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Sample records for magnet weight supports

  1. Sliding weight supports for W7-X magnet system: structural aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, V.; Fellinger, J.; Egorov, K.; Schauer, F.; Köppen, M.; Jenzsch, H.

    2015-05-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator is presently under commissioning at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald. The coil system consisting of 70 superconducting coils of seven different types is supported by a massive central support structure (CSS), and thermally protected by the cryostat. The magnet system weight is borne by supports which are bolted to the cold CSS. These ten so-called cryo-legs penetrate through the cryostat wall to the warm machine base. The design of the cryo-legs incorporates glass-reinforced plastic tubes to guarantee relatively small thermal conductivity. In order to ensure free thermal shrinkage of the magnet system and to reduce stresses in the cryo-legs, sliding and rotating bearings are used as interfaces to the machine base. Tie-rods between the machine base and the warm ends of the cryo-legs prevent toroidal rotation of the magnet system, as well as any other horizontal shifts due to asymmetric loads. The assembly of the magnet system introduced some vertical imperfections in the cryo-leg positions causing considerable additional internal stresses which were not considered during the design stage. In addition, originally not planned trim coils induce unsymmetrical cyclic loads. Therefore, the previously used method to analyse one magnet system module with periodical boundary conditions is not applicable. Consequently, a model of the complete magnet system, including all five modules, was created and analysed. Fatigue analyses of the cryo-legs under the new cyclic loads, applied on top of the approximately 100 t static weight, have been performed in order to evaluate the lifetime. The paper presents the progress in structural analyses of the W7-X magnet system under the as-built conditions, loads due to the trim coil operation, and results of the weight support fatigue analysis.

  2. Magnetic record support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, M.; Morita, H.; Tokuoka, Y.; Izumi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Kubota, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic layer of a magnetic record support is coated with a thin film of a polymer with a siloxane bond. The magnetic layer consists of a thin film obtained by vacuum metallization, cathode sputtering or dispersion of a ferromagnetic metal powder in a binder. The polymer with a siloxane bond is produced by the polymerization of an organic silicon compound which inherently contains or is able to form this bond. Polymerization is preferably performed by plasma polymerization.

  3. Autonomy Support, Self-Regulation, and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Amy A.; Powers, Theodore A.; Koestner, Richard; Wing, Rena R.; Raynor, Hollie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Social support is believed to contribute to weight loss success, yet the type of support received is rarely assessed. To develop more effective weight loss interventions, examinations of the types of support that are associated with positive outcomes are needed. Self-Determination Theory suggests that support for an individual’s autonomy is beneficial and facilitates internalization of autonomous self-regulation. We examined whether autonomy support and directive forms of support were associated with weight loss outcomes in a larger randomized controlled trial. Method Adults (N = 201; 48.9 ± 10.5 years; 78.1% women) participating in a weight loss trial were assessed at 0, 6, and 18 months. Autonomy support (AS), directive support, and autonomous self-regulation (ASR) were measured at 0 and 6 months and examined in relation to 18-month weight loss outcomes. Results Baseline AS and ASR did not predict outcomes; however, AS and ASR at 6 months positively predicted 18-month weight losses (ps < .05), encouragement of healthy eating at 6 months was negatively related to 18-month weight losses (p < .01), and other forms of directive support were not associated with outcomes. Conclusions Autonomy support predicted better weight loss outcomes while some forms of directive support hindered progress. Weight loss trials are needed to determine whether family members and friends can be trained to provide autonomy support and whether this is more effective than programs targeting more general or directive forms of support. PMID:23730718

  4. Weight minimization of a support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kluberdanz, Donald J.; Segalman, Helaine J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the weight minimization of a circular plate-like structure which resulted in a 26 percent weight reduction. The optimization was performed numerically with the COPES/ADS program using the modified method of feasible directions. Design parameters were the inner thickness and outer thickness of the plate with constraints on maximum yield stress and maximum transverse displacement. Also, constraints were specified for the upper and lower bounds of the fundamental frequency and plate thicknesses. The MSC/NASTRAN finite element program was used for the evaluation of response variables. Original and final designs of the plate were tested using an Instron tension-compression machine to compare finite element results to measured strain data. The difference between finite element strain components and measured strain data was within engineering accuracy.

  5. Measuring social support for weight loss in an internet weight loss community.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kevin O; Ottenbacher, Allison J; Lucke, Joseph F; Etchegaray, Jason M; Graham, Amanda L; Thomas, Eric J; Bernstam, Elmer V

    2011-02-01

    Although overweight and obese individuals are turning to Internet communities for social support for weight loss, there is no validated online instrument for measuring the subjective social support experiences of participants in these communities. The authors' objective was to determine whether an online version of a validated paper questionnaire, the Weight Management Support Inventory, is appropriate for measuring social support among members of Internet weight loss communities. The authors administered the paper and online versions of the questionnaire in random, counterbalanced fashion to 199 members of a large Internet weight loss community. Scores for the paper and online versions were comparable in between-subjects and within-subjects comparisons. Convergent validity is suggested by the finding that participants who posted messages on Internet forums several times per day reported more social support than those who posted less frequently. However, the instrumental (tangible) support items did not load significantly on the instrumental support factor, suggesting that instrumental support is not relevant to the social support exchanged among participants in these communities. The authors conclude that the online, modified Weight Management Support Inventory, without items for instrumental support, is an appropriate instrument for measuring social support for weight loss among members of Internet weight loss communities.

  6. The role of social support in weight loss maintenance: results from the MedWeight study.

    PubMed

    Karfopoulou, Eleni; Anastasiou, Costas A; Avgeraki, Evangelia; Kosmidis, Mary H; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2016-06-01

    The role of social support in weight management is not fully understood, as more support has been linked to both favorable and unfavorable outcomes. We examined social support in relation to weight loss maintenance, comparing between maintainers and regainers of weight loss. The MedWeight study is a Greek registry of people who have intentionally lost ≥10 % of their weight and are either maintaining this loss for over a year (maintainers), or have regained weight (regainers). Demographics and lifestyle habits questionnaires are completed online. Dietary assessment is carried out by two telephone 24 h recalls. Perceived social support was assessed by validated scales examining support from family and friends regarding healthy eating and exercise. 289 maintainers and 122 regainers participated. Regainers received more support compared to maintainers. However, maintainers reported receiving compliments and active participation, whereas regainers receiving verbal instructions and encouragements. Maintainers who received diet support displayed improved dietary intakes, such as lower energy intake; regainers' diet was unaffected by support. Positive, rather than instructive, support appears beneficial in weight loss maintenance.

  7. Weight loss support seeking on twitter: the impact of weight on follow back rates and interactions.

    PubMed

    May, Christine N; Waring, Molly E; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Oleski, Jessica L; Olendzki, Effie; Evans, Martinus; Carey, Jennifer; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2017-03-01

    People seek weight loss support on online social networks, but little is known about how to build a supportive community. We created four Twitter accounts portraying women interested in weight loss (two obese, two normal weight/overweight) and followed health care professional and peer accounts for 2-5 weeks. We examined follow back rates, interactions, and organic follows from professionals and peers by weight status. Follow back rates did not differ by weight status when following professionals (6.8 % normal weight/overweight vs 11.0 % for obese; p = 0.4167) or peers (6.7 % for normal weight/overweight vs 10.8 % for obese; p = 0.1548). Number of interactions and organic followers also did not differ by weight status. Peers interacted with study accounts significantly more than professionals (p = 0.0138), but interactions were infrequent. Women seeking weight loss support on Twitter may need to be present for more than 5 weeks to build an interactive weight loss community.

  8. Hardware friendly adaptive support-weight approach for stereo matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zuoxun; Han, Pei; Zhang, Hongwei; An, Ran

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the hardware friendly adaptive support-weight approach is proposed to simplify the weight calculation process of the standard approach, which employs the support region to simplify the calculation of the similarity and uses the fixed distance dependent weight to present the proximity. In addition, the complete stereo matching algorithm and the hardware structure for FPGA implementation compatible with the approach is proposed. The experimental results show that the algorithm produces the disparity map accurately in different illumination conditions and different scenes, and its processing average bad pixel rate is only 6.65% for the standard test images of the Middlebury database, which is approximate to the performance of the standard adaptive support-weight approach. The proposed hardware structure provides a basis for design and implementation of real-time accurate stereo matching FPGA system.

  9. Nutritional support of very low birth weight newborns.

    PubMed

    Ditzenberger, Georgia

    2009-06-01

    Nutritional support to promote optimal postnatal growth for very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns less than 1500 g at birth during the initial prolonged hospitalization is a significant issue. This article reviews the concepts involved in the nutritional support of VLBW newborns, including definitions and discussions of growth, optimal postnatal growth, body composition, initial weight loss, growth expectations, growth assessment tools used during the postnatal period, the relation between inadequate nutrition and neurodevelopment, the relation between protein intake and cognitive outcome, postnatal nutrition balance, the potential for programming of future adult-onset chronic conditions, a review of fetal nutritional intake, and current recommendations for nutritional support of VLBW newborns.

  10. Support Needs of Overweight African American Women for Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Janet L.; Stewart, Diana W.; Lynam, Ian M.; Daley, Christine M.; Befort, Christie; Scherber, Robyn M.; Mercurio, Andrea E.; Okuyemi, Kolawole S.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine social support needs of obese and overweight African American women for weight loss. Methods: Focus groups were conducted with overweight and obese African American women. Data were analyzed using standard grounded theory text analysis. Results: Our middle-aged (45.7 years; SD = 12.6) women (N = 66) were interested in…

  11. DC Control Effort Minimized for Magnetic-Bearing-Supported Shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic-bearing-supported shaft may have a number of concentricity and alignment problems. One of these involves the relationship of the position sensors, the centerline of the backup bearings, and the magnetic center of the magnetic bearings. For magnetic bearings with permanent magnet biasing, the average control current for a given control axis that is not bearing the shaft weight will be minimized if the shaft is centered, on average over a revolution, at the magnetic center of the bearings. That position may not yield zero sensor output or center the shaft in the backup bearing clearance. The desired shaft position that gives zero average current can be achieved if a simple additional term is added to the control law. Suppose that the instantaneous control currents from each bearing are available from measurements and can be input into the control computer. If each control current is integrated with a very small rate of accumulation and the result is added to the control output, the shaft will gradually move to a position where the control current averages to zero over many revolutions. This will occur regardless of any offsets of the position sensor inputs. At that position, the average control effort is minimized in comparison to other possible locations of the shaft. Nonlinearities of the magnetic bearing are minimized at that location as well.

  12. Isotropic anomalous filtering in Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    da S Senra Filho, Antonio Carlos; Jinzenji Duque, Juliano; Murta Junior, Luiz Otávio

    2013-01-01

    Noise is inherent to Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DWI) and noise reduction methods are necessary. Although process based on classical diffusion is one of the most used approaches for digital image, anomalous diffusion has the potential for image enhancement and it has not been tested for DWI noise reduction. This study evaluates Anomalous Diffusion (AD) filter as DWI enhancement method. The proposed method was applied to magnetic resonance diffusion weighted images (DW-MRI) with different noise levels. Results show better performance for anomalous diffusion when compared to classical diffusion approach. The proposed method has shown potential in DWI enhancement and can be an important process to improve quality in DWI for neuroimage-based diagnosis.

  13. The Ganong paradigm: Converging evidence supporting initial phoneme weighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Erik C.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2003-10-01

    In the present experiment we investigate whether the initial phoneme is given more weight in word recognition [W. D. Marslen-Wilson and A. Welsh, Cognit. Psych. 10, 29-63 (1978)] or if all phonemes in a word are weighted equally [C. M. Connine, D. G. Blasko, and D. Titone, J. Mem. Lang. 32, 193-210 (1993)]. Using the Ganong paradigm [W. F. Ganong, JEP:HPP. 6, 110-125 (1980)], participants were instructed to categorize a final ambiguous fricative in the target items, which included both words and pseudowords. Pseudowords were created by changing either the initial or a medial phoneme within the words. For example, the word diminish was altered to create the pseudowords timinish and dimimish. In addition, initial and medial phonemes were altered by either one or three distinctive features. The differences in the labeling of the final ambiguous fricative in the target items led to the conclusion that the initial phoneme is weighted more heavily. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  14. Magnetic Support and Fragmentation of Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Pudritz, R. E.

    1990-12-01

    Molecular clouds contain magnetic fields with energies comparable to their gravitational binding energies. In the dynamic environment of the interstellar medium, strong hydromagnetic waves are excited in this field on wavelengths longer than the ion-neutral mean free path. In a typical molecular cloud this length-scale, λmin, is of the order of 10-1 of the cloud size. On shorter length-scales the gas is without wave pressure support, and can flow down field lines. The joint effects of excess gravity and flux leakage causes a local dynamic collapse. We test our ideas with a detailed -body calculation in which we impose MHD waves on an initially uniform isothermal gas cloud. The effect of magnetic fields is included in our calculation by the frictional drag on the dominant, neutral population. In the absence of MHD waves the cloud fragments slightly while collapsing, then merges together at the centre into a single, pressure-supported, flattened object. We impose a spectrum of large amplitude Alfvén waves whose velocity amplitude varies as k-3/2, where k is the wavenumber. The initial background magnetic field is chosen to have an energy density slightly larger than the gravitational energy density. The damping is assumed to be balanced by a continuous external supply of wave energy. The simulation shows that the magnetic field and hydromagnetic waves provide sufficient support against gravity so that the cloud undergoes a global, isotropic contraction at a quarter the free-fall rate. The shortest wave present, λ≍λmin, sets the minimum fragment mass, for small Jeans masses. We follow the evolution of fragments having a minimum overdensity of 30 (corresponding to a mass m ≥ 0.4 × 10-3 Mcloud). The fragments appear quickly, and then agglomerate together, yielding an evolving mass spectrum that remains approximately a power law, dN/dm ∝ m-α, where a is 2.5 ± 0.5. Several specific tests of this theory are proposed: (i) that a short wavelength cut

  15. Support for linguistic macrofamilies from weighted sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Gerhard

    2015-10-13

    Computational phylogenetics is in the process of revolutionizing historical linguistics. Recent applications have shed new light on controversial issues, such as the location and time depth of language families and the dynamics of their spread. So far, these approaches have been limited to single-language families because they rely on a large body of expert cognacy judgments or grammatical classifications, which is currently unavailable for most language families. The present study pursues a different approach. Starting from raw phonetic transcription of core vocabulary items from very diverse languages, it applies weighted string alignment to track both phonetic and lexical change. Applied to a collection of ∼1,000 Eurasian languages and dialects, this method, combined with phylogenetic inference, leads to a classification in excellent agreement with established findings of historical linguistics. Furthermore, it provides strong statistical support for several putative macrofamilies contested in current historical linguistics. In particular, there is a solid signal for the Nostratic/Eurasiatic macrofamily.

  16. Weighted averages of magnetization from magnetic field measurements: A fast interpretation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, Maurizio

    2003-08-01

    Magnetic anomalies may be interpreted in terms of weighted averages of magnetization (WAM) by a simple transformation. The WAM transformation consists of dividing at each measurement point the experimental magnetic field by a normalizing field, computed from a source volume with a homogeneous unit-magnetization. The transformation yields a straightforward link among source and field position vectors. A main WAM outcome is that sources at different depths appear well discriminated. Due to the symmetry of the problem, the higher the considered field altitude, the deeper the sources outlined by the transformation. This is shown for single and multi-source synthetic cases as well as for real data. We analyze the real case of Mt. Vulture volcano (Southern Italy), where the related anomaly strongly interferes with that from deep intrusive sources. The volcanic edifice is well identified. The deep source is estimated at about 9 km depth, in agreement with other results.

  17. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: A novel heterogeneous catalyst support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have emerged as viable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. Post-synthetic surface modification protocol for magnetic nanoparticles has been developed that imparts desirable che...

  18. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in cystic renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Balyemez, Fikret; Aslan, Ahmet; Inan, Ibrahim; Ayaz, Ercan; Karagöz, Vildan; Özkanli, Sıdıka Şeyma; Acar, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to introduce the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing benign and malignant renal cystic masses. Methods: Abdominal DWI-MRIs of patients with Bosniak categories 2F, 3, and 4 cystic renal masses were evaluated retrospectively. Cystic masses were assigned as benign or malignant according to histopathological or followup MRI findings and compared with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Results: There were 30 patients (18 males and 12 females, mean age was 59.23 ± 12.08 years [range 38–83 years]) with cystic renal masses (eight Bosniak category 2F, 12 Bosniak category 3, 10 Bosniak category 4). Among them, 14 cysts were diagnosed as benign and 16 as malignant by followup imaging or histopathological findings. For the malignant lesions, the mean ADC values were lower than for benign lesions (p=0.001). An ADC value of ≤2.28 ×10−6 mm2/s or less had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 92.86% for detecting malignancy. Conclusions: ADC can improve the diagnostic performance of MRI in the evaluation of complex renal cysts when used together with conventional MRI sequences. PMID:28163806

  19. Is social support associated with greater weight loss after bariatric surgery?: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Livhits, M; Mercado, C; Yermilov, I; Parikh, J A; Dutson, E; Mehran, A; Ko, C Y; Shekelle, P G; Gibbons, M M

    2011-02-01

    Social support may be associated with increased weight loss after bariatric surgery. The objective of this article is to determine impact of post-operative support groups and other forms of social support on weight loss after bariatric surgery. MEDLINE search (1988-2009) was completed using MeSH terms including bariatric procedures and a spectrum of patient factors with potential relationship to weight loss outcomes. Of the 934 screened studies, 10 reported on social support and weight loss outcomes. Five studies reported on support groups and five studies reported on other forms of social support (such as perceived family support or number of confidants) and degree of post-operative weight loss (total n = 735 patients). All studies found a positive association between post-operative support groups and weight loss. One study found a positive association between marital status (being single) and weight loss, while three studies found a non-significant positive trend and one study was inconclusive. Support group attendance after bariatric surgery is associated with greater post-operative weight loss. Further research is necessary to determine the impact of other forms of social support. These factors should be addressed in prospective studies of weight loss following bariatric surgery, as they may represent ways to improve post-operative outcomes.

  20. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  1. Random synaptic feedback weights support error backpropagation for deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillicrap, Timothy P.; Cownden, Daniel; Tweed, Douglas B.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2016-11-01

    The brain processes information through multiple layers of neurons. This deep architecture is representationally powerful, but complicates learning because it is difficult to identify the responsible neurons when a mistake is made. In machine learning, the backpropagation algorithm assigns blame by multiplying error signals with all the synaptic weights on each neuron's axon and further downstream. However, this involves a precise, symmetric backward connectivity pattern, which is thought to be impossible in the brain. Here we demonstrate that this strong architectural constraint is not required for effective error propagation. We present a surprisingly simple mechanism that assigns blame by multiplying errors by even random synaptic weights. This mechanism can transmit teaching signals across multiple layers of neurons and performs as effectively as backpropagation on a variety of tasks. Our results help reopen questions about how the brain could use error signals and dispel long-held assumptions about algorithmic constraints on learning.

  2. Random synaptic feedback weights support error backpropagation for deep learning.

    PubMed

    Lillicrap, Timothy P; Cownden, Daniel; Tweed, Douglas B; Akerman, Colin J

    2016-11-08

    The brain processes information through multiple layers of neurons. This deep architecture is representationally powerful, but complicates learning because it is difficult to identify the responsible neurons when a mistake is made. In machine learning, the backpropagation algorithm assigns blame by multiplying error signals with all the synaptic weights on each neuron's axon and further downstream. However, this involves a precise, symmetric backward connectivity pattern, which is thought to be impossible in the brain. Here we demonstrate that this strong architectural constraint is not required for effective error propagation. We present a surprisingly simple mechanism that assigns blame by multiplying errors by even random synaptic weights. This mechanism can transmit teaching signals across multiple layers of neurons and performs as effectively as backpropagation on a variety of tasks. Our results help reopen questions about how the brain could use error signals and dispel long-held assumptions about algorithmic constraints on learning.

  3. Random synaptic feedback weights support error backpropagation for deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Lillicrap, Timothy P.; Cownden, Daniel; Tweed, Douglas B.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    The brain processes information through multiple layers of neurons. This deep architecture is representationally powerful, but complicates learning because it is difficult to identify the responsible neurons when a mistake is made. In machine learning, the backpropagation algorithm assigns blame by multiplying error signals with all the synaptic weights on each neuron's axon and further downstream. However, this involves a precise, symmetric backward connectivity pattern, which is thought to be impossible in the brain. Here we demonstrate that this strong architectural constraint is not required for effective error propagation. We present a surprisingly simple mechanism that assigns blame by multiplying errors by even random synaptic weights. This mechanism can transmit teaching signals across multiple layers of neurons and performs as effectively as backpropagation on a variety of tasks. Our results help reopen questions about how the brain could use error signals and dispel long-held assumptions about algorithmic constraints on learning. PMID:27824044

  4. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging: extraneurological applications.

    PubMed

    Colagrande, S; Carbone, S F; Carusi, L M; Cova, M; Villari, N

    2006-04-01

    Diffusion-weighted (Dw) imaging has for a number of years been a diagnostic tool in the field of neuroradiology, yet only since the end of the 1990s, with the introduction of echoplanar imaging (EPI) and the use of sequences capable of performing diffusion studies during a single breath hold, has it found diagnostic applications at the level of the abdomen. The inherent sensitivity to motion and the magnetic susceptibility of Dw sequences nonetheless still create problems in the study of the abdomen due to artefacts caused by the heartbeat and intestinal peristalsis, as well as the presence of various parenchymal-gas interfaces. With regard to focal liver lesions, a review of the literature reveals that Dw imaging is able to differentiate lesions with high water content (cysts and angiomas) from solid lesions. With regard to the latter, although there are differences between benign forms [focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), adenoma] and malignant forms [metastasis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)] in their apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the average values for histological type, there is a significant overlap in values when lesions are assessed individually, with the consequent problem of their correct identification. One promising aspect is the possibility of quantifying the degree of fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease and cirrhosis given that the deposit of collagen fibres "restricts" the motion of water molecules and therefore reduces ADC values. However, even in this field, studies can only be considered preliminary and far from real clinical applications. The retroperitoneum is less affected by motion artefacts and similarly deserves the attention of Dw imaging. Here it is possible to differentiate mucin-producing tumours of the pancreas from pseudocystic forms on the basis of ADC values even though the limited spatial resolution of Dw imaging does not enable the identification of small lesions. Dw imaging may be applied to the study of the

  5. Which worksite supports for healthy weight do employees use?

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Rachel G.; Hipp, J. Aaron; Marx, Christine M.; Yang, Lin; Brownson, Ross C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores factors associated with employee use of available supports for improving nutrition and activity behaviors. A cross-sectional telephone-survey assessed presence and use of available program, facility, and policy supports. Logistic regression was used to explore associations between job characteristics (e.g., supervising others) and use of available supports, adjusting for demographic characteristics. After adjustment, most supports were associated with at least one job-related factor. Participants supervising others were more likely to utilize eight supports including personal services for fitness, indoor exercise and shower facilities, and flextime for physical activity. The programs and facilities associated with the most factors were health fairs (e.g., increased likelihood with increased hours worked/week) and indoor exercise and shower facilities (e.g., increased likelihood with increased flexibility at work), respectively. Policies were associated with fewer factors. Since use of many programs and facilities differed based on job-related factors, employers might target supports based on job-related factors. PMID:26924850

  6. Posture interacts with arm weight support to modulate corticomotor excitability to the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Runnalls, Keith D; Anson, Greg; Byblow, Winston D

    2017-01-01

    The use of arm weight support (WS) to optimize movement quality may be an avenue for improved upper limb stroke rehabilitation; however, the underlying neurophysiological effects of WS are not well understood. Rehabilitation exercises may be performed when sitting or standing, but the interaction of posture with WS has not been examined until now. We explored the effect of posture with WS on corticomotor excitability (CME) in healthy adults. Thirteen participants performed static shoulder abduction in two postures (sitting and standing) at three levels of WS (0, 45, and 90 % of full support). Transcranial magnetic stimulation of primary motor cortex was used to elicit motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in eight upper limb muscles. Stimulus-response (SR) curves were fitted to the MEP data using nonlinear regression. Whole-body posture interacted with WS to influence tonic activity and CME in all muscles examined. SR curve parameters revealed greater CME when standing compared to sitting for upper arm muscles, but lower CME to the shoulder, forearm, and hand. Distal to the shoulder, tonic activity and CME were modulated independent of any explicit differences in task requirements. Overall, these results support a model of integrated upper limb control influenced by whole-body posture and WS. These findings have implications for the application of WS in settings such as upper limb rehabilitation after stroke.

  7. Identifying the ischaemic penumbra using pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harston, George W. J.; Tee, Yee Kai; Blockley, Nicholas; Okell, Thomas W.; Thandeswaran, Sivarajan; Shaya, Gabriel; Sheerin, Fintan; Cellerini, Martino; Payne, Stephen; Jezzard, Peter; Chappell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The original concept of the ischaemic penumbra suggested imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism would be required to identify tissue that may benefit from intervention. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging, a chemical exchange saturation transfer technique, has been used to derive cerebral intracellular pH in preclinical stroke models and has been proposed as a metabolic marker of ischaemic penumbra. In this proof of principle clinical study, we explored the potential of this pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique at tissue-level. Detailed voxel-wise analysis was performed on data from a prospective cohort of 12 patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Voxels within ischaemic core had a more severe intracellular acidosis than hypoperfused tissue recruited to the final infarct (P < 0.0001), which in turn was more acidotic than hypoperfused tissue that survived (P < 0.0001). In addition, when confined to the grey matter perfusion deficit, intracellular pH (P < 0.0001), but not cerebral blood flow (P = 0.31), differed between tissue that infarcted and tissue that survived. Within the presenting apparent diffusion coefficient lesion, intracellular pH differed between tissue with early apparent diffusion lesion pseudonormalization and tissue with true radiographic recovery. These findings support the need for further investigation of pH-weighted imaging in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. PMID:25564491

  8. Identifying the ischaemic penumbra using pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Harston, George W J; Tee, Yee Kai; Blockley, Nicholas; Okell, Thomas W; Thandeswaran, Sivarajan; Shaya, Gabriel; Sheerin, Fintan; Cellerini, Martino; Payne, Stephen; Jezzard, Peter; Chappell, Michael; Kennedy, James

    2015-01-01

    The original concept of the ischaemic penumbra suggested imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism would be required to identify tissue that may benefit from intervention. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging, a chemical exchange saturation transfer technique, has been used to derive cerebral intracellular pH in preclinical stroke models and has been proposed as a metabolic marker of ischaemic penumbra. In this proof of principle clinical study, we explored the potential of this pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique at tissue-level. Detailed voxel-wise analysis was performed on data from a prospective cohort of 12 patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Voxels within ischaemic core had a more severe intracellular acidosis than hypoperfused tissue recruited to the final infarct (P < 0.0001), which in turn was more acidotic than hypoperfused tissue that survived (P < 0.0001). In addition, when confined to the grey matter perfusion deficit, intracellular pH (P < 0.0001), but not cerebral blood flow (P = 0.31), differed between tissue that infarcted and tissue that survived. Within the presenting apparent diffusion coefficient lesion, intracellular pH differed between tissue with early apparent diffusion lesion pseudonormalization and tissue with true radiographic recovery. These findings support the need for further investigation of pH-weighted imaging in patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticle-supported glutathione: a conceptually sustainable organocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptually novel nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable organocatalyst has been developed, which is readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials in a truly sustainable manner; which catalyzes Paal-Knorr reaction with high yield in pure aqueous medium that...

  10. [Effect of vibration caused by time-varying magnetic fields on diffusion-weighted MRI].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Akio; Maeda, Fumie; Miyai, Akira; Hayashi, Kohji; Hongoh, Takaharu

    2006-04-20

    Diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) with high b-factor in the body are often used to detect and diagnose cancer at MRI. The echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence and high motion probing gradient pulse are used at diffusion weighted imaging, causing high table vibration. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the diffusion signal and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values are influenced by this vibration because of time-varying magnetic fields. Two DWIs were compared. In one, phantoms were fixed on the MRI unit's table transmitting the vibration. In the other, phantoms were supported in air, in the absence of vibration. The phantoms called "solution phantoms" were made from agarose of a particular density. The phantoms called "jelly phantoms" were made from agarose that was heated. The diffusion signal and ADC value of each image were compared. The results showed that the signal of DWI units using the solution phantom was not affected by vibration. However, the signal of DWI and ADC were increased in the low-density jelly phantom as a result of vibration, causing the jelly phantom to vibrate. The DWIs of vibrating regions such as the breast maybe be subject to error. A countermeasure seems to be to support the region adequately.

  11. Case history of magnetic bearing supported hot gas turboexpander

    SciTech Connect

    Destombes, Y.; Allaire, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    A very significant advantage for the use of magnetic bearings in hot gas and cryogenic expanders is that the bearing operating temperature can be much higher or lower than for conventional oil lubricated fluid film or rolling element bearings. This has lead to the increasing development of industrial expanders which are magnetic bearing supported and rather complex bearing oil supply sealing arrangements can be eliminated. As advances in magnetic bearing technology and understanding occur, the design and performance of the magnetic bearings continues to improve. The purpose of this paper is to describe some characteristics of industrial magnetic bearing supported turboexpanders, both hot gas and cryogenic, and present a particular hot gas expander application. This paper discusses the basic principles of operation of the magnetic bearings including the bearing radial and thrust bearings, sensors, control system, and dynamic characteristics. The governing equations are given for upper quadrant radial bearing designs. Design equations relevant to bearing design will be presented to assist potential users of magnetic bearings in understanding their operation. The paper also presents a practical application of magnetic bearings to a hot gas turbogenerator. The bearings support a turbine wheel which converts the exhaust gas energy of a blast furnace into electrical power through a synchronous 6 MW generator. The magnetic bearing allowed the rotor to be constructed as a single shaft machine. The turbine wheel is directly connected to the generator rotor. The unit has been successfully operated for a 8 year period and now has in excess of 70,000 hours in a steel plant in Europe. It has some unique features: (1) it is the heaviest magnetic bearing supported rotor in industrial operation at 8 tons, (2) it has very high unbalance acceptance, (3) it has a special rotor mounted auxiliary bearing design, and (4) only the upper quadrant of the bearing is employed in the unit.

  12. The role of nurse support within an Internet-delivered weight management intervention: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Sarah; Bradbury, Katherine; Yardley, Lucy; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored patients' experiences of nurse support for an Internet-delivered weight management intervention. Eighteen patients who had received either basic or regular nurse support (three or seven contacts, respectively) for the Internet intervention were interviewed. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. The findings suggest that more regular support for Internet interventions may have the potential to inhibit the development of autonomous motivation for weight loss, which might lead to problems in sustaining losses after support ends. Further research is now needed to confirm whether motivation is influenced by frequency of nurse support in Internet interventions in order to inform the development of optimal support which promotes sustained weight loss.

  13. Effects of Peer Support and Therapist Contact on Long-Term Weight Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, Michael G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of posttreatment programs to enhance weight loss maintenance. Obese clients (N=85) participated in either behavior therapy, behavior therapy and peer-support, or behavior therapy and therapist-contact programs. At 7-month follow-up, therapist-contact program showed significantly greater weight loss maintenance than did…

  14. Combating Weight-Based Bullying in Schools: Is There Public Support for the Use of Litigation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhl, Rebecca; Luedicke, Joerg; King, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying litigation is an emerging area of law that has increased in response to serious cases of bullying at school. Weight-based bullying is prevalent at school, but no research has examined the use of litigation to address this problem. We assessed public support for litigation approaches to address weight-based bullying at school,…

  15. Strategies to Address Weight-Based Victimization: Youths' Preferred Support Interventions from Classmates, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhl, Rebecca M.; Peterson, Jamie Lee; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Weight-Based Victimization is a frequent experience for adolescents who are overweight or obese, and is associated with numerous psychosocial and physical consequences for those who are targets of victimization. Assessing targets' preferences for different types of support and intervention has been absent in the context of weight-based…

  16. Effects of social support and spirituality on weight loss for rural African-American women.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sanggon

    2013-01-01

    Obesity continues to be an increasing health problem among African-American women. A 10-week weight-loss intervention program designed to address the problem in these women. Two different interventions (spiritually based and nonspiritually based) were tested, and both utilized a pre-test, posttest design On the basis of theories of social support, it was expected that participation in the intervention would produce a significant reduction in weight. In addition, the spiritual-based weight-loss program was hypothesized to produce greater weight reduction than the standard health (non-spiritual) program. The results demonstrated that the average weight and BMI of all participants in either a spiritually-based or a nonspiritually-based program were lower at the completion of the intervention program. In addition, the average weight and BMI loss for the spiritual group was significantly greater than the average weight and BMI loss for the non-spiritual group.

  17. Combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for the assessment of in vivo knee joint kinematics under full weight-bearing conditions.

    PubMed

    Al Hares, Ghaith; Eschweiler, Jörg; Radermacher, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    The development of detailed and specific knowledge on the biomechanical behavior of loaded knee structures has received increased attention in recent years. Stress magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been introduced in previous work to study knee kinematics under load conditions. Previous studies captured the knee movement either in atypical loading supine positions, or in upright positions with help of inclined supporting backrests being insufficient for movement capture under full-body weight-bearing conditions. In this work, we used a combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for measurement and assessment in knee kinematics under full-body weight-bearing in single legged stance. The proposed method is based on registration of high-resolution static magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in supine position with low-resolution data, quasi-static upright-magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in loaded positions for different degrees of knee flexion. The proposed method was applied for the measurement of tibiofemoral kinematics in 10 healthy volunteers. The combined magnetic resonance imaging approach allows the non-invasive measurement of knee kinematics in single legged stance and under physiological loading conditions. We believe that this method can provide enhanced understanding of the loaded knee kinematics.

  18. A Design Library of Magnet Support - a Proposal -

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Although the ideal and universal support system has not been invented yet, there are many implementations which fulfill most of alignment's requirements. However, inventing a new support system seems to represent the last design challenge, why would we otherwise witness so many new attempts. Already Plato reminded his scholars that one should learn from the past. Unfortunately, learning from previous designs and implementations doesn't seem to carry much attraction. Or it is that we, the customers, are not doing our job by letting the design engineer know what we would like to see done, what we think works, and what is already there. This contribution is an initiative to create a reference for support systems which exist in our laboratories and we know do work. Such an undertaking will require everybody's active support and feedback. I already have to thank my peers at many laboratories who helped me put together this first draft. Only if a more or less complete library of existing designs can be compiled with easy access to drawings can we then hope that the support system design competition looses its challenge. As alignment tolerances get ever tighter, the interplay of alignment with mechanical engineering becomes ever more important. In fact, accelerator alignment has advanced so far that mechanical uncertainties now exceed observational uncertainties. Of the mechanical issues bearing upon alignment, one of the most crucial is the magnet supports; these must provide both stability and a fineness of motion substantially exceeding the final alignment tolerances. Magnet supports are the interface that allows mechanical mounting of components and their subsequent alignment to a nominal position in three-dimensional space. Supports thus provide two functions: that of a spacer to bring the component close to its ideal position, and that of a fine motion system to enable the surveyor to move the component to its ideal location within the required tolerance. It is

  19. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  20. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-02-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  1. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  2. A novel body weight support system extension: initial concept and simulation study.

    PubMed

    Pennycott, Andrew; Vallery, Heike; Wyss, Dario; Spindler, Markus; Dewarrat, Antoine; Riener, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Body weight supported treadmill training is an approach to gait rehabilitation following a stroke or spinal cord injury. Although lateral control of balance is an important aspect of walking, many of the currently available body weight support systems have a fixed pulley configuration which can lead to lateral forces being developed in the supporting cables, interfering with the lateral balance task. In this paper, a novel extension for body weight support systems, used for treadmill walking, is presented which features a system of pulleys and trolleys. A model is developed for the device along with a basic feedback controller in order to enable simulation of the concept. The lateral forces induced by the novel system are greatly reduced in comparison to a fixed pulley system. This device has applications in balance training within gait rehabilitation programs.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids improve firefly luciferase properties.

    PubMed

    Noori, Ali Reza; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ghiasi, Parisa; Akbari, Jafar; Heydari, Akbar

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids as neoteric solvents, microwave irradiation, and alternative energy source are becoming as a solvent for many enzymatic reactions. We recently showed that the incubation of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis with various ionic liquids increased the activity and stability of luciferase. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids have been obtained by covalent bonding of ionic liquids-silane on magnetic silica nanoparticles. In the present study, the effects of [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImCl] and [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImI] were investigated on the structural properties and function of luciferase using circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and bioluminescence assay. Enzyme activity and structural stability increased in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids. Furthermore, the effect of ingredients which were used was not considerable on K(m) value of luciferase for adenosine-5'-triphosphate and also K(m) value for luciferin.

  4. Design study for a magnetically supported reaction wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.; Dendy, J.; Sabnis, A.

    1974-01-01

    Results are described of a study program in which the characteristics of a magnetically supported reaction wheel are defined. Tradeoff analyses are presented for the principal components, which are then combined in several reaction wheel design concepts. A preliminary layout of the preferred configuration is presented along with calculated design and performance parameters. Recommendations are made for a prototype development program.

  5. Orthotic Body-Weight Support Through Underactuated Potential Energy Shaping with Contact Constraints.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ge; Gregg, Robert D

    2015-12-01

    Body-weight support is an effective clinical tool for gait rehabilitation after neurological impairment. Body-weight supported training systems have been developed to help patients regain mobility and confidence during walking, but conventional systems constrain the patient's treatment in clinical environments. We propose that this challenge could be addressed by virtually providing patients with body-weight support through the actuators of a powered orthosis (or exoskeleton) utilizing potential energy shaping control. However, the changing contact conditions and degrees of underactuation encountered during human walking present significant challenges to consistently matching a desired potential energy for the human in closed loop. We therefore introduce a generalized matching condition for shaping Lagrangian systems with holonomic contact constraints. By satisfying this matching condition for four phases of gait, we derive control laws to achieve virtual body-weight support through a powered knee-ankle orthosis. We demonstrate beneficial effects of virtual body-weight support in simulations of a human-like biped model, indicating the potential clinical value of this proposed control approach.

  6. Orthotic Body-Weight Support Through Underactuated Potential Energy Shaping with Contact Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Ge; Gregg, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Body-weight support is an effective clinical tool for gait rehabilitation after neurological impairment. Body-weight supported training systems have been developed to help patients regain mobility and confidence during walking, but conventional systems constrain the patient's treatment in clinical environments. We propose that this challenge could be addressed by virtually providing patients with body-weight support through the actuators of a powered orthosis (or exoskeleton) utilizing potential energy shaping control. However, the changing contact conditions and degrees of underactuation encountered during human walking present significant challenges to consistently matching a desired potential energy for the human in closed loop. We therefore introduce a generalized matching condition for shaping Lagrangian systems with holonomic contact constraints. By satisfying this matching condition for four phases of gait, we derive control laws to achieve virtual body-weight support through a powered knee-ankle orthosis. We demonstrate beneficial effects of virtual body-weight support in simulations of a human-like biped model, indicating the potential clinical value of this proposed control approach. PMID:26900254

  7. A novel device for studying weight supported, quadrupedal overground locomotion in spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Marvin; Traughber, Terrance; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; de Leon, Ray D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Providing weight support facilitates locomotion in spinal cord injured animals. To control weight support, robotic systems have been developed for treadmill stepping and more recently for overground walking. New Method We developed a novel device, the body weight supported ambulatory rodent trainer (i.e. BART). It has a small pneumatic cylinder that moves along a linear track above the rat. When air is supplied to the cylinder, the rats are lifted as they perform overground walking. We tested the BART device in rats that received a moderate spinal cord contusion injury and in normal rats. Locomotor training with the BART device was not performed. Results All of the rats learned to walk in the BART device. In the contused rats, significantly greater paw dragging and dorsal stepping occurred in the hindlimbs compared to normal. Providing weight support significantly raised hip position and significantly reduced locomotor deficits. Hindlimb stepping was tightly coupled to forelimb stepping but only when the contused rats stepped without weight support. Three weeks after the contused rats received a complete spinal cord transection, significantly fewer hindlimb steps were performed. Comparison with Existing Methods Relative to rodent robotic systems, the BART device is a simpler system for studying overground locomotion. The BART device lacks sophisticated control and sensing capability, but it can be assembled relatively easily and cheaply. Conclusions These findings suggest that the BART device is a useful tool for assessing quadrupedal, overground locomotion which is a more natural form of locomotion relative to treadmill locomotion. PMID:25794460

  8. Weighted current sheets supported in normal and inverse configurations - A model for prominence observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, P.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    A technique which incorporates both photospheric and prominence magnetic field observations is used to analyze the magnetic support of solar prominences in two dimensions. The prominence is modeled by a mass-loaded current sheet which is supported against gravity by magnetic fields from a bipolar source in the photosphere and a massless line current in the corona. It is found that prominence support can be achieved in three different kinds of configurations: an arcade topology with a normal polarity; a helical topology with a normal polarity; and a helical topology with an inverse polarity. In all cases the important parameter is the variation of the horizontal component of the prominence field with height. Adding a line current external to the prominence eliminates the nonsupport problem which plagues virtually all previous prominence models with inverse polarity.

  9. Young adults' strategies for managing social support during weight-loss attempts.

    PubMed

    Faw, Meara H

    2014-02-01

    Obesity and being overweight often result in serious health problems. Despite growing awareness of the dangers associated with being overweight, many individuals struggle to lose weight. Investigators have identified social support as a key element in weight-loss attempts. Unfortunately, little has been done to investigate how people solicit social support from members of their pre-existing social network without a structured intervention. To address this limitation, I conducted in-depth interviews with 25 participants. Through grounded theory analysis of these interviews, I developed a typology of support management strategies used by overweight young adults when attempting to lose weight. I outline these strategies, their perceived success, and implications for future research in this article.

  10. Modelling and control of a rotor supported by magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Pradeep, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dynamical model of a rotor and the active magnetic bearings used to support the rotor. We use this model to develop a stable state feedback control of the magnetic bearing system. We present the development of a rigid body model of the rotor, utilizing both Rotation Matrices (Euler Angles) and Euler Parameters (Quaternions). In the latter half of the paper we develop a stable state feedback control of the actively controlled magnetic bearing to control the rotor position under inbalances. The control law developed takes into account the variation of the model with rotational speed. We show stability over the whole operating range of speeds for the magnetic bearing system. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the closed loop system performance. We develop the model of the magnetic bearing, and present two schemes for the excitation of the poles of the actively controlled magnetic bearing. We also present a scheme for averaging multiple sensor measurements and splitting the actuation forces amongst redundant actuators.

  11. Improved equilibrium reconstructions by advanced statistical weighting of the internal magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Murari, A; Gelfusa, M; Peluso, E; Gaudio, P; Mazon, D; Hawkes, N; Point, G; Alper, B; Eich, T

    2014-12-01

    In a Tokamak the configuration of the magnetic fields remains the key element to improve performance and to maximise the scientific exploitation of the device. On the other hand, the quality of the reconstructed fields depends crucially on the measurements available. Traditionally in the least square minimisation phase of the algorithms, used to obtain the magnetic field topology, all the diagnostics are given the same weights, a part from a corrective factor taking into account the error bars. This assumption unduly penalises complex diagnostics, such as polarimetry, which have a limited number of highly significant measurements. A completely new method to choose the weights, to be given to the internal measurements of the magnetic fields for improved equilibrium reconstructions, is presented in this paper. The approach is based on various statistical indicators applied to the residuals, the difference between the actual measurements and their estimates from the reconstructed equilibrium. The potential of the method is exemplified using the measurements of the Faraday rotation derived from JET polarimeter. The results indicate quite clearly that the weights have to be determined carefully, since the inappropriate choice can have significant repercussions on the quality of the magnetic reconstruction both in the edge and in the core. These results confirm the limitations of the assumption that all the diagnostics have to be given the same weight, irrespective of the number of measurements they provide and the region of the plasma they probe.

  12. Diagnosis of pericardial cysts using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging: A case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Congenital pericardial cysts are benign lesions that arise from the pericardium during embryonic development. The diagnosis is based on typical imaging features, but atypical locations and signal magnetic resonance imaging sequences make it difficult to exclude other lesions. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a novel method that can be used to differentiate tissues based on their restriction to proton diffusion. Its use in differentiating pericardial cysts from other pericardial lesions has not yet been described. Case presentation We present three cases (a 51-year-old Caucasian woman, a 66-year-old Caucasian woman and a 77-year-old Caucasian woman) with pericardial cysts evaluated with diffusion-weighted imaging using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Each lesion demonstrated a high apparent diffusion coefficient similar to that of free water. Conclusion This case series is the first attempt to investigate the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pericardial cysts. Diffusion-weighted imaging may be a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool for pericardial cysts when conventional imaging findings are inconclusive. PMID:21943086

  13. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  14. Strategies to address weight-based victimization: youths' preferred support interventions from classmates, teachers, and parents.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Peterson, Jamie Lee; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-03-01

    Weight-Based Victimization is a frequent experience for adolescents who are overweight or obese, and is associated with numerous psychosocial and physical consequences for those who are targets of victimization. Assessing targets` preferences for different types of support and intervention has been absent in the context of weight-based victimization, but is needed to help inform potential interventions, motivate action, and identify strategies to help adolescents cope with experiences of weight-related teasing or bullying. Adolescents (14-18 years, N = 361, 40 % female, 71 % Caucasian) enrolled in national weight-loss camps completed an on-line survey. Participants who reported previous experiences of weight-based victimization were surveyed about their preferred interventions from peers, friends, teachers, Physical Education (PE) teachers/coaches, and parents. Participants indicated their preferences for specific strategies pertaining to target support, bullying intervention and prevention (e.g., inclusion in peer activities, confronting the bully, telling an adult, and improving anti-bullying policies). Friends (66 %) and peers (58 %) were the most highly preferred intervention agents followed by teachers (55 %), PE teachers/coaches (44 %), and parents (43 %). Participants who experienced more weight-based victimization expressed increased desire for intervention. The frequency of victimization, social support from friends and family, and perceived likelihood and helpfulness of intervention significantly influenced participant preferences for certain types of intervention, although preferences were generally consistent across participants' characteristics. The current study is the first to document youth's preferences for interventions in response to weight-based victimization. The findings have important implications for encouraging appropriate intervention and informing bystanders, which may help to reduce the prevalence, recurrence, and consequences for youth

  15. Digital control of magnetic bearings supporting a multimass flexible rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, F. J.; Williams, R. D.; Allaire, P. E.; Schafer, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of magnetic bearings used to support a three mass flexible rotor operated at speeds up to 14,000 RPM are discussed. The magnetic components of the bearing are of a type reported in the literature previously, but the earlier analog controls were replaced by digital ones. Analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters and digital control software were installed in an AT&T PC. This PC-based digital controller was used to operate one of the magnetic bearings on the test rig. Basic proportional-derivative control was applied to the bearings, and the bearing stiffness and damping characteristics were evaluated. Particular attention is paid to the frequency dependent behavior of the stiffness and damping properties, and comparisons are made between the actual controllers and ideal proportional-derivative control.

  16. Vibration and Control of Flexible Rotor Supported by Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou

    1988-01-01

    Active vibration control of flexible rotors supported by magnetic bearings is discussed. Using a finite-element method for a mathematical model of the flexible rotor, the eigenvalue problem is formulated taking into account the interaction between a mechanical system of the flexible rotor and an electrical system of the magnetic bearings and the controller. However, for the sake of simplicity, gyroscopic effects are disregarded. It is possible to adapt this formulation to a general flexible rotor-magnetic bearing system. Controllability with and without collocation sensors and actuators located at the same distance along the rotor axis is discussed for the higher order flexible modes of the test rig. In conclusion, it is proposed that it is necessary to add new active control loops for the higher flexible modes even in the case of collocation. Then it is possible to stabilize for the case of uncollocation by means of this method.

  17. Prototype ventricular assist device supported on magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Maslen, E.H.; Kim, H.C.; Olsen, D.B.; Bearnson, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Mechanical artificial hearts are now expected to be used as assist or total replacements for failing human hearts, if a reliable, anatomically appropriate design is developed. Initially, ventricular assist or total replacement devices were pulsatile air driven units containing a flexing polymeric diaphragm and two valves for each ventricle. Many reliability problems were encountered. Recently, attention has been focused on axial or centrifugal continuous flow blood pumps. Magnetic bearings employed in such devices offer the advantages of no required lubrication and large operating clearances. This paper describes a prototype continuous flow pump supported in magnetic bearings. The pump performance was measured in a simulated adult human circulation system. It delivered 6 liters/min of flow at 100 mm Hg differential head operating at 2,400 rpm in water. The pump is totally magnetically supported in four magnetic bearings - two radial and two thrust. The geometry and other properties of the bearings are described. Bearing parameters such as load capacity, current gains, and open loop stiffness are discussed. Bearing coil currents were measured during operation in air and water. The rotor was operated in various orientations to determine the actuator current gains. These values were then used to estimate the radial and thrust forces acting on the rotor in both air and water.

  18. Magnetic bearing development for support of satellite flywheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Li, Mu; Kenny, Andrew; Lei, Shuliang; Havelka, Danny; Kascak, Albert

    1998-01-01

    The use of magnetic bearings (MB) for support of space based flywheels can provide significant improvement in efficiency due to reduction in drag torque. A NASA supported program directed through the Texas A&M Center for Space Power has been formed to advance the technology of MB's for satellite flywheel applications. The five areas of the program are: (a) Magnetic Field Simulation, (b) MB controller Development, (c) Electromechanical Rotordynamics Modeling, (d) Testing and (e) Technology Exchange. Planned innovations in these tasks include eddy current drag torque and power loss determination including moving conductor effects, digital (DSP) based control for high speed operation, MATLAB-based coupled flexible rotor/controller/actuator electromechanical model with fuzzy logic nonlinear control, and ultra high speed>100 krpm measurement of drag torque. The paper examines these areas and provides an overview of the project.

  19. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOEpatents

    Withers, Gregory J.; Meier, Stephen W.; Walter, Robert J.; Child, Michael D.; DeGraaf, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  20. Diffeomorphic susceptibility artifact correction of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthotto, L.; Kugel, H.; Olesch, J.; Fischer, B.; Modersitzki, J.; Burger, M.; Wolters, C. H.

    2012-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a key investigation technique in modern neuroscience. In clinical settings, diffusion-weighted imaging and its extension to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are usually performed applying the technique of echo-planar imaging (EPI). EPI is the commonly available ultrafast acquisition technique for single-shot acquisition with spatial encoding in a Cartesian system. A drawback of these sequences is their high sensitivity against small perturbations of the magnetic field, caused, e.g., by differences in magnetic susceptibility of soft tissue, bone and air. The resulting magnetic field inhomogeneities thus cause geometrical distortions and intensity modulations in diffusion-weighted images. This complicates the fusion with anatomical T1- or T2-weighted MR images obtained with conventional spin- or gradient-echo images and negligible distortion. In order to limit the degradation of diffusion-weighted MR data, we present here a variational approach based on a reference scan pair with reversed polarity of the phase- and frequency-encoding gradients and hence reversed distortion. The key novelty is a tailored nonlinear regularization functional to obtain smooth and diffeomorphic transformations. We incorporate the physical distortion model into a variational image registration framework and derive an accurate and fast correction algorithm. We evaluate the applicability of our approach to distorted DTI brain scans of six healthy volunteers. For all datasets, the automatic correction algorithm considerably reduced the image degradation. We show that, after correction, fusion with T1- or T2-weighted images can be obtained by a simple rigid registration. Furthermore, we demonstrate the improvement due to the novel regularization scheme. Most importantly, we show that it provides meaningful, i.e. diffeomorphic, geometric transformations, independent of the actual choice of the regularization parameters.

  1. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  2. A voxel based comparative analysis using magnetization transfer imaging and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Mangalore; Saini, Jitender; Pasha, Shaik Afsar; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Aims: In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) tissue damage occurs in specific cortical and subcortical regions. Voxel based analysis using T1-weighted images depict quantitative gray matter (GM) atrophy changes. Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging depicts qualitative changes in the brain parenchyma. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether MT imaging could indicate abnormalities in PSP. Settings and Design: A total of 10 patients with PSP (9 men and 1 woman) and 8 controls (5 men and 3 women) were studied with T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3DMT imaging. Voxel based analysis of T1-weighted MRI was performed to investigate brain atrophy while MT was used to study qualitative abnormalities in the brain tissue. We used SPM8 to investigate group differences (with two sample t-test) using the GM and white matter (WM) segmented data. Results: T1-weighted imaging and MT are equally sensitive to detect changes in GM and WM in PSP. Magnetization transfer ratio images and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo revealed extensive bilateral volume and qualitative changes in the orbitofrontal, prefrontal cortex and limbic lobe and sub cortical GM. The prefrontal structures involved were the rectal gyrus, medial, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). The anterior cingulate, cingulate gyrus and lingual gyrus of limbic lobe and subcortical structures such as caudate, thalamus, insula and claustrum were also involved. Cerebellar involvement mainly of anterior lobe was also noted. Conclusions: The findings suggest that voxel based MT imaging permits a whole brain unbiased investigation of central nervous system structural integrity in PSP. PMID:25024571

  3. Interlimb coordination in body-weight supported locomotion: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Seiterle, Stefan; Susko, Tyler; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Riener, Robert; Igo Krebs, Hermano

    2015-08-20

    Locomotion involves complex neural networks responsible for automatic and volitional actions. During locomotion, motor strategies can rapidly compensate for any obstruction or perturbation that could interfere with forward progression. In this pilot study, we examined the contribution of interlimb pathways for evoking muscle activation patterns in the contralateral limb when a unilateral perturbation was applied and in the case where body weight was externally supported. In particular, the latency of neuromuscular responses was measured, while the stimulus to afferent feedback was limited. The pilot experiment was conducted with six healthy young subjects. It employed the MIT-Skywalker (beta-prototype), a novel device intended for gait therapy. Subjects were asked to walk on the split-belt treadmill, while a fast unilateral perturbation was applied mid-stance by unexpectedly lowering one side of the split-treadmill walking surfaces. Subject's weight was externally supported via the body-weight support system consisting of an underneath bicycle seat and the torso was stabilized via a loosely fitted chest harness. Both the weight support and the chest harness limited the afferent feedback. The unilateral perturbations evoked changes in the electromyographic activity of the non-perturbed contralateral leg. The latency of all muscle responses exceeded 100ms, which precludes the conjecture that spinal cord alone is responsible for the perturbation response. It suggests the role of supraspinal or midbrain level pathways at the inter-leg coordination during gait.

  4. Interlimb Coordination in Body-Weight Supported Locomotion: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Seiterle, Stefan; Susko, Tyler; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K.; Riener, Robert; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Locomotion involves complex neural networks responsible for automatic and volitional actions. During locomotion, motor strategies can rapidly compensate for any obstruction or perturbation that could interfere with forward progression. In this pilot study, we examined the contribution of interlimb pathways for evoking muscle activation patterns in the contralateral limb when a unilateral perturbation was applied and in the case where body weight was externally supported. In particular, the latency of neuromuscular responses was measured, while the stimulus to afferent feedback was limited. The pilot experiment was conducted with six healthy young subjects. It employed the MIT-Skywalker (beta-prototype), a novel device intended for gait therapy. Subjects were asked to walk on the split-belt treadmill, while a fast unilateral perturbation was applied mid-stance by unexpectedly lowering one side of the split-treadmill walking surfaces. Subject's weight was externally supported via the body-weight support system consisting of an underneath bicycle seat and the torso was stabilized via a loosely fitted chest harness. Both the weight support and the chest harness limited the afferent feedback. The unilateral perturbations evoked changes in the electromyographic activity of the non-perturbed contralateral leg. The latency of all muscle responses exceeded 100 ms, which precludes the conjecture that spinal cord alone is responsible for the perturbation response. It suggests the role of supraspinal or midbrain level pathways at the inter-leg coordination during gait. PMID:25990210

  5. Kinematic assessment of treadmill running using different body-weight support harnesses.

    PubMed

    Millslagle, Duane; Levy, Morris; Matack, Nicholas

    2006-10-01

    10 male collegiate runners (M age = 21.4, SD = 1.5 yr.) ran on a treadmill with no body-weight support (BWS), 20% BWS, and 40% BWS conditions. In addition, they wore three different commercially available harnesses at the 20% and 40% BWS conditions. The aim was to run on the treadmill at a fast speed while maintaining an adequate step length. The purpose was to investigate how each harness changed running gait, and the differences in running gait between the harnesses with various body-weight support. Analysis of variance indicated significant restriction of upper body torso rotation between the harnesses at the 40% BWS conditions. Body-weight support resulted in a longer stride, decreased cadence, less vertical displacement of the center of mass, and diminished hip and ankle joint excursions. These changes indicated that increased body-weight support results in longer steps with the foot contacting the belt for a shorter period of time with less leg angular changes throughout the running cycling.

  6. Treadmill Training with Partial Body-Weight Support in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, Akmer; Krosschell, Kristin; Spira, Deborah Gaebler

    2009-01-01

    OKAim: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the literature on the effects of partial body-weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on functional outcomes and attainment of ambulation. Method: We searched the relevant literature from 1950 to July 2007. We found eight studies on the use of PWSBTT on…

  7. Teacher and Friend Social Support: Association with Body Weight in African-American Adolescent Females

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Jevetta; Webb, Fern J.; Lee, Jenny; Doldren, Michelle; Rathore, Mobeen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect ecological influences of teacher and friend social support on body weight and diet behaviors in African-American adolescent females. Using a quantitative, cross-sectional research design, a convenience sample of 182 urban African-American adolescent females (12–17 years old) completed a 39-item questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed perceived teacher social support, friend social support, nutrition self-efficacy, and diet behaviors (with internal reliability values of scale items: alpha=0.74, 0.81, 0.77, and 0.69 respectively). Anthropometric assessments were conducted to measure height and weight to compute BMI. Majority of the participants were in middle or early high school (65 %) and were overweight or obese (57.7 %). Both teacher social support and friend social support demonstrated a positive, indirect influence on child weight status through nutrition self-efficacy and diet behaviors following two different and specific paths of influence. Diet behaviors, in turn, demonstrated a positive, direct effect on child weight status. In the structural model, teacher social support had the greatest effect on diet behaviors, demonstrating a direct, positive influence on diet behaviors (B=0.421, p<0.05), but its direct effect on nutrition self-efficacy was not significant. Friend social support demonstrated a positive, direct effect on nutrition self-efficacy (B=0.227, p<0.05), but its direct effect on diet behaviors was not statistically significant. The study’s findings call for actively addressing the childhood obesity epidemic in the school environment by implementing health behavior change strategies at various social and ecological environmental levels. PMID:26863465

  8. Teacher and Friend Social Support: Association with Body Weight in African-American Adolescent Females.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Jevetta; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Webb, Fern J; Lee, Jenny; Doldren, Michelle; Rathore, Mobeen

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect ecological influences of teacher and friend social support on body weight and diet behaviors in African-American adolescent females. Using a quantitative, cross-sectional research design, a convenience sample of 182 urban African-American adolescent females (12-17 years old) completed a 39-item questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed perceived teacher social support, friend social support, nutrition self-efficacy, and diet behaviors (with internal reliability values of scale items: alpha = 0.74, 0.81, 0.77, and 0.69 respectively). Anthropometric assessments were conducted to measure height and weight to compute BMI. Majority of the participants were in middle or early high school (65 %) and were overweight or obese (57.7 %). Both teacher social support and friend social support demonstrated a positive, indirect influence on child weight status through nutrition self-efficacy and diet behaviors following two different and specific paths of influence. Diet behaviors, in turn, demonstrated a positive, direct effect on child weight status. In the structural model, teacher social support had the greatest effect on diet behaviors, demonstrating a direct, positive influence on diet behaviors (B = 0.421, p < 0.05), but its direct effect on nutrition self-efficacy was not significant. Friend social support demonstrated a positive, direct effect on nutrition self-efficacy (B = 0.227, p < 0.05), but its direct effect on diet behaviors was not statistically significant. The study's findings call for actively addressing the childhood obesity epidemic in the school environment by implementing health behavior change strategies at various social and ecological environmental levels.

  9. Wearable devices and mobile technologies for supporting behavioral weight loss among people with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Scherer, Emily A; McHugo, Gregory J; Marsch, Lisa A; Bartels, Stephen J

    2016-10-30

    Promoting physical activity is essential for addressing elevated cardiovascular risk and high obesity rates affecting people with serious mental illness. Numerous challenges interfere with exercise participation in this high-risk group including mental health symptoms, low motivation, and limited access to safe and affordable options for physical activity. Wearable devices and mobile health technologies may afford new opportunities for promoting physical activity and supporting behavioral weight loss efforts. This exploratory study examined whether daily step count measured using Fitbit wearable devices was associated with weight loss and improved fitness among individuals with serious mental illness enrolled in a 6-month lifestyle program. Participants (n=34) had a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (23.5%), major depression (50.0%), or bipolar disorder (26.5%), and wore Fitbits most of the days (M=86.2%; SD=18.4%) they were enrolled in the study. At 6-months, higher average daily step count was associated with greater weight loss (F=5.07; df=1,32; p=0.0314), but not improved fitness (F=1.92; df=1,31; p=0.176). These findings demonstrate that encouraging participants with serious mental illness enrolled in lifestyle interventions to collect more steps may contribute to greater weight loss. This suggests that wearable devices may offer a feasible and potentially effective strategy for supporting behavioral weight loss in community mental health settings.

  10. Influence of 7 days of hindlimb suspension and intermittent weight support on rat muscle mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierotti, David J.; Roy, Roland R.; Flores, Vinicio; Edgerton, Reggie

    1990-01-01

    The effect of intermittent periods of weight support on a decrease in mass of the soleus (Sol) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles atrophied by hindlimb suspension (HS) was investigated in rats subjected to continuous HS for seven days or an HS plus intermittent (10 min every 6 hrs of slow walking on a treadmill) weight support (HS-WS). After 7 d HS, the Sol weight relative to body weight was 21 and 9 percent lower in Hs and HS-WS, respectively, than in control rats. Maximum tetanic tension/muscle mass ratio was significantly lower in HS than in controls; the HS-WS rats had values similar to controls, whereas the maximum tetanic tension/muscle weight was significantly elevated in HS-WS compared to controls. Contraction times were 25 percent faster in the Sol and unchanged in the MG of HS rats, indicating that a low-force short-duration exercise regime results in a significant functional recovery in the 'slow' Sol, whereas the 'fast' MG is less affected.

  11. Prototype continuous flow ventricular assist device supported on magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Allaire, P E; Kim, H C; Maslen, E H; Olsen, D B; Bearnson, G B

    1996-06-01

    This article describes a prototype continuous flow pump (CFVAD2) fully supported in magnetic bearings. The pump performance was measured in a simulated adult human circulation system. The pump delivered 6 L/min of flow at 100 mm Hg of differential pressure head operating at 2,400 rpm in water. The pump is totally supported in 4 magnetic bearings: 2 radial and 2 thrust. Magnetic bearings offer the advantages of no required lubrication and large operating clearances. The geometry and other properties of the bearings are described. Bearing parameters such as load capacity and current gains are discussed. Bearing coil currents were measured during operation in air and water. The rotor was operated in various orientations to determine the actuator current gains. These values were then used to estimate the radial and thrust forces acting on the rotor in both air and water. Much lower levels of force were found than were expected, allowing for a very significant reduction in the size of the next prototype. Hemolysis levels were measured in the prototype pump and found not to indicate damage to the blood cells.

  12. Measuring Restriction Sizes Using Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews a new concept in magnetic resonance as applied to cellular and biological systems. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be used to infer information about restriction sizes of samples being measured. The measurements rely on the apparent diffusion coefficient changing with diffusion times as measurements move from restricted to free diffusion regimes. Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) measurements are limited in the ability to shorten diffusion times and thus are limited in restriction sizes which can be probed. Oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) measurements could provide shorter diffusion times so smaller restriction sizes could be probed. PMID:25114548

  13. Supporting self-efficacy through interactive discussion in online communities of weight loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Willis, Erin

    2016-06-22

    By conducting a content analysis of online communities connected by the Weight Watchers' online message boards, this study examined the relationship between conversational interactivity and consumer-generated content about consumer health information, self-efficacious content, and experiences with dieting and physical activities. The results showed that discussion about successful experiences with weight loss tended to be more interactive. Discussion about consumer health information tended to be non-interactive. The findings suggest that online communities generate social support through interactive discussion about successful experiences, and the interactive discussion, in return, sustains active participation in the community.

  14. Minimum classification error-based weighted support vector machine kernels for speaker verification.

    PubMed

    Suh, Youngjoo; Kim, Hoirin

    2013-04-01

    Support vector machines (SVMs) have been proved to be an effective approach to speaker verification. An appropriate selection of the kernel function is a key issue in SVM-based classification. In this letter, a new SVM-based speaker verification method utilizing weighted kernels in the Gaussian mixture model supervector space is proposed. The weighted kernels are derived by using the discriminative training approach, which minimizes speaker verification errors. Experiments performed on the NIST 2008 speaker recognition evaluation task showed that the proposed approach provides substantially improved performance over the baseline kernel-based method.

  15. A six-axis hybrid vibration isolation system using active zero-power control supported by passive weight support mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emdadul Hoque, Md.; Mizuno, Takeshi; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a six-degree-of-freedom hybrid vibration isolation system integrated with an active negative suspension, an active-passive positive suspension and a passive weight support mechanism. The aim of the research consists in maximizing the system and control performances, and minimizing the system development and maintenance costs. The vibration isolation system is, fundamentally, developed by connecting an active negative suspension realized by zero-power control in series with an active-passive positive suspension. The system could effectively isolate ground vibrations in addition to suppress the effect of on-board generated direct disturbances of the six-axis motions, associated with vertical and horizontal directions. The system is further reinforced by introducing a passive weight support mechanism in parallel with the basic system. The modified system with zero-power control allows simplified design of the isolation table without power consumption. It also offers enhanced performance on direct disturbance suppression and large payload supporting capabilities, without degrading transmissibility characteristics. A mathematical model of the system is presented and, therefore, analyzed to demonstrate that zero-compliance to direct disturbance could be generated by the developed system. Experimental demonstrations validate the proposed concept that exhibits high stiffness of the isolation table to static and dynamic direct disturbances, and good transmissibility characteristics against ground vibration. Further improvements of the vibration isolation system and the control system are discussed as well.

  16. Automated prostate cancer detection using T2-weighted and high-b-value diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford J.; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.; Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors propose a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for prostate cancer to aid in improving the accuracy, reproducibility, and standardization of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: The proposed system utilizes two MRI sequences [T2-weighted MRI and high-b-value (b = 2000 s/mm2) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] and texture features based on local binary patterns. A three-stage feature selection method is employed to provide the most discriminative features. The authors included a total of 244 patients. Training the CAD system on 108 patients (78 MR-positive prostate cancers and 105 benign MR-positive lesions), two validation studies were retrospectively performed on 136 patients (68 MR-positive prostate cancers, 111 benign MR-positive lesions, and 117 MR-negative benign lesions). Results: In distinguishing cancer from MR-positive benign lesions, an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76–0.89] was achieved. For cancer vs MR-positive or MR-negative benign lesions, the authors obtained an AUC of 0.89 AUC (95% CI: 0.84–0.93). The performance of the CAD system was not dependent on the specific regions of the prostate, e.g., a peripheral zone or transition zone. Moreover, the CAD system outperformed other combinations of MRI sequences: T2W MRI, high-b-value DWI, and the standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map of DWI. Conclusions: The novel CAD system is able to detect the discriminative texture features for cancer detection and localization and is a promising tool for improving the quality and efficiency of prostate cancer diagnosis. PMID:25979032

  17. Effects of periodic weight support on medial gastrocnemius fibers of suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Scot C.; Roy, Roland R.; Hauschka, Edward O.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1989-01-01

    The effects of seven-day-long hindlimb suspension (HS) and HS plus daily periodic weight support activity on the size and metabolic properties of individual fibers in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) of rats were examined. Sections of muscle tissue removed after seven day suspension were stained quantitatively for succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, and qualitatively for myosin ATPase. It was found that short intermittent periods of weight support had a beneficial effect in maintaining the size and metabolic properties of both dark and light ATPase fibers in the deep regions (i.e., close to the bone) and of dark ATPase fibers in the superficial regions of the MG. The effect was greater in the deep regions.

  18. A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Treadmill Training and Body Weight Support in Pediatric Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Diane L.; DeJong, Stacey L.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Purpose Given the extensive literature on body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) in adult rehabilitation, a systematic review was undertaken to explore the strength, quality and conclusiveness of the scientific evidence supporting the use of treadmill training and body weight support in those with pediatric motor disabilities. A secondary goal was to ascertain whether sufficient protocol guidelines for BWSTT are as yet available to guide pediatric physical therapy practice. Methods The database search included MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database), Cochrane Library databases, and ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) from January 1, 1980 until May 31, 2008 for all articles that included treadmill training and body weight support alone or in combination for individuals under 21 years of age, with or at risk for having a motor disability. We identified 277 unique articles from which 29 met all inclusion criteria Results Efficacy of treadmill training in accelerating walking development in Down syndrome has been well-demonstrated. Evidence supporting the efficacy or effectiveness of BWSTT in pediatric practice for improving gait impairments and level of activity and participation in those with cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, and other central nervous system disorders remains insufficient even though many studies noted positive, yet small, effects. Increased use of randomized designs, studies with treadmill training only groups, and dosage studies are needed before practice guidelines can be formulated. Neural changes in response to training warrant greater exploration, especially given the capacity for change in developing nervous systems. Discussion and Conclusion Large scale controlled trials are critically needed to support the use of BWSTT in specific pediatric patient sub-groups and to define optimal protocol parameters. PMID:19265768

  19. Breast milk expression and maintenance in mothers of very low birth weight infants: supports and barriers.

    PubMed

    Sisk, Paula; Quandt, Sara; Parson, Nikki; Tucker, Jenna

    2010-11-01

    The study objective was to identify patterns of factors that supported or hindered initiation of breast milk expression and maintenance of breast milk production after the birth of a very low birth weight (VLBW) infant in a sample of US women with varied prenatal infant feeding intentions. In-depth interviews were conducted 1 to 6 months after delivery in 32 women who initiated breast milk expression after encouragement from hospital staff. Pregnancy complications, anxiety regarding their infant's health, and lack of privacy interfered with initiation of milk expression. After hospital discharge, using manual or small electric breast pumps, travel to the neonatal intensive care unit, return to work, and difficulty with time management interfered with maintenance of breast milk production. Family support, positive attitudes toward pumping, and anticipation of breastfeeding supported maintenance of breast milk production. From these data emerge points of intervention where additional support could improve mothers' experiences and increase duration of breast milk feeding.

  20. Hybrid Nanotrimers for Dual T1 and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoparticle-based probes for dual T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could allow us to image and diagnose the tumors or other abnormalities in an exceptionally accurate and reliable manner. In this study, by fusing distinct nanocrystals via solid-state interfaces, we built hybrid heteronanostructures to combine both T1 and T2- weighted contrast agents together for MRI with high accuracy and reliability. The resultant hybrid heterotrimers showed high stability in physiological conditions and could induce both simultaneous positive and negative contrast enhancements in MR images. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging study revealed that the hybrid heterostructures displayed favorable biodistribution and were suitable for in vivo imaging. Their potential as dual contrast agents for T1 and T2-weighted MRI was further demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. PMID:25283972

  1. Arm weight support training improves functional motor outcome and movement smoothness after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Sebastiano, Fabio; Spicciato, Francesca; Tortola, Paolo; Nilsson, Jan; Pierelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness in acute stroke patients of a rehabilitation program performed with or without an arm weight support device. Twenty-eight acute, first-ever unilateral stroke patients were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Clinical evaluation included Fugl-Mayer Assessment, Functional Independence Measure and kinematic analysis [maximum and mean hand velocity, maximum range of motion (Max RoM), normalized jerk (NJ)]. Patients received 12 daily 30-minute sessions (6/week) of additional upper limb therapy performed using an arm weight support device (study group) or additional traditional physiotherapy (control group). The patients were evaluated on admission and at the end of the rehabilitation intervention. The two groups were clinically comparable on admission (p>0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements in clinical scale scores and in Max RoM in flexion-extension, while only the study group showed improvements in NJ and in Max RoM in adduction-abduction. Rehabilitation training using an arm weight support device appears to be a useful method to supplement conventional therapy in acute stroke patients, increasing smoothness of movement and motor function. PMID:25014045

  2. Development and evaluation of a soft wearable weight support device for reducing muscle fatigue on shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Compensating the weight of human limbs is important in reducing muscle fatigue experienced by manual laborers. In this study, a compact and lightweight soft wearable weight support device was developed and evaluated. The device supports gravitational force on the shoulder at any arm posture, although there are some limitations in its assistive performance. The device actuator consists of a cam-rod structure, a tendon-driven mechanism, and a rubber band. The desired assistive torque is translated to the shoulder joint along a tendon routing structure. Device performance was evaluated by measuring muscle activation in with-assist and without-assist conditions. Muscle activation on the deltoid was measured by surface electromyography. An experimental protocol consisting of a series of exercises was executed with six healthy subjects. The subjects raised and lowered their arm from 0 to 100 degrees for 30 times under eight conditions, which were combined with-assist and without-assist conditions, and holding the horizontal angle of the arm at 0, 30, 60, or 90 degrees against the sagittal plane. Surface electromyography data were pre-processed and analyzed using a root mean square method. When muscle fatigue occurs, the root mean square of the surface electromyography increases nonlinearly. This was calculated using the standard deviation of the root mean square. Three of six subjects showed decreased variation of the root mean square between the exercises in the with-assist condition. One subject’s result was significantly reduced (by about 57.6%) in the with-assist condition. In contrast, two subjects did not show significant difference between measurements taken in the with-assist and without-assist conditions. One subject was dropped from the experiment because the device did not fit the subject’s body. In conclusion, the effectiveness of the soft wearable weight support device in supporting shoulder movements was verified through the decreased variation of

  3. sw-SVM: sensor weighting support vector machines for EEG-based brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jrad, N; Congedo, M; Phlypo, R; Rousseau, S; Flamary, R; Yger, F; Rakotomamonjy, A

    2011-10-01

    In many machine learning applications, like brain-computer interfaces (BCI), high-dimensional sensor array data are available. Sensor measurements are often highly correlated and signal-to-noise ratio is not homogeneously spread across sensors. Thus, collected data are highly variable and discrimination tasks are challenging. In this work, we focus on sensor weighting as an efficient tool to improve the classification procedure. We present an approach integrating sensor weighting in the classification framework. Sensor weights are considered as hyper-parameters to be learned by a support vector machine (SVM). The resulting sensor weighting SVM (sw-SVM) is designed to satisfy a margin criterion, that is, the generalization error. Experimental studies on two data sets are presented, a P300 data set and an error-related potential (ErrP) data set. For the P300 data set (BCI competition III), for which a large number of trials is available, the sw-SVM proves to perform equivalently with respect to the ensemble SVM strategy that won the competition. For the ErrP data set, for which a small number of trials are available, the sw-SVM shows superior performances as compared to three state-of-the art approaches. Results suggest that the sw-SVM promises to be useful in event-related potentials classification, even with a small number of training trials.

  4. Conductivity tensor imaging of the brain using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekino, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Kikuo; Iriguchi, Norio; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-05-01

    Conductivity tensor images of the rat brain were obtained by a method based on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion-weighted images were acquired by a 4.7 T MRI system with motion probing gradients (MPGs) applied in three directions. Conductivities in each MPG direction were calculated from the fast component of the apparent diffusion coefficient and the fraction of the fast component, and two-dimensional conductivity tensor was estimated. Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected in the cortex and the corpus callosum. The mean conductivities in each ROI were 0.014 S/m and 0.018 S/m, respectively. The corpus callosum exhibited higher conductivity anisotropy resulting from anisotropic tissue structures such as axons and dendrites.

  5. Bifurcation Behavior of a Rotor Supported by Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JI, J. C.; YU, L.; LEUNG, A. Y. T.

    2000-08-01

    The non-linear dynamics of a rigid rotor levitated by active magnetic bearings is investigated. The vibrations in the horizontal and vertical directions are analyzed on the center manifold near the double-zero degenerate point by using normal-form method. The resulting normal forms in the horizontal and vertical directions are different due to the effect of rotor weight. It is shown that the vibratory behavior in the vertical direction can be reduced on the center manifold to the Bogdanov-Takens form. For the autonomous case, there exist saddle-node bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation for local analysis, and a saddle-connection bifurcation for global analysis. For non-autonomous case, the Melnikov technique is used to determine the critical parameter at which the homoclinic orbits intersect transversally. For the vibrations in the horizontal direction, the essential non-linear terms of the truncated normal form are third order. The behaviors of zero solutions are given. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to verify the analytical predictions.

  6. Sensitivity of joint moments to changes in walking speed and body-weight-support are interdependent and vary across joints.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Saryn R; Stanhope, Steven J

    2013-04-05

    We investigated the effect of simultaneous changes in body-weight-support level and walking speed on mean peak internal joint moments at the ankle, knee and hip. We hypothesized that observed changes in these joint moments would be approximately linear with both body-weight-support and walking speed and would be similar across joints. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 8 unimpaired adult subjects walking on an instrumented treadmill while wearing a dynamically controlled overhead support harness. Subjects walked with four levels of body-weight-support (0%, 20%, 40%, and 60% of bodyweight) at three walking speeds (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 statures/s, ranging on average from 0.7 to 1.4m/s). Data were used to calculate mean peak joint moments across subjects for each condition. In general, subjects' mean peak joint moments decreased linearly with decreasing walking speed and with increasing body-weight-support, except the knee extension moment, which showed a quadratic relationship with walking speed and no significant change with body-weight-support. All joint moments, with the exception of knee extension, showed a significant interaction effect between walking speed and body-weight-support, indicating that the sensitivity of these joint moments to changes in these variables was interdependent. In most cases, the ankle and hip extension moments showed the largest sensitivity to walking speed. The ankle moment was observed to have the greatest sensitivity to body-weight-support. This finding, that altering walking speed and body-weight-support level results in non-uniform changes in peak moments across joints, suggests that further research is warranted to establish the set of combined speed and support conditions that produce motor patterns supportive of normal gait retraining.

  7. In vivo measurement of aerodynamic weight support in freely flying birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-11-01

    Birds dynamically change the shape of their wing during the stroke to support their body weight aerodynamically. The wing is partially folded during the upstroke, which suggests that the upstroke of birds might not actively contribute to aerodynamic force production. This hypothesis is supported by the significant mass difference between the large pectoralis muscle that powers the down-stroke and the much smaller supracoracoideus that drives the upstroke. Previous works used indirect or incomplete techniques to measure the total force generated by bird wings ranging from muscle force, airflow, wing surface pressure, to detailed kinematics measurements coupled with bird mass-distribution models to derive net force through second derivatives. We have validated a new method that measures aerodynamic force in vivo time-resolved directly in freely flying birds which can resolve this question. The validation of the method, using independent force measurements on a quadcopter with pulsating thrust, show the aerodynamic force and impulse are measured within 2% accuracy and time-resolved. We demonstrate results for quad-copters and birds of similar weight and size. The method is scalable and can be applied to both engineered and natural flyers across taxa. The first author invented the method, the second and third authors validated the method and present results for quadcopters and birds.

  8. Effects of training and weight support on muscle activation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rose, Martin H; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Jensen, Bente R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-intensity locomotor training on knee extensor and flexor muscle activation and adaptability to increased body-weight (BW) support during walking in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirteen male patients with idiopathic PD and eight healthy participants were included. The PD patients completed an 8-week training program on a lower-body, positive-pressure treadmill. Knee extensor and flexor muscles activation during steady treadmill walking (3 km/h) were measured before, at the mid-point, and after training. Increasing BW support decreased knee extensor muscle activation (normalization) and increased knee flexor muscle activation (abnormal) in PD patients when compared to healthy participants. Training improved flexor peak muscle activation adaptability to increased (BW) support during walking in PD patients. During walking without BW support shorter knee extensor muscle off-activation time and increased relative peak muscle activation was observed in PD patients and did not improve with 8 weeks of training. In conclusion, patients with PD walked with excessive activation of the knee extensor and flexor muscles when compared to healthy participants. Specialized locomotor training may facilitate adaptive processes related to motor control of walking in PD patients.

  9. Development of a compact, sealless, tripod supported, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yuhki, A; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a tripod supported sealless centrifugal blood pump was designed and fabricated for implantable application using a specially designed DC brushless motor. The tripod structure consists of 3 ceramic balls mounted at the bottom surface of the impeller moving in a polyethylene groove incorporated at the bottom pump casing. The follower magnet inside the impeller is coupled to the driver magnet of the motor outside the bottom pump casing, thus allowing the impeller to slide-rotate in the polyethylene groove as the motor turns. The pump driver has a weight of 230 g and a diameter of 60 mm. The acrylic pump housing has a weight of 220 g with the priming volume of 25 ml. At the pump rpm of 1,000 to 2,200, the generated head pressure ranged from 30 to 150 mm Hg with the maximum system efficiency being 12%. When the prototype pump was used in the pulsatile mock loop to assist the ventricle from its apex to the aorta, a strong correlation was obtained between the motor current and bypass flow waveforms. The waveform deformation index (WDI), defined as the ratio of the fundamental to the higher order harmonics of the motor current power spectral density, was computed to possibly detect the suction occurring inside the ventricle due to the prototype centrifugal pump. When the WDI was kept under the value of 0.20 by adjusting the motor rpm, it was successful in suppressing the suction due to the centrifugal pump in the ventricle. The prototype sealless, centrifugal pump together with the control method based on the motor current waveform analysis may offer an intermediate support of the failing left or right ventricle bridging to heart transplantation.

  10. Broadening molecular weight polyethylene distribution by tailoring the silica surface environment on supported metallocenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Eliana Galland; Stedile, Fernanda C.; Brambilla, Rodrigo; dos Santos, João H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of nonporous monodisperse chemically modified spherical silica particles was carried out according to the Stöber method. The resulting hybrid silicas were employed in the preparation of supported Cp2ZrCl2. The resulting metal loading, determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), was between 0.15 and 0.48 wt% Zr/SiO2. The systems were evaluated in ethylene polymerization with MAO as the co-catalyst. The presence of ligands can increase catalyst activity and the nature of the employed organosilane ligand on the hybrid silicas were shown to affect the molecular weight distribution leading to polyethylenes with broad polydispersity (Mw/Mn = 3.8) and even with bimodality (Mw/Mn = 12.6).

  11. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  12. Weight-supported treadmill vs over-ground training for walking after acute incomplete SCI

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, B; Apple, D.; Barbeau, H.; Basso, M.; Behrman, A.; Deforge, D.; Ditunno, J.; Dudley, G.; Elashoff, R.; Fugate, L.; Harkema, S.; Saulino, M.; Scott, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of step training with body weight support on a treadmill (BWSTT) with over-ground practice to the efficacy of a defined over-ground mobility therapy (CONT) in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Methods A total of 146 subjects from six regional centers within 8 weeks of SCI were entered in a single-blinded, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (MRCT). Subjects were graded on the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (ASIA) as B, C, or D with levels from C5 to L3 and had a Functional Independence Measure for locomotion (FIM-L) score <4. They received 12 weeks of equal time of BWSTT or CONT. Primary outcomes were FIM-L for ASIA B and C subjects and walking speed for ASIA C and D subjects 6 months after SCI. Results No significant differences were found at entry between treatment groups or at 6 months for FIM-L (n = 108) or walking speed and distance (n = 72). In the upper motor neuron (UMN) subjects, 35% of ASIA B, 92% of ASIA C, and all ASIA D subjects walked independently. Velocities for UMN ASIA C and D subjects were not significantly different for BWSTT (1.1 ± 0.6 m/s, n = 30) and CONT (1.1 ± 0.7, n = 25) groups. Conclusions The physical therapy strategies of body weight support on a treadmill and defined overground mobility therapy did not produce different outcomes. This finding was partly due to the unexpectedly high percentage of American Spinal Injury Association C subjects who achieved functional walking speeds, irrespective of treatment. The results provide new insight into disability after incomplete spinal cord injury and affirm the importance of the multicenter, randomized clinical trial to test rehabilitation strategies. PMID:16505299

  13. Eu, Gd-Codoped Yttria Nanoprobes for Optical and T₁-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Atabaev, Timur Sh; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Han, Dong-Wook; Choo, Ki Seok; Jeon, Ung Bae; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Yeom, Jeong A; Kim, Hyung-Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2017-02-10

    Nanoprobes with multimodal functionality have attracted significant interest recently because of their potential applications in nanomedicine. This paper reports the successful development of lanthanide-doped Y₂O₃ nanoprobes for potential applications in optical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The morphology, structural, and optical properties of these nanoprobes were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), and photoluminescence (PL). The cytotoxicity test showed that the prepared lanthanide-doped Y₂O₃ nanoprobes have good biocompatibility. The obvious contrast enhancement in the T₁-weighted MR images suggested that these nanoprobes can be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. In addition, the clear fluorescence images of the L-929 cells incubated with the nanoprobes highlight their potential for optical imaging. Overall, these results suggest that prepared lanthanide-doped Y₂O₃ nanoprobes can be used for simultaneous optical and MR imaging.

  14. Patient self-efficacy and spouse perception of spousal support are associated with lower patient weight: baseline results from a spousal support behavioral intervention.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick; Yancy, William S; Jeffreys, Amy S; Coffman, Cynthia J; Weinberger, Morris; Bosworth, Hayden B; Voils, Corrine I

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and related chronic illnesses are leading causes of death and excessive health care costs, necessitating identification of factors that can help patients achieve and maintain healthy weight. Greater self-efficacy and perceived spousal support in patients have been associated with successful weight management. The current study also assesses self-efficacy and perceived support in spouses and whether these factors are related to patient weight. At baseline of a spousal support trial, patients and spouses (N = 255 couples) each completed measures of self-efficacy and spousal support for their own exercise and healthy eating behaviors. We fit a multivariable regression model to examine the relationship between these factors and patient weight. Patients were 95% males and 65% Whites, with average age of 61 years (SD = 12) and weight of 212 lbs (SD = 42). Spouses were 64% Whites, with average age of 59 years (SD = 12). Factors associated with lower patient weight were older patient age (estimate = -0.8 lbs, p < .01), normal blood pressure (estimate = -17.6 lbs, p < .01), higher patient self-efficacy for eating healthy (estimate = -3.8 lbs, p = .02), and spouse greater perceived support for eating healthy (estimate = -10.0 lbs, p = .03). Future research should explore the causal pathways between perceived support and health outcomes to establish whether patient support behaviors could be a point of intervention for weight management.

  15. An adaptive diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scheme using the multistation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yeji

    2016-02-01

    Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a useful tool in oncology, which enables fast screening of disseminated tumors, lymph nodes or abscesses in the body. Multistation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or continuously moving table (CMT) MRI can be performed to overcome the limited field of view (FOV) of the magnet bore in whole-body DWI. Although CMT-MRI is regarded as a more advanced form of whole-body MRI, it cannot be widely used because most of the available MR systems are not equipped with the required hardware/software to perform CMT. Thus, optimizing the multistation approach for whole-body DWI, which is more widely available and easier to perform with the existing MR systems, is worthwhile. To improve the quality of DW images acquired with the multistation approach, we used different combinations of the built-in body RF coil and the phased-array surface RF coils for reception of the signals in whole-body DWI in this work. If different coils are selectively used in the extended FOV and appropriate reconstruction algorithms are exploited, the screening ability of whole-body DWI can be improved while minimizing the patient's discomfort and the artifacts due to physiological motions.

  16. Preliminary study of diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in Kimura disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Tang, Zuohua; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Zeng, Wenjiao; Tang, Weijun; Wu, Lingjie; Jin, Lixin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) combined with computed tomography (CT) and conventional MR imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of Kimura disease (KD). The clinical data and CT and MRI findings of 5 patients with KD proven by histopathologic examination were retrospectively reviewed. Diffusion-weighted imaging and MRSI were performed at 1.5 T in 3 patients with KD. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and the choline/creatine ratio of the lesions were compared with those of the contralateral normal parotid glands. All imaging results were compared with histopathologic findings. The typical features of KD were subcutaneous lesions, continuously infiltrative parotid lesions with or without intraparotid lymphadenopathies, and reactive cervical lymphadenopathies on CT and conventional MRI. On DWI, the ADC values of all subcutaneous and infiltrative parotid lesions were higher compared to those of normal parotid glands, and the ADC values of reactive lymphadenopathies were lower compared to both. The choline/creatine levels of subcutaneous and infiltrative parotid lesions were slightly higher than those of normal parotid glands. In conclusion, DWI and MRSI offer valuable information that may be characteristic of KD, which can highly suggest the diagnosis of KD when combined with morphological imaging.

  17. Assessment of Activity of Crohn Disease by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Hua; Sun, Can-Hui; Mao, Ren; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Jiang, Xiao-Song; Pui, Margaret H; Chen, Min-Hu; Li, Zi-Ping

    2015-10-01

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for evaluating inflammatory activity in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). A total of 47 CD patients underwent MR enterography (MRE) and DWI using 3 b values of 50, 400, and 800 s/mm. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of inflamed and normal bowel wall were calculated. The conventional MRE findings and DWI signal intensities were qualitatively scored from 0 to 3. The correlation between Crohn disease activity index (CDAI) and both ADCs and magnetic resonance imaging scores was analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CD activity. Of the 47 patients, 25 were active CD (CDAI≥150) and 22 were inactive (CDAI<150). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MRE + DWI scores of active CD were significantly higher than that of inactive CD (both P < 0.001). Apparent diffusion coefficients in inflamed segments of active CD were lower than that of inactive CD (P < 0.001). The DWI scores (r = 0.74, P < 0.001), ADCs (r = -0.71, P < 0.001), MRE scores (r = 0.54, P < 0.001), and MRE + DWI scores (r = 0.66, P < 0.001) were all correlated with CDAI. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristics curves for ADCs, DWI scores, MRE scores, and MRE + DWI scores ranged from 0.83 to 0.98. The threshold ADC value of 1.17 × 10 mm/s allowed differentiation of active from inactive CD with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and ADC correlated with CD activity, and had excellent diagnostic accuracy for differentiating active from inactive CD.

  18. T2-weighted fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging of extraocular muscles

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.; Dushyanth, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide unique information about extraocular muscle (EOM) structure and function. Prior high-resolution motility imaging studies employed T1 weighting, which provides intrinsic contrast of dark-appearing EOMs against bright orbital fat and is suitable for intravenous contrast. However, time-consuming T1 sequences are subject to motion artifacts. We evaluated an alternative T2-weighted fast spin-echo pulse sequence that emphasizes tissue-free fluid. Methods We prospectively used high resolution, surface coil technique for orbital MRI at 1.5T in 21 normal and 113 living strabismic subjects and 2 monkey cadavers using T2 fast spin-echo (T2FSE) weighting (long repetition time, short echo time). T2FSE was compared with T1 in 17 subjects, and with T1 in 506 different living subjects, and 12 cadavers. Results For 2 mm thick coronal MRIs of 312 μm resolution spanning the entire orbit, T1 acquisition required 218 seconds, whereas T2FSE required 150 seconds (31% faster). T2-defined the globe border better, and provided intrinsic contrast between EOMs and their pulleys. While both T1 and T2 demonstrated motor nerves to EOMs in living subjects, only T1 was satisfactory with injected contrast and in cadavers. Conclusions For motility imaging, T2FSE is faster than T1 MRI and demonstrates superior tissue details of EOMs and other orbital tissues. T2FSE of the orbits can be performed using widely available standard equipment. We suggest that T2FSE be the preferred method for clinical imaging of EOM structure, function, and innervation, although T1 may be more appropriate when intravenous contrast must be employed. PMID:21397801

  19. [The clinical application of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging to acute cerebrovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Chu, B C; Miyasaka, K

    1998-09-01

    Diffusion is a measure of motion freedom and is a sensitive parameter to characterize the tissue at the microscopic level. The methods of measuring in vivo diffusion by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been based mainly on the addition of two motion-probing gradients (MPG) to the spin echo sequence to produce signal attenuation for the spins moving at random. The resultant MR images reflect the intravoxel incoherent motions (IVIM), which contain both water molecule diffusion and perfusion in the capillary network, and can be quantified by an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Diffusion weighted MRI, acquired from IVIM MR imaging by the addition of the very strong MPG predicate water diffusion and anisotropy. High signal or reduced ADC can be observed in case of the slower diffusion. The anisotropy depends upon the orientation of the subjects and the gradients. Greater signal attenuation (faster diffusion) can be observed when the relative orientation of white matter tracts to the MPG is parallel as compared to that obtained with a perpendicular alignment. This anisotropy may preclude the detection or delineation of an ischemic lesion. Diffusion tensor trace has been designated to eliminate this anisotropy effect. In ischemic animal models, low signal (fast diffusion) and high signal (slow diffusion) have been noted in the vasogenic edema and cytotoxic edema, respectively. High signal appears only in case of cerebral blood flow below 15-20 ml/100 g per minute, a value identical to the threshold of tissue at high energetic metabolism and ion homeostasis. ADC value decreases following the cerebral vessel occlusion, or remains unchanged when collateral circulation develops. It has been speculated that reduction in ADC reflects the water shift from extracellular space to intracellular space due to the membrane permeability and/or intracellular osmolality increase. These results suggest that diffusion weighted MRI correlates well with the cell metabolism, and

  20. A Single-band Cold Mass Support System for the MICE Superconducting Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Liu, X.K.; Liu, C.S.; Li, L.K.; Xu, Feng Yu; Jia, Lin X.; Green, Michael A.

    2008-04-02

    The cooling channel of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils, which are magnetically hooked together and contained in seven modules. The operations of a pair of MICE superconducting coupling magnets are affected directly by the other solenoid coils in the MICE channel. In order to meet the stringent requirement for the magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4.2 K, a self-centered tension-band cold mass support system with intermediate thermal interruption was applied for the MICE superconducting coupling magnet. The physical center of the magnet does not change as it is cooled down from 300 K to 4.2 K using this support system. This paper analyzed and calculated force loads on the coupling magnet under various operation modes of the MICE cooling channel. The performance parameters of a single-band cold mass support system were calculated also.

  1. APT-Weighted and NOE-Weighted Image Contrasts in Glioma with Different RF Saturation Powers Based on Magnetization Transfer Ratio Asymmetry Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Hong, Xiaohua; Zhao, Xuna; Gao, Jia-Hong; Yuan, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the saturation-power dependence of amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-weighted image contrasts in a rat glioma model at 4.7 T. Methods 9L tumor-bearing rats (n = 8) and fresh eggs (n = 4) were scanned on a 4.7-T animal MRI scanner. Z-spectra over an offset range of ±6 ppm were acquired with different saturation powers, followed by the magnetization transfer-ratio (MTR) asymmetry analyses around the water resonance. Results The NOE signal upfield from the water resonance (−2.5 to −5 ppm) was clearly visible at lower saturation powers (e.g., 0.6 μT) and was larger in the contralateral normal brain tissue than in the tumor. Conversely, the APT effect downfield from the water resonance was observed at relatively higher saturation powers (e.g., 2.1 μT) and was larger in the tumor than in the contralateral normal brain tissue. The NOE decreased the APT-weighted image signal, based on the MTR asymmetry analysis, but increased the APT-weighted image contrast between the tumor and contralateral normal brain tissue. Conclusion The APT and NOE image signals in tumor are maximized at different saturation powers. The saturation power of roughly 2 μT is ideal for APT-weighted imaging at clinical B0 field strengths. PMID:23661598

  2. Support Vector Machine Classification of Major Depressive Disorder Using Diffusion-Weighted Neuroimaging and Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Sacchet, Matthew D.; Prasad, Gautam; Foland-Ross, Lara C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in understanding brain networks in major depressive disorder (MDD). Neural pathways can be tracked in the living brain using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI); graph theory can then be used to study properties of the resulting fiber networks. To date, global abnormalities have not been reported in tractography-based graph metrics in MDD, so we used a machine learning approach based on “support vector machines” to differentiate depressed from healthy individuals based on multiple brain network properties. We also assessed how important specific graph metrics were for this differentiation. Finally, we conducted a local graph analysis to identify abnormal connectivity at specific nodes of the network. We were able to classify depression using whole-brain graph metrics. Small-worldness was the most useful graph metric for classification. The right pars orbitalis, right inferior parietal cortex, and left rostral anterior cingulate all showed abnormal network connectivity in MDD. This is the first use of structural global graph metrics to classify depressed individuals. These findings highlight the importance of future research to understand network properties in depression across imaging modalities, improve classification results, and relate network alterations to psychiatric symptoms, medication, and comorbidities. PMID:25762941

  3. Support vector machine classification of major depressive disorder using diffusion-weighted neuroimaging and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Prasad, Gautam; Foland-Ross, Lara C; Thompson, Paul M; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in understanding brain networks in major depressive disorder (MDD). Neural pathways can be tracked in the living brain using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI); graph theory can then be used to study properties of the resulting fiber networks. To date, global abnormalities have not been reported in tractography-based graph metrics in MDD, so we used a machine learning approach based on "support vector machines" to differentiate depressed from healthy individuals based on multiple brain network properties. We also assessed how important specific graph metrics were for this differentiation. Finally, we conducted a local graph analysis to identify abnormal connectivity at specific nodes of the network. We were able to classify depression using whole-brain graph metrics. Small-worldness was the most useful graph metric for classification. The right pars orbitalis, right inferior parietal cortex, and left rostral anterior cingulate all showed abnormal network connectivity in MDD. This is the first use of structural global graph metrics to classify depressed individuals. These findings highlight the importance of future research to understand network properties in depression across imaging modalities, improve classification results, and relate network alterations to psychiatric symptoms, medication, and comorbidities.

  4. Overground body-weight-supported gait training for children and youth with neuromuscular impairments.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Max J; Stuberg, Wayne; Dejong, Stacey; Arpin, David J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine if body-weight-supported (BWS) overground gait training has the potential to improve the walking abilities of children and youth with childhood onset motor impairments and intellectual disabilities. Eight participants (mean age of 16.3 years) completed 12 weeks of BWS overground gait training that was performed two times a week. BWS was provided during the training sessions by an overhead harness system that rolls overground. There was a significant improvement in the preferred walking speed after the training (p < .01; pre = 0.51 ± 0.2 m/s; post = 0.67 ± 0.3 m/s; Cohen's d = 0.80) and cadence (p = .04; pre = 37 ± 7 steps/min; post = 43 ± 8 steps/min; Cohen's d = 0.94). Our results indicate that overground BWS gait training may be an effective treatment strategy for improving the preferred walking speed of children and youth with motor impairments.

  5. Treadmill training with partial body weight support after stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Restoration and improvement of gait after stroke are major aspects of neurorehabilitation. Mobilization out of the bed into the wheelchair and verticalisation with the help of a standing frame are first steps. With the patient cardiovascular stable, gait restoration is put on the agenda. Instead of tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory maneuvers, patients should practice complex gait cycles repetitively. Treadmill training with partial body weight support enables the harness-secured patients to practice numerous steps assisted by two or three therapists. In controlled studies, it proved equally effective as walking on the floor. Gait machines, as the Lokomat or the Gait Trainer GTI, intend to relieve the strenuous effort for the therapists. For the GTI, several controlled trials showed a superior effect in acute stroke patients with respect to walking ability and velocity. For the ambulatory patient, aerobic treadmill training is effective to improve speed and endurance without worsening gait quality. Belt velocity and inclination are gradually increased so that the patients reach a predefined target heart rate. On the belt, patients walk more symmetrically, and higher velocities result in a facilitation of paretic muscles and render gait more efficient. In summary, gait rehabilitation has seen dramatic changes over the last years. More is to be expected.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of pineal gland calcification

    PubMed Central

    Böker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Diederichs, Gerd; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (SWMR) for the detection of pineal gland calcifications (PGC) compared to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference standard. Methods 384 patients who received a 1.5 Tesla MRI scan including SWMR sequences and a CT scan of the brain between January 2014 and October 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. 346 patients were included in the analysis, of which 214 showed PGC on CT scans. To assess correlation between imaging modalities, the maximum calcification diameter was used. Sensitivity and specificity and intra- and interobserver reliability were calculated for SWMR and conventional MRI sequences. Results SWMR reached a sensitivity of 95% (95% CI: 91%-97%) and a specificity of 96% (95% CI: 91%-99%) for the detection of PGC, whereas conventional MRI achieved a sensitivity of 43% (95% CI: 36%-50%) and a specificity of 96% (95% CI: 91%-99%). Detection rates for calcifications in SWMR and conventional MRI differed significantly (95% versus 43%, p<0.001). Diameter measurements between SWMR and CT showed a close correlation (R2 = 0.85, p<0.001) with a slight but not significant overestimation of size (SWMR: 6.5 mm ± 2.5; CT: 5.9 mm ± 2.4, p = 0.02). Interobserver-agreement for diameter measurements was excellent on SWMR (ICC = 0.984, p < 0.0001). Conclusions Combining SWMR magnitude and phase information enables the accurate detection of PGC and offers a better diagnostic performance than conventional MRI with CT as a reference standard. PMID:28278291

  7. Evaluation of Angiographic and Technical Aspects of Carotid Stenting with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blasel, Stella Hattingen, Elke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kurre, Wiebke; Morawe, Gerald; Zanella, Friedhelm; Rochemont, Richard Du Mesnil de

    2009-07-15

    The detection of clinically silent ischemic lesions on postprocedural diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has become a preferred method for the description of embolic risks. The purpose of this single-center study was to evaluate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) could determine material related or technical risk factors of filter-protected carotid stenting. Eighty-four patients with symptomatic severe ({>=}60%) carotid artery stenoses received filter-protected carotid stenting. Standard DWI (b = 1000) was performed within 48 h before and after carotid stenting. The occurrence and load of new postinterventional DWI lesions were assessed. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors associated with DWI lesions, with emphasis on technical factors such as use of different access devices (guiding catheter method vs. long carotid sheath method), type of stent (open-cell nitinol stent vs. closed-cell Wallstent), and protective device (filters with 80-{mu}m vs. 110-120-{mu}m pore size). Markers for generalized atherosclerosis and for degree and site of stenosis were assessed to allow comparison of adequate risk profiles. Access, protective device, and stent type were not significantly associated with new embolic DWI lesions when we compared patients with equivalent risk profiles (long carotid sheath method 48% [11 of 23] vs. guiding catheter method 44% [27 of 61], Wallstent 47% [15 of 32] vs. nitinol stent 44% [23 of 52], and small pore size filter 61% [11 of 18] vs. large pore size filter 41% [27 of 66]). Single-center DWI studies with a moderate number of cases are inadequate for proper assessment of the embolic risk of technical- or material-related risk factors in carotid stenting. Larger multicenter studies with more cases are needed.

  8. Elucidating the aberrant brain regions in bipolar disorder using T1-weighted/T2-weighted magnetic resonance ratio images.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takuya; Donishi, Tomohiro; Iwatani, Jun; Yamada, Shinichi; Takahashi, Shun; Ukai, Satoshi; Shinosaki, Kazuhiro; Terada, Masaki; Kaneoke, Yoshiki

    2017-03-25

    Although diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have revealed brain abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD) subjects, DTI methods might not detect disease-related abnormalities in the white matter (WM) where nerve fibers are crossing. We investigated BD myelin-related abnormal brain regions in both gray matter and WM for 29 BD and 33 healthy control (HC) participants using T1-weighted (T1w)/T2-weighted (T2w) ratio images that increase myelin-related contrast irrespective of nerve fiber orientation. To check effect of the brain volume, the results were compared with those of voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We found significantly lower T1w/T2w signal intensity in broad WM regions in BD subjects, including the corpus callosum, corona radiata, internal capsule, middle cerebellar peduncle and cerebellum. Regional volume reduction was found in the WM bilateral posterior thalami and retrolenticular part of the internal capsules of BD subjects. We also performed tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in 25 BD and 24 HC participants and compared those for the T1w/T2w ratio images. Both methods detected the BD corpus callosum abnormality. Further, the ratio images detected the corona radiata and the cerebellar abnormality in BD. These results suggest that T1w/T2w ratio image analysis could take a complementary role with the DTI method in elucidating myelin-related abnormalities in BD.

  9. Cryomdoule Test Stand Reduced-Magnetic Support Design at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, Mike; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar; Crawford, Anthony; Harms, Elvin; Leibfritz, Jerry; Wu, Genfa

    2016-06-01

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These devices will be tested at Fermilab's Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) within the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS-1) cave. The problem of magnetic pollution became one of major issues during design stage of the LCLS-II cryomodule as the average quality factor of the accelerating cavities is specified to be 2.7 x 10¹⁰. One of the possible ways to mitigate the effect of stray magnetic fields and to keep it below the goal of 5 mGauss involves the application of low permeable materials. Initial permeability and magnetic measurement studies regarding the use of 316L stainless steel material indicated that cold work (machining) and heat affected zones from welding would be acceptable.

  10. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  11. The global structure of magnetic fields which support quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences were observed, but only recently has it become possible to measure the full magnetic field vector. The component of the field along the line of sight, B (parallel) can be uniquely determined, whereas for the component perpendicular to the line of sight B (perpendicular) and -B (perpendicular) are indistinguishable. An ambiguity remains in the actual magnetic field vector, in particular with respect to its orientation relative to the prominence axis. A sample of more than 100 prominences were studied. A more detailed analysis of 10 prominences are presented, and then set these prominence fields into relation to the underlying photospheric fields. It is found from statistical analysis of several hundred prominences that in 25% of the cases the field penetrates the prominence directly, whereas in 75% the field orientation in the prominence is reversed.

  12. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dongsu; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  13. Silica supported Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic solid-phase extraction and magnetic in-tube solid-phase microextraction: application to organophosphorous compounds.

    PubMed

    Moliner-Martinez, Y; Vitta, Yosmery; Prima-Garcia, Helena; González-Fuenzalida, R A; Ribera, Antonio; Campíns-Falcó, P; Coronado, Eugenio

    2014-03-01

    This work demonstrates the application of silica supported Fe3O4 nanoparticles as sorbent phase for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) and magnetic on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (Magnetic-IT-SPME) combined with capillary liquid chromatography-diode array detection (CapLC-DAD) to determine organophosphorous compounds (OPs) at trace level. In MSPE, magnetism is used as separation tool while in Magnetic-IT-SPME, the application of an external magnetic field gave rise to a significant improvement of the adsorption of OPs on the sorbent phase. Extraction efficiency, analysis time, reproducibility and sensitivity have been compared. This work showed that Magnetic-IT-SPME can be extended to OPs with successful results in terms of simplicity, speed, extraction efficiency and limit of detection. Finally, wastewater samples were analysed to determine OPs at nanograms per litre.

  14. Supporting the transition from weight loss to maintenance: development and optimisation of a face-to-face behavioural intervention component.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Cleland, Claire L; Evans, Elizabeth H; Adamson, Ashley; Batterham, Alan; Dombrowski, Stephan U; Gellert, Paul; Hill, Moira; Kwasnicka, Dominika; Scott, Dawn; Sniehotta, Falko F; White, Martin; Araújo-Soares, Vera

    2017-01-01

    After weight loss, most individuals regain lost weight. Interventions to support the transition from successful loss to weight loss maintenance (WLM), regardless of the method of prior weight loss, are needed. The aims of this study were to (1) develop a face-to-face behavioural intervention session to support overweight and obese individuals who have recently lost a clinically significant amount of weight in the transition to WLM; (2) to assess the single-session intervention for acceptability and feasibility prior to its use in a larger, 12-month, multi-component trial; and (3) to optimise the intervention session for future use based on participant feedback. Participants with a Body Mass Index of ≥25 kg/m(2) prior to a ≥5% weight loss in the previous 12 months were recruited via the local government authority and community-based advertisements. Each attended the one-hour session with a trained facilitator, which focused on setting maintenance-relevant weight, eating, and physical activity goals. Semi-structured interviews were carried out immediately post-session to obtain feedback on the acceptability of this intervention component. Data were used to generate recommendations for changes to the session, which were discussed by the team, and used to optimise the session. Seventeen participants (13 female; median WL = 13%) were recruited. All participants evaluated the intervention session positively; 11 participants suggested improvements including reducing information provision in favour of greater focus on identifying and coping with barriers, and the inclusion of practical examples. The systematic refinement and optimisation process resulted in an acceptable and feasible face-to-face behavioural intervention session (described here), which will be tested as part of a multi-component intervention. We anticipate the session could be used to supplement existing support including online services, and has the potential to benefit people who have lost a

  15. Supporting the transition from weight loss to maintenance: development and optimisation of a face-to-face behavioural intervention component

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Cleland, Claire L.; Evans, Elizabeth H.; Adamson, Ashley; Batterham, Alan; Dombrowski, Stephan U.; Gellert, Paul; Hill, Moira; Kwasnicka, Dominika; Scott, Dawn; Sniehotta, Falko F.; White, Martin; Araújo-Soares, Vera

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT After weight loss, most individuals regain lost weight. Interventions to support the transition from successful loss to weight loss maintenance (WLM), regardless of the method of prior weight loss, are needed. The aims of this study were to (1) develop a face-to-face behavioural intervention session to support overweight and obese individuals who have recently lost a clinically significant amount of weight in the transition to WLM; (2) to assess the single-session intervention for acceptability and feasibility prior to its use in a larger, 12-month, multi-component trial; and (3) to optimise the intervention session for future use based on participant feedback. Participants with a Body Mass Index of ≥25 kg/m2 prior to a ≥5% weight loss in the previous 12 months were recruited via the local government authority and community-based advertisements. Each attended the one-hour session with a trained facilitator, which focused on setting maintenance-relevant weight, eating, and physical activity goals. Semi-structured interviews were carried out immediately post-session to obtain feedback on the acceptability of this intervention component. Data were used to generate recommendations for changes to the session, which were discussed by the team, and used to optimise the session. Seventeen participants (13 female; median WL = 13%) were recruited. All participants evaluated the intervention session positively; 11 participants suggested improvements including reducing information provision in favour of greater focus on identifying and coping with barriers, and the inclusion of practical examples. The systematic refinement and optimisation process resulted in an acceptable and feasible face-to-face behavioural intervention session (described here), which will be tested as part of a multi-component intervention. We anticipate the session could be used to supplement existing support including online services, and has the potential to benefit people who have

  16. Graphene oxide based theranostic platform for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxin; Cao, Yuhua; Chong, Yu; Ma, Yufei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Hu, Chunhong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2013-12-26

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful and widely used clinical technique in cancer diagnosis. MRI contrast agents (CAs) are often used to improve the quality of MRI-based diagnosis. In this work, we developed a positive T1 MRI CA based on graphene oxide (GO)-gadolinium (Gd) complexes. In our strategy, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is chemically conjugated to GO, followed by Gd(III) complexation, to form a T1 MRI CA (GO-DTPA-Gd). We have demonstrated that the GO-DTPA-Gd system significantly improves MRI T1 relaxivity and leads to a better cellular MRI contrast effect than Magnevist, a commercially used CA. Next, an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was loaded on the surface of GO sheets via physisorption. Thus-prepared GO-DTPA-Gd/DOX shows significant cytotoxicity to the cancer cells (HepG2). This work provides a novel strategy to build a GO-based theranostic nanoplatform with T1-weighted MRI, fluorescence imaging, and drug delivery functionalities.

  17. Anomalous diffusion of brain metabolites evidenced by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marchadour, Charlotte; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Hantraye, Philippe; Lebon, Vincent; Valette, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Translational displacement of molecules within cells is a key process in cellular biology. Molecular motion potentially depends on many factors, including active transport, cytosol viscosity and molecular crowding, tortuosity resulting from cytoskeleton and organelles, and restriction barriers. However, the relative contribution of these factors to molecular motion in the cytoplasm remains poorly understood. In this work, we designed an original diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy strategy to probe molecular motion at subcellular scales in vivo. This led to the first observation of anomalous diffusion, that is, dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on the diffusion time, for endogenous intracellular metabolites in the brain. The observed increase of the ADC at short diffusion time yields evidence that metabolite motion is characteristic of hindered random diffusion rather than active transport, for time scales up to the dozen milliseconds. Armed with this knowledge, data modeling based on geometrically constrained diffusion was performed. Results suggest that metabolite diffusion occurs in a low-viscosity cytosol hindered by ∼2-μm structures, which is consistent with known intracellular organization. PMID:22929443

  18. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in survivors of very low birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, L; Palaniappan, M; Cooke, R

    2002-01-01

    Background: Children who survive very low birth weight (VLBW) without major disability have a high prevalence of learning difficulty, attention deficit, and dyspraxia. Aims: To determine whether learning difficulty in children with VLBW is associated with structural brain abnormalities. Methods: A total of 87 children (aged 15–16 years) with a history of VLBW (<1500 g) and eight age matched full term controls have been studied with detailed magnetic resonance brain scans. Volume measurements of the caudate nuclei and hippocampal formations were made. Results: Scans in 42.5% of the children showed evidence of perinatal brain injury. There was no significant difference in IQ, dyspraxia, or attention deficit between children with qualitatively normal and abnormal scans. However, quantitative volumetric analysis showed that children with a low IQ had smaller volume measurements for the right caudate nucleus and left hippocampus, and a smaller hippocampal ratio (left volume:right volume) than those with normal IQ. Conclusion: Data suggest that learning disorder, attention deficit, and dyspraxia in children who survive VLBW do not correlate with conventional markers of perinatal brain injury, and may be related to global brain growth and the development of key structures, such as the caudate nuclei and hippocampal formations. PMID:12243993

  19. Direct Portal Vein Thrombosis Visualization with T2*-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuanming; Hu, Alice; Haacke, Mark; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Daiquan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of direct magnetic resonance portal vein thrombosis (PVT) visualization with T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI) without contrast agent. METHODS: Thirty patients with PVT were included in this study. All of them were imaged with contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) as well as non-contrast MRI T1, T2 and T2*WI. Imaging data was independently analyzed by two experienced radiologists. T2*WI of all PVT was compared slice-by-slice with each of the comparison sequences (T1WI, T2WI and CE-CT) on the following categories: the location, size, boundary, and conspicuity of thrombus and portal veins. RESULTS: The average score of PVT visualization in T2*WI was higher than T1WI and T2WI in location, size, boundary and conspicuity (t = 7.54 - 84.16, P<0.05), and higher than CE-CT in boundary and conspicuity (t = 3.03- 6.98, P<0.05). For portal vein visualization, there was no significant score difference in left, middle and right portal veins between CE-CT and T2*WI (t = -1.76- 1.35, P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest T2*WI can characterize PVT accurately with high quality without the use of intravenous contrast agents. PMID:24046533

  20. Electromagnet weight reduction in a magnetic levitation system for contactless delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Hong, Do-Kwan; Woo, Byung-Chul; Koo, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Chang

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an optimum design of a lightweight vehicle levitation electromagnet, which also provides a passive guide force in a magnetic levitation system for contactless delivery applications. The split alignment of C-shaped electromagnets about C-shaped rails has a bad effect on the lateral deviation force, therefore, no-split positioning of electromagnets is better for lateral performance. This is verified by simulations and experiments. This paper presents a statistically optimized design with a high number of the design variables to reduce the weight of the electromagnet under the constraint of normal force using response surface methodology (RSM) and the kriging interpolation method. 2D and 3D magnetostatic analysis of the electromagnet are performed using ANSYS. The most effective design variables are extracted by a Pareto chart. The most desirable set is determined and the influence of each design variable on the objective function can be obtained. The generalized reduced gradient (GRG) algorithm is adopted in the kriging model. This paper's procedure is validated by a comparison between experimental and calculation results, which shows that the predicted performance of the electromagnet designed by RSM is in good agreement with the simulation results.

  1. Robust optimal design of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments for skin microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Raguin, L. G.

    2010-10-01

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in several diseases including chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance (MR) has the potential to provide quantitative information and a better penetration depth compared with other non-invasive methods such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. The continuous progress in hardware resulting in higher sensitivity must be coupled with advances in data acquisition schemes. In this article, we first introduce a physical model for quantifying skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MR (DWMR) based on an effective dispersion model for skin leading to a q-space model of the DWMR complex signal, and then design the corresponding robust optimal experiments. The resulting robust optimal DWMR protocols improve the worst-case quality of parameter estimates using nonlinear least squares optimization by exploiting available a priori knowledge of model parameters. Hence, our approach optimizes the gradient strengths and directions used in DWMR experiments to robustly minimize the size of the parameter estimation error with respect to model parameter uncertainty. Numerical evaluations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach as compared to conventional DWMR protocols.

  2. Eu, Gd-Codoped Yttria Nanoprobes for Optical and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Atabaev, Timur Sh; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Han, Dong-Wook; Choo, Ki Seok; Jeon, Ung Bae; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Yeom, Jeong A.; Kim, Hyung-Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2017-01-01

    Nanoprobes with multimodal functionality have attracted significant interest recently because of their potential applications in nanomedicine. This paper reports the successful development of lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes for potential applications in optical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The morphology, structural, and optical properties of these nanoprobes were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), and photoluminescence (PL). The cytotoxicity test showed that the prepared lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes have good biocompatibility. The obvious contrast enhancement in the T1-weighted MR images suggested that these nanoprobes can be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. In addition, the clear fluorescence images of the L-929 cells incubated with the nanoprobes highlight their potential for optical imaging. Overall, these results suggest that prepared lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes can be used for simultaneous optical and MR imaging. PMID:28336868

  3. Magnetic resonance susceptibility weighted imaging in neurosurgery: current applications and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Lam, Timothy; Alcaide-Leon, Paula; Bharatha, Aditya; Montanera, Walter; Cusimano, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a relatively new imaging technique. Its high sensitivity to hemorrhagic components and ability to depict microvasculature by means of susceptibility effects within the veins allow for the accurate detection, grading, and monitoring of brain tumors. This imaging modality can also detect changes in blood flow to monitor stroke recovery and reveal specific subtypes of vascular malformations. In addition, small punctate lesions can be demonstrated with SWI, suggesting diffuse axonal injury, and the location of these lesions can help predict neurological outcome in patients. This imaging technique is also beneficial for applications in functional neurosurgery given its ability to clearly depict and differentiate deep midbrain nuclei and close submillimeter veins, both of which are necessary for presurgical planning of deep brain stimulation. By exploiting the magnetic susceptibilities of substances within the body, such as deoxyhemoglobin, calcium, and iron, SWI can clearly visualize the vasculature and hemorrhagic components even without the use of contrast agents. The high sensitivity of SWI relative to other imaging techniques in showing tumor vasculature and microhemorrhages suggests that it is an effective imaging modality that provides additional information not shown using conventional MRI. Despite SWI's clinical advantages, its implementation in MRI protocols is still far from consistent in clinical usage. To develop a deeper appreciation for SWI, the authors here review the clinical applications in 4 major fields of neurosurgery: neurooncology, vascular neurosurgery, neurotraumatology, and functional neurosurgery. Finally, they address the limitations of and future perspectives on SWI in neurosurgery.

  4. Assessment of allograft function using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Anupma; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Lal, Hira; Yadav, Abhishek; Bhadhuria, Dharmendra; Prasad, Narayan; Gupta, Amit

    2014-11-01

    Developing a non-invasive method such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) could be used as a feasible and reproducible modality in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction. We assessed the functional status of the renal allograft by DWMRI and its applicability in assessment of graft dysfunction on all end-stage renal transplant patients who attained normal renal function on the 7th day post-transplantation. Follow-up imaging of the recipient allograft was performed at the end of 90 and 180 days and in case of graft dysfunction. Kidney biopsies were performed to correlate with the corresponding MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps of the cortex and medulla were obtained by studying the DWMRI. The ADC values were significantly lower in the medulla compared with the cortex in normal donor kidneys and normally functioning transplanted kidneys, while they decreased significantly when rejection occurred. The reduction in ADC values occurred both in the cortex and in the medulla, and correlated with the degree of rejection on the kidney biopsies. The ADC values increased significantly during the recovery from rejection. We conclude that DWMRI can be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of transplant patients during acute rejection.

  5. Effect of Body-Weight-Support Running on Lower-Limb Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Neal, Michael; Fleming, Neil; Eberman, Lindsey; Games, Kenneth; Vaughan, Jeremiah

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Body-weight-support (BWS) running is increasing in popularity, despite limited evidence of its effects on running mechanics. Objectives To determine the effect of increasing BWS on lower-limb biomechanics during lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill running. Methods Fourteen male recreational runners completed 15 randomized trials on an LBPP treadmill at 5 levels of BWS and 3 velocities (1-minute trials with 3-minute recovery). Knee and ankle kinematic data were recorded continuously via electrogoniometry. Synchronous in-shoe plantar-pressure data identified stride onset and quantified foot-segment forces. Data were recorded during the final 30 seconds of each trial and averaged over 10 consecutive stride cycles. Results Higher levels of BWS resulted in significantly (P<.001) increased stride duration, reduced stride frequency, and reduced ground contact time (GCT). In addition, normalized GCT (GCT/stride duration) was significantly reduced (P<.001), indicating increased flight time. Increasing BWS resulted in significant reductions (P<.001) in peak knee flexion and dorsiflexion and reduced overall knee and ankle range of motion during the stance phase. Conclusion Running on an LBPP treadmill alters lower-limb kinematics, resulting in reduced ankle and knee joint range of motion. In addition, increased BWS alters stride characteristics, resulting in shorter GCT and longer flight time. Clinicians must be aware of lower-limb kinematic alterations to provide safe and effective parameters for rehabilitation involving LBPP treadmills. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):784-793. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6503.

  6. Limb contribution to increased self-selected walking speeds during body weight support in individuals poststroke.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Christopher P; Burgess, Jamie K; Brown, David A

    2015-03-01

    Individuals poststroke walk at faster self-selected speeds under some nominal level of body weight support (BWS) whereas nonimpaired individuals walk slower after adding BWS. The purpose of this study was to determine whether increases in self-selected overground walking speed under BWS conditions of individuals poststroke can be explained by changes in their paretic and nonparetic ground reaction forces (GRF). We hypothesize that increased self-selected walking speed, recorded at some nominal level of BWS, will relate to decreased braking GRFs by the paretic limb. We recruited 10 chronic (>12 months post-ictus, 57.5±9.6 y.o.) individuals poststroke and eleven nonimpaired participants (53.3±4.1 y.o.). Participants walked overground in a robotic device, the KineAssist Walking and Balance Training System that provided varying degrees of BWS (0-20% in 5% increments) while individuals self-selected their walking speed. Self-selected walking speed and braking and propulsive GRF impulses were quantified. Out of 10 poststroke individuals, 8 increased their walking speed 13% (p=0.004) under some level of BWS (5% n=2, 10% n=3, 20% n=3) whereas nonimpaired controls did not change speed (p=0.470). In individuals poststroke, changes to self-selected walking speed were correlated with changes in paretic propulsive impulses (r=0.68, p=0.003) and nonparetic braking impulses (r=-0.80, p=0.006), but were not correlated with decreased paretic braking impulses (r=0.50 p=0.14). This investigation demonstrates that when individuals poststroke are provided with BWS and allowed to self-select their overground walking speed, they are capable of achieving faster speeds by modulating braking impulses on the nonparetic limb and propulsive impulses of the paretic limb.

  7. Synchronous Control Effort Minimized for Magnetic-Bearing-Supported Shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2001-01-01

    Various disturbances that are synchronous with the shaft speed can complicate radial magnetic bearing control. These include position sensor target irregularities (runout) and shaft imbalance. The method presented here allows the controller to ignore all synchronous harmonics of the shaft position input (within the closed-loop bandwidth) and to respond only to asynchronous motions. The result is reduced control effort.

  8. Magnetic Silica Supported Copper: A Modular Approach to Aqueous Ullmann-type Amination of Aryl Halides

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of magnetic silica supported copper catalyst has been described via in situ generated magnetic silica (Fe3O4@SiO2); the catalyst can be used for the efficacious amination of aryl halides in aqueous medium under microwave irradiation.

  9. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  10. T2-weighted four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with result-driven phase sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: T2-weighted MRI provides excellent tumor-to-tissue contrast for target volume delineation in radiation therapy treatment planning. This study aims at developing a novel T2-weighted retrospective four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) phase sorting technique for imaging organ/tumor respiratory motion. Methods: A 2D fast T2-weighted half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo MR sequence was used for image acquisition of 4D-MRI, with a frame rate of 2–3 frames/s. Respiratory motion was measured using an external breathing monitoring device. A phase sorting method was developed to sort the images by their corresponding respiratory phases. Besides, a result-driven strategy was applied to effectively utilize redundant images in the case when multiple images were allocated to a bin. This strategy, selecting the image with minimal amplitude error, will generate the most representative 4D-MRI. Since we are using a different image acquisition mode for 4D imaging (the sequential image acquisition scheme) with the conventionally used cine or helical image acquisition scheme, the 4D dataset sufficient condition was not obviously and directly predictable. An important challenge of the proposed technique was to determine the number of repeated scans (N{sub R}) required to obtain sufficient phase information at each slice position. To tackle this challenge, the authors first conducted computer simulations using real-time position management respiratory signals of the 29 cancer patients under an IRB-approved retrospective study to derive the relationships between N{sub R} and the following factors: number of slices (N{sub S}), number of 4D-MRI respiratory bins (N{sub B}), and starting phase at image acquisition (P{sub 0}). To validate the authors’ technique, 4D-MRI acquisition and reconstruction were simulated on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom using simulation derived parameters. Twelve healthy volunteers were involved

  11. Is an Apple Magnetic: Magnetic Response of Everyday Materials Supporting Views About the Nature of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laumann, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Magnetism and its various applications are essential for our daily life and for many technological developments. The term magnetism is almost always used as a synonym for ferromagnetism. However, the magnetic properties of the elements of the periodic table indicate that the vast majority of elements are not ferromagnetic, but rather, diamagnetic or paramagnetic. Typically, only ferromagnetism is discussed in classrooms, which can create a distorted picture. This article supplies the further development of an experiment demonstrating the dia- and paramagnetic properties with an electronic balance and a neodymium magnet. It focuses on an investigation of ordinary materials that occur in pupils' everyday environment. The experiment is applicable both for a quantitative measurement of the magnetic (volume) susceptibility χV and can serve as a phenomenological approach to dia- and paramagnetism. Moreover, it encourages a discussion about typical beliefs regarding the nature of science, comparing the behavior of common objects in weak and in strong magnetic fields.

  12. Vibration study of the APS magnet support assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Chen, S.S.

    1990-11-01

    Stability of the positron closed orbit is a requirement for successful operation of the Advanced Photon Source. The fact that vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets can lead to distortion of the positron closed orbit and to potentially unacceptable beam emittance growth provides the motivation for the subject studies. Low frequency vibrations can be controlled with steering magnets using feedback systems, provided the vibration amplitudes are within the dynamic range of the controllers. High frequency vibration amplitudes, on the other hand, are out of the range of the controller and, therefore must be limited to ensure the emittance growth will not exceed a prescribed value. Vibration criteria were developed based on the requirement that emittance growth be limited to 10 percent. Recognizing that the quadrupole magnets have the most significant effect, three different scenarios were considered: vibration of a single quadrupole within the storage ring, random vibration of all the quadrupoles in the ring, and the hypothetical case of a plane wave sweeping across the site and the quadrupoles following the motion of the plane wave. The maximum allowable peak vibration amplitudes corresponding to these three vibration scenarios are given. The criteria associated with the passage of a plane wave is dependent on wavelength, or, alternatively, on frequency given the wave speed. The wave speed used is that measured as a part of the geotechnical investigation at the APS site.

  13. A longitudinal study of patients with cirrhosis treated with L-ornithine L-aspartate, examined with magnetization transfer, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grover, Vijay P B; McPhail, Mark J W; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Crossey, Mary M E; Fitzpatrick, Julie A; Southern, Louise; Saxby, Brian K; Cook, Nicola A; Cox, I Jane; Waldman, Adam D; Dhanjal, Novraj S; Bak-Bol, Aluel; Williams, Roger; Morgan, Marsha Y; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2017-02-01

    The presence of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is associated with structural, metabolic and functional changes in the brain discernible by use of a variety of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques. The changes in patients with minimal HE are less well documented. Twenty-two patients with well-compensated cirrhosis, seven of whom had minimal HE, were examined with cerebral 3 Tesla MR techniques, including T1- and T2-weighted, magnetization transfer and diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences. Studies were repeated after a 4-week course of oral L-ornithine L-aspartate (LOLA). Results were compared with data obtained from 22 aged-matched healthy controls. There was no difference in mean total brain volume between patients and controls at baseline. Mean cerebral magnetization transfer ratios were significantly reduced in the globus pallidus and thalamus in the patients with cirrhosis irrespective of neuropsychiatric status; the mean ratio was significantly reduced in the frontal white matter in patients with minimal HE compared with healthy controls but not when compared with their unimpaired counterparts. There were no significant differences in either the median apparent diffusion coefficients or the mean fractional anisotropy, calculated from the diffusion-weighted imaging, or in the mean basal ganglia metabolite ratios between patients and controls. Psychometric performance improved in 50 % of patients with minimal HE following LOLA, but no significant changes were observed in brain volumes, cerebral magnetization transfer ratios, the diffusion weighted imaging variables or the cerebral metabolite ratios. MR variables, as applied in this study, do not identify patients with minimal HE, nor do they reflect changes in psychometric performance following LOLA.

  14. Cerebral Effects of Targeted Temperature Management Methods Assessed by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Grejs, Anders Morten; Gjedsted, Jakob; Pedersen, Michael; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne; Rauff-Mortensen, Andreas; Andersen, Kristian Kjær; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this randomized porcine study was to compare surface targeted temperature management (TTM) to endovascular TTM evaluated by cerebral diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and by intracerebral/intramuscular microdialysis. It is well known that alteration in the temperature affects ADC, but the relationship between cerebral ADC values and the cooling method per se has not been established. Eighteen anesthetized 60-kg female swine were hemodynamically and intracerebrally monitored and subsequently subjected to a baseline MRI. The animals were then randomized into three groups: (1) surface cooling (n = 6) at 33.5°C using EMCOOLSpad(®), (2) endovascular cooling (n = 6) at 33.5°C using an Icy(®) cooling catheter with the CoolGard 3000(®), or (3) control (n = 6) at 38.5°C using a Bair Hugger™. The swine were treated with TTM for 6 hours followed by a second MRI examination, including ADC. Blood and microdialysate were sampled regularly throughout the experiment, and glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and the lactate/pyruvate ratio did not differ among groups, neither intracerebrally nor intramuscularly. Surface cooling yielded a significantly lower median ADC than endovascular cooling: 714 (634; 804) × 10(-6) mm(2)/s versus 866 (828; 927) × 10(-6) mm(2)/s, (p < 0.05). The surface cooling ADC was lowered to a range usually attributed to cytotoxic edema and these low values could not be explained solely by the temperature effect per se. To what extent the ADC is fully reversible at rewarming is unknown and the clinical implications should be further investigated in clinical studies.

  15. An 8-Week Web-Based Weight Loss Challenge With Celebrity Endorsement and Enhanced Social Support: Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J; Callister, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Background Initial engagement and weight loss within Web-based weight loss programs may predict long-term success. The integration of persuasive Web-based features may boost engagement and therefore weight loss. Objective To determine whether an 8-week challenge within a commercial Web-based weight loss program influenced weight loss, website use, and attrition in the short term, when compared to the standard program. Methods De-identified data for participants (mean age 36.7±10.3 years; 86% female) who enrolled in the Biggest Loser Club (BLC) (n=952) and the BLC’s Shannan Ponton Fast Track Challenge (SC) for 8 weeks (n=381) were compared. The BLC program used standard evidence-based website features, with individualized calorie and exercise targets to facilitate a weight loss of 0.5-1 kg per week (–500kcal/day less than estimated energy expenditure). SC used the same website features but in addition promoted greater initial weight loss using a 1200 kcal/day energy intake target and physical activity energy expenditure of 600 kcal/day. SC used persuasive features to facilitate greater user engagement, including offering additional opportunities for social support (eg, webinar meetings with a celebrity personal trainer and social networking) endorsed by a celebrity personal trainer. Self-reported weekly weight records were used to determine weight change after 8 weeks. A primary analysis was undertaken using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) with all available weight records for all participants included. Dropout (participants who cancelled their subscription) and nonusage (participants who stopped using the Web-based features) attrition rates at 8 weeks were calculated. The number of participants who accessed each website feature and the total number of days each feature was used were calculated. The difference between attrition rates and website use for the two programs were tested using chi-square and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests, respectively. Results

  16. Design and Analyisi of a Self-centered Cold Mass Support for the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Li, S. Y.; Guo, Xing Long; Zheng, Shi Xian; Green, Michael A.

    2011-05-04

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils in seven modules, which are magnetically hooked together since there is no iron to shield the coils and the return flux. The RF coupling coil (RFCC) module consists of a superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around four conventional conducting 201.25 MHz closed RF cavities. The coupling coil will produce up to a 2.2 T magnetic field on the centerline to keep the beam within the RF cavities. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in MICE is up to 500 kN in longitudinal direction, which will be transferred to the base of the RF coupling coil (RFCC) module through a cold mass support system. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediate thermal interruption is applied to the coupling magnet, and the design is introduced in detail in this paper. The thermal and structural analysis on the cold mass support assembly has been carried out using ANSYS. The present design of the cold mass support can satisfy with the stringent requirements for the magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4.2 K and fully charged.

  17. Computer-supported weight-based drug infusion concentrations in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Gay

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the development of a computerized provider order entry (CPOE)-embedded solution for weight-based neonatal drug infusion developed during the transition from a legacy CPOE system to a customized application of a neonatal CPOE product during a hospital-wide information system transition. The importance of accurate fluid management in the neonate is reviewed. The process of tailoring the system that eventually resulted in the successful development of a computer application enabling weight-based medication infusion calculation for neonates within the CPOE information system is explored. In addition, the article provides guidelines on how to customize a vendor solution for hospitals with neonatal intensive care unit.

  18. THE ROLE OF TURBULENT MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN THE FORMATION OF ROTATIONALLY SUPPORTED PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Lima, R.; De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2012-03-01

    The formation of protostellar disks out of molecular cloud cores is still not fully understood. Under ideal MHD conditions, the removal of angular momentum from the disk progenitor by the typically embedded magnetic field may prevent the formation of a rotationally supported disk during the main protostellar accretion phase of low-mass stars. This has been known as the magnetic braking problem and the most investigated mechanism to alleviate this problem and help remove the excess of magnetic flux during the star formation process, the so-called ambipolar diffusion (AD), has been shown to be not sufficient to weaken the magnetic braking at least at this stage of the disk formation. In this work, motivated by recent progress in the understanding of magnetic reconnection in turbulent environments, we appeal to the diffusion of magnetic field mediated by magnetic reconnection as an alternative mechanism for removing magnetic flux. We investigate numerically this mechanism during the later phases of the protostellar disk formation and show its high efficiency. By means of fully three-dimensional MHD simulations, we show that the diffusivity arising from turbulent magnetic reconnection is able to transport magnetic flux to the outskirts of the disk progenitor at timescales compatible with the collapse, allowing the formation of a rotationally supported disk around the protostar of dimensions {approx}100 AU, with a nearly Keplerian profile in the early accretion phase. Since MHD turbulence is expected to be present in protostellar disks, this is a natural mechanism for removing magnetic flux excess and allowing the formation of these disks. This mechanism dismisses the necessity of postulating a hypothetical increase of the ohmic resistivity as discussed in the literature. Together with our earlier work which showed that magnetic flux removal from molecular cloud cores is very efficient, this work calls for reconsidering the relative role of AD in the processes of star

  19. Neural responses to visual food cues according to weight status: a systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Pursey, Kirrilly M; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E; Burrows, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies.

  20. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pursey, Kirrilly M.; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J.; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E.; Burrows, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies. PMID:25988110

  1. Evaluation of Public Health Professionals' Capacity to Implement Environmental Changes Supportive of Healthy Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantner, Leigh A.; Olson, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Community-based interventions to promote healthy weights by making environmental and policy changes in communities may be an important strategy in reversing the obesity epidemic. However, challenges faced by local public health professionals in facilitating effective environmental and policy change need to be better understood and addressed. To…

  2. Role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in differentiating malignancies from benign ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xinhua; Zhang, Hongbin; Meng, Shuang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Chuge

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the diagnostic values of computed tomography (CT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating malignancies from benign ovarian tumors and a meta-analysis to further confirm our results on DW-MRI. Methods: Totally 64 patients pathologically confirmed as ovarian cancer were included in this study. CT scan and DWI-MRI were performed and analyzed to get compared with pathological results, thereby assessing their accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Meta-analysis was conducted by database searching and strict eligibility criteria, using STATA 12.0 (Stata Corp, College Station, TX, USA) software. Results: The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for diagnosis of ovarian cancer in CT were 81.82%, 84.48%, 76.67%, 87.50% and 71.88%, respectively; those in DW-MRI were 89.77%, 93.10%, 83.33%, 91.53% and 86.21%, respectively. The Kappa coefficient of DW-MRI (K = 0.771) compared with pathological results was higher than CT (K = 0.602). The average apparent diffusion coefficient values of DW-MRI in diagnosis of benign and malignant ovarian tumors suggested statistically significant difference (1.325 ± 0.269×10-3 mm2/s vs. 0.878 ± 0.246×10-3 mm2/s, P < 0.001). Meta-analysis results showed that the combined sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio and diagnostic odds ratio of DW-MRI in discriminating benign versus malignant ovarian tumors were 0.93, 0.88, 7.70, 0.08 and 101.24, respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.95. Conclusions: Both CT and DW-MRI were of great diagnostic value in differentiating malignancies from benign ovarian tumors, while DW-MRI was superior to CT with higher accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26884905

  3. Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Blood Flow in the Microvasculature of Abdominal Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truica, Loredana Sorina

    In this thesis, water diffusion in human liver and placenta is studied using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging. For short, randomly oriented vascular segments, intravascular water motion is diffusion-like. For tissues with large vascular compartments the diffusion decay is bi-exponential with one component corresponding to diffusing water and the other to water in the microvasculature. This model, known as the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model, is seldom used with abdominal organs because of motion artifacts. This limitation was overcome for the experiments reported here by introducing: 1) parallel imaging, 2) navigator echo respiratory triggering (NRT), 3) a double echo diffusion sequence that inherently compensates for eddy current effects, 4) SPAIR fat suppression and 5) a superior approach to image analysis. In particular, the use of NRT allowed us to use a free breathing protocol instead of the previously required breath hold protocol. The resulting DWI images were of high quality and motion artifact free. Diffusion decays were measured over a larger portion of the decay than had previously been reported and the results are considerably better than those previously reported. For both studies, reliable measurements of the diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D) and perfusion fraction (f), were obtained using a region of interest analysis as well as a pixel-by-pixel approach. To within experimental error, all patients had the same values of D (1.10 mum 2/ms +/- 0.16 mum2/ms), D* (46 mum2/ms +/- 17 mum2/ms) and f (44.0% +/- 6.9%) in liver and D (1.8 mum 2/ms +/- 0.2 mum2/ms), D* (30 mum 2/ms +/- 12 mmu2/ms), and f (40% +/- 6%) in the placenta. No dependence on gestational age was found for the placental study. Parametric maps of f and D* were consistent with blood flow patterns in both systems. The model worked well for both investigated organs even though their anatomical structures are quite different. A method for

  4. Dual-Enzyme-Loaded Multifunctional Hybrid Nanogel System for Pathological Responsive Ultrasound Imaging and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Niu, Dechao; Li, Pei; Wu, Qing; Bo, Xiaowan; Liu, Boji; Bao, Song; Su, Teng; Xu, Huixiong; Wang, Qigang

    2015-06-23

    A dual-enzyme-loaded multifunctional hybrid nanogel probe (SPIO@GCS/acryl/biotin-CAT/SOD-gel, or SGC) has been developed for dual-modality pathological responsive ultrasound (US) imaging and enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This probe is composed of functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles, a dual enzyme species (catalase and superoxide dismutase), and a polysaccharide cationic polymer glycol chitosan gel. The dual-modality US/MR imaging capabilities of the hybrid nanogel for responsive US imaging and enhanced T2-weighted MR imaging have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. These results show that the hybrid nanogel SGC can exhibit efficient dual-enzyme biocatalysis with pathological species for responsive US imaging. SGC also demonstrates increased accumulation in acidic environments for enhanced T2-weighted MR imaging. Further research on these nanogel systems may lead to the development of more efficient US/MR contrast agents.

  5. 'Are you still on that stupid diet?': women's experiences of societal pressure and support regarding weight loss, and attitudes towards health policy intervention.

    PubMed

    Whale, Katie; Gillison, Fiona B; Smith, Paula C

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated how people's attitudes and motivations towards losing weight are influenced by societal pressures surrounding weight loss, their interaction with the obesogenic environment and individuals' attitudes and motivations towards weight. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 women currently attending commercial weight-loss programmes. Participants experienced conflicting messages regarding weight norms, with the media portraying powerful social norms relating to thinness and beauty, and changes to the food environment and interactions with family and friends commonly undermining weight-loss activities and promoting increased consumption. Providing social and environmental support for the behaviours needed to produce weight loss may need to be a primary focus for obesity policy.

  6. Extremely long-lived magnetic excitations in supported Fe chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, J. P.; Lorente, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the lifetime of the first excited state of spin chains made of an odd number of Fe atoms on C u2N /Cu (100 ) . Yan, Choi, Burgess, Rolf-Pissarczyk, and Loth [Nat. Nanotech. 10, 40 (2015), 10.1038/nnano.2014.281] recently observed very long lifetimes in the case of F e3 chains. We consider the decay of the first excited state induced by electron-hole pair creation in the substrate. For a finite magnetic field, the two lowest-lying states in the chain have a quasi-Néel state structure. Decay from one state to the other strongly depends on the degree of entanglement of the local spins in the chain. The weak entanglement in the chain accounts for the long lifetimes that increase exponentially with chain length. Despite their apparently very different properties, the behavior of odd and even chains is governed by the same kind of phenomena, in particular entanglement effects. The present results account quite well for the lifetimes recently measured by Yan et al. on F e3 .

  7. Imposing spatio-temporal support in magnetic resonance angiographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; Vafadar, Bahareh; Watts, Richard; Wu, Bing

    2010-08-01

    A method to improve time resolution in 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) is proposed. A temporal basis based on prior knowledge of the contrast flow dynamics is applied to a sequence of image reconstructions. In CE-MRA a contrast agent (gadolinium) is injected into a peripheral vein and MR data is acquired as the agent arrives in the arteries and then the veins of the region of clinical interest. The acquisition extends over several minutes. Information is effectively measured in 3D k-space (spatial frequency space) one line at-atime. That line may be along a Cartesian grid line in k-space, a radial line or a spiral trajectory. A complete acquisition comprises many such lines but in order to improve temporal resolution, reconstructions are made from only partial sets of k-space data. By imposing a basis for the temporal changes, based on prior expectation of the smoothness of the changes in contrast concentration with time, it is demonstrated that a significant reduction in artifacts caused by the under-sampling of k-space can be achieved. The basis is formed from a set of gamma variate functions. Results are presented for a simulated set of 2D spiral-sampled CE-MRA data.

  8. Innovations in the Use of Interactive Technology to Support Weight Management

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt-Metz, D.; Wen, C.K.F.; O’Reilly, G.; Li, M.; Lee, S; Emken, B.A.; Mitra, U.; Annavaram, M.; Ragusa, G.; Narayanan, S.

    2015-01-01

    New and emerging mobile technologies are providing unprecedented possibilities for understanding and intervening on obesity-related behaviors in real time. However, the mobile health (mHealth) field has yet to catch up with the fast-paced development of technology. Current mHealth efforts in weight management still tend to focus mainly on short message systems (SMS) interventions, rather than taking advantage of real-time sensing to develop Just-In-Time, Adaptive Interventions (JITAIs). This paper will give an overview of the current technology landscape for sensing and intervening on three behaviors that are central to weight management; diet, physical activity, and sleep. Then five studies that really dig into the possibilities that these new technologies afford will be showcased. We conclude with a discussion of hurdles that mHealth obesity research has yet to overcome, and a future-facing discussion. PMID:26364308

  9. Innovations in the Use of Interactive Technology to Support Weight Management.

    PubMed

    Spruijt-Metz, D; Wen, C K F; O'Reilly, G; Li, M; Lee, S; Emken, B A; Mitra, U; Annavaram, M; Ragusa, G; Narayanan, S

    2015-12-01

    New and emerging mobile technologies are providing unprecedented possibilities for understanding and intervening on obesity-related behaviors in real time. However, the mobile health (mHealth) field has yet to catch up with the fast-paced development of technology. Current mHealth efforts in weight management still tend to focus mainly on short message systems (SMS) interventions, rather than taking advantage of real-time sensing to develop just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). This paper will give an overview of the current technology landscape for sensing and intervening on three behaviors that are central to weight management: diet, physical activity, and sleep. Then five studies that really dig into the possibilities that these new technologies afford will be showcased. We conclude with a discussion of hurdles that mHealth obesity research has yet to overcome and a future-facing discussion.

  10. Treadmill training with partial body-weight support after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    luo, Yuan; Shen, Weizhong; Jiang, Zhong; Sha, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the effects of treadmill training with partial body weight support (TTPBWS) and conventional physical therapy (PT) on subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 subjects were randomly allocated to either a treatment group or a control group. Subjects received either treadmill training with partial body weight support (treatment group) or conventional physical therapy (control group). The circumferences of the lower extremities, Holden classifications, 10-meter walking times and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were compared at 12 and 24 weeks post-operation. The knee joint stability was tested at 24 weeks post-operation using a KT-1000. [Results] Significant differences were found between the two groups at the 12 weeks post-operation. For most of the measures, there was no significant difference between the groups at 24 weeks post-operation. Interestingly, for most of the measures, there was no significant difference between their values in the treatment group at 12 weeks and their values in the control group at 24 weeks post-operation. [Conclusion] The function of a subject’s lower extremities can be improved and the improvement was clearly accelerated by the intervention of treadmill training with partial body weight support, without compromising the stability of the knee joints in a given follow-up period. PMID:28174445

  11. Decoherence-governed magnetic-moment dynamics of supported atomic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás

    2015-11-01

    Due to the quantum evolution of molecular magnetic moments, the magnetic state of nanomagnets can suffer spontaneous changes. This process can be completely quenched by environment-induced decoherence. However, we show that for typical small supported atomic objects, the substrate-induced decoherence does change the magnetic-moment evolution but does not quell it. To be specific and to compare with experiment, we analyze the spontaneous switching between two equivalent magnetization states of atomic structures formed by Fe on Cu2N/Cu (1 0 0), measured by Loth et al (2012 Science 335 196-9). Due to the substrate-induced decoherence, the Rabi oscillations proper to quantum tunneling between magnetic states are replaced by an irreversible decay of long characteristic times leading to the observed stochastic magnetization switching. We show that the corresponding switching rates are small, rapidly decreasing with system’s size, with a 1/T thermal behavior and in good agreement with experiments. Quantum tunneling is recovered as the switching mechanism at extremely low temperatures below the μK range for a six-Fe-atom system and exponentially lower for larger atomic systems. The unexpected conclusion of this work is that experiments could detect the switching of these supported atomic systems because their magnetization evolution is somewhere between complete decoherence-induced stability and unobservably fast quantum-tunneling switching.

  12. Nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable palladium (Pd) catalyst: a selective and sustainable oxidation protocol with high turnover number

    EPA Science Inventory

    A magnetic nanoparticle-supported ruthenium hydroxide catalyst was readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials and shown to catalyze hydration of nitriles with excellent yield in benign aqueous medium. Catalyst recovery using an external magnetic field, superior activity...

  13. Evaluation of public health professionals' capacity to implement environmental changes supportive of healthy weight.

    PubMed

    Gantner, Leigh A; Olson, Christine M

    2012-08-01

    Community-based interventions to promote healthy weights by making environmental and policy changes in communities may be an important strategy in reversing the obesity epidemic. However, challenges faced by local public health professionals in facilitating effective environmental and policy change need to be better understood and addressed. To better understand capacity-building needs, this study evaluated the efforts of the Healthy Start Partnership, a university-community project to promote healthy weights in young families in a rural eight-county area of upstate New York. Qualitative interviews (n=30) and pre/post surveys (n=31) were conducted over three years of the intervention. Challenges faced by partners significantly slowed progress of environmental interventions in some communities. First, many partners did not feel their "regular" jobs afforded them sufficient time to do community work. Second, many partners did not feel they had the personal political power to work on broader environmental, policy, or system change issues. Third, facilitating and policy change and reaching out to non-traditional partners, like businesses, required developing a new set of public health skills. Fourth, the long-time frame of environmental and policy work meant that many efforts would exceed the grant period. Building local public health leaders for environmental and policy change necessitates that these challenges are acknowledged and addressed.

  14. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-01-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  15. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-12-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case.

  16. Design of set-point weighting PIλ + Dμ controller for vertical magnetic flux controller in Damavand tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, H; Fatehi, A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a simple method is presented for tuning weighted PI(λ) + D(μ) controller parameters based on the pole placement controller of pseudo-second-order fractional systems. One of the advantages of this controller is capability of reducing the disturbance effects and improving response to input, simultaneously. In the following sections, the performance of this controller is evaluated experimentally to control the vertical magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak. For this work, at first a fractional order model is identified using output-error technique in time domain. For various practical experiments, having desired time responses for magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak, is vital. To approach this, at first the desired closed loop reference models are obtained based on generalized characteristic ratio assignment method in fractional order systems. After that, for the identified model, a set-point weighting PI(λ) + D(μ) controller is designed and simulated. Finally, this controller is implemented on digital signal processor control system of the plant to fast/slow control of magnetic flux. The practical results show appropriate performance of this controller.

  17. [Susceptibility weighted magnetic resonance sequences "SWAN, SWI and VenoBOLD": technical aspects and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Hodel, J; Rodallec, M; Gerber, S; Blanc, R; Maraval, A; Caron, S; Tyvaert, L; Zuber, M; Zins, M

    2012-05-01

    Susceptibility-weighted MR sequences, T2 star weighted angiography (SWAN, General Electric), Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI, Siemens) and venous blood oxygen level dependant (VenoBOLD, Philips) are 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence that provide a high sensitivity for the detection of blood degradation products, calcifications, and iron deposits. For all these sequences, an appropriate echo time allows for the visualization of susceptibility differences between adjacent tissues. However, each of these sequences presents a specific technical background. The purpose of this review was to describe 1/the technical aspects of SWAN, VenoBOLD and SWI sequences, 2/the differences observed in term of contrast within the images, 3/the key imaging findings in neuroimaging using susceptibility-weighted MR sequences.

  18. Diagnostic Performance of Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Bone Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Peng; Cui, Long-Biao; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Cao, Jing; Chang, Ning; Tang, Xing; Qi, Shun; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Yin, Hong; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current state-of-the-art nuclear medicine imaging methods (such as PET/CT or bone scintigraphy) may have insufficient sensitivity for predicting bone tumor, and substantial exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with the risk of secondary cancer development. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is radiation free and requires no intravenous contrast media, and hence is more suitable for population groups that are vulnerable to ionizing radiation and/or impaired renal functions. This meta-analysis was conducted to investigate whether whole-body DW-MRI is a viable means in differentiating bone malignancy. Medline and Embase databases were searched from their inception to May 2015 without language restriction for studies evaluating DW-MRI for detection of bone lesions. Methodological quality was assessed by the quality assessment of diagnostic studies (QUADAS-2) instrument. Sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and areas under the curve (AUC) were used as measures of the diagnostic accuracy. We combined the effects by using the random-effects mode. Potential threshold effects and publication bias were investigated. We included data from 32 studies with 1507 patients. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and AUC were 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90–0.97), 0.92 (95% CI, 0.88–0.95), and 0.98 on a per-patient basis, and they were 0.91 (95% CI, 0.87–0.94), 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90–0.96), and 0.97 on a per-lesion basis. In subgroup analysis, there is no statistical significance found in the sensitivity and specificity of using DWI only and DWI combined with other morphological or functional imaging sequence in both basis (P > 0.05). A b value of 750 to 1000 s/mm2 enables higher AUC and DOR for whole-body imaging purpose when compared with other values in both basis either (P < 0.01). The ROC space did not show a curvilinear trend of points and a threshold effect was not observed. According to the Deek's plots, there was no publication bias on

  19. Pilot and Feasibility Test of a Mobile Health-Supported Behavioral Counseling Intervention for Weight Management Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Quintiliani, Lisa M; Mann, Devin M; Puputti, Marissa; Quinn, Emily; Bowen, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    task (MET) minutes per week (2791 to 3336, mean change 545 [SD 1694]). Conclusions Findings support the conduct of a fully powered trial to evaluate the efficacy of mHealth as a feasible intervention modality for breast cancer survivors. Future research should employ accelerometer-based physical activity assessment and consider development of an all-in-one app to integrate devices, messaging, and educational content and other mHealth approaches to support behavioral counselors conducting weight management interventions. PMID:27761518

  20. Patients' experience of a telephone booster intervention to support weight management in Type 2 diabetes and its acceptability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lihua; Forbes, Angus; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    We studied the patient experience of a telephone booster intervention, i.e. weekly reinforcement of the clinic advice regarding lifestyle modification advice to support weight loss. Forty six adults with Type 2 diabetes and a body mass index >28 kg/m(2) were randomised into either intervention (n = 25) or control (n = 21) groups. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the intervention group participants to explore their views and experiences. The patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the telephone calls and most would recommend the intervention to others in a similar situation. The content of the telephone follow-up met their need for on-going support. The benefits arising from the telephone calls included: being reminded to comply with their regimen; prompting and motivating adherence to diabetes self-care behaviours; improved self-esteem; and feeling 'worthy of interest'. The convenience and low cost of telephone support has much potential in chronic disease management.

  1. Effects of improved self-appraisal and mood factors on weight loss in obese women initiating supported exercise.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to test to what extent improvements in self-appraisal and mood factors were associated with changes in body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) and waist circumference. Women with obesity (N=171) completed Physical Self-Concept, Exercise Self-Efficacy, Body Areas Satisfaction, Tension, and Depression scales, and were measured on BMI and waist circumference, at baseline and just after a 24-week supported exercise program. With the exception of Physical Self-Concept, improvements on each psychological factor were associated with significantly greater weight and waist circumference improvements. Multiple regression analyses indicated that improvement/non-improvement on the psychological factors explained a significant 9 to 11 percent of the variance in BMI change, and 13 to 20 percent of the variance in waist circumference change. Significant unique contributions to the explained variance in BMI were made by improvements in Exercise Self-Efficacy and Depression, with improvement in Tension also making significant unique contributions to the explained variance in waist circumference change. Consistent with tenets of social cognitive theory, the association of improvements in self-appraisal and mood factors with weight and waist circumference improvements was supported in obese women. Replications and extensions of this preliminary research to, ultimately, improve weight loss theory and treatment, was suggested.

  2. In Vivo Magnetization Transfer and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detects Thrombus Composition in a Mouse Model of Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Prakash; Modarai, Bijan; Smith, Alberto; Botnar, René M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep vein thrombosis remains a major health problem necessitating accurate diagnosis. Thrombolysis is associated with significant morbidity and is effective only for the treatment of unorganized thrombus. We tested the feasibility of in vivo magnetization transfer (MT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to detect thrombus organization in a murine model of deep vein thrombosis. Methods and Results Deep vein thrombosis was induced in the inferior vena cava of male BALB/C mice. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction using MT, diffusion-weighted, inversion-recovery, and T1-mapping protocols. Delayed enhancement and T1 mapping were repeated 2 hours after injection of a fibrin contrast agent. Finally, excised thrombi were used for histology. We found that MT and diffusion-weighted imaging can detect histological changes associated with thrombus aging. MT rate (MTR) maps and percentage of MT rate (%MTR) allowed visualization and quantification of the thrombus protein content, respectively. The %MTR increased with thrombus organization and was significantly higher at days 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction (days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28: %MTR=2483±451, 2079±1210, 7029±2490, 10 295±4356, 32 994±25 449; Panova<0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the %MTR and the histological protein content of the thrombus (r=0.70; P<0.05). The apparent diffusion coefficient was lower in erythrocyte-rich and collagen-rich thrombus (0.72±0.10 and 0.69±0.05 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Thrombus at days 7 and 14 had the highest apparent diffusion coefficient values (0.95±0.09 and 1.10±0.18 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Conclusions MT and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences are promising for the staging of thrombus composition and could be useful in guiding medical intervention. PMID:23564561

  3. A comparative quantitative analysis of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in echo planar and PROPELLER diffusion-weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Yang, Han-Joon; Lee, Gui-Won; Park, Yong-Soon; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether periodically-rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can remove magnetic susceptibility artifacts and compared apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for PROPELLER DWI and the common echo planar (EP) DWI. Twenty patients that underwent brain MRI with a metal dental implant were selected. A 3.0T MR scanner was then used to obtain EP DWI, PROPELLER DWI, and corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for a b-value of 0 and 1,000 s/mm2. The frequencies of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in four parts of the brain (bilateral temporal lobes, pons, and orbit) were selected. In the ADC maps, we measured the ADC values of both sides of the temporal lobe and the pons. According to the study results, the frequency of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in PROPELLER DW images was lower than it was in EP DW images. In ADC maps, the ADC values of the bilateral temporal lobes and the pons were all higher in PROPELLER ADC maps than in EP ADC maps. Our findings show that when a high-field MRI machine is used, magnetic susceptibility artifacts can distort anatomical structures and produce high-intensity signals. Furthermore, our findings suggest that in many cases, PROPELLER DWI would be helpful in terms of achieving a correct diagnosis.

  4. Does Brief Telephone Support Improve Engagement With a Web-Based Weight Management Intervention? Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Leanne; Lloyd, Scott; Phillips, Dawn; Stuart, Beth; Williams, Sarah; Bradbury, Katherine; Roderick, Paul; Murray, Elizabeth; Michie, Susan; Little, Paul; Yardley, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent reviews suggest Web-based interventions are promising approaches for weight management but they identify difficulties with suboptimal usage. The literature suggests that offering some degree of human support to website users may boost usage and outcomes. Objective We disseminated the POWeR (“Positive Online Weight Reduction”) Web-based weight management intervention in a community setting. POWeR consisted of weekly online sessions that emphasized self-monitoring, goal-setting, and cognitive/behavioral strategies. Our primary outcome was intervention usage and we investigated whether this was enhanced by the addition of brief telephone coaching. We also explored group differences in short-term self-reported weight loss. Methods Participants were recruited using a range of methods including targeted mailouts, advertisements in the local press, notices on organizational websites, and social media. A total of 786 adults were randomized at an individual level through an online procedure to (1) POWeR only (n=264), (2) POWeR plus coaching (n=247), or (3) a waiting list control group (n=275). Those in the POWeR plus coaching arm were contacted at approximately 7 and 28 days after randomization for short coaching telephone calls aimed at promoting continued usage of the website. Website usage was tracked automatically. Weight was assessed by online self-report. Results Of the 511 participants allocated to the two intervention groups, the median number of POWeR sessions completed was just one (IQR 0-2 for POWeR only, IQR 0-3 for POWeR plus coach). Nonetheless, a substantial minority completed at least the core three sessions of POWeR: 47 participants (17.8%, 47/264) in the POWeR-only arm and 64 participants (25.9%, 64/247) in the POWeR plus coaching arm. Participants in the POWeR plus coaching group persisted with the intervention for longer and were 1.61 times more likely to complete the core three sessions than the POWeR-only group (χ2 1=4.93; OR 1

  5. Superconductive material and magnetic field for damping and levitation support and damping of cryogenic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A superconductive load bearing support without a mechanical contact and vibration damping for cryogenic instruments in space is presented. The levitation support and vibration damping is accomplished by the use of superconducting magnets and the 'Meissner' effect. The assembly allows for transfer of vibration energy away from the cryogenic instrument which then can be damped by the use of either an electronic circuit or conventional vibration damping mean.

  6. Magnetic silica supported palladium catalyst: synthesis of allyl aryl ethers in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and benign procedure for the synthesis of aryl allyl ethers has been developed using phenols, allyl acetates and magnetically recyclable silica supported palladium catalyst in water; performance of reaction in air and easy separation of the catalyst using an external mag...

  7. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  8. Interdistrict Magnet High School Students' Perceived Social Support: An Exploratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Diana J.; Fitzgerald, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Magnet high school attendance seems to lead to improved academic performance (Cobb, Bifulco, & Bell, 2009; U.S. Department of Education, 2008; Yu & Taylor, 1997). Likewise, perceived social support has been linked with positive outcomes for adolescents, including improved academic performance (Rosenfeld, Richman, & Bowen, 2000; Demaray & Malecki,…

  9. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Do Not Help Support DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Category

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Janssen, Joost; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aims to determine whether or not structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data support the DSM-5 proposal of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic category, and whether or not classical DSM-IV autistic disorder (AD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) categories should be subsumed into it. The most replicated sMRI findings…

  10. Nonlinear instability of wormholes supported by exotic dust and a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbach, Olivier; Zannias, Thomas

    2010-02-15

    Recently, spherically symmetric, static wormholes supported by exotic dust and a radial magnetic field have been derived and argued to be stable with respect to linear radial fluctuations. In this report we point out that these wormholes are unstable due to the formation of shell-crossing singularities when the nonlinearities of the theory are taken into account.

  11. Study on the support technology of the light-weighted mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nengbing; QI, Bo; Ren, Ge; Zhu, Fuyin; Ai, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    To reduce the surface deformation of a space remote sensor mirror in space environments, a flexible supporting structure of space mirror is designed to improve the surface accuracy of mirror under operating conditions, making the mirror in good thermal dimensional stability and the structure stiffness meet the requirements of mechanics at the same time. Using the finite element method to do simulation analysis about the surface accuracy and structural strength and dynamic stiffness of the mirror assembly under the force-heat coupling state. Simulation results show that the first-order natural frequency of the mirror component is 393.73Hz, and the RMS values of 1g gravity respectively reach 8.920nm, 1.856nm, 4.516nm; under 1g gravity and 4 degrees centigrade rising coupling state in three directions, the RMS values respectively reach 10.02nm, 3.312nm, 5.718nm, the results meet the design specifications requirement that the RMS value less than λ/50 (λ=632.8nm). Finally, the analysis of the random vibration was carried out on the mirror components, results show that the mirror and its supporting structure was designed reasonable which can meet the requirements of space applications.

  12. Effects of different cooling treatments on water diffusion, microcirculation, and water content within exercised muscles: evaluation by magnetic resonance T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of different cooling treatments on exercised muscles. Seven adults underwent four post-exercise treatments (20-min ice-bag application, 60-min gel-pack application at 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C, and non-cooling treatment) with at least 1 week between treatments. Magnetic resonance diffusion- and T2-weighted images were obtained to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficients (apparent diffusion coefficient 1, which reflects intramuscular water diffusion and microcirculation, and apparent diffusion coefficient 2, which is approximately equal to the true diffusion coefficient that excludes as much of the effect of intramuscular microcirculation as possible) and the T2 values (intramuscular water content level) of the ankle dorsiflexors, respectively, before and after ankle dorsiflexion exercise and after post-exercise treatment. The T2 values increased significantly after exercise and returned to pre-exercise values after each treatment; no significant differences were observed among the four post-exercise treatments. Both apparent diffusion coefficients also increased significantly after exercise and decreased significantly after the three cooling treatments; no significant difference was detected among the three cooling treatments. Local cooling suppresses both water diffusion and microcirculation within exercised muscles. Moreover, although the treatment time was longer, adequate cooling effects could be achieved using the gel-pack applications at relatively mild cooling temperatures.

  13. Tensor Based Representation and Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barmpoutis, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    Cartesian tensor bases have been widely used to model spherical functions. In medical imaging, tensors of various orders can approximate the diffusivity function at each voxel of a diffusion-weighted MRI data set. This approximation produces tensor-valued datasets that contain information about the underlying local structure of the scanned tissue.…

  14. 3-D residual eddy current field characterisation: applied to diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kieran; Daducci, Alessandro; Kickler, Nils; Lazeyras, Francois; Gruetter, Rolf; Feiweier, Thorsten; Krueger, Gunnar

    2013-08-01

    Clinical use of the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion weighted images is hampered by the geometric distortions that result from the large residual 3-D eddy current field induced. In this work, we aimed to predict, using linear response theory, the residual 3-D eddy current field required for geometric distortion correction based on phantom eddy current field measurements. The predicted 3-D eddy current field induced by the diffusion-weighting gradients was able to reduce the root mean square error of the residual eddy current field to ~1 Hz. The model's performance was tested on diffusion weighted images of four normal volunteers, following distortion correction, the quality of the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion-weighted images was found to have comparable quality to image registration based corrections (FSL) at low b-values. Unlike registration techniques the correction was not hindered by low SNR at high b-values, and results in improved image quality relative to FSL. Characterization of the 3-D eddy current field with linear response theory enables the prediction of the 3-D eddy current field required to correct eddy current induced geometric distortions for a wide range of clinical and high b-value protocols.

  15. Structural Design and Analysis for a Double-Band Cold Mass Support of the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Wu, Hong; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Li, S. Y.; Guo, XingLong; Pan, Heng; Xu, FengYu

    2009-07-01

    The cooling channel of Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils, which are magnetically hooked together. A pair ofcoupling magnets operating at 4 K is applied to produce up to .6 T magnetic field on the magnet centerline to keep muon beam within the RF cavity windows. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in the MICE channel is up to 500 kN inlongitudinal direction, and the requirements for magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4 K are stringent. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediatethermal interruption is applied for the coupling magnet. The physical center of the magnet does not change as it is cooled down from 300 K to 4.2 K with this support system. In this paper the design parameters of the support system are discussed. The integral analysis of the support system using FEA method was carried out to etermine the tension forces in bands when various loads are applied. The magnet centre displacement and concentricity deviation form the axis of the warm bore are obtained, and the peak tension in support bands is also determined according to the simulation results.

  16. Structure and Stability of Filamentary Clouds Supported by Lateral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2015-03-01

    We have constructed two types of analytical models for an isothermal filamentary cloud supported mainly by magnetic tension. The first one describes an isolated cloud while the second considers filamentary clouds spaced periodically. Both models assume that the filamentary clouds are highly flattened. The former is proved to be the asymptotic limit of the latter in which each filamentary cloud is much thinner than the distance to the neighboring filaments. We show that these models reproduce the main features of the 2D equilibrium model of Tomisaka for a filamentary cloud threaded by a perpendicular magnetic field. It is also shown that the critical mass to flux ratio is M/Φ={{(2π \\sqrt{G})}-1}, where M, Φ and G denote the cloud mass, the total magnetic flux of the cloud, and the gravitational constant, respectively. This upper bound coincides with that for an axisymmetric cloud supported by poloidal magnetic fields. We apply the variational principle for studying the Jeans instability of the first model. Our model cloud is unstable against fragmentation as well as the filamentary clouds threaded by a longitudinal magnetic field. The fastest growing mode has a wavelength several times longer than the cloud diameter. The second model describes quasi-static evolution of a filamentary molecular cloud by ambipolar diffusion.

  17. The relationship between body mass index and unhealthy weight control behaviors among adolescents: the role of family and peer social support.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S

    2012-12-01

    Adolescents classified as overweight or obese are more likely to use unhealthy weight control behaviors such as skipping meals or fasting than their healthy weight peers. Adolescents with low perceived social support may be at particular risk. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between adolescent overweight and obesity, indices of perceived peer and family social support, and their interaction in the use of unhealthy weight control behaviors among adolescents. The present study used data from the 2001-2002 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children collaborative survey. Participants included 4598 adolescent girls and boys in the ninth and tenth grades. Results of binary logistic regression analyses showed that obese boys and girls were more likely to use unhealthy weight control behaviors than their healthy weight peers. Boys and girls who endorsed difficult communication with their parents, low levels of parent school support, or frequent bullying were more likely to engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors than relevant comparison groups. Among girls, poor classmate relationships were associated with increased use of unhealthy weight control behaviors whereas fewer friendships were associated with decreased use. Results suggest that adolescents are at high risk for use of unhealthy weight control behaviors and would benefit from interventions to increase knowledge and social support for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight.

  18. Long-lived resonances supported by a contact interaction in crossed magnetic and electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Krajewska, K. Kaminski, J.Z.; Potvliege, R.M.

    2008-11-15

    The lifetime of the resonance states of an electron interacting with a zero-range potential in the presence of crossed magnetic and electric fields is studied for the case where the electron is confined in the direction of the magnetic field by a parabolic quantum well. It is shown that long-lived electric field-induced resonances exist in this system even when the zero-range potential does not support any field-free bound state. The relationship of these resonances with the Landau states localized near the point interaction is discussed.

  19. Hyperintensity signal in the joint space of the temporomandibular joint on fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the incidence of a hyperintense signal in the joint space of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) on fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs). We studied 112 patients (224 joints) with disorders of the TMJ who were examined by T2-weighted MRI, and recorded the association between displacement of the disc and the hyperintense signal using the κ coefficient. A hyperintense signal was found in 4 of 91 joints (4%) when the disc was in the normal position, in all 19 joints with anterior disc displacement with reduction, and in 108 of the 114 joints (95%) with anterior disc displacement without reduction. There was a significant correlation between displacement of the disc and the hyperintense signal (p<0.001). The κ coefficient was 0.91. Such a signal in the joint space of the TMJ on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI may indicate the presence of synovial fluid in the joint space with displacement of the disc.

  20. Studies of Ciliated Microorganism Swimming with and against a Magnetic Field Tuned Apparent Weight Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ilyong; Mickalide, Harry; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2012-11-01

    There is a class of microorganisms that are small enough to swim at low Reynolds number but large enough for gravity to influence their behavior. Remarkably, Paramecia exert a stronger (weaker) propulsion force when swimming against (with) their apparent weight force, W -->. To investigate the source of the swimming speed response, we are examining how the trajectories of single swimmers change when they reverse their direction relative to W -->. We characterize their helical trajectories with three parameters that we can relate to their beating of their cilia using a simple model. The latest results will be described.

  1. Gd(III)-Dithiolane Gold Nanoparticles for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Rammohan, Nikhil; Rotz, Matthew W.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Preslar, Adam T.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a 5 year survival of approximately 3% and median survival of 6 months and is among the most dismal of prognoses in all of medicine. This poor prognosis is largely due to delayed diagnosis where patients remain asymptomatic until advanced disease is present. Therefore, techniques to allow early detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are desperately needed. Imaging of pancreatic tissue is notoriously difficult, and the development of new imaging techniques would impact our understanding of organ physiology and pathology with applications in disease diagnosis, staging, and longitudinal response to therapy in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides numerous advantages for these types of investigations; however, it is unable to delineate the pancreas due to low inherent contrast within this tissue type. To overcome this limitation, we have prepared a new Gd(III) contrast agent that accumulates in the pancreas and provides significant contrast enhancement by MR imaging. We describe the synthesis and characterization of a new dithiolane-Gd(III) complex and a straightforward and scalable approach for conjugation to a gold nanoparticle. We present data that show the nanoconjugates exhibit very high per particle values of r1 relaxivity at both low and high magnetic field strengths due to the high Gd(III) payload. We provide evidence of pancreatic tissue labeling that includes MR images, post-mortem biodistribution analysis, and pancreatic tissue evaluation of particle localization. Significant contrast enhancement was observed allowing clear identification of the pancreas with contrast-to-noise ratios exceeding 35:1. PMID:27050622

  2. One-way helical electromagnetic wave propagation supported by magnetized plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; Lawrence, Mark; Gao, Wenlong; Guo, Qinghua; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we reveal the presence of photonic one-way helical surface states in a simple natural system- magnetized plasma. The application of an external magnetic field to a bulk plasma body not only breaks time-reversal-symmetry but also leads to separation of Equi-Frequency Contour surfaces (EFCs) to form topologically nontrivial gaps in k space. Interestingly, these EFCs support topologically protected surface states. We numerically investigate an interface between magnetized plasma, using a realistic model for parameter dispersion, and vacuum, to confirm the existence of one-way scatter-immune helical surface states. Unlike previous proposals for achieving photonic one-way propagation, our scheme does not require the use of artificial structures and should therefore be simple to implement experimentally. PMID:26883883

  3. Effect of the metal support interactions on the physicochemical and magnetic properties of Ni catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Polo, C.; Gil, A.; Korili, S. A.; Pérez-Landázabal, J. I.; Recarte, V.; Trujillano, R.; Vicente, M. A.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, the effect of the preparation method on the physicochemical and magnetic properties of nickel-containing catalysts is analysed. The catalysts were prepared by two methods, incipient wetness impregnation and precipitation-deposition using two commercial oxides, γ-Al 2O 3 (Rhône-Poulenc) and SiO 2 (AF125, Kali Chemie) as supports. The precursors were dried at 393 K for 16 h and then calcined at 823 K for 4 h. The physicochemical characterization of the catalysts included nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and chemical analysis. A SQUID magnetometer was employed in the magnetic characterization. The basic compositional and structural characteristics of these Ni-based nanoporous catalysts are analysed in relation to their magnetic response.

  4. SU-E-J-157: Improving the Quality of T2-Weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Clinical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, D; Mutic, S; Hu, Y; Caruthers, S; Glide-Hurst, C; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an imaging technique that enables us to acquire T2- weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging (4DMRI) with sufficient spatial coverage, temporal resolution and spatial resolution for clinical evaluation. Methods: T2-weighed 4DMRI images were acquired from a healthy volunteer using a respiratory amplitude triggered T2-weighted Turbo Spin Echo sequence. 10 respiratory states were used to equally sample the respiratory range based on amplitude (0%, 20%i, 40%i, 60%i, 80%i, 100%, 80%e, 60%e, 40%e and 20%e). To avoid frequent scanning halts, a methodology was devised that split 10 respiratory states into two packages in an interleaved manner and packages were acquired separately. Sixty 3mm sagittal slices at 1.5mm in-plane spatial resolution were acquired to offer good spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. The in-plane field of view was 375mm × 260mm with nominal scan time of 3 minutes 42 seconds. Acquired 2D images at the same respiratory state were combined to form the 3D image set corresponding to that respiratory state and reconstructed in the coronal view to evaluate whether all slices were at the same respiratory state. 3D image sets of 10 respiratory states represented a complete 4D MRI image set. Results: T2-weighted 4DMRI image were acquired in 10 minutes which was within clinical acceptable range. Qualitatively, the acquired MRI images had good image quality for delineation purposes. There were no abrupt position changes in reconstructed coronal images which confirmed that all sagittal slices were in the same respiratory state. Conclusion: We demonstrated it was feasible to acquire T2-weighted 4DMRI image set within a practical amount of time (10 minutes) that had good temporal resolution (10 respiratory states), spatial resolution (1.5mm × 1.5mm × 3.0mm) and spatial coverage (60 slices) for future clinical evaluation.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Evaluate Major Salivary Gland Function Before and After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Stroobants, Sigrid; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI as a noninvasive tool to investigate major salivary gland function before and after radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: DW-MRI was performed in 8 HNC patients before and after parotid-sparing RT (mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland <26 Gy). A DW sequence was performed once at rest and then repeated continuously during salivary stimulation. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for both parotid and submandibular glands were calculated. Findings were compared with salivary gland scintigraphy. Results: Before RT, the mean ADC value at rest was significantly lower in the parotid than in the submandibular glands. During the first 5 min of stimulation, the ADC value of the salivary glands showed a decrease, followed by a steady increase until a peak ADC, significantly higher than the baseline value, was reached after a median of 17 min. The baseline ADC value at rest was significantly higher after RT than before RT in the nonspared salivary glands but not in the spared parotid glands. In the contralateral parotid glands, the same response was seen as before RT. This pattern was completely lost in the nonspared glands. These results corresponded with remaining or loss of salivary function, respectively, as confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Conclusions: Diffusion-weighted-MRI allows noninvasive evaluation of functional changes in the major salivary glands after RT and is a promising tool for investigating radiation-induced xerostomia.

  6. Cuckoo Search with Lévy Flights for Weighted Bayesian Energy Functional Optimization in Global-Support Curve Data Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Akemi; Iglesias, Andrés; Cabellos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The problem of data fitting is very important in many theoretical and applied fields. In this paper, we consider the problem of optimizing a weighted Bayesian energy functional for data fitting by using global-support approximating curves. By global-support curves we mean curves expressed as a linear combination of basis functions whose support is the whole domain of the problem, as opposed to other common approaches in CAD/CAM and computer graphics driven by piecewise functions (such as B-splines and NURBS) that provide local control of the shape of the curve. Our method applies a powerful nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithm called cuckoo search, introduced recently to solve optimization problems. A major advantage of this method is its simplicity: cuckoo search requires only two parameters, many fewer than other metaheuristic approaches, so the parameter tuning becomes a very simple task. The paper shows that this new approach can be successfully used to solve our optimization problem. To check the performance of our approach, it has been applied to five illustrative examples of different types, including open and closed 2D and 3D curves that exhibit challenging features, such as cusps and self-intersections. Our results show that the method performs pretty well, being able to solve our minimization problem in an astonishingly straightforward way. PMID:24977175

  7. Cuckoo search with Lévy flights for weighted Bayesian energy functional optimization in global-support curve data fitting.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Akemi; Iglesias, Andrés; Cabellos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The problem of data fitting is very important in many theoretical and applied fields. In this paper, we consider the problem of optimizing a weighted Bayesian energy functional for data fitting by using global-support approximating curves. By global-support curves we mean curves expressed as a linear combination of basis functions whose support is the whole domain of the problem, as opposed to other common approaches in CAD/CAM and computer graphics driven by piecewise functions (such as B-splines and NURBS) that provide local control of the shape of the curve. Our method applies a powerful nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithm called cuckoo search, introduced recently to solve optimization problems. A major advantage of this method is its simplicity: cuckoo search requires only two parameters, many fewer than other metaheuristic approaches, so the parameter tuning becomes a very simple task. The paper shows that this new approach can be successfully used to solve our optimization problem. To check the performance of our approach, it has been applied to five illustrative examples of different types, including open and closed 2D and 3D curves that exhibit challenging features, such as cusps and self-intersections. Our results show that the method performs pretty well, being able to solve our minimization problem in an astonishingly straightforward way.

  8. Youth dietary intake and weight status: healthful neighborhood food environments enhance the protective role of supportive family home environments.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jerica M; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Forsyth, Ann; Bauer, Katherine W; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate individual and joint associations of the home environment and the neighborhood built environment with adolescent dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n=2682; 53.2% girls; mean age14.4 years) participating in the EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) study completed height and weight measurements and surveys in Minnesota middle and high schools. Neighborhood variables were measured using Geographic Information Systems data. Multiple regressions of BMI z-score, fruit and vegetable intake, and fast food consumption were fit including home and neighborhood environmental variables as predictors and also including their interactions to test for effect modification. Supportive family environments (i.e., higher family functioning, frequent family meals, and parent modeling of healthful eating) were associated with higher adolescent fruit and vegetable intake, lower fast food consumption, and lower BMI z-score. Associations between the built environment and adolescent outcomes were fewer. Interaction results, although not all consistent, indicated that the relationship between a supportive family environment and adolescent fruit and vegetable intake and BMI was enhanced when the neighborhood was supportive of healthful behavior. Public health interventions that simultaneously improve both the home environment and the neighborhood environment of adolescents may have a greater impact on adolescent obesity prevention than interventions that address one of these environments alone.

  9. Isolation of genomic DNA using magnetic nanoparticles as a solid-phase support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiyed, Z. M.; Ramchand, C. N.; Telang, S. D.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years, techniques employing magnetizable solid-phase supports (MSPS) have found application in numerous biological fields. This magnetic separation procedure offers several advantages in terms of subjecting the analyte to very little mechanical stress compared to other methods. Secondly, these methods are non-laborious, cheap, and often highly scalable. The current paper details a genomic DNA isolation method optimized in our laboratory using magnetic nanoparticles as a solid-phase support. The quality and yields of the isolated DNA from all the samples using magnetic nanoparticles were higher or equivalent to the traditional DNA extraction procedures. Additionally, the magnetic method takes less than 15 min to extract polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ready genomic DNA as against several hours taken by traditional phenol-chloroform extraction protocols. Moreover, the isolated DNA was found to be compatible in PCR amplification and restriction endonuclease digestion. The developed procedure is quick, inexpensive, robust, and it does not require the use of organic solvents or sophisticated instruments, which makes it more amenable to automation and miniaturization.

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of silicon supported organometallic molecular wires: a density functional theory (DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Tan, Yingzi; Li, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaojun; Pei, Yong

    2015-08-28

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to the well-studied gas phase TM-benzene molecular wires. Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ and Si-[Cr(styrene)]∞ single molecular wires (SMWs) are a ferromagnetic semiconductor and half metal, respectively. Creation of H-atom defects on the silicon surface can introduce an impurity metallic band, which leads to novel half-metallic magnetism of a Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ system. Moreover, double molecular wires (DMWs) containing two identical or hetero SMWs are theoretically designed. The [Mn(styrene)]∞-[Cr(styrene)]∞ DMW exhibits half-metallic magnetism where the spin-up and spin-down channels are contributed by two single molecular wires. Finally, we demonstrate that introducing a TM-defect may significantly affect the electronic structure and magnetic properties of molecular wires. These studies provide new insights into the structure and properties of surface supported 1-D sandwiched molecular wires and may inspire the future experimental synthesis of substrate confined organometallic sandwiched molecular wires.

  11. Maximizing retention in long‐term clinical trials of a weight loss agent: use of a dietitian support team

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, M.; Klioze, S. S.; Chew, R. D.; England, R. D.; Digenio, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective High‐attrition rates have been observed in long‐term clinical trials of weight loss agents. We evaluated the impact of an innovative retention programme on 1‐year retention. Methods Three Phase 3 global multicentre clinical trials evaluated the efficacy and safety of a CB1 receptor antagonist in subjects with BMI ≥ or = 27 kg/m2. The impact of a multifaceted retention programme including a dietitian screening interview, a comprehensive culturally adapted lifestyle modification programme, and a dietitian support system to maximize lifestyle adherence, was evaluated in 4,410 subjects from four subpopulations (non‐US English‐speaking, non‐English‐speaking, US‐without dietitian screening and US‐with dietitian screening) comprising 208 centres from 15 countries. Results The median proportion retained over the first year among subjects in three protocols was 82%. Non‐English‐speaking countries showed higher retention rates (89%) compared with the USA (73%) and non‐US English‐speaking (81%) countries. Within the USA, behavioural screening was associated with 29% reduction in dropout rate; for every five monthly teleconferences attended above 11, there was a 32% decrease in dropout rate. Conclusions This novel retention programme greatly improved upon reported retention rates of studies conducted with other weight loss agents in long‐term clinical trials. Its effectiveness should be confirmed in future trials. PMID:27708842

  12. LMethyR-SVM: Predict Human Enhancers Using Low Methylated Regions based on Weighted Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingting; Hu, Hong; Dai, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of enhancers is a challenging task. Various types of epigenetic information including histone modification have been utilized in the construction of enhancer prediction models based on a diverse panel of machine learning schemes. However, DNA methylation profiles generated from the whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) have not been fully explored for their potential in enhancer prediction despite the fact that low methylated regions (LMRs) have been implied to be distal active regulatory regions. Method In this work, we propose a prediction framework, LMethyR-SVM, using LMRs identified from cell-type-specific WGBS DNA methylation profiles and a weighted support vector machine learning framework. In LMethyR-SVM, the set of cell-type-specific LMRs is further divided into three sets: reliable positive, like positive and likely negative, according to their resemblance to a small set of experimentally validated enhancers in the VISTA database based on an estimated non-parametric density distribution. Then, the prediction model is obtained by solving a weighted support vector machine. Results We demonstrate the performance of LMethyR-SVM by using the WGBS DNA methylation profiles derived from the human embryonic stem cell type (H1) and the fetal lung fibroblast cell type (IMR90). The predicted enhancers are highly conserved with a reasonable validation rate based on a set of commonly used positive markers including transcription factors, p300 binding and DNase-I hypersensitive sites. In addition, we show evidence that the large fraction of the LMethyR-SVM predicted enhancers are not predicted by ChromHMM in H1 cell type and they are more enriched for the FANTOM5 enhancers. Conclusion Our work suggests that low methylated regions detected from the WGBS data are useful as complementary resources to histone modification marks in developing models for the prediction of cell-type-specific enhancers. PMID:27662487

  13. Whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: current evidence in oncology and potential role in colorectal cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Cappendijk, Vincent C; Prompers, Leonne M; Mottaghy, Felix M; Beets, Geerard L; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2011-09-01

    Tumour staging in cancer patients generally entails a multimodality imaging approach. Whole-body (WB) imaging techniques may, however, be more time- and cost-effective than a multimodality approach. 2-fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET), computed tomography (CT) and hybrid positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) are the most established WB modalities, although new techniques, amongst which diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), are emerging. This review aims to evaluate the current evidence for WB-DWI in oncology, to discuss its potential for the WB staging of (colo)rectal cancer and to relate it to the established WB techniques.

  14. Three-Tesla magnetic resonance elastography for hepatic fibrosis: Comparison with diffusion-weighted imaging and gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Yu, Mi Hye; Choe, Won Hyeok; Jung, Sung Il; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for hepatic fibrosis and to compare that with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. METHODS: Forty-two patients were included in the study. On MRE, mean stiffness values were measured on the elastograms in kilopascals. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the liver was measured using DWI. On gadoxetic acid enhanced MR, the contrast enhancement index (CEI) was calculated as signal intensity (SI)post/SIpre, where SIpost is liver-to-muscle SI ratio on hepatobiliary phase images and SIpre is that on nonenhanced images. Correlation between aspartate aminotransferase to the platelet ratio index (APRI) and three MR parameters was assessed. Each MR parameter was compared between a hepatic fibrosis (HF) group and non-hepatic fibrosis (nHF) group. RESULTS: Liver stiffness showed strong positive correlation with APRI [Spearman correlation coeffiecient (r) = 0.773, P < 0.0001], while ADC and CEI showed weak or prominent negative correlation (r = -0.28 and -0.321, respectively). In the HF group, only liver stiffness showed strong correlation with APRI (r = 0.731, P < 0.0001). Liver stiffness, ADC, and APRI were significantly different between the HF group and nHF group. CONCLUSION: MRE at 3-Tesla could be a feasible method for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25516671

  15. A Magnetic Soft Endoscopic Capsule-Inflated Intragastric Balloon for Weight Management

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh Nho; Ho, Khek Yu; Phee, Soo Jay

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity have been identified as a cause of high risk diseases like diabetes and cancer. Although conventional Intragastric Balloons (IGBs) have become an efficient and less invasive method for overweight and obesity treatment, the use of conventional tools such as catheter or endoscope to insert and remove the IGBs from the patient’s body causes nausea, vomiting, discomfort, and even gastric mucous damage. To eliminate these drawbacks, we develop a novel magnetic soft capsule device with gas-filled balloon inflation. The balloon is made from a thin and biocompatible material that can be inflated to a desired volume using biocompatible effervescent chemicals. In addition, both the outer balloon and inner capsule are designed to be soft and chemical resistance. The soft capsule shell is fabricated using scaffold-solvent approach while the outer balloon utilizes a novel fabrication approach for 3D spherical structure. A prototype of the proposed capsule and balloon is given. Experiments are successfully carried out in stimulated gastric environment and fresh porcine stomach to validate the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed approach. PMID:28000756

  16. Predicting Mortality in Patients With “Malignant” Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction Using Susceptibility-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shu-Ping; Chen, Chia-Yuen; Tsai, Fong Y.; Chan, Wing P.; Chen, Chin-I

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction (defined as space-occupying edema in more than 50% to 75% of the MCA territory) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence and assess the usefulness of SWI findings, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) as predictors of clinical outcome. Data from 16 patients with large MCA infarction previously admitted to our institution between December 2009 and October 2012 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Within 7 days after stroke onset, 1 neurologist and 1 neuroradiologist estimated the area of infarction on DWI/ADC and extent of prominent vessel sign (PVS) on SWI images using the Stroke Program Early MR Score (SPEMRS). The PVS on SWI was defined as a local prominence of hypointense vessels with either increased vessel number or diameter in the target area, when compared with the number or diameter of the contralateral MCA territory vessels. Six patients died and 10 survived. Although the DWI/ADC-SPEMRS and clinical profiles were similar between the nonsurvivor and survivor groups, SWI-SPEMRS was significantly lower in the nonsurvivor group (P < 0.001). The area of deoxygenation on SWI in patients with malignant MCA infarction can predict mortality. Lower SWI-SPEMRS is a potentially better predictor of poor outcome than lower DWI-SPEMRS. A larger prospective study is needed to clarify the role of SWI as a therapeutic guide in malignant MCA. PMID:26937906

  17. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunbin; Lin, Zuan Tao; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, He; Deng, Ya Li; Le, D Elizabeth; Bin, Jianguo; Li, Meiyu; Liao, Yulin; Liu, Yili; Jiang, Gangbiao; Bin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS) micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm) and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors.

  18. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in detecting intracranial hemorrhage at different stages: a comparative study with susceptibility weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoyue; Bai, Yan; Lin, Yusong; Hong, Xiaohua; Liu, Taiyuan; Ma, Lun; Haacke, E Mark; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Meiyun

    2017-01-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is a noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique based on the chemical exchange-dependent saturation transfer mechanism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of APT MRI in detecting intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) at hyperacute, acute and subacute stages by comparing with susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI). APT MRI and SWI were performed on 33 included patients with ICH by using a 3-T MRI unit. A two-sided Mann-Whitney U test was used to detect differences in APT-weighted (APTw) and SWI signal intensities of ICH at hyperacute, acute and subacute stages. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the diagnostic utilities of APT MRI and SWI. Our results showed that APT MRI could detect ICH at hyperacute, acute and subacute stages. Therefore, APTw signal intensity may serve as a reliable, noninvasive imaging biomarker for detecting ICH at hyperacute, acute and subacute stages. Moreover, APT MRI could provide additional information for the ICH compared with SWI. PMID:28374764

  19. √Structure and Stability of Filamentary Clouds Supported by Lateral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2015-08-01

    We have constructed two types of analytical models for an isothermal filamentary cloud supported mainly by magnetic tension. The first one describes an isolated cloud while the second considers filamentary clouds spaced periodically. Both the models assume that the filamentary clouds are highly flattened. The former is proved to be the asymptotic limit of the latter in which each filamentary cloud is much thinner than the distance to the neighboring filaments. We show that these models reproduce the main features of the 2D equilibrium model of a filamentary cloud threaded by a perpendicular magnetic field. It is also shown that the critical mass to flux ratio is M/Φ = 1/(2 π√G ) , where M, Φ, and G denote the cloud mass, the total magnetic flux of the cloud, and the gravitational constant, respectively. This upper bound coincides with that for an axisymmetric cloud supported by poloidal magnetic fields. We apply the variational principle for studying the Jeans instability of the first model. Our model cloud is unstable against fragmentation as well as the filamentary clouds threaded by a longitudinal magnetic field. The fastest growing mode has a wavelength several times longer than the cloud diameter. This is because the first model is supercritical. The second model describes quasi-static evolution of a filamentary molecular cloud by ambipolar diffusion. The mass to flux ratio increases at the filament center and exceeds the critical value at a certain point. It is suggested that the filamentary cloud becomes unstable against fragmentation at the critical mass to flux ratio.

  20. 3D segmentation of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Eltes, Peter E.; Del Rio, Luis; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-12-01

    Computational medicine aims at employing personalised computational models in diagnosis and treatment planning. The use of such models to help physicians in finding the best treatment for low back pain (LBP) is becoming popular. One of the challenges of creating such models is to derive patient-specific anatomical and tissue models of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs), as a prior step. This article presents a segmentation scheme that obtains accurate results irrespective of the degree of IVD degeneration, including pathological discs with protrusion or herniation. The segmentation algorithm, employing a novel feature selector, iteratively deforms an initial shape, which is projected into a statistical shape model space at first and then, into a B-Spline space to improve accuracy. The method was tested on a MR dataset of 59 patients suffering from LBP. The images follow a standard T2-weighted protocol in coronal and sagittal acquisitions. These two image volumes were fused in order to overcome large inter-slice spacing. The agreement between expert-delineated structures, used here as gold-standard, and our automatic segmentation was evaluated using Dice Similarity Index and surface-to-surface distances, obtaining a mean error of 0.68 mm in the annulus segmentation and 1.88 mm in the nucleus, which are the best results with respect to the image resolution in the current literature.

  1. 3D segmentation of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M; Eltes, Peter E; Rio, Luis Del; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2014-12-21

    Computational medicine aims at employing personalised computational models in diagnosis and treatment planning. The use of such models to help physicians in finding the best treatment for low back pain (LBP) is becoming popular. One of the challenges of creating such models is to derive patient-specific anatomical and tissue models of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs), as a prior step. This article presents a segmentation scheme that obtains accurate results irrespective of the degree of IVD degeneration, including pathological discs with protrusion or herniation. The segmentation algorithm, employing a novel feature selector, iteratively deforms an initial shape, which is projected into a statistical shape model space at first and then, into a B-Spline space to improve accuracy.The method was tested on a MR dataset of 59 patients suffering from LBP. The images follow a standard T2-weighted protocol in coronal and sagittal acquisitions. These two image volumes were fused in order to overcome large inter-slice spacing. The agreement between expert-delineated structures, used here as gold-standard, and our automatic segmentation was evaluated using Dice Similarity Index and surface-to-surface distances, obtaining a mean error of 0.68 mm in the annulus segmentation and 1.88 mm in the nucleus, which are the best results with respect to the image resolution in the current literature.

  2. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of parotid masses. Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Yologlu, Zeynel; Aydin, Hasan; Alp, Nalan A.; Aribas, Bilgin K.; Kizilgoz, Volkan; Arda, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the diagnostic potentials of MRI, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping in the detection of parotid masses correlated to the histopathological results. Methods Study design was retrospective. Fifteen patients with parotid gland masses were included as the study group and contralateral normal parotis glands of same patients were taken as the control group. Patients with bilateral parotid gland tumors were excluded, 7 right-sided and 8 left-sided parotid masses were included in the research. The study took place at the Department of Radiology, Ankara, Turkey, between May 2012 and September 2014. Results Apparent diffusion coefficient measurements of 15 parotis tumors in 1000 and 750 sec/mm2 b-values with comparison to the contralateral normal gland parenchyma were demonstrated. Neurofibromas was predicted as the highest, and lipomas as the lowest ADC values. Pleomorphic adenomas, Warthin’s tumor, and normal parotid parenchyma indicate significant statistical differences from each other on the basis of mean ADC values (p<0.05). Conclusion The DWI and ADC mapping of parotis gland could aid in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant masses. PMID:27874161

  3. Automatic Brain Tumor Detection in T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, P.; Kropatsch, W. G.; Bartušek, K.

    2013-10-01

    This work focuses on fully automatic detection of brain tumors. The first aim is to determine, whether the image contains a brain with a tumor, and if it does, localize it. The goal of this work is not the exact segmentation of tumors, but the localization of their approximate position. The test database contains 203 T2-weighted images of which 131 are images of healthy brain and the remaining 72 images contain brain with pathological area. The estimation, whether the image shows an afflicted brain and where a pathological area is, is done by multi resolution symmetry analysis. The first goal was tested by five-fold cross-validation technique with 100 repetitions to avoid the result dependency on sample order. This part of the proposed method reaches the true positive rate of 87.52% and the true negative rate of 93.14% for an afflicted brain detection. The evaluation of the second part of the algorithm was carried out by comparing the estimated location to the true tumor location. The detection of the tumor location reaches the rate of 95.83% of correct anomaly detection and the rate 87.5% of correct tumor location.

  4. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Therapy Response Monitoring and Early Treatment Prediction of Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guifeng; Zhu, Lei; Yang, Kai; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Xie, Jin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-03-02

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) as a relatively new cancer treatment method has attracted worldwide attention. Previous research on PTT has focused on its therapy efficiency and selectivity. The early prognosis of PTT, which is pivotal for the assessment of the treatment and the therapy stratification, however, has been rarely studied. In the present study, we investigated diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) as a tool for therapy monitoring and early prognosis of PTT. To this end, we injected PEGylated graphene oxide (GO-PEG) or iron oxide deposited graphene oxide (GO-IONP-PEG) to 4T1 tumor models and irradiated the tumors at different drug-light intervals to induce PTT. For GO-IONP-PEG injected animals, we also included therapy arms where an external magnetic field was applied to the tumors to improve the delivery of the nanoparticle transducers. DW-MRI was performed at different time points after PTT and the tumor apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were analyzed and compared. Our studies show that photothermal agents, magnetic guidance, and drug-light intervals can all affect PTT treatment efficacy. Impressively, ADC value changes at early time points after PTT (less than 48 h) were found to be well-correlated with tumor growth suppression that was apparent days or weeks later. The changes were most sensitive to conditions that can extend the survival for more than 4 weeks, in which cases the 48 h ADC values were increased by more than 80%. These studies demonstrate for the first time that DW-MRI can be an accurate prognosis tool for PTT, suggesting an important role it can play in the future PTT evaluation and clinical translation of the modality.

  5. Distinction Between Recurrent Glioma and Radiation Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Combination With Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Q.-S. . E-mail: nanwushan@yahoo.com; Li, C.-F.; Liu Hong; Zhen, J.-H.; Feng, D.-C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with diffusion-weighted imaging on the evaluation of the recurrent contrast-enhancing areas at the site of treated gliomas. Methods and Materials: In 55 patients who had new contrast-enhancing lesions in the vicinity of the previously resected and irradiated high-grade gliomas, two-dimensional MR spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed. Spectral data for N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), lipid (Lip), and lactate (Lac) were analyzed in conjunction with the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in all patients. Diagnosis of these lesions was assigned by means of follow-up or histopathology. Results: The Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly higher in recurrent tumor than in regions of radiation injury (p < 0.01). The ADC value and ADC ratios (ADC of contrast-enhancing lesion to matching structure in the contralateral hemisphere) were significantly higher in radiation injury regions than in recurrent tumor (p < 0.01). With MR spectroscopic data, two variables (Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios) were shown to differentiate recurrent glioma from radiation injury, and 85.5% of total subjects were correctly classified into groups. However, with discriminant analysis of MR spectroscopy imaging plus diffusion-weighted imaging, three variables (Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and ADC ratio) were identified and 96.4% of total subjects were correctly classified. There was a significant difference between the diagnostic accuracy of the two discriminant analyses (Chi-square = 3.96, p = 0.046). Conclusion: Using discriminant analysis, this study found that MR spectroscopy in combination with ADC ratio, rather than ADC value, can improve the ability to differentiate recurrent glioma and radiation injury.

  6. Evaluation of the pituitary gland using magnetic resonance imaging: T1-weighted vs. VIBE imaging.

    PubMed

    Davis, M A; Castillo, M

    2013-06-01

    Volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) is used for abdominal imaging as a fast and efficient modality. Evaluation of brain lesions using VIBE is not common and its use for the pituitary gland has not yet been addressed. Our goal was to compare coronal T1-weighted (T1W) and VIBE images in patients undergoing studies of the pituitary gland. We hypothesized that, for this purpose, VIBE is superior to T1W images. T1W and VIBE images of the pituitary gland in 32 patients were evaluated. The two sequences were compared with specific attention to: contrast enhancement (gland and cavernous sinuses) and ability to view the anatomy of the cavernous sinuses. In patients with macroadenomas, visualization of the optic chiasm was also assessed. Images were rated as: VIBE being better, equal, or worse in comparison to T1W images. We also compared VIBE and T1W images specifically looking at micro/macro-adenomas and post-surgical patients. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square statistics. Of the 32 patients, the VIBE sequence showed superior contrast enhancement in 18 patients, six were found as being equal to T1W, and in eight instances VIBE was found to be worse than T1W. These results were statistically significant (p=.02). When looking at micro/macro-adenomas and post-surgical patients specifically, there was a trend to VIBE being superior to T1W but these data were not statistically significant. Visualization of chiasm in macroadenomas was similar for both techniques. VIBE was significantly superior to T1W with respect to pituitary and cavernous sinus contrast enhancement and cavernous sinus anatomy. A trend towards VIBE being superior in the evaluation of adenomas (pre- and post-operative) was seen, but it was not statistically significant. This is likely due to the small population size.

  7. Effects of Progressive Body Weight Support Treadmill Forward and Backward Walking Training on Stroke Patients’ Affected Side Lower Extremity’s Walking Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Lee, Kyoungbo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of progressive body weight supported treadmill forward and backward walking training (PBWSTFBWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill forward walking training (PBWSTFWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill backward walking training (PBWSTBWT), on stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 36 chronic stroke patients were divided into three groups with 12 subjects in each group. Each of the groups performed one of the progressive body weight supported treadmill training methods for 30 minute, six times per week for three weeks, and then received general physical therapy without any other intervention until the follow-up tests. For the assessment of the affected side lower extremity’s walking ability, step length of the affected side, stance phase of the affected side, swing phase of the affected side, single support of the affected side, and step time of the affected side were measured using optogait and the symmetry index. [Results] In the within group comparisons, all the three groups showed significant differences between before and after the intervention and in the comparison of the three groups, the PBWSTFBWT group showed more significant differences in all of the assessed items than the other two groups. [Conclusion] In the present study progressive body weight supported treadmill training was performed in an environment in which the subjects were actually walked, and PBWSTFBWT was more effective at efficiently training stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. PMID:25540499

  8. Spontaneous development of full weight-supported stepping after complete spinal cord transection in the neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Benjamin J; Callaway, Jennifer K; Ek, C Joakim; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Saunders, Norman R

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord trauma in the adult nervous system usually results in permanent loss of function below the injury level. The immature spinal cord has greater capacity for repair and can develop considerable functionality by adulthood. This study used the marsupial laboratory opossum Monodelphis domestica, which is born at a very early stage of neural development. Complete spinal cord transection was made in the lower-thoracic region of pups at postnatal-day 7 (P7) or P28, and the animals grew to adulthood. Injury at P7 resulted in a dense neuronal tissue bridge that connected the two ends of the cord; retrograde neuronal labelling indicated that supraspinal and propriospinal innervation spanned the injury site. This repair was associated with pronounced behavioural recovery, coordinated gait and an ability to use hindlimbs when swimming. Injury at P28 resulted in a cyst-like cavity encased in scar tissue forming at the injury site. Using retrograde labelling, no labelled brainstem or propriospinal neurons were found above the lesion, indicating that detectable neuronal connectivity had not spanned the injury site. However, these animals could use their hindlimbs to take weight-supporting steps but could not use their hindlimbs when swimming. White matter, demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining, was present in the injury site of P7- but not P28-injured animals. Overall, these studies demonstrated that provided spinal injury occurs early in development, regrowth of supraspinal innervation is possible. This repair appears to lead to improved functional outcomes. At older ages, even without detectable axonal growth spanning the injury site, substantial development of locomotion was still possible. This outcome is discussed in conjunction with preliminary findings of differences in the local propriospinal circuits following spinal cord injury (demonstrated with fluororuby labelling), which may underlie the weight bearing locomotion observed in the apparent absence of

  9. Design of a superconducting 28 GHz ion source magnet for FRIB using a shell-based support structure

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Rochepault, E.; Hafalia, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Prestemon, S. O.; Machicoane, G.; Pozdeyev, E.; Bultman, N.; Rao, X.

    2014-12-05

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is completing the design of a 28 GHz NbTi ion source magnet for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The design parameters are based on the parameters of the ECR ion source VENUS in operation at LBNL since 2002 featuring a sextupole-in-solenoids configuration. Whereas most of the magnet components (such as conductor, magnetic design, protection scheme) remain very similar to the VENUS magnet components, the support structure of the FRIB ion source uses a different concept. A shell-based support structure using bladders and keys is implemented in the design allowing fine tuning of the sextupole preload and reversibility of the magnet assembly process. As part of the design work, conductor insulation scheme, coil fabrication processes and assembly procedures are also explored to optimize performance. We present the main features of the design emphasizing the integrated design approach used at LBNL to achieve this result.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Changes in Abdominal Compartments in Obese Diabetics during a Low-Calorie Weight-Loss Program

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Lena J.; Steveling, Antje; Meffert, Peter J.; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Kessler, Rebecca; Hosten, Norbert; Krüger, Janine; Gärtner, Simone; Aghdassi, Ali A.; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Kühn, Jens-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate changes in the fat content of abdominal compartments and muscle area during weight loss using confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in overweight diabetics. Methods Twenty-nine obese diabetics (10/19 men/women, median age: 59.0 years, median body mass index (BMI): 34.0 kg/m2) prospectively joined a standardized 15-week weight-loss program (six weeks of formula diet exclusively, followed by reintroduction of regular food with gradually increasing energy content over nine weeks) over 15 weeks. All subjects underwent a standardized MRI protocol including a confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded MR sequence with water/fat separation before the program as well at the end of the six weeks of formula diet and at the end of the program at 15 weeks. Fat fractions of abdominal organs and vertebral bone marrow as well as volumes of visceral and subcutaneous fat were determined. Furthermore, muscle area was evaluated using the L4/L5 method. Data were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for paired samples. Results Median BMI decreased significantly from 34.0 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2 (p < 0.001) at 15 weeks. Liver fat content was normalized (14.2% to 4.1%, p < 0.001) and vertebral bone marrow fat (57.5% to 53.6%, p = 0.018) decreased significantly throughout the program, while fat content of pancreas (9.0%), spleen (0.0%), and psoas muscle (0.0%) did not (p > 0.15). Visceral fat volume (3.2 L to 1.6 L, p < 0.001) and subcutaneous fat diameter (3.0 cm to 2.2 cm, p < 0.001) also decreased significantly. Muscle area declined by 6.8% from 243.9 cm2 to 226.8 cm2. Conclusion MRI allows noninvasive monitoring of changes in abdominal compartments during weight loss. In overweight diabetics, weight loss leads to fat reduction in abdominal compartments, such as visceral fat, as well as liver fat and vertebral bone marrow fat while pancreas fat remains unchanged. PMID:27110719

  11. Stabilizing Gyroscopic Modes in Magnetic-Bearing-Supported Flywheels by Using Cross-Axis Proportional Gains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, Timothy P.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2006-01-01

    For magnetic-bearing-supported high-speed rotating machines with significant gyroscopic effects, it is necessary to stabilize forward and backward tilt whirling modes. Instability or low damping of these modes can prevent the attainment of desired shaft speed. We show analytically that both modes can be stabilized by using cross-axis proportional gains and high- and low-pass filters in the magnetic bearing controller. Furthermore, at high shaft speeds, where system phase lags degrade the stability of the forward-whirl mode, a phasor advance of the control signal can partially counteract the phase lag. In some range of high shaft speed, the derivative gain for the tilt modes (essential for stability for slowly rotating shafts) can be removed entirely. We show analytically how the tilt eigenvalues depend on shaft speed and on various controller feedback parameters.

  12. Electronic and magnetic properties of silicon supported organometallic molecular wires: a density functional theory (DFT) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Tan, Yingzi; Li, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaojun; Pei, Yong

    2015-08-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to the well-studied gas phase TM-benzene molecular wires. Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ and Si-[Cr(styrene)]∞ single molecular wires (SMWs) are a ferromagnetic semiconductor and half metal, respectively. Creation of H-atom defects on the silicon surface can introduce an impurity metallic band, which leads to novel half-metallic magnetism of a Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ system. Moreover, double molecular wires (DMWs) containing two identical or hetero SMWs are theoretically designed. The [Mn(styrene)]∞-[Cr(styrene)]∞ DMW exhibits half-metallic magnetism where the spin-up and spin-down channels are contributed by two single molecular wires. Finally, we demonstrate that introducing a TM-defect may significantly affect the electronic structure and magnetic properties of molecular wires. These studies provide new insights into the structure and properties of surface supported 1-D sandwiched molecular wires and may inspire the future experimental synthesis of substrate confined organometallic sandwiched molecular wires.The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to

  13. Stability Limits of a PD Controller for a Flywheel Supported on Rigid Rotor and Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, TImothy P.

    2006-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings are used to provide a long-life, low-loss suspension of a high-speed flywheel rotor. This paper describes a modeling effort used to understand the stability boundaries of the PD controller used to control the active magnetic bearings on a high speed test rig. Limits of stability are described in terms of allowable stiffness and damping values which result in stable levitation of the nonrotating rig. Small signal stability limits for the system is defined as a nongrowth in vibration amplitude of a small disturbance. A simple mass-force model was analyzed. The force resulting from the magnetic bearing was linearized to include negative displacement stiffness and a current stiffness. The current stiffness was then used in a PD controller. The phase lag of the control loop was modeled by a simple time delay. The stability limits and the associated vibration frequencies were measured and compared to the theoretical values. The results show a region on stiffness versus damping plot that have the same qualitative tendencies as experimental measurements. The resulting stability model was then extended to a flywheel system. The rotor dynamics of the flywheel was modeled using a rigid rotor supported on magnetic bearings. The equations of motion were written for the center of mass and a small angle linearization of the rotations about the center of mass. The stability limits and the associated vibration frequencies were found as a function of nondimensional magnetic bearing stiffness and damping and nondimensional parameters of flywheel speed and time delay.

  14. Test Results of LARP Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnets Using a Shell-based Support Structure (TQS)

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.; Ghosh, A.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lamm, M.; Tartaglia, M. A.; Zlobin, A. V.; Bajko, M.; Bordini, B.; DeRijk, G.; Giloux, C.; Karppinen, M.; Perez, J. C.; Rossi, L.; Siemko, A.; Todesco, E.

    2008-08-17

    Among the magnet development program of a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade, six quadrupole magnets were built and tested using a shell based key and bladder technology (TQS). The 1 m long 90 mm aperture magnets are part o fthe US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) aimed at demonstrating Nb{sub 3}Sn technology by the year 2009, of a 3.6 m long magnet capable of achieving 200 T/m. In support of the LARP program the TQS magnets were tested at three different laboratories, LBNL, FNAL and CERN and while at CERN a technology-transfer and a four days magnet disassembly and reassembly were included. This paper summarizes the fabrication, assembly, cool-down and test results of the six magnets and compres measruements with design expectations.

  15. Efficacy and acceptance of a commercial Hoodia parviflora product for support of appetite and weight control in a consumer trial.

    PubMed

    Landor, Michael; Benami, Ari; Segev, Nitzan; Loberant, Beth

    2015-02-01

    Species of Hoodia Sweet ex Decne., family Apocynaceae, a southern African succulent plant, have been recognized for their appetite suppressing properties. Products that support appetite and weight control have been developed in Israel from locally cultivated Hoodia spp. To study consumer acceptance, efficacy of, and tolerance for a frozen product based on whole aerial parts of Hoodia parviflora N.E. Br., we initiated and conducted this single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled consumer trial. Volunteer participants ingested flavored 3 g frozen Hoodia or placebo cubes for 40 days. Subjects were weighed and measured and baseline body-mass index was determined. Adverse events were monitored and eight mild, transient, possible treatment-emergent events were reported. No moderate, severe, or chronic events were reported. On days 1, 10, and 40, subjects self-reported their perceptions of food consumption, hunger development, incidence and control of food cravings, and efficacy of the product. On day 40, the treatment group demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in measured quantitative parameters against the placebo and reported a positive perception of the product.

  16. Development of body weight support gait training system using pneumatic Mckibben actuators -control of lower extremity orthosis.

    PubMed

    Mat Dzahir, M A; Nobutomo, T; Yamamoto, S I

    2013-01-01

    Recently, robot assisted therapy devices are increasingly used for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation in assisting handicapped patients to regain their impaired movements. Assistive robotic systems may not be able to cure or fully compensate impairments, but it should be able to assist certain impaired functions and ease movements. In this study, the control system of lower extremity orthosis for the body weight support gait training system which implements pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) is proposed. The hip and knee joint angles of the gait orthosis system are controlled based on the PAM coordinates information from the simulation. This information provides the contraction data for the mono- and bi-articular PAMs that are arranged as posterior and anterior actuators to simulate the human walking motion. The proposed control system estimates the actuators' contraction as a function of hip and knee joint angles. Based on the contraction model obtained, input pressures for each actuators are measured. The control system are performed at different gait cycles and two PMA settings for the mono- and bi-articular actuators are evaluated in this research. The results showed that the system was able to achieve the maximum muscle moment at the joints, and able to perform the heel contact movement. This explained that the antagonistic mono- and bi-articular actuators worked effectively.

  17. The relationships among stress, coping, social support, and weight class in premenopausal African American women at risk for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Ora Lea; Giger, Joyce Newman; Nelson, Michelle A; Davis, Claudia M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the relationships among stress, coping, social support, and weight class in premenopausal African American women as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Overweight and obesity are significant problems for African American women who are at an increased risk of weight-related diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Of these women, those who are premenopausal have a significantly higher coronary heart disease mortality rate than their white counterparts. There are gaps in current knowledge concerning the role that stress and other psychosocial factors play in weight control of premenopausal African American women. Data were obtained from 178 women with eligible data sets from a larger study of 236 subjects (Genetic Predictors of Coronary Heart Disease in Premenopausal African American Women). The measures for stress, coping, and social support included the Perceived Stress Scale, the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale. The weight class of the women was determined as: normal weight-body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-24.9 kg/m, overweight-BMI of 25-29.9 kg/m, or obese-BMI > or = 30 kg/m. Statistical analysis conducted included Spearman's rho, Chi-square, and regression analysis. Confrontive coping was shown to be used more often to a "high" degree in normal-weight African American women than in overweight and obese African American women (chi = 24.024; P = .0001). Confrontive coping was the only independent predictor of weight class in a regression model that included perceived stress, life events, social support, and optimistic, self-reliant, and evasive coping strategies. Therefore, African American women who use confrontive coping to a high degree were more likely to confront problems, such as weight control issues, than those who use this coping strategy to a low or medium degree.

  18. Reduced Integration and Differentiation of the Imitation Network in Autism: A Combined Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Inna; Datko, Michael; Cabrera, Yuliana; Carper, Ruth A.; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Converging evidence indicates that brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involve atypical network connectivity, but few studies have integrated functional with structural connectivity measures. This multimodal investigation examined functional and structural connectivity of the imitation network in children and adolescents with ASD, and its links with clinical symptoms. Methods Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed in 35 participants with ASD and 35 typically developing controls, aged 8 to 17 years, matched for age, gender, intelligence quotient, and head motion. Results Within-network analyses revealed overall reduced functional connectivity (FC) between distributed imitation regions in the ASD group. Whole brain analyses showed that underconnectivity in ASD occurred exclusively in regions belonging to the imitation network, whereas overconnectivity was observed between imitation nodes and extraneous regions. Structurally, reduced fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity were found in white matter tracts directly connecting key imitation regions with atypical FC in ASD. These differences in microstructural organization of white matter correlated with weaker FC and greater ASD symptomatology. Interpretation Findings demonstrate atypical connectivity of the brain network supporting imitation in ASD, characterized by a highly specific pattern. This pattern of underconnectivity within, but overconnectivity outside the functional network is in contrast with typical development and suggests reduced network integration and differentiation in ASD. Our findings also indicate that atypical connectivity of the imitation network may contribute to ASD clinical symptoms, highlighting the role of this fundamental social cognition ability in the pathophysiology of ASD. PMID:26418284

  19. Combining Persuasive Technology With Behavioral Theory to Support Weight Maintenance Through a Mobile Phone App: Protocol for the MotiMate App

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Gilly A; Freyne, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of health-focused mobile phone apps available for download increases daily, with weight management apps being among the most proliferative. However, most lack theoretic grounding or evidence of efficacy. There is a significant body of literature which provides evidence for behaviors which are associated with successful weight loss maintenance. Behavioral theory also provides further insight regarding successful behavior change and maintenance. Objective We aimed to apply this knowledge to the development of the functionality of an app targeting weight loss maintenance. Methods We have subsequently undertaken the development of a persuasive and behavior targeting mobile app (MotiMate) to assist in maintenance of weight loss. MotiMate combines persuasive and behavior change theories in a practical targeted tool through its motivational messages, personalized feedback, and intelligent supportive tools to manage weight, food, exercise, mood and stress. Results The development and trial of MotiMate received funding support in May 2014. All 88 volunteers started the trial by December 2014 and were in the process of completing their final visits when this paper was submitted (May 2015). Data analysis is currently underway. Conclusions The paper has presented a scientifically informed mobile phone app to support weight loss maintenance. Further evaluation of its efficacy is in progress. Trial Registration ANZCTR 12614000474651; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366120 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6eJeQiKxi). PMID:26747725

  20. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  1. Mobile magnetic particles as solid-supports for rapid surface-based bioanalysis in continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Sally A; Iles, Alexander; Pamme, Nicole

    2009-11-07

    An extremely versatile microfluidic device is demonstrated in which multi-step (bio)chemical procedures can be performed in continuous flow. The system operates by generating several co-laminar flow streams, which contain reagents for specific (bio)reactions across a rectangular reaction chamber. Functionalized magnetic microparticles are employed as mobile solid-supports and are pulled from one side of the reaction chamber to the other by use of an external magnetic field. As the particles traverse the co-laminar reagent streams, binding and washing steps are performed on their surface in one operation in continuous flow. The applicability of the platform was first demonstrated by performing a proof-of-principle binding assay between streptavidin coated magnetic particles and biotin in free solution with a limit of detection of 20 ng mL(-1) of free biotin. The system was then applied to a mouse IgG sandwich immunoassay as a first example of a process involving two binding steps and two washing steps, all performed within 60 s, a fraction of the time required for conventional testing.

  2. A miniaturized two-DOF rotational gyro with a ball-joint supported permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Weiping; Zhang, Haifeng

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a miniaturized two-degrees of freedom (DOF) rotational gyro with a ball-joint supported permanent magnet rotor. The structural design and the dynamic model of the gyro are presented and analyzed in detail in this paper and testified by preliminary experiments. When the rotor tilts away from its null position, it will be constrained by a contactless magnetic equivalent elastic torque derived from the driving structure. As a rotational gyro, this structure is very simple and small, with a core size less than 6 cm3, and it needs only 0.75 W to keep the rotor spinning at a speed of 15 000 revolutions per minute (rpm) in a standard air pressure condition. Preliminary measurements show that, at 7000 rpm within a full scale of ±100 °/s, the gyro has a scale factor of 18.69 mV/(°/s), and a nonlinearity of 0.33% is also achieved through calculation. The results show that the gyro can be used to measure two DOFs' angular rates of carriers without close-loop control due to the existence of magnetic equivalent elasticity.

  3. Covalent organic framework-coated magnetic graphene as a novel support for trypsin immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heping; Jiao, Fenglong; Gao, Fangyuan; Zhao, Xinyuan; Zhao, Yan; Shen, Yehua; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong

    2017-03-01

    Deep and efficient proteolysis is the critical premise in mass spectrometry-based bottom-up proteomics. It is difficult for traditional in-solution digestion to meet the requirement unless prolonged digestion time and enhanced enzyme dosage are employed, which makes the whole workflow time-consuming and costly. The abovementioned problems could be effectively ameliorated by anchoring many proteases on solid supports. In this work, covalent organic framework-coated magnetic graphene (MG@TpPa-1) was designed and prepared as a novel enzyme carrier for the covalent immobilization of trypsin with a high degree of loading (up to 268 μg mg(-1)). Profiting from the advantages of magnetic graphene and covalent organic frameworks, the novel trypsin bioreactor was successfully applied for the enzymatic digestion of a model protein with dramatically improved digestion efficiency, stability, and reusability. Complete digestion could be achieved in a time period as short as 2 min. For the digestion of proteins extracted from Amygdalus pedunculata, a total of 2833 protein groups were identified, which was slightly more than those obtained by 12 h of in-solution digestion (2739 protein groups). All of the results demonstrate that MG@TpPa-1-trypsin is an excellent candidate for sample preparation in a high-throughput proteomics analysis. Graphical abstract Covalent organic frameworks-coated magnetic graphene was prepared as novel carrier for highly efficient tryptic immobilization.

  4. Impact of food support on food security and body weight among HIV antiretroviral therapy recipients in Honduras: a pilot intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Palar, Kartika; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Smith, Alexandria; Farías, Hugo; Wagner, Glenn; Martinez, Homero

    2015-01-01

    Optimal strategies to improve food security and nutrition for people living with HIV (PLHIV) may differ in settings where overweight and obesity are prevalent and cardiovascular disease risk is a concern. However, no studies among PLHIV have investigated the impact of food support on nutritional outcomes in these settings. We therefore assessed the effect of food support on food insecurity and body weight in a population of PLHIV with high prevalence of overweight and obesity. We implemented a pilot intervention trial in four government-run HIV clinics in Honduras. The trial tested the effect of a monthly household food ration plus nutrition education (n = 203), compared to nutrition education alone (n = 197), over 12 months. Participants were clinic patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Assessments were obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcomes for this analysis were food security, using the validated Latin American and Caribbean Food Security Scale and body weight (kg). Thirty-one percent of participants were overweight (22%) or obese (8%) at baseline. At 6 months, the probability of severe food insecurity decreased by 48.3% (p < 0.01) in the food support group, compared to 11.6% in the education-only group (p < 0.01). Among overweight or obese participants, food support led to average weight gain of 1.13 kg (p < 0.01), while nutrition education alone was associated with average weight loss of 0.72 kg (p < 0.10). Nutrition education alone was associated with weight gain among underweight and normal weight participants. Household food support may improve food security but not necessarily nutritional status of ART recipients above and beyond nutrition education. Improving nutritional tailoring of food support and testing the impact of nutrition education should be prioritized for PLHIV in Latin America and similar settings.

  5. Use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance as an Experimental Probe in Multiphase Systems: Determination of the Instrument Weight Function for Measurements of Liquid-Phase Volume Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneval, J. E.; McCarthy, M. J.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-11-01

    The relativist approach (Baveye and Sposito (1984)) to the interpretation of measurements in multiphase systems was proposed in order to incorporate the details of measurements into theoretical analyses of multiphase transport processes. To help establish the utility of this approach, the weight functions for actual experimental probes must be determined. In this paper we analyze the measurement of liquid-phase porosity in a model system by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. We show how both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) physics and experimental technique combine to determine the weight function for the spin-warp spin-echo sequence. The analysis shows clearly what aspects of the weight function are determined by the experimental method and what aspects are determined by the system being studied. The results will help establish the utility of the relativist approach as well as improve understanding NMR measurements in multiphase systems.

  6. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Differentiation Between Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Lymphoma at the Primary Site

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Ping; Hou, Jing; Li, Fei-Ping; Wang, Hui; Hu, Ping-Sheng; Bi, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) for differentiating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from lymphoma. Methods Intravoxel incoherent motion–based parameters including the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), pure diffusion coefficient (D), pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*), perfusion fraction (f), and fD* (the product of D* and f) were retrospectively compared between 102 patients (82 with NPC, 20 with lymphoma) who received pretreatment IVIM DWI. Results Compared with lymphoma, NPC exhibited higher ADC, D, D*, fD* values (P < 0.001) and f value (P = 0.047). The optimal cutoff values (area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively) for distinguishing the 2 tumors were as follows: ADC value of 0.761 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.781, 93.90%, 55.00%); D, 0.66 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.802, 54.88%, 100.00%); D*, 7.89 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.898, 82.93%, 85.00%); f, 0.29 (0.644, 41.46%, 95.00%); and fD*, 1.99 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.960, 85.37%, 100.00%). Conclusions Nasopharyngeal carcinoma exhibits different IVIM-based imaging features from lymphoma. Intravoxel incoherent motion DWI is useful for differentiating lymphoma from NPC. PMID:26953769

  7. HSX: Engineering Design and Fabrication of the main Magnet Coils, Vacuum Vessel and Support/Alignment Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. Simon B.; Anderson, D. T.; Almagri, A. F.; Matthews, P. G.; Probert, P. H.; Shohet, J. L.; Talmadge, J. N.

    1996-11-01

    The HSX device, with a magnetic field consisting of a SINGLE dominant HELICAL component, has a set of 48 twisted main magnetic field coils. Engineering analysis (ANSYS) has resulted in a set of construction and alignment constraints and goals for field accuracy and coil structural strength. Close proximity of the main coil set to the magnetic separatrix imposes space restrictions on the vacuum vessel. Fabrication of the vessel using explosive techniques, and the structural analysis for the stresses in the vacuum chamber will be discussed. Crucial to the integrity of the quasihelical magnetic field is the accurate positioning of the magnet coils and maintenance of the position during operation. The design and construct- ion of the completed support structure for HSX coils will also be presented. *** Work supported by U.S Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222

  8. Success in Weight Management Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Do Perceived Autonomy Support, Autonomous Motivation, and Self-Care Competence Play a Role?

    PubMed

    Koponen, Anne M; Simonsen, Nina; Suominen, Sakari B

    2017-03-21

    Based on self-determination theory (SDT), this study investigated whether the three central SDT variables-perceived autonomy support (from a physician), autonomous motivation and self-care competence-were associated with success in weight management (SWM) among primary care patients with type 2 diabetes when the effect of other important life-context factors was controlled for. Patients participated in a mail survey in 2011. Those who had tried to change their health behavior during the past two years in order to lose weight, either with or without success (n = 1433, mean age 63 years, 50% men), were included in this study. The successors were more autonomously motivated and energetic than the non-successors. Moreover, male gender, younger age, taking oral medication only, and receiving less social support in diabetes care predicted better success. Autonomous motivation predicted SWM; self-care competence also played a role by partly mediating the effect of autonomous motivation on SWM. These results support the idea of SDT that internalizing the value of weight management and its health benefits is necessary for long-term maintenance of health behavior change. Perceived autonomy support was not directly associated with SWM. However, physicians can promote patients' weight management by supporting their autonomous motivation and self-care competence.

  9. High frequencies of elevated alkaline phosphatase activity and rickets exist in extremely low birth weight infants despite current nutritional support

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopenia and rickets are common among extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW, <1000 g birth weight) despite current practices of vitamin and mineral supplementation. Few data are available evaluating the usual course of markers of mineral status in this population. Our objectives in this study w...

  10. Structuring a life support program using evidence-based practice and the Magnet model for successful patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Krugman, Mary; Paston, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Integrating life support activities into an acute care academic hospital structure using evidence-based practice and the Magnet Model framework provides program operations and outcomes that are cost effective, link quality to life support professional development, and demonstrate excellence patient safety outcomes.

  11. Monitoring and normalising a lack of appetite and weight loss. A discursive analysis of an online support group for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, Jo; Seymour-Smith, Sarah

    2012-06-01

    A significant adjustment in eating practices is required before and after bariatric surgery, yet we know relatively little about how patients manage these changes. In this paper, we explored how members of an online bariatric support group constructed their appetite and weight loss. Two hundred and eighty four online posts were collected, covering a period of just over a year, and analysed using discursive psychology. We found that a lack of appetite post-surgery was oriented to as something that was positively evaluated yet a cause for concern. Indeed, members monitored their food intake and marked out food consumption as a necessary activity in line with notions of healthy eating. Through monitoring members also normalised periods of weight stabilisation and were inducted into a group philosophy which encouraged a more holistic approach to post-surgery 'success'. Our analysis also highlights how monitoring and policing work as social support mechanisms which help to maintain weight management. Thus we argue, in line with others, that weight management, typically depicted as an individual responsibility, is bound up with the social practices of the online support group. We suggest that clinical advice about a loss of appetite and periods of weight stabilisation post-surgery perhaps need further explanation to patients.

  12. Clinical utility of optimized three-dimensional T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted sequences in spinal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanitame, Nobuko; Tanitame, Keizo; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-02-23

    This article reviews the clinical utility of 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences optimized for the evaluation of various intraspinal lesions. First, intraspinal tumors with hypervascular components and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are clearly shown on contrast-enhanced (CE)-3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences with high spatial resolution. Second, dynamic CE-3D time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) shows delineated feeding arteries of intraspinal AVM or arteriovenous fistula (AVF), greatly aiding subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Third, 3D multiecho T2*-weighted GE sequences are used to visualize intraspinal structures and spinal cord lesions and are sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility of intraspinal hemorrhages. Three-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) and multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP sequences produce contiguous thin images with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in short scanning times. Intraspinal cystic lesions and small nerve-root tumors in subarachnoid space can be viewed using 3D balanced SSFP. Spinal cord myelomalacia and cord compression can be evaluated on fat-suppressed multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP. Finally, a 3D T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence with variable flip angle (FA) refocusing pulse improves through-plane spatial resolution over conventional 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences while matching image contrast.

  13. ARE TORNADO-LIKE MAGNETIC STRUCTURES ABLE TO SUPPORT SOLAR PROMINENCE PLASMA?

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Priest, E.

    2015-07-20

    Recent high-resolution and high-cadence observations have surprisingly suggested that prominence barbs exhibit apparent rotating motions suggestive of a tornado-like structure. Additional evidence has been provided by Doppler measurements. The observations reveal opposite velocities for both hot and cool plasma on the two sides of a prominence barb. This motion is persistent for several hours and has been interpreted in terms of rotational motion of prominence feet. Several authors suggest that such barb motions are rotating helical structures around a vertical axis similar to tornadoes on Earth. One of the difficulties of such a proposal is how to support cool prominence plasma in almost-vertical structures against gravity. In this work we model analytically a tornado-like structure and try to determine possible mechanisms to support the prominence plasma. We have found that the Lorentz force can indeed support the barb plasma provided the magnetic structure is sufficiently twisted and/or significant poloidal flows are present.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood-brain barrier permeability in ischemic stroke using diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling in rats.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Yash V; Lu, Jianfei; Shen, Qiang; Cerqueira, Bianca; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed to quantify the rate of water exchange (Kw) across the blood-brain barrier in humans. This study aimed to evaluate the blood-brain barrier disruption in transient (60 min) ischemic stroke using Kw magnetic resonance imaging with cross-validation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology in the same rats. The major findings were: (i) at 90 min after stroke (30 min after reperfusion), group Kw magnetic resonance imaging data showed no significant blood-brain barrier permeability changes, although a few animals showed slightly abnormal Kw. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging confirmed this finding in the same animals. (ii) At two days after stroke, Kw magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant blood-brain barrier disruption. Regions with abnormal Kw showed substantial overlap with regions of hyperintense T2 (vasogenic edema) and hyperperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology confirmed these findings in the same animals. The Kw values in the normal contralesional hemisphere and the ipsilesional ischemic core two days after stroke were: 363 ± 17 and 261 ± 18 min(-1), respectively (P < 0.05, n = 9). Kw magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive to blood-brain barrier permeability changes in stroke, consistent with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue extravasation. Kw magnetic resonance imaging offers advantages over existing techniques because contrast agent is not needed and repeated measurements can be made for longitudinal monitoring or averaging.

  15. Evaluation of efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma using magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jun-Feng; Ji, Jian-Song; Chen, Ming-Gao; Song, Jian-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Although the efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) has been recommended as first-line therapy for nonsurgical patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is difficult to accurately predict the efficacy of TACE. Therefore, this study evaluated the efficacy of TACE for HCC using magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). A total of 84 HCC patients who received initial TACE were selected and assigned to the stable group (n=39) and the progressive group (n=45). Before TACE treatment, a contrast-enhanced MR scan and DWI (b=300, 600, and 800 s/mm2) were performed on all patients. The modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors were used for evaluation of tumor response. Receiver operating characteristic curve was employed to predict the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for TACE efficacy. The ADC values of HCC patients in the progressive group were higher than those in the stable group at different b-values (b=300, 600, and 800 s/mm2) before TACE treatment. The area under the curve of ADC values with b-values of 300, 600, and 800 s/mm2 were 0.693, 0.724, and 0.746; the threshold values were 1.94×10−3 mm2/s, 1.28×10−3 mm2/s, and 1.20×10−3 mm2/s; the sensitivity values were 55.6%, 77.8%, and 73.3%; and the specificity values were 82.1%, 61.5%, and 71.8%, respectively. Our findings indicate that the ADC values of MR-DWI may accurately predict the efficacy of TACE in the treatment of HCC patients. PMID:28352195

  16. Feasibility study of reduced field of view diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in head and neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Vidiri, Antonello; Minosse, Silvia; Piludu, Francesca; Curione, Davide; Pichi, Barbara; Spriano, Giuseppe; Marzi, Simona

    2017-03-01

    Background Reduced field of view (rFOV) imaging may be used to improve the quality of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the head and neck (HN) region. Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of rFOV-DWI in patients affected by HN tumors, through a comparison with conventional full FOV (fFOV) DWI. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients with histologically-proven malignant or benign tumors of the head and neck were included in a retrospective study. All patients underwent pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies including rFOV-DWI and fFOV-DWI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value distributions inside tumor and muscle were derived and the mean, standard deviation (SD), and kurtosis were calculated. Image distortion was quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated, as well as the capability of lesion identification. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare all variables. Agreements between the ADC estimations were assessed by Bland-Altman plots. Results Image distortion and lesion identification scores were both higher for rFOV-DWI compared to fFOV-DWI. A reduction in ADC values with rFOV-DWI emerged for both lesion and muscle, with a mean percentage difference in ADC of 6.2% in the lesions and 24.9% in the muscle. The difference in SD of ADC was statistically significant in the lesions, indicating a higher ADC homogeneity for rFOV DWI ( P = 0.005). Conclusion The application of rFOV DWI in patients affected by HN tumors is feasible and promising, based on both qualitative and quantitative analyses. This technique has potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy of fFOV-DWI for the study of specific tumoral areas.

  17. Hybrid RGSA and Support Vector Machine Framework for Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Brain Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh Sharma, R.; Marikkannu, P.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid approach for the identification of brain regions using magnetic resonance images accountable for brain tumor is presented in this paper. Classification of medical images is substantial in both clinical and research areas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality outperforms towards diagnosing brain abnormalities like brain tumor, multiple sclerosis, hemorrhage, and many more. The primary objective of this work is to propose a three-dimensional (3D) novel brain tumor classification model using MRI images with both micro- and macroscale textures designed to differentiate the MRI of brain under two classes of lesion, benign and malignant. The design approach was initially preprocessed using 3D Gaussian filter. Based on VOI (volume of interest) of the image, features were extracted using 3D volumetric Square Centroid Lines Gray Level Distribution Method (SCLGM) along with 3D run length and cooccurrence matrix. The optimal features are selected using the proposed refined gravitational search algorithm (RGSA). Support vector machines, over backpropagation network, and k-nearest neighbor are used to evaluate the goodness of classifier approach. The preliminary evaluation of the system is performed using 320 real-time brain MRI images. The system is trained and tested by using a leave-one-case-out method. The performance of the classifier is tested using the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.986 (±002). The experimental results demonstrate the systematic and efficient feature extraction and feature selection algorithm to the performance of state-of-the-art feature classification methods. PMID:26509188

  18. Structure and Stability of Filamentary Clouds Supported by Lateral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Tomisakar, Kohji

    We have constructed two types of analytical models for an isothermal filamentary cloud supported mainly by magnetic tension. The first one describes an isolated cloud while the second considers filamentary clouds spaced periodically. The filamentary clouds are assumed to be highly flattened in both the models. The former is proved to be the asymptotic limit of the latter in which each filamentary cloud is much thinner than the distance to the neighboring filaments. These models show that the mass to flux ratio is crucial for the magnetohydrodynamical equilibrium. The upper bound for the line density, i.e., the mass per unit length, is proportional to the magnetic flux. The mass to flux ratio is slightly larger than the critical value, ( )-1, in the first model and lower in the second model. The first model is unstable against fragmentation and the wavelength of the fastest growing mode is several times longer than the cloud diameter. The second model is likely to be unstable only when the mass to flux ratio is supercritical.

  19. Permanent Magnet Synchronous Condenser for Wind Power Plant Grid Connection Support: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.; Muljadi, E.

    2015-04-03

    A synchronous condenser (SC) using a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) is proposed for providing necessary reactive power to a wind power plant to support its connection to a weak grid. A PMSG has the advantage of higher efficiency and reliability. Because of its lack of a field winding, a PMSG is typically controlled by a full-power converter, which can be costly. In the proposed system, the reactive power of the SC is controlled by a serially connected compensator operating in a closed-loop configuration. The compensator also damps the PMSG's tendency to oscillate. The compensator's VA rating is only a fraction of the rating of the SC and the PMSG. In this initial investigation, the proposed scheme is shown to be effective by computer simulations.

  20. Muscle Activation and Estimated Relative Joint Force During Running with Weight Support on a Lower-Body Positive-Pressure Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bente R; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine L

    2016-08-01

    Running on a lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg muscle activation and to estimate relative knee and ankle joint forces. Runners performed 6-min running sessions at 2.22 m/s and 3.33 m/s, at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% body weight (BW). Surface electromyography, ground reaction force, and running characteristics were measured. Relative knee and ankle joint forces were estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and antigravity forces. At 20% BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100% BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20% BW, while activity of biceps femoris muscle remained unchanged. Unweighting with LBPP reduced estimated joint force significantly although less than proportional to the degree of weight support (ankle). It was concluded that leg muscle activation adapted to the new biomechanical environment, and the effect of unweighting on estimated knee force was more pronounced than on ankle force.

  1. Combined diffusion-weighted and functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals a temporal-occipital network involved in auditory-visual object processing

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Anton L.; Plank, Tina; Meyer, Georg; Greenlee, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the superior temporal and occipital cortex are involved in multisensory integration. Probabilistic fiber tracking based on diffusion-weighted MRI suggests that multisensory processing is supported by white matter connections between auditory cortex and the temporal and occipital lobe. Here, we present a combined functional MRI and probabilistic fiber tracking study that reveals multisensory processing mechanisms that remained undetected by either technique alone. Ten healthy participants passively observed visually presented lip or body movements, heard speech or body action sounds, or were exposed to a combination of both. Bimodal stimulation engaged a temporal-occipital brain network including the multisensory superior temporal sulcus (msSTS), the lateral superior temporal gyrus (lSTG), and the extrastriate body area (EBA). A region-of-interest (ROI) analysis showed multisensory interactions (e.g., subadditive responses to bimodal compared to unimodal stimuli) in the msSTS, the lSTG, and the EBA region. Moreover, sounds elicited responses in the medial occipital cortex. Probabilistic tracking revealed white matter tracts between the auditory cortex and the medial occipital cortex, the inferior occipital cortex (IOC), and the superior temporal sulcus (STS). However, STS terminations of auditory cortex tracts showed limited overlap with the msSTS region. Instead, msSTS was connected to primary sensory regions via intermediate nodes in the temporal and occipital cortex. Similarly, the lSTG and EBA regions showed limited direct white matter connections but instead were connected via intermediate nodes. Our results suggest that multisensory processing in the STS is mediated by separate brain areas that form a distinct network in the lateral temporal and inferior occipital cortex. PMID:23407860

  2. Herbig stars' near-infrared excess: An origin in the protostellar disk's magnetically supported atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.; Dullemond, C. P.; Hirose, S.

    2014-01-01

    Young stars with masses 2-8 times solar, the Herbig Ae and Be stars, often show a near-infrared excess too large to explain with a hydrostatically supported circumstellar disk of gas and dust. At the same time, the accretion flow carrying the circumstellar gas to the star is thought to be driven by magnetorotational turbulence, which, according to numerical MHD modeling, yields an extended low-density atmosphere supported by the magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the base of the atmosphere can be optically thick to the starlight and that the parts lying near 1 AU are tall enough to double the fraction of the stellar luminosity reprocessed into the near-infrared. We generate synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations with opacities for submicron silicate and carbonaceous grains. The synthetic SEDs closely follow the median Herbig SED constructed recently by Mulders and Dominik and, in particular, match the large near-infrared flux, provided the grains have a mass fraction close to interstellar near the disk's inner rim.

  3. Evaluating the Role of Reduced Oxygen Saturation and Vascular Damage in Traumatic Brain Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Perfusion-Weighted Imaging and Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and Mapping.

    PubMed

    Kou, Zhifeng; Ye, Yongquan; Haacke, Ewart Mark

    2015-10-01

    The cerebral vasculature, along with neurons and axons, is vulnerable to biomechanical insult during traumatic brain injury (TBI). Trauma-induced vascular injury is still an underinvestigated area in TBI research. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism could be important future treatment targets in neural critical care. Magnetic resonance imaging offers a number of key methods to probe vascular injury and its relationship with traumatic hemorrhage, perfusion deficits, venous blood oxygen saturation changes, and resultant tissue damage. They make it possible to image the hemodynamics of the brain, monitor regional damage, and potentially show changes induced in the brain's function not only acutely but also longitudinally following treatment. These methods have recently been used to show that even mild TBI (mTBI) subjects can have vascular abnormalities, and thus they provide a major step forward in better diagnosing mTBI patients.

  4. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in cancer: Reported apparent diffusion coefficients, in-vitro and in-vivo reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Maysam M; Parsai, Arman; Miquel, Marc E

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable disparity in the published apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values across different anatomies. Institutions are increasingly assessing repeatability and reproducibility of the derived ADC to determine its variation, which could potentially be used as an indicator in determining tumour aggressiveness or assessing tumour response. In this manuscript, a review of selected articles published to date in healthy extra-cranial body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is presented, detailing reported ADC values and discussing their variation across different studies. In total 115 studies were selected including 28 for liver parenchyma, 15 for kidney (renal parenchyma), 14 for spleen, 13 for pancreatic body, 6 for gallbladder, 13 for prostate, 13 for uterus (endometrium, myometrium, cervix) and 13 for fibroglandular breast tissue. Median ADC values in selected studies were found to be 1.28 × 10-3 mm2/s in liver, 1.94 × 10-3 mm2/s in kidney, 1.60 × 10-3 mm2/s in pancreatic body, 0.85 × 10-3 mm2/s in spleen, 2.73 × 10-3 mm2/s in gallbladder, 1.64 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.31 × 10-3 mm2/s in prostate peripheral zone and central gland respectively (combined median value of 1.54×10-3 mm2/s), 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s in endometrium, 1.53 × 10-3 mm2/s in myometrium, 1.71 × 10-3 mm2/s in cervix and 1.92 × 10-3 mm2/s in breast. In addition, six phantom studies and thirteen in vivo studies were summarized to compare repeatability and reproducibility of the measured ADC. All selected phantom studies demonstrated lower intra-scanner and inter-scanner variation compared to in vivo studies. Based on the findings of this manuscript, it is recommended that protocols need to be optimised for the body part studied and that system-induced variability must be established using a standardized phantom in any clinical study. Reproducibility of the measured ADC must also be assessed in a volunteer population, as variations are far more significant in vivo compared

  5. Development of a Support Vector Machine - Based Image Analysis System for Focal Liver Lesions Classification in Magnetic Resonance Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatos, I.; Tsantis, S.; Karamesini, M.; Skouroliakou, A.; Kagadis, G.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a computer-based image analysis system employing the support vector machine (SVM) classifier system for the classification of Focal Liver Lesions (FLLs) on routine non-enhanced, T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 92 patients; each one of them has undergone MRI performed on a Magnetom Concerto (Siemens). Typical signs on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and biopsies were employed towards a three class categorization of the 92 cases: 40-benign FLLs, 25-Hepatocellular Carcinomas (HCC) within Cirrhotic liver parenchyma and 27-liver metastases from Non-Cirrhotic liver. Prior to FLLs classification an automated lesion segmentation algorithm based on Marcov Random Fields was employed in order to acquire each FLL Region of Interest. 42 texture features derived from the gray-level histogram, co-occurrence and run-length matrices and 12 morphological features were obtained from each lesion. Stepwise multi-linear regression analysis was utilized to avoid feature redundancy leading to a feature subset that fed the multiclass SVM classifier designed for lesion classification. SVM System evaluation was performed by means of leave-one-out method and ROC analysis. Results: Maximum accuracy for all three classes (90.0%) was obtained by means of the Radial Basis Kernel Function and three textural features (Inverse- Different-Moment, Sum-Variance and Long-Run-Emphasis) that describe lesion's contrast, variability and shape complexity. Sensitivity values for the three classes were 92.5%, 81.5% and 96.2% respectively, whereas specificity values were 94.2%, 95.3% and 95.5%. The AUC value achieved for the selected subset was 0.89 with 0.81 - 0.94 confidence interval. Conclusion: The proposed SVM system exhibit promising results that could be utilized as a second opinion tool to the radiologist in order to decrease the time/cost of diagnosis and the need for patients to undergo invasive examination.

  6. Differences between young and older adults in the control of weight shifting within the surface of support.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Elisabeth A; Caljouw, Simone R; Coppens, Milou J M; Postema, Klaas; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J; Lamoth, Claudine J C

    2014-01-01

    An important reason for falling in elderly is incorrect weight-shifting. In many daily life activities quick and accurate weight-shifting is needed to maintain balance and to prevent from falling. The present study aims to gain more insight in age-related differences in the control of weight-shifting. Nine healthy older adults (70.3 ± 6.9 years) and twelve young adults (20.9 ± 0.5 years) participated in the study. They performed a weight shifting task by moving the body's center of pressure, represented by a red dot on a screen, in different directions, towards targets of different sizes and at different distances projected on a screen. Movement time, fluency and accuracy of the movement were determined. Accuracy was quantified by the number of times the cursor hit the goal target before a target switch was realized (counts on goal) and by the time required to realize a target switch after the goal target was hit by the cursor for the first time (dwelling time). Fluency was expressed by the maximal deviation of the performed path with respect to the ideal path and the number of peaks, or inflections in the performed path. Significant main effects of target size, target distance and age on all outcome measures were found. With decreasing target size, increasing target distance and increasing age, movement time significantly increased and fluency and accuracy significantly decreased (i.e. increased number of peaks, maximal deviation, number of times on the goal target and longer dwelling time around the goal target). In addition, significant interaction effects of size*age and distance*age were found. Older adults needed more time to perform the weight-shifting task and their movements were less fluent and accurate compared to younger adults, especially with increasing task difficulty. This indicates that elderly might have difficulties with executing an adequate adaptation to a perturbation in daily life.

  7. Design of a superconducting 28 GHz ion source magnet for FRIB using a shell-based support structure

    DOE PAGES

    Felice, H.; Rochepault, E.; Hafalia, R.; ...

    2014-12-05

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is completing the design of a 28 GHz NbTi ion source magnet for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The design parameters are based on the parameters of the ECR ion source VENUS in operation at LBNL since 2002 featuring a sextupole-in-solenoids configuration. Whereas most of the magnet components (such as conductor, magnetic design, protection scheme) remain very similar to the VENUS magnet components, the support structure of the FRIB ion source uses a different concept. A shell-based support structure using bladders and keys is implemented in themore » design allowing fine tuning of the sextupole preload and reversibility of the magnet assembly process. As part of the design work, conductor insulation scheme, coil fabrication processes and assembly procedures are also explored to optimize performance. We present the main features of the design emphasizing the integrated design approach used at LBNL to achieve this result.« less

  8. Spatial association analysis between hydrocarbon fields and sedimentary residual magnetic anomalies using Weights of Evidence: An example from the Triassic Province of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allek, Karim; Boubaya, Djamel; Bouguern, Abderrahmane; Hamoudi, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    The presence of near-surface magnetic anomalies over oil and gas accumulations and their contribution to exploration remain somewhat controversial despite encouraging results and an improved understanding of genetic links between hydrocarbon seepage-induced alterations and near-surface magnetic minerals. This controversy is likely to remain since the cause of shallow-sourced sedimentary magnetic anomalies may well be microseepage related, but could also result from other sources such as cultural features and detrital magnetite. The definite way of discriminating between them remains a challenge. In this paper we examine means to deal with this particular purpose using a Bayesian technique known as 'Weights-of-Evidence'. The technique is implemented in GIS to explore spatial associations between known hydrocarbon fields within the central Triassic province of Algeria and sedimentary residual magnetic anomalies. We use the results to show possible application of the method to the recognition of some characteristics (amplitude and width) of anomalies assumed to be induced by hydrocarbon microseepages. Our results reveal strong spatial association with certain typical class of anomalies, confirming therefore hypothesis that hydrocarbon microseepages may result in detectable magnetic anomalies. It is possible to use the anomalies occurring outside the known gas and oil fields to make informed decisions in the selection of new targets for more detailed hydrocarbon exploration.

  9. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  10. ASA conference on radiation and health: Health effects of electric and magnetic fields: Statistical support for research strategies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This report is a collection of papers documenting presentations made at the VIII ASA (American Statistical Association) Conference on Radiation and Health entitled Health Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields: Statistical Support for Research Strategies. Individual papers are abstracted and indexed for the database.

  11. Hydrophilic immobilized trypsin reactor with magnetic graphene oxide as support for high efficient proteome digestion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhao, Qun; Wu, Qi; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Peng, Xiaojun; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-09-07

    In this paper, magnetic Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles modified graphene oxide nanocomposites (GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄) were prepared by covalent bonding, via the reaction between the amino groups of fuctionalized Fe₃O₄ and the carboxylic groups of GO, confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectra, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. With GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄ as a novel substrate, trypsin was immobilized via π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding interaction, and the binding capacity of trypsin reached as high as 0.275 mg/mg. Since GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄ worked as not only support for enzyme immobilization, but also as an excellent microwave irradiation absorber, the digestion efficiency could be further improved with microwave assistance. By such an immobilized enzymatic reactor (IMER), standard proteins could be efficiently digested within 15 s, with sequence coverages comparable or better than those obtained by conventional in-solution digestion (12 h). Since trypsin was immobilized under mild conditions, the enzymatic activity of IMER preserved at least for a month. In addition, due to the good hydrophilicity of GO, no peptide residue was observed in the sequent digestion of bovine serum albumin and myoglobin. To further confirm the efficiency of such an IMER for proteome analysis, it was applied to digest proteins extracted from rat liver, followed by nanoRPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. With only 5 min microwave-assisted digestion, in 3 parallel runs, totally 456 protein groups were identified, comparable to that obtained by 12 h in-solution digestion, indicating the great potential of IMERs with GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄ as the support for high throughput proteome study.

  12. Recent Advances in the Application of Magnetic Nanoparticles as a Support for Homogeneous Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Joseph; Gun’ko, Yurii K.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are a highly valuable substrate for the attachment of homogeneous inorganic and organic containing catalysts. This review deals with the very recent main advances in the development of various nanocatalytic systems by the immobilisation of homogeneous catalysts onto magnetic nanoparticles. We discuss magnetic core shell nanostructures (e.g., silica or polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles) as substrates for catalyst immobilisation. Then we consider magnetic nanoparticles bound to inorganic catalytic mesoporous structures as well as metal organic frameworks. Binding of catalytically active small organic molecules and polymers are also reviewed. After that we briefly deliberate on the binding of enzymes to magnetic nanocomposites and the corresponding enzymatic catalysis. Finally, we draw conclusions and present a future outlook for the further development of new catalytic systems which are immobilised onto magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:28344220

  13. Sting-free measurements on a magnetically supported right circular cylinder aligned with the free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    The flow over cylinders of varying fineness ratio (length to diameter) aligned with the free stream was examined using a magnetic suspension and balance system in order to avoid model support interference. The drag coefficient variation of a right circular cylinder was obtained for a wide range of fineness ratios. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to examine the flow field, particularly the behaviour of the leading-edge separation shear layer and its effect on the wake. Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter ranged from 5105, while the major portion of the experiment was conducted at ReD=1.0×105. For moderately large fineness ratio, the shear layer reattaches with subsequent growth of the boundary layer, whereas over shorter cylinders, the shear layer remains detached. Differences in the wake recirculation region and the immediate wake patterns are clarified in terms of both the mean velocity and turbulent flow fields, including longitudinal vortical structures in the cross-flow plane of the wake. The minimum drag corresponded to the fineness ratio for which the separated shear layer reattached at the trailing edge of the cylinder. The base pressure was obtained with a telemetry technique. Pressure fields and aerodynamic force fluctuations are also discussed.

  14. Magnetic anisotropy of heteronuclear dimers in the gas phase and supported on graphene: relativistic density-functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Błoński, Piotr; Hafner, Jürgen

    2014-04-09

    The structural and magnetic properties of mixed PtCo, PtFe, and IrCo dimers in the gas phase and supported on a free-standing graphene layer have been calculated using density-functional theory, both in the scalar-relativistic limit and self-consistently including spin-orbit coupling. The influence of the strong magnetic moments of the 3d atoms on the spin and orbital moments of the 5d atoms, and the influence of the strong spin-orbit coupling contributed by the 5d atom on the orbital moments of the 3d atoms have been studied in detail. The magnetic anisotropy energy is found to depend very sensitively on the nature of the eigenstates in the vicinity of the Fermi level, as determined by band filling, exchange splitting and spin-orbit coupling. The large magnetic anisotropy energy of free PtCo and IrCo dimers relative to the easy direction parallel to the dimer axis is coupled to a strong anisotropy of the orbital magnetic moments of the Co atom for both dimers, and also on the Ir atom in IrCo. In contrast the PtFe dimer shows a weak perpendicular anisotropy and only small spin and orbital anisotropies of opposite sign on the two atoms. For dimers supported on graphene, the strong binding within the dimer and the stronger interaction of the 3d atom with the substrate stabilizes an upright geometry. Spin and orbital moments on the 3d atom are strongly quenched, but due to the weaker binding within the dimer the properties of the 5d atom are more free-atom-like with increased spin and orbital moments. The changes in the magnetic moment are reflected in the structure of the electronic eigenstates near the Fermi level, for all three dimers the easy magnetic direction is now parallel to the dimer axis and perpendicular to the graphene layer. The already very large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of IrCo is further enhanced by the interaction with the support, the MAE of PtFe changes sign, and that of the PtCo dimer is reduced. These changes are discussed in relation to

  15. Design of set-point weighting PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller for vertical magnetic flux controller in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, H.; Fatehi, A.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a simple method is presented for tuning weighted PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller parameters based on the pole placement controller of pseudo-second-order fractional systems. One of the advantages of this controller is capability of reducing the disturbance effects and improving response to input, simultaneously. In the following sections, the performance of this controller is evaluated experimentally to control the vertical magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak. For this work, at first a fractional order model is identified using output-error technique in time domain. For various practical experiments, having desired time responses for magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak, is vital. To approach this, at first the desired closed loop reference models are obtained based on generalized characteristic ratio assignment method in fractional order systems. After that, for the identified model, a set-point weighting PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller is designed and simulated. Finally, this controller is implemented on digital signal processor control system of the plant to fast/slow control of magnetic flux. The practical results show appropriate performance of this controller.

  16. Evaluation of diet quality and weight status of children from a low socioeconomic urban environment supports "at risk" classification.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Denise D; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia; McKay, M Geraldine; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; Touger-Decker, Riva; Smith, Jeffrey K; Perlman, Adam

    2007-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated diet quality and weight status in 248 randomly selected low-income urban children, aged 7 to 13 years, who were participating in a larger study on the effectiveness of multivitamin supplementation on school performance. Food frequency questionnaires were used to determine intake of total calories and food groups, selected micronutrients, and amount and percent of calories from sweets. Results were compared to age-appropriate recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid and to the Dietary Reference Intakes. Height, weight, and ages obtained from current-year student health records were used to calculate body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) percentile for age. Of 193 participants with usable food frequencies and available weight, height, sex, and age, 22% (n=43) were at risk for overweight and 36% (n=69) were overweight. More than 75% of participants failed to meet recommended servings for grains, vegetables, dairy, and fruit groups, and mean intake of each of these food groups was significantly less than recommendations (P<0.001). Twenty-five percent or more of subjects did not meet Recommended Dietary Allowances for iron and folate. Mean intake of calcium was below the Adequate Intake for calcium and 76% of children 8 years old and younger and 93% of children 9 years old and older did not meet the Adequate Intake for calcium. Mean calorie intake was 1,723 kcal (standard deviation+/-924) and mean percent of calories from carbohydrate, protein, and fat was 57%, 13%, and 32%, respectively. No correlation was found between total calories, total dietary sugar, or percent of calories from sweets and body mass index. Results of this study suggest that these urban children may be "at risk," based on the high percentage who are overweight and have insufficient food group consumption and micronutrient intake.

  17. Cyclodextrin-supported organic matrix for application of MALDI-MS for forensics. Soft-ionization to obtain protonated molecules of low molecular weight compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Tetsu; Asano, Takashi; Fujino, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    A mass measurement technique for detecting low-molecular-weight drugs with a cyclodextrin-supported organic matrix was investigated. By using cyclodextrin-supported 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP), the matrix-related peaks of drugs were suppressed. The peaks of protonated molecules of the sample and THAP were mainly observed, and small fragments were detected in a few cases. Despite the Na+ and K+ peaks were observed in the spectrum, Na+ or K+ adduct sample molecules were undetected, owing to the sugar units of cyclodextrin. The advantages of MALDI-MS with cyclodextrin-supported matrices as an analytical tool for forensic samples are discussed. The suppression of alkali adducted molecules and desorption process are also discussed.

  18. System frequency support of permanent magnet synchronous generator-based wind power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziping

    With ever-increasing penetration of wind power into modern electric grids all over the world, a trending replacement of conventional synchronous generators by large wind power plants will likely result in the poor overall frequency regulation performance. On the other hand, permanent magnet synchronous generator wind Turbine System (PMSG-WTG) with full power back to back converters tends to become one of the most promising wind turbine technologies thanks to various advantages. It possesses a significant amount of kinetic energy stored in the rotating mass of turbine blades, which can be utilized to enhance the total inertia of power system. Additionally, the deloaded operation and decoupled control of active and reactive power make it possible for PMSG-WTG to provide a fast frequency regulation through full-power converter. First of all, a comprehensive and in-depth survey is conducted to analyze the motivations for incorporating the inertial response and frequency regulation of VSWT into the system frequency regulation. Besides, control classifications, fundamental control concepts and advanced control schemes implemented for auxiliary frequency support of individual WT or wind power plant are elaborated along with a comparison of the potential frequency regulation capabilities of four major types of WTs. Secondly, a Controls Advanced Research Turbine2-Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator wind turbine (CART2-PMSG) integrated model representing the typical configuration and operation characteristics of PMSG-WT is established in Matlab/Simulink,. Meanwhile, two different rotor-side converter control schemes, including rotor speed-based control and active power-based control, are integrated into this CART2-PMSG integrated model to perform Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) operation over a wide range of wind speeds, respectively. Thirdly, a novel comprehensive frequency regulation (CFR) control scheme is developed and implemented into the CART2-PMSG model based

  19. Decision support system for localizing prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vijay; Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Pang, Yuxi; Pohida, Thomas; Merino, Maria J.; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.; Bernardo, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need to localize prostate cancers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to facilitate the use of image guided biopsy, focal therapy, and active surveillance follow up. Our goal was to develop a decision support system (DSS) for detecting and localizing peripheral zone prostate cancers by using machine learning approach to calculate a cancer probability map from multiparametric MR images (MP-MRI). Methods: This IRB approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study consisted of 31 patients (mean age and serum prostate specific antigen of 60.4 and 6.62 ng/ml, respectively) who had MP-MRI at 3 T followed by radical prostatectomy. Seven patients were excluded due to technical issues with their MP-MRI (e.g., motion artifact, failure to perform all sequences). Cancer and normal regions were identified in the peripheral zone by correlating them to whole mount histology slides of the excised prostatectomy specimens. To facilitate the correlation, tissue blocks matching the MR slices were obtained using a MR-based patient-specific mold. Segmented regions on the MP-MRI were correlated to histopathology and used as training sets for the learning system that generated the cancer probability maps. Leave-one-patient-out cross-validation on the cancer and normal regions was performed to determine the learning system's efficacy, an evolutionary strategies approach (also known as a genetic algorithm) was used to find the optimal values for a set of parameters, and finally a cancer probability map was generated. Results: For the 24 patients that were used in the study, 225 cancer and 264 noncancerous regions were identified from the region maps. The efficacy of DSS was first determined without optimizing support vector machines (SVM) parameters, where a region having a cancer probability greater than or equal to 50% was considered as a correct classification. The nonoptimized system had an f-measure of 85% and the

  20. Molecular weight dependence of segmental alignment in a sheared polymer melt: A deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Ryan J.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2002-06-01

    2H NMR quadrupole interaction spectroscopy has been used to measure the molecular weight dependence of poly(dimethylsiloxane) chain deformation under shear in a cylindrical Couette cell while NMR velocimetry has been used to directly measure shear rates. The signals were acquired from a perdeuterated benzene probe molecule, which provides a motionally averaged sampling of the entire segmental ensemble. We have measured the dependence on shear rate of the SXX (velocity), SYY (velocity gradient), and SZZ (vorticity) elements of the segmented alignment tensor, fitting the data using the standard Doi-Edwards theory and modified to allow for convected constraint release. Our results suggest that the tube disengagement times scale as molecular weight to the power 3.5±0.1, consistent with the usual 3.4 power law. Our velocimetry measurements indicate a reproducible and consistent slip occurring at high molecular weights (>1 M Dalton), a phenomenon which is independently observed in a lower than expected chain deformation.

  1. Usefulness of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation using double roller pumps in a low body weight newborn: A novel strategy for mechanical circulatory support in an infant.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Kato, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Shiori; Amano, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with a centrifugal pump requires a certain flow rate; therefore, its application for low body weight infants is frequently accompanied by oxygenator membrane malfunction and/or inadequate perfusion. To prevent low-flow associated complications, we report a case in which a novel system of dual roller pumps was used. A baby girl with a body mass index 0.25 m(2), who experienced difficulty weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass after a Norwood-like operation, required an ECMO. Concerns for the tube lifespan reduction due to roller pump friction led to the use of a double roller pump circulation. The termination of ECMO during tube exchange is not needed, because circulation is maintained by another roller pump. The novel strategy of ECMO with double roller pumps will allow low perfusion rate to provide adequate circulatory support for low body weight patients.

  2. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  3. Magnetic bioinspired hybrid nanostructured collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds supporting cell proliferation and tuning regenerative process.

    PubMed

    Tampieri, Anna; Iafisco, Michele; Sandri, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Cunha, Carla; Sprio, Simone; Savini, Elisa; Uhlarz, Marc; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas

    2014-09-24

    A bioinspired mineralization process was applied to develop biomimetic hybrid scaffolds made of (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+))-doped hydroxyapatite nanocrystals nucleated on self-assembling collagen fibers and endowed with super-paramagnetic properties, minimizing the formation of potentially cytotoxic magnetic phases such as magnetite or other iron oxide phases. Magnetic composites were prepared at different temperatures, and the effect of this parameter on the reaction yield in terms of mineralization degree, morphology, degradation, and magnetization was investigated. The influence of scaffold properties on cells was evaluated by seeding human osteoblast-like cells on magnetic and nonmagnetic materials, and differences in terms of viability, adhesion, and proliferation were studied. The synthesis temperature affects mainly the chemical-physical features of the mineral phase of the composites influencing the degradation, the microstructure, and the magnetization values of the entire scaffold and its biological performance. In vitro investigations indicated the biocompatibility of the materials and that the magnetization of the super-paramagnetic scaffolds, induced applying an external static magnetic field, improved cell proliferation in comparison to the nonmagnetic scaffold.

  4. Supported Exercise Improves Controlled Eating and Weight through Its Effects on Psychosocial Factors: Extending a Systematic Research Program Toward Treatment Development

    PubMed Central

    Annesi, James J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Behavioral weight-loss treatments have been overwhelmingly unsuccessful. Many inadequately address both behavioral theory and extant research—especially in regard to the lack of viability of simply educating individuals on improved eating and exercise behaviors. Objective: The aim was to synthesize research on associations of changes in exercise behaviors, psychosocial factors, eating behaviors, and weight; and then conduct further direct testing to inform the development of an improved treatment approach. Methods: A systematic program of health behavior-change research based on social cognitive theory, and extensions of that theory applied to exercise and weight loss, was first reviewed. Then, to extend this research toward treatment development and application, a field-based study of obese adults was conducted. Treatments incorporated a consistent component of cognitive-behaviorally supported exercise during 26 weeks that was paired with either standard nutrition education (n = 183) or cognitive-behavioral methods for controlled eating that emphasized self-regulatory methods such as goal setting and caloric tracking, cognitive restructuring, and eating cue awareness (n = 247). Results: Both treatment conditions were associated with improved self-efficacy, self-regulation, mood, exercise, fruit and vegetable consumption, weight, and waist circumference; with improvements in self-regulation for eating, fruit and vegetable consumption, weight, and waist circumference significantly greater in the cognitive-behavioral nutrition condition. Changes in exercise- and eating-related self-efficacy and self-regulation were associated with changes in exercise and eating (R2 = 0.40 and 0.17, respectively), with mood change increasing the explanatory power to R2 = 0.43 and 0.20. Improved self-efficacy and self-regulation for exercise carried over to self-efficacy and self-regulation for controlled eating (β= 0.53 and 0.68, respectively). Conclusions: Development

  5. Estimation of Curie temperature of manganite-based materials for magnetic refrigeration application using hybrid gravitational based support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owolabi, Taoreed O.; Akande, Kabiru O.; Olatunji, Sunday O.; Alqahtani, Abdullah; Aldhafferi, Nahier

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic refrigeration (MR) technology stands a good chance of replacing the conventional gas compression system (CGCS) of refrigeration due to its unique features such as high efficiency, low cost as well as being environmental friendly. Its operation involves the use of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of a magnetic material caused by application of magnetic field. Manganite-based material demonstrates maximum MCE at its magnetic ordering temperature known as Curie temperature (TC). Consequently, manganite-based material with TC around room temperature is essentially desired for effective utilization of this technology. The TC of manganite-based materials can be adequately altered to a desired value through doping with appropriate foreign materials. In order to determine a manganite with TC around room temperature and to circumvent experimental challenges therein, this work proposes a model that can effectively estimates the TC of manganite-based material doped with different materials with the aid of support vector regression (SVR) hybridized with gravitational search algorithm (GSA). Implementation of GSA algorithm ensures optimum selection of SVR hyper-parameters for improved performance of the developed model using lattice distortions as the descriptors. The result of the developed model is promising and agrees excellently with the experimental results. The outstanding estimates of the proposed model suggest its potential in promoting room temperature magnetic refrigeration through quick estimation of the effect of dopants on TC so as to obtain manganite that works well around the room temperature.

  6. Potential for Differentiation of Pseudoprogression From True Tumor Progression With Dynamic Susceptibility-Weighted Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Ferumoxytol vs. Gadoteridol: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Raslan, Ahmed M.; Muldoon, Leslie L.; Hamilton, Bronwyn E.; Rooney, William D.; Varallyay, Csanad G.; Njus, Jeffrey M.; Haluska, Marianne; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) using gadoteridol in comparison to the iron oxide nanoparticle blood pool agent, ferumoxytol, in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who received standard radiochemotherapy (RCT). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with GBM received standard RCT and underwent 19 MRI sessions that included DSC-MRI acquisitions with gadoteridol on Day 1 and ferumoxytol on Day 2. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were calculated from DSC data obtained from each contrast agent. T1-weighted acquisition post-gadoteridol administration was used to identify enhancing regions. Results: In seven MRI sessions of clinically presumptive active tumor, gadoteridol-DSC showed low rCBV in three and high rCBV in four, whereas ferumoxytol-DSC showed high rCBV in all seven sessions (p = 0.002). After RCT, seven MRI sessions showed increased gadoteridol contrast enhancement on T1-weighted scans coupled with low rCBV without significant differences between contrast agents (p = 0.9). Based on post-gadoteridol T1-weighted scans, DSC-MRI, and clinical presentation, four patterns of response to RCT were observed: regression, pseudoprogression, true progression, and mixed response. Conclusion: We conclude that DSC-MRI with a blood pool agent such as ferumoxytol may provide a better monitor of tumor rCBV than DSC-MRI with gadoteridol. Lesions demonstrating increased enhancement on T1-weighted MRI coupled with low ferumoxytol rCBV are likely exhibiting pseudoprogression, whereas high rCBV with ferumoxytol is a better marker than gadoteridol for determining active tumor. These interesting pilot observations suggest that ferumoxytol may differentiate tumor progression from pseudoprogression and warrant further investigation.

  7. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  8. Weighting Statistical Inputs for Data Used to Support Effective Decision Making During Severe Emergency Weather and Environmental Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) weather and atmospheric environmental organizations are insatiable consumers of geophysical, hydrometeorological and solar weather statistics. The expanding array of internet-worked sensors producing targeted physical measurements has generated an almost factorial explosion of near real-time inputs to topical statistical datasets. Normalizing and value-based parsing of such statistical datasets in support of time-constrained weather and environmental alerts and warnings is essential, even with dedicated high-performance computational capabilities. What are the optimal indicators for advanced decision making? How do we recognize the line between sufficient statistical sampling and excessive, mission destructive sampling ? How do we assure that the normalization and parsing process, when interpolated through numerical models, yields accurate and actionable alerts and warnings? This presentation will address the integrated means and methods to achieve desired outputs for NASA and consumers of its data.

  9. Thermal and structural performance of a single tube support post for the Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnet cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Ruschman, M.K.; Schoo, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    The reentrant support post currently incorporated in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole cryostat has been shown to meet the structural and thermal requirements of the cryostat, both in prototype magnet assemblies and through component testing. However, the reentrant post design has two major drawbacks: tight dimensional control on all components, and cost driven by these tolerance constraints and a complex assembly procedure. A single tube support post has been developed as an alternative to the reentrant post design. Several prototype assemblies have been fabricated and subjected to structural testing. Compressive, tensile, and bending forces were applied to each assembly with deflection measured at several locations. A prototype support post has also been thermally evaluated in a heat leak measurement facility. Heat load to 4.2 K was measured with the intermediate post intercept operating at various temperatures while thermometers positioned along the conductive path of the post mapped thermal gradients. Results from these measurements indicate the single tube support post meets the design criteria for the SSC dipole magnet cryostat support system.

  10. Biophysical mechanisms: a component in the weight of evidence for health effects of power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Swanson, John; Kheifets, Leeka

    2006-04-01

    Comparatively high exposures to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields produce established biological effects that are explained by accepted mechanisms and that form the basis of exposure guidelines. Lower exposures to magnetic fields (< 1 microT average in the home) are classified as "possibly carcinogenic" on the basis of epidemiological studies of childhood leukemia. This classification takes into consideration largely negative laboratory data. Lack of biophysical mechanisms operating at such low levels also argues against causality. We survey around 20 biophysical mechanisms that have been proposed to explain effects at such low levels, with particular emphasis on plausibility: the principle that to produce biological effects, a mechanism must produce a "signal" larger than the "noise" that exists naturally. Some of the mechanisms are impossible, and some require specific conditions for which there is limited or no evidence as to their existence in a way that would make them relevant to human exposure. Others are predicted to become plausible above some level of field. We conclude that effects below 5 microT are implausible. At about 50 microT, no specific mechanism has been identified, but the basic problem of implausibility is removed. Above about 500 microT, there are established or likely effects from accepted mechanisms. The absence of a plausible biophysical mechanism at lower fields cannot be taken as proof that health effects of environmental electric and magnetic fields are impossible. Nevertheless, it is a relevant consideration in assessing the overall evidence on these fields.

  11. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments.

    PubMed

    Chan, Irene H L; Fong, Kenneth N K; Chan, Dora Y L; Wang, Apple Q L; Cheng, Eddy K N; Chau, Pinky H Y; Chow, Kathy K Y; Cheung, Hobby K Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone.

  12. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Irene H. L.; Chan, Dora Y. L.; Wang, Apple Q. L.; Cheng, Eddy K. N.; Chau, Pinky H. Y.; Chow, Kathy K. Y.; Cheung, Hobby K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: comparison of 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo, 2D T2*weighted gradient-recalled echo and 3D T2-weighted variable flip-angle turbo spin echo sequences.

    PubMed

    Meindl, T; Wirth, S; Weckbach, S; Dietrich, O; Reiser, M; Schoenberg, S O

    2009-03-01

    To compare an isotropic three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution T2-weighted (w) MR sequence and its reformations with conventional sequences for imaging of the cervical spine. Fifteen volunteers were examined at 1.5 T using sagittal and axial 3D T2-w, sagittal and axial 2D T2w, and axial 2D T2*w MR sequences. Axial reformations of the sagittal 3D dataset were generated (3D MPR T2w). Signal-to-noise and image homogeneity were evaluated in a phantom and in vivo. Visibility of ten anatomical structures of the cervical spine was evaluated. Artifacts were assessed. For statistical analysis, Cohen's kappa, Wilcoxon matched pairs, and t-testing were utilized. There were no significant differences in homogeneity between the sequences. Sagittal 3D T2w enabled better delineation of nerve roots, neural foramina, and intraforaminal structures compared to sagittal 2D T2w. Axial 3D T2w and axial 3D MPR T2w resulted in superior visibility of most anatomical structures compared to axial 2D T2w and comparable results to 2D T2*w concerning the spinal cord, nerve roots, intraforaminal structures, and fat. Artifacts were most pronounced in axial 2D T2w and axial 3D T2w. Acquisition of a 3D T2w data set is feasible in the cervical spine with superior delineation of anatomical structures compared to 2D sequences.

  14. Chemical shift and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior mediastinum in oncology: Current clinical applications in qualitative and quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Gned, Dario; Veltri, Andrea; Priola, Sandro Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the use of magnetic resonance (MR) in clinical practice for the evaluation of the anterior mediastinum has considerably increased due to technological improvements and standardization of thoracic protocols. Currently, MR imaging is increasingly seen as a useful problem-solving modality, especially in equivocal cases at computed tomography, with the advantage of a higher contrast resolution and no radiation exposure. Chemical shift and diffusion-weighted MR are helpful in tissue characterization and present advantages over conventional MR imaging, first in providing quantitative data, without the need for the administration of contrast medium. By detecting microscopic fat in tissue, chemical shift imaging is useful for differentiating normal thymus and rebound hyperplasia from cancer tissue at diagnosis and after chemotherapy in oncologic patients, and for distinguishing lymphoid hyperplasia from thymoma in autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis. Diffusion-weighted MR reflects diffusivity of water molecules within tissue and is increasingly used as a cancer biomarker, even in the thorax, for the detection and characterization of tumors, for their differentiation from benign conditions, and for monitoring treatment response. In this review, based on the current literature, technical considerations about image acquisition and data analysis of chemical shift and diffusion-weighted MR are discussed along with clinical applications in the field of benign and malignant disease of the anterior mediastinum.

  15. Improved Mitochondrial and Methylglyoxal-Related Metabolisms Support Hyperproliferation Induced by 50 Hz Magnetic Field in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Falone, Stefano; Santini, Silvano; di Loreto, Silvia; Cordone, Valeria; Grannonico, Marta; Cesare, Patrizia; Cacchio, Marisa; Amicarelli, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) are common environmental agents that are suspected to promote later stages of tumorigenesis, especially in brain-derived malignancies. Even though ELF magnetic fields have been previously linked to increased proliferation in neuroblastoma cells, no previous work has studied whether ELF-MF exposure may change key biomolecular features, such as anti-glycative defence and energy re-programming, both of which are currently considered as crucial factors involved in the phenotype and progression of many malignancies. Our study investigated whether the hyperproliferation that is induced in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells by a 50 Hz, 1 mT ELF magnetic field is supported by an improved defense towards methylglyoxal (MG), which is an endogenous cancer-static and glycating α-oxoaldehyde, and by rewiring of energy metabolism. Our findings show that not only the ELF magnetic field interfered with the biology of neuron-derived malignant cells, by de-differentiating further the cellular phenotype and by increasing the proliferative activity, but also triggered cytoprotective mechanisms through the enhancement of the defense against MG, along with a more efficient management of metabolic energy, presumably to support the rapid cell outgrowth. Intriguingly, we also revealed that the MF-induced bioeffects took place after an initial imbalance of the cellular homeostasis, which most likely created a transient unstable milieu. The biochemical pathways and molecular targets revealed in this research could be exploited for future approaches aimed at limiting or suppressing the deleterious effects of ELF magnetic fields. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2014-2025, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Genesis of supported carbon-coated Co nanoparticles with controlled magnetic properties, prepared by decomposition of chelate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Konstantin; Beaunier, Patricia; Che, Michel; Marceau, Eric; Li, Yanling

    2011-05-01

    Following procedures formerly developed for the preparation of supported heterogeneous catalysts, carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticles dispersed on porous alumina have been prepared by impregnation of γ-Al2O3 with (NH4)2[Co(EDTA)] and thermal decomposition in inert atmosphere. Below 350 °C, Co(II) ions are complexed in a hexa-coordinated way by the EDTA ligand. The thermal treatment at 400-900 °C leads to the EDTA ligand decomposition and recovering of the support porosity, initially clogged by the impregnated salt. According to X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and due to in situ redox reactions between the organic ligand and Co(II), both oxidic and metallic cobalt phases are formed. Characterisation by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements reveals that an increase in the treatment temperature leads to an increase of the degree of cobalt reduction as well as to a growth of the cobalt metal particles. As a consequence, the samples prepared at 400-700 °C exhibit superparamagnetism and a saturation magnetisation of 1.7-6.5 emu g-1 at room temperature, whilst the sample prepared at 900 °C has a weak coercivity (0.1 kOe) and a saturation magnetisation of 12 emu g-1. Metal particles are homogeneously dispersed on the support and appear to be protected by carbon; its elimination by a heating in H2 at 400 °C is demonstrated to cause sintering of the metal particles. The route investigated here can be of interest for obtaining porous magnetic adsorbents or carriers with high magnetic moments and low coercivities, in which the magnetic nanoparticles are protected from chemical aggression and sintering by their coating.

  17. Applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted imaging to the study of brain biochemistry and pathology.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, R A; Williams, S R; Busza, A L; van Bruggen, N

    1993-03-01

    The first practical demonstration that nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy could be applied to the study of brain biochemistry in vivo came in 1980, with the studies of the rat brain using a surface coil. Since then the technique has been rapidly and extensively developed into a versatile, non-invasive tool for the investigation of various aspects of brain biochemistry, physiology and disease. NMR is non-destructive and can be used to examine a wide variety of samples, ranging from localized regions within the whole brain in humans or animals, through tissue preparations (perfused organ, tissue slices and homogenates), to isolated cells and aqueous solutions, such as tissue extracts. 31P and 1H NMR spectra deriving from endogenous compounds of the brain in situ allow assessment of tissue metabolites and provide information about high-energy phosphates, lactate, certain amino acids, intracellular pH and ionic concentrations. Exogenous substrates or probes labelled with stable isotopes can also be introduced into the brain and used to monitor metabolism. Animal models of brain diseases have given some impetus to rapid progress in clinical NMR spectroscopy and also magnetic imaging techniques. The purpose of this article is to highlight the type of information available from these NMR techniques, and to present this in a neuroscience context, emphasizing the biochemical, physiological and pathological information that can be obtained using these methods.

  18. Effect of substrate interface on the magnetism of supported iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Balan, A; Fraile Rodríguez, A; Vaz, C A F; Kleibert, A; Nolting, F

    2015-12-01

    In situ X-ray photo-emission electron microscopy is used to investigate the magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles deposited on different single crystalline substrates, including Si(001), Cu(001), W(110), and NiO(001). We find that, in our room temperature experiments, Fe nanoparticles deposited on Si(001) and Cu(001) show both superparamagnetic and magnetically stable (blocked) ferromagnetic states, while Fe nanoparticles deposited on W(110) and NiO(001) show only superparamagnetic behaviour. The dependence of the magnetic behaviour of the Fe nanoparticles on the contact surface is ascribed to the different interfacial bonding energies, higher for W and NiO, and to a possible relaxation of point defects within the core of the nanoparticles on these substrates, that have been suggested to stabilise the ferromagnetic state at room temperature when deposited on more inert surfaces such as Si and Cu.

  19. Predicting Outcome of Patients with High-grade Gliomas After Radiotherapy using Quantitative Analysis of T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Lee, Julia; Lawrence, Theodore; Haken, Randall K. ten; Junck, Larry R.; Ross, Brian; Cao Yue

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that measuring quantitative changes in signal intensity early after radiotherapy (RT) in the contrast-enhancing tumor rim and nonenhancing core may be a noninvasive marker of early treatment response in patients with high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with high-grade gliomas had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 1 week before RT, during Weeks 1 and 3 of RT, and every 1 to 3 months after RT as part of a clinical prospective study. Regions of interest (ROI) including contrast-enhancing rim, and the nonenhancing core were defined automatically based on a calculated image of post- to precontrast T1-weighted MRI. Pretreatment T1-weighted MRI signal intensity changes were compared with Weeks 1 and 3 RT and 1 and 3 months post-RT MRI. Clinical and MRI parameters were then tested for prediction of overall survival. Results: Regional T1-weighted signal intensity changes in both the contrast-enhancing rim and the nonenhancing core were observed in all patients during Week 1 and Week 3 of RT. Imaging parameters including signal intensity change within the nonenhancing core after Weeks 1 to 2 RT (p = 0.004), Weeks 3 to 4 RT (p = 0.002) and 1 month after completion of RT (p 0.002) were predictive of overall survival. Using multivariate analysis including RTOG recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and signal intensity change, only the signal intensity change in the nonenhancing core at 1 month after RT (p = 0.01) retained significance. Conclusion: Quantitative measurements of T1-weighted MRI signal intensity changes in the nonenhancing tumor core (using ratios of pre-post values) may provide valuable information regarding early response during treatment and improve our ability to predict posttreatment outcome.

  20. The Use of Susceptibility-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Characterize the Safety Window of Focused Ultrasound Exposure for Localized Blood—Brain-Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hong; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Jin-Chung; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound has been discovered to be able to locally and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood—brain barrier (BBB), which can be detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, side effects such as microhemorrhage, erythrocyte extravasations, or even extensive hemorrhage can also occur. Although current contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI can be used to detect the changes in BBB permeability, its efficacy in detecting tissue hemorrhage after focused-ultrasound sonication remains limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using MR susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to identify tissue hemorrhage associated with the process of BBB permeability increase and characterize the safety window of acoustic pressure level. Brains of 42 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 107 sonications either unilaterally or bilaterally. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, together with SWI were performed. Tissue damage and hemorrhage were analyzed histologically with light microscopy and staining by Evan's blue, HE staining as well as TUNEL staining. Our results showed that contrast-enhanced T1 weighted imaging is sensitive to the presence of the BBB disrupture, but was unable to differentiate from extensive tissue damage such as hemorrhage. Also, SWI proved to be a superior tool for the realtime monitoring of the presence of hemorrhage, which is essential to the clinical concerns. The safety operation window in vivo in our study indicated a pressure of 0.78 to 1.1 MPa. to increase the BBB permeability successfully without hemorrhage. Potential applications such as drug delivery in the brain might be benefited.

  1. Immobilization of enterokinase on magnetic supports for the cleavage of fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Santana, Sara D F; Pina, Ana S; Roque, Ana C A

    2012-10-31

    Magnetic nanobiocatalysts for tag cleavage on fusion proteins have been prepared by immobilizing enterokinase (EK) onto iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles coated with biopolymers. Two different chemistries have been explored for the covalent coupling of EK, namely carbodiimide (EDC coupling) and maleimide activation (Sulfo coupling). Upon immobilization, EK initial activity lowered but EDC coupling lead to higher activity retention. Regarding the stability of the nanobiocatalysts, these were recycled up to ten times with the greater activity losses observed in the first two cycles. The immobilized EK also proved to cleave a control fusion protein and to greatly simplify the separation of the enzyme from the reaction mixture.

  2. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  3. Properly scaled and targeted AAV2-NRTN (neurturin) to the substantia nigra is safe, effective and causes no weight loss: support for nigral targeting in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bartus, Raymond T; Brown, Lamar; Wilson, Alistair; Kruegel, Brian; Siffert, Joao; Johnson, Eugene M; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Herzog, Christopher D

    2011-10-01

    had no impact on the weight loss phenomenon, further dissociating neurotrophic exposure to the SN as the culprit for weight changes. Finally, low AAV2-NRTN doses provided significant neuroprotection against 6-OHDA toxicity, establishing a wide therapeutic index for nigral targeting. These data support targeting the SN with AAV2-NRTN in PD patients, demonstrating that properly targeted and scaled AAV2-NRTN provides safe and effective NRTN expression. They also provided the means to define an appropriate human-equivalent dose for proceeding into an ongoing clinical trial, using empirically-based scaling to account for marked differences in SN volume between species.

  4. Simulation of Internal Damping in a Rotating System Supported by Magnetic Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This thesis developed and validated a model for this purpose. An existing rotordynamic Finite Element Method (FEM) model and magnetic bearing...controllers were unable to counteract the destabilizing effects of internal damping during supercritical operation. This improved rotordynamic model and

  5. Novel light-weight, high-performance anode-supported microtubular solid oxide fuel cells with an active anode functional layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Yao; Ren, Cong; Fang, Shumin; Mao, Yating; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-10-01

    Influence of the air-gap, the distance from the tube-in-orifice spinneret to the upper surface of the external coagulant bath during the extrusion/phase-inversion process, on the microstructure of nickel - yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) hollow fibers has been systematically studied. When the air-gap is 0 cm, the obtained Ni-YSZ hollow fiber has a sandwich microstructure. However, when the air-gap is increased to 15 cm, a bi-layer Ni-YSZ hollow fiber consisting of a thin layer with small pores and a thick support with highly porous fingerlike macrovoids has been achieved. The output power density of microtubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) with a cell configuration of Ni-YSZ/YSZ/YSZ-LSM increases from 594 mW cm-2 for the cells with the Ni-YSZ anode of sandwich microstructure to 832 mW cm-2 for the cells with the Ni-YSZ anode of bi-layer microstructure at 750 °C, implying that to achieve the same output power density, the weight of the cells with the bi-layer anode support can be reduced to 41.5% compared with that of the cells with the sandwich anode support. Thermal-cycling test shows no obvious degradation on the open-circuit-voltage (OCV), indicating that the MT-SOFCs have robust resistance to thermal cycling.

  6. Cobalt salophen complex supported on imidazole functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as a recoverable catalyst for oxidation of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Mozhgan; Gorjizadeh, Maryam; Nazari, Simin; Naseh, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    A new magnetically separable catalyst consisting of Co(II) salophen complex covalently supported on imidazole functionalized silica coated cobalt ferrite was prepared. The synthesized catalyst was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). The immobilized catalyst was shown to be an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the oxidation of some alkenes using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant. The catalyst could be easily and efficiently isolated from the final product solution by magnetic decantation and be reused for 5 consecutive reactions without showing any significant activity degradation.

  7. Effects of conventional overground gait training and a gait trainer with partial body weight support on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of both conventional overground gait training (CGT) and a gait trainer with partial body weight support (GTBWS) on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were alternately assigned to one of two treatment groups, and both groups underwent CGT and GTBWS. [Results] The functional ambulation classification on the affected side improved significantly in the CGT and GTBWS groups. Walking speed also improved significantly in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the GTBWS in company with CGT may be, in part, an effective method of gait training for restoring gait ability in patients after a stroke. PMID:26157272

  8. Multiplex protein pattern unmixing using a non-linear variable-weighted support vector machine as optimized by a particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Zou, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Li-Juan; Shen, Guo-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-01-15

    Most of the proteins locate more than one organelle in a cell. Unmixing the localization patterns of proteins is critical for understanding the protein functions and other vital cellular processes. Herein, non-linear machine learning technique is proposed for the first time upon protein pattern unmixing. Variable-weighted support vector machine (VW-SVM) is a demonstrated robust modeling technique with flexible and rational variable selection. As optimized by a global stochastic optimization technique, particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, it makes VW-SVM to be an adaptive parameter-free method for automated unmixing of protein subcellular patterns. Results obtained by pattern unmixing of a set of fluorescence microscope images of cells indicate VW-SVM as optimized by PSO is able to extract useful pattern features by optimally rescaling each variable for non-linear SVM modeling, consequently leading to improved performances in multiplex protein pattern unmixing compared with conventional SVM and other exiting pattern unmixing methods.

  9. Enhancement of brain plasticity and recovery of locomotive function after lumbar spinal cord stimulation in combination with gait training with partial weight support in rats with cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Shi-Uk

    2017-02-22

    Lumbar spinal cord stimulation (LSCS) is reportedly effective for the recovery of locomotive intraspinal neural network, motor cortex and basal ganglia in animals with complete spinal cord injury and parkinsonism. We evaluated the effect of LSCS in combination with gait training on the recovery of locomotive function and brain plasticity using a rat model of brain ischemia. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats with ischemia were randomly assigned into one of four groups: sham treatment (group 1), LSCS only (group 2), LSCS with gait training and 50% (group 3) and 80% (group 4) of body weight support. Evaluations before randomization and 4 weeks after intervention included motor scoring index, real-time PCR and Western blot. Motor scoring index was significantly improved after the intervention in groups 2 and 3. The ratio of phospho-Protein Kinase C (PKC) to PKC measured in the infarcted area tended to be higher in groups 3 and 4. Protein expression of mGluR2 and mRNA expression of mGluR1 measured in the contralateral cortex were lower in groups 3 and 4. The ratio of phospho-Akt to Akt and mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor measured in the ischemic border zone were higher in group 2. The mRNA expression of MAP1b measured in the infarcted area was significantly higher in group 2. The findings suggest that LSCS and gait training with an adequate amount of body weight support may promote brain plasticity and facilitate the functional recovery.

  10. Magnetic anisotropy in surface-supported single-ion lanthanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Paul; Bernien, Matthias; Rolf, Daniela; Nickel, Fabian; Xu, Qingyu; Hartmann, Claudia; Umbach, Tobias R.; Kopprasch, Jens; Ladenthin, Janina N.; Schierle, Enrico; Weschke, Eugen; Czekelius, Constantin; Kuch, Wolfgang; Franke, Katharina J.

    2016-12-01

    Single-ion lanthanide-organic complexes can provide stable magnetic moments with well-defined orientation for spintronic applications on the atomic level. Here, we show by a combined experimental approach of scanning tunneling microscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy that dysprosium-tris(1,1,1-trifluoro-4-(2-thienyl)-2,4-butanedionate) (Dy (tta) 3 ) complexes deposited on a Au(111) surface undergo a molecular distortion, resulting in distinct crystal field symmetry imposed on the Dy ion. This leads to an easy-axis magnetization direction in the ligand plane. Furthermore, we show that tunneling electrons hardly couple to the spin excitations, which we ascribe to the shielded nature of the 4 f electrons.

  11. [Preparation of and study on magnetic resonance imaging performance of metal porphyrin modified by low molecular weight chitosan].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong-Jun; Li, Min-Zhi; Huang, Xian-Zhu; Zhu, Wei-Hua; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Qing

    2013-10-01

    The functional complex Mn-TCPP-CS20 as a potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was synthesized through tetra(4-carboxyphenyl) Mn(II)-porphyrin (Mn-TCPP) modified by CS20, which was low degree of polymerization and narrow distribution. The results showed that Mn-TCPP-CS20 had good water-solubility and structural stability. The chemical structures of the products were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), UV-Vis spectra, mass spectrum (MS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results showed that Mn-TCPP was successfully linked to CS20 by an amide function. The relaxation properties in vitro of the functional complex Mn-TCPP-CS20 as the potential MRI contrast agent were preliminarily studied. It was found that the longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of the synthesized Mn-TCPP-CS20 (6.11 mmol(-1) x L x s(-1)) was higher than that of the commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA (r1 = 3.59 mmol(-1) x L x s(-1)). Besides, the imaging effect of Mn-TCPP-CS20 was superior to that of Gd-DTPA in the same condition. These studies suggested that Mn-TCPP-CS20 has the advantage of becoming a potential tissue-targeting contrast agent.

  12. Preparation and characterization of supported magnetic nanoparticles prepared by reverse micelles

    PubMed Central

    Han, Luyang; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Ziemann, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Monatomic (Fe, Co) and bimetallic (FePt and CoPt) nanoparticles were prepared by exploiting the self-organization of precursor loaded reverse micelles. Achievements and limitations of the preparation approach are critically discussed. We show that self-assembled metallic nanoparticles can be prepared with diameters d = 2–12 nm and interparticle distances D = 20–140 nm on various substrates. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of the particle arrays were characterized by several techniques to give a comprehensive view of the high quality of the method. For Co nanoparticles, it is demonstrated that magnetostatic interactions can be neglected for distances which are at least 6 times larger than the particle diameter. Focus is placed on FePt alloy nanoparticles which show a huge magnetic anisotropy in the L10 phase, however, this is still less by a factor of 3–4 when compared to the anisotropy of the bulk counterpart. A similar observation was also found for CoPt nanoparticles (NPs). These results are related to imperfect crystal structures as revealed by HRTEM as well as to compositional distributions of the prepared particles. Interestingly, the results demonstrate that the averaged effective magnetic anisotropy of FePt nanoparticles does not strongly depend on size. Consequently, magnetization stability should scale linearly with the volume of the NPs and give rise to a critical value for stability at ambient temperature. Indeed, for diameters above 6 nm such stability is observed for the current FePt and CoPt NPs. Finally, the long-term conservation of nanoparticles by Au photoseeding is presented. PMID:21977392

  13. Gd (III) complex conjugate of low-molecular-weight chitosan as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance/fluorescence dual-modal imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Boamah, Peter Osei; Gong, Jianbo; Zhang, Qi; Hua, Mingqing; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-06-05

    The fusion of molecular and anatomical modalities facilitates more reliable and accurate detection in clinic. In this work, we prepared gadolinium (III) complex Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 with magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence dual-modal imaging modalities. Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 consisted of fluorescein isothiocyanate and low-molecular-weight chitosan (CS11) units conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 exhibited a higher longitudinal relaxivity (14.09 mM(-1)s(-1)) than the clinical Gd-DTPA (3.85 mM(-1)s(-1)). T1-weighted MR contrast enhancement was also demonstrated the comparability to Gd-DTPA at lower dosage. The binding with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated. The fluorescence of BSA in the presence of Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 was weakened due to static quenching mechanism. The conformation of BSA was slightly changed but α-helix was dominant. The binding was entropy-driven and spontaneous and the main contribution was hydrophobic interaction. Our results suggested the potential of Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 as an MR/fluorescence dual-modal imaging contrast agent in improving the diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy.

  14. Relationship between Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Frontoinsular Gray Matter and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Very Low Birth Weight Children at the Age of 4.

    PubMed

    Durlak, Wojciech; Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Urbanik, Andrzej; Klimek, Małgorzata; Karcz, Paulina; Dutkowska, Grażyna; Nitecka, Magdalena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-01-01

    Very low birth weight is associated with long term neurodevelopmental complications. Macroscopic brain abnormalities in prematurity survivors have been investigated in several studies. However, there is limited data regarding local cerebral metabolic status and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between proton magnetic resonance spectra in basal ganglia, frontal white matter and frontoinsular gray matter, neurodevelopmental outcomes assessed with the Leiter scale and the Developmental Test of Visual Perception and selected socioeconomic variables in a cohort of very low birth weight children at the age of four. Children were divided in three groups based on the severity of neurodevelopmental impairment. There were no differences in spectroscopy in basal ganglia and frontal white matter between the groups. Lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) and myoinositol (mI) were observed in the frontoinsular cortex of the left hemisphere in children with neurodevelopmental impairment compared to children with normal neurodevelopmental outcomes. Higher parental education, daycare attendance and breastfeeding after birth were associated with more favorable neurodevelopmental prognosis, whereas rural residence was more prevalent in children with moderate and severe impairment. Our study demonstrates the role of long term neurometabolic disruption in the left frontoinsular cortex and selected socioeconomic variables in determination of neurodevelopmental prognosis in prematurity survivors.

  15. Molecular weight distributions of irradiated siloxane-based elastomers: A complementary study by statistical modeling and multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L. N.; Mayer, B. P.; Maiti, A.; Chinn, S. C.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-05-01

    The statistical methodology of population balance (PB) has been applied in order to predict the effects of cross-linking and chain-scissioning induced by ionizing radiation on the distribution of molecular weight between cross-links (MWBC) of a siloxane-based elastomer. Effective molecular weight distributions were extracted from the quantification of residual dipolar couplings via multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance (MQ-NMR) measurements and are taken to reflect actual MWBC distributions. The PB methodology is then applied to the unirradiated MWBC distribution and considers both chain-scissioning and the possibility of the formation of three types of cross-links: random recombination of scissioned-chain ends (end-linking), random covalent bonds of free radicals on scissioned-chain ends (Y-cross-linking), and the formation of random cross-links from free radicals on side groups (H-cross-linking). The qualitative agreement between the statistical modeling approach and the NMR data confirms that it is possible to predict trends for the evolution of the distribution of MWBC of polymers under irradiation. The approach described herein can also discern heterogeneities in radiation effects in different structural motifs in the polymer network.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing a perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is poor with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We recently reported that a high signal-intensity area is usually found on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI in the joint space between the articular disc and cartilage surface in joints in which the disc is displaced. A discrete image with an area of high signal-intensity in the middle of the articular disc may indicate perforation or rupture. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of diagnosis of a perforated articular disc by fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI with that of arthroscopy. We studied 50 joints in 50 patients with closed lock of the TMJ who were examined with MRI and then by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. The agreement between the two methods of diagnosis was assessed using the κ coefficient. Evidence of perforation of the disc on MRI and arthroscopically was found in the same 7 joints; there was complete concordance (κ=1.00, p<0.001). The accuracy of diagnosis of perforation of a disc by fat-saturated MRI was therefore the same as that by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope.

  17. Anisotropic diffusion of metabolites in peripheral nerve using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy at ultra-high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellegood, Jacob; McKay, Ryan T.; Hanstock, Chris C.; Beaulieu, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Although the diffusivity and anisotropy of water has been investigated thoroughly in ordered axonal systems (i.e., nervous tissue), there have been very few studies on the directional dependence of diffusion of metabolites. In this study, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (Trace/3 ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the intracellular metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine and phosphocreatine (tCr), choline (Cho), taurine (Tau), and glutamate and glutamine (Glx) were measured parallel and perpendicular to the length of excised frog sciatic nerve using a water suppressed, diffusion-weighted, spin-echo pulse sequence at 18.8 T. The degree of anisotropy (FA) of NAA (0.41 ± 0.09) was determined to be less than tCr (0.59 ± 0.07) and Cho (0.61 ± 0.11), which is consistent with previously reported human studies of white matter. In contrast, Glx diffusion was found to be almost isotropic with an FA value of 0.20 ± 0.06. The differences of FA between the metabolites is most likely due to their differing micro-environments and could be beneficial as an indicator of compartment specific changes with disease, information not readily available with water diffusion.

  18. Quantitative Evaluation of Growth Plates around the Knees of Adolescent Soccer Players by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krajnc, Zmago; Rupreht, Mitja; Drobnič, Matej

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate growth plates around the knees in adolescent soccer players utilizing the diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). Methods. The knees and adjacent growth plates of eleven 14-year-old male soccer players were evaluated by MRI before (end of season's summer break) and after two months of intense soccer training. MRI evaluation was conducted in coronal plane by PD-FSE and DWI. All images were screened for any major pathological changes. Later, central growth plate surface area (CGPSA) was measured and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated in two most central coronal slices divided into four regions: distal femur medial (DFM), distal femur lateral (DFL), proximal tibia medial (PTM), and proximal tibia lateral (PTL). Results. No gross pathology was diagnosed on MRI. CGPSA was not significantly reduced: DFM 278 versus 272, DFL 265 versus 261, PTM 193 versus 192, and PTL 214 versus 210. ADC decrease was statistically significant only for PTM: DFM 1.27 versus 1.22, DFL 1.37 versus 1.34, PTM 1.13 versus 1.03 (p = 0.003), and PTL 1.28 versus 1.22. Conclusions. DWI measurements indicate increased cellularity in growth plates around knees in footballers most prominent in PTM after intense training. No detectable differences on a standard PD-FSE sequence were observed. PMID:26693482

  19. Case Report of False-Negative Diffusion-Weighted Image of Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Lun; Lai, Ji-Ching; Chen, Rong-Fu; Hu, Han-Hwa; Pan, Chau-Shiung

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 75 Final Diagnosis: Acute ischemic stroke Symptoms: Dizziness • unsteady gait Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Radiology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in Taiwan. Diffusion-weighted image (DWI) is a sensitive and common strategy used for imaging acute ischemic stroke. Case report: We present a case of a negative DWI MRI for detecting acute ischemic stroke in a clinical setting. A 75-year-old male had a DWI performed after onset of symptoms suggesting acute ischemic stroke. The initial DWI result was negative at 72 hours of presentation. The neurological symptoms of the patient persisted and DWI was repeated. After 14 days, the DWI data confirmed and demonstrated an acute ischemic stroke. The delay in DWI confirmation, from symptom onset until DWI diagnosis, was 336 hours. Conclusions: DWI may not have 100% sensitivity and accuracy in early stages of acute ischemic stroke. The time course to the development of abnormalities detected by DWI may be longer than anticipated. PMID:28111452

  20. Efficient method for calculating kinetic parameters using T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya

    2004-04-01

    It has become increasingly important to quantitatively estimate tissue physiological parameters such as perfusion, capillary permeability, and the volume of extravascular-extracellular space (EES) using T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). A linear equation was derived by integrating the differential equation describing the kinetic behavior of contrast agent (CA) in tissue, from which K(1) (rate constant for the transfer of CA from plasma to EES), k(2) (rate constant for the transfer from EES to plasma), and V(p) (plasma volume) can be easily obtained by the linear least-squares (LLSQ) method. The usefulness of this method was investigated by means of computer simulations, in comparison with the nonlinear least-squares (NLSQ) method. The new method calculated the above parameters faster than the NLSQ method by a factor of approximately 6, and estimated them more accurately than the NLSQ method at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of < approximately 10. This method will be useful for generating functional images of K(1), k(2), and V(p) from DCE-MRI data.

  1. Polystyrene or Magnetic Nanoparticles as Support in Enantioselective Organocatalysis? A Case Study in Friedel-Crafts Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Sara; Riente, Paola; Rodríguez-Escrich, Carles; Yadav, Jagjit; Ramineni, Kishore; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-04-01

    Heterogenized versions of the second-generation MacMillan imidazolidin-4-one are described for the first time. This versatile organocatalyst has been supported on 1% DVB Merrifield resin and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles through a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. The resulting catalytic materials have been successfully applied to the asymmetric Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. While both catalytic systems can be easily recovered and admit repeated recycling, the polystyrene-based catalyst shows higher stability and provides better stereoselectivities.

  2. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Early After Chemoradiotherapy to Monitor Treatment Response in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecaveye, Vincent; Dirix, Piet; De Keyzer, Frederik; Op de Beeck, Katya; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Hauben, Esther; Lambrecht, Maarten; Nuyts, Sandra; Hermans, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for assessment of treatment response in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) three weeks after the end of chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with HNSCC underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to and 3 weeks after CRT, including T{sub 2}-weighted and pre- and postcontrast T{sub 1}-weighted sequences and an echo-planar DWI sequence with six b values (0 to 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}), from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated. ADC changes 3 weeks posttreatment compared to baseline ( Increment ADC) between responding and nonresponding primary lesions and adenopathies were correlated with 2 years locoregional control and compared with a Mann-Whitney test. In a blinded manner, the Increment ADC was compared to conventional MRI 3 weeks post-CRT and the routinely implemented CT, on average 3 months post-CRT, which used size-related and morphological criteria. Positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) were compared between the Increment ADC and anatomical imaging. Results: The Increment ADC of lesions with later tumor recurrence was significantly lower than lesions with complete remission for both primary lesions (-2.3% {+-} 0.3% vs. 80% {+-} 41%; p < 0.0001) and adenopathies (19.9% {+-} 32% vs. 63% {+-} 36%; p = 0.003). The Increment ADC showed a PPV of 89% and an NPV of 100% for primary lesions and a PPV of 70% and an NPV of 96% for adenopathies per neck side. DWI improved PPV and NPV compared to anatomical imaging. Conclusion: DWI with the Increment ADC 3 weeks after concluding CRT for HNSCC allows for early assessment of treatment response.

  3. Screening nucleotide binding to amino acid-coated supports by surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Carla; Cabrita, Eurico J; Queiroz, João A

    2011-08-01

    Here, we describe a rapid and efficient screening method using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and saturation transfer difference-nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) spectroscopy to yield information regarding the residues involved in nucleotide binding to amino acid-coated supports. The aim of this work was to explore the use of these spectroscopic techniques to study amino acid-nucleotide interactions in order to improve the binding specificity of the amino acid ligands used to purify plasmid DNA. For SPR, we present a strategy that immobilizes arginine and lysine on a surface as model supports, and we analyze binding responses when synthetic homo-deoxyoligonucleotides are injected over the amino acid surface. The binding responses are detectable and reproducible despite the small size of the immobilized amino acids. Using STD-NMR, we performed epitope mapping of homo-deoxyoligonucleotides bound to L-arginine-bisoxyran-Sepharose and L-lysine-Sepharose supports. Polynucleotide binding preferences differed; for example, polyC interacted preferentially through its backbone with the two supports, whereas polyT bound the supports through its thymine moiety. STD-NMR combined with SPR measurements was successfully used to screen amino acid-nucleotide interactions and determine the binding affinities of the complexes.

  4. 2D segmentation of intervertebral discs and its degree of degeneration from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, José Maria; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-03-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a disorder suffered by a large population around the world. A key factor causing this illness is Intervertebral Disc (IVD) degeneration, whose early diagnosis could help in preventing this widespread condition. Clinicians base their diagnosis on visual inspection of 2D slices of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, which is subject to large interobserver variability. In this work, an automatic classification method is presented, which provides the Pfirrmann degree of degeneration from a mid-sagittal MR slice. The proposed method utilizes Active Contour Models, with a new geometrical energy, to achieve an initial segmentation, which is further improved using fuzzy C-means. Then, IVDs are classified according to their degree of degeneration. This classification is attained by employing Adaboost on five specific features: the mean and the variance of the probability map of the nucleus using two different approaches and the eccentricity of the fitting ellipse to the contour of the IVD. The classification method was evaluated using a cohort of 150 intervertebral discs assessed by three experts, resulting in a mean specificity (93%) and sensitivity (83%) similar to the one provided by every expert with respect to the most voted value. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Index (DSI) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the point-to-contour distance. The mean DSI ± 2 standard deviation was 91:7% ±5:6%, the mean RMSE was 0:82mm and the 95 percentile was 1:36mm. These results were found accurate when compared to the state-of-the-art.

  5. Relationship between Gleason score and apparent diffusion coefficients of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byung Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Jeon, Seong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and pathological Gleason score (GS) of prostate cancer patients. Methods A total of 125 patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging before radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were included in this study. ADC values were compared with different GS. We used receiver operating characteristic analysis and determined the ADC cutoff value to differentiate tumours with a GS of 6 from those with a GS ≥7. Results We identified 34 patients (27.2%) with a GS of 6; 33 patients (26.4%) with a GS of 7; 22 patients (17.6%) with a GS of 8; and 36 patients (28.8%) with a GS of ≥9. The mean ADC value for disease with a GS of 6 was 0.914 ± 0.161 ×10−3 mm2/s; GS of 7: 0.741 ± 0.164 ×10−3 mm2/s; GS of 8: 0.679 ± 0.130 ×10−3 mm2/s; and GS of ≥9: 0.593 ± 0.089 ×10−3 mm2/s. An ADC value of 0.830 ×10−3mm2/s was the best cutoff value to identify prostate cancer with a GS of 6. Conclusions We observed an inverse relationship between GS and ADC value. Moreover, a cutoff ADC value may help differentiate disease with a GS of 6 from disease with a GS ≥7. PMID:28096922

  6. Alternate design concept for the SSC dipole magnet cryogenic support post

    SciTech Connect

    Lipski, A.; Nicol, T.H.; Richardson, R.

    1991-03-01

    New materials and developments in the field of advanced composites have created the opportunity to take a fresh look into the design of the cryogenic supports for SSC collider dipole cryostats. Although the present reentrant post design meets the structural and thermal requirements, its assembly requires precision and proficiency. The objective of the proposed alternate concept is to reduce the overall cost of the support post by means of simplifying and optimizing its component design and assembly process. The present shrink fitted tube assembly may potentially be replaced by injection molded parts. New resin systems with lower thermal conductivity and high strength properties enable the utilization of automated production techniques such as injection molding and filament winding. This paper will provide analysis and design information for the alternate support post concept and compare its test performance and cost to the present support post. 3 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homaifar, Abdollah (Editor); Kelly, John C., Jr. (Editor); Flowers, G. T.; Xie, H.; Sinha, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  8. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.; Xie, Huajun; Sinha, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  9. On the equilibrium of a cylindrical plasma supported horizontally by magnetic fields in uniform gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Low, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical equilibrium of a cylinder of plasma suspended horizontally by magnetic fields in uniform gravity is examined. A set of exact solutions describing the equilibrium is derived assuming the plasma distribution to be cylindrically symmetric to obtain an exact force balance between plasma pressure, the Lorentz pressure, and gravity in space. The set of solutions considers a case of uniform temperature and cases where the temperature rises from zero at the center of the plasma cylinder to reach a constant asymptotic value outside the cylinder.

  10. Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Predicting Sensitivity to Chemoradiotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Koga, Fumitaka; Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Ishii, Chikako; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hajime; Komai, Yoshinobu; Saito, Kazutaka; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In chemoradiation (CRT)-based bladder-sparing approaches for muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), patients who respond favorably to induction CRT enjoy the benefits of bladder preservation, whereas nonresponders do not. Thus, accurate prediction of CRT sensitivity would optimize patient selection for bladder-sparing protocols. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is a functional imaging technique that quantifies the diffusion of water molecules in a noninvasive manner. We investigated whether DW-MRI predicts CRT sensitivity of MIBC. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 23 MIBC patients (cT2/T3 = 7/16) who underwent induction CRT consisting of radiotherapy to the small pelvis (40 Gy) with two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/day for 5 days), followed by partial or radical cystectomy. All patients underwent DW-MRI before the initiation of treatment. Associations of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with CRT sensitivity were analyzed. The proliferative potential of MIBC was also assessed by analyzing the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in pretherapeutic biopsy specimens. Results: Thirteen patients (57%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR) to CRT. These CRT-sensitive MIBCs showed significantly lower ADC values (median, 0.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.43-0.77) than CRT-resistant (no pCR) MIBCs (median, 0.84 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.69-1.09; p = 0.0003). Multivariate analysis identified ADC value as the only significant and independent predictor of CRT sensitivity (p < 0.0001; odds ratio per 0.001 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s increase, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08). With a cutoff ADC value at 0.74 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, sensitivity/specificity/accuracy in predicting CRT sensitivity was 92/90/91%. Ki-67 LI was significantly higher in CRT-sensitive MIBCs (p = 0.0005) and significantly and inversely correlated with ADC values ({rho} = -0.67, p = 0

  11. Effect of body temperature on the pattern of spontaneous breathing in extremely low birth weight infants supported by proportional assist ventilation.

    PubMed

    Rieger-Fackeldey, Esther; Schaller-Bals, Susanne; Schulze, Andreas

    2003-09-01

    The optimum body temperature for infants <1000 g is unknown. We investigated body temperature effects on spontaneous breathing using proportional assist ventilation (PAV), because this mode supports spontaneous breathing such that all breathing pattern variables remain controlled by the infant. Minute volume (MV), respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (Vt), incidence and duration of respiratory pauses, arterial oxygen desaturations <85%, and arterial Pco2 levels will remain unaffected by targeting core body temperature to 36.1-36.5 degrees C (low normal range) versus 37.7-37.9 degrees C (upper normal). Twenty infants (mean +/- SD: birth weight, 696 +/- 155 g; gestational age, 25 +/- 1 wk; age, 5 +/- 3 d) who were supported by PAV were exposed to each target temperature range on 2 consecutive days in four 2-h intervals for a total of 8 h with the sequence of the temperature ranges randomized. Core body temperature was 36.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C and 37.9 +/- 0.2 degrees C in the two conditions. MV was 291 and 314 mL. min-1. kg-1, respectively (7% difference; p < 0.001) as a result of a difference in RR (8%; p < 0.001). The infants maintained their blood CO2 levels and Vt (5.25 +/- 0.6 versus 5.19 +/- 0.6 mL/kg). Incidence and duration of respiratory pauses were not different between conditions. Extremely immature infants who are supported by PAV modify their spontaneous breathing in response to changes in thermal environment such that Pco2 levels are appropriately maintained early in postnatal life. This response pattern occurred consistently and is currently of uncertain clinical significance.

  12. Community-wide Validation of Geospace Model Ground Magnetic Field Perturbation Predictions to Support Model Transition to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M.; Singer, H.; Balch, C.; Weimer, D.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.; Gombosi, T.; Wiltberger, M.; Raeder, J.; Weigel, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we continue the community-wide rigorous modern space weather model validation efforts carried out within GEM, CEDAR and SHINE programs. In this particular effort, in coordination among the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), modelers, and science community, we focus on studying the models' capability to reproduce observed ground magnetic field fluctuations, which are closely related to geomagnetically induced current phenomenon. One of the primary motivations of the work is to support NOAA SWPC in their selection of the next numerical model that will be transitioned into operations. Six geomagnetic events and 12 geomagnetic observatories were selected for validation.While modeled and observed magnetic field time series are available for all 12 stations, the primary metrics analysis is based on six stations that were selected to represent the high-latitude and mid-latitude locations. Events-based analysis and the corresponding contingency tables were built for each event and each station. The elements in the contingency table were then used to calculate Probability of Detection (POD), Probability of False Detection (POFD) and Heidke Skill Score (HSS) for rigorous quantification of the models' performance. In this paper the summary results of the metrics analyses are reported in terms of POD, POFD and HSS. More detailed analyses can be carried out using the event by event contingency tables provided as an online appendix. An online interface built at CCMC and described in the supporting information is also available for more detailed time series analyses.

  13. Palladium was supported on superparamagnetic nanoparticles: A magnetically recoverable catalyst for Heck reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fengwei; Niu, Jianrui; Wang, Haibo; Yang, Honglei; Jin, Jun; Liu, Na; Zhang, Yubin; Li, Rong; Ma, Jiantai

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Palladium-based heterogeneous catalyst was prepared facilely via the co-precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particles are nearly spherical in shape with an average size of 20 {+-} 1.0 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed magnetic catalyst showed high activity for Heck reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst was easily recovered from the reaction mixture with external magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalytic efficiency for Heck reaction remains unaltered even after 6 repeated cycles. -- Abstract: A novel and high-performance palladium-based catalyst for Heck reaction was prepared easily by the co-precipitation method. The catalyst was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The catalyst afforded a fast conversion of the 4-bromonitrobenzene to 4-nitrostilbene at a catalyst loading of 5 mol%, and the efficiency of the catalyst remains unaltered even after 6 repeated cycles. The excellent catalytic performance of the Pd/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalyst might be attributed to the enhanced synergistic effect between Pd nanoparticles and magnetite.

  14. Fast magnetic reconnection supported by sporadic small-scale Petschek-type shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Shibayama, Takuya Nakabou, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Vekstein, Grigory

    2015-10-15

    Standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory predicts reconnection rate that is far too slow to account for a wide variety of reconnection events observed in space and laboratory plasmas. Therefore, it was commonly accepted that some non-MHD (kinetic) effects play a crucial role in fast reconnection. A recently renewed interest in simple MHD models is associated with the so-called plasmoid instability of reconnecting current sheets. Although it is now evident that this effect can significantly enhance the rate of reconnection, many details of the underlying multiple-plasmoid process still remain controversial. Here, we report results of a high-resolution computer simulation which demonstrate that fast albeit intermittent magnetic reconnection is sustained by numerous small-scale Petschek-type shocks spontaneously formed in the current sheet due to its plasmoid instability.

  15. Magnetic Dirac fermions and Chern insulator supported on pristine silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Huixia; Liu, Zheng; Lian, Chao; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hui; Sun, Jia-Tao; Meng, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Emergence of ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic semiconductors is strongly desirable, especially in topological materials because of the possibility of achieving the quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose that for Si thin film grown on metal substrate, the pristine Si(111)-√{3 }×√{3 } surface with a spontaneous weak reconstruction has a strong tendency toward ferromagnetism and nontrivial topological properties, characterized by spin-polarized Dirac-fermion surface states. In contrast to conventional routes relying on introduction of alien charge carriers or specially patterned substrates, the spontaneous magnetic order and spin-orbit coupling on the pristine silicon surface together give rise to the quantized anomalous Hall effect with a finite Chern number C =-1 . This work suggests opportunities in silicon-based spintronics and quantum computing free from alien dopants or proximity effects.

  16. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    SciTech Connect

    Testylier, Guy . E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana; Montigon, Olivier; Foquin, Annie; Delacour, Claire; Bernabe, Denis; Segebarth, Christoph; Dorandeu, Frederic; Carpentier, Pierre

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

  17. Evaluating Mesorectal Lymph Nodes in Rectal Cancer Before and After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Using Thin-Section T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Dow-Mu Chau, Ian; Tait, Diana; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Brown, Gina

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To apply thin-section T2-weighted magnetic resoance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the number, size, distribution, and morphology of benign and malignant mesorectal lymph nodes before and after chemoradiation treatment compared with histopathologic findings. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with poor-risk adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation were evaluated prospectively. Thin-section T2-weighted MR images obtained before and after chemoradiation treatment were independently reviewed in consensus by 2 expert radiologists to determine the tumor stage, nodal size, nodal distribution, and nodal stage. Total mesorectal excision surgery after chemoradiation allowed MR nodal stage to be compared with histopathology using {kappa} statistics. Nodal downstaging was compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Before chemoradiation, 152 mesorectal nodes were visible (mean, 6.2 mm; 100 benign, 52 malignant) and 4 of 52 malignant nodes were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. The nodal staging was 7/25 N0, 10/25 N1, and 7/25 N2. After chemoradiation, only 29 nodes (mean, 4.1 mm; 24 benign, 5 malignant) were visible, and none were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. Nodal downstaging was observed: 20/25 N0 and 5/25 N1 (p < 0.01, Chi-square test). There was good agreement between MRI and pathologic T-staging ({kappa} = 0.64) and N-staging ({kappa} = 0.65) after chemoradiation. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation treatment resulted in a decrease in size and number of malignant- and benign-appearing mesorectal nodes on MRI. Nodal downstaging and nodal regression from the mesorectal fascia were observed after treatment. MRI is a useful tool for assessing nodal response to neoadjuvant treatment.

  18. Comparison of [{sup 11}C]choline Positron Emission Tomography With T2- and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Delineating Malignant Intraprostatic Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Davis, Ian D.; Lee, Sze Ting; Hiew, Chee-Yan; Esler, Stephen; Gong, Sylvia J.; Wada, Morikatsu; Clouston, David; O'Sullivan, Richard; Goh, Yin P.; Bolton, Damien; Scott, Andrew M.; Khoo, Vincent

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography (CHOL-PET) with that of the combination of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (T2W/DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for delineating malignant intraprostatic lesions (IPLs) for guiding focal therapies and to investigate factors predicting the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Methods and Materials: This study included 21 patients who underwent CHOL-PET and T2W/DW MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. Two observers manually delineated IPL contours for each scan, and automatic IPL contours were generated on CHOL-PET based on varying proportions of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV). IPLs identified on prostatectomy specimens defined reference standard contours. The imaging-based contours were compared with the reference standard contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and sensitivity and specificity values. Factors that could potentially predict the DSC of the best contouring method were analyzed using linear models. Results: The best automatic contouring method, 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV{sub 60}) , had similar correlations (DSC: 0.59) with the manual PET contours (DSC: 0.52, P=.127) and significantly better correlations than the manual MRI contours (DSC: 0.37, P<.001). The sensitivity and specificity values were 72% and 71% for SUV{sub 60}; 53% and 86% for PET manual contouring; and 28% and 92% for MRI manual contouring. The tumor volume and transition zone pattern could independently predict the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Conclusions: CHOL-PET is superior to the combination of T2W/DW MRI for delineating IPLs. The accuracy of CHOL-PET is insufficient for gland-sparing focal therapies but may be accurate enough for focal boost therapies. The transition zone pattern is a new classification that may predict how well CHOL-PET delineates IPLs.

  19. Demonstration of Non-Gaussian Restricted Diffusion in Tumor Cells Using Diffusion Time-Dependent Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Tuva R.; White, Nathan S.; Kuperman, Joshua; Chao, Ying; Yamin, Ghiam; Bartch, Hauke; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca; Bussell, Robert; Nomura, Natsuko; Kesari, Santosh; Bjørnerud, Atle; Dale, Anders M.

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) technique enables quantification of water mobility for probing microstructural properties of biological tissue and has become an effective tool for collecting information about the underlying pathology of cancerous tissue. Measurements using multiple b-values have indicated biexponential signal attenuation, ascribed to “fast” (high ADC) and “slow” (low ADC) diffusion components. In this empirical study, we investigate the properties of the diffusion time (Δ)-dependent components of the diffusion-weighted (DW) signal in a constant b-value experiment. A xenograft gliobastoma mouse was imaged using Δ = 11 ms, 20 ms, 40 ms, 60 ms, and b = 500–4000 s/mm2 in intervals of 500 s/mm2. Data were corrected for EPI distortions, and the Δ-dependence on the DW-signal was measured within three regions of interest [intermediate- and high-density tumor regions and normal-appearing brain (NAB) tissue regions]. In this study, we verify the assumption that the slow decaying component of the DW-signal is non-Gaussian and dependent on Δ, consistent with restricted diffusion of the intracellular space. As the DW-signal is a function of Δ and is specific to restricted diffusion, manipulating Δ at constant b-value (cb) provides a complementary and direct approach for separating the restricted from the hindered diffusion component. We found that Δ-dependence is specific to the tumor tissue signal. Based on an extended biexponential model, we verified the interpretation of the diffusion time-dependent contrast and successfully estimated the intracellular restricted ADC, signal volume fraction, and cell size within each ROI. PMID:27532028

  20. Improvement of gait ability with a short-term intensive gait rehabilitation program using body weight support treadmill training in community dwelling chronic poststroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Naoki; Iizuka, Noboru; Saitou, Hideyuki; Tamaoka, Akira; Yanagi, Hisako

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Most previous studies have shown that body weight support treadmill training (BWSTT) can improve gait speed poststroke patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of a short-term intensive program using BWSTT among community dwelling poststroke survivors. [Subjects] Eighteen subjects participated in this study. The treatment group was composed of 10 subjects (2 women; 8 men; mean age, 59.1 ± 12.5 years; time since stroke onset, 35.3 ± 33.2 months), whereas the control group was made up of 8 subjects (3 women; 5 men; mean age, 59.8 ± 6.3 years; time since stroke onset, 39.3 ± 27.3 months). [Methods] The treatment group received BWSTT 3 times a week for 4 weeks (a total of 12 times), with each session lasting 20 minutes. The main outcome measures were maximum gait speed on a flat floor, cadence, and step length. [Results] No differences were observed in the baseline clinical data between the 2 groups. The gait speed in the treatment group was significantly improved compared with that in the control by 2-way ANOVA, while the other parameters showed no significant interaction. [Conclusion] These results suggested that short-term intensive gait rehabilitation using BWSTT was useful for improving gait ability among community dwelling poststroke subjects. PMID:25642063

  1. Methods for a Randomized Trial of Weight-Supported Treadmill Training versus Conventional Training for Walking during Inpatient Rehabilitation after Incomplete Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Apple, David; Barbeau, Hugues; Basso, Michele; Behrman, Andrea; Deforge, Dan; Ditunno, John; Dudley, Gary; Elashoff, Robert; Fugate, Lisa; Harkema, Susan; Saulino, Michael; Scott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the rationale and methodology for the first prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a task-oriented walking intervention for subjects during early rehabilitation for an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). The experimental strategy, body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT), allows physical therapists to systematically train patients to walk on a treadmill at increasing speeds typical of community ambulation with increasing weight bearing. The therapists provide verbal and tactile cues to facilitate the kinematic, kinetic, and temporal features of walking. Subjects were randomly assigned to a conventional therapy program for mobility versus the same intensity and duration of a combination of BWSTT and over-ground locomotor retraining. Subjects had an incomplete SCI (American Spinal Injury Association grades B, C, and D) from C-4 to T-10 (upper motoneuron group) or from T-11 to L-3 (lower motoneuron group). Within 8 weeks of a SCI, 146 subjects were entered for 12 weeks of intervention. The 2 single-blinded primary outcome measures are the level of independence for ambulation and, for those who are able to walk, the maximal speed for walking 50 feet, tested 6 and 12 months after randomization. The trial’s methodology offers a model for the feasibility of translating neuroscientific experiments into a RCT to develop evidence-based rehabilitation practices. PMID:14503436

  2. [The influence of locomotor treatment using robotic body-weight-supported treadmill training on rehabilitation outcome of patients suffering from neurological disorders].

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Isabella; Meiner, Zeev

    2013-03-01

    Regaining one's ability to walk is of great importance for neurological patients and is a major goal of all rehabilitation programs. Treating neurological patients in the acute phase after the event is technically difficult because of their motor weakness and balance disturbances. Based on studies in spinalized animals, a novel locomotor training that incorporates high repetitions of task-oriented practice by the use of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) was developed to overcome these obstacles. The use of BWSTT enables early initiation of gait training, integration of weightbearing activities, stepping and balance by the use of a task-specific approach, and a symmetrical gait pattern. However, despite the theoretical potential of BWSTT to become an invaluable therapeutic tool, its effect on walking outcomes was disappointing when compared with conventional training of the same duration. To facilitate the deLivery of BWSTT, a motorized robotic driven gait orthosis (RBWSTT) was recently developed. It has many advantages over the conventional method, including less effort for the physiotherapists, longer session duration, more physiological and reproducible gait patterns, and the possibility of measuring a patient's performances. Several studies have been conducted using RBWSTT in patients after stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases. Although some of the results were encouraging, there is still uncertainty regarding proper patient selection, timing and protocol for RBWTT treatment following neurological diseases. More large randomized controlled studies are needed in order to answer these questions.

  3. A Combination of Geographically Weighted Regression, Particle Swarm Optimization and Support Vector Machine for Landslide Susceptibility Mapping: A Case Study at Wanzhou in the Three Gorges Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xianyu; Wang, Yi; Niu, Ruiqing; Hu, Youjian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel coupling model for landslide susceptibility mapping is presented. In practice, environmental factors may have different impacts at a local scale in study areas. To provide better predictions, a geographically weighted regression (GWR) technique is firstly used in our method to segment study areas into a series of prediction regions with appropriate sizes. Meanwhile, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is exploited in each prediction region for landslide susceptibility mapping. To further improve the prediction performance, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is used in the prediction regions to obtain optimal parameters for the SVM classifier. To evaluate the prediction performance of our model, several SVM-based prediction models are utilized for comparison on a study area of the Wanzhou district in the Three Gorges Reservoir. Experimental results, based on three objective quantitative measures and visual qualitative evaluation, indicate that our model can achieve better prediction accuracies and is more effective for landslide susceptibility mapping. For instance, our model can achieve an overall prediction accuracy of 91.10%, which is 7.8%–19.1% higher than the traditional SVM-based models. In addition, the obtained landslide susceptibility map by our model can demonstrate an intensive correlation between the classified very high-susceptibility zone and the previously investigated landslides. PMID:27187430

  4. A Combination of Geographically Weighted Regression, Particle Swarm Optimization and Support Vector Machine for Landslide Susceptibility Mapping: A Case Study at Wanzhou in the Three Gorges Area, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianyu; Wang, Yi; Niu, Ruiqing; Hu, Youjian

    2016-05-11

    In this study, a novel coupling model for landslide susceptibility mapping is presented. In practice, environmental factors may have different impacts at a local scale in study areas. To provide better predictions, a geographically weighted regression (GWR) technique is firstly used in our method to segment study areas into a series of prediction regions with appropriate sizes. Meanwhile, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is exploited in each prediction region for landslide susceptibility mapping. To further improve the prediction performance, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is used in the prediction regions to obtain optimal parameters for the SVM classifier. To evaluate the prediction performance of our model, several SVM-based prediction models are utilized for comparison on a study area of the Wanzhou district in the Three Gorges Reservoir. Experimental results, based on three objective quantitative measures and visual qualitative evaluation, indicate that our model can achieve better prediction accuracies and is more effective for landslide susceptibility mapping. For instance, our model can achieve an overall prediction accuracy of 91.10%, which is 7.8%-19.1% higher than the traditional SVM-based models. In addition, the obtained landslide susceptibility map by our model can demonstrate an intensive correlation between the classified very high-susceptibility zone and the previously investigated landslides.

  5. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  6. Parallel mesh support for particle-in-cell methods in magnetic fusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Eisung; Shephard, Mark S.; Seol, E. Seegyoung; Kalyanaraman, Kaushik; Ibanez, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    As supercomputing power continues to increase Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are being widely adopted for transport simulations of magnetic fusion devices. Current implementations place a copy of the entire continuum mesh and its fields used in the PIC calculations on every node. This is in general not a scalable solution as computational power continues to grow faster than node level memory. To address this scalability issue, while still maintaining sufficient mesh per node to control costly inter-node communication, a new unstructured mesh distribution methods and associated mesh based PIC calculation procedure is being developed building on the parallel unstructured mesh infrastructure (PUMI). Key components to be outlined in the presentation include (i) the mesh distribution strategy, (ii) how the particles are tracked during a push cycle taking advantage of the unstructured mesh adjacency structures and searches based on that structure, and (iii) how the field solve steps and particle migration are controlled. Performance comparisons to the current approach will also be presented.

  7. A dynamically collapsing core and a precursor of a core in a filament supported by turbulent and magnetic pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Shinnaga, Hiroko E-mail: kitamura@isas.jaxa.jp

    2014-10-01

    To study physical properties of the natal filament gas around the cloud core harboring an exceptionally young low-mass protostar GF 9-2, we carried out J = 1-0 line observations of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O molecules using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The mapping area covers ∼ one-fifth of the whole filament. Our {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O maps clearly demonstrate that the core formed at the local density maxima of the filament, and the internal motions of the filament gas are totally governed by turbulence with Mach number of ∼2. We estimated the scale height of the filament to be H = 0.3-0.7 pc, yielding the central density of n {sub c} = 800-4200 cm{sup –3}. Our analysis adopting an isothermal cylinder model shows that the filament is supported by the turbulent and magnetic pressures against the radial and axial collapse due to self-gravity. Since both the dissipation timescales of the turbulence and the transverse magnetic fields can be comparable to the free-fall time of the filament gas of 10{sup 6} yr, we conclude that the local decay of the supersonic turbulence and magnetic fields made the filament gas locally unstable, hence making the core collapse. Furthermore, we newly detected a gas condensation with velocity width enhancement to ∼0.3 pc southwest of the GF 9-2 core. The condensation has a radius of ∼0.15 pc and an LTE mass of ∼5 M {sub ☉}. Its internal motion is turbulent with Mach number of ∼3, suggesting a gravitationally unbound state. Considering the uncertainties in our estimates, however, we propose that the condensation is a precursor of a cloud core, which would have been produced by the collision of the two gas components identified in the filament.

  8. Weight Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weight share What It Takes to Lose Weight: Calorie Basics When you’re trying to lose weight... ... wcdapps.hhs.gov/Badges/Handlers/Badge.ashx?js=0&widgetname=betobaccofreew200short</NOFRAMES& ...

  9. Predicting Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome Following Superficial Temporal Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass based on Intraoperative Perfusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Defeng; Zhu, Fengping; Fung, Ka Ming; Zhu, Wei; Luo, Yishan; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Mok, Vincent Chung Tong; Wu, Jinsong; Shi, Lin; Ahuja, Anil T; Mao, Ying

    2015-09-14

    Moyamoya disease leads to the formation of stenosis in the cerebrovasculature. A superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass is an effective treatment for the disease, yet it is usually associated with postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS). This study aimed to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes immediately after surgery and assess whether a semiquantitative analysis of an intraoperative magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted image (PWI) is useful for predicting postoperative CHS. Fourteen patients who underwent the STA-MCA bypass surgery were included in this study. An atlas-based registration method was employed for studying hemodynamics in different cerebral regions. Pre- versus intraoperative and group-wise comparisons were conducted to evaluate the hemodynamic changes. A postoperative increase in relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the terminal MCA territory (P = 0.035) and drop in relative mean-time-transit at the central MCA territory (P = 0.012) were observed in all patients. However, a significant raise in the increasing ratio of relative-CBF at the terminal MCA territory was only found in CHS patients (P = 0.023). The cerebrovascular changes of the patients after revascularization treatment were confirmed. Intraoperative PWI might be helpful in predicting the change in relative-CBF at MCA terminal territory which might indicate a risk of CHS.

  10. A review of technical aspects of T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, M; Bonzano, L; Levrero, F; Mancardi, G L; Roccatagliata, L

    2014-09-01

    In the last few years, several imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, have been used to investigate the degree of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in patients with neurological diseases including multiple sclerosis, ischemic stroke, and brain tumors. One promising MRI method for assessing the BBB permeability of patients with neurological diseases in vivo is T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Here we review the technical issues involved in DCE-MRI in the study of human brain tumors. In the first part of this paper, theoretical models for the DCE-MRI analysis will be described, including the Toft-Kety models, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model and the two-compartment exchange model. These models can be used to estimate important kinetic parameters related to BBB permeability. In the second part of this paper, details of the data acquisition, issues related to the arterial input function, and procedures for DCE-MRI image analysis are illustrated.

  11. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  12. High Speed, High Temperature, Fault Tolerant Operation of a Combination Magnetic-Hydrostatic Bearing Rotor Support System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark; Montague, Gerald; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Closed loop operation of a single, high temperature magnetic radial bearing to 30,000 RPM (2.25 million DN) and 540 C (1000 F) is discussed. Also, high temperature, fault tolerant operation for the three axis system is examined. A novel, hydrostatic backup bearing system was employed to attain high speed, high temperature, lubrication free support of the entire rotor system. The hydrostatic bearings were made of a high lubricity material and acted as journal-type backup bearings. New, high temperature displacement sensors were successfully employed to monitor shaft position throughout the entire temperature range and are described in this paper. Control of the system was accomplished through a stand alone, high speed computer controller and it was used to run both the fault-tolerant PID and active vibration control algorithms.

  13. Repaired tetralogy of Fallot: the roles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in evaluating pathophysiology and for pulmonary valve replacement decision support

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Surgical management of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) results in anatomic and functional abnormalities in the majority of patients. Although right ventricular volume load due to severe pulmonary regurgitation can be tolerated for many years, there is now evidence that the compensatory mechanisms of the right ventricular myocardium ultimately fail and that if the volume load is not eliminated or reduced by pulmonary valve replacement the dysfunction might be irreversible. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has evolved during the last 2 decades as the reference standard imaging modality to assess the anatomic and functional sequelae in patients with repaired TOF. This article reviews the pathophysiology of chronic right ventricular volume load after TOF repair and the risks and benefits of pulmonary valve replacement. The CMR techniques used to comprehensively evaluate the patient with repaired TOF are reviewed and the role of CMR in supporting clinical decisions regarding pulmonary valve replacement is discussed. PMID:21251297

  14. The immobilisation of chiral organocatalysts on magnetic nanoparticles: the support particle cannot always be considered inert.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Oliver; Davies, Gemma-Louise; Peschiulli, Aldo; Tekoriute, Renata; Gun'ko, Yurii K; Connon, Stephen J

    2011-10-26

    A systematic study concerning the immobilisation onto magnetic nanoparticles of three useful classes of chiral organocatalyst which rely on a confluence of weak, easily perturbed van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions to promote enantioselective reactions has been undertaken for the first time. The catalysts were evaluated in three different synthetically useful reaction classes: the kinetic resolution of sec-alcohols, the conjugate addition of dimethyl malonate to a nitroolefin and the desymmetrisation of meso anhydrides. A chiral bifunctional 4-N,N-dialkylaminopyridine derivative could be readily immobilised; the resulting heterogeneous catalyst is highly active and is capable of promoting the kinetic resolution of sec-alcohols with synthetically useful selectivity under process-scale friendly conditions and has been demonstrated to be reusable in a minimum of 32 consecutive cycles. The immobilisation of a cinchona alkaloid-derived urea-substituted catalyst proved considerably less successful in terms of both catalyst stability and product levels of enantiomeric excess. An immobilised cinchona alkaloid-derived sulfonamide catalyst was also prepared, with mixed results: the catalyst exhibits outstanding recyclability on a par with that associated with the successful N,N-dialkylaminopyridine analogue, however product enantiomeric excess is consistently lower than that obtained using the corresponding homogeneous catalyst. While no physical deterioration of the heterogeneous catalysts was detected on analysis after multiple recycles, in the cases of both the conjugate addition to nitroolefins and the desymmetrisation of meso anhydrides, significant levels of background catalysis by the nanoparticles in the absence of the organocatalyst was detected, which explains in part the poor performance of the immobilised organocatalysts in these reactions from a stereoselectivity standpoint. It seems clear that the immobilisation of sensitive chiral organocatalysts

  15. A Comprehensive C++ Controller for a Magnetically Supported Vertical Rotor. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    This manual describes the new FATMaCC (Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Control Code). The FATMaCC (pronounced "fat mak") is a versatile control code that possesses many desirable features that were not available in previous in-house controllers. The ultimate goal in designing this code was to achieve full rotor levitation and control at a loop time of 50 microsec. Using a 1-GHz processor, the code will control a five-axis system in either a decentralized or a more elegant centralized (modal control) mode at a loop time of 56 microsec. In addition, it will levitate and control (with only minor modification to the input/output wiring) a two-axis and/or a four-axis system. Stable rotor levitation and control of any of the systems mentioned above are accomplished through appropriate key presses to modify parameters, such as stiffness, damping, and bias. A signal generation block provides 11 excitation signals. An excitation signal is then superimposed on the radial bearing x- and y-control signals, thus producing a resultant force vector. By modulating the signals on the bearing x- and y-axes with a cosine and a sine function, respectively, a radial excitation force vector is made to rotate 360 deg. about the bearing geometric center. The rotation of the force vector is achieved manually by using key press or automatically by engaging the "one-per-revolution" feature. Rotor rigid body modes can be excited by using the excitation module. Depending on the polarities of the excitation signal in each radial bearing, the bounce or tilt mode will be excited.

  16. Maternal social support and neighborhood income inequality as predictors of low birth weight and preterm birth outcome disparities: analysis of South Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System survey, 2000-2003.

    PubMed

    Nkansah-Amankra, Stephen; Dhawain, Ashish; Hussey, James Robert; Luchok, Kathryn J

    2010-09-01

    Effects of income inequality on health and other social systems have been a subject of considerable debate, but only a few studies have used multilevel models to evaluate these relationships. The main objectives of the study were to (1) Evaluate the relationships among neighborhood income inequality, social support and birth outcomes (low birth weight, and preterm delivery) and (2) Assess variations in racial disparities in birth outcomes across neighborhood contexts of income distribution and maternal social support. We evaluated these relationships by using South Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey for 2000-2003 geocoded to 2000 US Census data for South Carolina. Multilevel analysis was used to simultaneously evaluate the association between income inequality (measured as Gini), maternal social relationships and birth outcomes (low birth weight and preterm delivery). The results showed residence in neighborhoods with medium levels of income inequality was independently associated with low birth weight (OR: 2.00; 95% CI 1.14-3.26), but not preterm birth; low social support was an independent risk for low birth weight or preterm births. The evidence suggests that non-Hispanic black mothers were at increased risks of low birth weight or preterm birth primarily due to greater exposures of neighborhood deprivations associated with low income and reduced social support and modified by unequal income distribution.

  17. Bi-directional-bi-dimensionality alignment of self-supporting Mn3O4 nanorod and nanotube arrays with different bacteriostasis and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Wei, Chengzhen; Gao, Feng; Pang, Huan; Lu, Qingyi

    2013-11-01

    Self-supported Mn3O4 patterns of aligned nanorods and nanotubes were synthesized through a bi-directional-bi-dimensionality growth model by using sodium gluconate and urea as additives under mild hydrothermal conditions without the use of any substrates. In one direction, Mn3O4 grows to form one-dimensional nanorods or nanotubes, while in the other direction Mn3O4 grows into two-dimensional nanoplates to support the nanorods or nanotubes to align into arrays. These two kinds of new nanostructures, a nanotube pattern and a nanorod pattern, show similar and good bacteriostasis for Gram positive bacteria, but for Gram negative bacteria the nanotube pattern shows much better bacterial restraint than the nanorod pattern. Magnetic studies show that the nanorod arrays display similar magnetic properties to the commercial Mn3O4, while the nanotube arrays show different ferromagnetic behaviors with enhanced remnant magnetization and saturation magnetization (Ms) at low temperature.Self-supported Mn3O4 patterns of aligned nanorods and nanotubes were synthesized through a bi-directional-bi-dimensionality growth model by using sodium gluconate and urea as additives under mild hydrothermal conditions without the use of any substrates. In one direction, Mn3O4 grows to form one-dimensional nanorods or nanotubes, while in the other direction Mn3O4 grows into two-dimensional nanoplates to support the nanorods or nanotubes to align into arrays. These two kinds of new nanostructures, a nanotube pattern and a nanorod pattern, show similar and good bacteriostasis for Gram positive bacteria, but for Gram negative bacteria the nanotube pattern shows much better bacterial restraint than the nanorod pattern. Magnetic studies show that the nanorod arrays display similar magnetic properties to the commercial Mn3O4, while the nanotube arrays show different ferromagnetic behaviors with enhanced remnant magnetization and saturation magnetization (Ms) at low temperature. Electronic supplementary

  18. Effect of high-speed treadmill training with a body weight support system in a sport acceleration program with female soccer players.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A Wayne; Eastman, Carie S; Feland, Jeffery Brent; Mitchell, Ulrike H; Mortensen, Bartley Brett; Eggett, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Maximum running speed and acceleration are essential components in many sports. The identification of specific training protocols to maximize sprint speed would be useful knowledge for coaches and players. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a high-speed treadmill (HST) with the use of a body weight support (BWS) system in a 6-week sport acceleration program (SAP) on female soccer athlete's 40-yard sprint time and maximal isometric knee flexor and extensor strength. Two treatment groups and one control group were created. Both treatment groups participated in a 12-session SAP. The first treatment group (n = 12) used a BWS system while running on a HST; the second group (n = 12) used a standard treadmill (ST) with no BWS system. The participants of the control group (n = 8), NT, did not participate in a sports acceleration program and did not alter their exercise routines outside of the study. An analysis of covariance was performed using baseline measures as the covariate. The 40-yard sprint times for both treatment groups were shown to improve significantly compared with the control group (p < 0.001). Isometric knee flexor strength showed a greater increase in the ST group (p = 0.026) than in the other 2 groups, whereas knee extensor strengths did not show significant differences between treatment groups and control group (p > 0.05). Participants in the ST group had a much higher rate (66%) of shin splints and foot pain throughout the study than those in the HST (8%) and NT (0%) groups. These results can help high school coaches and athletes determine the optimal treadmill training regime.

  19. Bayesian integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization potency assessment: a decision support system for quantitative weight of evidence and adaptive testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy; Strickland, Judy; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The presented Bayesian network Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS-3) for skin sensitization potency assessment is a decision support system for a risk assessor that provides quantitative weight of evidence, leading to a mechanistically interpretable potency hypothesis, and formulates adaptive testing strategy for a chemical. The system was constructed with an aim to improve precision and accuracy for predicting LLNA potency beyond ITS-2 (Jaworska et al., J Appl Toxicol 33(11):1353-1364, 2013) by improving representation of chemistry and biology. Among novel elements are corrections for bioavailability both in vivo and in vitro as well as consideration of the individual assays' applicability domains in the prediction process. In ITS-3 structure, three validated alternative assays, DPRA, KeratinoSens and h-CLAT, represent first three key events of the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization. The skin sensitization potency prediction is provided as a probability distribution over four potency classes. The probability distribution is converted to Bayes factors to: 1) remove prediction bias introduced by the training set potency distribution and 2) express uncertainty in a quantitative manner, allowing transparent and consistent criteria to accept a prediction. The novel ITS-3 database includes 207 chemicals with a full set of in vivo and in vitro data. The accuracy for predicting LLNA outcomes on the external test set (n = 60) was as follows: hazard (two classes)-100 %, GHS potency classification (three classes)-96 %, potency (four classes)-89 %. This work demonstrates that skin sensitization potency prediction based on data from three key events, and often less, is possible, reliable over broad chemical classes and ready for practical applications.

  20. The Effect of Body Weight Support Treadmill Training on Gait Recovery, Proximal Lower Limb Motor Pattern, and Balance in Patients with Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yu-Rong; Lo, Wai Leung; Lin, Qiang; Li, Le; Xiao, Xiang; Raghavan, Preeti; Huang, Dong-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Gait performance is an indicator of mobility impairment after stroke. This study evaluated changes in balance, lower extremity motor function, and spatiotemporal gait parameters after receiving body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and conventional overground walking training (CT) in patients with subacute stroke using 3D motion analysis. Setting. Inpatient department of rehabilitation medicine at a university-affiliated hospital. Participants. 24 subjects with unilateral hemiplegia in the subacute stage were randomized to the BWSTT (n = 12) and CT (n = 12) groups. Parameters were compared between the two groups. Data from twelve age matched healthy subjects were recorded as reference. Interventions. Patients received gait training with BWSTT or CT for an average of 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week, for 3 weeks. Main Outcome Measures. Balance was measured by the Brunel balance assessment. Lower extremity motor function was evaluated by the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale. Kinematic data were collected and analyzed using a gait capture system before and after the interventions. Results. Both groups improved on balance and lower extremity motor function measures (P < 0.05), with no significant difference between the two groups after intervention. However, kinematic data were significantly improved (P < 0.05) after BWSTT but not after CT. Maximum hip extension and flexion angles were significantly improved (P < 0.05) for the BWSTT group during the stance and swing phases compared to baseline. Conclusion. In subacute patients with stroke, BWSTT can lead to improved gait quality when compared with conventional gait training. Both methods can improve balance and motor function. PMID:26649295

  1. Dynamic Spin Rig Upgraded With a Five- Axis-Controlled Three-Magnetic-Bearing Support System With Forward Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Mehmed, Oral

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Dynamic Spin Rig is used for experimental evaluation of vibration analysis methods and dynamic characteristics for rotating systems. Measurements are made while rotors are spun and vibrated in a vacuum chamber. The rig has been upgraded with a new active magnetic bearing rotor support and excitation system. This design is expected to provide operational improvements over the existing rig. The rig will be able to be operated in either the old or new configuration. In the old configuration, two ball bearings support the vertical shaft of the rig, with the test article located between the bearings. Because the bearings operate in a vacuum, lubrication is limited to grease. This limits bearing life and speed. In addition, the old configuration employs two voice-coil electromagnetic shakers to apply oscillatory axial forces or transverse moments to the rotor shaft through a thrust bearing. The excitation amplitudes that can be imparted to the test article with this system are not adequate for components that are highly damped. It is expected that the new design will overcome these limitations.

  2. Texture-based characterization of pre- and post-operative T2-weighted magnetic resonance signals of the cervical spinal cord in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Klironomos, George; Gatzounis, George; Panayiotakis, George

    2009-10-01

    The utility of texture analysis regarding the provision of quantitative prognostic factors, potentially valuable to the prediction of the post-operative outcome of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients, is investigated. The clinical sample of the study comprised six subjects, who had undergone surgical therapeutic intervention for CSM. Following a specific imaging protocol, a pair of MR images of the cervical spine, corresponding to pre- and post-operative MR scans, was obtained for each of the patients. Accordingly, 12 sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were studied. Employing custom developed software, a Region Of Interest (ROI) within the spinal cord, corresponding to the region of the high-intensity CSM MR signal, was segmented on each image, according to the region growing method. Utilizing custom developed algorithms, the following sets of textural features were generated from the segmented ROIs: (i) gradient features, (ii) mean values of features from co-occurrence matrices (co-occurrence features) and (iii) range values of co-occurrence features. Utilizing each one of these sets of features, as well as the least-squares minimum distance and the quadratic classification algorithms, pattern recognition classification schemes were implemented for the discrimination between pre-operative and post-operative MR signals. Statistical analysis revealed the existence of statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between textural features generated from pre-operative and post-operative high-intensity MR signals. The classification accuracies accomplished ranged from 75% to 100%. Textural features, descriptive of relevant properties of the high-intensity MR signal in CSM, may be considered as quantitative information of potential value for the prediction of the post-operative outcome of CSM patients.

  3. Intravoxel incoherent motion model–based analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with 3 b-values for response assessment in locoregional therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mürtz, Petra; Penner, Arndt-Hendrik; Pfeiffer, Anne-Kristina; Sprinkart, Alois M; Pieper, Claus C; König, Roy; Block, Wolfgang; Schild, Hans H; Willinek, Winfried A; Kukuk, Guido M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate an intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model–based analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for assessing the response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to locoregional therapy. Patients and methods Respiratory-gated DWI (b=0, 50, and 800 s/mm2) was retrospectively analyzed in 25 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T before and 6 weeks following the first cycle of transarterial chemoembolization therapy, transarterial ethanol-lipiodol embolization therapy, and transarterial radioembolization therapy. In addition to the determination of apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC(0,800), an estimation of the diffusion coefficient, D′, and the perfusion fraction, f′, was performed by using a simplified IVIM approach. Parameters were analyzed voxel-wise. Tumor response was assessed in a central slice by using a region of interest (ROI) covering the whole tumor. HCCs were categorized into two groups, responders and nonresponders, according to tumor size changes on first and second follow ups (if available) and changes of contrast-enhanced region on the first follow up. Results In total, 31 HCCs were analyzed: 17 lesions were assigned to responders and 14 were to nonresponders. In responders, ADC(0,800) and D′ were increased after therapy by ~30% (P=0.00004) and ~42% (P=0.00001), respectively, whereas f′ was decreased by ~37% (P=0.00094). No significant changes were found in nonresponders. Responders and nonresponders were better differentiated by changes in D′ than by changes in ADC(0,800) (area under the curve =0.878 vs 0.819 or 0.714, respectively). Conclusion In patients with HCCs undergoing embolization therapy, diffusion changes were better reflected by D′ than by conventional ADC(0,800), which is influenced by counteracting perfusion changes as assessed by f′. PMID:27799790

  4. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Treatment Response Evaluation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yunseon; Jung, Sang Hoon; Paik, Seung Woon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Young Kon

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) as a response evaluation indicator for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria of this retrospective study were DW MRI acquisition within 1 month before and 3 to 5 months after RT. In total, 48 patients were enrolled. Two radiation oncologists measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Possible predictive factors, including alteration of the ADC value before and 3 to 5 month after RT, in relation to local progression-free survival (LPFS) were analyzed and compared. Results: Three months after RT, 6 patients (12.5%) showed a complete response, and 27 patients (56.3%) showed a partial response when evaluated using the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). The average ADC ± SD values were 1.21 ± 0.27 ( × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) before and 1.41 ± 0.36 ( × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) after RT (P<.001). The most significant prognostic factor related to LPFS was mRECIST (P<.001). The increment of ADC value (≥20%) was also a significant factor (P=.02), but RECIST (version 1.1; P=.11) was not. When RECIST was combined with the increment of ADC value (≥20%), the LPFS rates were significantly different between the groups (P=.004), and the area under the curve value (0.745) was comparable with that of mRECIST (0.765). Conclusions: ADC value change before and after RT in HCC was closely related to LPFS. ADC value and RECIST may substitute for mRECIST in patients who cannot receive contrast agents.

  5. Dynamics and stability of rigid rotors levitated by passive cylinder-magnet bearings and driven/supported axially by pointwise contact clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Søren B.; Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2013-12-01

    A stable rotor—supported laterally by passive magnetic bearings and longitudinally by magnetic forces and a clutch—loses suddenly its contact to the clutch and executes abruptly longitudinal movements away from its original equilibrium position as a result of small increases in angular velocity. Such an abrupt unstable behaviour and its reasons are thoroughly theoretically as well as experimentally investigated in this work. In this context, this paper gives theoretical as well as experimental contributions to the problem of two dimensional passive magnetic levitation and one dimensional pointwise contact stability dictated by mechanical-magnetic interaction. Load capacity and stiffness of passive multicylinder magnetic bearings (MCMB) are thoroughly investigated using two theoretical approaches followed by experimental validation. The contact dynamics between the clutch and the rotor supported by MCMB using several configurations of magnet distribution are described based on an accurate nonlinear model able to reliably reproduce the rotor-bearing dynamic behaviour. Such investigations lead to: (a) clear physical explanation about the reasons for the rotor's unstable behaviour, losing its contact to the clutch and (b) an accurate prediction of the threshold of stability based on the nonlinear rotor-bearing model, i.e. maximum angular velocity before the rotor misses its contact to the clutch as a function of rotor, bearing and clutch design parameters. passive cylinder-magnet bearings, imbalance ring with a screw, passive rotating cylinder-magnets, rotor, Pointwise contact clutch, and DC-motor. The rotor (4) is levitated in the two horseshoe-shaped bearing houses (1) which contain several cylinder-magnets arranged in a circular pattern. These permanent magnets form a magnetic field around the rotor which repels similar cylinder-magnets (3) embedded in the rotor, thereby counteracting the gravity forces. As the shape of the magnetic field generated by the

  6. Prizes for weight loss.

    PubMed Central

    Englberger, L.

    1999-01-01

    A programme of weight loss competitions and associated activities in Tonga, intended to combat obesity and the noncommunicable diseases linked to it, has popular support and the potential to effect significant improvements in health. PMID:10063662

  7. Keep Weight Off

    MedlinePlus

    ... proved to be the most useful by the end of the 2 ½-year study. Researchers say overall the effects of the counseling and support were modest, and most people in the study did regain some weight. But they note that even modest weight loss can have health ...

  8. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang; Feng, Xueshang E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ≲ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  9. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  10. Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ... it comes to weight loss, there's no lack of fad diets promising fast results. But such diets limit your nutritional intake, can be unhealthy, and tend to fail ...

  11. Weight Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Together Understanding Adult Overweight & Obesity About Food Portions Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity More Weight Management Topics Healthy ... Sleep Apnea Weight Management Topics About Food Portions Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity Being Healthy is a Big ...

  12. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Does Neuroimaging Support the DSM-5 Proposal for a Symptom Dyad? A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Fraguas, David; Boada, Leticia; Janssen, Joost; Navas-Sanchez, Francisco J.; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review of 208 studies comprising functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data in patients with "autism spectrum disorder" (ASD) was conducted, in order to determine whether these data support the forthcoming DSM-5 proposal of a social communication and behavioral symptom dyad. Studies consistently reported…

  13. Value of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction and Early Assessment of Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy in Rectal Cancer: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, Maarten; Vandecaveye, Vincent; De Keyzer, Frederik; Roels, Sarah; Penninckx, Freddy; Van Cutsem, Eric; Filip, Claus; Haustermans, Karin

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) for response prediction before and response assessment during and early after preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients receiving RCT for LARC underwent MRI including DWI before RCT, after 10-15 fractions and 1 to 2 weeks before surgery. Tumor volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; b-values: 0-1000 s/mm{sup 2}) were determined at all time points. Pretreatment tumor ADC and volume, tumor ADC change ( Increment ADC), and volume change ( Increment V) between pretreatment and follow-up examinations were compared with histopathologic findings after total mesorectal excision (pathologic complete response [pCR] vs. no pCR, ypT0-2 vs. ypT3-4, T-downstaging or not). The discriminatory capability of pretreatment tumor ADC and volume, Increment ADC, and Increment V for the detection of pCR was compared with receiver operating characteristics analysis. Results: Pretreatment ADC was significantly lower in patients with pCR compared with patients without (in mm{sup 2}/s: 0.94 {+-} 0.12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} vs. 1.19 {+-} 0.22 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, p = 0.003), yielding a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 86% for detection of pCR. The volume reduction during and after RCT was significantly higher in patients with pCR compared with patients without (in %: {Delta}V{sub during}: -62 {+-} 16 vs. -33 {+-} 16, respectively, p = 0.015; and {Delta}V{sub post}: -86 {+-} 12 vs. -60 {+-} 21, p = 0.012), yielding a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 71% for the {Delta}V{sub during} and, respectively, 83% and 86% for the {Delta}V{sub post}. The Increment ADC during ({Delta}ADC{sub during}) and after RCT ({Delta}ADC{sub post}) showed a significantly higher value in patients with pCR compared with patients without (in %: {Delta}ADC{sub during}: 72 {+-} 14 vs. 16 {+-} 12, p = 0.0006; and {Delta}ADC{sub post}: 88

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with magnetic resonance conditional pacemaker systems at 1.5 T: influence of pacemaker related artifacts on image quality including first pass perfusion, aortic and mitral valve assessment, flow measurement, short tau inversion recovery and T1-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Klein-Wiele, Oliver; Garmer, Marietta; Busch, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban; Urbien, Rhyan; Barbone, Gianluca; Kara, Kaffer; Schulte-Hermes, Michael; Metz, Frauke; Hailer, Birgit; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2017-03-01

    There are only limited data on the impact of device-related artifacts on image quality in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with pacemakers (PM). Adenosine stress perfusion, T1-weighted imaging and flow measurement as well as valve characterization have not been evaluated previously concerning artifact burden. We aimed to assess image quality in all routinely used CMR sequences. We analyzed 2623 myocardial segments in CMR scans of 61 patients with MR conditional PM (mean age 72.1 ± 11.5 years), 23 (37.7%) with right sided, 38 (62.3%) with left-sided devices. There were no relevant artifacts in patients with right-sided devices irrespective of the imaging sequence. In left-sided implants no PM-induced artifacts were found in first pass perfusion sequence, flow analysis and T1 weighted imaging. Only few patients with left-sided devices showed significant PM-artifacts in aortic (3/38, 7.9%)/mitral (n = 2/38, 5.3%) valve imaging and STIR (n = 3/35, 8.6%). In STIR only 14/805 (1.7%) segments were involved. In left-sided PM SSFP cine sequences had more artifact burden than LGE with 377/1505 (25.0%) vs. 162/1505 (10.8%) myocardial segments involved by relevant artifacts respectively (p < 0.001). Apart from cine and LGE imaging in anterior myocardial segments with left-sided implants presence of MRI conditional pacemakers does not affect CMR image quality in multimodal CMR examinations to a significant extent. Our data supports evidence that reduced image quality does not need to be a major concern in PM patients undergoing CMR.

  15. Fabrication of Au nanoparticles supported on CoFe2O4 nanotubes by polyaniline assisted self-assembly strategy and their magnetically recoverable catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Yanzhou; Chi, Maoqiang; Yang, Zezhou; Nie, Guangdi; Lu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Ce

    2016-02-01

    This article reports the fabrication of magnetically responsive Au nanoparticles supported on CoFe2O4 nanotubes through polyaniline (PANI) assisted self-assembly strategy which can be used as an efficient magnetically recoverable nanocatalyst. The central magnetic CoFe2O4 nanotubes possess a strong magnetic response under an externally magnetic field, enabling an easy and efficient separation from the reaction system for reuse. The thorn-like PANI layer on the surface of CoFe2O4 nanotubes provides large surface area for supporting Au nanocatalysts due to the electrostatic interactions. The as-prepared CoFe2O4/PANI/Au nanotube assemblies exhibit a high catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at room temperature, with an apparent kinetic rate constant (Kapp) of about 7.8 × 10-3 s-1. Furthermore, the composite nanocatalyst shows a good recoverable property during the catalytic process. This work affords a reliable way in developing multifunctional nanocomposite for catalysis and other potential applications in many fields.

  16. WSU-IR at TREC 2015 Clinical Decision Support Track: Joint Weighting of Explicit and Latent Medical Query Concepts from Diverse Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-20

    into sequential bigrams. For example, a multi-word concept “Iron Deficiency Anemia ” was represented using the Indri query language as follows: 1.00...weight( 0.40 #combine( Iron Deficiency Anemia ) 0.35 #combine( #od4( Iron Deficiency ) #od4( Deficiency Anemia ) ) 0.45 #combine( #uw17( Iron Deficiency...uw17( Deficiency Anemia ) ) ) where 0.40, 0.35 and 0.45 are the weights of the corresponding concept types. The window sizes for ordered and

  17. Fabrication and Test of a 3.7 m Long Support Structure for the LARP Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet LQS01

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Bingham, B.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.W.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Nobrega, F.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Schmalzle, J.; Trillaud, F.; Wanderer, P.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2008-08-17

    The 3.7 m long quadrupole magnet LQS01 represents a major step of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) towards the development of long Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator quadrupole magnets for a LHC Luminosity upgrade. The magnet support structure is a scale up of the 1 m long Technology Quadrupole TQS design with some modifications suggested by TQS model test results. It includes an aluminum shell pre-tensioned over iron yokes using pressurized bladders and locking keys (bladder and key technology). The axial support is provided by two stainless steel end plates compressed against the coil ends by four stainless steel rods. The structure, instrumented with strain gauges, has been fabricated and assembled around four aluminum 'dummy coils' to determine pre-load homogeneity and mechanical characteristics during cool-down. After presenting the main magnetic and mechanical parameters of LQS01, we report in this paper on the design, assembly, and test of the support structure, with a comparison between strain gauges data and 3D finite element model results.

  18. Weighted Automata and Weighted Logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droste, Manfred; Gastin, Paul

    In automata theory, a fundamental result of Büchi and Elgot states that the recognizable languages are precisely the ones definable by sentences of monadic second order logic. We will present a generalization of this result to the context of weighted automata. We develop syntax and semantics of a quantitative logic; like the behaviors of weighted automata, the semantics of sentences of our logic are formal power series describing ‘how often’ the sentence is true for a given word. Our main result shows that if the weights are taken in an arbitrary semiring, then the behaviors of weighted automata are precisely the series definable by sentences of our quantitative logic. We achieve a similar characterization for weighted Büchi automata acting on infinite words, if the underlying semiring satisfies suitable completeness assumptions. Moreover, if the semiring is additively locally finite or locally finite, then natural extensions of our weighted logic still have the same expressive power as weighted automata.

  19. Quantitative estimation of the spin-wave features supported by a spin-torque-driven magnetic waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Consolo, Giancarlo Currò, Carmela; Valenti, Giovanna

    2014-12-07

    The main features of the spin-waves excited at the threshold via spin-polarized currents in a one-dimensional normally-to-plane magnetized waveguide are quantitatively determined both analytically and numerically. In particular, the dependence of the threshold current, frequency, wavenumber, and decay length is investigated as a function of the size of the nanocontact area through which the electric current is injected. From the analytical viewpoint, such a goal has required to solve the linearized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation together with boundary and matching conditions associated with the waveguide geometry. Owing to the complexity of the resulting transcendent system, particular solutions have been obtained in the cases of elongated and contracted nanocontacts. These results have been successfully compared with those arising from numerical integration of the abovementioned transcendent system and with micromagnetic simulations. This quantitative agreement has been achieved thanks to the model here considered which takes explicitly into account the diagonal demagnetizing factors of a rectangular prism as well as the dependence of the relaxation rate on the wavenumber. Our analysis confirmed that the spin-wave features supported by such a waveguide geometry are significantly different from the ones observed in classical two-dimensional nanocontact devices. Moreover, it has been proved that the characteristic parameters depend strongly on the material properties and on the modulus of external field, but they could be independent of the nanocontact length. Finally, it is shown that spin-transfer oscillators based on contracted nanocontacts have a better capability to transmit spin-waves over large distances.

  20. Application of an activated carbon-based support for magnetic solid phase extraction followed by spectrophotometric determination of tartrazine in commercial beverages.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José A; Escamilla-Lara, Karen A; Guevara-Lara, Alfredo; Miranda, Jose M; Páez-Hernández, Ma Elena

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for magnetic solid phase extraction of tartrazine from nonalcoholic beverages. The method involves the extraction and clean-up by activated carbon covered with magnetite dispersed in the sample, followed by the magnetic isolation and desorption of the analyte by basified methanol. The tartrazine eluted from the magnetic support was determined by spectrophotometry. Under optimal conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve ranges from 3 to 30 mg L(-1), with a limit of detection of 1 mg L(-1). The method was validated by comparing the results with those obtained by HPLC. A precision of <5.0% was obtained in all cases and no significant differences were observed (P < 0.05).

  1. Application of an Activated Carbon-Based Support for Magnetic Solid Phase Extraction Followed by Spectrophotometric Determination of Tartrazine in Commercial Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, José A.; Escamilla-Lara, Karen A.; Guevara-Lara, Alfredo; Miranda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for magnetic solid phase extraction of tartrazine from nonalcoholic beverages. The method involves the extraction and clean-up by activated carbon covered with magnetite dispersed in the sample, followed by the magnetic isolation and desorption of the analyte by basified methanol. The tartrazine eluted from the magnetic support was determined by spectrophotometry. Under optimal conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve ranges from 3 to 30 mg L−1, with a limit of detection of 1 mg L−1. The method was validated by comparing the results with those obtained by HPLC. A precision of <5.0% was obtained in all cases and no significant differences were observed (P < 0.05). PMID:25873965

  2. Minimum Weight Design of a Leaf Spring Tapered in Thickness and Width for the Hubble Space Telescope-Space Support Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.

    1990-01-01

    A linear elastic solution to the problem of minimum weight design of cantilever beams with variable width and depth is presented. The solution shown is for the specific application of the Hubble Space Telescope maintenance mission hardware. During these maintenance missions, delicate instruments must be isolated from the potentially damaging vibration environment of the space shuttle cargo bay during the ascent and descent phases. The leaf springs are designed to maintain the isolation system natural frequency at a level where load transmission to the instruments in a minimum. Nonlinear programming is used for the optimization process. The weight of the beams is the objective function with the deflection and allowable bending stress as the constraint equations. The design variables are the width and depth of the beams at both the free and the fixed ends.

  3. Effectiveness of a mHealth Lifestyle Program With Telephone Support (TXT2BFiT) to Prevent Unhealthy Weight Gain in Young Adults: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Stephanie R; McGeechan, Kevin; Hebden, Lana; Balestracci, Kate; Wong, Annette TY; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Harris, Mark F; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Bauman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Weight gained in young adulthood often persists throughout later life with associated chronic disease risk. Despite this, current population prevention strategies are not specifically designed for young adults. Objective We designed and assessed the efficacy of an mHealth prevention program, TXT2BFiT, in preventing excess weight gain and improving dietary and physical activity behaviors in young adults at increased risk of obesity and unhealthy lifestyle choices. Methods A two-arm, parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted. Subjects and analyzing researchers were blinded. A total of 250 18- to 35-year-olds with a high risk of weight gain, a body mass index (BMI) of 23.0 to 24.9 kg/m2 with at least 2 kg of weight gain in the previous 12 months, or a BMI of 25.0 to 31.9 kg/m2 were randomized to the intervention or control group. In the 12-week intervention period, the intervention group received 8 text messages weekly based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change, 1 email weekly, 5 personalized coaching calls, a diet booklet, and access to resources and mobile phone apps on a website. Control group participants received only 4 text messages and printed dietary and physical activity guidelines. Measured body weight and height were collected at baseline and at 12 weeks. Outcomes were assessed via online surveys at baseline and at 12 weeks, including self-reported weight and dietary and physical activity measures. Results A total of 214 participants—110 intervention and 104 control—completed the 12-week intervention period. A total of 10 participants out of 250 (4.0%)—10 intervention and 0 control—dropped out, and 26 participants (10.4%)—5 intervention and 21 control—did not complete postintervention online surveys. Adherence to coaching calls and delivery of text messages was over 90%. At 12 weeks, the intervention group were 2.2 kg (95% CI 0.8-3.6) lighter than controls (P=.005). Intervention participants consumed more

  4. Substitution of Ni for Fe in superconducting Fe0.98Te0.5Se0.5 depresses the normal-state conductivity but not the magnetic spectral weight

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jinghui; Zhong, Ruidan; Li, Shichao; ...

    2015-01-05

    We have performed systematic resistivity and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe₀.₉₈₋zNizTe₀.₅Se₀.₅ samples to study the impact of Ni substitution on the transport properties and the low-energy (≤ 12 meV) magnetic excitations. It is found that, with increasing Ni doping, both the conductivity and superconductivity are gradually suppressed; in contrast, the low-energy magnetic spectral weight changes little. Comparing with the impact of Co and Cu substitution, we find that the effects on conductivity and superconductivity for the same degree of substitution grow systematically as the atomic number of the substituent deviates from that of Fe. The impact of the substituentsmore » as scattering centers appears to be greater than any contribution to carrier concentration. The fact that low-energy magnetic spectral weight is not reduced by increased electron scattering indicates that the existence of antiferromagnetic correlations does not depend on electronic states close to the Fermi energy.« less

  5. Substitution of Ni for Fe in superconducting Fe0.98Te0.5Se0.5 depresses the normal-state conductivity but not the magnetic spectral weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinghui; Zhong, Ruidan; Li, Shichao; Gan, Yuan; Xu, Zhijun; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, T.; Matsuda, M.; Zhao, Yang; Li, Qiang; Xu, Guangyong; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Wen, Jinsheng

    2015-01-01

    We have performed systematic resistivity and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe0.98 -zNizTe0.5Se0.5 samples to study the impact of Ni substitution on the transport properties and the low-energy (≤12 meV) magnetic excitations. It is found that, with increasing Ni doping, both the conductivity and superconductivity are gradually suppressed; in contrast, the low-energy magnetic spectral weight changes little. Comparing with the impact of Co and Cu substitution, we find that the effects on conductivity and superconductivity for the same degree of substitution grow systematically as the atomic number of the substituent deviates from that of Fe. The impact of the substituents as scattering centers appears to be greater than any contribution to carrier concentration. The fact that low-energy magnetic spectral weight is not reduced by increased electron scattering indicates that the existence of antiferromagnetic correlations does not depend on electronic states close to the Fermi energy.

  6. Using magnetic levitation to distinguish atomic-level differences in chemical composition of polymers, and to monitor chemical reactions on solid supports.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Phillips, Scott T; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2008-12-31

    This communication describes a density-based method that uses magnetic levitation for monitoring solid-supported reactions and for distinguishing differences in chemical composition of polymers. The method is simple, rapid, and inexpensive and is similar to thin-layer chromatography (TLC; for solution-phase chemistry) in its potential for monitoring reactions in solid-phase chemistry. The technique involves levitating a sample of beads (taken from a reaction mixture) in a cuvette containing a paramagnetic solution (e.g., GdCl(3) dissolved in H(2)O) positioned between two NdFeB magnets. The vertical position at which the beads levitate corresponds to the density of the beads and correlates with the progress of a chemical reaction on a solid support. The method is particularly useful for monitoring the kinetics of reactions occurring on polymer beads.

  7. Autism spectrum disorder: does neuroimaging support the DSM-5 proposal for a symptom dyad? A systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Fraguas, David; Boada, Leticia; Janssen, Joost; Navas-Sánchez, Francisco J; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2012-07-01

    A systematic review of 208 studies comprising functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data in patients with 'autism spectrum disorder' (ASD) was conducted, in order to determine whether these data support the forthcoming DSM-5 proposal of a social communication and behavioral symptom dyad. Studies consistently reported abnormal function and structure of fronto-temporal and limbic networks with social and pragmatic language deficits, of temporo-parieto-occipital networks with syntactic-semantic language deficits, and of fronto-striato-cerebellar networks with repetitive behaviors and restricted interests in ASD patients. Therefore, this review partially supports the DSM-5 proposal for the ASD dyad.

  8. Exercise support for therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, M. J.; Irick, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Constant-value weight-relieving apparatus, which moves on rollers on overhead track, supports weight of walking, stooping, squatting, or standing patient with combination of multiple pulleys and spring clusters. Individually preselected support force is constant for all movements.

  9. Weight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Device applies compressive force to bone to minimize loss of bone calcium during weightlessness or bedrest. Force is applied through weights, or hydraulic, pneumatic or electrically actuated devices. Device is lightweight and easy to maintain and operate.

  10. Increased rate of positive biopsies using a combination of MR-Tomography, spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging prior to prostate biopsies in patients with persistent elevated prostate-specific antigen values: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lunacek, A.; Simon, J.; Bernt, R.; Huber, M.; Plas, E.; Mrstik, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Persistently elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values following negative biopsies result in a diagnostic dilemma. In order to improve detection rates in patients with former negative biopsies and persistently elevated PSA values, magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) were performed prior to prostate rebiopsies. Materials and Methods: Over a 14-month period, 67 patients (mean age of 66 years) with a history of 1-5 negative biopsies underwent endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using T2-weighted MRT MRS and DW-MRI before an additional prostate biopsy was performed. Subsequently, 5 contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies were performed according to a 10-core systematic scheme. Out of the 67 men, 25 patients had positive biopsies and opted for radical prostatectomy. Histological evaluation of cancer localization, PSA, diameters of primary tumors, numbers and diameters of satellite tumors, prostate volume, and staging pathology was performed. These findings were compared with MRI and MRS results. Results: Serum PSA levels ranged from 3.1 to 19.5 g/ml (median level of 7.96 ng/ml). After the 25 patients underwent radical prostatectomy, analysis of 20 whole-mount sections of 25 radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE) specimens presented results agreeing with the tumor location from MRI and MRS data. Conclusions: The aim of image-guided diagnostics should be to provide more critical information prior to biopsy. Furthermore, the acquisition of such data is important for better risk stratification in therapeutic decisions. PMID:23798861

  11. Therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor on cerebral infarction in dogs using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhe; Geng, Zuojun; Liu, Huaijun; Yang, Haiqing; Song, Peng; Liu, Qing

    2012-08-25

    A model of focal cerebral ischemic infarction was established in dogs through middle cerebral artery occlusion of the right side. Thirty minutes after occlusion, models were injected with nerve growth factor adjacent to the infarct locus. The therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor against cerebral infarction was assessed using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio, a quantitative index of diffusion-weighted MRI. At 6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days and 3 months after modeling, the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio was significantly reduced after treatment with nerve growth factor. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and neurological function scores showed that infarct defects were slightly reduced and neurological function significantly improved after nerve growth factor treatment. This result was consistent with diffusion-weighted MRI measurements. Experimental findings indicate that nerve growth factor can protect against cerebral infarction, and that the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted MRI can be used to evaluate the therapeutic effect.

  12. Therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor on cerebral infarction in dogs using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging★

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhe; Geng, Zuojun; Liu, Huaijun; Yang, Haiqing; Song, Peng; Liu, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A model of focal cerebral ischemic infarction was established in dogs through middle cerebral artery occlusion of the right side. Thirty minutes after occlusion, models were injected with nerve growth factor adjacent to the infarct locus. The therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor against cerebral infarction was assessed using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio, a quantitative index of diffusion-weighted MRI. At 6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days and 3 months after modeling, the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio was significantly reduced after treatment with nerve growth factor. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and neurological function scores showed that infarct defects were slightly reduced and neurological function significantly improved after nerve growth factor treatment. This result was consistent with diffusion-weighted MRI measurements. Experimental findings indicate that nerve growth factor can protect against cerebral infarction, and that the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted MRI can be used to evaluate the therapeutic effect. PMID:25624813

  13. Phthalocyanine supported dinuclear Ln(III) complexes: the solvent-induced change of magnetic properties in dysprosium(iii) analogues.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Ying; Li, Jing; Xie, Jia-Ze; Song, You; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2017-02-24

    Three dinuclear lanthanide complexes, [Ln2(thd)4Pc]·2C6H6 (Hthd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptanedione, Ln = Sm (1), Tb (2), Dy (3)), have been synthesized based on phthalocyanine (Pc). They can be reversibly transformed into [Ln2(thd)4Pc] (Ln = Sm (1'), Tb (2'), Dy (3')) via desolvation and resolvation of the lattice benzene molecules. This change generates dramatic influences on the structural and magnetic properties of the dysprosium analogue. In complex 3, one crystallographically independent metal center is observed, and it exhibits a single relaxation process of magnetization with an energy barrier of 55.7 K. Upon desolvation, the resulting complex 3' contains two types of metal centers, and shows the field-induced single-molecule magnetic behavior with two thermally activated magnetic relaxation processes. The anisotropy barriers for 3' are as high as 63.3 K and 109.6 K, respectively. This work confirms that the solvated molecules can finely tune the magnetic relaxation mechanisms.

  14. Structural and magnetic properties of FeMnx chains (x =1 -6 ) supported on Cu2N /Cu (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Deung-Jang; Robles, Roberto; Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Ternes, Markus; Loth, Sebastian; Lorente, Nicolás

    2016-08-01

    Heterogeneous atomic magnetic chains are built by atom manipulation on a Cu2N /Cu (100) substrate. Their magnetic properties are studied and rationalized by a combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) work completed by model Hamiltonian studies. The chains are built using Fe and Mn atoms ontop of the Cu atoms along the N rows of the Cu2N surface. Here, we present results for FeMnx chains (x =1 -6 ) emphasizing the evolution of the geometrical, electronic, and magnetic properties with chain size. By fitting our results to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian we have studied the exchange-coupling matrix elements J for different chains. For the shorter chains, x ≤2 , we have included spin-orbit effects in the DFT calculations, extracting the magnetic anisotropy energy. Our results are also fitted to a simple anisotropic spin Hamiltonian and we have extracted values for the longitudinal-anisotropy D and transversal-anisotropy E constants. These parameters together with the values for J allow us to compute the magnetic excitation energies of the system and to compare them with the experimental data.

  15. International shipment of light weight radioisotopic heater units (LWRHU) using the USA/9516/B(U)F Mound 1 kW shipping package in support of the 'Pluto Express' mission

    SciTech Connect

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Merten, C. William

    1997-01-10

    Radioisotopes have provided heat that has been used to maintain specific operating environments within remote satellites and spacecraft. For the 'Pluto Express' mission the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fueled light weight radioisotopic heater unit (LWRHU) will be used within the spacecraft. Since the current plan for the 'Pluto Express' mission incorporates the use of a Russian launch platform for the spacecraft, the LWRHUs must be transported in an internationally certified shipping container. An internationally certified shipping package that is versatile enough to be reconfigured to transport the LWRHUs that will be required to support the 'Pluto Express' mission is the Mound USA/9516/B(U)F.

  16. The Weight of Evidence Does Not Support the Listing of Styrene as "Reasonably Anticipated to be a Human Carcinogen" in NTP's Twelfth Report on Carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R; Goodman, Julie E; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2013-01-01

    Styrene was listed as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the twelfth edition of the National Toxicology Program's Report on Carcinogens based on what we contend are erroneous findings of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, and supporting mechanistic data. The epidemiology studies show no consistent increased incidence of, or mortality from, any type of cancer. In animal studies, increased incidence rates of mostly benign tumors have been observed only in certain strains of one species (mice) and at one tissue site (lung). The lack of concordance of tumor incidence and tumor type among animals (even within the same species) and humans indicates that there has been no particular cancer consistently observed among all available studies. The only plausible mechanism for styrene-induced carcinogenesis-a non-genotoxic mode of action that is specific to the mouse lung-is not relevant to humans. As a whole, the evidence does not support the characterization of styrene as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen," and styrene should not be listed in the Report on Carcinogens.

  17. The Weight of Evidence Does Not Support the Listing of Styrene as “Reasonably Anticipated to be a Human Carcinogen” in NTP's Twelfth Report on Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R.; Goodman, Julie E.; Prueitt, Robyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Styrene was listed as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” in the twelfth edition of the National Toxicology Program's Report on Carcinogens based on what we contend are erroneous findings of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, and supporting mechanistic data. The epidemiology studies show no consistent increased incidence of, or mortality from, any type of cancer. In animal studies, increased incidence rates of mostly benign tumors have been observed only in certain strains of one species (mice) and at one tissue site (lung). The lack of concordance of tumor incidence and tumor type among animals (even within the same species) and humans indicates that there has been no particular cancer consistently observed among all available studies. The only plausible mechanism for styrene-induced carcinogenesis—a non-genotoxic mode of action that is specific to the mouse lung—is not relevant to humans. As a whole, the evidence does not support the characterization of styrene as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen,” and styrene should not be listed in the Report on Carcinogens. PMID:23335843

  18. Weight Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Show Your Support! Help stop diabetes with these promotions that give back. Healthy Recipes: Delicious Recipe Kits ... to Give Do-It-Yourself Fundraising & Local Events Promotions that Give Back Donate Your Collectibles Donate Stocks ...

  19. MedTech Mag-Lev, single-use, extracorporeal magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump for mid-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-01-01

    Short- to mid-term extracorporeal ventricular assist devices (VADs) are recommended for critical cardiogenic shock patients. We have designed a preclinical, single-use MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for one-month extracorporeal use. The impeller-rotor of the pump was suspended by a two degree-of-freedom active magnetic bearing in a 300 μm fluid gap, where the computational fluid dynamics analysis predicted a secondary flow of about 400-500 ml/min at a pump speed of 1800-2200 rpm. Three eddy current sensors were employed to implement noise- and drift-free magnetic levitation. The pump components were injection molded using polycarbonate for smooth surfaces as well as improved reproducibility, followed by coating with a biocompatible 2-methacryloyl-oxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Chronic animal experiments were performed in nine calves. Three of the nine calves were excluded from analysis for problems with the circuit. Five of the six (83.3%) completed the 60 day duration of the study, while one prematurely died of massive bleeding due to inflow port detachment. The pump did not stop due to magnetic-levitation malfunction. Neither pump thrombosis nor major organ infarction was observed at autopsy. In comparison to machined surfaces, the injection-molded pump surfaces were thrombus-free after 60 day implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for 60 day circulatory support.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic silica-supported Mn(II)-substituted polyoxophosphotungstate as catalyst in sulfoxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi-Shoeili, Zeinab; Zare, Maryam; Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba

    2016-10-01

    Polyoxometalate-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-MnPOW) were successfully synthesized via covalent anchoring of Mn(II)-substituted phosphotungstate on ammonium-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles. The complete characterization of nanoparticles has been carried out by scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared and elemental analysis. The resulting nanocomposites were efficient catalysts for the selective oxidation of sulfides with different green oxidants in good to excellent yields and also high selectivity. Leaching and recycling tests showed that the nanocatalyst can be reused several times without significant loss of efficiency.

  1. Estimating volumes of the pituitary gland from T1-weighted magnetic-resonance images: effects of age, puberty, testosterone, and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Wong, Angelita Pui-Yee; Pipitone, Jon; Park, Min Tae M; Dickie, Erin W; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Pike, Bruce G; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2014-07-01

    The pituitary gland is a key structure in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis--it plays an important role in sexual maturation during puberty. Despite its small size, its volume can be quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we study a cohort of 962 typically developing adolescents from the Saguenay Youth Study and estimate pituitary volumes using a newly developed multi-atlas segmentation method known as the MAGeT Brain algorithm. We found that age and puberty stage (controlled for age) each predicts adjusted pituitary volumes (controlled for total brain volume) in both males and females. Controlling for the effects of age and puberty stage, total testosterone and estradiol levels also predict adjusted pituitary volumes in males and pre-menarche females, respectively. These findings demonstrate that the pituitary gland grows during adolescence, and its volume relates to circulating plasma-levels of sex steroids in both males and females.

  2. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Duo; Li, Xiao-hui; Zhai, Xu; He, Xi-jing

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury; fiber tractography visualizes the white matter fibers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the fiber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were significantly lower than those in normal rats (P < 0.05); the apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05). Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient values (r = –0.856, P < 0.01), and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r = 0.943, P < 0.01), while apparent diffusion coefficient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = –0.949, P < 0.01). Experimental findings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualitative and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefficient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which reflect functional recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:25878589

  3. The influence of gender on 'tissue at risk' in acute stroke: A diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging study in a rat model of focal cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Macrae, I Mhairi; Holmes, William M; McCabe, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This is the first study to assess the influence of sex on the evolution of ischaemic injury and penumbra. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male (n = 9) and female (n = 10) Sprague-Dawley rats. Diffusion-weighted imaging was acquired over 4 h and infarct determined from T2 images at 24 h post-permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Penumbra was determined retrospectively from serial apparent diffusion coefficient lesions and T2-defined infarct. Apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume was significantly smaller in females from 0.5 to 4 h post permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion as was infarct volume. Penumbral volume, and its loss over time, was not significantly different despite the sex difference in acute and final lesion volumes.

  4. Scuba Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Attitude Adjuster is a system for weight repositioning corresponding to a SCUBA diver's changing positions. Compact tubes on the diver's air tank permit controlled movement of lead balls within the Adjuster, automatically repositioning when the diver changes position. Manufactured by Think Tank Technologies, the system is light and small, reducing drag and energy requirements and contributing to lower air consumption. The Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center helped the company with both technical and business information and arranged for the testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's Weightlessness Environmental Training Facility for astronauts.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetisation transfer imaging, and diffusion weighted imaging correlates of optic nerve, brain, and cervical cord damage in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, M; Rovaris, M; Bianchi, S; Mantia, L; Mancardi, G; Ghezzi, A; Montagna, P; Salvi, F; Filippi, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease leading to bilateral loss of central vision and severe optic nerve atrophy. A subtype of LHON presents additional clinical and MRI aspects indistinguishable from those of multiple sclerosis (MS) (LHON-MS). In patients with LHON or LHON-MS, an assessment was made of (a) the severity of optic nerve damage, using MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging (MTI), and (b) the presence and extent of macroscopic and microscopic pathology in the brain and cervical cord, using MRI and MT ratio (MTR) and mean diffusivity (&Dmacr;) histogram analysis.
METHODS—Ten patients with LHON, four with LHON-MS, and 20 age and sex matched healthy controls were studied. For the optic nerve and the brain, dual-echo turbo spin echo (TSE), T1 weighted spin echo, and MT images were obtained. For the brain, fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) and diffusion weighted images were also obtained. For the cervical cord, fast short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and MT images were obtained. The volume and the average MTR value of both the optic nerves were measured. MTR and &Dmacr; histograms of the normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) and MTR histograms of the whole cervical cord tissue were created.
RESULTS—The mean values of optic nerve volumes and MTR were significantly lower in patients with LHON than in healthy controls. Mean NABT-MTR histogram peak height was significantly lower in patients with LHON than in controls, whereas no significant difference was found for any of the cervical cord MTR histogram derived measures. Average diffusivity (&Dmacr;) was higher in patients with LHON than in controls. Optic nerve volume and MTR value and mean NABT-MTR were lower in patients with LHON-MS than in those with LHON.
CONCLUSIONS—The severity of optic nerve pathology in LHON is measurable in vivo using MRI and MTI. MTR and &Dmacr; histogram analysis suggests that microscopic brain damage occurs

  6. Measurement of the weighted peak level for occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields for 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI body scanners.

    PubMed

    Bonutti, F; Tecchio, M; Maieron, M; Trevisan, D; Negro, C; Calligaris, F

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to give a contribution to the construction of a comprehensive knowledge of the exposure levels to gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in terms of the weighed peak (WP), especially for 3 Tesla scanners for which there are still few works available in the literature. A new generation probe for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in the range of 1 Hz-400 kHz was used to assess the occupational exposure levels to the GMF for 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI body scanners, using the method of the WP according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) approach. The probe was placed at a height of 1.1 m, close to the MRI scanners, where operators could stay during some medical procedures with particular issues. The measurements were performed for a set of typical acquisition sequences for body (liver) and head exams. The measured values of WP were in compliance with ICNIRP 2010 reference levels for occupational exposures.

  7. International shipment of light weight radioisotopic heater units (LWRHU) using the USA/9516/B(U)F Mound 1 kW shipping package in support of the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission

    SciTech Connect

    Barklay, C.D.; Merten, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes have provided heat that has been used to maintain specific operating environments within remote satellites and spacecraft. For the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fueled light weight radioisotopic heater unit (LWRHU) will be used within the spacecraft. Since the current plan for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission incorporates the use of a Russian launch platform for the spacecraft, the LWRHUs must be transported in an internationally certified shipping container. An internationally certified shipping package that is versatile enough to be reconfigured to transport the LWRHUs that will be required to support the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission is the Mound USA/9516/B(U)F. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Advanced MR imaging techniques in the evaluation of nonenhancing gliomas: perfusion-weighted imaging compared with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Neslin; Melhem, Elias R; Wang, Sumei; Krejza, Jaroslaw; Poptani, Harish; Chawla, Sanjeev; Verma, Gaurav

    2013-10-01

    A significant number of nonenhancing (NE) gliomas are reported to be malignant. The purpose of this study was to compare the value of advanced MR imaging techniques, including T2*-dynamic susceptibility contrast PWI (DSC-PWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) in the evaluation of NE gliomas. Twenty patients with NE gliomas underwent MRI including DSC-PWI and (1)HMRS. The relative CBV (rCBV) measurements were obtained from regions of maximum perfusion. The peak ratios of choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and myo-inositol/creatine (mIns/Cr) were measured at a TE of 30 ms. Demographic features, tumor volumes, and PWI- and (1)HMRS-derived measures were compared between low-grade gliomas (LGGs) and high-grade gliomas (HGGs). In addition, the association of initial rCBV ratio with tumor progression was evaluated in LGGs. No significant difference was noted in age, sex or tumor size between LGGs and HGGs. Cho/Cr ratios were significantly higher in HGGs (1.7±0.63) than in LGGs (1.2±0.38). The receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that a Cho/Cr ratio with a cutoff value of 1.3 could differentiate between LGG and HGG with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 71.4%. There was no significant difference in the rCBV ratio and the mIns/Cr ratio between LGG and HGG. However, higher rCBV ratios were observed with more rapid progressions in LGGs. The results imply that Cho/Cr ratios are useful in distinguishing NE LGG from HGG and can be helpful in preoperative grading and biopsy guidance. On the other hand, rCBV ratios do not help in the distinction.

  9. The Therapeutic Response of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors to Imatinib Treatment Assessed by Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Histopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunfang; Wang, He; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Weizhen; Hong, Nan; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To exploit the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI when evaluating the therapeutic response of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) to Imatinib in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Mice with xenografts bearing cells from the GIST-T1 cell line were randomly divided into a treated group receiving Imatinib and a control group. DWMRI scans with 14 b-values (0–1500 s/mm2) were performed before and after treatment (days 1, 3 and 7). IVIM related parameters perfusion fractions (fp) and perfusion-related diffusion coefficients (D*) and the conventional apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated by fitting the DWMRI signal decay. The mean changes from baseline to each post-treatment time point for each measurement (ΔADC, Δfp and ΔD*) were calculated. The differences of mean changes between the two groups were tested for statistical significance. Histopathological analyses including Ki-67, CD31, TUNEL and H&E were conducted in conjunction with the MRI scans. Results Increases in ADC of the treated group were higher than those of the control group after treatment, whereas statistical significances were not observed. Compared to the control group, D* in the treated group decreased significantly (ΔD*treated = -41%, -49%, and -49% with P = 0.0001, 0.0001 and 0.0001), and fp increased significantly (Δfptreated = 79%, 82% and 110%, with P = 0.001, 0.0001 and P = 0.0007) on days 1, 3 and 7 after treatment. Histopathological analyses demonstrated different tumor tissue characteristics between the treated and control groups. Conclusion IVIM measurements may serve as more sensitive imaging biomarkers than ADC when assessing GIST response to Imatinib as early as one day after treatment. PMID:27911930

  10. Supporting your child with weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... and reward your child when he makes good food choices and participates in healthy activities . This will encourage ... so they can learn how to make good food choices. The best way to keep kids from eating ...

  11. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jerome, N P; d'Arcy, J A; Feiweier, T; Koh, D-M; Leach, M O; Collins, D J; Orton, M R

    2016-12-21

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm(-2)s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm(-2)s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm(-2)s at TE  =  80, 100 ms; scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms); T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  12. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerome, N. P.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.; Orton, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm-2s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm-2s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm-2s at TE  =  80, 100 ms scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms) T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  13. Your Child's Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) Overweight and Obesity Weight and Diabetes Growth Charts ... Losing Weight: Brandon's Story (Video) Managing Your Weight Weight Loss Surgery When Being Overweight Is a Health Problem Who ...

  14. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, F L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an ‘obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their

  15. Magnetic carbon-supported cobalt derived from a Prussian blue analogue as a heterogeneous catalyst to activate peroxymonosulfate for efficient degradation of caffeine in water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Jau

    2017-01-15

    Extensive usage of caffeine (CAF) as a medicine and additives in beverages has led to increasing presence of CAF in wastewater and even drinking water. To remove CAF, peroxymonosulfate (PMS), is adopted to generate sulfate radical to degrade CAF in water. To facilitate PMS activation, a magnetic carbon-supported cobalt (MC/Co) hybrid material is prepared via carbonization of a cobalt-containing Prussian blue analogue framework (Co3[Co(CN)6]2). The resultant MC/Co contains Co and Co3O4 nanoparticles supported on a carbon matrix, making it an attractive magnetic catalyst to activate PMS for degrading CAF. MC/Co-activated PMS was shown to degrade CAF much more effectively than PMS and Co3O4-activated PMS. Parameters affecting CAF degradation by MC/Co-activated PMS were also examined, including MC/Co and PMS concentrations, temperature, pH, and salt. Effects of radical quenchers were also examined to provide insights into the CAF degradation mechanism. MC/Co-activated PMS was much more favorable at higher temperatures than ambient temperature, and under neutral conditions. Nevertheless, the presence of concentrated NaCl noticeably hindered CAF degradation. Through examining effects of radical quenchers, the mechanism of CAF degradation by MC/Co-activated PMS was attributed primarily to sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals to a lesser extent. The degradation products of CAF by MC/Co-activated PMS were also identified and a possible degradation pathway is proposed. MC/Co can activate PMS over multiple cycles without loss of catalytic activity. These findings demonstrate that MC/Co, simply prepared from simple carbonization of Co3[Co(CN)6]2 can be a promising heterogeneous catalyst for activating PMS to degrade CAF.

  16. Weight gain attitudes among pregnant adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Simon, C; Nakashima, I; Andrews, D

    1993-07-01

    Maternal weight gain is the most important, manageable determinant of infant birth weight among adolescents. Negative attitudes toward weight gain may adversely affect maternal weight gain. We hypothesized that (a) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain are more common among younger pregnant adolescents, and (b) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain adversely affect adolescent maternal weight gain. The study subjects, 99, radially diverse, pregnant 13 through 18 year olds, completed the 18-item, Likert-format, Pregnancy and Weight Gain Attitude Scale. Responses to the questionnaire indicated that most (83.8%) of the adolescents we interviewed had a positive attitude toward pregnancy weight gain when they entered prenatal care. Univariate analyses revealed that attitudes toward weight gain were unrelated to the respondents' ages but inversely related to their prepregnant weights (-0.16; p = 0.06) and the severity of their symptoms of depression (r = -0.26; p = 0.004). Attitudes toward weight gain were also directly related to their family support (r = 0.17; p = 0.06). Weight gain was significantly related to 4 of the 18 scale items but not to the total attitude scale score. We conclude that (a) the developmental task of formulating a positive body image does not foster more negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain among younger adolescents; (b) negative weight gain attitudes are most common among heavier adolescents, depressed adolescents, and adolescents who do not perceive their families as supportive; and (c) negative weight gain attitudes could adversely affect pregnancy weight gain.

  17. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  18. The relationship between multiple developmental difficulties in very low birth weight children at 3½ years of age and the need for learning support at 5 years of age.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Gijs; Jeukens-Visser, Martine; van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, Aleid; Kok, Joke; Nollet, Frans

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether multiple developmental difficulties are more frequent in very low birth weight (VLBW) children than in those born full term. The association between multiple developmental difficulties assessed at 3½ years of age and educational provision for the child at 5½ years was also investigated, with 'educational provision' referring to the curriculum, school placement and the level of learning support. There were 143 VLBW children without cerebral palsy (CP) and 41 term-born peers assessed at 3½ years of age. The assessment included 6 measures of development: word comprehension, visual motor integration, visual perception, motor coordination, executive functioning and behaviour. Educational provision was determined at age 5½ years. A mildly abnormal score (score <1 standard deviation) was considered to indicate developmental difficulty. Scores from the six measures of development were analysed to determine the difficulty frequency and the presence of multiple difficulties (>1 difficulty score) in each child. This study showed that at 3½ years of age, the VLBW children had significantly more difficulty with motor coordination than their term-born peers. In addition, 27% of the VLBW children had multiple difficulties compared to 10% in the term-born group. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that of the difficulties, impaired motor coordination was most strongly associated with the requirement for learning support two years later. Regression analyses showed that having multiple difficulties was significantly associated with the need for learning support (Odds Ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.5-7.8). These results show that the presence of multiple difficulties in a VLBW child of preschool age, can impact the child's educational provision two years later.

  19. Investigations of the Response of Swimming Paramecia to Variations in their Apparent Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James; Jung, Ilyong; Guevorkian, Karine; Mickalide, Harry; Wagman, Michael

    2011-11-01

    There is a set of micro-organisms that are small enough that they swim at low Reynolds number and large enough that gravity exerts an influence on their behavior Many protists, like paramecia, for example, exhibit negative gravi-taxis by orienting their swimming upward and negative gravi-kinesis by increasing their propulsion when swimming against their apparent weight. It is not clear whether these responses to a very weak force (about 100 pN) are active or passive. We have developed a technique, Magnetic Force Buoyancy Variation, which enables us to vary the apparent weight of the swimmers in situ. We will describe experiments on paramecia conducted at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. In particular, we will describe how increasing the apparent weight induces paramecia to accumulate at upper surfaces. A simple force model suggests that this accumulation is a passive response. Supported by NSF-PHY0750360 and a grant to the NHMFL, NSF DMR-0654118.

  20. Propulsion and PWR Rapid Response Research and Development (R&R) Support: Delivery Order 0030: Study of Hot Deformation of Nanocomposite Rare Earth Magnets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    date: 26 Apr 2006. 14. ABSTRACT High performance bulk anisotropic nanograin composite Nd2Fe14B /Fe and Nd2Fe14B /Fe-Co magnets were successfully...deformation, hybrid magnets, interface exchange coupling, nanocomposite, nanograin magnets, nanostructure, Nd2Fe14B , permanent magnets, powder coating...1 High-Performance Nanograin Composite Nd2Fe14B /α-Fe and Nd2Fe14B /Fe-Co Magnets 2 1.1 Magnets prepared by using powder blending technique 2

  1. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  2. Obesity in primary care: evidence for advising weight constancy rather than weight loss in unsuccessful dieters.

    PubMed

    Pryke, Rachel; Docherty, Andrea

    2008-02-01

    In view of the limited success rates of all weight-loss strategies to date, this article hypothesises that in situations where previous dieting attempts have failed, better outcomes and health improvements will arise from advocating weight-stability goals. This means the promotion of weight maintenance (to ensure any reduction in weight is maintained) and weight constancy (where steps are taken to maintain existing weight without attempting weight loss), rather than advocating existing 5-10% weight-loss targets for these patients. The majority of approaches to obesity focus on weight reduction despite poor evidence of effectiveness. Primary care remains reluctant to engage in ineffective approaches, yet is well placed to give advice, and would undoubtedly adopt effective obesity-management approaches if they were developed. Despite guidance for overweight or obese people to aim for a 5-10% weight reduction, current trends demonstrate escalation of average weights and obesity. A literature review found little information about evaluation of weight-stability approaches (either weight maintenance or weight constancy), despite theoretical support for them. Yet taking steps to protect weight reduction where it is achieved, and to promote weight constancy (without weight loss) where further dieting is predicted to fail, would have a beneficial effect on preventing further growth of obesity-related morbidity in the population. Some evidence exists to support simple behavioural approaches to improve weight stability, but these measures do not feature in current advice and hence are not widely advocated.

  3. Reconstructing Weighted Networks from Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Lai, P. Y.; Leung, C. Y.

    2015-03-01

    The knowledge of how the different nodes of a network interact or link with one another is crucial for the understanding of the collective behavior and the functionality of the network. We have recently developed a method that can reconstruct both the links and their relative coupling strength of bidirectional weighted networks. Our method requires only measurements of node dynamics as input and is based on a relation between the pseudo-inverse of the matrix of the correlation of the node dynamics and the Laplacian matrix of the weighted network. Using several examples of different dynamics, we demonstrate that our method can accurately reconstruct the connectivity as well as the weights of the links for weighted random and weighted scale-free networks with both linear and nonlinear dynamics. The work of ESCC and CYL has been supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council under Grant No. CUHK 14300914.

  4. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  5. Emotion Regulation and Excess Weight: Impaired Affective Processing Characterized by Dysfunctional Insula Activation and Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Steward, Trevor; Picó-Pérez, Maria; Mata, Fernanda; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Cano, Marta; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Yucel, Murat; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Emotion-regulation strategies are understood to influence food intake. This study examined the neurophysiological underpinnings of negative emotion processing and emotion regulation in individuals with excess weight compared to normal-weight controls. Fifteen participants with excess-weight (body mass index >25) and sixteen normal-weight controls (body mass index 18-25) performed an emotion-regulation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants were exposed to 24 negative affective or neutral pictures that they were instructed to Observe (neutral pictures), Maintain (sustain the emotion elicited by negative pictures) or Regulate (down-regulate the emotion provoked by negative pictures through previously trained reappraisal techniques). When instructed to regulate negative emotions by means of cognitive reappraisal, participants with excess weight displayed persistently heightened activation in the right anterior insula. Decreased responsivity was also found in right anterior insula, the orbitofrontal cortex and cerebellum during negative emotion experience in participants with excess weight. Psycho-physiological interaction analyses showed that excess-weight participants had decreased negative functional coupling between the right anterior insula and the right dlPFC, and the bilateral dmPFC during cognitive reappraisal. Our findings support contentions that excess weight is linked to an abnormal pattern of neural activation and connectivity during the experience and regulation of negative emotions, with the insula playing a key role in these alterations. We posit that ineffective regulation of emotional states contributes to the acquisition and preservation of excess weight.

  6. Emotion Regulation and Excess Weight: Impaired Affective Processing Characterized by Dysfunctional Insula Activation and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Fernanda; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Cano, Marta; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Yucel, Murat; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Emotion-regulation strategies are understood to influence food intake. This study examined the neurophysiological underpinnings of negative emotion processing and emotion regulation in individuals with excess weight compared to normal-weight controls. Fifteen participants with excess-weight (body mass index >25) and sixteen normal-weight controls (body mass index 18–25) performed an emotion-regulation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants were exposed to 24 negative affective or neutral pictures that they were instructed to Observe (neutral pictures), Maintain (sustain the emotion elicited by negative pictures) or Regulate (down-regulate the emotion provoked by negative pictures through previously trained reappraisal techniques). When instructed to regulate negative emotions by means of cognitive reappraisal, participants with excess weight displayed persistently heightened activation in the right anterior insula. Decreased responsivity was also found in right anterior insula, the orbitofrontal cortex and cerebellum during negative emotion experience in participants with excess weight. Psycho-physiological interaction analyses showed that excess-weight participants had decreased negative functional coupling between the right anterior insula and the right dlPFC, and the bilateral dmPFC during cognitive reappraisal. Our findings support contentions that excess weight is linked to an abnormal pattern of neural activation and connectivity during the experience and regulation of negative emotions, with the insula playing a key role in these alterations. We posit that ineffective regulation of emotional states contributes to the acquisition and preservation of excess weight. PMID:27003840

  7. Development of HTS Magnet for Rotating Gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Kenji; Koyanagi, Kei; Takayama, S. Shigeki; Ishii, Yusuke; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Ogitsu, Toru; iwata, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    The effectiveness of heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment has been recognized by medical experts and the public. However, due to the large size of the equipment, this therapy has not been widely adopted. In particular, the rotating gantries used to irradiate patients with the heavy-ion beams from any direction may be as heavy as 600 tons in our estimation. By employing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires in these rotating gantries and increasing the magnetic field generated by the deflecting coils, the total weight of the rotating gantry can be reduced to around the weight of those used for proton radiotherapy. A project for developing an HTS deflecting magnet for heavy-ion radiotherapy has been underway since 2013, supported by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED). The aim of this project is to develop fundamental technologies for designing and fabricating HTS deflecting magnets, such as irregular magnetic field estimating techniques, design technology for HTS magnets, high-precision HTS coil winding technology, AC loss estimating techniques, and thermal runaway estimating techniques and to fabricate a small model of an HTS deflecting magnet and evaluate its performance. In this paper, the project's progress will be described.

  8. Iron Oxide-Supported Copper Oxide Nanoparticles (Nanocat-Fe-CuO): Magnetically Recyclable Catalysts for the Synthesis of Pyrazole Derivatives, 4-Methoxyaniline, and Ullmann-type Condensation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient and benign protocol is reported for the synthesis of 4-methoxyaniline, medicinally important pyrazole derivatives, and Ullmann-type condensation reaction using magnetically separable and reusable magnetite-supported copper (nanocat-Fe-CuO) nanoparticles under mild co...

  9. 'Doctor, How Can I Lose Weight?'

    PubMed Central

    Bright-See, Elizabeth

    1983-01-01

    Millions of Canadians are trying to lose weight. According to the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company's recently released height and weight tables, some of them don't need to lose weight from a health standpoint. For those who would benefit from weight loss, a good program includes a balanced, low fat, high fiber diet; exercise; behavior modification and moral support. Few of the popular books and self-help groups offer all these essential components. PMID:21283478

  10. Liver lobe-based magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging using multiple b values in patients with hepatitis B-related liver cirrhosis: association with the liver disease severity according to the Child-Pugh class

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hong-Jie; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Jun; Chen, Tian-Wu; Zeng, Nan-Lin; Wang, Dan; Li, Jie; Huang, Yu-Cheng; Tang, Yu-Lian; Hu, Jiani

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the associations of liver lobe-based magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging findings using multiple b values with the presence and Child-Pugh class of cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis B. METHODS: Seventy-four cirrhotic patients with hepatitis B and 25 healthy volunteers underwent diffusion-weighted imaging using b values of 0, 500, 800 and 1000 sec/mm2. The apparent diffusion coefficients of individual liver lobes for b(0,500), b(0,800) and b(0,1000) were derived from the signal intensity averaged across images obtained using b values of 0 and 500 sec/mm2, 0 and 800 sec/mm2, or 0 and 1000 sec/mm2, respectively, and were statistically analyzed to evaluate cirrhosis. RESULTS: The apparent diffusion coefficients for b(0,500), b(0,800) and b(0,1000) inversely correlated with the Child-Pugh class in the left lateral liver lobe, the left medial liver lobe, the right liver lobe and the caudate lobe (r=–0.35 to –0.60, all p<0.05), except for the apparent diffusion coefficient for b(0,1000) in the left medial liver lobe (r=–0.17, p>0.05). Among these parameters, the apparent diffusion coefficient for b(0,500) in the left lateral liver lobe best differentiated normal from cirrhotic liver, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.989. The apparent diffusion coefficient for b(0,800) in the right liver lobe best distinguished Child-Pugh class A from B–C and A–B from C, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.732 and 0.747, respectively. CONCLUSION: Liver lobe-based apparent diffusion coefficients for b(0,500) and b(0,800) appear to be associated with the presence and Child-Pugh class of liver cirrhosis. PMID:26222818

  11. Who succeeds in maintaining weight loss? A conceptual review of factors associated with weight loss maintenance and weight regain.

    PubMed

    Elfhag, K; Rössner, S

    2005-02-01

    Weight loss is difficult to achieve and maintaining the weight loss is an even greater challenge. The identification of factors associated with weight loss maintenance can enhance our understanding for the behaviours and prerequisites that are crucial in sustaining a lowered body weight. In this paper we have reviewed the literature on factors associated with weight loss maintenance and weight regain. We have used a definition of weight maintenance implying intentional weight loss that has subsequently been maintained for at least 6 months. According to our review, successful weight maintenance is associated with more initial weight loss, reaching a self-determined goal weight, having a physically active lifestyle, a regular meal rhythm including breakfast and healthier eating, control of over-eating and self-monitoring of behaviours. Weight maintenance is further associated with an internal motivation to lose weight, social support, better coping strategies and ability to handle life stress, self-efficacy, autonomy, assuming responsibility in life, and overall more psychological strength and stability. Factors that may pose a risk for weight regain include a history of weight cycling, disinhibited eating, binge eating, more hunger, eating in response to negative emotions and stress, and more passive reactions to problems.

  12. Effect of clothing weight on body weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: In clinical settings, it is common to measure weight of clothed patients and estimate a correction for the weight of clothing, but we can find no papers in the medical literature regarding the variability in clothing weight with weather, season, and gender. Methods: Fifty adults (35 wom...

  13. Forensic age estimation via 3-T magnetic resonance imaging of ossification of the proximal tibial and distal femoral epiphyses: Use of a T2-weighted fast spin-echo technique.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Can, Ismail Ozgur; Aksoy, Sema; Kazimoglu, Cemal

    2016-03-01

    Radiation exposure during forensic age estimation is associated with ethical implications. It is important to prevent repetitive radiation exposure when conducting advanced ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of 3.0-T MRI in determining the degree of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses in a group of Turkish population. We retrospectively evaluated coronal T2-weighted and turbo spin-echo sequences taken upon MRI of 503 patients (305 males, 198 females; age 10-30 years) using a five-stage method. Intra- and interobserver variations were very low. (Intraobserver reliability was κ=0.919 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.961 for the proximal tibial epiphysis, and interobserver reliability was κ=0.836 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.885 for the proximal tibial epiphysis.) Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive relationship between age and the extent of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses (p<0.001). Comparison of male and female data revealed significant between-gender differences in the ages at first attainment of stages 2, 3, and 4 ossifications of the distal femoral epiphysis and stage 1 and 4 ossifications of the proximal tibial epiphysis (p<0.05). The earliest ages at which ossification of stages 3, 4, and 5 was evident in the distal femoral epiphysis were 14, 17, and 22 years in males and 13, 16, and 21 years in females, respectively. Proximal tibial epiphysis of stages 3, 4, and 5 ossification was first noted at ages 14, 17, and 18 years in males and 13, 15, and 16 years in females, respectively. MRI of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses is an alternative, noninvasive, and reliable technique to estimate age.

  14. Somatotypes of weight lifters.

    PubMed

    Orvanová, E

    1990-01-01

    The present paper reviews published studies on the body shape of weight lifters. The differences between the somatotype ratings of weight lifters studied using the Sheldon and the Heath-Carter methods, and the differences between performance levels and age groups of weight lifters are discussed. The differences in mean somatoplots among the weight lifters studied as a whole group, weight lifters divided into two, three or four groups according to body weight, and weight lifters considered according to the official weight classes, are assessed. Weight lifters in the lighter weight classes are found to be ectomorphic or balanced mesomorphs, while those in the heavier weight classes tend to be endomorphic mesomorphs. Ectomorphy decreases, whereas mesomorphy and endomorphy increase with weight class. When three age groups of weight lifters were compared within each weight class, the same pattern of differences between ages occurs. The younger lifters in each weight class have higher endomorphy and lower mesomorphy than the senior lifters. Ectomorphy is higher in the younger lifters below the weight class of 82.5 kg. Since significant differences in all three somatotype components between 10 weight classes of weight lifters and also within three age groups were noted, it will be necessary in future studies to consider the somatotypes of weight lifters according to the official weight classes.

  15. Informed Test Component Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and evaluates alternative methods for weighting tests. Presents formulas for composite reliability and validity as a function of component weights and suggests a rational process that identifies and considers trade-offs in determining weights. Discusses drawbacks to implicit weighting and explicit weighting and the difficulty of…

  16. Magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) advanced study.I - System design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W.; Abdelsalam, Mostafa K.; Eyssa, Yehia M.; Mcintosh, Glen E.

    1987-01-01

    A magnetic suspension and balance system is designed to support models of aircraft or other objects in wind tunnels by means of magnetic forces. Major design improvements have been achieved, resulting in reductions of the system size, weight, and cost. These improvements are due to: (1) the use of holmium in the model core to increase its magnetic moment, (2) the use of a powerful new permanent magnet material in the model wings, (3) a new arrangement for the roll coils, and (4) the use of a nonmetallic structure to eliminate eddy current losses. The conceptual design of the holmium core superconductive solenoid and of the new permanent magnet wing assembly is described in detail. The discussion includes comparisons of the pole strengths for different model core magnets, the design of a superconducting solenoid and cryostat, and the analysis of model wing magnetic requirements.

  17. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Weight Loss Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Weight Loss Surgery A A ... Risks and Side Effects? What Is Weight Loss Surgery? For some people, being overweight is about more ...

  18. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious medical problems. Weight loss surgery (also called bariatric surgery) can help very obese people lose weight. But ... Gastric banding is the simplest of the three weight loss surgeries. People who get it might not lose as ...

  19. The INTERPRET Decision-Support System version 3.0 for evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy data from human brain tumours and other abnormal brain masses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proton Magnetic Resonance (MR) Spectroscopy (MRS) is a widely available technique for those clinical centres equipped with MR scanners. Unlike the rest of MR-based techniques, MRS yields not images but spectra of metabolites in the tissues. In pathological situations, the MRS profile changes and this has been particularly described for brain tumours. However, radiologists are frequently not familiar to the interpretation of MRS data and for this reason, the usefulness of decision-support systems (DSS) in MRS data analysis has been explored. Results This work presents the INTERPRET DSS version 3.0, analysing the improvements made from its first release in 2002. Version 3.0 is aimed to be a program that 1st, can be easily used with any new case from any MR scanner manufacturer and 2nd, improves the initial analysis capabilities of the first version. The main improvements are an embedded database, user accounts, more diagnostic discrimination capabilities and the possibility to analyse data acquired under additional data acquisition conditions. Other improvements include a customisable graphical user interface (GUI). Most diagnostic problems included have been addressed through a pattern-recognition based approach, in which classifiers based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were trained and tested. Conclusions The INTERPRET DSS 3.0 allows radiologists, medical physicists, biochemists or, generally speaking, any person with a minimum knowledge of what an MR spectrum is, to enter their own SV raw data, acquired at 1.5 T, and to analyse them. The system is expected to help in the categorisation of MR Spectra from abnormal brain masses. PMID:21114820

  20. Effects of background electrolytes and ionic strength on enrichment of Cd(II) ions with magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-jiang; Liu, Yun-guo; Zeng, Guang-ming; You, Shao-hong; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xi; Guo, Yi-ming; Tan, Xiao-fei; Guo, Fang-ying

    2014-12-01

    To elucidate the influence mechanisms of background electrolytes and ionic strength on Cd(II) removal, the adsorption of Cd(II) onto magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid (MGO-SA) in aqueous solutions containing different types and concentrations of background electrolytes was studied. The results indicate that Cd(II) adsorption was strongly dependent on pH and could be strongly affected by background electrolytes and ionic strength. The Cd(II) removal was decreased with the presence of background electrolyte cations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+)), and the divalent cations exerted more obvious influences on the Cd(II) uptake than the monovalent cations at pH 6. Both Cl(-) and NO3(-) had negative effects on Cd(II) adsorption because they can form water-soluble metal-anion complexes with Cd(II) ions. The presence of 0.01molL(-1) Na3PO4 reduced the removal percentage of Cd(II) at pH<5 but extremely enhanced the Cd(II) removal when the pH>5. The Cd(II) adsorption was sensitive to changes in the concentration of NaCl, NaNO3, NaClO4, and Na3PO4. Besides, the adsorption isotherm of Cd(II) onto MGO-SA could be well described by the Freundlich model and was also influenced by the type of background electrolyte ions and the ionic strength.

  1. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  2. Magnetic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ferrofluidics Corporation's recent innovation is a spindle for rotating computer discs that supports the disc's rotating shaft on a film of magnetic fluid instead of conventional ball bearings. According to its developers, the spindle offers greatly increased rotational stability, meaning substantially reduced vibration and mechanical noise, and non- repeatable runout. This allows disc drives to store two to 10 times more information.

  3. Body weight relationships in early marriage. Weight relevance, weight comparisons, and weight talk.

    PubMed

    Bove, Caron F; Sobal, Jeffery

    2011-12-01

    This investigation uncovered processes underlying the dynamics of body weight and body image among individuals involved in nascent heterosexual marital relationships in Upstate New York. In-depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews conducted with 34 informants, 20 women and 14 men, just prior to marriage and again one year later were used to explore continuity and change in cognitive, affective, and behavioral factors relating to body weight and body image at the time of marriage, an important transition in the life course. Three major conceptual themes operated in the process of developing and enacting informants' body weight relationships with their partner: weight relevance, weight comparisons, and weight talk. Weight relevance encompassed the changing significance of weight during early marriage and included attracting and capturing a mate, relaxing about weight, living healthily, and concentrating on weight. Weight comparisons between partners involved weight relativism, weight competition, weight envy, and weight role models. Weight talk employed pragmatic talk, active and passive reassurance, and complaining and critiquing criticism. Concepts emerging from this investigation may be useful in designing future studies of and approaches to managing body weight in adulthood.

  4. Body Weight Relationships in Early Marriage: Weight Relevance, Weight Comparisons, and Weight Talk

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Caron F.; Sobal, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    This investigation uncovered processes underlying the dynamics of body weight and body image among individuals involved in nascent heterosexual marital relationships in Upstate New York. In-depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews conducted with 34 informants, 20 women and 14 men, just prior to marriage and again one year later were used to explore continuity and change in cognitive, affective, and behavioral factors relating to body weight and body image at the time of marriage, an important transition in the life course. Three major conceptual themes operated in the process of developing and enacting informants’ body weight relationships with their partner: weight relevance, weight comparisons, and weight talk. Weight relevance encompassed the changing significance of weight during early marriage and included attracting and capturing a mate, relaxing about weight, living healthily, and concentrating on weight. Weight comparisons between partners involved weight relativism, weight competition, weight envy, and weight role models. Weight talk employed pragmatic talk, active and passive reassurance, and complaining and critiquing criticism. Concepts emerging from this investigation may be useful in designing future studies of and approaches to managing body weight in adulthood. PMID:21864601

  5. Thermodynamics of weight loss diets.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eugene J; Feinman, Richard D

    2004-12-08

    BACKGROUND: It is commonly held that "a calorie is a calorie", i.e. that diets of equal caloric content will result in identical weight change independent of macronutrient composition, and appeal is frequently made to the laws of thermodynamics. We have previously shown that thermodynamics does not support such a view and that diets of different macronutrient content may be expected to induce different changes in body mass. Low carbohydrate diets in particular have claimed a "metabolic advantage" meaning more weight loss than in isocaloric diets of higher carbohydrate content. In this review, for pedagogic clarity, we reframe the theoretical discussion to directly link thermodynamic inefficiency to weight change. The problem in outline: Is metabolic advantage theoretically possible? If so, what biochemical mechanisms might plausibly explain it? Finally, what experimental evidence exists to determine whether it does or does not occur? RESULTS: Reduced thermodynamic efficiency will result in increased weight loss. The laws of thermodynamics are silent on the existence of variable thermodynamic efficiency in metabolic processes. Therefore such variability is permitted and can be related to differences in weight lost. The existence of variable efficiency and metabolic advantage is therefore an empiric question rather than a theoretical one, confirmed by many experimental isocaloric studies, pending a properly performed meta-analysis. Mechanisms are as yet unknown, but plausible mechanisms at the metabolic level are proposed. CONCLUSIONS: Variable thermodynamic efficiency due to dietary manipulation is permitted by physical laws, is supported by much experimental data, and may be reasonably explained by plausible mechanisms.

  6. Evaluation of efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma using magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging and computed tomography perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Guo-Liang; Zheng, Jia-Ping; Guo, Li-Wen; Chen, Yu-Tang; Zeng, Hui; Yao, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging (MR-DWI) and CT perfusion imaging (CT-PI). Methods: From January 2008 to January 2014, a total of 522 HCC patients receiving TACE combined with CT-RFA were included in this study. All patients underwent TACE followed by CT-RFA, and 1 day before treatment and 1 month after treatment they received MR-DWI and CT-PI. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect the concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Tumor response was evaluated using the revised RECIST criteria. One-year follow-up was conducted on all patients. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to evaluate the efficacy of TACE combined with CT-RFA for HCC using MR-DWI and CT-PI. Results: Total effective rate (complete remission [CR] + partial remission [PR]) of TACE combined with CT-RFA for HCC was 82.95%. HCC patients of CR + PR had lower hepatic blood flow (HBF), hepatic blood volume (HBV), permeability surface (PS), hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP), and hepatic perfusion index (HPI) levels than those of SD + PD, but HCC patients of CR + PR had higher mean transit time (MTT) level than those of SD + PD. The patients of PR + CR had higher apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values than those of SD + PD. The patients of PR + CR showed lower AFP concentration than those of SD + PD. ROC curve analysis indicated that the area under the curve (AUC) of AFP, HBV, PS, HAP, HPI, and ADC was more than 0.7, but the AUC of HBF, MTT, and PVP were less than 0.7. After treatment, the AFP, HBF, HBV, PS, HAP, and HPI in the HCC patients with recurrence were higher than those in the HCC patients without, but MTT and ADC in the HCC patients with

  7. Use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to distinguish between lung cancer and focal inflammatory lesions: a comparison of intravoxel incoherent motion derived parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Li, Xinchun; Lei, Yongxia; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-11-01

    Background Using imaging techniques to diagnose malignant and inflammatory lesions in the lung can be challenging. Purpose To compare intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis in their ability to discriminate lung cancer from focal inflammatory lung lesions. Material and Methods Thirty-eight patients with lung masses were included: 30 lung cancers and eight inflammatory lesions. Patients were imaged with 3.0T MRI diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) using 10 b values (range, 0-1000 s/mm(2)). Tissue diffusivity ( D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient ( D*), and perfusion fraction ( f) were calculated using segmented biexponential analysis. ADC (total) was calculated with monoexponential fitting of the DWI data. D, D*, f, and ADC were compared between lung cancer and inflammatory lung lesions. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for all DWI parameters. Results The ADC was significantly higher for inflammatory lesions than for lung cancer ([1.21 ± 0.20] × 10(-3) mm(2)/s vs. [0.97 ± 0.15] × 10(-3) mm(2)/s; P = 0.004). By IVIM, f was found to be significantly higher in inflammatory lesions than lung cancer ([46.10 ± 12.92] % vs. [29.29 ± 10.89] %; P = 0.005). There was no difference in D and D* between lung cancer and inflammatory lesions ( P = 0.747 and 0.124, respectively). f showed comparable diagnostic performance with ADC in differentiating lung cancer from inflammatory lung lesions, with areas under the curve of 0.833 and 0.826, sensitivity 80.0% and 73.3%, and specificity 75.0% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusion The IVIM parameter f value provides comparable diagnostic performance with ADC and could be used as a surrogate marker for differentiating lung cancer from inflammatory lesions.

  8. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. It can lower ... at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Proven Weight Loss Methods Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  9. Performance of a continuous flow ventricular assist device: magnetic bearing design, construction, and testing.

    PubMed

    Allaire, P; Hilton, E; Baloh, M; Maslen, E; Bearnson, G; Noh, D; Khanwilkar, P; Olsen, D

    1998-06-01

    A new centrifugal continuous flow ventricular assist device, the CFVAD III, which is fully magnetic bearing suspended, has been developed. It has only one moving part (the impeller), has no contact (magnetic suspension), is compact, and has minimal heating. A centrifugal impeller of 2 inch outer diameter is driven by a permanent magnet brushless DC motor. This paper discusses the design, construction, testing, and performance of the magnetic bearings in the unit. The magnetic suspension consists of an inlet side magnetic bearing and an outlet side magnetic bearing, each divided into 8 pole segments to control axial and radial displacements as well as angular displacements. The magnetic actuators are composed of several different materials to minimize size and weight while having sufficient load capacity to support the forces on the impeller. Flux levels in the range of 0.1 T are employed in the magnetic bearings. Self sensing electronic circuits (without physical sensors) are employed to determine the impellar position and provide the feedback control signal needed for the magnetic bearing control loops. The sensors provide position sensitivity of approximately 0.025 mm. A decentralized 5 axis controller has been developed using modal control techniques. Proportional integral derivative controls are used for each axis to levitate the magnetically supported impeller.

  10. Seismometer using a vertical long natural-period rotational pendulum with magnetic levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Otake, Yuji; Araya, Akito; Hidano, Kazuo

    2005-05-15

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive/wideband vertical-component seismometer using an astatic rotational pendulum to obtain a long natural period. This seismometer employs magnetic levitation for removing any parasitic resonances of a spring to support a weight due to gravity and the thermal dependence of the spring constant. The pendulum has a cylindrical plunger-type permanent magnet that has a weight at one side of its end edge. The plunger magnet is inserted into a uniform magnetic field generated by a window-frame-type permanent magnet, and attached to two crossed-leaf spring hinges as a rotational axis outside of the bore of the magnet. Magnetic forces applied to the plunger magnet counterbalance the gravitational force at the weight. To realize stable operation of the rotational pendulum without any unnecessary movements of the plunger magnet, a tilt of lines of the magnetic force in the bore of the window-frame magnet was compensated by a tilted magnetic-pole surface near to its opening. The field uniformity reached 10{sup -4} owing to this compensation. The thermal dependence of a magnetic field strength of about 10{sup -3}/K was also compensated by as much as 9x10{sup -5}/K by Ni-Fe metal having a negative permeability coefficient. The metal was attached along the sidewalls of the window-frame magnet. To determine the feedback control parameters for a feedback control seismometer, the natural period of a prototype rotational pendulum was measured. It was more than 8 s, and was able to be changed from 5 to 8 s by using an additional magnetic spring, similar to the voice coil actuator of a speaker. This change was in accordance with theoretical calculations, and showed that the pendulum movement did not include a big nonlinearity caused by the tilt of the lines of the magnetic force. No parasitic resonances were found during experiments. A velocity feedback-control circuit and a capacitance position detector to measure the weight position were applied to

  11. Permanent magnet energy conversion machine with magnet mounting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Adams, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid permanent magnet dc motor includes three sets of permanent magnets supported by the rotor and three sets of corresponding stators fastened to the surrounding frame. One set of magnets operates across a radial gap with a surrounding radial gap stator, and the other two sets of magnets operate off the respective ends of the rotor across respective axial gaps.

  12. Permanent magnet energy conversion machine with magnet mounting arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Adams, D.J.

    1999-09-14

    A hybrid permanent magnet dc motor includes three sets of permanent magnets supported by the rotor and three sets of corresponding stators fastened to the surrounding frame. One set of magnets operates across a radial gap with a surrounding radial gap stator, and the other two sets of magnets operate off the respective ends of the rotor across respective axial gaps.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  14. Gestational weight gain among Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lam, Kim; Raine, Susan P

    2014-01-01

    To describe gestational weight gain among Hispanic women and to examine psychological, social, and cultural contexts affecting weight gain. A total of 282 Hispanic women were surveyed post-partum before leaving the hospital. Women were queried about their prepregnancy weight and weight gained during pregnancy. Adequacy of gestational weight gain was based on guidelines set by the Institute of Medicine in 2009. Independent risk factors for excessive or insufficient weight gain were examined by logistic regression. Most women were unmarried (59 %), with a mean age of 28.4 ± 6.6 years and an average weight gain of 27.9 ± 13.3 lbs. Approximately 45 % of women had gained too much, 32 % too little, and only 24 % had an adequate amount of weight gain. The mean birth weight was 7.3, 7.9, and 6.8 lbs among the adequate, excessive, and insufficient weight gain groups. Among women who exercised before pregnancy, two-thirds continued to do so during pregnancy; the mean gestational weight gain of those who continued was lower than those who stopped (26.8 vs. 31.4 lbs, p = 0.04). Independent risk factors for excessive weight gain were being unmarried, U.S. born, higher prepregnancy body mass index, and having indifferent or negative views about weight gain. Independent risk factors for insufficient weight gain were low levels of support and late initiation of prenatal care. Depression, stress, and a woman's or her partner's happiness regarding pregnancy were unrelated to weight gain. The results of this study can be used by prenatal programs to identify Hispanic women at risk for excessive or insufficient gestational weight gain.

  15. Losing weight after pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... below the minimum number of calories you need. Breastfeeding If you are breastfeeding, you will want to lose weight slowly. Weight ... not affect your milk supply or your health. Breastfeeding makes your body burn calories. It helps you ...

  16. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Can antidepressants cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. Weight gain is a possible side effect of nearly all antidepressants. ...

  17. Substitution of Ni for Fe in superconducting Fe0.98Te0.5Se0.5 depresses the normal-state conductivity but not the magnetic spectral weight

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinghui; Zhong, Ruidan; Li, Shichao; Gan, Yuan; Xu, Zhijun; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, T.; Matsuda, M.; Zhao, Yang; Li, Qiang; Xu, Guangyong; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Wen, Jinsheng

    2015-01-05

    We have performed systematic resistivity and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe₀.₉₈₋zNizTe₀.₅Se₀.₅ samples to study the impact of Ni substitution on the transport properties and the low-energy (≤ 12 meV) magnetic excitations. It is found that, with increasing Ni doping, both the conductivity and superconductivity are gradually suppressed; in contrast, the low-energy magnetic spectral weight changes little. Comparing with the impact of Co and Cu substitution, we find that the effects on conductivity and superconductivity for the same degree of substitution grow systematically as the atomic number of the substituent deviates from that of Fe. The impact of the substituents as scattering centers appears to be greater than any contribution to carrier concentration. The fact that low-energy magnetic spectral weight is not reduced by increased electron scattering indicates that the existence of antiferromagnetic correlations does not depend on electronic states close to the Fermi energy.

  18. Gradient Weight in Phonology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Kevin Michael

    2011-01-01

    Research on syllable weight in generative phonology has focused almost exclusively on systems in which weight is treated as an ordinal hierarchy of clearly delineated categories (e.g. light and heavy). As I discuss, canonical weight-sensitive phenomena in phonology, including quantitative meter and quantity-sensitive stress, can also treat weight…

  19. Assessing Your Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... to learn more? Preventing Weight Gain Choosing a lifestyle that includes good eating habits and daily physical activity can help you maintain a healthy weight and prevent weight gain. The Possible Health Effects from Having Obesity Having obesity can increase your chances of developing ...

  20. Feasibility of magnetic bearings for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, David; Rosado, Lewis

    1992-01-01

    The application of active magnetic bearings to advanced gas turbine engines will provide a product with major improvements compared to current oil lubricated bearing designs. A rethinking of the engine rotating and static structure design is necessary and will provide the designer with significantly more freedom to meet the demanding goals of improved performance, increased durability, higher reliability, and increased thrust to weight ratio via engine weight reduction. The product specific technology necessary for this high speed, high temperature, dynamically complex application has been defined. The resulting benefits from this approach to aircraft engine rotor support and the complementary engine changes and improvements have been assessed.

  1. Feasibility of magnetic bearings for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibner, David; Rosado, Lewis

    1992-05-01

    The application of active magnetic bearings to advanced gas turbine engines will provide a product with major improvements compared to current oil lubricated bearing designs. A rethinking of the engine rotating and static structure design is necessary and will provide the designer with significantly more freedom to meet the demanding goals of improved performance, increased durability, higher reliability, and increased thrust to weight ratio via engine weight reduction. The product specific technology necessary for this high speed, high temperature, dynamically complex application has been defined. The resulting benefits from this approach to aircraft engine rotor support and the complementary engine changes and improvements have been assessed.

  2. WeightLifter: Visual Weight Space Exploration for Multi-Criteria Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Pajer, Stephan; Streit, Marc; Torsney-Weir, Thomas; Spechtenhauser, Florian; Muller, Torsten; Piringer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    A common strategy in Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) is to rank alternative solutions by weighted summary scores. Weights, however, are often abstract to the decision maker and can only be set by vague intuition. While previous work supports a point-wise exploration of weight spaces, we argue that MCDM can benefit from a regional and global visual analysis of weight spaces. Our main contribution is WeightLifter, a novel interactive visualization technique for weight-based MCDM that facilitates the exploration of weight spaces with up to ten criteria. Our technique enables users to better understand the sensitivity of a decision to changes of weights, to efficiently localize weight regions where a given solution ranks high, and to filter out solutions which do not rank high enough for any plausible combination of weights. We provide a comprehensive requirement analysis for weight-based MCDM and describe an interactive workflow that meets these requirements. For evaluation, we describe a usage scenario of WeightLifter in automotive engineering and report qualitative feedback from users of a deployed version as well as preliminary feedback from decision makers in multiple domains. This feedback confirms that WeightLifter increases both the efficiency of weight-based MCDM and the awareness of uncertainty in the ultimate decisions.

  3. Manufacturing the MFTF magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Hinkle, R.E.; Hodges, A.J.

    1980-10-13

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a large mirror program experiment for magnetic fusion energy. It will combine and extend the near-classical plasma confinement achieved in 2XIIB with advanced neutral-beam and magnet technologies. The product of ion density and confinement time will be improved more than an order of magnitude, while the superconducting magnet weight will be extrapolated from 15 tons in Baseball II to 375 tons in MFTF. Recent reactor studies show that the MFTF will traverse much of the distance in magnet technology towards the reactor regime.

  4. High-Temperature Hybrid Rotor Support System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory Vehicle Technology Directorate and the NASA Glenn Research Center demonstrated a unique high-speed, high-temperature rotor support system in September 2003. Advanced turbomachinery is on its way to surpassing the capabilities of rolling-element bearings and conventional dampers. To meet these demands, gas turbine engines of the future will demand increased efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, and reduced specific fuel consumption and noise. The more-electric engine replaces oil-lubricated bearings, dampers, gears, and seals with electrical devices. One such device is the magnetic bearing. The Vehicle Technology Directorate and Glenn have demonstrated the operation of a radial magnetic bearing in combination with a hydrostatic bearing at 1000 F at 31,000 rpm (2.3 MDN1). This unique combination takes advantage of a high-temperature rub surface in the event of electrical power loss or sudden overloads. The hydrostatic bearings allow load sharing with the magnetic bearing. The magnetic-hydrostatic bearing combination eliminates wear and high contact stress from sudden acceleration of the rolling-element bearings and overheating. The magnetic bearing enables high damping, adaptive vibration control, and precise rotor positioning, diagnostics, and health monitoring. A model of the test facility used at Glenn for this technology demonstration is shown. A high-temperature heteropolar radial magnetic bearing is located at the center of gravity of the test rotor. There is a 0.022-in. radial air gap between the rotor and stator. Two rub surface hydrostatic bearings were placed on either side of the magnetic bearing. The rotor is supported by a 0.002-in. hydrostatic air film and the magnetic field. The prototype active magnetic bearing cost $24,000 to design and fabricate and a set of four high temperature, rub-surface, hydrostatic bearings cost $28,000. This work was funded by the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle program.

  5. "If I write like a scientist, then soy un cientifico": Differentiated Writing Supports and the Effects on Fourth-Grade English Proficient Students' and English Language Learners' Science Content Knowledge and Explanatory Writing About Magnetism and Electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichon, Kathryn A.

    The purpose of this pre-post quasi-experimental dissertation was to investigate the effects of differentiated writing supports on English Proficient Students' (EPSs) and English Language Learners' (ELLs) science content knowledge and explanatory writing about magnetism and electricity. Eighty-seven fourth-grade students (EPSs = 35; ELLs = 52) were randomly assigned to two groups based on two differentiated writing: guided questions ( n = 43) or targeted writing frames (n = 44). In the guided questions condition, students completed four question sets after a science investigation, and in the targeted writing frames condition, students completed the same four question sets, but with explicit support for vocabulary, transitions, and relational language in the form of if-then statements. Over the course of the four week intervention, students completed a total of nine writing tasks, and were pretested and posttested on six variables: magnetism and electricity content knowledge test, explanatory writing task, total number of words written, total number of sentences written, number of if-then statements, and number of content-based vocabulary words. Results indicate that EPSs and ELLs in both writing conditions improved significantly from pretest to posttest on six content and explanatory writing variables, with statistically significant gain scores occurring for the magnetism and electricity content knowledge test in which the targeted writing frames condition had a larger rate of gain. ANCOVA results indicated that in comparing writing conditions, a statistically significant difference was found for magnetism and electricity content knowledge posttests, when controlling for pretests. No statistically significant effects for language classification on the six variables were found when controlling for pretest scores. Interaction effects between writing condition and language classification were statistically significantly different for the interaction effect found on if

  6. Magnetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Defense supported the development of microwave ferrites , and today 85 percent of that market is still military. Magnetostrictive sensors for sonar...or hard ferrite , Although both cobalt and samarium are expensive and the production process is difficult v4,*-°’. because of the strong tendency of...plentiful materials supply and low magnet cost. This calls for automated mass-production methods for ferrites and, perhaps, Nd-Fe-based REPMs. But for

  7. Yogurt and weight management.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Paul F; Wang, Huifen

    2014-05-01

    A large body of observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has examined the role of dairy products in weight loss and maintenance of healthy weight. Yogurt is a dairy product that is generally very similar to milk, but it also has some unique properties that may enhance its possible role in weight maintenance. This review summarizes the human RCT and prospective observational evidence on the relation of yogurt consumption to the management and maintenance of body weight and composition. The RCT evidence is limited to 2 small, short-term, energy-restricted trials. They both showed greater weight losses with yogurt interventions, but the difference between the yogurt intervention and the control diet was only significant in one of these trials. There are 5 prospective observational studies that have examined the association between yogurt and weight gain. The results of these studies are equivocal. Two of these studies reported that individuals with higher yogurt consumption gained less weight over time. One of these same studies also considered changes in waist circumference (WC) and showed that higher yogurt consumption was associated with smaller increases in WC. A third study was inconclusive because of low statistical power. A fourth study observed no association between changes in yogurt intake and weight gain, but the results suggested that those with the largest increases in yogurt intake during the study also had the highest increase in WC. The final study examined weight and WC change separately by sex and baseline weight status and showed benefits for both weight and WC changes for higher yogurt consumption in overweight men, but it also found that higher yogurt consumption in normal-weight women was associated with a greater increase in weight over follow-up. Potential underlying mechanisms for the action of yogurt on weight are briefly discussed.

  8. Recruitment and Retention for a Weight Loss Maintenance Trial Involving Weight Loss Prior to Randomization

    PubMed Central

    Grubber, J. M.; McVay, M. A.; Olsen, M. K.; Bolton, J.; Gierisch, J. M.; Taylor, S. S.; Maciejewski, M. L.; Yancy, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective A weight loss maintenance trial involving weight loss prior to randomization is challenging to implement due to the potential for dropout and insufficient weight loss. We examined rates and correlates of non‐initiation, dropout, and insufficient weight loss during a weight loss maintenance trial. Methods The MAINTAIN trial involved a 16‐week weight loss program followed by randomization among participants losing at least 4 kg. Psychosocial measures were administered during a screening visit. Weight was obtained at the first group session and 16 weeks later to determine eligibility for randomization. Results Of 573 patients who screened as eligible, 69 failed to initiate the weight loss program. In adjusted analyses, failure to initiate was associated with lower age, lack of a support person, and less encouragement for making dietary changes. Among participants who initiated, 200 dropped out, 82 lost insufficient weight, and 222 lost sufficient weight for randomization. Compared to losing sufficient weight, dropping out was associated with younger age and tobacco use, whereas losing insufficient weight was associated with non‐White race and controlled motivation for physical activity. Conclusions Studies should be conducted to evaluate strategies to maximize recruitment and retention of subgroups that are less likely to initiate and be retained in weight loss maintenance trials. PMID:28090340

  9. Temperature-dependent tensile strength, surface roughness diagnostics, and magnetic support and positioning of polymer ICF shells. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, A.

    1995-12-15

    During the course of this grant, we perfected emissivity and accommodation coefficient measurements on polymer ICF shells in the temperature range 250 to 350 K. Values for polystyrene shells are generally between 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -3}, which are very advantageous for ICF at cryogenic temperatures. Preliminary results on Br doped target shells indicate an accommodation coefficient, presumably associated with surface roughness on an atomic scale, about an order of magnitude larger than for ordinary polystyrene target shells. We also constructed apparatus with optical access for low temperature tensile strength and emissivity measurements, and made preliminary tests on this system. Magnetic shells were obtained both from GDP coating and from doping styrene with 10 manometer size ferromagnetic particles. The magnetic properties were measured through electron spin resonance (ESR). These experiments confirm the applicability of the Curie law, and establish the validity of using ESR measurements to determine shell temperature in the low temperature regime from 4K to 250K, thus complementing our presently accessible range. The high electron spin densities (> 10{sup 20}/CM{sup 3}) suggest magnetic levitation should be feasible at cryogenic temperatures. This work has resulted in two conference presentations, a Technical Report, a paper to be published in Fusion Technology, and a Master`s Thesis.

  10. Strategic coating of NdFeB magnets with Dy to improve the coercivity of permanent magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Ucar, Huseyin; Parker, David S.; Nlebedim, I. C.; ...

    2015-12-25

    Here, we present a method, supported by theoretical analysis, for optimizing the usage of the critical rare earth element dysprosium in Nd2Fe14B (NdFeB)-based permanent magnets. In this method, we use Dy selectively in locations such as magnet edges and faces, where demagnetization factors are most significant, rather than uniformly throughout the bulk sample. A 200 nm thick Dy film was sputtered onto commercial N-38, NdFeB magnets with a thickness of 3 mm and post-annealed at temperatures from 600 - 700 C. Magnets displayed enhanced coercivities after post-annealing. Furthermore, our experimental results indicate as large as a 5 percent increase inmore » the energy product of NdFeB magnets, achieved for a total Dy weight percentage of 0.06 percent, much less than that used in commercial grade Dy-NdFeB magnets. Finally, by assuming all Dy diffused into NdFeB magnets, the improvement in energy product corresponds to a saving of over 1% Dy (critical element). Magnets manufactured using this technique will therefore be higher performing and significantly less expensive than those made presently.« less

  11. Strategic coating of NdFeB magnets with Dy to improve the coercivity of permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ucar, Huseyin; Parker, David S.; Nlebedim, I. C.; McCallum, R. W.; McCall, S. K.; Parans Paranthaman, M.

    2015-12-25

    Here, we present a method, supported by theoretical analysis, for optimizing the usage of the critical rare earth element dysprosium in Nd2Fe14B (NdFeB)-based permanent magnets. In this method, we use Dy selectively in locations such as magnet edges and faces, where demagnetization factors are most significant, rather than uniformly throughout the bulk sample. A 200 nm thick Dy film was sputtered onto commercial N-38, NdFeB magnets with a thickness of 3 mm and post-annealed at temperatures from 600 - 700 C. Magnets displayed enhanced coercivities after post-annealing. Furthermore, our experimental results indicate as large as a 5 percent increase in the energy product of NdFeB magnets, achieved for a total Dy weight percentage of 0.06 percent, much less than that used in commercial grade Dy-NdFeB magnets. Finally, by assuming all Dy diffused into NdFeB magnets, the improvement in energy product corresponds to a saving of over 1% Dy (critical element). Magnets manufactured using this technique will therefore be higher performing and significantly less expensive than those made presently.

  12. Electrically Tunable Magnetism in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao

    2015-03-01

    The external controllability of the magnetic properties in topological insulators would be important both for fundamental and practical interests. Here we predict the electric-field control of ferromagnetism in a thin film of insulating magnetic topological insulators. The decrease of band inversion by the application of electric fields results in a reduction of magnetic susceptibility, and hence in the modication of magnetism. Remarkably, the electric field could even induce the magnetic quantum phase transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. We further propose a topological transistor device in which the dissipationless charge transport of chiral edge states is controlled by an electric field. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and chiral edge transport in such a device may lead to electronic and spintronic applications for topological insulators. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  13. Greater weight loss among men participating in a commercial weight loss program: a pooled analysis of 2 randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Barraj, Leila M; Murphy, Mary M; Heshka, Stanley; Katz, David L

    2014-02-01

    Being overweight and obese are significant health concerns for men and women, yet despite comparable needs for effective weight loss and maintenance strategies, little is known about the success of commercial weight loss programs in men. This study tests the hypothesis that men participating in a commercial weight loss program (Weight Watchers) had significantly greater weight loss than men receiving limited support from health professionals for weight loss (controls). A pooled analysis of weight loss and related physiologic parameter data from 2 randomized clinical trials was conducted. After 12 months, analysis of covariance tests showed that men in the commercial program group (n = 85) lost significantly more weight (P < .01) than men in the control group (n = 84); similar significant differences were observed for body mass index and waist circumference. These results suggest that participation in a commercial weight loss program may be a more effective means to lose weight and maintain weight loss.

  14. Impact of parental weight status on weight loss efforts in Hispanic children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents have been shown to play an important role in weight loss for children. Parents are typically involved either as models for change or as supporters of children's weight loss efforts. It is likely that overweight/obese parents will need to be involved in changing the environment for themselv...

  15. Cyclo- and carbophosphazene-supported ligands for the assembly of heterometallic (Cu2+/Ca2+, Cu2+/Dy3+, Cu2+/Tb3+) complexes: synthesis, structure, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli; Senapati, Tapas; Dey, Atanu; Das, Sourav; Kalisz, Marguerite; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2012-02-20

    The carbophosphazene and cyclophosphazene hydrazides, [{NC(N(CH(3))(2))}(2){NP{N(CH(3))NH(2)}(2)}] (1) and [N(3)P(3)(O(2)C(12)H(8))(2){N(CH(3))NH(2)}(2)] were condensed with o-vanillin to afford the multisite coordination ligands [{NC(N(CH(3))(2))}(2){NP{N(CH(3))N═CH-C(6)H(3)-(o-OH)(m-OCH(3))}(2)}] (2) and [{N(2)P(2)(O(2)C(12)H(8))(2)}{NP{N(CH(3))N═CH-C (6)H(3)-(o-OH)(m-OCH(3))}(2)}] (3), respectively. These ligands were used for the preparation of heterometallic complexes [{NC(N(CH(3))(2))}(2){NP{N(CH(3))N═CH-C(6)H(3)-(o-O)(m-OCH(3))}(2)}{CuCa(NO(3))(2)}] (4), [{NC(N(CH(3))(2))}(2){NP{N(CH(3))N═CH-C(6)H(3)-(o-O)(m-OCH(3))}(2)}{Cu(2)Ca(2)(NO(3))(4)}]·4H(2)O (5), [{NC(N(CH(3))(2))}(2){NP{N(CH(3))N═CH-C(6)H(3)-(o-O)(m-OCH(3))}(2)}{CuDy(NO(3))(4)}]·CH(3)COCH(3) (6), [{NP(O(2)C(12)H(8))}(2){NP{N(CH(3))N═CH-C(6)H(3)-(o-O)(m-OCH(3))}(2)}{CuDy(NO(3))(3)}] (7), and [{NP(O(2)C(12)H(8))}(2){NP{N(CH(3))N═CH-C(6)H(3)-(o-O)(m-OCH(3))}(2)}{CuTb(NO(3))(3)}] (8). The molecular structures of these compounds reveals that the ligands 2 and 3 possess dual coordination pockets which are used to specifically bind the transition metal ion and the alkaline earth/lanthanide metal ion; the Cu(2+)/Ca(2+), Cu(2+)/Tb(3+), and Cu(2+)/Dy(3+) pairs in these compounds are brought together by phenoxide and methoxy oxygen atoms. While 4, 6, 7, and 8 are dinuclear complexes, 5 is a tetranuclear complex. Detailed magnetic properties on 6-8 reveal that these compounds show weak couplings between the magnetic centers and magnetic anisotropy. However, the ac susceptibility experiments did not reveal any out of phase signal suggesting that in these compounds slow relaxation of magnetization is absent above 1.8 K.

  16. Blogging for weight loss: personal accountability, writing selves, and the weight-loss blogosphere.

    PubMed

    Leggatt-Cook, Chez; Chamberlain, Kerry

    2012-09-01

    Body weight is a key concern in contemporary society, with large proportions of the population attempting to control their weight. However, losing weight and maintaining weight loss is notoriously difficult, and new strategies for weight loss attract significant interest. Writing about experiences of weight loss in online journals, or blogging, has recently expanded rapidly. Weight-loss bloggers typically write about daily successes and failures, report calorie consumption and exercise output, and post photographs of their changing bodies. Many bloggers openly court the surveillance of blog readers as a motivation for accountability to their weight-loss goals. Drawing from a sample of weight-loss blogs authored by women, we explore three issues arising from this practice of disclosing a conventionally private activity within an online public domain. First, we examine motivations for blogging, focusing on accountability. Secondly, we consider the online construction of self, exploring how weight-loss bloggers negotiate discourses around fatness, and rework selves as their bodies transform. Finally, we consider the communities of interest that form around weight-loss blogs. This 'blogosphere' provides mutual support for weight loss. However, participating in online social spaces is complicated and bloggers must carefully manage issues of privacy and disclosure.

  17. Weight gain - unintentional

    MedlinePlus

    ... trying to do so can have many causes. Metabolism slows down as you age . This can cause weight gain if you eat too much, eat the wrong foods, or do not get enough exercise. Drugs that can cause weight gain include: Birth ...

  18. The Meaning of Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iona, Mario

    1975-01-01

    Presents a summary and comparison of various views on the concepts of mass and weight. Includes a consideration of gravitational force in an inertial system and apparent gravitational force on a rotating earth. Discusses the units and methods for measuring mass and weight. (GS)

  19. Labor Supply and Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakdawalla, Darius; Philipson, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    We use panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate on-the-job exercise and weight. For male workers, job-related exercise has causal effects on weight, but for female workers, the effects seem primarily selective. A man who spends 18 years in the most physical fitness-demanding occupation is about 25 pounds (14…

  20. Exercise and Weight Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Victor L.

    This paper describes a number of factors which go into determining weight. The paper describes what calories are, how caloric expenditure is measured, and why caloric expenditure is different for different people. The paper then outlines the way the body tends to adjust food intake and exercise to maintain a constant body weight. It is speculated…

  1. Pregnancy and Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profiles Multimedia Pregnancy & Healthy Weight Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content New research shows that maintaining a healthy weight before and during pregnancy can reduce the likelihood of negative effects for mothers and babies We’ve heard the ...

  2. The Weighted Oblimin Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates that the weighting procedure proposed by E. Cureton and S. Mulaik (1975) can be applied to the Direct Oblimin approach of D. Clarkson and R. Jennrich (1988) to provide good results. The rotation method obtained is called Weighted Oblimin. Compared this method to other rotation methods with favorable results. (SLD)

  3. Common Weight Loss Challenges

    MedlinePlus

    ... to lose that we’ve been talking about weight-loss surgery. Is that something we should consider?” Although the ... have the operation should not be made hastily. Weight-loss surgery is only advisable for extremely overweight adolescents for ...

  4. Stabilizing Alginate Confinement and Polymer Coating of CO-Releasing Molecules Supported on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles To Trigger the CO Release by Magnetic Heating.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Hajo; Winkler, Felix; Kunz, Peter; Schmidt, Annette M; Hamacher, Alexandra; Kassack, Matthias U; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-12-07

    Maghemite (Fe2O3) iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized, modified with covalent surface-bound CO-releasing molecules of a tri(carbonyl)-chlorido-phenylalaninato-ruthenium(II) complex (CORM), and coated with a dextran polymer. The time- and temperature-dependent CO release from this CORM-3 analogue was followed by a myoglobin assay. A new measurement method for the myoglobin assay was developed, based on confining "water-soluble" polymer-coated Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles in hollow spheres of nontoxic and easily prepared calcium alginate. Dropping a mixture of Dextran500k@CORM@IONP and sodium alginate into a CaCl2 solution leads to stable hollow spheres of Ca(2+) cross-linked alginate which contain the Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles. This "alginate-method" (i) protects CORM-3 analogues from rapid CO-displacement reactions with a protein, (ii) enables a spatial separation of the CORM from its surrounding myoglobin assay with the alginate acting as a CO-permeable membrane, and (iii) allows the use of substances with high absorptivity (such as iron oxide nanoparticles) in the myoglobin assay without interference in the optical path of the UV cell. Embedding the CORM@IONP nanoparticles in the alginate vessel represents a compartmentation of the reactive component and allows for close contact with, yet facile separation from, the surrounding myoglobin assay. The half-life of the CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles surrounded by alginate was determined to be 890 ± 70 min at 20 °C. An acceleration of the CO release occurs at higher temperature with a half-life of 172 ± 27 min at 37 °C and 45 ± 7 min at 50 °C. The CO release can be triggered in an alternating current magnetic field (31.7 kA m(-1), 247 kHz, 39.9 mT) through local magnetic heating of the susceptible iron oxide nanoparticles. With magnetic heating at 20 °C in the bulk solution, the half-life of CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles decreased to 155 ± 18 min

  5. Weight discrimination and bullying.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Rebecca M; King, Kelly M

    2013-04-01

    Despite significant attention to the medical impacts of obesity, often ignored are the negative outcomes that obese children and adults experience as a result of stigma, bias, and discrimination. Obese individuals are frequently stigmatized because of their weight in many domains of daily life. Research spanning several decades has documented consistent weight bias and stigmatization in employment, health care, schools, the media, and interpersonal relationships. For overweight and obese youth, weight stigmatization translates into pervasive victimization, teasing, and bullying. Multiple adverse outcomes are associated with exposure to weight stigmatization, including depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, suicidal ideation, poor academic performance, lower physical activity, maladaptive eating behaviors, and avoidance of health care. This review summarizes the nature and extent of weight stigmatization against overweight and obese individuals, as well as the resulting consequences that these experiences create for social, psychological, and physical health for children and adults who are targeted.

  6. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-10-23

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation.

  7. Biocompatible and high-performance amino acids-capped MnWO4 nanocasting as a novel non-lanthanide contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kai; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jianhua; Huang, Sa; Li, Zhenhua; Yuan, Qinghai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, a novel non-lanthanide dual-modality contrast agent, manganese tungstate (MnWO4), has been successfully constructed by a facile and versatile hydrothermal route. With the merits of a high atomic number and a well-positioned K-edge energy of tungsten, our well-prepared non-lanthanide nanoprobes provide a higher contrast efficacy than routine iodine-based agents in clinics. Additionally, the presence of Mn in these nanoparticles endow them with excellent T1-weighted MR imaging capabilities. As an alternative to T2-weighted MRI and CT dual-modality contrast agents, the nanoprobes can provide a positive contrast signal, which prevents confusion with the dark signals from hemorrhage and blood clots. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that a non-lanthanide imaging nanoprobe is applied for CT and T1-weighted MRI simultaneously. Moreover, comparing with gadolinium-based T1-weighted MRI and CT dual-modality contrast agents that were associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), our contrast agents have superior biocompatibility, which is proved by a detailed study of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and in vivo toxicology. Together with excellent dispersibility, high biocompatibility and superior contrast efficacy, these nanoprobes provide detailed and complementary information from dual-modality imaging over traditional single-mode imaging and bring more opportunities to the new generation of non-lanthanide nanoparticulate-based contrast agents.In the present work, a novel non-lanthanide dual-modality contrast agent, manganese tungstate (MnWO4), has been successfully constructed by a facile and versatile hydrothermal route. With the merits of a high atomic number and a well-positioned K-edge energy of tungsten, our well-prepared non-lanthanide nanoprobes provide a higher contrast efficacy than routine iodine-based agents in clinics. Additionally, the presence of Mn in these nanoparticles endow them with excellent T1

  8. INTERMAGNET and magnetic observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Chulliat, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic observatory is a specially designed ground-based facility that supports time-series measurement of the Earth’s magnetic field. Observatory data record a superposition of time-dependent signals related to a fantastic diversity of physical processes in the Earth’s core, mantle, lithosphere, ocean, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and, even, the Sun and solar wind.

  9. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  10. Topology dependent epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wei; Quax, Rick; Lees, Michael; Qiu, Xiaogang; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many diffusive processes occur on structured networks with weighted links, such as disease spread by airplane transport or information diffusion in social networks or blogs. Understanding the impact of weight-connectivity correlations on epidemic spreading in weighted networks is crucial to support decision-making on disease control and other diffusive processes. However, a real understanding of epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks is still lacking. Here we conduct a numerical study of the velocity of a Reed-Frost epidemic spreading process in various weighted network topologies as a function of the correlations between edge weights and node degrees. We find that a positive weight-connectivity correlation leads to a faster epidemic spreading compared to an unweighted network. In contrast, we find that both uncorrelated and negatively correlated weight distributions lead to slower spreading processes. In the case of positive weight-connectivity correlations, the acceleration of spreading velocity is weak when the heterogeneity of weight distribution increases.

  11. Temperature-dependent tensile strength, surface roughness diagnostics, and magnetic support and positioning of polymer ICF shells. Final report, April 17, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, A.

    1997-08-15

    The research carried out under this grant is a continuation of some of the authors previous experimental work on ICF target shells which focused on emissivity properties over a large temperature range, and on magnetic properties which could lead to successful levitation of target shells. Former methods in which contact-less shell temperature determination was achieved by accurate measurements of shell permeation rate are not workable at temperatures below about 230K, since the permeation rate becomes too slow. A new method explored here for emissivity determination at lower temperatures than in the preceding studies utilizes visual observation of phase changes between the liquid and gaseous phases as the shell warms up under the influence of black-body radiation absorption. The apparatus for this method was modified from its previously form by using cold flowing gas as coolant rather than a liquid N{sub 2} bath. Two gases, argon and methane, were principally employed. While the actual emissivities were not accurately measured here, proof of the method was established. CH{sub 4} (methane) gives the best results, thus extending the temperature range of emissivity determination down to about 140K. For emissivity determinations at still lower temperatures, another method discussed in previous work provides contact-less temperature measurement via the Curie law through measurements of the magnetic susceptibility using electron spin resonance (ESR). Current work showed some interesting distinctions among variously doped shells, but otherwise the results of the preliminary work carried out at the end of the previous grant were confirmed.

  12. Magnetically Attached Multifunction Maintenance Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Joffe, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mobile telerobot, denoted the magnetically attached multifunction maintenance rover (MAGMER), has been proposed for use in the inspection and maintenance of the surfaces of ships, tanks containing petrochemicals, and other large ferromagnetic structures. As its name suggests, this robot would utilize magnetic attraction to adhere to a structure. As it moved along the surface of the structure, the MAGMER would perform tasks that could include close-up visual inspection by use of video cameras, various sensors, and/or removal of paint by water-jet blasting, laser heating, or induction heating. The water-jet nozzles would be mounted coaxially within compressed-air-powered venturi nozzles that would collect the paint debris dislodged by the jets. The MAGMER would be deployed, powered, and controlled from a truck, to which it would be connected by hoses for water, compressed air, and collection of debris and by cables for electric power and communication (see Figure 1). The operation of the MAGMER on a typical large structure would necessitate the use of long cables and hoses, which can be heavy. To reduce the load of the hoses and cables on the MAGMER and thereby ensure its ability to adhere to vertical and overhanging surfaces, the hoses and cables would be paid out through telescopic booms that would be parts of a MAGMER support system. The MAGMER would move by use of four motorized, steerable wheels, each of which would be mounted in an assembly that would include permanent magnets and four pole pieces (see Figure 2). The wheels would protrude from between the pole pieces by only about 3 mm, so that the gap between the pole pieces and the ferromagnetic surface would be just large enough to permit motion along the surface but not so large as to reduce the magnetic attraction excessively. In addition to the wheel assemblies, the MAGMER would include magnetic adherence enhancement fixtures, which would comprise arrays of permanent magnets and pole pieces

  13. Fortification of human milk in very low birth weight infants (VLBW <1500 g birth weight).

    PubMed

    Adamkin, David H; Radmacher, Paula G

    2014-06-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics supports the feeding of human milk for all infants. Very-low-birth-weight and extremely low-birth-weight infants especially can benefit from the immune and neurodevelopmental effects of human milk. However, human milk alone is nutritionally inadequate for the rapid growth of the very-low-birth-weight infant during a critical window for brain development and requires fortification to meet current recommendations. There are a variety of products, devices, and strategies that can be used to fine tune nutritional support of these very vulnerable infants.

  14. Light-weight plastination.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Hanno; Rabi, Suganthy; Saito, Toshiyuki; Sawutti, Alimjan; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Itoh, Masahiro; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2008-11-20

    Plastination is an excellent technique which helps to keep the anatomical specimens in a dry, odourless state. Since the invention of plastination technique by von Hagens, research has been done to improve the quality of plastinated specimens. In this paper, we have described a method of producing light-weight plastinated specimens using xylene along with silicone and in the final step, substitute xylene with air. The finished plastinated specimens were light-weight, dry, odourless and robust. This method requires less use of resin thus making the plastination technique more cost-effective. The light-weight specimens are easy to carry and can easily be used for teaching.

  15. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  16. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  17. Terms vs. Concepts - The Case of Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taibu, Rex

    2017-01-01

    Terminological and conceptual issues surrounding the definition of scientific terms have bothered teachers [A] and students for many years. Some terms such as energy are not even usually defined, although they appear in different contexts of scientific communication, and others such as weight have debatable definitions, and for this reason the term weight is a great example to demonstrate general issues regarding terms and concepts. The term weight is defined in different ways, e.g., as the gravitational force or operationally as the force exerted by the body on its support. In an inertial situation, the magnitude of the gravitational force is equal to that of the support force. However, the two meanings are distinct when the object is in an accelerating situation (e.g., an accelerating elevator or on the surface of a rotating planet). Apart from these dichotomous definitions of weight, there are further language problems associated with each gravitational and operational definition of weight. This paper demonstrates these issues and asserts that arguing for which definition of weight is correct is not a viable approach to solve the language issue. The paper proposes an alternative route to deal with language issues facing weight and other related terms.

  18. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Non-magnetic CNTs and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayondo, Moses; Seifu, Dereje

    Magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in non-magnetic CNTs and graphene matrix to incorporate all the advantages and the unique properties of CNTs and graphene. Composites of CNTs and graphene with magnetic nanoparticles may offer new opportunities for a wide variety of potential applications such as magnetic data storage, magnetic force microscopy tip, electromagnetic interference shields, thermally conductive films, reinforced polymer composites, transparent electrodes for displays, solar cells, gas sensors, magnetic nanofluids, and magnetically guided drug delivery systems. Magnetic nanoparticles coated CNTs can also be used as an electrode in lithium ion battery to replace graphite because of the higher theoretical capacity. Graphene nanocomposites, coated with magnetic sensitive nanoparticles, have demonstrated enhanced magnetic property. We would like to acknowledge support by NSF-MRI-DMR-1337339.

  19. Preventing Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    ... body composition gradually shifts — the proportion of muscle decreases and the proportion of fat increases. This shift slows their metabolism, making it easier to gain weight. In addition, some people become less physically ...

  20. Your Child's Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... spurts in height and weight gain in both boys and girls. Once these changes start, they continue for several ... or obese . Different BMI charts are used for boys and girls under the age of 20 because the amount ...

  1. Weight in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kenshole, Anne B.

    1972-01-01

    Diabetes is being increasingly detected among the overweight. The author discusses the links between diabetes and obesity, and outlines methods by which satisfactory weight reduction may be achieved. PMID:20468726

  2. Implications of magnetic and magnetodielectric behavior of GdCrTiO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Tathamay; Singh, Kiran; Gohil, Smita; Ghosh, Shankar; Sampathkumaran, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out dc magnetization, heat-capacity, and dielectric studies down to 2 K for the compound GdCrTiO5, crystallizing in orthorhombic Pbam structure, in which well-known multiferroics RMn2O5 (R = Rare-earths) form. The points of emphasis are: (i) The magnetic ordering temperature of Cr appears to be suppressed compared with that in isostructural Nd counterpart, NdCrTiO5. This finding on the Gd compound suggests that Nd 4f hybridization plays an uncommon role in the magnetism of Cr in contrast to a proposal long ago. (ii) Dielectric constant does not exhibit any notable feature below about 30 K in the absence of external magnetic field, but a peak appears and gets stronger with the application of external magnetic fields, supporting the existence of magnetodielectric coupling. (iii) The dielectric anomalies appear even near 100 K, which can be attributed to short-range magnetic-order. We also observe a gain in spectral weight below about 150 K in Raman spectra in the frequency range 150-400 cm-1, which could be magnetic in origin, supporting short-range magnetic order. It is of interest to explore whether geometrically frustration plays any role in the dielectric properties of this family, as in the case of RMn2O5.

  3. Monofluoride bridged, binuclear metallacycles of first row transition metals supported by third generation bis(1-pyrazolyl)methane ligands: unusual magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Reger, Daniel L; Foley, Elizabeth A; Watson, Russell P; Pellechia, Perry J; Smith, Mark D; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J

    2009-11-16

    The reaction of M(BF(4))(2).xH(2)O, where M is Fe, Co, Cu, and Zn, and the ditopic, bis(pyrazolyl)methane ligand m-[CH(pz)(2)](2)C(6)H(4), L(m), where pz is a pyrazolyl ring, yields the monofluoride bridged, binuclear [M(2)(mu-F)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(3) complexes. In contrast, a similar reaction of L(m) with Ni(BF(4))(2).6H(2)O yields dibridged [Ni(2)(mu-F)(2)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(2). The solid state structures of seven [M(2)(mu-F)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(3) complexes show that the divalent metal ion is in a five-coordinate, trigonal bipyramidal, coordination environment with either a linear or nearly linear M-F-M bridging arrangement. NMR results indicate that [Zn(2)(mu-F)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(3) retains its dimeric structure in solution. The [Ni(2)(mu-F)(2)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(2) complex has a dibridging fluoride structure that has a six-coordination environment about each nickel(II) ion. In the solid state, the [Fe(2)(mu-F)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(3) and [Co(2)(mu-F)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(3) complexes show weak intramolecular antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the two metal(II) ions with J values of -10.4 and -0.67 cm(-1), respectively; there is no observed long-range magnetic order. Three different solvates of [Cu(2)(mu-F)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(3) are diamagnetic between 5 and 400 K, thus showing strong antiferromagnetic exchange interactions of -600 cm(-1) or more negative. Mossbauer spectra indicate that [Fe(2)(mu-F)(mu-L(m))(2)](BF(4))(3) exhibits no long-range magnetic order between 4.2 and 295 K and isomer shifts that are consistent with the presence of five-coordinate, high-spin iron(II).

  4. Rotor dynamic behaviour of a high-speed oil-free motor compressor with a rigid coupling supported on four radial magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmied, J.; Pradetto, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    The combination of a high-speed motor, dry gas seals, and magnetic bearings realized in this unit facilitates the elimination of oil. The motor is coupled with a quill shaft to the compressor. This yields higher natural frequencies of the rotor than with the use of a diaphragm coupling and helps to maintain a sufficient margin of the maximum speed to the frequency of the second compressor bending mode. However, the controller of each bearing then has to take the combined modes of both machines into account. The requirements for the controller to ensure stability and sufficient damping of all critical speeds are designed and compared with the implemented controller. The calculated closed loop behavior was confirmed experimentally, except the stability of some higher modes due to slight frequency deviations of the rotor model to the actual rotor. The influence of a mechanical damper as a device to provide addition