sphere. The outer parts of the circumplanetary disk are shown to rotate significantly below Keplerian speed, independent of viscosity, while the circumplanetary disk density (therefore the angular momentum) increases with viscosity. For a simulation of a magnetized turbulent disk, where the global averaged alpha stress is {alpha}{sub MHD} = 10{sup -3}, we find the accretion rate onto the planet to be M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}M{sub J} yr{sup -1} for a gap surface density of 12 g cm{sup -2}. This is about a third of the accretion rate obtained in a laminar viscous simulation with equivalent {alpha} parameter.

  18. Magnetic roller gas gate employing transonic sweep gas flow to isolate regions of differing gaseous composition or pressure

    DOEpatents

    Doehler, Joachim

    1994-12-20

    Disclosed herein is an improved gas gate for interconnecting regions of differing gaseous composition and/or pressure. The gas gate includes a narrow, elongated passageway through which substrate material is adapted to move between said regions and inlet means for introducing a flow of non-contaminating sweep gas into a central portion of said passageway. The gas gate is characterized in that the height of the passageway and the flow rate of the sweep gas therethrough provides for transonic flow of the sweep gas between the inlet means and at least one of the two interconnected regions, thereby effectively isolating one region, characterized by one composition and pressure, from another region, having a differing composition and/or pressure, by decreasing the mean-free-path length between collisions of diffusing species within the transonic flow region. The gas gate preferably includes a manifold at the juncture point where the gas inlet means and the passageway interconnect.

  19. [Extraction and analysis of profenofos residue in tomato and cabbage by gas chromatography-flame photometric detector].

    PubMed

    Chen, Y J; Lu, Y H; Zhang, J; Liu, J; Wen, X M

    2001-05-01

    A quick and effective extraction and clean-up method of profenofos residue in tomato and cabbage is presented. Tomato and cabbage samples were homogenized with a mixture of acetone-hexane (1:1, V/V) using a mechanical homogenizer. The resultant homogenate was cleaned-up by adding active carbon and then filtered under reduced pressure. The filter cake was extracted twice with the same solvent mixture. The filtrates were combined and transferred into a separatory funnel. The organic layer was separated and evaporated to dryness using a rotary evaporator. The residue was dissolved in 2 mL of acetone and transferred into a small glass vial and then determined by GC on a 5% OV-101 Chromosorb W-HP column with flame photometric detector. The results showed that this analytical method can be used for an accurate determination of profenofos residues in tomato and cabbage. The minimum detectable concentration of profenofos in samples was 0.06 mg/kg. The recoveries of profenofos in tomato and cabbage were in the range of 96.2%-105.9% and 94.7%-102.3%, respectively. The relative standard deviations were in the range of 3.7%-4.9% and 3.7%-5.0%, respectively. The tomato and cabbage samples were collected 3 weeks after applying profenofos in the field, and the contents of profenofos were determined. The average contents of profenofos in tomato and cabbage were (13.8 +/- 0.8) mg/kg and (14.4 +/- 0.7) mg/kg, respectively. PMID:12541821

  20. A comparison between digital radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance in the detection of gunshot residues in burnt tissues and bone.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Borgonovo, Simone; Brandone, Alberto; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The radiological search for GSR is crucial in burnt material although it has been rarely tested. In this study, thirty-one bovine ribs were shot at near-contact range and burnt to calcination in an oven simulating a real combustion. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed before and after carbonization and compared with former analyses with DR (digital radiography); thus comparing the assistance, the radiological methods can provide in the search for GSR in fresh and burnt bone. DR demonstrated the greatest ability in the detection of metallic residues, CT showed lower abilities, while MR showed a high sensitivity only in soft tissues. Thus, DR can be considered as the most sensitive method in the detection of GSR in charred bones, whereas CT and MR demonstrated much less reliability. Nonetheless, the MR ameliorates the analysis of gunshot wounds in other types of remains with large quantities of soft tissues.

  1. Measuring the magnetic-field-dependent chemical potential of a low-density three-dimensional electron gas in n -GaAs and extracting its magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N.; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic-field-dependent shift of the electron chemical potential in bulk, n -type GaAs at room temperature. A transient voltage of ˜100 μ V was measured across a Au-Al2O3 -GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor in a pulsed magnetic field of ˜6 T . Several spurious voltages larger than the signal that had plagued earlier researchers performing similar experiments were carefully eliminated. The itinerant magnetic susceptibility of GaAs is extracted from the experimentally measured data for four different doping densities, including one as low as 5 ×1015cm-3 . Though the susceptibility in GaAs is dominated by Landau-Peierls diamagnetism, the experimental technique demonstrated can be a powerful tool for extracting the total free carrier magnetization of any electron system. The method is also virtually independent of the carrier concentration and is expected to work better in the nondegenerate limit. Such experiments had been successfully performed in two-dimensional electron gases at cryogenic temperatures. However, an unambiguous report on having observed this effect in any three-dimensional electron gas has been lacking. We highlight the 50 year old literature of various trials and discuss the key details of our experiment that were essential for its success. The technique can be used to unambiguously yield only the itinerant part of the magnetic susceptibility of complex materials such as magnetic semiconductors and hexaborides, and thus shed light on the origin of ferromagnetism in such systems.

  2. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, K.; Ohshima, Y.; Tona, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  3. Novel and rapid method for determination of organophosphorus pesticide residues in edible fungus using direct gas purge microsyringe extraction coupled on-line with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nan, Jingxi; Wang, Juan; Piao, Xiangfan; Yang, Cui; Wu, Xue; Quinto, Maurizio; Li, Donghao

    2015-09-01

    In this work a new analytical method for a rapid and simultaneous determination of 28 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) residues in edible fungus using gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE), coupled with on-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GP-MSE-GC-MS) has been developed and optimized. GP-MSE, a novel gas flow liquid-phase microextraction technique, has been then fruitfully used as innovative and one-step extraction procedure, allowing a direct injection into the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometry detector (GC-MS) system without any further cleaning step. Once optimized, the GP-MSE-GC-MS analysis procedure showed reproducibility values, resolutions, linear responses, detection and quantification limits that allowed to consider this method suitable for the analysis of the 28 OPPs in real samples. Furthermore, OPP recoveries and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 85.26% to 100.21%, and from 1.6% to 6.9%, respectively. This procedure was then used for the analysis of real samples and the obtained results were compared with those of ultrasonic extraction-solid phase extraction. Among the 28 OPPs, 14 of them were found in Lentinus edodes and Enoki mushrooms fungus samples, with a total concentrations of 112.7 and 210.7 μg kg(-1), respectively. This work demonstrated then that GP-MSE-GC-MS provided a highly efficient, solvent-saving, accurate and sensitive quantitative analysis method for a rapid determination of OPPs in edible fungus.

  4. Application of elevated temperature-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides residues in aqueous samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Afshar Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza; Rezaee Aghdam, Samaneh; Nouri, Nina; Bamorrowat, Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, an elevated temperature, dispersive, liquid-liquid microextraction/gas chromatography-flame ionization detection was investigated for the determination, pre-concentration, and extraction of six organophosphorus pesticides (malathion, phosalone, dichlorvos, diazinon, profenofos, and chlorpyrifos) residues in fruit juice and aqueous samples. A mixture of 1,2-dibromoethane (extraction solvent) and dimethyl sulfoxide (disperser solvent) was injected rapidly into the sample solution heated at an elevated temperature. Analytical parameters, including enrichment factors (1600-2075), linearity (r>0.994), limits of detection (0.82-2.72ngmL(-1)) and quantification (2.60-7.36ngmL(-1)), relative standard deviations (<7%) and extraction recoveries (64-83%), showed the high efficiency of the method developed for analysis of the target analytes. The proposed procedure was used effectively to analyse selected analytes in river water and fruit juice, and diazinon was found at ngmL(-1) concentrations in apple juice.

  5. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  6. A novel fully automated on-line coupled liquid chromatography-gas chromatography technique used for the determination of organochlorine pesticide residues in tobacco and tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dawei; Fei, Ting; Sha, Yunfei; Wang, Leijun; Li, Gang; Wu, Da; Liu, Baizhan

    2014-12-29

    In this study, a novel fully automated on-line coupled liquid chromatography-gas chromatography (LC-GC) technique was reported and applied for the determination of organochlorine pesticide residues (OCPs) in tobacco and tobacco products. Using a switching valve to isolate the capillary pre-column and the analytical column during the solvent evaporation period, the LC solvent can be completely removed and prevented from reaching the GC column and the detector. The established method was used to determinate the OCPs in tobacco samples. By using Florisil SPE column and employing GPC technique, polarity impurities and large molecule impurities were removed. A dynamic range 1-100ng/mL was achieved with detection limits from 1.5 to 3.3μg/kg. The method exhibited good repeatability and recoveries. This technology may provide an alternative way for trace analysis of complex samples.

  7. Evaluation of the QuEChERS Method and Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis Pesticide Residues in Water and Sediment

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo, A. N.; Vicente, G. H. L.; Nogueira, A. R. A.

    2010-01-01

    A method for the determination of pesticide residues in water and sediment was developed using the QuEChERS method followed by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry. The method was validated in terms of accuracy, specificity, linearity, detection and quantification limits. The recovery percentages obtained for the pesticides in water at different concentrations ranged from 63 to 116%, with relative standard deviations below 12%. The corresponding results from the sediment ranged from 48 to 115% with relative standard deviations below 16%. The limits of detection for the pesticides in water and sediment were below 0.003 mg L−1 and 0.02 mg kg−1, respectively. PMID:21165598

  8. Monitoring pesticide residues in greenhouse tomato by combining acetonitrile-based extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Melo, Armindo; Cunha, Sara C; Mansilha, Catarina; Aguiar, Ana; Pinho, Olívia; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2012-12-01

    A multiclass and multiresidue method for pesticide analysis in tomato was validated. Extraction and pre-concentration of the pesticide residues from acetonitrile extracts was performed by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique, followed by gas chromatography-mass detection. DLLME was performed using carbon tetrachloride as extractive solvent and acetonitrile extract as dispersive solvent, in order to increase enrichment factor of the extraction procedure. Validation parameters indicated the suitability of the method for routine analyses of thirty pesticides in a large number of samples. In general, pesticide recoveries ranged between 70% and 110% and repeatability ranged between 1% and 20%. The proposed method was applied to the monitoring of pesticides in tomatoes grown during winter in greenhouses. Among the compounds considered in this work, cyprodinil was found in tomato at concentrations of 0.33mg/kg, other pesticides like azoxystrobin, fenhexanid, tolyfluanid, λ-cyhalothrin and trifloxystrobin were also detected, but, not quantified.

  9. Determination of pesticide residues and related compounds in water and industrial effluent by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Manoel L; Donato, Filipe F; Prestes, Osmar D; Adaime, Martha B; Zanella, Renato

    2013-09-01

    Pollution of drinking water supplies from industrial waste is a result of several industrial processes and disposal practices, and the establishment of analytical methods for monitoring organic compounds related to environmental and health problems is very important. In this work, a method using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of pesticide residues and related compounds in drinking and surface water as well as in industrial effluent. Optimization of the method was achieved by using a central composite design approach on parameters such as the sample pH and SPE eluent composition. A single SPE consisting of the loading on a polymeric sorbent of 100 mL of sample adjusted to pH 3 and elution with methanol/methylene chloride (10:90, v/v) permitted the obtaining of acceptable recoveries in most cases. The concentration factor associated with sensitivity of the chromatographic analysis permitted the achievement of the method limit of detection values between 0.01 and 0.25 μg L(-1). Recovery assays presented mean recoveries between 70 and 120% for most of the compounds with very good precision, despite the different chemical nature of the compounds analyzed. The selectivity of the method, evaluated through the relative intensity of quantification and qualification ions obtained by GC-QqQ-MS/MS, was considered adequate. The developed method was finally applied to the determination of target analytes in real samples. River water and treated industrial effluent samples presented residues of some compounds, but no detectable residues were found in the drinking water samples evaluated. PMID:23995504

  10. Determination of pesticide residues and related compounds in water and industrial effluent by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Manoel L; Donato, Filipe F; Prestes, Osmar D; Adaime, Martha B; Zanella, Renato

    2013-09-01

    Pollution of drinking water supplies from industrial waste is a result of several industrial processes and disposal practices, and the establishment of analytical methods for monitoring organic compounds related to environmental and health problems is very important. In this work, a method using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of pesticide residues and related compounds in drinking and surface water as well as in industrial effluent. Optimization of the method was achieved by using a central composite design approach on parameters such as the sample pH and SPE eluent composition. A single SPE consisting of the loading on a polymeric sorbent of 100 mL of sample adjusted to pH 3 and elution with methanol/methylene chloride (10:90, v/v) permitted the obtaining of acceptable recoveries in most cases. The concentration factor associated with sensitivity of the chromatographic analysis permitted the achievement of the method limit of detection values between 0.01 and 0.25 μg L(-1). Recovery assays presented mean recoveries between 70 and 120% for most of the compounds with very good precision, despite the different chemical nature of the compounds analyzed. The selectivity of the method, evaluated through the relative intensity of quantification and qualification ions obtained by GC-QqQ-MS/MS, was considered adequate. The developed method was finally applied to the determination of target analytes in real samples. River water and treated industrial effluent samples presented residues of some compounds, but no detectable residues were found in the drinking water samples evaluated.

  11. [Determination of hexachlorocyclohexane and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethen residues in honey by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Hou, Chuanjin; Zhao, Ercheng; Jia, Chunhong

    2015-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the determination of hexachlorocyclohexane (BHC) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) residues in honey was developed using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) as sample preparation method. The samples were extracted with chloroform, and concentrated into chloroform by vortex and centrifuging. The analytes were analyzed by GC-MS. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, such as the type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvent, extraction time, etc. The matrix effects and method performance were evaluated at the same time. The results indicated that all the eight BHC and DDT pesticides displayed the enhancement of signals due to the matrix effects. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 2-500 microg/L and the correlation coefficients were 0.991-0.998 for the eight BHC and DDT pesticides. The enrichment factors (EF) were 74-96 for the eight pesticides. The recoveries of the eight BHC and DDT pesticides at three spiked levels of 20, 50 and 100 microg/kg were 61.0%-100.1%, while the RSDs were 2.2%-19.5%. The limits of quantification for the eight pesticides were 20 microg/kg, and the limits of detection were 1.0 ng. The developed method is easy, quick and with high performance. It is applicable for the determination of BHC and DDT residues in honey. PMID:25958666

  12. Multipesticide residue analysis in maize combining acetonitrile-based extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Fernandes, J O

    2011-10-28

    A fast and simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for determination of forty-one pesticide residues in maize is introduced. The sample preparation involves liquid-liquid partitioning with acetonitrile in presence of anhydrous MgSO(4) and NaCl (QuEChERS) followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) using carbon tetrachloride as extractive solvent and the extract obtained by QuEChERS as dispersive solvent. The main factors influencing DLLME efficiency including extractive solvent type and volume as well as the volume of dispersive solvent were evaluated in this study. The DLLME procedure effectively provides an enrichment of the extract and a cleanup of certain polar matrix components, which can maximize the sensitivity when a single quadrupole MS is used. For validation purposes, recoveries studies were carried out at two concentration levels, yielding recovery rates in the range 70-120% for 82% of the analytes. A good linearity and precision, with relative standard deviations generally below 20% were obtained for all forty-one pesticides. The limits of detection obtained were lower than 19 μg kg(-1) for more than 63% of the analytes. In two of a total of ten samples of maize, residues of lindane, tefluthrin, pirimicarb, folpet and bifenthrin were found, although at levels below the maximum limit established for this kind of samples.

  13. Automated Multiplug Filtration Cleanup for Pesticide Residue Analyses in Kiwi Fruit (Actinidia chinensis) and Kiwi Juice by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuhong; Zhang, Jingru; He, Yining; Han, Yongtao; Zou, Nan; Li, Yanjie; Chen, Ronghua; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-08-10

    To reduce labor-consuming manual operation workload in the cleanup steps, an automated multiplug filtration cleanup (m-PFC) method for QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extracts was developed. It could control the volume and speed of pulling and pushing cycles accurately. In this study, m-PFC was based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) mixed with primary-secondary amines (PSA) and anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) in a packed column for analysis of pesticide residues followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detection. It was validated by analyzing 33 pesticides in kiwi fruit and kiwi juice matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100 μg/kg. Salts, sorbents, m-PFC procedure, 4 mL of automated pulling and pushing volume, 6 mL/min automated pulling speed, and 8 mL/min pushing speed were optimized for each matrix. After optimization, spike recoveries were within 71-120% and <20% RSD for all analytes in kiwi fruit and kiwi juice. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with the coefficients of determination >0.99 between concentration levels of 10 and 1000 μg/kg. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples. PMID:26809284

  14. Determination of coumaphos, chlorpyrifos and ethion residues in propolis tinctures by matrix solid-phase dispersion and gas chromatography coupled to flame photometric and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Parada, Andrés; Colazzo, Marcos; Besil, Natalia; Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Rey, Federico; Heinzen, Horacio

    2011-08-26

    A new analytical method has been developed and successfully evaluated in routine application for the quantitative analysis of a selected group of organophosphate pesticides (coumaphos, chlorpyrifos and ethion) which can be found at trace levels in propolis tinctures (ethanolic propolis extracts); a valuable commodity used as raw material in the food and pharmaceutical industries for which there have been few attempts for pesticide residue analysis reported in the literature. The proposed methodology is based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) using aluminum sulfate anh. a novel dispersant material and subsequent column chromatography clean-up in silica gel prior to gas chromatography (GC) with both flame photometric detector (FPD) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection used for the routine quantification and identification of the residues, respectively. The limits of detection, for coumaphos, chlorpyrifos and ethion were below 26.0 μg/kg in FPD and 1.43 μg/kg for MS detection. Mean recoveries were in the range of 85-123% with RSD values below 13%, which suggests that the proposed method is fit for the purpose of analyzing pesticides in propolis tinctures containing high concentration of polyphenolics. The method has been successfully applied in our laboratory for the last 2 year in the analysis of real propolis tinctures samples. PMID:21782188

  15. Rapid multiplug filtration cleanup with multiple-walled carbon nanotubes and gas chromatography-triple-quadruple mass spectrometry detection for 186 pesticide residues in tomato and tomato products.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengyue; Huang, Baoyong; Li, Yanjie; Han, Yongtao; Zou, Nan; Gu, Kejia; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2014-04-30

    This study reports the development and validation of a novel rapid cleanup method based on multiple-walled carbon nanotubes in a packed column filtration procedure for analysis of pesticide residues followed by gas chromatography-triple-quadruple tandem mass spectrometry detection. The cleanup method was carried out by applying the streamlined procedure on a multiplug filtration cleanup column with syringes. The sorbent used for removing the interferences in the matrices is multiple-walled carbon nanotubes mixed with anhydrous magnesium sulfate. The proposed cleanup method is convenient and time-saving as it does not require any solvent evaporation, vortex, or centrifugation procedures. It was validated on 186 pesticides and 3 tomato product matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100 μg kg(-1). Satisfactory recoveries and relative standard deviations are shown for most pesticides using the multiplug filtration cleanup method in tomato product samples. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples.

  16. Automated Multiplug Filtration Cleanup for Pesticide Residue Analyses in Kiwi Fruit (Actinidia chinensis) and Kiwi Juice by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuhong; Zhang, Jingru; He, Yining; Han, Yongtao; Zou, Nan; Li, Yanjie; Chen, Ronghua; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-08-10

    To reduce labor-consuming manual operation workload in the cleanup steps, an automated multiplug filtration cleanup (m-PFC) method for QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extracts was developed. It could control the volume and speed of pulling and pushing cycles accurately. In this study, m-PFC was based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) mixed with primary-secondary amines (PSA) and anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) in a packed column for analysis of pesticide residues followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detection. It was validated by analyzing 33 pesticides in kiwi fruit and kiwi juice matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100 μg/kg. Salts, sorbents, m-PFC procedure, 4 mL of automated pulling and pushing volume, 6 mL/min automated pulling speed, and 8 mL/min pushing speed were optimized for each matrix. After optimization, spike recoveries were within 71-120% and <20% RSD for all analytes in kiwi fruit and kiwi juice. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with the coefficients of determination >0.99 between concentration levels of 10 and 1000 μg/kg. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples.

  17. Multiresidue Method for Determination of 183 Pesticide Residues in Leeks by Rapid Multiplug Filtration Cleanup and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zou, Nan; Han, Yongtao; Li, Yanjie; Qin, Yuhong; Gu, Kejia; Zhang, Jingru; Pan, Canping; Li, Xuesheng

    2016-08-10

    This study reports the development of a novel multiplug filtration cleanup (m-PFC) procedure for analysis of pesticide residues in leek samples followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection. The leek samples were initially purified following the dispersive solid-phase extraction with different sorbents to determine the most suitable proportioning of sorbent materials; then, the m-PFC method was carried out by applying the streamlined procedure with syringes. Average recoveries of most pesticides were in the range from 70.2 to 126.0% with the relative standard deviation < 20% with the m-PFC process. The limits of detection were 0.03-3.3 μg kg(-1). The limits of quantification were 0.1-10 μg kg(-1). The m-PFC process is convenient and time-efficient, taking just a few seconds per sample. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples. In that analysis, 35 pesticides were detected in 29 samples, with values ranging from 2.0 to 9353.1 μg kg(-1).

  18. Determination of ethephon residues in water by gas chromatography with cubic mass spectrometry after ion-exchange purification and derivatisation with N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide.

    PubMed

    Royer, A; Laporte, F; Bouchonnet, S; Communal, P-Y

    2006-03-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of residues of ethephon (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid) in drinking and surface water. The procedure is based on de-ionisation with an anion/cation-exchange resin, solid phase extraction by means of anion-exchange polystyrene-divinylbenzene extraction disks, elution with a mixture of methanol and 10 M hydrochloric acid (98/2, v/v), redisolution into acetonitrile after evaporation and silylation with N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Quantification is performed by gas chromatography with ion-trap cubic mass spectrometric detection in the electron impact mode (GC-EI-MS3). Method validation was conducted using samples of mineral, tap, and river water that were fortified with ethephon at concentration levels ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 microg/L. The mean recovery from all the fortified samples (n = 36) amounted to 88% with a relative standard deviation of 17%. The method, therefore, was shown to allow accurate determination of ethephon residues in drinking and surface water with a limit of quantification of 0.1 microg/L. PMID:16443233

  19. [Comparison of the performances of gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in rapid screening and confirmation of 208 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinyue; Pang, Guofang; Jin, Linghe; Kang, Jian; Hu, Xueyan; Chang, Qiaoying; Wang, Minglin; Fan, Chunlin

    2015-04-01

    The performances of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOF/MS) for the determination of 208 pesticide residues in fruit and vegetable samples, including apple, orange, tomato and cucumber, were compared comprehensively. Based on the differences of the two instruments, their respective characteristics and scopes of application in the detection of the pesticide residues were presented, which provided the reference for the analysis of pesticide residues. The performance parameters of the two instruments, such as overall recoveries, precisions, limits of detection, linear ranges, identification points and matrix effects, were evaluated according to a designed experiment. At three spiked levels (5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 µg/kg), the average recoveries for the majority of pesticides (93.0%) ranged from 70% to 120% in the four matrices with relative standard deviations below 20%. The limits of detection for most of the pesticides by GC-MS/MS and GC-Q-TOF/MS were less than 5.0 µg/kg. Compared with GC-QTOF/MS, GC-MS/MS showed relatively lower limits of detection and wider linear ranges, and its performance was more satisfactory in accurate quantitative analysis due to its superior sensitivity. On the other hand, GC-QTOF/MS provided accurate mass measurement, which was proved to be an efficient analytical tool on the rapid screening and confirmation of a large number of pesticides and non-target compounds. PMID:26292409

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Completion of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Can Accurately Discriminate between No Residual Carcinoma and Residual Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seho; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Sohn, Joohyuk; Park, Hyung Seok; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate evaluation of favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is critical to determine the extent of surgery. We investigated independent clinicopathological and radiological predictors to discriminate no residual carcinoma (ypT0) from residual ductal carcinoma in situ (ypTis) in breast cancer patients who received NCT. Patients and Methods Parameters of 117 patients attaining pathological complete response (CR) in the breast after NCT between January 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. All patients underwent mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after NCT. Results There were 67 (57.3%) patients with ypT0. These patients were associated with hormone receptor-negative status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative tumors, and a higher likelihood of breast-conservation surgery. Baseline mammographic and MRI presentation of the main lesion, absence of associated microcalcifications, shape, posterior features, and absence of calcifications on ultrasound were significantly associated with ypT0. CR in mammography, ultrasound, or MRI after NCT was also related to ypT0. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of ypT0 were the triple-negative subtype [Odds ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11–16.09] and CR in MRI after NCT (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.53–17.85). Stratified analysis by breast cancer subtype demonstrated that MRI well predicted ypT0 in all subtypes except the HER2-positive subtype. In particular, of 40 triple-negative subtypes, 22 showed CR in MRI and 21 (95.5%) were ypT0 after NCT. Conclusion Among imaging modalities, breast MRI can potentially distinguish between ypT0 and ypTis after NCT, especially in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. This information can help clinicians evaluate tumor response to NCT and plan surgery for breast cancer patients of all subtypes except for those with HER2

  1. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot

    2004-06-30

    Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of velocity fields, the void fraction and gas dynamics in a cavitating liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor V.; Arbabi, Aidin; Newling, Benedict; Hamza, Abdelhaq; Adair, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In acoustic cavitation, the relationship between the bubble dynamics on the microscale and the flow properties on the macroscale is critical in determining sonochemical reaction kinetics. A new technique was developed to measure the void fraction and estimate water mobility in the vicinity of cavitating bubbles using phase-encoded magnetic resonance imaging with short characteristic measurement timescales (0.1-1 ms). The exponential behavior of the NMR signal decay indicated the fast diffusion regime, with the relationship between local mechanical dispersion D mix and the average bubble radius R, D_mix≫ 2R^2/10^{-4s}, resulting in dispersion of orders of magnitude greater than diffusion in quiescent water. For two different samples (water and a surfactant solution), the independent measurements of three-dimensional void fraction and velocity fields permitted the calculation of compressibility, divergence and vorticity of the cavitating medium. The measured dynamics of the dissolved gas, compared with that of the surrounding liquid, reflected the difference in the bubble coalescence and lifetimes and correlated with the macroscopic flow parameters.

  3. Development and Application of Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bound Trinitrotoluene Residues in Soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.M.; Mckay, A.J.; Derito, C.; Watanabe, C.; Thorn, K.A.; Madsen, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    TNT (trinitrotoluene) is a contaminant of global environmental significance, yet determining its environmental fate has posed longstanding challenges. To date, only differential extraction-based approaches have been able to determine the presence of covalently bound, reduced forms of TNT in field soils. Here, we employed thermal elution, pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to distinguish between covalently bound and noncovalently bound reduced forms of TNT in soil. Model soil organic matter-based matrixes were used to develop an assay in which noncovalently bound (monomeric) aminodinitrotoluene (ADNT) and diaminonitrotoluene (DANT) were desorbed from the matrix and analyzed at a lower temperature than covalently bound forms of these same compounds. A thermal desorption technique, evolved gas analysis, was initially employed to differentiate between covalently bound and added 15N-labeled monomeric compounds. A refined thermal elution procedure, termed "double-shot analysis" (DSA), allowed a sample to be sequentially analyzed in two phases. In phase 1, all of an added 15N-labeled monomeric contaminant was eluted from the sample at relatively low temperature. In phase 2 during high-temperature pyrolysis, the remaining covalently bound contaminants were detected. DSA analysis of soil from the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant (LAAP; ???5000 ppm TNT) revealed the presence of DANT, ADNT, and TNT. After scrutinizing the DSA data and comparing them to results from solvent-extracted and base/acid-hydrolyzed LAAP soil, we concluded that the TNT was a noncovalently bound "carryover" from phase 1. Thus, the pyrolysis-GC/MS technique successfully defined covalently bound pools of ADNT and DANT in the field soil sample.

  4. Characterization of oil shale, isolated kerogen, and post-pyrolysis residues using advanced 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Birdwell, Justin E.; Chappell, Mark A.; Li, Yuan; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Mao, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of oil shale kerogen and organic residues remaining in postpyrolysis spent shale is critical to the understanding of the oil generation process and approaches to dealing with issues related to spent shale. The chemical structure of organic matter in raw oil shale and spent shale samples was examined in this study using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Oil shale was collected from Mahogany zone outcrops in the Piceance Basin. Five samples were analyzed: (1) raw oil shale, (2) isolated kerogen, (3) oil shale extracted with chloroform, (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C to mimic surface retorting, and (5) oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C to simulate in-situ retorting. The NMR methods applied included quantitative direct polarization with magic-angle spinning at 13 kHz, cross polarization with total sideband suppression, dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy filtering, and 1H-13C long-range recoupled dipolar dephasing. The NMR results showed that, relative to the raw oil shale, (1) bitumen extraction and kerogen isolation by demineralization removed some oxygen-containing and alkyl moieties; (2) unpyrolyzed samples had low aromatic condensation; (3) oil shale pyrolysis removed aliphatic moieties, leaving behind residues enriched in aromatic carbon; and (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C contained larger aromatic clusters and more protonated aromatic moieties than oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C, which contained more total aromatic carbon with a wide range of cluster sizes.

  5. Antibody-integrated and functionalized graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, produced using ammonia gas plasma technology, for capturing Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Chou, Han; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella spp. is the single and most important causative agent of foodborne infections, especially involving foods such as eggs, milk and meat. To prevent infection, a reliable surveillance system is required that can quickly and sensitively detect Salmonella. Here, we describe the development of antibody-integrated magnetic beads that are functionalized by a novel strategy using ammonia gas plasma. Ammonia plasma, produced by a radio frequency (RF) power supply, was allowed to react with the surface of graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, resulting in the introduction of amino groups. An anti-Salmonella antibody was then anchored by sulfide groups present on the protein surface to the amino groups of the magnetic beads via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The potential usefulness of these magnetic beads for capturing Salmonella was examined as follows. The beads were incubated with Salmonella in liquid medium and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thorough washing, adsorption of Salmonella to the beads was confirmed by immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction and a direct culture assay. Our findings indicate that the capture and concentration of Salmonella using the antibody-integrated magnetic beads was more efficient than commercial Dynabeads® anti-Salmonella, which are conventionally used for concentrating Salmonella from liquid cultures. We believe this novel bead technology will contribute to the enhanced detection of Salmonella. PMID:25660257

  6. Antibody-integrated and functionalized graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, produced using ammonia gas plasma technology, for capturing Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Chou, Han; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella spp. is the single and most important causative agent of foodborne infections, especially involving foods such as eggs, milk and meat. To prevent infection, a reliable surveillance system is required that can quickly and sensitively detect Salmonella. Here, we describe the development of antibody-integrated magnetic beads that are functionalized by a novel strategy using ammonia gas plasma. Ammonia plasma, produced by a radio frequency (RF) power supply, was allowed to react with the surface of graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, resulting in the introduction of amino groups. An anti-Salmonella antibody was then anchored by sulfide groups present on the protein surface to the amino groups of the magnetic beads via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The potential usefulness of these magnetic beads for capturing Salmonella was examined as follows. The beads were incubated with Salmonella in liquid medium and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thorough washing, adsorption of Salmonella to the beads was confirmed by immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction and a direct culture assay. Our findings indicate that the capture and concentration of Salmonella using the antibody-integrated magnetic beads was more efficient than commercial Dynabeads® anti-Salmonella, which are conventionally used for concentrating Salmonella from liquid cultures. We believe this novel bead technology will contribute to the enhanced detection of Salmonella.

  7. Microscopic theory of the residual surface resistivity of Rashba electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Juba; Lounis, Samir; Blügel, Stefan; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    A microscopic expression of the residual electrical resistivity tensor is derived in linear response theory for Rashba electrons scattering at a magnetic impurity with cylindrical or noncylindrical potential. The behavior of the longitudinal and transversal residual resistivity is obtained analytically and computed for an Fe impurity at the Au(111) surface. We studied the evolution of the resistivity tensor elements as a function of the Rashba spin-orbit strength and the magnetization direction of the impurity. We found that the absolute values of longitudinal resistivity reduce with increasing spin-orbit strength of the substrate and that the scattering of the conduction electrons at magnetic impurities with magnetic moments pointing in directions not perpendicular to the surface plane produce a planar Hall effect and an anisotropic magnetoresistance even if the impurity carries no spin-orbit interaction. Functional forms are provided describing the anisotropy of the planar Hall effect and the anisotropic magnetoresistance with respect to the direction of the impurity moment. In the limit of no spin-orbit interaction and a nonmagnetic impurity of cylindrical symmetry, the expression of the residual resistivity of a two-dimensional electron gas has the same simplicity and form as for the three-dimensional electron gas [J. Friedel, J. Nuovo. Cim. 7, 287 (1958), 10.1007/BF02751483] and can also be expressed in terms of scattering phase shifts.

  8. Magnetic flux leakage inspection of gas pipelines: The effects of biaxial stress. Topical report, April 1993-September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, A.E.; Beissner, R.E.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Creek, E.A.; Grant, T.S.

    1996-03-01

    The project is one component of the GRI program, `Characterization of Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) Indications Found During In-Line Inspection of Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines.` The objective of the greater project was to investigate the effects of pipeline parameters and MFL inspection variables on corrosion, defect characterization. The work at SwRI, the subject of this report, concerns the effect of biaxial pipe wall stress.

  9. Flow behind an exponential shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric perfect gas with magnetic field and variable density.

    PubMed

    Nath, G; Sahu, P K

    2016-01-01

    A self-similar model for one-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flows behind a strong exponential shock wave driven out by a cylindrical piston moving with time according to an exponential law in an ideal gas in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and variable density is discussed in a rotating atmosphere. The ambient medium is assumed to possess radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The initial density, the fluid velocities and magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying with time according to an exponential law. The gas is taken to be non-viscous having infinite electrical conductivity. Solutions are obtained, in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector. The effects of the variation of the initial density index, adiabatic exponent of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field behind the shock wave are investigated. It is found that the presence of the magnetic field have decaying effects on the shock wave. Also, it is observed that the effect of an increase in the magnetic field strength is more impressive in the case of adiabatic flow than in the case of isothermal flow. The assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, non-dimensional azimuthal and axial components of vorticity vector distributions in comparison to those in the case of adiabatic flow. A comparison is made between isothermal and adiabatic flows. It is obtained that an increase in the initial density variation index, adiabatic exponent and strength of the magnetic field decrease the shock strength. PMID:27652082

  10. Flow behind an exponential shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric perfect gas with magnetic field and variable density.

    PubMed

    Nath, G; Sahu, P K

    2016-01-01

    A self-similar model for one-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flows behind a strong exponential shock wave driven out by a cylindrical piston moving with time according to an exponential law in an ideal gas in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and variable density is discussed in a rotating atmosphere. The ambient medium is assumed to possess radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The initial density, the fluid velocities and magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying with time according to an exponential law. The gas is taken to be non-viscous having infinite electrical conductivity. Solutions are obtained, in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector. The effects of the variation of the initial density index, adiabatic exponent of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field behind the shock wave are investigated. It is found that the presence of the magnetic field have decaying effects on the shock wave. Also, it is observed that the effect of an increase in the magnetic field strength is more impressive in the case of adiabatic flow than in the case of isothermal flow. The assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, non-dimensional azimuthal and axial components of vorticity vector distributions in comparison to those in the case of adiabatic flow. A comparison is made between isothermal and adiabatic flows. It is obtained that an increase in the initial density variation index, adiabatic exponent and strength of the magnetic field decrease the shock strength.

  11. Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tienstra, M; Portolés, T; Hernández, F; Mol, J G J

    2015-11-27

    Significant speed improvement for instrumental runtime would make GC–MS much more attractive for determination of pesticides and contaminants and as complementary technique to LC–MS. This was the trigger to develop a fast method (time between injections less than 10 min) for the determination of pesticides and PCBs that are not (or less) amenable to LC–MS. A key factor in achieving shorter analysis time was the use of split injection (1:10) which allowed the use of a much higher initial GC oven temperature. A shorter column (15 m), higher temperature ramp, and higher carrier gas flow rate (6 mL/min) further contributed to analysis-time reduction. Chromatographic resolution was slightly compromised but still well fit-for-purpose. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique used (GC–APCI-triple quadrupole MS/MS), quantification and identification were still possible down to the 10 μg/kg level, which was demonstrated by successful validation of the method for complex feed matrices according to EU guidelines. Other advantages of the method included a better compatibility of acetonitrile extracts (e.g. QuEChERS) with GC, and a reduced transfer of co-extractants into the GC column and mass spectrometer. PMID:26601712

  12. Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tienstra, M; Portolés, T; Hernández, F; Mol, J G J

    2015-11-27

    Significant speed improvement for instrumental runtime would make GC–MS much more attractive for determination of pesticides and contaminants and as complementary technique to LC–MS. This was the trigger to develop a fast method (time between injections less than 10 min) for the determination of pesticides and PCBs that are not (or less) amenable to LC–MS. A key factor in achieving shorter analysis time was the use of split injection (1:10) which allowed the use of a much higher initial GC oven temperature. A shorter column (15 m), higher temperature ramp, and higher carrier gas flow rate (6 mL/min) further contributed to analysis-time reduction. Chromatographic resolution was slightly compromised but still well fit-for-purpose. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique used (GC–APCI-triple quadrupole MS/MS), quantification and identification were still possible down to the 10 μg/kg level, which was demonstrated by successful validation of the method for complex feed matrices according to EU guidelines. Other advantages of the method included a better compatibility of acetonitrile extracts (e.g. QuEChERS) with GC, and a reduced transfer of co-extractants into the GC column and mass spectrometer.

  13. Does further clean-up reduce the matrix enhancement effect in gas chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues in food?

    PubMed

    Schenck, F J; Lehotay, S J

    2000-01-28

    Sample extracts of apples, peas, green beans, oranges, raspberries, clementines, carrots, and wheat obtained using the Food and Drug Administration (acetone extraction) and Canadian Pest Management Regulatory Agency (acetonitrile extraction) multiresidue methods for pesticides were subjected to clean-up using different solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges in an attempt to reduce or eliminate the matrix enhancement effect. The matrix enhancement effect is related to the blocking of active sites on the injector liner by matrix components, thereby increasing signal in the presence of matrix versus standards in solvent in which the pesticides themselves interact with the active sites. Graphitized carbon black (GCB) was often used in combination with various anion-exchange SPE cartridges. The extracts were then spiked with organophosphorus insecticides. These process standards were then compared to standards in acetone of the same concentration using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection or ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Sample matrix enhancement varied from little to no effect for some pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos, malathion) to >200% in the case of certain susceptible pesticides. The GCB removed color components but showed little effect in reducing matrix enhancement by itself. The anion-exchange cartridges in combination with GCB or not, substantially reduced the matrix enhancement effect but did not eliminate it. PMID:10677079

  14. Effect of neutral gas heating on the wave magnetic fields of a low pressure 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K. Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2014-04-15

    The axial and radial magnetic field profiles in a 13.56 MHz (radio frequency) laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor are simulated with the consideration of the effect of neutral gas heating. Spatially resolved electron densities, electron temperatures, and neutral gas temperatures were obtained for simulation using empirically fitted electron density and electron temperature and heuristically determined neutral gas temperature. Comparison between simulated results and measured fields indicates that neutral gas heating plays an important role in determining the skin depth of the magnetic fields.

  15. Effect of a transverse magnetic field on the generation of electron beams in the gas-filled diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. H.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2008-06-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) on generation of an electron beam in the gas-filled diode is experimentally investigated. It is shown that, at voltage U = 25 kV across the diode and a low helium pressure (45 Torr), the transverse magnetic field influences the beam current amplitude behind a foil and its distribution over the foil cross section. At elevated pressures and under the conditions of ultrashort avalanche electron beam formation in helium, nitrogen, and air, the transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) has a minor effect on the amplitude and duration of the beam behind the foil. It is established that, when the voltage of the pulse generator reaches several hundreds of kilovolts, some runaway electrons (including the electrons from the discharge plasma near the cathode) are incident on the side walls of the diode.

  16. Rapid analysis of multiple pesticide residues in fruit-based baby food using programmed temperature vaporiser injection–low pressure gas chromatography–high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid method using programmed temperature vaporizer injection–low-pressure gas chromatography–high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTV–LP-GC–HRTOFMS) for the analysis of multiple pesticide residues in fruit-based baby food was developed. The fast and inexpensive buffered QuEChERS ext...

  17. Magnetic alignment experiment of fine graphite-crystals dispersed in He gas oriented to study alignment of crystalline-axes of nano-sized non-magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, C; Skakibara, M; Tanaka, K; Takashima, R

    2005-01-01

    The ensemble of nano-sized crystals is expected to attain additional physical properties when preferential alignments of certain crystal-axes are achieved by a magnetic field. The reduction of temperature T may realize alignment even if the mole number of the particle N and the diamagnetic anisotropy per mole (Deltachi)(DIA) are considerably small for the nano-sized diamagnetic oxides, since alignment proceeds by the balance between the energy of rotational Brownian motion and field-induced anisotropy energy. Alignment of various basic inorganic oxides such as gypsum, quartz, forsterite, KDP or calcite, having a size of 20 nm diameter, is expected to occur by a field intensity of approximately 50 T at T = 10 K; this intensity is presently available at a high magnetic-field laboratory. It is expected that the magnetic alignment of nano-sized particles can be observed by dispersing the particles in He gas, as achieved recently for micron-sized graphite crystals; a cryogenic liquid cannot be used as a dispersing medium. Measured (Deltachi)(DIA) values accumulated for basic inorganic-oxides are explained quantitatively by assuming that individual bonding-orbital composing the material possesses a constant amount of diamagnetic anisotropy; hence the majority of diamagnetic nano-sized insulators are expected to show magnetic alignment at finite field intensity.

  18. Determination of residual acetone and acetone related impurities in drug product intermediates prepared as Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) using gas chromatography with headspace autosampling (GCHS).

    PubMed

    Quirk, Emma; Doggett, Adrian; Bretnall, Alison

    2014-08-01

    Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) are uniform mixtures of a specific ratio of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and polymer prepared via a spray drying process. Volatile solvents are employed during spray drying to facilitate the formation of the SDD material. Following manufacture, analytical methodology is required to determine residual levels of the spray drying solvent and its associated impurities. Due to the high level of polymer in the SDD samples, direct liquid injection with Gas Chromatography (GC) is not a viable option for analysis. This work describes the development and validation of an analytical approach to determine residual levels of acetone and acetone related impurities, mesityl oxide (MO) and diacetone alcohol (DAA), in drug product intermediates prepared as SDDs using GC with headspace (HS) autosampling. The method development for these analytes presented a number of analytical challenges which had to be overcome before the levels of the volatiles of interest could be accurately quantified. GCHS could be used after two critical factors were implemented; (1) calculation and application of conversion factors to 'correct' for the reactions occurring between acetone, MO and DAA during generation of the headspace volume for analysis, and the addition of an equivalent amount of polymer into all reference solutions used for quantitation to ensure comparability between the headspace volumes generated for both samples and external standards. This work describes the method development and optimisation of the standard preparation, the headspace autosampler operating parameters and the chromatographic conditions, together with a summary of the validation of the methodology. The approach has been demonstrated to be robust and suitable to accurately determine levels of acetone, MO and DAA in SDD materials over the linear concentration range 0.008-0.4μL/mL, with minimum quantitation limits of 20ppm for acetone and MO, and 80ppm for DAA.

  19. Analysis of household ignitable liquids and their post-combustion weathered residues using compound-specific gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Zeland; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Jackson, Glen P

    2013-12-10

    The continuing rise in home and vehicular arson cases involving the use of ignitable liquids continues to be an area of concern for criminal and civil investigators. In this study, the compound-specific δ(13)C values of various components of four flammable household chemicals were measured using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer and an isotope ratio mass spectrometer as simultaneous detectors for a gas chromatograph. Whereas compound-specific carbon isotope ratios were able to discriminate between different sources of neat (pre-combustion) ignitable liquids, analyses of the post-combustion residues were problematic. Weathering caused by combustion resulted in a significant increase in the (13)C content of specific peaks relative to the neat liquids (i.e. less negative delta values) such that the isotopic comparison of pre- and post-combustion residues resulted in fractionation ranging from 0 to +10‰. Because of the current lack of understanding of isotopic fractionation during combustion, and because of problems encountered with co-elution in the more complex samples, compound-specific IRMS does not appear to be suitable for fire debris analysis. The comparison of non-combusted or non-weathered ignitable liquids is much more reliable, especially for relatively simple mixtures, and is best suited for exclusionary purposes until such time as a comprehensive database of samples is developed. Without a measure of the population variance, one cannot presently predict the false positive identification rate for the comparison of two ignitable liquids; i.e. the probability that two random ignitable liquid samples have indistinguishable isotope ratios. PMID:24314542

  20. Application of acetone acetals as water scavengers and derivatization agents prior to the gas chromatographic analysis of polar residual solvents in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Niels; Wolfs, Kris; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2015-12-18

    The sensitivity of gas chromatography (GC) combined with the full evaporation technique (FET) for the analysis of aqueous samples is limited due to the maximum tolerable sample volume in a headspace vial. Using an acetone acetal as water scavenger prior to FET-GC analysis proved to be a useful and versatile tool for the analysis of high boiling analytes in aqueous samples. 2,2-Dimethoxypropane (DMP) was used in this case resulting in methanol and acetone as reaction products with water. These solvents are relatively volatile and were easily removed by evaporation enabling sample enrichment leading to 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to the standard 10μL FET sample volumes for a selection of typical high boiling polar residual solvents in water. This could be improved even further if more sample is used. The method was applied for the determination of residual NMP in an aqueous solution of a cefotaxime analogue and proved to be considerably better than conventional static headspace (sHS) and the standard FET approach. The methodology was also applied to determine trace amounts of ethylene glycol (EG) in aqueous samples like contact lens fluids, where scavenging of the water would avoid laborious extraction prior to derivatization. During this experiment it was revealed that DMP reacts quantitatively with EG to form 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane (2,2-DD) under the proposed reaction conditions. The relatively high volatility (bp 93°C) of 2,2-DD makes it possible to perform analysis of EG using the sHS methodology making additional derivatization reactions superfluous.

  1. Theoretical gas to liquid shift of (15)N isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding in nitromethane using ab initio molecular dynamics and GIAO/GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Iann C; Jolibois, Franck

    2015-05-14

    Chemical shift requires the knowledge of both the sample and a reference magnetic shielding. In few cases as nitrogen (15N), the standard experimental reference corresponds to its liquid phase. Theoretical estimate of NMR magnetic shielding parameters of compounds in their liquid phase is then mandatory but usually replaced by an easily-get gas phase value, forbidding direct comparisons with experiments. We propose here to combine ab initio molecular dynamic simulations with the calculations of magnetic shielding using GIAO approach on extracted cluster's structures from MD. Using several computational strategies, we manage to accurately calculate 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in its liquid phase. Theoretical comparison between liquid and gas phase allows us to extrapolate an experimental value for the 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in gas phase between -121.8 and -120.8 ppm.

  2. PARKER INSTABILITY IN A SELF-GRAVITATING MAGNETIZED GAS DISK. III. NONLINEAR DEVELOPMENT OF THE PARKER INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Min; Hong, S. S. E-mail: ssrhong@gmail.com

    2011-06-20

    Using a total variation diminishing MHD code, we have simulated the nonlinear development of the Parker instability in an isothermal magnetized gas disk that is under the influence of self-gravity. Our objective is to investigate how the Jeans and Parker instabilities compete with the disruptive tendency of the convection in the nonlinear stage of evolution and to know whether the Parker-Jeans instability can be a mechanism for the formation of the larger scale structures in the Galaxy. When the perturbation wavelengths are larger than a Jeans critical wavelength, a cooperative action between the Parker and Jeans instabilities can suppress completely the disruptive behavior of the convective instability and lead the interstellar medium gas material into large-scale structures of high density, whose masses and sizes correspond to H I superclouds rather than to giant molecular clouds. The gas disk develops the vertical filamentary structures near the dense core instead of the chaotic sheet structures that are often seen from simulations of the classical Parker instability. The low-density filaments connect the dense part to the diffuse region far from the disk central plane. The filamentary structure is similar to galactic diffuse vertical structure. When the wavelength of the given perturbations is so short that the Jeans instability may not get triggered, the self-gravitating, magnetized gas disk seems to reach an equilibrium state different from the initial one.

  3. Gas Sloshing in the Rich Cluster A2204: Putting Constraints on the Properties of the Magnetized Hot Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Chen, Huanqing; Li, Zhiyuan; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Zuhone, John

    2016-01-01

    We present results from our detailed analysis of the gas sloshing structures in the rich galaxy cluster Abell 2204, based on deep Chandra observations. We investigate the spiral structure in the X-ray surface brightness, which is a common signature of gas sloshing caused by an interaction with another nearby cluster. We identify discontinuities (edges) in the cluster surface brightness profiles in different directions from the cluster center. We measure the gas temperature, pressure and entropy across these surface brightness edges and find that the prominant surface brightness edges in the east and west are both typical "cold fronts", likely produced by gas sloshing. We use the results of our analysis to constrain the strength of the magnetic field in the cluster. We also use our measurements to provide an upper limit on the velocity of the cold gas beneath the front surface of the cold front. Finally we identify two subcluster candidates in the cluster outskirts, which may have been responsible for the gas sloshing.This research was supported by the Smithsonian Institution, Chandra Prime Contract NAS8-03060, Nanjing University, and the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.

  4. Validation of a multi-residue method to determine deltamethrin and alpha-cypermethrin in mosquito nets by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-μECD)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays long-lasting insecticidal mosquito nets (LNs) are frequently used around the world to protect people against malaria vectors. As they contain insecticide, laboratory control is needed to check whether the content of the active ingredient follows the conditions of the manufacturer and also if the active ingredient is still present after some time of use. For this purpose, an analytical method had to be developed. The fact that LNs include a range of polymers for the yarn and use coated or incorporated technologies for the active ingredient, it is a challenge to find only one analytical method determining the active ingredient in LNs, which takes into account both impregnation technologies. Some methods are provided by international organizations but are limited by the determination of only one pesticide per method. The aim of this study was to optimize a short time extraction method for deltamethrin and alpha-cypermethrin from coated and incorporated mosquito nets and also to detect both insecticides in one analytical run, using gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-μECD). Methods Based on the literature, the most suitable solvent and the adequate extraction process for the insecticides used for net making were identified and adapted for the new multi-residue method. Results The validation data of the multi-residue method to determine deltamethrin and alpha-cypermethrin in mosquito nets by GC-μECD are given. Depending on the concentration of the active ingredient spiked on the nets, the mean recovery for alpha-cypermethrin ranged between 86% and 107% with a relative standard deviation below 3.5%. For deltamethrin it ranged between 90% and 108% with a relative standard deviation also below 3.5%. The limit of detection is 0.009 g.a.i/kg of net (0.3 mg a.i./m2 of net) both for alpha-cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Conclusions Data obtained are excellent. A 30 minutes reflux extraction method with xylene was developed to determine

  5. Trace gas emissions from combustion of peat, crop residue, biofuels, grasses, and other fuels: configuration and FTIR component of the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockwell, C. E.; Yokelson, R. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Robinson, A. L.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Reardon, J.; Ryan, K. C.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Stevens, L.

    2014-04-01

    During the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4, October-November~2012) a~large variety of regionally and globally significant biomass fuels was burned at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particle emissions were characterized by an extensive suite of instrumentation that measured aerosol chemistry, size distribution, optical properties, and cloud-nucleating properties. The trace gas measurements included high resolution mass spectrometry, one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography, and open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the overall experimental design for FLAME-4 including the fuel properties, the nature of the burn simulations, the instrumentation employed, and then focuses on the OP-FTIR results. The OP-FTIR was used to measure the initial emissions of 20 trace gases: CO2, CO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C3H6, HCHO, HCOOH, CH3OH, CH3COOH, glycolaldehyde, furan, H2O, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, HCN, HCl, and SO2. These species include most of the major trace gases emitted by biomass burning and for several of these compounds it is the first time their emissions are reported for important fuel types. The main fuel types included: African grasses, Asian rice straw, cooking fires (open (3-stone), rocket, and gasifier stoves), Indonesian and extratropical peat, temperate and boreal coniferous canopy fuels, US crop residue, shredded tires, and trash. Comparisons of the OP-FTIR emission factors (EF) and emission ratios (ER) to field measurements of biomass burning verify that the large body of FLAME-4 results can be used to enhance the understanding of global biomass burning and its representation in atmospheric chemistry models.

  6. Gas chromatographic method for the determination of residual monomers, 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate, as curing agents in an ultraviolet curable adhesive.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung-Hyoun; Kim, Nosun; Moon, Dong Cheul

    2014-02-01

    A gas chromatographic method is described for the determination of residual 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (AOI) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (MOI) as curing agents in an ultraviolet curable adhesive. Pre-column derivatization was employed in the determination of AOI and MOI as a means of enhancing the response of the flame ionization detector. Urethane derivatives of AOI and MOI were derived using methanol for 30 min at room temperature. The accuracies (n = 5, three concentration levels) were in the range of 113.4 to 126.7%, and precisions (n = 5, three concentration levels) were in the range of 0.8 to 4.3% for AOI-OMe. Furthermore, the accuracies were in the range of 79.5 to 108.6% and the precisions were in the range of 1.0 to 2.4% for MOI-OMe. The correlation coefficients of six calibration standards were all greater than 0.9999 for AOI-OMe and greater than 0.9998 for MOI-OMe over the range from 10 to 100 µg/mL.

  7. Multi-residue analysis of 80 environmental contaminants in honeys, honeybees and pollens by one extraction procedure followed by liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wiest, Laure; Buleté, Audrey; Giroud, Barbara; Fratta, Cédric; Amic, Sophie; Lambert, Olivier; Pouliquen, Hervé; Arnaudguilhem, Carine

    2011-08-26

    One of the factors that may explain nowadays honeybees' colonies losses is the increasing presence of chemicals in the environment. The aim of this study is to obtain a global view of the presence of environmental contaminants in beehives and, develop a fast, cheap and sensitive tool to analyze environmental contaminants in apiarian matrices. A multi residue analysis was developed to quantify 80 environmental contaminants, pesticides and veterinary drugs, belonging to different chemical classes, in honeys, honeybees and pollens. It consists in a single extraction, based on a modified "QuEChERS method", followed by gas chromatography coupled with Time of Flight mass spectrometry (GC-ToF) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The "QuEChERS method" combines salting-out liquid-liquid extraction with acetonitrile and a dispersive-SPE clean up. It was adjusted to honey and especially to honeybee and pollen, by adding a small fraction of hexane in acetonitrile to eliminate lipids that interfere with mass spectrometry analysis. This method, combined with accurate and sensitive detection, allowed quantification and confirmation at levels as low as 10 ng/g, with recoveries between 60 and 120%. Application to more than 100 samples of each matrix was achieved for a global view of pesticide presence in the honeybee environment. Relatively high percentages of honeys, honeybees and pollens were found to be contaminated by pesticides used to combat varroa but also by fungicides like carbendazim and ubiquitous contaminants.

  8. A multi-residue method for determination of 70 organic micropollutants in surface waters by solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terzopoulou, Evangelia; Voutsa, Dimitra; Kaklamanos, George

    2015-01-01

    A multi-residue method, based on gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), has been developed for the determination of 70 organic micropollutants from various chemical classes (organochlorinated, organophosphorous, triazines, carbamate and urea, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pharmaceuticals, phenols, etc.) in surface waters. A single-step SPE extraction using OASIS HLB cartridges was employed for the recovery of target micropollutants. The method has been validated according to monitoring performance criteria of the Water Framework Directive, taking into account the approved guidelines on quality assurance and quality control. The recoveries ranged from 60 to 110 %, the coefficient of variation from 0.84 to 27.4 %, and the uncertainty from 6 to 37 %. The LOD varied from 6.0 to 40 ng/L. The limits of quantification for the priority pollutants anthracene, alachlor, atrazine, benzo(a)pyrene, chlorfenvinphos, diuron, isoproturon, nonylphenol, simazine, and terbutryn fulfill the criterion of <30 % of the relevant environmental standards. The method was employed to investigate the water quality in the basin of a transboundary river, Strymonas, in NE Greece during three sampling campaigns conducted in the year 2013. Thirty-nine compounds were detected in the river water. Metolachlor, diuron, isoproturon, salicylic acid, chlorfenvinphos, 1,2-benzanthracene, pyrene, diflubenzuron, and carbaryl exhibited the highest detection frequencies.

  9. Gas chromatographic mass spectrometric detection of dihydroxy fatty acids preserved in the 'bound' phase of organic residues of archaeological pottery vessels.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Fabricio A; Bull, Ian D; Evershed, Richard P

    2011-07-15

    A methodology is presented for the determination of dihydroxy fatty acids preserved in the 'bound' phase of organic residues preserved in archaeological potsherds. The method comprises saponification, esterification, silica gel column chromatographic fractionation, and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The electron ionisation mass spectra of the trimethylsilyl ether methyl ester derivatives are characterised by fragment ions arising from cleavage of the bond between the two vicinal trimethylsiloxy groups. Other significant fragment ions are [M-15](+.), [M-31](+.), m/z 147 and ions characteristic of vicinal disubstituted (trimethylsiloxy) TMSO- groups (Δ(7,8), Δ(9,10), Δ(11,12) and Δ(13,14): m/z 304, 332, 360 and 388, respectively). The dihydroxy fatty acids identified in archaeological extracts exhibited carbon numbers ranging from C(16) to C(22) and concentrations varying from 0.05 to 14.05 µg g(-1) . The wide range of dihydroxy fatty acids observed indicates that this approach may be applied confidently in screening archaeological potsherds for the degradation products of monounsaturated fatty acids derived from commodities processed in archaeological pottery vessels.

  10. A multi-residue method for determination of 70 organic micropollutants in surface waters by solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terzopoulou, Evangelia; Voutsa, Dimitra; Kaklamanos, George

    2015-01-01

    A multi-residue method, based on gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), has been developed for the determination of 70 organic micropollutants from various chemical classes (organochlorinated, organophosphorous, triazines, carbamate and urea, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pharmaceuticals, phenols, etc.) in surface waters. A single-step SPE extraction using OASIS HLB cartridges was employed for the recovery of target micropollutants. The method has been validated according to monitoring performance criteria of the Water Framework Directive, taking into account the approved guidelines on quality assurance and quality control. The recoveries ranged from 60 to 110 %, the coefficient of variation from 0.84 to 27.4 %, and the uncertainty from 6 to 37 %. The LOD varied from 6.0 to 40 ng/L. The limits of quantification for the priority pollutants anthracene, alachlor, atrazine, benzo(a)pyrene, chlorfenvinphos, diuron, isoproturon, nonylphenol, simazine, and terbutryn fulfill the criterion of <30 % of the relevant environmental standards. The method was employed to investigate the water quality in the basin of a transboundary river, Strymonas, in NE Greece during three sampling campaigns conducted in the year 2013. Thirty-nine compounds were detected in the river water. Metolachlor, diuron, isoproturon, salicylic acid, chlorfenvinphos, 1,2-benzanthracene, pyrene, diflubenzuron, and carbaryl exhibited the highest detection frequencies. PMID:25109470

  11. [Determination of 107 pesticide residues in vegetables using off-line dispersive solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shen, Weijian; Yu, Keyao; Gui, Qianwen; Jiang, Yuan; Zhao, Zengyun; Shen, Chongyu; Wu, Bin; Chu, Xiaogang

    2009-07-01

    A screening method was developed for the determination of 107 pesticide residues in vegetables using off-line dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The pesticides interested were extracted from the samples with acetonitrile (saturated by n-hexane) containing 1% acetic acid and simultaneously separated by liquid-liquid partitioning with adding anhydrous magnesium sulfate plus sodium acetate following by a simple cleanup step known as dispersive solid-phase extraction. The extracts were determined by GC-MS/MS using external standard method. The method was reliable and stable that the recoveries of almost all pesticides were in the range from 60% to 130% at the spiked level of 10 microg/kg into four vegetable matrixes (garlic, green bean, radish 8 and spinach) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all not more than 15.3%. The linearity of the method was good between 0.05 mg/L and 1 mg/L, and all limits of quantification (LOQs) less than 10 microg/kg. The method is selective with no interference, especially in the complicated garlic matrix. PMID:19938491

  12. Residual gas analysis (RGA) and shear strength characteristics of a silver-filled epoxy and polyimide under long-term, high-temperature storage conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1994-04-01

    Introduction of organic materials into hermetically sealed electronic packages increases the risk of failure due to contamination. The contaminants of concern are moisture and ionics. This combination can lead to unwanted electrical pathways and/or corrosion. To minimize sealed-in moisture, packages are vacuum-baked for 16 hours at 200 C and Au/Sn solder-sealed i a glove box purged with dry nitrogen. Even following this procedure, the package plating and organic adhesive can still outgas moisture during high-temperature storage. Long-term aging characteristics for a silver-filled epoxy and a silver-filled polyimide were investigated. Leadless chip carriers (LCCs) containing die attached with epoxy or polyimide were aged at 25 C, 100 C, 150 C, and 200 C for up to six months. Residual gas analysis (RGA) and die shear testing were performed on each package. Results indicate that the epoxy can withstand storage at 150 C with no increase in internal moisture. The polyimide could only be stored at 100 C. No loss in shear strength for epoxy or polyimide was noted at any storage condition.

  13. Residual gas analyzer mass spectrometry for human breath analysis: a new tool for the non-invasive diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Banik, Gourab D; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Som, Suman; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Ghosh, Shibendu; Ghosh, Barnali; Raychaudhuri, Arup K; Pradhan, Manik

    2014-03-01

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA) coupled with a high vacuum chamber is described for the non-invasive diagnosis of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection through ¹³C-urea breath analysis. The present RGA-based mass spectrometry (MS) method is capable of measuring high-precision ¹³CO₂ isotope enrichments in exhaled breath samples from individuals harboring the H. pylori infection. The system exhibited 100% diagnostic sensitivity, and 93% specificity alongside positive and negative predictive values of 95% and 100%, respectively, compared with invasive endoscopy-based biopsy tests. A statistically sound diagnostic cut-off value for the presence of H. pylori was determined to be 3.0‰ using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The diagnostic accuracy and validity of the results are also supported by optical off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements. The δ¹³(DOB)C‰ values of both methods correlated well (R² = 0.9973 at 30 min). The RGA-based instrumental setup described here is simple, robust, easy-to-use and more portable and cost-effective compared to all other currently available detection methods, thus making it a new point-of-care medical diagnostic tool for the purpose of large-scale screening of the H. pylori infection in real time. The RGA-MS technique should have broad applicability for ¹³C-breath tests in a wide range of biomedical research and clinical diagnostics for many other diseases and metabolic disorders.

  14. Application of elevated temperature-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides residues in aqueous samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Afshar Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza; Rezaee Aghdam, Samaneh; Nouri, Nina; Bamorrowat, Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, an elevated temperature, dispersive, liquid-liquid microextraction/gas chromatography-flame ionization detection was investigated for the determination, pre-concentration, and extraction of six organophosphorus pesticides (malathion, phosalone, dichlorvos, diazinon, profenofos, and chlorpyrifos) residues in fruit juice and aqueous samples. A mixture of 1,2-dibromoethane (extraction solvent) and dimethyl sulfoxide (disperser solvent) was injected rapidly into the sample solution heated at an elevated temperature. Analytical parameters, including enrichment factors (1600-2075), linearity (r>0.994), limits of detection (0.82-2.72ngmL(-1)) and quantification (2.60-7.36ngmL(-1)), relative standard deviations (<7%) and extraction recoveries (64-83%), showed the high efficiency of the method developed for analysis of the target analytes. The proposed procedure was used effectively to analyse selected analytes in river water and fruit juice, and diazinon was found at ngmL(-1) concentrations in apple juice. PMID:27374524

  15. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' containing residual {alpha}-Fe prepared by low-temperature ammonia nitridation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, S.; Masubuchi, Y.; Nakazawa, Y.; Okayama, T.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kikkawa, S.

    2012-10-15

    Slight enhancement of saturation magnetization to 219 A m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} was observed from 199 A m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} for the original {alpha}-Fe on the intermediate nitrided mixture of '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' with residual {alpha}-Fe among the low temperature ammonia nitridation products under 5 T magnetic field at room temperature. The value changed not linearly against the yield as had been expected. Crystal structure refinement indicated that the phase similar to {alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} had deviations on its lattice constants and positional parameters, compared to previously reported values for {alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}. Spin-polarized total energy calculations were performed using the projector-augmented wave method as implemented in the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) to calculate magnetic moment on the refined crystal structure of the intermediate '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}'. The calculations supported the observed magnetization enhancement in the intermediate nitridation product. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structural parameters slightly change in the intermediate nitrided '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' from those in {alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} to show the magnetization maxima in the mixture of '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' and the residual {alpha}-F. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Larger magnetization was observed than the value of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} on its intermediate nitrided mixture with residual {alpha}-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement was related to the crystal structural deviation from Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} on the intermediate nitride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was supported by spin-polarized total energy calculation using the deviated structure.

  16. Mitigating stimulated scattering processes in gas-filled Hohlraums via external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Zhichao; Ding, Yongkun; Yang, Dong; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin

    2015-09-15

    A simple model, based on energy and pressure equilibrium, is proposed to deal with the effect of external magnetic fields on the plasma parameters inside the laser path, which shows that the electron temperature can be significantly enhanced as the intensity of the external magnetic fields increases. With the combination of this model and a 1D three-wave coupling code, the effect of external magnetic fields on the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes is studied. The results indicate that a magnetic field with an intensity of tens of Tesla can decrease the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes by several orders of magnitude.

  17. Origin of a magnetic easy axis in pipeline steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapham, L.; Heald, C.; Krause, T.; Atherton, D. L.; Clark, P.

    1999-08-01

    Oil and gas pipelines are generally magnetically anisotropic, with a magnetic easy axis in the pipe axial direction. This is of interest because magnetic flux leakage tools are commonly used for the detection and sizing of defects. In the present study we investigate the origin of this magnetic easy axis, using an angular magnetic Barkhausen noise technique to characterize the magnetic anisotropy. The texture, microstructure, and residual stress are examined as possible causes of the easy axis, using x-ray pole figure analysis and microstructural examination along with high and low temperature annealing treatments. Our results indicate that plastic deformation and residual stress are responsible for the magnetic easy axis, since an elimination of the residual stresses through low temperature "stress relief" heat treatment produces a magnetically isotropic structure without altering the texture or microstructure. X-ray pole figure analysis supports the conclusion that magnetic anisotropy is not related to texture in these materials. We conclude that the axial magnetic easy axis is due to a compressive residual hoop stress resulting from the cold bending and cold expansion of the pipe during processing.

  18. Comparative analysis of the chemical composition of mixed and pure cultures of green algae and their decomposed residues by C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zelibor, J L; Romankiw, L; Hatcher, P G; Colwell, R R

    1988-04-01

    It is known that macromolecular organic matter in aquatic environments, i.e., humic substances, is highly aliphatic. These aliphatic macromolecules, predominantly paraffinic in structure, are prevalent in marine and lacustrine sediments and are believed to originate from algae or bacteria. A comparative study of mixed and pure cultures of green algae and their decomposed residues was performed by using solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the primary analytical method. Results obtained in this study confirm the presence of components that are chemically refractory and that are defined as alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin. These were detected in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and axenic biomasses composed of several genera of Chlorophyta. Although the chemical composition of algal biomass varied with culture conditions, the chemical structure of the alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin, demonstrated by C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy appeared to be constant for members of the Chlorophyta examined in this study. The alghumin was dominated by carbohydrate-carbon, with minor amounts of amide or carboxyl carbon and paraffinic carbon, the latter surviving strong hydrolysis by 6 N HCI (hydrolyzed alghumin). Bacterial decomposition of heterogeneous algal biomass labeled with C was conducted under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to determine chemical structure and stability of the refractory material. The refractory fraction ranged from 33% in aerobic to 44% in anaerobic cultures. The refractory fraction recovered from either aerobic or anaerobic degradation comprised 40% alghumin, which represented an enrichment by 10% relative to the proportion of alghumin derived from whole cells of algae. The paraffinic component in the hydrolyzed alghumin of whole algal cells was found to be 1.8% and increased to 5.1 and 6.9% after aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation, respectively. It is concluded that members of the Chlorophyta contain a common

  19. Fast and sensitive determination of pesticide residues in vegetables using low-pressure gas chromatography with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Walorczyk, Stanisław; Gnusowski, Bogusław

    2006-09-22

    In this study, the feasibility of low-pressure gas chromatography (LP-GC) in conjunction with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, as a route towards fast pesticide residue analysis, was investigated. A Varian GC-MS system equipped with a mass spectrometer model 1200 was used. LP-GC-MS experiments were performed on a HP-5 10 m x 0.32 mm x 0.25 microm analytical column connected to a 2.5 m x 0.15 mm non-coated restriction precolumn at the inlet end. For comparison purposes conventional GC-MS analysis was performed on a RTX-5 30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.5 microm column. Under the optimized conditions the analysis time was reduced to 13.3 min with the LP-GC approach which corresponds to an almost threefold gain in speed versus the conventional GC (37 min). Despite the poorer separation power of the LP-GC column, the experiments conducted with tomato and onion extracts spiked with 78 pesticides proved that LP-GC-MS is of practical value to perform full scan screening analysis. Moreover, the rate of false negative results was higher in the case of conventional GC-MS while the LP-GC-MS enabled correct identification of pesticides at lower levels since the peaks were improved in both size and shape. Validation experiments were performed on a sample of 12 representative pesticides for comparison of performance characteristics of the LP-GC and GC approaches with mass spectrometer operated in scan, SIM and MS/MS mode. The LP-GC column set-up interfaced to the MS detector was found to be superior to the conventional GC with respect to obtained linearity, accuracy and precision parameters. Also, lower limits of detection in real extracts were achieved using the LP-GC approach. Finally, the LP-GC-MS/MS analysis of tomato samples with incurred pesticide residues demonstrated the applicability of the developed method for analysis of real samples. PMID:16820160

  20. Direct observation of an anisotropic in-plane residual stress induced by B addition as an origin of high magnetic anisotropy field of Ru/FeCoB film

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Gomi, Shunsuke; Mashiko, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2010-05-15

    Although boron-free FeCo films prepared on a Ru underlayer exhibits isotropic in-plane magnetic property, boron added FeCoB films prepared on Ru underlayer revealed large in-plane magnetic anisotropy with a high anisotropy field of 500 Oe. The effect of boron addition on the in-plane anisotropic residual stress in FeCoB film was investigated using sin{sup 2} {psi} method of x-ray diffraction analysis. Large isotropic compressive stress was observed in Ru/FeCo film. In contrast, anisotropic in-plane residual stress was observed in Ru/FeCoB film. The compressive stress along the easy axis of Ru/FeCoB film is released more than that along the hard axis. Such anisotropic residual stress is regarded as an origin of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy through inverse magnetostriction effect. Owing to the configuration of the facing targets sputtering system, boron atoms are sputtered and deposited anisotropically, and so they penetrate FeCo crystals and release the compressive stress along the incidence direction.

  1. Resistively detected NMR spectra of the crystal states of the two-dimensional electron gas in a quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, R.; Simoneau, Alexandre M.

    2016-02-01

    Transport experiments on the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined into a semiconductor quantum well and subjected to a quantizing magnetic field have uncovered a rich variety of uniform and nonuniform phases such as the Laughlin liquids, the Wigner, bubble, and Skyrme crystals, and the quantum Hall stripe state. Optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OP-NMR) has also been extremely useful in studying the magnetization and dynamics of electron solids with exotic spin textures such as the Skyrme crystal. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a related technique, resistively-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (RD-NMR), could be a good tool to study the topography of the electron solids in the fractional and integer quantum Hall regimes. In this work, we compute theoretically the RD-NMR line shapes of various crystal phases of the 2DEG and study the relation between their spin density and texture and their NMR spectra. This allows us to evaluate the ability of the RD-NMR to discriminate between the various types of crystal states.

  2. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskij, K. I.; Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Shatokhin, V. L.; Isaev, A. A.; Martynenko, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10-3-10-1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed.

  3. Gas-phase NMR measurements, absolute shielding scales, and magnetic dipole moments of 29Si and 73Ge nuclei.

    PubMed

    Makulski, W; Jackowski, K; Antusek, A; Jaszuński, M

    2006-10-12

    New gas-phase NMR measurements of the shielding constants of 29Si, 73Ge, and 1H nuclei in SiH4 and GeH4 are reported. The results, extrapolated to zero density, provide accurate isolated molecule values, best suited for comparison with theoretical calculations. Using the recent ab initio results for these molecules and the measured chemical shifts, we determine the absolute shielding scales for 29Si and 73Ge. This allows us to provide new values of the nuclear magnetic dipole moments for these two nuclei; in addition, we examine the dipole moments of 13C and 119Sn.

  4. The influence of the temperature and density of an electron gas on beta processes in a quantum magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, V. N.; Starcheus, S. G.; Tasev, M. A.; Ternov, I. M.

    1988-01-01

    Beta processes occurring upon variation of the temperature and density of an electron gas in a wide range are investigated by accounting for the effect of a strong magnetic field on the motion of charged particles. The study is performed in the Furry framework. Inherent to the case considered is that, for certain relationships between the main parameters of the problem, the probabilities of beta processes and the neutrino luminosities caused by them exhibit an oscillatory behavior. In the degeneracy case, the interference effects reflecting the nonanalyticity of the expressions upon field vanishing exceed the contributions from perturbation theory. The results are of interest in connection with the collapse of massive stellar nuclei.

  5. Determination of low-level agricultural residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography with mass-selective detection: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Paske, Nathan; Berry, Bryan; Schmitz, John; Sullivan, Darryl

    2007-01-01

    In this study, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc., a method was validated for measurement of 19 pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with mass selective detection The pesticide residues determined in this validation were alpha-benzenehexachloride (BHC); beta-BHC; gamma-BHC; delta-BHC; methyl parathion; malathion; chlorpyrifos; aldrin; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE); alpha-endosulfan; 4,4-DDE; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD); dieldrin; ethion; 4,4-DDD; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDT); beta-endosulfan; 4,4-DDT; and endosulfan sulfate when spiked into a 200 mL matrix sample at 0.50 microg/L. The samples were diluted with acetonitrile and water, then liquid-liquid phase extracted into petroleum ether. The resulting extract was concentrated to near dryness and diluted with hexane:dichloromethane (50:50). The concentrated samples were purified by gel permeation chromatography. The resulting solution was concentrated and separated on a Florisil substrate. The eluent was concentrated to near dryness, reconstituted to produce a 200-fold concentration, and analyzed using a GC/MS instrument operated in the selective ion monitoring mode. The GC/MS instrument was equipped with a large volume injector capable of injecting 25 microL. External standards prepared in dichloromethane were used for quantification without the need for matrix-matched calibration because the extraction step minimized the matrix effects. The calibration curves for all agricultural residues had coefficients of determination (r2) of greater than or equal to 0.9900, with the exception of one value that was 0.988. Fortification spikes at 0.50 microg/L in 3 matrixes (7UP, Gatorade, and Diet Pepsi) over the course of 2 days (4 days for Gatorade), where n=8 each day, yielded average percent recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) as follows (n=64): 95.6 (24.8) for alpha-BHC; 91.9 (23.6) for beta-BHC; 89.1 (21

  6. Determination of low-level agricultural residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography with mass-selective detection: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Paske, Nathan; Berry, Bryan; Schmitz, John; Sullivan, Darryl

    2007-01-01

    In this study, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc., a method was validated for measurement of 19 pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with mass selective detection The pesticide residues determined in this validation were alpha-benzenehexachloride (BHC); beta-BHC; gamma-BHC; delta-BHC; methyl parathion; malathion; chlorpyrifos; aldrin; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE); alpha-endosulfan; 4,4-DDE; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD); dieldrin; ethion; 4,4-DDD; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDT); beta-endosulfan; 4,4-DDT; and endosulfan sulfate when spiked into a 200 mL matrix sample at 0.50 microg/L. The samples were diluted with acetonitrile and water, then liquid-liquid phase extracted into petroleum ether. The resulting extract was concentrated to near dryness and diluted with hexane:dichloromethane (50:50). The concentrated samples were purified by gel permeation chromatography. The resulting solution was concentrated and separated on a Florisil substrate. The eluent was concentrated to near dryness, reconstituted to produce a 200-fold concentration, and analyzed using a GC/MS instrument operated in the selective ion monitoring mode. The GC/MS instrument was equipped with a large volume injector capable of injecting 25 microL. External standards prepared in dichloromethane were used for quantification without the need for matrix-matched calibration because the extraction step minimized the matrix effects. The calibration curves for all agricultural residues had coefficients of determination (r2) of greater than or equal to 0.9900, with the exception of one value that was 0.988. Fortification spikes at 0.50 microg/L in 3 matrixes (7UP, Gatorade, and Diet Pepsi) over the course of 2 days (4 days for Gatorade), where n=8 each day, yielded average percent recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) as follows (n=64): 95.6 (24.8) for alpha-BHC; 91.9 (23.6) for beta-BHC; 89.1 (21

  7. Spontaneous Demagnetization of a Dipolar Spinor Bose Gas in an Ultralow Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquiou, B.; Marechal, E.; Bismut, G.; Pedri, P.; Vernac, L.; Gorceix, O.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2011-06-24

    We study the spinor properties of S=3 {sup 52}Cr condensates, in which dipole-dipole interactions allow changes in magnetization. We observe a demagnetization of the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) when the magnetic field is quenched below a critical value corresponding to a phase transition between a ferromagnetic and a nonpolarized ground state, which occurs when spin-dependent contact interactions overwhelm the linear Zeeman effect. The critical field is increased when the density is raised by loading the BEC in a deep 2D optical lattice. The magnetization dynamics is set by dipole-dipole interactions.

  8. Screening and quantification of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables making use of gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Cervera, M I; Portolés, T; López, F J; Beltrán, J; Hernández, F

    2014-11-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source has been used to enhance the potential of gas chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for screening and quantification purposes in pesticide residue analysis. A screening method developed in our laboratory for around 130 pesticides has been applied to fruit and vegetable samples, including strawberries, oranges, apples, carrots, lettuces, courgettes, red peppers, and tomatoes. Samples were analyzed together with quality control samples (at 0.05 mg/kg) for each matrix and for matrix-matched calibration standards. The screening strategy consisted in first rapid searching and detection, and then a refined identification step using the QTOF capabilities (MS(E) and accurate mass). Identification was based on the presence of one characteristic m/z ion (Q) obtained with the low collision energy function and at least one fragment ion (q) obtained with the high collision energy function, both with mass errors of less than 5 ppm, and an ion intensity ratio (q/Q) within the tolerances permitted. Following this strategy, 15 of 130 pesticides were identified in the samples. Afterwards, the quantitation capabilities were tested by performing a quantitative validation for those pesticides detected in the samples. To this aim, five matrices were selected (orange, apple, tomato, lettuce, and carrot) and spiked at two concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg), and quantification was done using matrix-matched calibration standards (relative responses versus triphenyl phosphate used as an internal standard). Acceptable average recoveries and relative standard deviations were obtained for many but not all pesticide-matrix combinations. These figures allowed us to perform a retrospective quantification of positives found in the screening without the need for additional analysis. Taking advantage of the accurate-mass full-spectrum data provided by QTOF MS, we searched for a higher number of compounds

  9. Development and comparison of two multi-residue methods for the analysis of select pesticides in honey bees, pollen, and wax by gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanbo; Kelley, Rebecca A; Anderson, Troy D; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    One of the hypotheses that may help explain the loss of honey bee colonies worldwide is the increasing potential for exposure of honey bees to complex mixtures of pesticides. To better understand this phenomenon, two multi-residue methods based on different extraction and cleanup procedures have been developed, and compared for the determination of 11 relevant pesticides in honey bees, pollen, and wax by gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Sample preparatory methods included solvent extraction followed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) cleanup and cleanup using a dispersive solid-phase extraction with zirconium-based sorbents (Z-Sep). Matrix effects, method detection limits, recoveries, and reproducibility were evaluated and compared. Method detection limits (MDL) of the pesticides for the GPC method in honey bees, pollen, and wax ranged from 0.65 to 5.92 ng/g dw, 0.56 to 6.61 ng/g dw, and 0.40 to 8.30 ng/g dw, respectively, while MDLs for the Z-Sep method were from 0.33 to 4.47 ng/g dw, 0.42 to 5.37 ng/g dw, and 0.51 to 5.34 ng/g dw, respectively. The mean recoveries in all matrices and at three spiking concentrations ranged from 64.4% to 149.5% and 71.9% to 126.2% for the GPC and Z-Sep methods, with relative standard deviation between 1.5-25.3% and 1.3-15.9%, respectively. The results showed that the Z-Sep method was more suitable for the determination of the target pesticides, especially chlorothalonil, in bee hive samples. The Z-Sep method was then validated using a series of field-collected bee hive samples taken from honey bee colonies in Virginia. PMID:26048827

  10. Development and comparison of two multi-residue methods for the analysis of select pesticides in honey bees, pollen, and wax by gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanbo; Kelley, Rebecca A; Anderson, Troy D; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    One of the hypotheses that may help explain the loss of honey bee colonies worldwide is the increasing potential for exposure of honey bees to complex mixtures of pesticides. To better understand this phenomenon, two multi-residue methods based on different extraction and cleanup procedures have been developed, and compared for the determination of 11 relevant pesticides in honey bees, pollen, and wax by gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Sample preparatory methods included solvent extraction followed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) cleanup and cleanup using a dispersive solid-phase extraction with zirconium-based sorbents (Z-Sep). Matrix effects, method detection limits, recoveries, and reproducibility were evaluated and compared. Method detection limits (MDL) of the pesticides for the GPC method in honey bees, pollen, and wax ranged from 0.65 to 5.92 ng/g dw, 0.56 to 6.61 ng/g dw, and 0.40 to 8.30 ng/g dw, respectively, while MDLs for the Z-Sep method were from 0.33 to 4.47 ng/g dw, 0.42 to 5.37 ng/g dw, and 0.51 to 5.34 ng/g dw, respectively. The mean recoveries in all matrices and at three spiking concentrations ranged from 64.4% to 149.5% and 71.9% to 126.2% for the GPC and Z-Sep methods, with relative standard deviation between 1.5-25.3% and 1.3-15.9%, respectively. The results showed that the Z-Sep method was more suitable for the determination of the target pesticides, especially chlorothalonil, in bee hive samples. The Z-Sep method was then validated using a series of field-collected bee hive samples taken from honey bee colonies in Virginia.

  11. Physico-chemical assessment of a fixated flue-gas desulfurization sludge cap emplaced along with other coal-combustion residues to abate acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Shawn; Branam, Tracy D; Olyphant, Greg A

    2012-05-01

    Long term monitoring of the physical and chemical effects of using coal-combustion residues (CCRs), in particular fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, as a major component in the reclamation of a pyritic refuse deposit was undertaken to determine the beneficial and detrimental consequences of placing these controversial materials in an unrestricted environment. Monitoring wells, neutron probe access tubes, and weirs were installed before and after reclamation to observe hydrologic conditions and determine how the use of FGD sludge as a recharge barrier was affecting hydrochemical response to ambient weather conditions. Data were collected for six months prior to reclamation and then for an additional 13 years (more intensively during the first 5 years). Statistical analyses of water levels in the pyritic refuse deposit indicate a shift from precipitation- to barometric-controlled fluctuations. These findings, along with minimal variability in soil moisture within the CCR cap and transient perching of groundwater above the cap, are evidence that recharge of the refuse aquifer has been minimized. Statistically significant improvements in the quality of groundwater on-site and surface water leaving the site include long-term declines in acidity, As, and Fe concentrations within the refuse aquifer, attributed to a decrease in recharge of oxygenated water as supported by an analysis of calculated mineral saturation indices. Long-term declines in acidity and associated trace metals discharging from the site are attributed to the post-reclamation loss of sulfate salts brought to the surface by capillary forces. The results of this study indicate that strategic usage of CCRs in reclamation programs can produce beneficial effects, including acid drainage reductions, that are beyond those achieved using traditional reclamation approaches such as the utilization of mine spoil as capping and fill material.

  12. Change of Magnetic Field-gas Alignment at the Gravity-driven Alfvénic Transition in Molecular Clouds: Implications for Dust Polarization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; King, Patrick K.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-10-01

    Diffuse striations in molecular clouds are preferentially aligned with local magnetic fields, whereas dense filaments tend to be perpendicular to them. When and why this transition occurs remain uncertain. To explore the physics behind this transition, we compute the histogram of relative orientation (HRO) between the density gradient and the magnetic field in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of prestellar core formation in shock-compressed regions within giant molecular clouds. We find that, in the magnetically dominated (sub-Alfvénic) post-shock region, the gas structure is preferentially aligned with the local magnetic field. For overdense sub-regions with super-Alfvénic gas, their elongation becomes preferentially perpendicular to the local magnetic field. The transition occurs when self-gravitating gas gains enough kinetic energy from the gravitational acceleration to overcome the magnetic support against the cross-field contraction, which results in a power-law increase of the field strength with density. Similar results can be drawn from HROs in projected two-dimensional maps with integrated column densities and synthetic polarized dust emission. We quantitatively analyze our simulated polarization properties, and interpret the reduced polarization fraction at high column densities as the result of increased distortion of magnetic field directions in trans- or super-Alfvénic gas. Furthermore, we introduce measures of the inclination and tangledness of the magnetic field along the line of sight as the controlling factors of the polarization fraction. Observations of the polarization fraction and angle dispersion can therefore be utilized in studying local magnetic field morphology in star-forming regions.

  13. Efficient generation of fast neutrons by magnetized deuterons in an optimized deuterium gas-puff z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Shishlov, A. V.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kubes, P.; Labetsky, A. Yu; Rezac, K.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Dudkin, G. N.; Fursov, F. I.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kravarik, J.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Orcikova, H.; Padalko, V. N.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Sila, O.; Turek, K.; Varlachev, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Z-pinch experiments with deuterium gas puffs have been carried out on the GIT-12 generator at 3 MA currents. Recently, a novel configuration of a deuterium gas-puff z-pinch was used to accelerate deuterons and to generate fast neutrons. In order to form a homogeneous, uniformly conducting layer at a large initial radius, an inner deuterium gas puff was surrounded by an outer hollow cylindrical plasma shell. The plasma shell consisting of hydrogen and carbon ions was formed at the diameter of 350 mm by 48 plasma guns. A linear mass of the plasma shell was about 5 µg cm-1 whereas a total linear mass of deuterium gas in single or double shell gas puffs was about 100 µg cm-1. The implosion lasted 700 ns and seemed to be stable up to a 5 mm radius. During stagnation, m = 0 instabilities became more pronounced. When a disruption of necks occurred, the plasma impedance reached 0.4 Ω and high energy (>2 MeV) bremsstrahlung radiation together with high energy deuterons were produced. Maximum neutron energies of 33 MeV were observed by axial time-of-flight detectors. The observed neutron spectra could be explained by a suprathermal distribution of deuterons with a high energy tail f≤ft({{E}\\text{d}}\\right)\\propto E\\text{d}-(1.8+/- 0.2) . Neutron yields reached 3.6 × 1012 at a 2.7 MA current. A high neutron production efficiency of 6 × 107 neutrons per one joule of plasma energy resulted from the generation of high energy deuterons and from their magnetization inside plasmas.

  14. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  15. Magnetic and nematic phases in a Weyl type spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanjun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Yunbo

    2016-06-01

    We present a variational study of the spin-1 Bose gases in a harmonic trap with three-dimensional spin-orbit (SO) coupling of Weyl type. For weak SO coupling, we treat the single-particle ground states as the form of perturbational harmonic oscillator states in the lowest total angular momentum manifold with j = 1, m j = 1, 0, -1. When the two-body interaction is considered, we set the trail order parameter as the superposition of three degenerate single-particle ground-states and the weight coefficients are determined by minimizing the energy functional. Two ground state phases, namely the magnetic and the nematic phases, are identified depending on the spin-independent and the spin-dependent interactions. Unlike the non-SO-coupled spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate for which the phase boundary between the magnetic and the nematic phase lies exactly at zero spin-dependent interaction, the boundary is modified by the SO-coupling. We find the magnetic phase is featured with phase-separated density distributions, 3D skyrmion-like spin textures and competing magnetic and biaxial nematic orders, while the nematic phase is featured with miscible density distributions, zero magnetization and spatially modulated uniaxial nematic order. The emergence of higher spin order creates new opportunities for exploring spin-tensor-related physics in SO coupled superfluid.

  16. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Viswan, Anchu; Chou, Han; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito‑borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave‑excited inductively‑coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody‑integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV‑infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1‑4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody‑integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV.

  17. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology

    PubMed Central

    SAKUDO, AKIKAZU; VISWAN, ANCHU; CHOU, HAN; SASAKI, TADAHIRO; IKUTA, KAZUYOSHI; NAGATSU, MASAAKI

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave-excited inductively-coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody-integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV-infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1–4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody-integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV. PMID:27221214

  18. Analytic and numeric Green's functions for a two-dimensional electron gas in an orthogonal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cresti, Alessandro . E-mail: cresti@df.unipi.it; Grosso, Giuseppe . E-mail: grosso@df.unipi.it; Parravicini, Giuseppe Pastori . E-mail: pastori@fisicavolta.unipv.it

    2006-05-15

    We have derived closed analytic expressions for the Green's function of an electron in a two-dimensional electron gas threaded by a uniform perpendicular magnetic field, also in the presence of a uniform electric field and of a parabolic spatial confinement. A workable and powerful numerical procedure for the calculation of the Green's functions for a large infinitely extended quantum wire is considered exploiting a lattice model for the wire, the tight-binding representation for the corresponding matrix Green's function, and the Peierls phase factor in the Hamiltonian hopping matrix element to account for the magnetic field. The numerical evaluation of the Green's function has been performed by means of the decimation-renormalization method, and quite satisfactorily compared with the analytic results worked out in this paper. As an example of the versatility of the numerical and analytic tools here presented, the peculiar semilocal character of the magnetic Green's function is studied in detail because of its basic importance in determining magneto-transport properties in mesoscopic systems.

  19. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Viswan, Anchu; Chou, Han; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito‑borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave‑excited inductively‑coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody‑integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV‑infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1‑4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody‑integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV. PMID:27221214

  20. Examples of occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields at 110-kV gas-insulated substations (GISs).

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to present examples of occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields at gas-insulated substations (GISs) and to analyse the exposure according to the new European Directive 2013/35/EU. The aim was also to describe the details of the measurements of this study at GISs. Electric and magnetic fields were measured (45 measurements in total) at two GISs in the Tampere region of Finland. Inside the GISs, magnetic field values varied from 0.4 to 43.0 µT, and electric fields from 5 to 90 V m(-1). In the cable room of GIS B, the maximum value was 250 µT (very near the cables). The values did not exceed the low or high action levels of the new Directive 2013/35/EU. In conclusion, it can be stated that at 110-kV GISs, workers are not exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) higher than the new European Directive 2013/35/EU. PMID:24966339

  1. Nanosized cation-deficient Fe-Ti spinel: a novel magnetic sorbent for elemental mercury capture from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shijian; Guo, Yongfu; Yan, Naiqiang; Wu, Daqing; He, Hongping; Qu, Zan; Yang, Chen; Zhou, Qin; Jia, Jinping

    2011-02-01

    Nonstoichiometric Fe-Ti spinel (Fe(3-x)Ti(x))(1-δ)O(4) has a large amount of cation vacancies on the surface, which may provide active sites for pollutant adsorption. Meanwhile, its magnetic property makes it separable from the complex multiphase system for recycling, and for safe disposal of the adsorbed toxin. Therefore, (Fe(3-x)Ti(x))(1-δ)O(4) may be a promising sorbent in environmental applications. Herein, (Fe(3-x)Ti(x))(1-δ)O(4) is used as a magnetically separable sorbent for elemental mercury capture from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. (Fe(2)Ti)(0.8)O(4) shows a moderate capacity (about 1.0 mg g(-1) at 250 °C) for elemental mercury capture in the presence of 1000 ppmv of SO(2). Meanwhile, the sorbent can be readily separated from the fly ash using magnetic separation, leaving the fly ash essentially free of sorbent and adsorbed mercury. PMID:21250644

  2. Gas magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of a precessional rate of a gas, such as an alkali gas, in a magnetic field is made by promoting a non-uniform precession of the gas in which substantially no net magnetic field affects the gas during a majority of the precession cycle. This allows sensitive gases that would be subject to spin-exchange collision de-phasing to be effectively used for extremely sensitive measurements in the presence of an environmental magnetic field such as the Earth's magnetic field.

  3. A two-frequency gas laser in mutually orthogonal transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudelev, V. G.; Izmailov, A. Ch.; Iasinskii, V. M.

    1988-02-01

    The characteristics of the radiation from a two-frequency helium-neon laser during the superposition of mutually orthogonal transverse magnetic fields on the active medium are investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that dichroism and birefringence of the active medium are minimized at equal magnetic strengths. As a result, stable two-frequency laser operation is realized with nearly equal wave intensities and a sufficiently low beat frequency which is stable with respect to variations in the resonator length, pump intensity, and magnetic field induction. The influence of the amplitude and phase anisotropy of the resonator, magnetoplasma effects, isotopic composition, and pressure of the working mixture on the energy and frequency characteristics of the laser is analyzed.

  4. Competition between Abelian and Zeeman magnetic field effects in a two dimensional ultracold gas of fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Cichy, Agnieszka; Polak, Tomasz P.

    2015-03-15

    The ground state of ultracold fermions in the presence of effects of orbital and Zeeman magnetic fields is analyzed. Five different states are found: unpolarized superconducting state, partially and fully polarized normal states and phase separated regions, partially or fully polarized. The system, in the presence of orbital synthetic magnetic field effects, shows non-monotonous changes of the phase boundaries when electron concentration is varied. We observe not only reentrant phenomena, but also density dependent oscillations of different areas of the phase diagram. Moreover the chemical potential shows oscillatory behavior and discontinuities with respect to changes in the number of fermions.

  5. Estimates of Oil and Gas Potential of Source Rock by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbottom, T. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Boling, K. S.; Dworkin, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen is defined as the insoluble fraction of organic matter preserved in sediments. Due to its structural complexity, kerogen is poorly understood, yet it holds vast economic importance as petroleum source rock, and represents the largest organic carbon pool on earth. Kerogen originates from a mixture of organic biomolecules and tends to be dominated by the polymeric components of cell walls and cellular membranes, which undergo interactions with sedimentary minerals at elevated temperature and pressure upon burial. Due to the importance of burial diagenesis to petroleum formation, much of our knowledge of chemical properties of kerogens is related to diagenetic and catagenetic effects. The more common geochemical evaluations of the oil and gas potentials of source rock are based upon proximate analyses such as hydrogen and oxygen indices and thermal stability indices, such as those provided by Fisher assay and Rock Eval®. However, proximate analyses provide limited information regarding the chemical structure of kerogens, and therefore provide little insight to the processes of kerogen formation. NMR spectra of kerogen have been previously shown to be useful in estimating oil and gas potential, and the proposed study seeks to refine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool in kerogen characterization, specifically for the purpose of oil and gas potential calculations.

  6. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging of liquid and gas two-phase flow in packed beds.

    PubMed

    Sankey, M H; Holland, D J; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F

    2009-02-01

    Single-phase liquid flow in porous media such as bead packs and model fixed bed reactors has been well studied by MRI. To some extent this early work represents the necessary preliminary research to address the more challenging problem of two-phase flow of gas and liquid within these systems. In this paper, we present images of both the gas and liquid velocities during stable liquid-gas flow of water and SF(6) within a packing of 5mm spheres contained within columns of diameter 40 and 27 mm; images being acquired using (1)H and (19)F observation for the water and SF(6), respectively. Liquid and gas flow rates calculated from the velocity images are in agreement with macroscopic flow rate measurements to within 7% and 5%, respectively. In addition to the information obtained directly from these images, the ability to measure liquid and gas flow fields within the same sample environment will enable us to explore the validity of assumptions used in numerical modelling of two-phase flows. PMID:19059796

  7. Application of gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry for target and non-target analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cervera, M I; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Beltrán, J; Hernández, F

    2012-06-29

    In this work, the capability of gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) for quantitative analysis of pesticide residues has been evaluated. A multiclass method for rapid screening of pesticides (insecticides, acaricides, herbicides and fungicides) in fruit and vegetable matrices has been developed and validated, including detection, identification and quantification of the analytes. To this aim, several food matrices were selected: high water content (apples, tomatoes and carrots), high acid content (oranges) and high oil content (olives) samples. The well known QuEChERS procedure was applied for extraction of pesticides, and matrix-matched calibration using relative responses versus internal standard was used for quantification. The sample extracts were analyzed by GC-TOF MS. Up to five ions using narrow window (0.02 Da)-extracted ion chromatograms at the expected retention time were monitored using a target processing method. The most abundant ion was used for quantification while the remaining ones were used for confirmation of the analyte identity. Method validation was carried out for 55 analytes in the five sample matrices tested at three concentrations (0.01, 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg). Most recoveries were between 70% and 120% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 20% at 0.05 and 0.5mg/kg. At 0.01 mg/kg, roughly half of the pesticides could be satisfactorily validated due to sensitivity limitations of GC-TOF MS, which probably affected the ion ratios used for confirmation of identity. In the case of olive samples, results were not satisfactory due to the high complexity of the matrix. An advantage of TOF MS is the possibility to perform a non-target investigation in the samples by application of a deconvolution software, without any additional injection being required. Accurate-mass full-spectrum acquisition in TOF MS provides useful information for analytes identification, and has made feasible in this work the

  8. Reservoir Approach to Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, W.; Raymond, A.; Kubisa, M.

    We consider works which treat two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in quantum wells (QWs, mostly in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures) in the presence of quantizing magnetic fields as open systems in contact with outside reservoirs. If a reservoir is sufficiently large, it pins the Fermi level to a certain energy. As a result, in a varying external magnetic field the thermodynamic equilibrium will force oscillations of the electron density in and out of the QW. This leads to a number of physical phenomena in magneto-transport, interband and intraband magneto-optics, magnetization, magneto-plasma dispersion, etc. In particular, as first proposed by Baraff and Tsui, the density oscillations in and out of QW lead to plateaus in the integer Quantum Hall Effect at values observed in experiments. The gathered evidence, especially from magneto-optical investigations, allows one to conclude that, indeed, in most GaAs/GaAlAs hetrostructures one deals with open systems in which the electron density in QWs oscillates as the magnetic field varies. Relation of the density oscillations to other factors, such as electron localization, and their combined influence on the quantum transport in 2DEGs, is discussed. In particular, a validity of the classical formula for the Hall resistivity ρxy = B/Nec is considered. It is concluded that the density oscillations are not sufficient to be regarded as the only source of plateaus in the Quantum Hall Effect. Still, the general conclusion is that the reservoir approach should be included in various descriptions of 2DEGs in the presence of a magnetic field.

  9. Comments on 'The magnetic field of Mars - Implications from gas dynamic modeling' by C. T. Russell, J. C. Luhmann, J. R. Spreiter, and S. S. Stahara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolginov, Sh. SH.

    1986-01-01

    The Russell et al. (1984) claim that gas dynamic modeling allows a determination of interplanetary and magnetosheath field configurations resembling the Mars 3 magnetic field observations during the January 21, 1972 encounter, and their proposal of a draped magnetic field pattern model for these data, are presently disputed. Extensive use is made of Martian magnetic field analyses undertaken by Dolginov between 1973 and 1984, which are held to prove the existence of an intrinsic Martian magnetic field. Russell replies that the Russell et al. analysis of the variation in the Mars 2, 3, and 5 data suggests the presence of both zero-level and sensor polarity errors in these data. The rejection of an intrinsic Martian magnetic field is accordingly reaffirmed, pending the availability of less ambiguous data.

  10. Giant capacitance of a plane capacitor with a two-dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Brian; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2013-01-01

    If a clean two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with a low concentration n comprises one electrode of a plane capacitor, the resulting capacitance C can be higher than the “geometric capacitance” Cg determined by the physical separation d between electrodes. A recent paper [B. Skinner and B. I. Shklovskii, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.82.155111 82, 155111 (2010)] argued that when the effective Bohr radius aB of the 2DEG satisfies aB≪d, one can achieve C≫Cg at a low concentration nd2≪1. Here we show that even for devices with aB>d, including graphene, for which aB is effectively infinite, one also arrives at C≫Cg at low electron concentrations if there is a strong perpendicular magnetic field.

  11. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, A.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, C.; Urban, W.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  12. Magnetic-field-dependent plasma composition of a pulsed aluminum arc in an oxygen ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jochen M.; Anders, André; Yushkov, George Yu.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of plasma-based deposition techniques utilize magnetic fields to affect the degree of ionization as well as for focusing and guiding of plasma beams. Here we use time-of-flight charge-to-mass spectrometry to describe the effect of a magnetic field on the plasma composition of a pulsed Al plasma stream in an ambient containing intentionally introduced oxygen as well as for high vacuum conditions typical residual gas. The plasma composition evolution was found to be strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength and can be understood by invoking two electron impact ionization routes: ionization of the intentionally introduced gas as well as ionization of the residual gas. These results are characteristic of plasma-based techniques where magnetic fields are employed in a high-vacuum ambient. In effect, the impurity incorporation during reactive thin-film growth pertains to the present findings.

  13. Linear waves in a slowly rotating, compressible and perfectly conducting gas embedded in magnetic and gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Yin, Chun-lin

    1980-12-01

    We discuss the dispersion relation of local linear waves in a compressible and perfectly conducting gas possessing magnetic and gravitational fields in a slowly rotating frame of reference. Instead of the full energy equation and a gas law, a not necessarily adiabatic equation of state p= p( ϱ) is used to close the system of equations, — an arguably flexible way of treatment when we are not clear about the contributions by radiation and conductivity to the energy transport. We give a general dimensionless dispersion relation, (8). This reduces to (9) if the magnetic field B is zero; to (10) if, further, rotation φ is zero; to the relation for accoustic waves (11), if further the gravitational field G is zero. When B is not zero, we consider various cases with the propagation vector K always perpendicular to B: the relation now reduces to (13) if K is not perpendicular to φ; to (14) if, further, K is parallel to G; to (15) if φ=0; to the relation for last magneto-accoustic waves (16) if G=0. It reduces to (17) if K is perpendicular to G; to the fast magneto-accoustic waves (18), if, further, φ=0. It reduces to (19) if K is perpendicular to φ and to (20), if, further, K is parallel to G. Our study shows that, in general, there are no pure modes, only hybrids. In particular, a rotation gives rise to modes that are dependent on the latitude, which we call "physico-geometrical" waves. The present study is preliminary, and we may expect even more interesting results when we take into consideration the energy equation and the effects of radiation.

  14. Analysis of organo-chlorine pesticides residue in raw coffee with a modified "quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe" extraction/clean up procedure for reducing the impact of caffeine on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Bruno; Piol, Maria; Fabbro, Denis; Mancini, Maria Antonietta; Casetta, Bruno; Del Bianco, Clorinda

    2015-01-01

    The control of pesticide residues on raw coffee is a task of great importance due to high consumption of this beverage in Italy and in many other countries. High caffeine content can hamper extraction and measurement of any pesticide residue. A tandem extraction protocol has been devised by exploiting the quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe (QuEChERS) scheme for extraction, coupled to a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) in order to drastically reduce caffeine content in the final extract. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been used for quantification of organo-chlorine pesticides in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method has been validated and performances meet the criteria prescribed by European Union regulations. PMID:25537171

  15. A Systematic Investigation on CrCun Clusters with n = 9-16: Noble Gas and Tunable Magnetic Property.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Tan; Cuong, Ngo Tuan; Tam, Nguyen Minh; Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-09-22

    A systematic investigation on structure, dissociation behavior, chemical bonding, and magnetic property of Cr-doped Cun clusters (n = 9-16) is carried out using the mean of density functional theory calculations. It is found that CrCu12 is a crucial size, preferring an icosahedral Cu12 cage with the central Cr dopant. Smaller cluster sizes appear as on the way to form the CrCu12 icosahedron while larger ones are produced by attaching additional Cu atoms to the CrCu12 core. The presence of Cr dopant obviously enhances the stability of CrCun clusters in comparison to that of pure counterparts. Exceptionally stable CrCu12 has an 18-electron closed-shell electronic structure, mimicking a noble gas in the viewpoint of superatom concept. Analysis on cluster electronic structure shows that the interplay between 3d orbitals of Cr and 4s orbitals of Cu has a vital role on the magnetic properties of CrCun clusters. PMID:27556591

  16. Magnetic solid phase extraction and static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; Wang, Lijia; NguyenVan, Manh; Cai, Qingyun

    2016-01-15

    A magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) protocol combining a static headspace gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for extraction, and determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in drinking water samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and modified by cholesterol chloroformate. Transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the cholesterol-functionalized sorbents, and the main parameters affecting the extraction as well as HS sampling, such as sorbent amount, extraction time, oven temperature and equilibration time have been investigated and established. Combination with HS sampling, the MSPE procedure was simple, fast and environmentally friendly, without need of any organic solvent. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels obtaining the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging from 0.20 to 7.8 ng/L. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs ≤ 9.9%). The proposed method was successfully applied to drinking water samples.

  17. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  18. Magnetic excitations and spin-gap phenomenon in the BCS-BEC crossover regime of an ultracold Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Hiroyuki; Kashimura, Takashi; Hanai, Ryo; Watanabe, Ryota; Ohashi, Yoji

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the uniform spin susceptibility χ and strong-coupling corrections in the BCS-BEC crossover regime of an ultracold Fermi gas. Within the framework of an extended T-matrix theory,[2] we show that χ exhibits non-monotonic temperature dependence in the normal state, and is suppressed near the superfluid phase transition temperature Tc. This spin-gap phenomenon is found to be deeply related to the pseudogap phenomenon appearing in the single-particle density of states. To characterize this magnetic phenomenon, we introduce the spin-gap temperature Ts as the temperature at which χ takes a maximum value. Determining Ts in the entire BCS-BEC crossover region, we identify the spin-gap regime in the phase diagram of a Fermi gas with respect to the temperature and the strength of a pairing interaction. Since the spin-gap is crucial key phenomenon in high-Tc cuprates, our results would be useful for the study of this many-body phenomenon using ultracold Fermi gases, as well as in observing the pseudogap phenomenon through the spin-gap phenomenon. H. T. was supported by the Research Grant of Keio Leading-edge Laboratory of Science & Technology.

  19. Impact of the Application Technique on Nitrogen Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Budgets in Case of Energy Maize Fertilized with Biogas Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Monique; Fränzke, Manuel; Schuster, Carola; Kreuter, Thomas; Augustin, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Despite an increasing cultivation of energy maize fertilized with ammonia-rich biogas residues (BR), little is known about the impact of the application technique on gaseous nitrogen (N) losses as well as N budgets, indicative of N use efficiency. To contribute to closing this knowledge gap we conducted a field experiment supplemented by a laboratory incubation study. The field experiment was carried out in Dedelow, located in the Northeastern German Lowlands and characterized by well-drained loamy sand (haplic luvisol). Two treatments with different application technique for BR fertilization - i) trail hoses and ii) injection - were compared to an unfertilized control (0% N). Seventy percent of the applied N-BR was assumed to be plant-available. In 2013, biweekly nitrous oxide (N2O) measurements were conducted during the time period between BR application and maize harvest (18.04.-11.09.2013; 147 days) using non-flow-through non-steady-state chamber measurements. To quantify soil Nmin status, soil samples were taken from 0-30 cm soil depth in the spring (before fertilization) and autumn (after maize harvest). Immediately after BR application, ammonia (NH3) volatilization was measured intensively using the open dynamic chamber Dräger-Tube method. Export of N due to harvest was determined via plant N content (Nharvest). Based on the measured N gas fluxes, N soil and plant parameters, soil N budgets were calculated using a simple difference approach. Values of N output (Nharvest, NN2O_cum and NNH3_cum) are subtracted from N input values (Nfertilizer and Nmin_autumnminus Nmin_spring). In order to correctly interpret N budgets, other N fluxes must be integrated into the budget calculation. Apart from soil-based mobilization and immobilization turnover processes and nitrate leaching, this applies specifically to N2 losses due to denitrification. Therefore, we measured the N2 emissions from laboratory-incubated undisturbed soil cores (250 cm3) by means of the helium

  20. A multi-residue method for pesticides analysis in green coffee beans using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, Andre; Dickow Cardoso, Carmem; Reichert, Bárbara; de Kroon, Marijke; Wind, Wouter; Weber Righi, Laís; Caiel da Silva, Rosselei

    2012-08-17

    In this study, a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using the very selective negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode, was developed and applied in combination with a modified acetonitrile-based extraction method (QuEChERS) for the analysis of a large number of pesticide residues (51 pesticides, including isomers and degradation products) in green coffee beans. A previously developed integrated sample homogenization and extraction method for both pesticides and mycotoxins analysis was used. An homogeneous slurry of green milled coffee beans and water (ratio 1:4, w/w) was prepared and extracted with acetonitrile/acetic acid (1%), followed by magnesium sulfate addition for phase separation. Aliquots from this extract could be used directly for LC-MS/MS analysis of mycotoxins and LC-amenable pesticides. For GC-MS analysis, a further clean-up was necessary. C18- and PSA-bonded silica were tested as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents, separate and as a mixture, and the best results were obtained using C18-bonded silica. For the optimal sensitivity and selectivity, GC-MS detection in the NCI-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode had to be used to allow the fast analysis of the difficult coffee bean matrix. The validation was performed by analyzing recovery samples at three different spike concentrations, 10, 20 and 50 μg kg(-1), with 6 replicates (n=6) at each concentration. Linearity (r(2)) of calibration curves, estimated instrument and method limits of detection and limits of quantification (LOD(i), LOD(m), LOQ(i) and LOQ(m), respectively), accuracy (as recovery %), precision (as RSD%) and matrix effects (%) were determined for each individual pesticide. From the 51 analytes (42 parent pesticides, 4 isomers and 5 degradation products) determined by GC-MS (NCI-SIM), approximately 76% showed average recoveries between 70-120% and 75% and RSD ≤ 20% at the lowest spike concentration of 10 μg kg(-1), the target method LOQ. For the

  1. Pesticide residue analysis in foodstuffs applying capillary gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. State-of-the-art use of modified DFG-multimethod S19 and automated data evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stan, H J

    2000-09-15

    This paper focuses on recent developments in the author's laboratory and reports on the "ultimate" analysis scheme which has evolved over the last 20 years in our laboratory. This demonstrates the feasibility of screening analyses for pesticide residue identification, mainly by full scan GC-MS, down to the 0.01 ppm concentration level in plant foodstuffs. It is based on a miniaturized DFG S19 extraction applying acetone for extraction followed by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate-cyclohexane followed by gel permeation chromatography. The final chromatographic determination is carried out with a battery of three parallel operating gas chromatographic systems using effluent splitting to electron-capture and nitrogen-phosphorus detection, one with a SE-54 the other with a OV-17 capillary column and the third one with a SE-54 capillary column and mass selective detection for identification and quantitation. The method is established for monitoring more than 400 pesticides amenable to gas chromatography. These pesticide residues are identified in screening analyses by means of the dedicated mass spectral library PEST.L containing reference mass spectra and retention times of more than 400 active ingredients and also metabolites applying the macro program AuPest (Automated residue analysis on Pesticides) for automated evaluation which runs with Windows based HP ChemStation software. The two gas chromatographic systems with effluent splitting to electron-capture and nitrogen-phosphorus detection are used to check the results obtained with the automated GC-MS screening and also to detect those few pesticides which exhibit better response to electron-capture and nitrogen-phosphorus detection than to mass spectrometry in full scan.

  2. JET divertor diagnostic upgrade for neutral gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Kruezi, Uron; Sergienko, G; Morgan, P D; Matthews, G F; Brezinsek, S; Vartanian, S

    2012-10-01

    With installation of the ITER-like wall in JET a major diagnostic upgrade to measure the neutral gas pressure and composition in the sub-divertor region has been completed, to characterise retention and outgassing of the new metallic first wall. The upgrade includes two new magnetically shielded systems consisting of sensitive capacitance manometers and residual gas analysers, both capable of providing data during plasma operation. These enable absolute pressure and gas composition measurements (pressure range: 10(-5)-10(-1) mbar, mass range: 1-200 amu, respectively) and have been used to characterise the neutral gas behaviour under various plasma conditions.

  3. Prediction of magnetic orientation in driver gas associated -Bz events. [in interplanetary medium observed at earth when solar source is identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, Xuepu

    1992-01-01

    The source regions of five strong -Bz events detected at 1 AU for which solar sources were identified by Tang et al. (1989) and Tsurutani et al. (1992) are investigated in order to determine whether the magnetic orientation of driver gas in the interplanetary medium observed at the earth can be predicted when its solar source is identified. Three -Bz events were traced to flare-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), one to an eruptive prominence associated CME, and one to three possible solar sources. The computed magnetic orientations at the candidate 'release height' (the height where the front of a CME ceases to accelerate) above the flare sites associated with CMEs show the existence of the expected southward field component. It is concluded that the magnetic orientation in flare-associated CME generated driver gas may be predictable.

  4. Filtrates and Residues: Measuring the Atomic or Molecular Mass of a Gas with a Tire Gauge and a Butane Lighter Fluid Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.; Magginnis, Lenard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the use of an inexpensive apparatus (based on a butane lighter fluid can and a standard tire pressure gauge) in measuring the atomic/molecular mass of an unknown gas and in demonstrating the mass of air or the dependence of pressure on the mass of a gas. (JN)

  5. Gas fueling with an axisymmetric magnetic divertor in the Tara tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Brau, K.; Horne, S.; Casey, J.; Golovato, S.; Sevillano, E.; Shuy, G.; Smith, D.K.

    1987-07-01

    An axisymmetric divertor has been installed at the central cell midplane of Tara to provide magnetohydrodynamics stability and to generate a high-density halo at the edge of the plasma. A dense halo aids sloshing ion buildup in the plug cells and increases shielding of the core plasma from charge exchange recombination. Separate gas fueling of the halo in the divertor allows for the different fueling requirements of the potential-confined core plasma and the flow-confined edge during plugged operation.

  6. Solid phase extraction using magnetic core mesoporous shell microspheres with C18-modified interior pore-walls for residue analysis of cephalosporins in milk by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodan; Yu, Yingjia; Zhao, Meiyan; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Yan; Duan, Gengli

    2014-05-01

    A fast and effective extraction method has been developed for measuring the residue of cephalosporins (cefalexin, cefazolin, cefoperazone) in milk by using magnetic core-mesoporous shell microspheres with C18-functionalized interior pore-walls (C18-Fe3O4@mSiO2) as adsorbent. With no need for any protein precipitation procedure, the cephalosporins were directly adsorbed onto the C18-Fe3O4@mSiO2 microspheres through hydrophobic interaction with C18-groups (Octadecyl functional groups) functionalized in the interior walls of mesopore channels while the abundant proteins in milk sample were excluded out of the channel due to the size exclusion effect. Thereafter, the cephalosporins-absorbed C18-Fe3O4@mSiO2 microspheres were rapidly isolated by placing a magnet, and followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis after eluted by methanol. Various parameters which could affect the extraction performance were optimised. The newly developed extraction method was successfully applied in determination of cephalosporin residues in milk samples, offering a valuable alternative to simplify and speed up the sample preparation step.

  7. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of nonpolar organochlorine pesticide residues in a crude vegetable oil and its refinery by-products.

    PubMed

    Young, S J; Kamps, L R

    1982-07-01

    A crude soybean oil, several of its refinery by-products (described as soapstock, deodorizer distillate, and clabber stock), and the completely refined oil were analyzed for pesticide residues. Fourteen organo-chlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites were found in the deodorizer distillate; 5 of these were also found in the clabber stock. Levels in these by-products ranged from 0.3 to 8 ppm. Only endrin and dieldrin were detected in the crude oil at levels of 0.01 and 0.05 ppm, respectively. Forty to 150 times these levels were found in the deodorizer distillate and clabber stock. Pesticide residues were not detected in the refined oil or in the soapstock at limits of detection for dieldrin of about 0.01 and 0.1 ppm, respectively. The method used by the Food and Drug Administration to analyze fats and oils for multiple organohalogen pesticide residues was inadequate for the extraction of pesticide residues from vegetable oil refinery by-products. The method used to analyze the crude vegetable oil and the refinery by-products involved dissolution of the oil samples in ethyl acetate-toluene, filtration if necessary, cleanup by gel permeation chromatography, and then Florisil column chromatography. The oil was isolated from aqueous-oil mixtures by extraction with hexane before analysis. The crude soybean oil was fortified with 12 organohalogen pesticides and Aroclor 1254 at levels of 0.5-3.7 ppm. Recoveries ranged from 83 to 102%. PMID:6889594

  8. Interplanetary gas. XXV - A solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field interpretation of cometary light outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, M. B., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Possible relationships of cometary brightness outbursts with the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field are examined. Two types of outburst are distinguished: those which involve a significant brightening of both the head and the tail in a comet with a conspicuous plasma tail (Class I), and those involving the brightening of the central condensation of a previously faint comet with no detectable plasma tail (Class II). Class I bursts, as exemplified by Comet Morehouse 1908c, are attributed to the generation in the head of enhanced amounts of ions and their injection into the tail shortly before it disconnects, with ionization provided by sector boundary crossings. Class II events, as exhibited by Comet P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak 1973b, are interpreted as the result of the bombardment of the nucleus by disturbed solar wind near corotated high-speed streams and sector boundaries, leading to highly exothermic chemical reactions.

  9. Photoconductivity in AC-driven modulated two-dimensional electron gas in a perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Manuel; Kunold, Alejandro

    2006-04-01

    In this work we study the microwave photoconductivity of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the presence of a magnetic field and a two-dimensional modulation (2D). The model includes the microwave and Landau contributions in a non-perturbative exact way; the periodic potential is treated perturbatively. The Landau-Floquet states provide a convenient base with respect to which the lattice potential becomes time dependent, inducing transitions between the Landau-Floquet levels. Based on this formalism, we provide a Kubo-like formula that takes into account the oscillatory Floquet structure of the problem. The total longitudinal conductivity and resistivity exhibit strong oscillations, determined by epsi = ω/ωc, with ω the radiation frequency and ωc the cyclotron frequency. The oscillations follow a pattern with minima centred at \\omega /\\omega_{\\mathrm {c}}=j+\\frac {1}{2} (l-1)+\\delta , and maxima centred at \\omega /\\omega_{\\mathrm {c}}=j+\\frac {1}{2} (l-1)-\\delta , where j = 1,2,3..., δ~1/5 is a constant shift and l is the dominant multipole contribution. Negative resistance states (NRSs) develop as the electron mobility and the intensity of the microwave power are increased. These NRSs appear in a narrow window region of values of the lattice parameter (a), around a~lB, where lB is the magnetic length. It is proposed that these phenomena may be observed in artificially fabricated arrays of periodic scatterers at the interface of ultraclean GaAs /AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures.

  10. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of /sup 3/He gas. I. Pure /sup 3/He

    SciTech Connect

    Lusher, C.P.; Secca, M.F.; Richards, M.G.

    1988-07-01

    Longitudinal relaxation times T/sub 1/ have been measured in /sup 3/He gas, using pulsed NMR, for number densities between 3 /times/ 10/sup 23/ and 6 /times/ 10/sup 25/ spins m/sup /minus/3/ and temperatures between 0.6 and 15 K. Relaxation takes place on or near the walls of the Pyrex sample cells and measurements of T/sub 1/ give information about the surface phases. A cryogenic wall coating of solid molecular hydrogen was found to delay the formation of a /sup 3/He monolayer on cooling, and T/sub 1/ measurements were consistent with a binding energy of approx. 13 K for a /sup 3/He atom to a hydrogen surface. At temperatures below approx. 2 K a completed /sup 3/He monolayer forms on the H/sub 2/ coating. No variation of the areal density of monolayer completion with bulk number density at fixed temperature could be observed and the completed /sup 3/He monolayer is thought to be a dense fluid. Baking the Pyrex sample cells under vacuum and using an rf discharge in /sup 3/He gas to clean the walls before sealing in the sample gas were found to increase the observed T/sub 1/'s by up to three orders of magnitude. Once a /sup 3/He monolayer has formed on the H/sub 2/ surface in these cleaned, sealed cells, the dipolar interaction between adsorbed spins is thought to be the dominant source of longitudinal relaxation. The data are consistent with a dipolar relaxation model with a correlation time of approx. 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/9/ sec. This time is long compared to the value of 10/sup /minus/11/ or 10/sup /minus/12/ sec in the 3D fluid. This suggests that if the surface phase is a 2D fluid and the dipolar mechanism is indeed the dominant one, then the atoms in the 2D fluid are less mobile than in three dimensions. This is consistent with recent susceptibility measurements.

  11. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for the determination of β-agonist residues in milk by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Lin, Xin; Lin, Tao; Zhang, Yulong; Luo, Yinglan; Li, Qiwan

    2016-09-01

    A simple, accurate, and highly sensitive analytical method was developed in this study for the determination of nine β-agonists in milk. In this method, a new magnetic adsorbent of molecularly imprinted polymers/magnetic nanoparticles prepared by simple physical blending was adopted, which enabled magnetic solid-phase extraction. Thus, the resultant material can be separated from the solvent rapidly and conveniently by a magnet. Two kinds of molecularly imprinted polymer/magnetic nanoparticles materials were fabricated, and the characteristics of materials such as the ratio, pH, amount, desorption, and regeneration were investigated. The analytes were quantified by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer operating in multiple reaction monitoring modes. The detection limit of the method was 0.003-0.3 μg/L, and the detection capability was 0.01-0.3 μg/L. The recoveries of these compounds were 65.7-114% at three spiked levels. Reproducibility represented by relative standard deviation was 11.2% or less. The method was successfully applied to the screening of real samples obtained from local markets and confirmation of the suspected target analytes.

  12. Glioma residual or recurrence versus radiation necrosis: accuracy of pentavalent technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc-99m (V) DMSA] brain SPECT compared to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS): initial results.

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Moustafa, Hosna; Ahmed, Ebaa; El-Toukhy, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    We compared pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-99m (V) DMSA) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) for the detection of residual or recurrent gliomas after surgery and radiotherapy. A total of 24 glioma patients, previously operated upon and treated with radiotherapy, were studied. SPECT was acquired 2-3 h post-administration of 555-740 MBq of Tc-99m (V) DMSA. Lesion to normal (L/N) delayed uptake ratio was calculated as: mean counts of tumor ROI (L)/mean counts of normal mirror symmetric ROI (N). (1)H-MRS was performed using a 1.5-T scanner equipped with a spectroscopy package. SPECT and (1)H-MRS results were compared with pathology or follow-up neuroimaging studies. SPECT and (1)H-MRS showed concordant residue or recurrence in 9/24 (37.5%) patients. Both were true negative in 6/24 (25%) patients. SPECT and (1)H-MRS disagreed in 9 recurrences [7/9 (77.8%) and 2/9 (22.2%) were true positive by SPECT and (1)H-MRS, respectively]. Sensitivity of SPECT and (1)H-MRS in detecting recurrence was 88.8 and 61.1% with accuracies of 91.6 and 70.8%, respectively. A positive association between the delayed L/N ratio and tumor grade was found; the higher the grade, the higher is the L/N ratio (r = 0.62, P = 0.001). Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT is more accurate compared to (1)H-MRS for the detection of tumor residual tissues or recurrence in glioma patients with previous radiotherapy. It allows early and non-invasive differentiation of residual tumor or recurrence from irradiation necrosis.

  13. Unexpected stimulation of soil methane uptake by bio-based residue application: An emerging property of agricultural soils offsetting greenhouse gas balance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Adrian; Reim, Andreas; Ruijs, Rienke; Meima-Franke, Marion; Termorshuizen, Aad; de Boer, Wietse; Putten, Wim H. vd.; Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2016-04-01

    Intensification of agriculture to meet the global food, feed, and bioenergy demand entail increasing re-investment of carbon compounds (residues) into agro-systems to prevent decline of soil quality and fertility. However, agricultural intensification decreases soil methane uptake, reducing and even causing the loss of the methane sink function. In contrast to wetland agricultural soils (rice paddies), the methanotrophic potential in well-aerated agricultural soils have received little attention, presumably due to the anticipated low or negligible methane uptake capacity in these soils. Consequently, a detailed study verifying or refuting this assumption is still lacking. Exemplifying a typical agricultural practice, we determined the impact of bio-based residue application on soil methane flux, and determined the methanotrophic potential, including a qualitative (diagnostic microarray) and quantitative (group-specific qPCR assays) analysis of the methanotrophic community after residue amendments over two months. Unexpectedly, after amendments with specific residues we detected a significant transient stimulation of methane uptake confirmed by both the methane flux measurements and methane oxidation assay. This stimulation was apparently a result of induced cell-specific activity, rather than growth of the methanotrophic population. Although transient, the heightened methane uptake offsets up to 16% of total gaseous CO2 emitted during the incubation. The methanotrophic community, predominantly comprised of Methylosinus spp. may facilitate methane oxidation in the agricultural soils. Studies are under way to identify the active methane-oxidizers at near atmospheric methane concentrations using PLFA-Stable isotope probing (SIP). While agricultural soils are generally regarded as a net methane source or a relatively weak methane sink, our results show that the methane oxidation rate can be stimulated, leading to higher soil methane uptake. Moreover, the addition of

  14. MEASUREMENT OF PYRETHROID RESIDUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FOOD SAMPLES BY ENHANCED SOLVENT EXTRACTION/SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract summarizes pyrethorid methods development research. It provides a summary of sample preparation and analytical techniques such as supercritical fluid extraction, enhance solvent extraction, gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

  15. Determination and maintenance of DE minimis risk for migration of residual tritium (3H) from the 1969 Project Rulison nuclear test to nearby hydraulically fractured natural gas wells.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Jeffrey I; Chapman, Jenny B

    2013-05-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was a proof-of-concept experiment that was conducted under the Plowshare Program in 1969 in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin in west-central Colorado. Today, commercial production of natural gas is possible from low permeability, natural gas bearing formations like that of the Williams Fork Formation using modern hydraulic fracturing techniques. With natural gas exploration and production active in the Project Rulison area, this human health risk assessment was performed in order to add a human health perspective for site stewardship. Tritium (H) is the radionuclide of concern with respect to potential induced migration from the test cavity leading to subsequent exposure during gas-flaring activities. This analysis assumes gas flaring would occur for up to 30 d and produce atmospheric H activity concentrations either as low as 2.2 × 10 Bq m (6 × 10 pCi m) from the minimum detectable activity concentration in produced water or as high as 20.7 Bq m (560 pCi m), which equals the highest atmospheric measurement reported during gas-flaring operations conducted at the time of Project Rulison. The lifetime morbidity (fatal and nonfatal) cancer risks calculated for adults (residents and workers) and children (residents) from inhalation and dermal exposures to such activity concentrations are all below 1 × 10 and considered de minimis. The implications for monitoring production water for conforming health-protective, risk-based action levels also are examined.

  16. Residue determination of plant activator benzo-1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carboxylic acid 2-benzoyloxyethyl ester in water, soil, and vegetable by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shuying, Li; Yihu, Wang; Qianqian, Sun; Wenjun, Gui; Guonian, Zhu

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a rapid, specific and sensitive method for the residue determination of benzo-1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carboxylic acid 2-benzoyloxyethyl ester in soil, vegetable, and water by using gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. During the extraction procedure, modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method using acetonitrile was compared with classical oscillating extraction using ethyl acetate and acetone, respectively. Before injection, a solid-phase extraction cartridge of Bond Elut Florisil was used for sample clean-up. The method was fully validated and showed satisfactory linearity (r(2) > 0.99) over the range to be assayed (10-1000 ng/mL), with the limits of detection ranging from 0.092-0.229 ng/mL and the limits of quantification ranging from 0.307-0.763 ng/mL. Recovery values at the spiked concentrations of 10, 100 and 1000 ng/g varied from 85.9-109.3%, 81.0-108.2%, 74.2-113.4% for water, soil and vegetable, respectively, with the maximum relative standard deviations of 12.2%. Results indicated that the established modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method coupled to gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was promising for the residue monitoring of benzo-1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carboxylic acid 2-benzoyloxyethyl ester in the environment and vegetable products.

  17. Gas chromatographic determination of residual methylene chloride and trichloroethylene in decaffeinated instant and ground coffee with electrolytic conductivity and electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1977-05-01

    A method is described for the quantitative determination of residual methylene chloride (MC) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in decaffeinated instant and ground roasted coffees. The residual solvents were isolated by a closed system vacuum distillation technique with toluene as a carrier solvent, chromatographed on Chromosorb 102, detected by both electron capture and electrolytic conductivity detectors, and quantitated by comparison with an internal standard. Average recoveries of MC from instant and ground coffees spiked at 1, 10, and 25 ppm were 100.0 (88-113), 93.2 (92-95), and 97.7% (94-102%); and for TCE, 97.2 (92-101), 96.2 (95-99), and 96.5% (92-100%), respectively. The results from both detectors are compared. At lower attenuations, levels less than 1 ppm can be readily measured. The procedure developed was applied to domestic and imported coffee samples. PMID:858707

  18. Aging process of I-cathode with magnetic ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei; Feng, Niangen; Havekes, Jos; Tong, Linsu; den Engelsen, Daniel

    2005-09-01

    An aging process, which applies a high frequency (HF) magnetic field on the electron gun during the aging process, is introduced to solve the unbalanced I-cathode emission slump. The effect is that the scanning electron beam and the HF magnetic field heat up the gun parts by electron bombarding and eddy current heating. In this way, the grids are effectively degassed. A part of the desorbed gases is pumped by the Ba-getter in the tube, whereas another part is ionized by electron collision. These ionized gas molecules, notably Ar +, are partially trapped in gun parts. Therefore, a lower residual gas pressure and emission slump can be achieved.

  19. Comparison of sample preparation methods combined with gas chromatography with electron-capture detection for the analysis of multipesticide residues in lotus seeds.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qing; Kong, Weijun; Yang, Shihai; Yang, Meihua

    2013-06-01

    Sample preparation is always the major bottleneck in analytical chemistry for the determination of pesticide residues. Different sample preparation methods have been proposed due to the wide variety of pesticides used and the inherent complexity of the matrices. In this study, different sample preparation methods including SPE, matrix solid-phase dispersion, the quick, easy, cheap, efficient, rugged, and safe method, and a one-step completion method were compared and evaluated for extracting pesticides from lotus seeds. Analysis was carried out using GC with electron-capture detection. The results showed that good recoveries for tested pesticides were obtained by using Florisil in the four methods, and the extraction efficiency of the one-step completion method was superior to the other three methods. The one-step completion method was confirmed to have good linearity, reproducibility, stability, and recovery for the detection of 36 pesticides in lotus seed samples. The data collected from this study are expected to prove useful in regulating the concentration of the residues in lotus seeds, as well as in protecting human health from the hazards posed by these residues.

  20. Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation in large-diameter gas puff Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Sze, H.; Failor, B. H.; Banister, J.; Levine, J. S.; Riordan, J. C.; Steen, P.; Sincerny, P.; Lojewski, D.

    2008-02-15

    Recently, a new approach for efficiently generating K-shell x-rays in large-diameter, long-implosion time, structured argon gas Z-pinches has been demonstrated based on a 'pusher-stabilizer-radiator' model. In this paper, direct observations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation of a 12-cm diameter, 200-ns implosion time argon Z-pinch using a laser shearing interferometer (LSI) and a laser wavefront analyzer (LWA) are presented. Using a zero-dimensional snowplow model, the imploding plasma trajectories are calculated with the driver current waveforms and the initial mass distributions measured using the planar laser induced fluorescence method. From the LSI and LWA images, the plasma density and trajectory during the implosion are measured. The measured trajectory agrees with the snowplow calculations. The suppression of hydromagnetic instabilities in the ''pusher-stabilizer-radiator'' structured loads, leading to a high-compression ratio, high-yield Z-pinch, is discussed. For comparison, the LSI and LWA images of an alternative load (without stabilizer) show the evolution of a highly unstable Z-pinch.

  1. Rejection of seamless pipe noise in magnetic flux leakage data obtained from gas pipeline inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Udpa, Satish; Udpa, Lalita; Lord, William

    2000-05-01

    Natural gas is traditionally transmitted from production facilities to customer locations through a vast pipeline network. A major segment of this network employs seamless pipes. This is especially true for smaller diameter transmission and distribution lines. Manufacturing process associated with the production of seamless pipes contribute to a helical variation in the pipe along the axis. The deformation introduces an artifact in the data obtained from MFL inspection of these pipelines. This seamless pipe noise is usually correlated with signals generated by defects and other elements (joints, tees, etc.) in pipelines, and can therefore, mask their indications in MFL data. This warrants the need for methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MFL data from seamless pipes. This paper presents a technique for detecting signals in MFL data from seamless pipes. The approach processes the data in various steps. First, a wavelet based denoising technique is applied to reduce the noise due to instrumentation and other sources. An adaptive filtering approach is then applied to reject seamless noise in the data. Since the inspection of pipelines typically generates vast amounts of data, it is imperative that the algorithm be computationally efficient. The processing method has to be robust in that it should be data independent. The approach described in this paper meet these criteria. Results from application of the approach to data from field tests are presented.

  2. Residue gasification tests at TVA

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, D.

    1984-11-01

    The Texaco gasification process was identified as an attractive way to utilise vacuum bottoms from the Exxon Donor Solvent liquefaction process to generate synthesis gas. This gas can then be upgraded to produce the hydrogen required by the EDS plant. Gasification tests were carried out at TVA's 200 t/day Muscle Shoals plant and are reported here. As a result, Texaco expects that a plant could be designed to handle EDS residue from any high-rank coal.

  3. Determination of pesticide residues in fish tissues by modified QuEChERS method and dual-d-SPE clean-up coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Cieslik, Ewa; Cieslik, Iwona; Walkowska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to modify the Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) method for the determination of organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides in fatty animal matrices such as fish muscle tissues of carp and sturgeon collected from Carp Valley, Lesser Poland. Pesticides extraction effectiveness was evaluated at 0.030 mg kg(-1) spiking level and efficiency of the dispersive-solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up step was evaluated by comparison testing two different d-SPE clean-up stages, first the addition of the d-SPE sorbent combination (PSA + SAX + NH2), and secondly the addition of C18 after extracts enrichment with the d-SPE sorbent combination (PSA + SAX + NH2), introducing a novel concept of clean-up named dual-d-SPE clean-up. Analysis of pesticide residues was performed by Gas Chromatography Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (GC/Q-MS) working in selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Linear relation was observed from 0 to 200 ng mL(-1) and determination coefficient R(2) > 0.997 in all instances for all target analytes. Better recoveries and cleanliness of extracts in both samples, carp and sturgeon tissues, were obtained after C18 addition during the dual-d-SPE clean-up step. Recoveries were in the range 70-120%, with relative standard deviation lower than 10% at 0.030 mg kg(-1) spiking level for most pesticides. LODs ranged 0.001-0.003 mg kg(-1), while LOQs ranged 0.004-0.009 mg kg(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied analyzing pesticide residues in real carp and sturgeon muscle samples; detectable pesticide residues were observed, but in all of the cases contamination level was lower than the default maximum residue levels (MRLs) set by the European Union (EU), Regulation (EC) N 396/2005.

  4. Quantitative prediction of gas-phase 15N and 31P nuclear magnetic shielding constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochnow, Eric; Auer, Alexander A.

    2010-02-01

    High-level ab initio benchmark calculations of the N15 and P31 NMR chemical shielding constants for a representative set of molecules are presented. The computations have been carried out at the Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (HF-SCF), density functional theory (DFT) (B-P86 and B3-LYP), second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD), and CCSD augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] level of theory using basis sets of triple zeta quality or better. The influence of the geometry, the treatment of electron correlation, as well as basis set and zero-point vibrational effects on the shielding constants are discussed and the results are compared to gas-phase experimental shifts. As for the first time a study using high-level post-HF methods is carried out for a second-row element, we also propose a family of basis sets suitable for the computation of P31 shielding constants. The mean deviations observed for N15 and P31 are 0.9 [CCSD(T)/13s9p4d3f] and -3.3 ppm [CCSD(T)/15s12p4d3f2g], respectively, when corrected for zero-point vibrational effects. Results obtained at the DFT level of theory are of comparable accuracy to MP2 for N15 and of comparable accuracy to HF-SCF for P31. However, they are not improved by inclusion of zero-point vibrational effects. The PN molecule is an especially interesting case with exceptionally large electron correlation effects on shielding constants beyond MP2 which, therefore, represents an excellent example for further benchmark studies.

  5. Ionic liquid coated magnetic nanoparticles for the gas chromatography/mass spectrometric determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in waters.

    PubMed

    Galán-Cano, Francisco; Alcudia-León, María del Carmen; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2013-07-26

    In this paper, ionic liquid coated magnetic nanoparticles (IL-MNPs) have been prepared by covalent immobilization. The as-synthesized MNPs have been successfully used as sorbent for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water samples, the analytes being finally determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The influence of several experimental variables (including the ionic strength, amount of MNPs, sample volume, agitation time and desorption solvent) has been considered in depth in the optimization process. The developed method, which has been analytically characterized under its optimal operation conditions, allows the detection of the analytes in the samples with method detection limits in the range from 0.04μgL(-1) (fluoranthene) to 1.11μgL(-1) (indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene). The repeatability of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD, n=7), varies between 4.0% (benzo[b]fluoranthene) and 8.9% (acenaphthene), while the enrichment factors are in the range from 49 (naphthalene) to 158 (fluoranthene). The proposed procedure has been applied for the determination of thirteen PAHs in water samples (tap, river, well and reservoir ones) with recoveries in the range from 75 to 102%.

  6. Ionic liquid coated magnetic nanoparticles for the gas chromatography/mass spectrometric determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in waters.

    PubMed

    Galán-Cano, Francisco; Alcudia-León, María del Carmen; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2013-07-26

    In this paper, ionic liquid coated magnetic nanoparticles (IL-MNPs) have been prepared by covalent immobilization. The as-synthesized MNPs have been successfully used as sorbent for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water samples, the analytes being finally determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The influence of several experimental variables (including the ionic strength, amount of MNPs, sample volume, agitation time and desorption solvent) has been considered in depth in the optimization process. The developed method, which has been analytically characterized under its optimal operation conditions, allows the detection of the analytes in the samples with method detection limits in the range from 0.04μgL(-1) (fluoranthene) to 1.11μgL(-1) (indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene). The repeatability of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD, n=7), varies between 4.0% (benzo[b]fluoranthene) and 8.9% (acenaphthene), while the enrichment factors are in the range from 49 (naphthalene) to 158 (fluoranthene). The proposed procedure has been applied for the determination of thirteen PAHs in water samples (tap, river, well and reservoir ones) with recoveries in the range from 75 to 102%. PMID:23601292

  7. Diagnostic Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Detecting Residual or Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radical Prostatectomy: A Pooled Analysis of 12 Individual Studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Meng, Nan; Chi, Da; Zhao, Yingjie; Wang, Zhekun; Luo, Yahong

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in patients with recurrent or residual prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy. Studies were systematically searched in the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, SCI, CBM, CNKI, VIP, Wan Fang, and other databases. Additional studies were manually searched using the references of the retrieved articles. The retrieved deadline was Sep. 6th, 2014. Selection of eligible studies for inclusion was based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the quality of the studies was reviewed based on the QUADAS criteria. The Meta Disc 1.4 and Stata 12.1 software were used for meta-analysis, and a summary receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed. The patient-based pooled weighted estimates of the sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and 95 % confidence interval were calculated. Seven articles (12 studies) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of the sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the curve were 0.88 (95 % CI 0.84-0.91), 0.87 (95 % CI  0.81-0.92), and 0.9391, respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 50.4 (95 % CI 26.0-97.6) and Q* was 0.8764. DCE-MRI has high sensitivity and specificity in the evaluation of locally recurrent or residual PCa after radical prostatectomy.

  8. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  9. POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND DIBENZOFURANS: REMOVAL FROM FLUE GAS AND DISTRIBUTION IN ASH/RESIDUE OF A REFUSE-DERIVED FUEL COMBUSTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an early-1989 investigation of the effect of changing combustion and flue gas cleaning (FGC) system variables on the performance of these systems. Using information from earlier characterization tests at the same site (Mid-Connecticut facility in Hartfo...

  10. Synthesis of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) nanorods: diameter-size and shape effects on their applications in magnetism, lithium ion battery, and gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changzheng; Yin, Ping; Zhu, Xi; OuYang, Chuanzi; Xie, Yi

    2006-09-14

    We demonstrated in this paper the shape-controlled synthesis of hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) nanostructures with a gradient in the diameters (from less than 20 nm to larger than 300 nm) and surface areas (from 5.9 to 52.3 m(2)/g) through an improved synthetic strategy by adopting a high concentration of inorganic salts and high temperature in the synthesis systems to influence the final products of hematite nanostructures. The benefits of the present work also stem from the first report on the <20-nm-diameter and porous hematite nanorods, as well as a new facile strategy to the less-than-20-nm nanorods, because the less-than-20-nm diameter size meets the vital size domain for magnetization properties in hematite. Note that the porous and nonporous hematite one-dimensional nanostructures with diameter gradients give us the first opportunity to investigate the Morin temperature evolution of nanorod diameter and porosity. Evidently, the magnetic properties for nanorods exhibit differences compared with those for the spherical particle counterparts. Hematite nanorods are strongly dependent on their diameter size and porosity, where the magnetization is not sensitive to the size evolution from submicron particles to the 60-90 nm nanorods, while the magnetic properties change significantly in the case of <20 nm. In other words, for the magnetic properties of nanorods, in a comparable size range, the porous existence could also influence the magnetic behavior. Moreover, applications in formaldehyde (HCHO) gas sensors and lithium batteries for the hematite nanostructures with the diameter/surface area gradient reveal that the performance of electrochemical and gas-sensor properties strongly depends on the diameter size and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, which is consistent with the crystalline point of view. Thus, this work not only provides the first example of the fabrication of hematite nanostructure sensors for detecting HCHO gas, but also reveals that the

  11. Note: Fiber optic transport probe for Hall measurements under light and magnetic field at low temperatures: Case study of a two dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, P. P. S.; Gupta, Anurag; Kumar, Pramod; Dogra, Anjana; Budhani, R. C.

    2015-05-15

    A fiber optic based probe is designed and developed for electrical transport measurements in presence of quasi-monochromatic (360–800 nm) light, varying temperature (T = 1.8–300 K), and magnetic field (B = 0–7 T). The probe is tested for the resistivity and Hall measurements performed on a LaAlO{sub 3}–SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface system with a conducting two dimensional electron gas.

  12. A downscaled multi-residue strategy for detection of anabolic steroids in bovine urine using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS3).

    PubMed

    Impens, S; Van Loco, J; Degroodt, J M; De Brabander, H

    2007-03-14

    Within the scope of the European Community member states' residue monitoring plan, illicit administration of anabolic steroids is monitored at slaughterhouse level as well as on living animals. At farm level, urine is one of the target matrices to detect possible abuse of anabolic steroid growth promoters. Optimisation of the routinely applied analysis method resulted in a procedure for which high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) fractionation prior to GC-MS(n) analysis was no longer required. Analytical results could be obtained within 1 day and only 5 mL urine was needed to carry out the screening procedure. Using the downscaled methodology, all validation criteria described in the European Commission document 2002/657/EC could be fulfilled, and the minimum required performance limits (MRPLs) established for anabolic steroids in urine, could be achieved. A higher GC-MS technique's specificity was achieved by detecting the steroids using GC-MS3. Nevertheless, it was decided to screen routinely sampled urine with GC-MS2 whereas GC-MS3 was applied to confirm the presence of anabolic steroid residues in suspected sample extracts. PMID:17386695

  13. The Evolution of Gas Clouds Falling in the Magnetized Galactic Halo: High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs) Originated in the Galactic Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, Robin L.; Raley, Elizabeth A.

    2009-07-01

    In the Galactic fountain scenario, supernovae and/or stellar winds propel material into the Galactic halo. As the material cools, it condenses into clouds. By using FLASH three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we model and study the dynamical evolution of these gas clouds after they form and begin to fall toward the Galactic plane. In our simulations, we assume that the gas clouds form at a height of z = 5 kpc above the Galactic midplane, then begin to fall from rest. We investigate how the cloud's evolution, dynamics, and interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by the initial mass of the cloud. We find that clouds with sufficiently large initial densities (n >= 0.1 H atoms cm-3) accelerate sufficiently and maintain sufficiently large column densities as to be observed and identified as high-velocity clouds (HVCs) even if the ISM is weakly magnetized (1.3 μG). However, the ISM can provide noticeable resistance to the motion of a low-density cloud (n <= 0.01 H atoms cm-3) thus making it more probable that a low-density cloud will attain the speed of an intermediate-velocity cloud rather than the speed of an HVC. We also investigate the effects of various possible magnetic field configurations. As expected, the ISM's resistance is greatest when the magnetic field is strong and perpendicular to the motion of the cloud. The trajectory of the cloud is guided by the magnetic field lines in cases where the magnetic field is oriented diagonal to the Galactic plane. The model cloud simulations show that the interactions between the cloud and the ISM can be understood via analogy to the shock tube problem which involves shock and rarefaction waves. We also discuss accelerated ambient gas, streamers of material ablated from the clouds, and the cloud's evolution from a sphere-shaped to a disk- or cigar-shaped object.

  14. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  15. A New Jeans Resolution Criterion for (M)HD Simulations of Self-gravitating Gas: Application to Magnetic Field Amplification by Gravity-driven Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Sur, Sharanya; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2011-04-01

    Cosmic structure formation is characterized by the complex interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. The processes by which gravitational energy is converted into turbulent and magnetic energies, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we show with high-resolution, adaptive-mesh simulations that MHD turbulence is efficiently driven by extracting energy from the gravitational potential during the collapse of a dense gas cloud. Compressible motions generated during the contraction are converted into solenoidal, turbulent motions, leading to a natural energy ratio of E sol/E tot ≈ 2/3. We find that the energy injection scale of gravity-driven turbulence is close to the local Jeans scale. If small seeds of the magnetic field are present, they are amplified exponentially fast via the small-scale dynamo process. The magnetic field grows most efficiently on the smallest scales, for which the stretching, twisting, and folding of field lines, and the turbulent vortices are sufficiently resolved. We find that this scale corresponds to about 30 grid cells in the simulations. We thus suggest a new minimum resolution criterion of 30 cells per Jeans length in (magneto)hydrodynamical simulations of self-gravitating gas, in order to resolve turbulence on the Jeans scale, and to capture minimum dynamo amplification of the magnetic field. Due to numerical diffusion, however, any existing simulation today can at best provide lower limits on the physical growth rates. We conclude that a small, initial magnetic field can grow to dynamically important strength on timescales significantly shorter than the free-fall time of the cloud.

  16. Gas-phase spectroscopy and anharmonic vibrational analysis of the 3-residue peptide Z-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2 by the laser desorption supersonic jet technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Yamada, Kohei; Chakraborty, Shamik; Yagi, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    The electronic excitation and infrared (IR) spectra of a capped tri-peptide, Z-PLG-NH2 (Z = benzyloxycarbonyl, P = Pro, L = Leu, G = Gly), were measured in the gas phase by using the laser desorption supersonic jet technique. By measuring an ultraviolet-ultraviolet hole burning spectrum, it was found that Z-PLG-NH2 has the maximum three conformers in the gas phase, but that the population is mainly distributed to a single conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations well-reproduced the observed IR spectrum, except for splitting of the NH stretching bands by a β-turn structure that corresponds to a global minimum structure. Anharmonic vibrational analysis by vibrational quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (VQDPT) successfully reproduced the anharmonic splitting, and confirmed the assignments.

  17. Development of headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography method for the determination of solvent residues in edible oils and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Michulec, M; Wardencki, W

    2005-04-15

    The application of headspace solid-phase microextraction for isolation and enrichment of solvent residues from oils and pharmaceuticals is discussed. The optimal parameters for isolation and preconcentration of common process solvents (hexane, benzene, toluene and selected chloroderivatives of hydrocarbons) were established. Four fiber types (100 microm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), 75 microm Carboxen-PDMS, 65 microm PDMS-divinylbenzene and 85 microm polyacrylate) were evaluated to choose the most efficient coating, able to absorb the greatest amount of analytes. GC-flame ionization detection (FID) and GC-electron-capture detection systems were used for quantitative and qualitative analysis, adequately to the appropriate group of the analytes. For all compounds the limit of detection (LOD), linearity, dynamic range, repeatability and intermediate precision were estimated. PMID:15865182

  18. New field-based agricultural biomass burning trace gas, PM2.5, and black carbon emission ratios and factors measured in situ at crop residue fires in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianran; Wooster, Martin J.; Green, David C.; Main, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Despite policy attempts to limit or prevent agricultural burning, its use to remove crop residues either immediately after harvest (e.g. field burning of wheat stubble) or after subsequent crop processing (e.g. "bonfires" of rice straw and rapeseed residues) appears to remain widespread across parts of China. Emission factors for these types of small but highly numerous fire are therefore required to fully assess their impact on atmospheric composition and air pollution. Here we describe the design and deployment of a new smoke measurement system for the close-range sampling of key gases and particles within smoke from crop residue fires, using it to assess instantaneous mixing ratios of CO and CO2 and mass concentrations of black carbon (BC) and PM2.5 from wheat stubble, rice straw, and rapeseed residue fires. Using data of our new smoke sampling system, we find a strong linear correlation between the PM2.5 mass and BC, with very high PM2.5 to BC emission ratios found in the smouldering phase (up to 80.7 mg m-3.(mg m-3)-1) compared to the flaming phase (2.0 mg m-3.(mg m-3)-1). We conclude that the contribution of BC to PM2.5 mass was as high as 50% in the flaming phase of some burns, whilst during smouldering it sometimes decreased to little over one percent. A linear mixing model is used to quantify the relative contribution of each combustion phase to the overall measured smoke composition, and we find that flaming combustion dominated the total emission of most species assessed. Using time series of trace gas concentrations from different fire cases, we calculated 'fire integrated' trace gas emission factors (EFs) for wheat, rice and rapeseed residue burns as 1739 ± 19 g kg-1, 1761 ± 30 g kg-1and 1704 ± 27 g kg-1 respectively for CO2, and 60 ± 12 g kg-1, 47 ± 19 g kg-1 and 82 ± 17 g kg-1 respectively for CO. Where comparisons were possible, our EFs agreed well with those derived via a simultaneously-deployed open path Fourier transform infrared (OP

  19. Greenhouse gas emissions from passive composting of manure and digestate with crop residues and biochar on small-scale livestock farms in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Vu, Quynh Duong; de Neergaard, Andreas; Tran, Toan Duc; Hoang, Huong Thi Thu; Vu, Van Thi Khanh; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of different mixing ratios of crop residues and biochar with liquid digestate from anaerobically treated pig manure on CH₄, CO₂, and N₂O emissions over 84 days in a system of passive aeration composting, resembling typical Vietnamese solid manure storage conditions. Two treatments with solid manure were included for comparison. The results showed that C losses through CH4 and CO₂emissions accounted for 0.06-0.28% and 1.9-26.7%, respectively, of initial total C. CH4 losses accounted for just 0.4-4.0% of total C losses. Total N losses accounted for 27.1-40% of initial total N in which N₂O emissions corresponded to 0.01-0.57% of initial total N, and hence accounted for only 0.1-1.8% of total N losses. It is assumed that the remainder was either the result of denitrification losses to N₂or ammonia volatilization. The composting of biochar (B) or crop residue with digestate (D) showed significantly lower CH4 and N₂O emissions compared with composting manure (M) (p < .05). The composting of digestate with biochar showed significantly lower CO₂and CH₄emissions and significantly higher N₂O emissions compared to the composting of digestate with rice straw (RS) (p < .05). The combined composting of digestate with biochar and rice straw (D + B + RS5:0.3:1) showed significantly reduced N₂O emissions compared with composting digestate with biochar with alone (p < .05). Composting sugar cane bagasse (SC) with digestate (D + SC) significantly reduced CH₄and N₂O emissions compared with the composting of rice straw with digestate (D + RS3.5:1 and D + RS5:1) (p < .05).

  20. Simultaneous determination of 200 pesticide residues in honey using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in conjunction with streamlined quantification approach.

    PubMed

    Shendy, Amr H; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A; Mohammed, Moustapha N; Gad Alla, Sohair A; Lotfy, Hayam M

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive, accurate and reliable multi-class GC-MS/MS assay protocol for quantification and confirmation of 200 common agricultural pesticides in honey was developed and validated according to EU guidelines. A modified extraction procedure, based on QuEChERS method (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) was employed. Mass spectrophotometric conditions were individually optimized for each analyte to achieve maximum sensitivity and selectivity in MRM mode. The use of at least two reactions for each compound allowed simultaneous identification and quantification in a single run. The pesticides under investigation were separated in less than 31 min using the ultra-inert capillary column (DB-35MS). For all analytes, neat standard calibration curves in conjunction with correction for matrix effect were successfully employed. The detection limits of the assay ranged from 1.00 to 3.00 ng mL(-1) for the studied pesticides. The developed assay was linear over concentration range of 10.00-500.00 ng mL(-1), with correlation coefficient of more than 0.996. At the LOQ, 81% of the studied pesticides were efficiently recovered in the range of 70.00-120.00%, with CV% less than 15.00% while 99.3% compounds had mean percentage recovery of 60.00-140.00%, with CV% less than 21.00% (N=18, over three different days). The proposed assay was successfully applied for the analysis of the studied pesticide residues in one PT sample and 64 commercial honey samples collected over 1 year from different districts around Egypt. Results revealed that only one honey sample out of the 64 analyzed samples was contaminated with tau-Fluvalinate (10.00 μg kg(-1)). This wide scope assay protocol is applicable for monitoring pesticide residues in honey by national regulatory authorities and accredited labs; that should help ensure safety of such widely used product.

  1. Simultaneous determination of 200 pesticide residues in honey using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in conjunction with streamlined quantification approach.

    PubMed

    Shendy, Amr H; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A; Mohammed, Moustapha N; Gad Alla, Sohair A; Lotfy, Hayam M

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive, accurate and reliable multi-class GC-MS/MS assay protocol for quantification and confirmation of 200 common agricultural pesticides in honey was developed and validated according to EU guidelines. A modified extraction procedure, based on QuEChERS method (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) was employed. Mass spectrophotometric conditions were individually optimized for each analyte to achieve maximum sensitivity and selectivity in MRM mode. The use of at least two reactions for each compound allowed simultaneous identification and quantification in a single run. The pesticides under investigation were separated in less than 31 min using the ultra-inert capillary column (DB-35MS). For all analytes, neat standard calibration curves in conjunction with correction for matrix effect were successfully employed. The detection limits of the assay ranged from 1.00 to 3.00 ng mL(-1) for the studied pesticides. The developed assay was linear over concentration range of 10.00-500.00 ng mL(-1), with correlation coefficient of more than 0.996. At the LOQ, 81% of the studied pesticides were efficiently recovered in the range of 70.00-120.00%, with CV% less than 15.00% while 99.3% compounds had mean percentage recovery of 60.00-140.00%, with CV% less than 21.00% (N=18, over three different days). The proposed assay was successfully applied for the analysis of the studied pesticide residues in one PT sample and 64 commercial honey samples collected over 1 year from different districts around Egypt. Results revealed that only one honey sample out of the 64 analyzed samples was contaminated with tau-Fluvalinate (10.00 μg kg(-1)). This wide scope assay protocol is applicable for monitoring pesticide residues in honey by national regulatory authorities and accredited labs; that should help ensure safety of such widely used product. PMID:26687165

  2. Upgrade of the gas flow control system of the resistive current leads of the LHC inner triplet magnets: Simulation and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Perin, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Pezzetti, M.; Almeida, M.

    2014-01-29

    The 600 A and 120 A circuits of the inner triplet magnets of the Large Hadron Collider are powered by resistive gas cooled current leads. The current solution for controlling the gas flow of these leads has shown severe operability limitations. In order to allow a more precise and more reliable control of the cooling gas flow, new flowmeters will be installed during the first long shutdown of the LHC. Because of the high level of radiation in the area next to the current leads, the flowmeters will be installed in shielded areas located up to 50 m away from the current leads. The control valves being located next to the current leads, this configuration leads to long piping between the valves and the flowmeters. In order to determine its dynamic behaviour, the proposed system was simulated with a numerical model and validated with experimental measurements performed on a dedicated test bench.

  3. Upgrade of the gas flow control system of the resistive current leads of the LHC inner triplet magnets: Simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, A.; Almeida, M.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Pezzetti, M.

    2014-01-01

    The 600 A and 120 A circuits of the inner triplet magnets of the Large Hadron Collider are powered by resistive gas cooled current leads. The current solution for controlling the gas flow of these leads has shown severe operability limitations. In order to allow a more precise and more reliable control of the cooling gas flow, new flowmeters will be installed during the first long shutdown of the LHC. Because of the high level of radiation in the area next to the current leads, the flowmeters will be installed in shielded areas located up to 50 m away from the current leads. The control valves being located next to the current leads, this configuration leads to long piping between the valves and the flowmeters. In order to determine its dynamic behaviour, the proposed system was simulated with a numerical model and validated with experimental measurements performed on a dedicated test bench.

  4. Inspired gas-induced vascular change in tumors with magnetic-resonance-guided near-infrared imaging: human breast pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Colin M.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca; Jiang, Shudong; Daniel, Bruce L.; Pogue, Brian W.; Glover, Gary H.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates differences in the response of breast tumor tissue versus healthy fibroglandular tissue to inspired gases. Cycles of carbogen and oxygen gas are administered while measuring the changes with magnetic-resonance-guided near-infrared imaging in a pilot study of breast cancers. For two patients, analyses are performed with cross-correlation techniques, which measure the strength of hemodynamic modulation. The results show that the overall vasoresponse, indicated by total hemoglobin, of healthy tissue has approximately a 72% and 41% greater correlation to the gas stimulus than the tumor region, in two patients respectively, when background physiological changes are controlled. These data support the hypothesis that tumor vasculature has a poorly functioning vasodilatory mechanism, most likely caused by dysfunctional smooth muscle cells lining the vasculature. This study presents a methodology to quantitatively analyze inspired gas changes in human breast tumors, and demonstrates this technique in a pilot patient population.

  5. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26077971

  6. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction.

  7. Enrichment and determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in environmental water samples by magnetic solid-phase extraction with core-shell magnetic carbon microspheres before gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Bin; She, Xiao-Kun; Xing, Han-Zhu; Wang, Xia; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2016-05-01

    Core-shell magnetic carbon microspheres were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method and used as a novel magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the sensitive determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in environmental water samples. Gas chromatography with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry was adopted for the detection. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate and optimize important magnetic solid-phase extraction parameters through response surface methodology. Under the optimal conditions, low limits of detection (0.07-0.17 ng·L(-1) ), a wide linear range (1-1000 ng·L(-1) ), and good repeatability (0.80-4.58%) were achieved. The developed method was validated with several real water samples, and satisfactory results were obtained in the range of 72.8-97.9%. These results indicated that core-shell magnetic carbon microspheres have great potential as an adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of polybrominated diphenyl ethers at trace levels from environmental water samples.

  8. Negative differential conductivity induced current instability in two-dimensional electron gas system in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Ping; Komiyama, Susumu; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2015-03-01

    High mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed in the interface of a GaAs/AlGaAs hetero-structure in high magnetic field (B) exhibits interring nonlinear response either under microwave radiation or to a dc electric field (E). It is general believed that this kind nonlinear behavior is closely related to the occurrence of negative-differential conductance (NDC) in the presence of strong B and E. We observe a new type NDC state driven by a direct current above a threshold value (Ith) applied to a 2DEG as a function of B at relatively high temperatures (T). A current instability is observed in 2DEG system at high B ~6-8 T and at high T ~ 20- 30 K while the applied current is over Ith. The longitudinal voltage Vxx shows sub-linear behavior with the increase of I. As the current exceed Ith, Vxx suddenly drops a ΔVxx and becomes irregular associated with the appearance of hysteresis with sweeping I. We find that Ith increases with the increase of B and of T; meanwhile, ΔVxx is larger at higher B but lower T. Data analysis suggest that the onset of voltage fluctuation can be described by a NDC model proposed by Kurosawa et al. in 1976. The general behaviors of T and B dependence of current instability are analog to those recently reported at lower both T and B. This consistence suggests the same genuine mechanism of NDC phenomena observed in 2DEG system.

  9. A phytochemical comparison of saw palmetto products using gas chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Anthony; Suter, Andy; Krnjic, Ana; Strassel, Brigitte; Zloh, Mire; Said, Mazlina; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Preparations containing saw palmetto berries are used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). There are many products on the market, and relatively little is known about their chemical variability and specifically the composition and quality of different saw palmetto products notwithstanding that in 2000, an international consultation paper from the major urological associations from the five continents on treatments for BPH demanded further research on this topic. Here, we compare two analytical approaches and characterise 57 different saw palmetto products. Methods An established method – gas chromatography – was used for the quantification of nine fatty acids, while a novel approach of metabolomic profiling using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used as a fingerprinting tool to assess the overall composition of the extracts. Key findings The phytochemical analysis determining the fatty acids showed a high level of heterogeneity of the different products in the total amount and of nine single fatty acids. A robust and reproducible 1H NMR spectroscopy method was established, and the results showed that it was possible to statistically differentiate between saw palmetto products that had been extracted under different conditions but not between products that used a similar extraction method. Principal component analysis was able to determine those products that had significantly different metabolites. Conclusions The metabolomic approach developed offers novel opportunities for quality control along the value chain of saw palmetto and needs to be followed further, as with this method, the complexity of a herbal extract can be better assessed than with the analysis of a single group of constituents. PMID:24417505

  10. Novel method for the rapid and specific extraction of multiple β2 -agonist residues in food by tailor-made Monolith-MIPs extraction disks and detection by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibo; Gan, Ning; Chen, Yinji; Ding, Qingqing; Huang, Jie; Lin, Saichai; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua

    2016-09-01

    A quick and specific pretreatment method based on a series of extraction clean-up disks, consisting of molecularly imprinted polymer monoliths and C18 adsorbent, was developed for the specific enrichment of salbutamol and clenbuterol residues in food. The molecularly imprinted monolithic polymer disk was synthesized using salbutamol as a template through a one-step synthesis process. It can simultaneously and specifically recognize salbutamol and clenbuterol. The monolithic polymer disk and series of C18 disks were assembled with a syringe to form a set of tailor-made devices for the extraction of target molecules. In a single run, salbutamol and clenbuterol can be specifically extracted, cleaned, and eluted by methanol/acetic acid/H2 O. The target molecules, after a silylation derivatization reaction were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The parameters including solvent desorption, sample pH, and the cycles of reloading were investigated and discussed. Under the optimized extraction and clean-up conditions, the limits of detection and quantitation were determined as 0.018-0.022 and 0.042-0.049 ng/g for salbutamol and clenbuterol, respectively. The assay described was convenient, rapid, and specific; thereby potentially efficient in the high-throughput analysis of β2 -agonists residues in real food samples.

  11. Multi-residue methods for the determination of over four hundred pesticides in solid and liquid high sucrose content matrices by tandem mass spectrometry coupled with gas and liquid chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Lozowicka, Bozena; Ilyasova, Gulzhakhan; Kaczynski, Piotr; Jankowska, Magdalena; Rutkowska, Ewa; Hrynko, Izabela; Mojsak, Patrycja; Szabunko, Julia

    2016-05-01

    For the first time three methods: matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD), original and modified QuEChERS, with and without clean up step were studied in order to evaluate the extraction efficiency of various classes of pesticides from solid and liquid high sucrose content matrices. Determinations over four hundred pesticides were performed by gas and liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/LC/MS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring. The proposed methods were validated on sugar beets and their technological product beet molasses. In general, the recoveries obtained for the original QuEChERS and MSPD method were lower (<70%) than for the modified QuEChERS without clean up in sugar beet and with clean up in beet molasses. Among these methods, high extraction yields were achieved as recommended in SANCO/12571/2013, with repeatability of 4.4-19.2% and within-laboratory reproducibility of 7.1-18.4% for citrate QuEChERS, whereas greater ruggedness were observed for MSPD. The limit of quantification (LOQ) at (the lowest MRL=0.01mgkg(-1)e.g. for oxamyl()) or below (0.005mgkg(-1)) the regulatory maximum residue level for the pesticides were achieved. The expanded measurement uncertainty was not higher than 30% for all target analytes. Matrix effects were compared and observed for both matrices at both gas and liquid chromatography. The most compounds showed signal enhancement and it was compensated by using matrix-matched calibration and modified QuEChERS characterized lower matrix effects. The confirmation of suitability citrate QuEChERS optimized method was to use for routine testing of several dozen samples determination and residue of epoxiconazole and tebuconazole (both at 0.01mgkg(-1)) in the samples of beet molasses and cyfluthrin (0.06mgkg(-1)) in sugar beet were found.

  12. Multi-residue methods for the determination of over four hundred pesticides in solid and liquid high sucrose content matrices by tandem mass spectrometry coupled with gas and liquid chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Lozowicka, Bozena; Ilyasova, Gulzhakhan; Kaczynski, Piotr; Jankowska, Magdalena; Rutkowska, Ewa; Hrynko, Izabela; Mojsak, Patrycja; Szabunko, Julia

    2016-05-01

    For the first time three methods: matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD), original and modified QuEChERS, with and without clean up step were studied in order to evaluate the extraction efficiency of various classes of pesticides from solid and liquid high sucrose content matrices. Determinations over four hundred pesticides were performed by gas and liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/LC/MS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring. The proposed methods were validated on sugar beets and their technological product beet molasses. In general, the recoveries obtained for the original QuEChERS and MSPD method were lower (<70%) than for the modified QuEChERS without clean up in sugar beet and with clean up in beet molasses. Among these methods, high extraction yields were achieved as recommended in SANCO/12571/2013, with repeatability of 4.4-19.2% and within-laboratory reproducibility of 7.1-18.4% for citrate QuEChERS, whereas greater ruggedness were observed for MSPD. The limit of quantification (LOQ) at (the lowest MRL=0.01mgkg(-1)e.g. for oxamyl()) or below (0.005mgkg(-1)) the regulatory maximum residue level for the pesticides were achieved. The expanded measurement uncertainty was not higher than 30% for all target analytes. Matrix effects were compared and observed for both matrices at both gas and liquid chromatography. The most compounds showed signal enhancement and it was compensated by using matrix-matched calibration and modified QuEChERS characterized lower matrix effects. The confirmation of suitability citrate QuEChERS optimized method was to use for routine testing of several dozen samples determination and residue of epoxiconazole and tebuconazole (both at 0.01mgkg(-1)) in the samples of beet molasses and cyfluthrin (0.06mgkg(-1)) in sugar beet were found. PMID:26946009

  13. Two-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin. Nuclear Overhauser effect and electron self-exchange cross peaks from amino acid residues surrounding the Fe-2S* cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Skjeldal, L.; Westler, W.M.; Oh, Byungha; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L.; Holden, H.M.; Jacobson, B.L.; Rayment, I. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison )

    1991-07-30

    Hyperfine {sup 1}H NMR signals of the 2 Fe-2S* vegetative ferredoxin from Anabaena 7,120 have been studied by two-dimensional (2D) magnetization exchange spectroscopy. The rapid longitudinal relaxation rates of these signals required the use of very short nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) mixing times (0.5-20 ms). The resulting pattern of NOE cross-relaxation peaks when combined with previous 1D NOE results led to elucidation of the carbon-bound proton spin systems from each of the four cysteines ligated to the 2Fe-2S* cluster in the reduced ferredoxin. Additional NOE cross peaks were observed that provide information about other amino acid residues that interact with the iron-sulfur cluster. NOE cross peaks were assigned tentatively to Leu{sup 27}, Arg{sup 42}, and Ala{sup 43} on the basis of the X-ray coordinates of oxidized Anabaena 7,120 ferredoxin. Three chemical exchange cross peaks were detected in magnetization exchange spectra of half-reduced ferredoxin and assigned to the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} protons of Cys{sup 49} and Cys{sup 79} (both of whose sulfur atoms are ligated to Fe(III)) and Arg{sup 42} (whose amide nitrogen is hydrogen-bonded to one of the inorganic sulfurs of the 2Fe-2S* cluster). The chemical exchange cross peaks provide a means of extending assignments in the spectrum of reduced ferredoxin to assignments in the spectrum of the oxidized protein. The results suggest that 2D magnetization exchange spectroscopy employing short mixing times will be useful for the assignment and characterization of hyperfine {sup 1}H peaks in a variety of paramagnetic proteins.

  14. β-cyclodextrin functionalized meso-/macroporous magnetic titanium dioxide adsorbent as extraction material combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the detection of chlorobenzenes in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiabin; Gan, Ning; Chen, Si; Pan, Muyun; Wu, Dazhen; Cao, Yuting

    2015-07-01

    A high-performance and selective adsorbent was developed for simultaneous extraction of 6 chlorobenzenes residues in soil samples by using magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) combined with automated SPE followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The adsorbent was synthesized by grafting carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) on the surface of porous core-shell magnetic Fe3O4@flower like TiO2 microspheres (Fe3O4@fTiO2-CMCD), used as a carrier. The main factors (adsorbent amount, adsorption time, elution solvent, elution volume, and elution flow rate) affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. The adsorbent exhibited high loading capacity (25.6 mg g(-1) for 1,3-dichlorobenzene). This maybe due to meso-/macroporous TiO2 having high specific surface area; as a carrier of the β-cyclodextrin film, it could obviously increase the number of recognition sites. The newly developed adsorbent also showed good selectivity towards chlorobenzenes based on host-guest interactions between β-cyclodextrin (on adsorbent's surface) and targets, which can minimize complex matrix interference in soil samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of environmental soil samples with recovery ranging from 87.3 to 104.3%. All target compounds showed good linearities with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.996. The limits of quantitation for the 6 CBs were 0.03-0.09 μg kg(-1). These findings confirmed meso-/macroporous structure Fe3O4@fTiO2-CMCD as a highly effective extraction material for use in trace CB analyses in complex soil samples.

  15. β-cyclodextrin functionalized meso-/macroporous magnetic titanium dioxide adsorbent as extraction material combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the detection of chlorobenzenes in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiabin; Gan, Ning; Chen, Si; Pan, Muyun; Wu, Dazhen; Cao, Yuting

    2015-07-01

    A high-performance and selective adsorbent was developed for simultaneous extraction of 6 chlorobenzenes residues in soil samples by using magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) combined with automated SPE followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The adsorbent was synthesized by grafting carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) on the surface of porous core-shell magnetic Fe3O4@flower like TiO2 microspheres (Fe3O4@fTiO2-CMCD), used as a carrier. The main factors (adsorbent amount, adsorption time, elution solvent, elution volume, and elution flow rate) affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. The adsorbent exhibited high loading capacity (25.6 mg g(-1) for 1,3-dichlorobenzene). This maybe due to meso-/macroporous TiO2 having high specific surface area; as a carrier of the β-cyclodextrin film, it could obviously increase the number of recognition sites. The newly developed adsorbent also showed good selectivity towards chlorobenzenes based on host-guest interactions between β-cyclodextrin (on adsorbent's surface) and targets, which can minimize complex matrix interference in soil samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of environmental soil samples with recovery ranging from 87.3 to 104.3%. All target compounds showed good linearities with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.996. The limits of quantitation for the 6 CBs were 0.03-0.09 μg kg(-1). These findings confirmed meso-/macroporous structure Fe3O4@fTiO2-CMCD as a highly effective extraction material for use in trace CB analyses in complex soil samples. PMID:25990351

  16. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the effects of ligand binding on ryptophan residues of selectively deuterated dihydrofolate reductase from Lactobacillus casei

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, J.; Roberts, G.C.; Thomson, J.W.; King, R.W; Griffiths, D.V.; Burgen, A.S.

    1980-05-01

    We have prepared a selectively deuterated dihydrofolate reductase in which all the aromatic protons except the C(2) protons of tryptophan have been replaced by deuterium and have examined the 1H NMR spectra of its complexes with folate, trimethoprim, methotrexate, NADP+, and NADPH. One of the four Trp C(2)-proton resonance signals (signal P at 3.66 ppm from dioxane) has been asigned to Trp-21 by examining the NMR spectrum of a selectively deuterated N-bromosuccinimide-modified dihydrofolate reductase. This signal is not perturbed by NADPH, indicating that the coenzyme is not binding close to the 2 position of Trp-21. This contrasts markedly with the 19F shift (2.7 ppm) observed for the 19F signal of Trp-21 in the NADPH complex with the 6-fluorotryptophan-labeled enzyme. In fact the crystal structure of the enzyme . methotrexate . NADPH shows that the carboxamide group of the reduced nicotinamide ring is near to the 6 position of Trp-21 but remote from its 2 position. The nonadditivity of the 1H chemical-shift contributions for signals tentatively assigned to Trp-5 and -133 indicates that these residues are influenced by ligand-induced conformational changes.

  17. Residue-specific structures and membrane locations of pH-low insertion peptide by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Nicolas S.; Chung, Michael S.; Yao, Lan; An, Ming; Qiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The pH-low insertion peptide (pHLIP) binds to a membrane at pH 7.4 unstructured but folds across the bilayer as a transmembrane helix at pH∼6. Despite their promising applications as imaging probes and drug carriers that target cancer cells for cytoplasmic cargo delivery, the mechanism of pH modulation on pHLIP-membrane interactions has not been completely understood. Here, we show the first study on membrane-associated pHLIP using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Data on residue-specific conformation and membrane location describe pHLIP in various surface-bound and membrane-inserted states at pH 7.4, 6.4 and 5.3. The critical membrane-adsorbed state is more complex than previously envisioned. At pH 6.4, for the major unstructured population, the peptide sinks deeper into the membrane in a state II′ that is distinct from the adsorbed state II observed at pH 7.4, which may enable pHLIP to sense slight change in acidity even before insertion. PMID:26195283

  18. Enzymatic synthesis and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance conformational studies of disaccharides containing. beta. -D-galactopyranosyl and. beta. -D-(1-/sup 13/C)Galactopyranosyl residues

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, H.A.; Barker, R.

    1980-02-05

    Partially purified UDPgalactosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.22) from bovine milk has been used to synthesize millimolar amounts of compounds such as Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)Glc, Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)GlcNAc-..beta..-hexanolamine, and Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)-GlcNAc..beta..(1..-->..4)GlcNAc. The same method has been used to prepare similar compounds containing /sup 13/C-enriched galactopyranosyl moieties. Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)GlcNAc-..beta..-hexanolamine was also synthesized in a solid-phase system in which the GlcNAc-..beta..-hexanolamine glycoside was covalently linked to agarose beads. At pH 7.0 and at 1 to 5 mM Mn/sup 2 + +/ the yields of the galactosyl saccharides are greater than 90% by using 10% excess of UDPGal donor. The use of a 90% enriched (1-/sup 13/C)galactosyl residue allowed the determination of the most abundant conformer about the galactopyranosyl-glycoside linkage by analysis of the carbon-carbon coupling constants from Cl to Gal to the C3', C4', and C5' of GlcNAc or Glc. 3 figures, 1 table.

  19. Organic Rankine Cycle for Residual Heat to Power Conversion in Natural Gas Compressor Station. Part II: Plant Simulation and Optimisation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaczykowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    After having described the models for the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) equipment in the first part of this paper, this second part provides an example that demonstrates the performance of different ORC systems in the energy recovery application in a gas compressor station. The application shows certain specific characteristics, i.e. relatively large scale of the system, high exhaust gas temperature, low ambient temperature operation, and incorporation of an air-cooled condenser, as an effect of the localization in a compressor station plant. Screening of 17 organic fluids, mostly alkanes, was carried out and resulted in a selection of best performing fluids for each cycle configuration, among which benzene, acetone and heptane showed highest energy recovery potential in supercritical cycles, while benzene, toluene and cyclohexane in subcritical cycles. Calculation results indicate that a maximum of 10.4 MW of shaft power can be obtained from the exhaust gases of a 25 MW compressor driver by the use of benzene as a working fluid in the supercritical cycle with heat recuperation. In relation to the particular transmission system analysed in the study, it appears that the regenerative subcritical cycle with toluene as a working fluid presents the best thermodynamic characteristics, however, require some attention insofar as operational conditions are concerned.

  20. Magnetic NDE measurements on 410 stainless steel: An on-site and laboratory evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. J.; Jiles, D. C.; Lo, C. C. H.; Zombo, P.; Zhu, B.

    2002-05-01

    It is of practical interest to infer residual-stress information from the gas turbine compressor diaphragm (an assembly of a row of airfoils welded into inner and outer shrouds), using nondestructive methods. Residual stresses can build up as the airfoils are welded into shrouds. Magnetic hysteresis and Barkhausen effect measurements are particularly suitable for this purpose due to their high sensitivities to the stress-induced magnetic anisotropies. We report here on laboratory calibration measurements including a qualitative comparison with theoretical predictions. Field measurements are compared with results obtained using destructive techniques.