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Sample records for magnetic bead microarray

  1. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, “amplicon-in-answer-out” operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  2. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochol, R. D.; Casavant, B. P.; Dueck, M. E.; Lee, L. P.; Lin, L.

    2011-05-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening.

  3. Heterogeneous immunoassays using magnetic beads on a digital microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Sista, Ramakrishna S; Eckhardt, Allen E; Srinivasan, Vijay; Pollack, Michael G; Palanki, Srinivas; Pamula, Vamsee K

    2008-12-01

    A digital microfluidic platform for performing heterogeneous sandwich immunoassays based on efficient handling of magnetic beads is presented in this paper. This approach is based on manipulation of discrete droplets of samples and reagents using electrowetting without the need for channels where the droplets are free to move laterally. Droplet-based manipulation of magnetic beads therefore does not suffer from clogging of channels. Immunoassays on a digital microfluidic platform require the following basic operations: bead attraction, bead washing, bead retention, and bead resuspension. Several parameters such as magnetic field strength, pull force, position, and buffer composition were studied for effective bead operations. Dilution-based washing of magnetic beads was demonstrated by immobilizing the magnetic beads using a permanent magnet and splitting the excess supernatant using electrowetting. Almost 100% bead retention was achieved after 7776-fold dilution-based washing of the supernatant. Efficient resuspension of magnetic beads was achieved by transporting a droplet with magnetic beads across five electrodes on the platform and exploiting the flow patterns within the droplet to resuspend the beads. All the magnetic-bead droplet operations were integrated together to generate standard curves for sandwich heterogeneous immunoassays on human insulin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) with a total time to result of 7 min for each assay.

  4. Bead-based microarray immunoassay for lung cancer biomarkers using quantum dots as labels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifen; Wu, Simin; Jing, Fengxiang; Zhou, Hongbo; Jia, Chunping; Li, Gang; Cong, Hui; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we developed a multiplex immunoassay system that combines the suspension and planar microarray formats within a single layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using soft lithography technology. The suspension format was based on the target proteins forming a sandwich structure between the magnetic beads and the quantum dot (QD) probes through specific antibody-antigen interactions. The planar microarray format was produced by fabricating an array of micro-wells in PDMS. Each micro-well was designed to trap a single microbead and eventually generated a microbead array within the PDMS chamber. The resultant bead-based on-chip assay could be used for simultaneously detecting three lung cancer biomarkers-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), fragments of cytokeratin 19 (CYFRA21-1) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-in 10 μl of human serum, with a wide linear dynamic range (1.03-111 ng/mL for CEA and CYFRA21-1; 9.26-1000 ng/ml for NSE) and a low detection limit (CEA: 0.19 ng/ml; CYFRA21-1: 0.97 ng/ml; NSE: 0.37 ng/ml; S/N=3). Our micro-well chip does not require complex e-beam lithography or the reactive ion etching process as with existing micro-well systems, which rely on expensive focused ion beam (FIB) milling or optical fiber bundles. Furthermore, the current approach is easy to operate without extra driving equipment such as pumps, and can make parallel detection for multiplexing with rapid binding kinetics, small reagent consumption and low cost. This work has demonstrated the importance of the successful application of on-chip multiplexing sandwich assays for the detection of biomarker proteins.

  5. Magnet polepiece design for uniform magnetic force on superparamagnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Fallesen, Todd; Hill, David B; Steen, Matthew; Macosko, Jed C; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2010-07-01

    Here we report construction of a simple electromagnet with novel polepieces which apply a spatially uniform force to superparamagnetic beads in an optical microscope. The wedge-shaped gap was designed to keep partial differential B(x)/ partial differential y constant and B large enough to saturate the bead. We achieved fields of 300-600 mT and constant gradients of 67 T/m over a sample space of 0.5x4 mm(2) in the focal plane of the microscope and 0.05 mm along the microscope optic axis. Within this space the maximum force on a 2.8 microm diameter Dynabead was 12 pN with a spatial variation of approximately 10%. Use of the magnet in a biophysical experiment is illustrated by showing that gliding microtubules propelled by the molecular motor kinesin can be stopped by the force of an attached magnetic bead.

  6. Attomolar protein detection using a magnetic bead surface coverage assay.

    PubMed

    Tekin, H Cumhur; Cornaglia, Matteo; Gijs, Martin A M

    2013-03-21

    We demonstrate a microfluidic method for ultra-sensitive protein detection in serum. First, 'large' (2.8 μm) antibody-functionalized magnetic beads specifically capture antigen from a serum matrix under active microfluidic mixing. Subsequently, the large beads loaded with the antigens are gently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0 μm) antibody-coated magnetic beads. During the exposure, attractive magnetic bead dipole-dipole interactions improve the contact between the two bead types and help the antigen-antibody immunocomplex formation, while non-specific large bead adsorption is limited by exploiting viscous drag forces in the microfluidic channel on the small-bead pattern. This efficient antigen-antibody recognition and binding mechanism mimics a biological process of selective recognition of tissue molecules, like is the case when leukocytes roll and slow down on blood vessel walls by selectin-mediated adhesion. After exposure of the large beads to the pattern of small beads, the antigen concentration is detected by simply counting the number of surface pattern-bound large magnetic beads. The new technique allows detection of proteins down to the sub-zeptomole range. In particular, we demonstrate detection of only 200 molecules of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in a serum sample volume of 5 μL, corresponding to a concentration of 60 attomolar or 1 fg mL(-1).

  7. Guided self-assembly of magnetic beads for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Nguyen, Ha; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Fischbacher, Johann; Özelt, Harald; Kovacs, Alexander; Brandl, Martin; Schrefl, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Micromagnetic beads are widely used in biomedical applications for cell separation, drug delivery, and hyperthermia cancer treatment. Here we propose to use self-organized magnetic bead structures which accumulate on fixed magnetic seeding points to isolate circulating tumor cells. The analysis of circulating tumor cells is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. Microfluidic chips for isolating circulating tumor cells use either affinity, size or density capturing methods. We combine multiphysics simulation techniques to understand the microscopic behavior of magnetic beads interacting with soft magnetic accumulation points used in lab-on-chip technologies. Our proposed chip technology offers the possibility to combine affinity and size capturing with special antibody-coated bead arrangements using a magnetic gradient field created by Neodymium Iron Boron permanent magnets. The multiscale simulation environment combines magnetic field computation, fluid dynamics and discrete particle dynamics.

  8. Incorporation of pyrene in polypyrrole/polystyrene magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Głowala, Paulina; Budniak, Adam; Krug, Pamela; Wysocka, Barbara; Berbeć, Sylwia; Dec, Robert; Dołęga, Izabela; Kacprzak, Kamil; Wojciechowski, Jarosław; Kawałko, Jakub; Kępka, Paweł; Kępińska, Daria; Kijewska, Krystyna; Mazur, Maciej

    2014-10-15

    Pyrene, a fluorescent dye, was incorporated into polystyrene particles coated with polypyrrole. The incorporation was achieved by treating the polypyrrole/polystyrene (PPy/PS) beads in a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of the pyrene fluorophore followed by rinsing with methanol. The polystyrene cores of the beads swell in THF, allowing penetration of pyrene molecules into the polystyrene structure. The addition of methanol causes contraction of the swollen polystyrene, which encapsulates the dye molecules inside the beads. It is shown that the polypyrrole coating is permeable with respect to both the dye and the solvent, allowing the transport of molecules between the polystyrene cores and the contacting solution. The polypyrrole adlayer can be used as a matrix for the incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles. Embedded particles provide magnetic functionality to the PPy/PS beads. It is demonstrated that the pyrene-loaded beads can be manipulated with an external magnetic field.

  9. Magnetic track array for efficient bead capture in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Morandini, Jacques; Josserand, Jacques; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-10-01

    Magnetism-based microsystems, as those dedicated to immunoaffinity separations or (bio)chemical reactions, take benefit of the large surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the immobilized magnetic beads, thus increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. As the sensitivity is directly linked to the efficiency of the magnetic bead capture, this paper presents a simple method to enhance the capture in a microchannel. Considering a microchannel surrounded by two rectangular permanent magnets of different length (L (m) = 2, 5, 10 mm) placed in attraction, it is shown that the amount of trapped beads is limited by the magnetic forces mainly located at the magnet edges. To overcome this limitation, a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) microchip with an integrated magnetic track array has been prototyped by laser photo-ablation. The magnetic force is therefore distributed all along the magnet length. It results in a multi-plug bead capture, observed by microscope imaging, with a magnetic force value locally enhanced. The relative amount of beads, and so the specific binding surface for further immunoassays, presents a significant increase of 300% for the largest magnets. The influence of the track geometry and relative permeability on the magnetic force was studied by numerical simulations, for the microchip operating with 2-mm-long magnets.

  10. Programmable and automated bead-based microfluidics for versatile DNA microarrays under isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Penchovsky, Robert

    2013-06-21

    Advances in modern genomic research depend heavily on applications of various devices for automated high- or ultra-throughput arrays. Micro- and nanofluidics offer possibilities for miniaturization and integration of many different arrays onto a single device. Therefore, such devices are becoming a platform of choice for developing analytical instruments for modern biotechnology. This paper presents an implementation of a bead-based microfluidic platform for fully automated and programmable DNA microarrays. The devices are designed to work under isothermal conditions as DNA immobilization and hybridization transfer are performed under steady temperature using reversible pH alterations of reaction solutions. This offers the possibility for integration of more selection modules onto a single chip compared to maintaining a temperature gradient. This novel technology allows integration of many modules on a single reusable chip reducing the application cost. The method takes advantage of demonstrated high-speed DNA hybridization kinetics and denaturation on beads under flow conditions, high-fidelity of DNA hybridization, and small sample volumes are needed. The microfluidic devices are applied for a single nucleotide polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing by synthesis without the need for fluorescent removal step. Apart from that, the microfluidic platform presented is applicable to many areas of modern biotechnology, including biosensor devices, DNA hybridization microarrays, molecular computation, on-chip nucleic acid selection, high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for drug discovery.

  11. Multiplexed Analysis of Serum Breast and Ovarian Cancer Markers by Means of Suspension Bead-quantum Dot Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhnik, Kristina; Sokolova, Zinaida; Baryshnikova, Maria; Bilan, Regina; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    Multiplexed analysis of cancer markers is crucial for early tumor diagnosis and screening. We have designed lab-on-a-bead microarray for quantitative detection of three breast cancer markers in human serum. Quantum dots were used as bead-bound fluorescent tags for identifying each marker by means of flow cytometry. Antigen-specific beads reliably detected CA 15-3, CEA, and CA 125 in serum samples, providing clear discrimination between the samples with respect to the antigen levels. The novel microarray is advantageous over the routine single-analyte ones due to the simultaneous detection of various markers. Therefore the developed microarray is a promising tool for serum tumor marker profiling.

  12. Configurational Statistics of Magnetic Bead Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic beads that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic bead depends on the location of the bead relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple beads also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic beads does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for beads magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy and precision with which the coverage can be determined from a single sensor measurement. We show that statistical fluctuations between samples may reduce the sensitivity and dynamic range of a sensor significantly when the functionalized area is larger than the sensor area. Hence, the statistics of sampling is essential to sensor design. For illustration, we analyze three important published cases for which statistical fluctuations are dominant, significant, and insignificant, respectively. PMID:26496495

  13. Configurational Statistics of Magnetic Bead Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic beads that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic bead depends on the location of the bead relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple beads also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic beads does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for beads magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy and precision with which the coverage can be determined from a single sensor measurement. We show that statistical fluctuations between samples may reduce the sensitivity and dynamic range of a sensor significantly when the functionalized area is larger than the sensor area. Hence, the statistics of sampling is essential to sensor design. For illustration, we analyze three important published cases for which statistical fluctuations are dominant, significant, and insignificant, respectively.

  14. Thermophysical and Magnetic Properties of Carbon Beads Containing Cobalt Nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izydorzak, M.; Skumiel, A.; Leonowicz, M.; Kaczmarek-Klinowska, M.; Pomogailo, A. D.; Dzhardimalieva, G. I.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic Co-beads were fabricated in the course of a three-step procedure comprising preparation of a metal-acrylamide complex, followed by frontal polymerization and finally pyrolysis of the polymer. The composites obtained were composed of cobalt nanocrystallites stabilized in a carbon matrix built of disordered graphite. The crystallite size, material morphology, fraction of the magnetic component, and thus the magnetic properties can be tailored by a proper choice of the processing variables. The samples were subjected to an alternating magnetic field of different strengths ( H = 0 to 5 kA · m-1) at a frequency of f = 500 kHz. From the calorimetric measurements, we concluded that the relaxation processes dominate in the heat generation mechanism for the beads pyrolyzed at 773 K. For the beads pyrolyzed at 1073 K, significant values of magnetic properties, such as the coercive force and remanence give substantial contribution to the energy losses for hysteresis. The specific absorption coefficient ( SAR) related to the cobalt mass unit for the 1073 K pyrolyzed beads {({SAR} = 1340 W \\cdot g^{-1 }_cobalt)} is in very good conformity with the results obtained by other authors. The effective density power loss, caused by eddy currents, can be neglected for heating processes applied in magnetic hyperthermia. The Co-beads can potentially be applied for hyperthermia treatment.

  15. Phase Diagram Characterization Using Magnetic Beads as Liquid Carriers.

    PubMed

    Blumenschein, Nicholas; Han, Daewoo; Steckl, Andrew J

    2015-09-04

    Magnetic beads with ~1.9 µm average diameter were used to transport microliter volumes of liquids between contiguous liquid segments with a tube for the purpose of investigating phase change of those liquid segments. The magnetic beads were externally controlled using a magnet, allowing for the beads to bridge the air valve between the adjacent liquid segments. A hydrophobic coating was applied to the inner surface of the tube to enhance the separation between two liquid segments. The applied magnetic field formed an aggregate cluster of magnetic beads, capturing a certain liquid amount within the cluster that is referred to as carry-over volume. A fluorescent dye was added to one liquid segment, followed by a series of liquid transfers, which then changed the fluorescence intensity in the neighboring liquid segment. Based on the numerical analysis of the measured fluorescence intensity change, the carry-over volume per mass of magnetic beads has been found to be ~2 to 3 µl/mg. This small amount of liquid allowed for the use of comparatively small liquid segments of a couple hundred microliters, enhancing the feasibility of the device for a lab-in-tube approach. This technique of applying small compositional variation in a liquid volume was applied to analyzing the binary phase diagram between water and the surfactant C12E5 (pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether), leading to quicker analysis with smaller sample volumes than conventional methods.

  16. Magnetically-actuated, bead-enhanced silicon photonic immunosensor

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Enrique; McClellan, Melinda S.; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic actuation has been introduced to an optical immunosensor technology resulting in improvements in both rapidity and limit of detection for an assay quantitating low concentrations of a representative protein biomarker. For purposes of demonstration, an assay was designed for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), a small cytokine which regulates migration and infiltration of monocytes and macrophages, and is an emerging biomarker for several diseases. The immunosensor is based on arrays of highly multiplexed silicon photonic microring resonators. A one-step sandwich immunoassay was performed and the signal was further enhanced through a tertiary recognition event between biotinylated tracer antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. By integrating a magnet under the sensor chip, magnetic beads were rapidly directed towards the sensor surface resulting in improved assay performance metrics. Notably, the time required in the bead binding step was reduced by a factor of 11 (4 vs 45 min), leading to an overall decrease in assay time from 73 min to 32 min. The magnetically-actuated assay also lowered the limit of detection (LOD) for MCP-1 from 124 pg mL−1 down to 57 pg mL−1. In sum, the addition of magnetic actuation into bead-enhanced sandwich assays on a silicon photonic biosensor platform might facilitate improved detection of biomarkers in point-of-care diagnostics settings. PMID:26528374

  17. A rapid automatic processing platform for bead label-assisted microarray analysis: application for genetic hearing-loss mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Song, Xiumei; Xiang, Guangxin; Feng, Zhengde; Guo, Hongju; Mei, Danyang; Zhang, Guohao; Wang, Dong; Mitchelson, Keith; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Molecular diagnostics using microarrays are increasingly being used in clinical diagnosis because of their high throughput, sensitivity, and accuracy. However, standard microarray processing takes several hours and involves manual steps during hybridization, slide clean up, and imaging. Here we describe the development of an integrated platform that automates these individual steps as well as significantly shortens the processing time and improves reproducibility. The platform integrates such key elements as a microfluidic chip, flow control system, temperature control system, imaging system, and automated analysis of clinical results. Bead labeling of microarray signals required a simple imaging system and allowed continuous monitoring of the microarray processing. To demonstrate utility, the automated platform was used to genotype hereditary hearing-loss gene mutations. Compared with conventional microarray processing procedures, the platform increases the efficiency and reproducibility of hybridization, speeding microarray processing through to result analysis. The platform also continuously monitors the microarray signals, which can be used to facilitate optimization of microarray processing conditions. In addition, the modular design of the platform lends itself to development of simultaneous processing of multiple microfluidic chips. We believe the novel features of the platform will benefit its use in clinical settings in which fast, low-complexity molecular genetic testing is required.

  18. Magnetic Bead Actuation of Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    When decoupled from the overlying membrane, hair bundles of the amphibian sacculus exhibit spontaneous oscillation. To explore the dynamics of this innate motility without an imposed external load, we recorded their oscillations with a high-speed CMOS camera, and applied mechanical manipulation that minimally alters the geometry of an individual hair bundle. We present a technique that utilizes micron-sized magnetic particles to actuate the stereociliary bundle with a magnetized probe. Quasi-steady-state displacements were imposed on freely oscillating bundles. Our data indicate that deflection of the bundle affects both the frequency and the amplitude of the oscillations, with a crossing of the bifurcation that is dependent on the direction and speed of the applied offset.

  19. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  20. [Enrichment of giant panda microsatellite markers using dynal magnet beads].

    PubMed

    Shen, Fu-Jun; Watts, Phill; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, An-Ju; Sanderson, Stephanie; Kemp, Steve J; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-05-01

    The 400 -600 bp DNA fractions of giant panda containing STR sequences were captured by hybridization with the oligonucleotide probes attached to streptavadin coated magnetic beads (Dynal). The enriched DNA were ligated into pGEM-T and then transformed into E. coil JM109 competent cells. In total 260 positive clones were identified from 2 880 transformants in the libraries which were screened by gamma-32 P radiolabelled probes. Finally, we got 54 sequences and successfully designed 37 pairs of STR primers for giant panda. The results showed that this method is very efficient to isolate microsatellite markers.

  1. In situ single cell detection via microfluidic magnetic bead assay

    PubMed Central

    KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    We present a single cell detection device based on magnetic bead assay and micro Coulter counters. This device consists of two successive micro Coulter counters, coupled with a high gradient magnetic field generated by an external magnet. The device can identify single cells in terms of the transit time difference of the cell through the two micro Coulter counters. Target cells are conjugated with magnetic beads via specific antibody and antigen binding. A target cell traveling through the two Coulter counters interacts with the magnetic field, and have a longer transit time at the 1st counter than that at the 2nd counter. In comparison, a non-target cell has no interaction with the magnetic field, and hence has nearly the same transit times through the two counters. Each cell passing through the two counters generates two consecutive voltage pulses one after the other; the pulse widths and magnitudes indicating the cell’s transit times through the counters and the cell’s size respectively. Thus, by measuring the pulse widths (transit times) of each cell through the two counters, each single target cell can be differentiated from non-target cells even if they have similar sizes. We experimentally proved that the target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and non-target rat adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) have significant different transit time distribution, from which we can determine the recognition regions for both cell groups quantitatively. We further demonstrated that within a mixed cell population of rASCs and HUVECs, HUVECs can be detected in situ and the measured HUVECs ratios agree well with the pre-set ratios. With the simple device structure and easy sample preparation, this method is expected to enable single cell detection in a continuous flow and can be applied to facilitate general cell detection applications such as stem cell identification and enumeration. PMID:28222140

  2. Thermophysical and Magnetic Properties of Carbon Beads Containing Nickel Nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumiel, A.; Izydorzak, M.; Leonowicz, M.; Pomogailo, A. D.; Dzhardimalieva, G. I.

    2011-09-01

    Ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic nickel nanocrystallites, stabilized in a carbon matrix, were prepared by a three-step procedure including formation of a Ni acrylamide complex, followed by frontal polymerization and pyrolysis of the polymer at various temperatures. It was found that the procedure applied enables fabrication of magnetic beads containing metallic nanocrystallites embedded in a carbon matrix. The size of the crystallites, their morphology, volume fraction, and magnetic properties can be tailored by the pyrolysis temperature. The size of the crystallites affects their behavior in an external magnetic field, i.e., a heating process is the most effective for a sample pyrolyzed at 873 K. The revealed H n-type dependence of the temperature increase rate, (d T/d t) t=0, on the amplitude of the magnetic field indicates the presence of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic particles in all the samples studied since n > 2. For the superparamagnetic particles, the heating mechanism is associated with Néel relaxation. For the lower values of the magnetic field amplitude, H < H 0, the relaxation losses dominate whereas for the opposite case, H > H 0, the magnetic hysteresis is the main source of thermal energy losses. The composites containing magnetic Ni nanocrystallites entrapped in a carbon matrix can be potentially applied for hyperthermia treatment.

  3. Dose-response curve of a microfluidic magnetic bead-based surface coverage sandwich assay.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, Matteo; Trouillon, Raphaël; Tekin, H Cumhur; Lehnert, Thomas; Gijs, Martin A M

    2015-09-25

    Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic beads') have been used to advantage in many microfluidic devices for sensitive antigen (Ag) detection. Today, assays that use as read-out of the signal the number count of immobilized beads on a surface for quantification of a sample's analyte concentration have been among the most sensitive and have allowed protein detection lower than the fgmL(-1) concentration range. Recently, we have proposed in this category a magnetic bead surface coverage assay (Tekin et al., 2013 [1]), in which 'large' (2.8μm) antibody (Ab)-functionalized magnetic beads captured their Ag from a serum and these Ag-carrying beads were subsequently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0μm) Ab-coated magnetic beads. When the system was exposed to a magnetic induction field, the magnet dipole attractive interactions between the two bead types were used as a handle to approach both bead surfaces and assist with Ag-Ab immunocomplex formation, while unspecific binding (in absence of an Ag) of a large bead was reduced by exploiting viscous drag flow. The dose-response curve of this type of assay had two remarkable features: (i) its ability to detect an output signal (i.e. bead number count) for very low Ag concentrations, and (ii) an output signal of the assay that was non-linear with respect to Ag concentration. We explain here the observed dose-response curves and show that the type of interactions and the concept of our assay are in favour of detecting the lowest analyte concentrations (where typically either zero or one Ag is carried per large bead), while higher concentrations are less efficiently detected. We propose a random walk process for the Ag-carrying bead over the magnetic landscape of small beads and this model description explains the enhanced overall capture probability of this assay and its particular non-linear dose response curves.

  4. Use of magnetic beads for Gram staining of bacteria in aqueous suspension.

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, S P; Sørum, H; Larsen, H J; Gogstad, G

    2001-12-01

    A Gram staining technique was developed using monodisperse magnetic beads in concentrating bacteria in suspension for downstream application. The technique does not require heat fixation of organisms, electrical power, or a microscope. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were identified macroscopically based on the colour of the suspension. The bacteria concentrated on magnetic beads may also be identified microscopically.

  5. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads{sup ®} MyOne{sup ™}) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔB{sub dep} = 4.5–27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  6. Using magnets and magnetic beads to dissect signaling pathways activated by mechanical tension applied to cells.

    PubMed

    Marjoram, R J; Guilluy, C; Burridge, K

    2016-02-01

    Cellular tension has implications in normal biology and pathology. Membrane adhesion receptors serve as conduits for mechanotransduction that lead to cellular responses. Ligand-conjugated magnetic beads are a useful tool in the study of how cells sense and respond to tension. Here we detail methods for their use in applying tension to cells and strategies for analyzing the results. We demonstrate the methods by analyzing mechanotransduction through VE-cadherin on endothelial cells using both permanent magnets and magnetic tweezers.

  7. Rapid screening of peptide probes through in situ single-bead sequencing microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhi; Wei, Zewen; Zhang, Di; Ma, Huailei; Wang, Zihua; Bu, Xiangli; Li, Menglin; Geng, Lingling; Lausted, Christopher; Hood, Leroy; Fang, Qiaojun; Wang, Hao; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2014-12-02

    Peptide ligands as targeting probes for in vivo imaging and drug delivery have attracted great interest in the biomedical community. However, high affinity and specificity screening of large peptide libraries remains a tedious process. Here, we report a continuous-flow microfluidic method for one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial peptide library screening. We screened a library with 2 × 10(5) peptide beads within 4 h and discovered 140 noncanonical peptide hits targeting the tumor marker, aminopeptidase N (APN). Using the Clustal algorithm, we identified the conserved sequence Tyr-XX-Tyr in the N terminal. We demonstrated that the novel sequence YVEYHLC peptides have both nanomolar affinity and high specificity for APN in ex vivo and in vivo models. We envision that the successful demonstration of this integrated novel nanotechnology for peptide screening and identification open a new avenue for rapid discovery of new peptide-based reagents for disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  8. Three-dimensional pattern formation of magnetically labeled microgel beads for biological tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, H.; Inoue, H.; Nakamura, M.

    2009-03-01

    We commenced basic research on the three-dimensional (3D) pattern formation of microgel beads for applications in biological tissue engineering. In this new technique, microgel beads are premagnetized by doping them with magnetic nanoparticles. Living cells will be included in the beads for actual use. If a nonuniform magnetic field is applied to a solution containing these magnetized beads, the beads will align, contact, and form a 3D structure. The structure is controlled by the seed pattern of the magnetic particles plugged in a substrate and the profile of the magnetic field distribution. We constructed tubes, which imitate blood vessels, for demonstration using gel beads whose diameters are of the order of several tens of micrometers. The diameter of the demonstrated tube was less than 0.5 mm and its length was 6.6 mm, although living cells were not included in the beads. Numerical calculations by using the discrete element method were conducted to confirm the formation of the tube and to predict the effect of centrifugal force, which will be applied to fill cells in the space between magnetically patterned beads. Although this unique technology is in the nascent stage, this 3D pattern formation technique by the control of the magnetic field has potential to be one of the effective engineering technologies for manufacturing 3D patterned biological tissues in the future.

  9. Lectin-Magnetic Beads for Plasma Membrane Isolation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Chuang, Carol; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane proteins mainly function to transmit external signals into the cell. Many plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g., HER2 and EGFR) are known to mediate oncogenic progression, making them prime targets for cancer therapy. Recently, it has become important to identify plasma membrane proteins that are differentially expressed in normal versus cancer cells, in drug-sensitive versus drug-resistant cells, or among tumor cells that metastasize to different organ sites because these differentially expressed membrane proteins may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. In addition, there is an increased interest in identifying cell-surface proteins that could serve as markers for stem cells, progenitor cells, or cells of different lineages. Traditionally, membrane isolation requires multiple centrifugation steps to isolate different organelles based on their density. With the advent of affinity matrix technology, it is possible to separate organelles based on their molecular differences. A defining characteristic of the plasma membrane is that plasma membrane proteins are more extensively glycosylated than are intracellular membrane proteins. As a result, affinity chromatography employing lectin, a carbohydrate-binding protein, is commonly used to isolate plasma membrane proteins. We have extended this concept for plasma membrane isolation by using concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin with mannose specificity. Here we describe a protocol that uses immobilized ConA bound to magnetic beads to isolate plasma membranes from homogenized cell lysates. The captured plasma membrane proteins are then solubilized from the ConA-magnetic beads by detergents in the presence of a competing sugar, methyl α-mannopyranoside.

  10. Magnetic Beads-based Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic beads (MBs) has been developed to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PAH-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PAH (HRP-PAH). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreaction among PAH-antibody-coated MBs, PAH analyte, and HRP-PAH. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing 3, 3´, 5, 5´- tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for electrochemical detection. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate were investigated, and the reduction peak current of TMB was used to quantify the concentration of PAH. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PAH conjugates, the enzyme catalytic reaction time, and the pH of the supporting electrolyte that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 50 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical magnetic immunoassay was successfully evaluated with tap water spiked with PAHs, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental applications.

  11. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle’s position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  12. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm(2), a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle's position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  13. Magnetic bead counter using a micro-Hall sensor for biological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.; Kim, K.; Joo, S.; Kim, S.U.; Rhie, K.; Hong, J.; Shin, K-H.; and Kim, K.H.

    2009-04-13

    Micro-Hall sensors have been fabricated, and various numbers of micron-size magnetic beads have been placed within the sensor area. The Hall resistances measured at room temperature are found to be proportional to the number of the beads, and are in good agreement with the numerically simulated results presented in this study. Our sensors are designed to measure the number of beads between zero and full-scale signals for a given number range of interest. The effects of miniaturizing the beads and sensors to nanoscale are also discussed.

  14. On-chip magnetic separation of superparamagnetic beads for integrated molecular analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Octavian; Wang, Kevan; Au, Patrick; Tang, Jimmy; Harris, Eva; Beatty, P. Robert; Boser, Bernhard E.

    2010-03-01

    We have demonstrated a postprocessed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) capable of on-chip magnetic separation, i.e., removing via magnetic forces the nonspecifically bound magnetic beads from the detection area on the surface of the chip. Initially, 4.5 μm wide superparamagnetic beads sedimenting out of solution due to gravity were attracted to the detection area by a magnetic concentration force generated by flowing current through a conductor embedded in the IC. After sedimentation, the magnetic beads that did not bind strongly to the functionalized surface of the IC through a specific biochemical complex were removed by a magnetic separation force generated by flowing current through another conductor placed laterally to the detection area. As the spherical bead pivoted on the surface of the chip, the lateral magnetic force was further amplified by mechanical leveraging, and 50 mA of current flowing through the separation conductor placed 18 μm away from the bead resulted in 7.5 pN of tensile force on the biomolecular tether immobilizing the bead. This force proved high enough to break nonspecific interactions while leaving specific antibody-antigen bonds intact. A sandwich capture immunoassay on purified human immunoglobulin G showed strong correlation with a control enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a detection limit of 10 ng/ml or 70 pM. The beads bound to the detection area after on-chip magnetic separation were detected optically. To implement a fully integrated molecular diagnostics platform, the on-chip magnetic separation functionality presented in this work can be readily combine with state-of-the art CMOS-based magnetic bead detection technology.

  15. Conditions for efficient on-chip magnetic bead detection via magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, E; Petti, D; Cantoni, M; Damin, F; Torti, A; Chiari, M; Bertacco, R

    2013-09-15

    A commonly used figure of merit of magnetoresistive sensors employed to detect magnetic beads labeling biomolecules in lab-on-chip applications is the sensor sensitivity (S0) to external magnetic fields in the linear region of the sensor. In this paper we show that, in case of lock-in detection and bead excitation by a small AC magnetic field, S0 is not the good figure of merit to optimize. Indeed, the highest sensitivity to the magnetic beads is achieved biasing the sensor in the region of its characteristics where the product between the DC bias field and the second derivative of the resistance with respect to the magnetic field is maximum. The validity of this criterion, derived from a phenomenological model of bead detection, is proved in case of magnetic tunneling junction sensors detecting magnetic beads with 250nm diameter. This work paves the way to the development of a new generation of sensors properly designed to maximize the bead sensitivity.

  16. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-04-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.

  17. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  18. Magnetic Bead Based Immunoassay for Autonomous Detection of Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y; Hara, C A; Knize, M G; Hwang, M H; Venkatesteswaran, K S; Wheeler, E K; Bell, P M; Renzi, R F; Fruetel, J A; Bailey, C G

    2008-05-01

    As a step towards toward the development of a rapid, reliable analyzer for bioagents in the environment, we are developing an automated system for the simultaneous detection of a group of select agents and toxins. To detect toxins, we modified and automated an antibody-based approach previously developed for manual medical diagnostics that uses fluorescent eTag{trademark} reporter molecules and is suitable for highly multiplexed assays. Detection is based on two antibodies binding simultaneously to a single antigen, one of which is labeled with biotin while the other is conjugated to a fluorescent eTag{trademark} through a cleavable linkage. Aqueous samples are incubated with the mixture of antibodies along with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads coupled to a photo-activatable porphyrin complex. In the presence of antigen, a molecular complex is formed where the cleavable linkage is held in proximity to the photoactivable group. Upon excitation at 680 nm, free radicals are generated, which diffuse and cleave the linkage, releasing the eTags{trademark}. Released eTags{trademark} are analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Limits of detection for ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid individually were 4 ng/mL (or 80 pg) and 16 ng/mL (or 320 pg), respectively, using the manual assay. In addition, we demonstrated the use of pairs of antibodies from different sources in a single assay to decrease the rate of false positives. Automation of the assay was demonstrated on a flow-through format with higher LODs of 125 ng/mL (or 2.5 ng) each of a mixture of ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid. This versatile assay can be easily modified with the appropriate antibodies to detect a wide range of toxins and other proteins.

  19. Magnetic bead based immunoassay for autonomous detection of toxins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Youngeun; Hara, Christine A; Knize, Mark G; Hwang, Mona H; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S; Wheeler, Elizabeth K; Bell, Perry M; Renzi, Ronald F; Fruetel, Julie A; Bailey, Christopher G

    2008-11-15

    We are developing an automated system for the simultaneous, rapid detection of a group of select agents and toxins in the environment. To detect toxins, we modified and automated an antibody-based approach previously developed for manual medical diagnostics that uses fluorescent eTag reporter molecules and is suitable for highly multiplexed assays. Detection is based on two antibodies binding simultaneously to a single antigen, one of which is labeled with biotin while the other is conjugated to a fluorescent eTag through a cleavable linkage. Aqueous samples are incubated with the mixture of antibodies along with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and a photoactive porphyrin complex. In the presence of antigen, a molecular complex is formed where the cleavable linkage is held in proximity to the photoactive group. Upon excitation at 680 nm, free radicals are generated, which diffuse and cleave the linkage, releasing the eTags. Released eTags are analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Limits of detection for ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid individually were 4 (or 80 pg) and 16 ng/mL (or 320 pg), respectively, using the manual assay. In addition, we demonstrated the use of pairs of antibodies from different sources in a single assay to decrease the rate of false positives. Automation of the assay was demonstrated in a flow-through format with higher LODs of 32 ng/mL (or 640 ng) each of a mixture of ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid. This versatile assay can be easily modified with the appropriate antibodies to detect a wide range of toxins and other proteins.

  20. Magnetic actuator for the control and mixing of magnetic bead-based reactions on-chip.

    PubMed

    Berenguel-Alonso, Miguel; Granados, Xavier; Faraudo, Jordi; Alonso-Chamarro, Julián; Puyol, Mar

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic bead (MB)-based bioassays have been implemented in integrated devices, their handling on-chip is normally either not optimal--i.e. only trapping is achieved, with aggregation of the beads--or requires complex actuator systems. Herein, we describe a simple and low-cost magnetic actuator to trap and move MBs within a microfluidic chamber in order to enhance the mixing of a MB-based reaction. The magnetic actuator consists of a CD-shaped plastic unit with an arrangement of embedded magnets which, when rotating, generate the mixing. The magnetic actuator has been used to enhance the amplification reaction of an enzyme-linked fluorescence immunoassay to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7 whole cells, an enterohemorrhagic strain, which have caused several outbreaks in food and water samples. A 2.7-fold sensitivity enhancement was attained with a detection limit of 603 colony-forming units (CFU) /mL, when employing the magnetic actuator.

  1. Magnetic Pycnoporus sanguineus-loaded alginate composite beads for removing dye from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Hui; Shih, Ming-Cheng; Chiu, Han-Chen; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2014-06-18

    Dye pollution in wastewater is a severe environmental problem because treating water containing dyes using conventional physical, chemical, and biological treatments is difficult. A conventional process is used to adsorb dyes and filter wastewater. Magnetic filtration is an emerging technology. In this study, magnetic Pycnoporus sanguineus-loaded alginate composite beads were employed to remove a dye solution. A white rot fungus, P. sanguineus, immobilized in alginate beads were used as a biosorbent to remove the dye solution. An alginate polymer could protect P. sanguineus in acidic environments. Superparamagnetic nanomaterials, iron oxide nanoparticles, were combined with alginate gels to form magnetic alginate composites. The magnetic guidability of alginate composites and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles facilitated the magnetic filtration and separation processes. The fungus cells were immobilized in loaded alginate composites to study the influence of the initial dye concentration and pH on the biosorption capacity. The composite beads could be removed easily post-adsorption by using a magnetic filtration process. When the amount of composite beads was varied, the results of kinetic studies of malachite green adsorption by immobilized cells of P. sanguineus fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. The results indicated that the magnetic composite beads effectively adsorbed the dye solution from wastewater and were environmentally friendly.

  2. Use of a magnetic field to modify and detect avalanche behavior on a conical bead pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nathan; Lehman, Susan

    2015-03-01

    A conical bead pile subject to slow driving and an external magnetic field is used to test the effects of drop height and cohesion on avalanche statistics. Magnetically susceptible beads were dropped onto a pile from different heights and into different strengths of magnetic field. Avalanches were recorded by the change in mass as beads fall off the pile. For beads dropped from a low drop height with no cohesion, the avalanche size distribution follows a power law. As cohesion increases, we observe an increase in the probability of very large avalanches and decreases in the mid-size avalanches. The resulting bump in the avalanche distribution moves to larger avalanche size as the cohesion in the system is increased, matching the prediction by an analytic theory from a mean-field model of slip avalanches. The model also makes predictions for avalanche duration, which is not measurable with our current system. Since the steel beads are magnetized while in the applied magnetic field, their motion during an avalanche creates a change in magnetic flux. To detect this motion, we have placed a large-diameter pick-up coil around the pile. Results of the testing and calibration of this coil to measure avalanche duration are presented.

  3. Development of a Magnetic Beads Quantitative Detection System for Fast Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yujiro; Morishita, Tomohiro; Matsuyama, Kenji; Takasa, Kenji; Shibasaki, Ichiro

    This paper reports the development and performance of a detection system for magnetic beads. The system consists of a semiconductor based magneto-resistance sensor for beads detection and a lateral flow kit. Detection of anti-gen of H.Influenza at concentration of 0.1ng/ml was performed with satisfactory sensitivity, showing the system to be a promising for immunoassay.

  4. Manipulation of superparamagnetic beads on patterned Au/Co/Au multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosz, A.; Holzinger, D.; Urbaniak, M.; Ehresmann, A.; Stobiecki, F.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetophoresis of water-suspended 4 μm-diameter superparamagnetic beads above topographically patterned, sputter deposited Ti(4 nm)/Au(60 nm)/[Co(0.7 nm)/Au(1 nm)] × 3 multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated. The results impressively demonstrate that the magnetic stray field landscape above the stripe structure when superimposed with an external, slowly rotating, field enables the directed transport of magnetic beads across the stripe panel with velocities up to 12 μm s-1.

  5. Optimization of the Magnetic Recovery of Hits from One-Bead-One-Compound Library Screens.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Kimberly; Ndungu, J M; Clark, Lorraine F; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-09-14

    On-bead screening of one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries is a useful procedure for the identification of protein ligands. An important aspect of this experiment is the method by which beads that bind the target protein are separated from those that do not. Ideally, such a method would be rapid and convenient and result in the isolation of 100% of the "hits" with no false positives (beads that display compounds that are not good ligands for the target). We introduced a technique in which beads that have bound a labeled target protein can be magnetized, thus allowing their convenient isolation ( Astle et al. Chem. Biol. 2010 , 17 , 38 - 45 ). However, recent work in our laboratory and others has shown that magnetic hit recovery can result in the isolation of large numbers of false positives and has also suggested that many true hit beads are missed. In this study, we employ a well-defined model system to examine the efficiency of various magnetic hit isolation protocols. We show that the choice of reagents and the particular operations employed are critical for optimal results.

  6. A novel magnetic bead bioassay platform using a microchip-based sensor for infectious disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Aytur, Turgut; Foley, Jonathan; Anwar, Mekhail; Boser, Bernhard; Harris, Eva; Beatty, P Robert

    2006-07-31

    New technologies are greatly needed to improve laboratory tests that can be used in point-of-care clinical settings. Here, a biosensor was used to detect micron-scale paramagnetic beads in order to replace the conventional enzymatic label used in ELISAs. This novel biosensor was fabricated through standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) manufacturing and was used to quantify magnetic beads bound to the sensor surface by immunological recognition, analogous to ELISA. CMOS technology can integrate multiple laboratory functions into the sensor chip, potentially enabling inexpensive, compact and sophisticated diagnostic systems for a number of diseases. We present results for two immunological assays: antigen capture of purified mouse IgG and detection of human anti-dengue virus IgG in clinical serum samples. The sensitivity of detecting purified protein with magnetic beads was comparable to ELISA. We found a high correlation between the ELISA optical density and the biosensor output in the clinical assay. We also demonstrate the use of a controlled magnetic field to remove non-specifically bound magnetic beads from the sensor surface, effectively washing the sensor surface. This novel sensor can be mass-produced at low cost and can detect magnetic beads bound to the surface through specific antibody-antigen interactions, making it a potential platform for new simplified and rapid point-of-care diagnostic tests.

  7. Dye removal from aqueous solution by magnetic alginate beads crosslinked with epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Vincent; Bee, Agnès; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-06-15

    Innovative magnetic alginate beads are used to remove organic pollutants from aqueous solution under different experimental conditions. These alginate beads (EpiMAB) are prepared by an extrusion technique and crosslinked with epichlorohydrin. They contain both magnetic nanoparticles and activated carbon (AC). With the addition of magnetic properties, the beads can be easily recovered or manipulated with an external magnetic field. Their capacity to adsorb pollutants is linked to encapsulated AC and to active sites coming from both magnetic nanoparticles and alginate. The efficiency of the beads as biosorbent for the removal of dyes is assessed using methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) as model molecules. The dye uptake is found to vary with the initial concentration and the charge of the adsorbed molecule. The Langmuir equation fits well the adsorption data with maximum adsorption capacities of 0.02 mmol/g for MO and 0.7 mmol/g for MB. Kinetics experiments are performed to evaluate the equilibrium time; the pseudo-second-order kinetic model adequately describes the experimental data. The influence of the pH of the solution on adsorption is also investigated and a comparison with alginate beads crosslinked by calcium ions is made.

  8. Simple enrichment of thiol-containing biomolecules by using zinc(II)-cyclen-functionalized magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Haruto; Tsunehiro, Masaya; Kawaguchi, Maho; Kuramoto, Yasuhiro; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Hieda, Yuhzo; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Kinoshita, Eiji; Koike, Tohru

    2014-07-01

    A simple and efficient method based on magnetic-bead technology has been developed for the enrichment of thiol-containing biomolecules, such as l-glutathione and cysteine-containing peptides. The thiol-binding site on the bead is a mononuclear complex of zinc(II) with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen); this is linked to a hydrophilic cross-linked agarose coating on a particle that has a magnetic core. All steps for the thiol-affinity separation are conducted in aqueous buffers with 0.10 mL of the magnetic beads in a 1.5 mL microtube. The entire separation protocol for thiol-containing compounds, from addition to elution, requires less than one hour per sample, provided the buffers and the zinc(II)-cyclen-functionalized magnetic beads have been prepared in advance. The thiol-affinity magnetic beads are reusable at least 15 times without a decrease in their thiol-binding ability, and they are stable for six months at room temperature.

  9. Design of a Microfluidic Chip for Magnetic-Activated Sorting of One-Bead-One-Compound Libraries.

    PubMed

    Cho, Choi-Fong; Lee, Kyungheon; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Bononi, Fernanda C; Viapiano, Mariano S; Luyt, Leonard G; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Lee, Hakho; Lawler, Sean E

    2016-06-13

    Molecular targeting using ligands specific to disease markers has shown great promise for early detection and directed therapy. Bead-based combinatorial libraries have served as powerful tools for the discovery of novel targeting agents. Screening platforms employing magnetic capture have been used to achieve rapid and efficient identification of high-affinity ligands from one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries. Traditional manual methodologies to isolate magnetized "hit" beads are tedious and lack accuracy, and existing instruments to expedite bead sorting tend to be costly and complex. Here, we describe the design and construction of a simple and inexpensive microfluidic magnetic sorting device using standard photolithography and soft lithography approaches to facilitate high-throughput isolation of magnetized positive hit beads from combinatorial libraries. We have demonstrated that the device is able to sort magnetized beads with superior accuracy compared to conventional manual sorting approaches. This chip offers a very convenient yet inexpensive alternative for screening OBOC libraries.

  10. Moment Selective Digital Detection of Single Magnetic Beads for Multiplexed Bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llandro, J.; Hayward, T. J.; Bland, J. A. C.; Morecroft, D.; Castaño, F. J.; Colin, I. A.; Ross, C. A.

    2008-06-01

    Research into lab-on-a-chip multiplexed bioassays has focused on libraries of biochemical probes, indexed by optically encoded micron-sized labels. However, few current methods have reconciled large multiplexing capability with a rapid detection system amenable to miniaturization. Magnetic identification of labels provides a strong candidate solution to this problem, yet no proposed single-label magnetic detection system can both read and encode magnetic labels. We present a magnetic multiplexed assay in lab-on-a-chip format which identifies target biomolecules from the hybridization results by reading encoded magnetic beads. We show that a microfabricated magnetoresistive ring-shaped sensor can read the magnetic moments of individual commercially available paramagnetic beads using an active digital technique. This work provides proof of principle for a new approach to magnetic labeling of biomolecules for high-throughput bioassays.

  11. Magnetically-assisted impedimetric detection of bacteria using phage-modified carbon microarrays.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Arghavan; Marquette, Christophe A; Mandeville, Rosemonde; Lawrence, Marcus F

    2013-11-15

    This study presents an investigation on the possibility of improving the detection limit of bacteria with an inexpensive electrochemical, impedimetric sensor platform, by integrating the sensor with magnetic manipulation. The approach uses T4 bacteriophage coated Dynabeads to selectively capture and concentrate E. coli K12 cells from samples, to increase the sensitivity of detection at the surface of functionalized screen-printed carbon microarrays. Fluorescence and flow cytometry measurements indicate that the surface modification of the magnetic beads, with phages, and binding with the bacteria, were successful. Integration of the screen-printed carbon-based impedimetric sensor, with a magnetic manipulation system, was found to improve the sensitivity of the device, decreasing the limit of detection of E. coli K12 from 10(4) to 10(3) cfu/mL. We have also demonstrated that this approach provides for more specific detection of bacteria, enabling the operator to account for non-specific adsorption, and detection of bacteria in more complex (real) samples (milk).

  12. Magnetic chitosan/clay beads: A magsorbent for the removal of cationic dye from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bée, Agnès; Obeid, Layaly; Mbolantenaina, Rakotomalala; Welschbillig, Mathias; Talbot, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    A magnetic composite material composed of magnetic nanoparticles and clay encapsulated in cross-linked chitosan beads was prepared, characterized and used as a magsorbent for the removal of a cationic dye, methylene blue (MB), from aqueous solutions. The magnetic properties of these beads represent an advantage to recover them at the end of the depollution process. The optimal weight ratio R=clay:chitosan for the removal of MB in a large range of pH was determined. For beads without clay, the maximal adsorption capacity of MB occurs in the pH range [9-12], while for beads with clay, the pH range extends by increasing the amount of clay to reach [3-12] for R>0.5. Adsorption isotherms show that the adsorption capacity of magnetic beads is equal to 82 mg/g. Moreover, the kinetics of dye adsorption is relatively fast since 50% of the dye is removed in the first 13 min for an initial MB concentration equal to 100 mg/L. The estimation of the number of adsorption sites at a given pH shows that the main driving force for adsorption of MB in a large range of pH is the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged dye and the permanent negative charges of clay.

  13. Adsorption of a cationic surfactant by a magsorbent based on magnetic alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layaly; El Kolli, Nadia; Dali, Noëlle; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sébastien; Welschbillig, Mathias; Cabuil, Valérie; Bée, Agnès

    2014-10-15

    Adsorption of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant, by magnetic alginate beads (MagAlgbeads) was investigated. The magnetic adsorbent (called magsorbent) was prepared by encapsulation of magnetic functionalized nanoparticles in an alginate gel. The influence on CPC adsorption of several parameters such as contact time, pH and initial surfactant concentration was studied. The equilibrium isotherm shows that adsorption occurs through both electrostatic interactions with charge neutralization of the carboxylate groups of the beads and hydrophobic interactions inducing the formation of surfactant aggregates in the beads. The dosage of calcium ions released in the solution turns out to be a useful tool for understanding the adsorption mechanisms. Adsorption is accompanied by a shrinking of the beads that corresponds to a 45% reduction of the volume. Adsorption kinetic experiments show that equilibrium time is strongly dependent on the surfactant concentration, which monitors the nature of the interactions. On the other hand, since the pH affects the ionization state of adsorption sites, adsorption depends on the pH solution, maximum adsorption being obtained in a large pH range (3.2-12) in agreement with the pKa value of alginate (pKa=3.4-4.2). Finally, due to the formation of micelle-like surfactants aggregates in the magnetic alginate beads, they could be used as a new efficient magsorbent for hydrophobic pollutants.

  14. An integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for protein analysis with magnetic bead-based sampling capabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Woo; Oh, Kwang W; Thomas, Jennifer H; Heineman, William R; Halsall, H Brian; Nevin, Joseph H; Helmicki, Arthur J; Henderson, H Thurman; Ahn, Chong H

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of an integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for fast and low-volume immunoassays using magnetic beads, which are used as both immobilization surfaces and bio-molecule carriers. Microfluidic components have been developed and integrated to construct a microfluidic biochemical detection system. Magnetic bead-based immunoassay, as a typical example of biochemical detection and analysis, has been successfully performed on the integrated microfluidic biochemical analysis system that includes a surface-mounted biofilter and electrochemical sensor on a glass microfluidic motherboard. Total time required for an immunoassay was less than 20 min including sample incubation time, and sample volume wasted was less than 50 microl during five repeated assays. Fast and low-volume biochemical analysis has been successfully achieved with the developed biofilter and immunosensor, which is integrated to the microfluidic system. Such a magnetic bead-based biochemical detection system, described in this paper, can be applied to protein analysis systems.

  15. Fine-tuning of magnetic and microfluidic viscous forces for specific magnetic bead-based immunocomplex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, M.; Tekin, H. C.; Lehnert, T.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the working principle of a novel type of microfluidic sandwich immunoassay, as used for the detection of biomarkers. The heterogeneous assay is based on the specific interactions between an array of functionalized superparamagnetic beads and a flow of secondary superparamagnetic beads that carry the antigens and are simultaneously used as detection labels. We identify the main forces governing the immunoassay performance and develop a combined finite element method/analytical model to predict and control these forces. The clue for the improved assay specificity is in the fine-tuning of inter-bead magnetic dipolar and microfluidic viscous forces, which allows strongly reducing non-specific interactions, while enhancing the specific formation of immunocomplexes. We exploit our theoretical model to explain the enhanced sensitivity of magnetic bead-based immunoassay experiments performed in microfluidic chips.

  16. Magnetic bead-quantum dot assay for detection of a biomarker for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chloe; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-10-01

    Current diagnostic methods for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which accounts for 15% of all emergency room visits, are limited to neuroimaging modalities. The challenges of accurate diagnosis and monitoring of TBI have created the need for a simple and sensitive blood test to detect brain-specific biomarkers. Here we report on an assay for detection of S100B, a putative biomarker for TBI, using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads for capture of the protein, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. From Western Blot, we show efficient antigen capture and concentration by the magnetic beads. Using magnetic bead capture and quantum dot detection in serum samples, we show a wide detection range and detection limit below the clinical cut-off level.Current diagnostic methods for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which accounts for 15% of all emergency room visits, are limited to neuroimaging modalities. The challenges of accurate diagnosis and monitoring of TBI have created the need for a simple and sensitive blood test to detect brain-specific biomarkers. Here we report on an assay for detection of S100B, a putative biomarker for TBI, using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads for capture of the protein, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. From Western Blot, we show efficient antigen capture and concentration by the magnetic beads. Using magnetic bead capture and quantum dot detection in serum samples, we show a wide detection range and detection limit below the clinical cut-off level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05608j

  17. Digital microfluidics-enabled single-molecule detection by printing and sealing single magnetic beads in femtoliter droplets.

    PubMed

    Witters, Daan; Knez, Karel; Ceyssens, Frederik; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2013-06-07

    Digital microfluidics is introduced as a novel platform with unique advantages for performing single-molecule detection. We demonstrate how superparamagnetic beads, used for capturing single protein molecules, can be printed with unprecedentedly high loading efficiency and single bead resolution on an electrowetting-on-dielectric-based digital microfluidic chip by micropatterning the Teflon-AF surface of the device. By transporting droplets containing suspended superparamagnetic beads over a hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic micropatterned Teflon-AF surface, single beads are trapped inside the hydrophilic microwells due to their selective wettability and tailored dimensions. Digital microfluidics presents the following advantages for printing and sealing magnetic beads for single-molecule detection: (i) droplets containing suspended beads can be transported back and forth over the array of hydrophilic microwells to obtain high loading efficiencies of microwells with single beads, (ii) the use of hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic patterns permits the use of a magnet to speed up the bead transfer process to the wells, while the receding droplet meniscus removes excess beads off the chip surface and thereby shortens the bead patterning time, and (iii) reagents can be transported over the printed beads multiple times, while capillary forces and a magnet hold the printed beads in place. High loading efficiencies (98% with a CV of 0.9%) of single beads in microwells were obtained by transporting droplets of suspended beads over the array 10 times in less than 1 min, which is much higher than previously reported methods (40-60%), while the total surface area needed for performing single-molecule detection can be decreased. The performance of the device was demonstrated by fluorescent detection of the presence of the biotinylated enzyme β-galactosidase on streptavidin-coated beads with a linear dynamic range of 4 orders of magnitude ranging from 10 aM to 90 fM.

  18. Alginate/magnetite hybrid beads for magnetically stimulated release of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Kondaveeti, Stalin; Cornejo, Daniel R; Petri, Denise Freitas Siqueira

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid beads composed of magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) and alginate (Alg) were synthesized and coded as Alg-MNP. They were incubated in dopamine (DOPA) solution (5 g/L), at pH 7.4 and 8 °C, during 12 h, promoting the DOPA loaded magnetic beads, coded as Alg-MNP/DOPA. The release of DOPA was further evaluated in the absence and the presence of external magnetic field (EMF) of 0.4 T. The products Alg-MNP and Alg-MNP/DOPA were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR), UV spectrophotometry, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analyses and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The magnetic and chemical properties of Alg-MNP beads were not affected by DOPA loading. The incorporation of DOPA into the beads depended on the pH and on the negative charge density. At pH 7.4 38% of DOPA were loaded into Alg-MNP beads, whereas at pH 2 or using neat Alg beads (lower charge density than Alg-MNP) the loading efficiency decreased to one third or less. In the absence of EMF, 24% of the loaded DOPA was released from Alg-MNP at pH 7.4 over a period of 26 h. The released amount increased to 33% under the stimulus of EMF. A model was proposed to explain the loading efficiency of charged drugs, as DOPA, into hybrid beads and the role played by EMF on delivery systems, where drug and matrix are oppositely charged. The results suggest that the alginate combined with magnetite nanoparticles is a promising system for release of DOPA in the presence of EMF.

  19. Design Considerations for CMOS-Integrated Hall-Effect Magnetic Bead Detectors for Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Skucha, K.; Gambini, S.; Liu, P.; Megens, M.; Kim, J.; Boser, BE

    2014-01-01

    We describe a design methodology for on-chip magnetic bead label detectors based on Hall-effect sensors. Signal errors caused by the label-binding process and other factors that limit the minimum detection area are quantified and adjusted to meet typical assay accuracy standards. The methodology is demonstrated by designing an 8192 element Hall sensor array, implemented in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process with single-mask postprocessing. The array can quantify a 1% surface coverage of 2.8 μm beads in 30 seconds with a coefficient of variation of 7.4%. This combination of accuracy and speed makes this technology a suitable detection platform for biological assays based on magnetic bead labels. PMID:25031503

  20. Design Considerations for CMOS-Integrated Hall-Effect Magnetic Bead Detectors for Biosensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Skucha, K; Gambini, S; Liu, P; Megens, M; Kim, J; Boser, Be

    2013-06-05

    We describe a design methodology for on-chip magnetic bead label detectors based on Hall-effect sensors. Signal errors caused by the label-binding process and other factors that limit the minimum detection area are quantified and adjusted to meet typical assay accuracy standards. The methodology is demonstrated by designing an 8192 element Hall sensor array, implemented in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process with single-mask postprocessing. The array can quantify a 1% surface coverage of 2.8 μm beads in 30 seconds with a coefficient of variation of 7.4%. This combination of accuracy and speed makes this technology a suitable detection platform for biological assays based on magnetic bead labels.

  1. Performance of dye-affinity beads for aluminium removal in magnetically stabilized fluidized bed

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Handan; Say, Ridvan; Andaç, Müge; Bayraktar, Necmi; Denizli, Adil

    2004-01-01

    Background Aluminum has recently been recognized as a causative agent in dialysis encephalopathy, osteodystrophy, and microcytic anemia occurring in patients with chronic renal failure who undergo long-term hemodialysis. Only a small amount of Al(III) in dialysis solutions may give rise to these disorders. Methods Magnetic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (mPHEMA) beads in the size range of 80–120 μm were produced by free radical co-polymerization of HEMA and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in the presence of magnetite particles (Fe3O4). Then, metal complexing ligand alizarin yellow was covalently attached onto mPHEMA beads. Alizarin yellow loading was 208 μmol/g. These beads were used for the removal of Al(III) ions from tap and dialysis water in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. Results Al(III) adsorption capacity of the beads decreased with an increase in the flow-rate. The maximum Al(III) adsorption was observed at pH 5.0. Comparison of batch and magnetically stabilized fluidized bed (MSFB) maximum capacities determined using Langmuir isotherms showed that dynamic capacity (17.5 mg/g) was somewhat higher than the batch capacity (11.8 mg/g). The dissociation constants for Al(III) were determined using the Langmuir isotherm equation to be 27.3 mM (MSFB) and 6.7 mM (batch system), indicating medium affinity, which was typical for pseudospecific affinity ligands. Al(III) ions could be repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed with these beads without noticeable loss in their Al(III) adsorption capacity. Conclusions Adsorption of Al(III) demonstrate the affinity of magnetic dye-affinity beads. The MSFB experiments allowed us to conclude that this inexpensive sorbent system may be an important alternative to the existing adsorbents in the removal of aluminium. PMID:15329149

  2. Assesment of dimethyl phthalate removal from aqueous phase using barium hexaferrite containing magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Osman, Bilgen; Özer, Elif Tümay; Kara, Ali; Güçer, Şeref; Beşirli, Necati

    2012-07-15

    The barium hexaferrite (BaFe(12)O(19)) containing magnetic poly (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate-vinyl pyridine; mag-poly [EGDMA-VP]) beads (average diameter=53-212 μm) were synthesized and characterized. Their use as an adsorbent in the removal of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) from an aqueous solution was investigated. The mag-poly (EGDMA-VP) beads were prepared by copolymerizing of 4-vinyl pyridine (VP) with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). The mag-poly (EGDMA-VP) beads were characterized by N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms (BET), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and swelling studies. At a fixed solid/solution ratio, the various factors affecting the adsorption of DMP from aqueous solutions such as pH, initial concentration, contact time, and temperature were analyzed. The maximum DMP adsorption capacity of the mag-poly (EGDMA-VP) beads was determined as 96.2 mg/g at pH 3.0, 25 °C. All the isotherm data can be fitted with both the Langmuir and the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Ritch-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the adsorption kinetics. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicated the exothermic nature of the adsorption. The DMP adsorption capacity did not change after 10 batch successive reactions, demonstrating the usefulness of the magnetic beads in applications.

  3. Removal of diethyl phthalate from aqueous phase using magnetic poly(EGDMA-VP) beads.

    PubMed

    Özer, Elif Tümay; Osman, Bilgen; Kara, Ali; Beşirli, Necati; Gücer, Seref; Sözeri, Hüseyin

    2012-08-30

    The barium hexaferrite (BaFe(12)O(19)) containing magnetic poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate-vinyl pyridine), (mag-poly(EGDMA-VP)) beads (average diameter=53-212 μm) were synthesized and characterized. Their use as an adsorbent in the removal of diethyl phthalate (DEP) from an aqueous solution was investigated. The mag-poly(EGDMA-VP) beads were prepared by copolymerizing of 4-vinyl pyridine (VP) with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). The mag-poly(EGDMA-VP) beads were characterized by N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms (BET), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and swelling studies. At a fixed solid/solution ratio, the various factors affecting the adsorption of DEP from aqueous solutions such as pH, initial concentration, contact time and temperature were analyzed. The maximum DEP adsorption capacity of the mag-poly(EGDMA-VP) beads was determined as 98.9 mg/g at pH 3.0, 25°C. All the isotherm data can be fitted with both the Langmuir and the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The pseudo first-order, pseudo-second-order, Ritch-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the adsorption kinetics. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicated the exothermic nature of the adsorption. The DEP adsorption capacity did not change after 10 batch successive reactions, demonstrating the usefulness of the magnetic beads in applications.

  4. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-03-23

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals.

  5. Attempt to remove peanut allergens from peanut extracts, using IgE-attached magnetic beads.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies from sera of peanut-allergic individuals are known to bind specifically to major peanut allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2. The objective of this study was to determine the efficiency of magnetic beads (Dynabeads) attached with IgE antibodies in the removal of major pea...

  6. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-01-01

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals. PMID:28332631

  7. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  8. Quantitative screening of yeast surface-displayed polypeptide libraries by magnetic bead capture.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Yik A; Wittrup, K Dane

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bead capture is demonstrated here to be a feasible alternative for quantitative screening of favorable mutants from a cell-displayed polypeptide library. Flow cytometric sorting with fluorescent probes has been employed previously for high throughput screening for either novel binders or improved mutants. However, many laboratories do not have ready access to this technology as a result of the limited availability and high cost of cytometers, restricting the use of cell-displayed libraries. Using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and biotinylated ligands, an alternative approach to cell-based library screening for improved mutants was developed. Magnetic bead capture probability of labeled cells is shown to be closely correlated with the surface ligand density. A single-pass enrichment ratio of 9400 +/- 1800-fold, at the expense of 85 +/- 6% binder losses, is achieved from screening a library that contains one antibody-displaying cell (binder) in 1.1 x 10(5) nondisplaying cells. Additionally, kinetic screening for an initial high affinity to low affinity (7.7-fold lower) mutant ratio of 1:95,000, the magnetic bead capture method attains a single-pass enrichment ratio of 600 +/- 200-fold with a 75 +/- 24% probability of loss for the higher affinity mutant. The observed high loss probabilities can be straightforwardly compensated for by library oversampling, given the inherently parallel nature of the screen. Overall, these results demonstrate that magnetic beads are capable of quantitatively screening for novel binders and improved mutants. The described methods are directly analogous to procedures in common use for phage display and should lower the barriers to entry for use of cell surface display libraries.

  9. Antibody-integrated and functionalized graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, produced using ammonia gas plasma technology, for capturing Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Chou, Han; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella spp. is the single and most important causative agent of foodborne infections, especially involving foods such as eggs, milk and meat. To prevent infection, a reliable surveillance system is required that can quickly and sensitively detect Salmonella. Here, we describe the development of antibody-integrated magnetic beads that are functionalized by a novel strategy using ammonia gas plasma. Ammonia plasma, produced by a radio frequency (RF) power supply, was allowed to react with the surface of graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, resulting in the introduction of amino groups. An anti-Salmonella antibody was then anchored by sulfide groups present on the protein surface to the amino groups of the magnetic beads via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The potential usefulness of these magnetic beads for capturing Salmonella was examined as follows. The beads were incubated with Salmonella in liquid medium and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thorough washing, adsorption of Salmonella to the beads was confirmed by immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction and a direct culture assay. Our findings indicate that the capture and concentration of Salmonella using the antibody-integrated magnetic beads was more efficient than commercial Dynabeads® anti-Salmonella, which are conventionally used for concentrating Salmonella from liquid cultures. We believe this novel bead technology will contribute to the enhanced detection of Salmonella.

  10. A Criterion for the Complete Deposition of Magnetic Beads on the Walls of Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes numerical simulations of the trajectories of magnetic beads in a microchannel, with a nearby permanent cubical magnet, under different flow and magnetic conditions. Analytically derived local fluid velocities and local magnetic forces have been used to track the particles. A centered position and a lateral position of the magnet above the microchannel are considered. The computed fractions of deposited particles on the walls are compared successfully with a new theoretically derived criterion that imposes a relation between the sizes of the magnet and the microchannel and the particle Stokes and Alfvén numbers to obtain the complete deposition of the flowing particles on the wall. In the cases in which all the particles, initially distributed uniformly across the section of the microchannel, are deposited on the walls, the simulations predict the accumulation of the major part of particles on the wall closest to the magnet and near the first half of the streamwise length of the magnet.

  11. Magnetic alginate beads for Pb(II) ions removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bée, Agnès; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sébastien; Dupuis, Vincent

    2011-10-15

    A magnetic adsorbent (called magsorbent) was developed by encapsulation of magnetic functionalized nanoparticles in calcium-alginate beads. The adsorption of Pb(II) ions by these magnetic beads was studied and the effect of different parameters, such as initial concentration, contact time and solution pH value on the adsorption of Pb(II) ions was investigated. Our magsorbent was found to be efficient to adsorb Pb(II) ions and maximal adsorption capacity occurred at pH 2.3-6. The classical Langmuir model used to fit the experimental adsorption data showed a maximum sorption capacity close to 100 mg g(-1). The experimental kinetic data were well correlated with a pseudo second-order model, 50% of the Pb(II) ions were removed within 20 min and the equilibrium was attained around 100 min. Moreover our magsorbent was easily collected from aqueous media by using an external magnetic field. These results permitted to conclude that magnetic alginate beads could be efficiently used to remove heavy metals in a water treatment process.

  12. DNA-magnetic bead detection using disposable cards and the anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, L. T.; Quynh, L. K.; Huyen, V. T.; Tu, B. D.; Hien, N. T.; Phuong, D. M.; Nhung, P. H.; Giang, D. T. H.; Duc, N. H.

    2016-12-01

    A disposable card incorporating specific DNA probes targeting the 16 S rRNA gene of Streptococcus suis was developed for magnetically labeled target DNA detection. A single-stranded target DNA was hybridized with the DNA probe on the SPA/APTES/PDMS/Si as-prepared card, which was subsequently magnetically labeled with superparamagnetic beads for detection using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. An almost linear response between the output signal of the AMR sensor and amount of single-stranded target DNA varied from 4.5 to 18 pmol was identified. From the sensor output signal response towards the mass of magnetic beads which were directly immobilized on the disposable card surface, the limit of detection was estimated about 312 ng ferrites, which corresponds to 3.8 μemu. In comparison with DNA detection by conventional biosensor based on magnetic bead labeling, disposable cards are featured with higher efficiency and performances, ease of use and less running cost with respects to consumables for biosensor in biomedical analysis systems operating with immobilized bioreceptor.

  13. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  14. Automated solid-phase subcloning based on beads brought into proximity by magnetic force.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Elton P; Nikoshkov, Andrej; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2012-01-01

    In the fields of proteomics, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology there is a need for high-throughput and reliable cloning methods to facilitate construction of expression vectors and genetic pathways. Here, we describe a new approach for solid-phase cloning in which both the vector and the gene are immobilized to separate paramagnetic beads and brought into proximity by magnetic force. Ligation events were directly evaluated using fluorescent-based microscopy and flow cytometry. The highest ligation efficiencies were obtained when gene- and vector-coated beads were brought into close contact by application of a magnet during the ligation step. An automated procedure was developed using a laboratory workstation to transfer genes into various expression vectors and more than 95% correct clones were obtained in a number of various applications. The method presented here is suitable for efficient subcloning in an automated manner to rapidly generate a large number of gene constructs in various vectors intended for high throughput applications.

  15. Magnetomechanics of superparamagnetic beads on a magnetic merry-go-round: from micromagnetics to radial looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjad, Umer; Bahne Holländer, Rasmus; Klingbeil, Finn; McCord, Jeffrey

    2017-04-01

    The motion of functionalized superparamagnetic beads provides the foundation for the manipulation of labelled chemical and biological species in microfluidic environments, where patterned ferromagnetic thin films serve as a versatile and reconfigurable platform for biomedical applications. A recurring release and capture of superparamagnetic microbeads is achieved by moving stray magnetic field gradients generated by a circulating micromagnetic state of a soft magnetic disc. The full micromagnetic analysis of the transport dynamics fully describes the fundamental alternating behaviour of microsphere motion. An excellent level of agreement is obtained between experiment and modelling for all stages of motion, confirming the validity of describing particle motion dynamics in the applied quasi ab initio modelling approach. The demonstrated comprehension of the non-linear microbead displacement opens the way towards the modelling of various alternative dynamic excitation schemes, even for complicated integrated micromagnetic platforms, for controlled biological analyte–superparamagnetic bead manipulation.

  16. Efficient capture and simple quantification of circulating tumor cells using quantum dots and magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyegeun; Jo, Seong-Min; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-06-03

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are valuable biomarkers for monitoring the status of cancer patients and drug efficacy. However, the number of CTCs in the blood is extremely low, and the isolation and detection of CTCs with high efficiency and sensitivity remain a challenge. Here, we present an approach to the efficient capturing and simple quantification of CTCs using quantum dots and magnetic beads. Anti-EpCAM antibody-conjugated quantum dots are used for the targeting and quantification of CTCs, and quantum-dot-attached CTCs are isolated using anti-IgG-modified magnetic beads. Our approach is shown to result in a capture efficiency of about 70%-80%, enabling the simple quantification of captured CTCs based on the fluorescence intensity of the quantum dots. The present method can be used effectively in the capturing and simple quantification of CTCs with high efficiency for cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

  17. Salmonella detection in a microfluidic channel using orbiting magnetic beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Matt; Mills, Zachary; Owen, Drew; Hanasoge, Srinivas; Hesketh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We use three-dimensional simulations to model the detection of salmonella in a complex fluid sample in a microfluidic channel. Salmonella is captured using magnetic microbeads orbiting around soft ferromagnetic discs at the microchannel bottom subjected to a rotating external magnetic field. Numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of salmonella and microbeads throughout the detection process. We examine the effect of the channel geometry on the salmonella capture, and the forces applied to the salmonella as it is dragged through the fluid after capture. Our findings guide the design of a lab-on-a-chip device to be used for detection of salmonella in food samples in a way that ensures that salmonella captured by orbiting microbeads are preserved until they can be extracted from the system for testing, and are not washed away by the fluid flow or damaged due to the experience of excessive stresses. Such a device is needed to detect bacteria at the food source and prevention of consumption of contaminated food, and also can be used for the detection of a variety of biomaterials of interest from complex fluid samples. Support from USDA and NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Potentiometric Aptasensing of Vibrio alginolyticus Based on DNA Nanostructure-Modified Magnetic Beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangtao; Ding, Jiawang; Yu, Han; Yin, Tanji; Qin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A potentiometric aptasensing assay that couples the DNA nanostructure-modified magnetic beads with a solid-contact polycation-sensitive membrane electrode for the detection of Vibrio alginolyticus is herein described. The DNA nanostructure-modified magnetic beads are used for amplification of the potential response and elimination of the interfering effect from a complex sample matrix. The solid-contact polycation-sensitive membrane electrode using protamine as an indicator is employed to chronopotentiometrically detect the change in the charge or DNA concentration on the magnetic beads, which is induced by the interaction between Vibrio alginolyticus and the aptamer on the DNA nanostructures. The present potentiometric aptasensing method shows a linear range of 10–100 CFU mL−1 with a detection limit of 10 CFU mL−1, and a good specificity for the detection of Vibrio alginolyticus. This proposed strategy can be used for the detection of other microorganisms by changing the aptamers in the DNA nanostructures. PMID:27918423

  19. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection.

  20. Cetylpyridinium chloride/magnetic alginate beads: an efficient system to remove p-nitrophenol from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeid, Layaly; Bee, Agnes; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sebastien; Welschbillig, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption process is one of the most efficient methods to remove pollutants from wastewater provided that suitable adsorbents are used. In order to produce environmentally safe adsorbents, natural polymers have received increasing attention in recent years. Thus, alginate, a polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweeds, is extensively used as inexpensive, non-toxic and efficient biosorbent. Furthermore, it has been shown that the encapsulation of magnetic materials in alginate beads facilitates their recovery from wastewater after the adsorption step, by the use of an external magnetic field gradient, obtained with a magnet or an electromagnet [1, 2]. In the present work, we have studied the adsorption affinity of magnetic alginate beads (called magsorbents)for p-nitrophenol (PNP), used as a hydrophobic pollutant, in presence of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant. First, the effect of different parameters (pH solution, contact time, surfactant initial concentration…) on the adsorption of CPC on the alginate beads was investigated. Adsorption of the surfactant occurs due to electrostatic attractions between its cationic head groups and negative carboxylate functions of the alginate beads. At larger surfactant concentrations, adsorption is also due to the interaction between the hydrocarbon chains of CPC forming aggregated structures capable of solubilizing hydrophobic solutes. In a second step, we showed that PNP can reach up to 95% of adsorption in the beads in presence of CPC, although the pollutant is poorly adsorbed by alginate in absence of the surfactant. At highest CPC concentrations, desorption occurs as micellar solubilization is preferred over coadsorption. Our magsorbents appear to efficiently remove both cationic surfactant and hydrophobic pollutants and we hope that this fundamental research will be helpful for the future development of magnetically assisted processes in water treatment plants. 1. A.Bee, D.Talbot, S.Abramson, V

  1. Acetylcholinesterase immobilized on magnetic beads for pesticides detection: application to olive oil analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Oujji, Najwa; Bakas, Idriss; Istamboulié, Georges; Ait-Ichou, Ihya; Ait-Addi, Elhabib; Rouillon, Régis; Noguer, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the development of bioassays and biosensors for the detection of insecticides widely used in the treatment of olive trees. The systems are based on the covalent immobilisation of acetylcholinesterase on magnetic microbeads using either colorimetry or amperometry as detection technique. The magnetic beads were immobilised on screen-printed electrodes or microtitration plates and tested using standard solutions and real samples. The developed devices showed good analytical performances with limits of detection much lower than the maximum residue limit tolerated by international regulations, as well as a good reproducibility and stability.

  2. Co-immobilized enzymes in magnetic chitosan beads for improved hydrolysis of macromolecular substrates under a time-varying magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Xu, Ning-Shou; Su, Wei Wen

    2010-07-20

    Glucoamylase and alpha-amylase co-immobilized with gamma ferric oxide powders in chitosan beads for consecutive starch liquefaction and saccharification under different magnetic fields was investigated. The chitosan concentration in the beads was found to greatly affect the immobilized enzyme performance. Superior immobilization efficiency and enzyme stability were noted when 2% instead of 4% chitosan was utilized. Using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the beads with 2% chitosan were seen to exhibit a more rugged surface topology with more macropores and accommodate more protein near the external surface than with the 4% chitosan beads. An optimum loading ratio between alpha-amylase and glucoamylase exists that gives the highest glucose production, and this ratio varies with the size of the beads. The inclusion of the gamma ferric oxide powders renders the beads magnetically anisotropic and causes them to tumble under a single-phase alternating magnetic field, resulted in increased overall reaction rates. When exposed to a three-phase alternating magnetic field, these beads were stirred vigorously, also leading to enhanced reaction rates. The use of multi-enzyme co-immobilization in magnetic anisotropic chitosan beads may be extended to other practical applications that involve coordinated enzymatic reactions of macromolecular substrates.

  3. Prion protein-coated magnetic beads: Synthesis, characterization and development of a new ligands screening method☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Santos, Juliana Bosco; dos Anjos, Daniel Meira; Rangel, Luciana Pereira; Vieira, Tuane Cristine Ramos Gonçalves; Moaddel, Ruin; da Silva, Jerson Lima

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by protein aggregation and neurodegeneration. Conversion of the native prion protein (PrPC) into the abnormal scrapie PrP isoform (PrPSc), which undergoes aggregation and can eventually form amyloid fibrils, is a critical step leading to the characteristic path morphological hallmark of these diseases. However, the mechanism of conversion remains unclear. It is known that ligands can act as cofactors or inhibitors in the conversion mechanism of PrPC into PrPSc. Within this context, herein, we describe the immobilization of PrPC onto the surface of magnetic beads and the morphological characterization of PrPC-coated beads by fluorescence confocal microscopy. PrPC-coated magnetic beads were used to identify ligands from a mixture of compounds, which were monitored by UHPLC–ESI-MS/MS. This affinity-based method allowed the isolation of the anti-prion compound quinacrine, an inhibitor of PrP aggregation. The results indicate that this approach can be applied to not only “fish” for anti-prion compounds from complex matrixes, but also to screening for and identify possible cellular cofactors involved in the deflagration of prion diseases. PMID:25576041

  4. A novel and rapid assay for HIV-1 protease detection using magnetic bead mediation.

    PubMed

    Esseghaier, Chiheb; Ng, Andy; Zourob, Mohammed

    2013-03-15

    A simple sensing assay was established for label-free detection of HIV-1 protease. HIV-1 protease peptide substrate conjugated to magnetic beads via its N-terminus is directly fixed onto the sensor gold surface through the sulphur atom of cysteine. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to study the peptide substrate cleavage efficiency of the protease with magnetic beads of different sizes (1 μm and 30 nm). Cyclic voltammetry and faradic impedance spectroscopy were employed in order to characterize the functionalized gold electrode. It was found that the nano-sized beads are a more efficient sensing probe for the protease. Electrochemical biosensing showed a gradual decrease in charge transfer resistance after injection of the HIV-1 protease. The experimental data established a detection limit of 10 pg/ml, as well as demonstrated a drug screening assay. This HIV-1 protease biosensor represents a new detection approach which will lead to low-cost point-of-care devices for sensitive HIV-1 diagnosis, as well as high-throughput drug screening platforms.

  5. Development of an enzymatic reaction device using magnetic bead-cluster handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Takayanagi, Kentaro; Honda, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazuo

    2006-09-01

    We previously proposed a magnetic bead-cluster handling device for Micro-total analysis systems (Micro-TAS) and investigated its operation principle. The device does not need mechanical fluidic devices, such as pumps and valves, for handling solutions. We further developed the biochemical reaction unit chip, which is a key component in Micro-TAS, by applying a bead-cluster handling mechanism. We were able to do the enzymatic reaction by using hydrolysis between alkaline phosphatase and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. We also confirmed that the obtained calibration curves were linear during the enzymatic reaction. We had 70% reaction efficiency on the reaction chip by performing a comparative experiment. From these results, we concluded that our developed reaction chip is applicable to enzymatic immuno-assay systems.

  6. Flow-orthogonal bead oscillation in a microfluidic chip with a magnetic anisotropic flux-guide array.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, Stijn; Derks, Roy; Matteucci, Marco; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Dietzel, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    A new concept for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads inside a microfluidic chip is presented in this paper. The concept allows for bead actuation orthogonal to the flow direction inside a microchannel. Basic manipulation functionalities were studied by means of finite element simulations and results were oval-shaped steady state oscillations with bead velocities up to 500 μm/s. The width of the trajectory could be controlled by prescribing external field rotation. Successful verification experiments were performed on a prototype chip fabricated with excimer laser ablation in polycarbonate and electroforming of nickel flux-guides. Bead velocities up to 450 μm/s were measured in a 75 μm wide channel. By prescribing the currents in the external quadrupole magnet, the shape of the bead trajectory could be controlled.

  7. Detection of a magnetic bead by hybrid nanodevices using scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Marchi, F.; Motte, J.-F.; Manzin, A.; Schumacher, H. W.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid ferromagnetic(Py)/non-magnetic metal(Au) junctions with a width of 400 nm are studied by magnetotransport measurements, magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM) with a magnetic bead (MB) attached to the probe, and micromagnetic simulations. In the transverse geometry, the devices demonstrate a characteristic magnetoresistive behavior that depends on the direction of the in plane magnetic field, with minimum/maximum variation when the field is applied parallel/perpendicular to the Py wire. The SGM is performed with a NdFeB bead of 1.6 μm diameter attached to the scanning probe. Our results demonstrate that the hybrid junction can be used to detect this type of MB. A rough approximation of the sensing volume of the junction has the shape of elliptical cylinder with the volume of ˜1.51 μm3. Micromagnetic simulations coupled to a magnetotransport model including anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effects are in good agreement with the experimental findings, enabling the interpretation of the SGM images.

  8. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force–extension experiments

    PubMed Central

    (O’) Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data. PMID:27493568

  9. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force-extension experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Kornyshev, A. A.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data.

  10. Simultaneous detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium: The use of magnetic beads conjugated with multiple capture antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptavidin-coated magnetic beads were conjugated with biotinylated capture antibodies to both Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Samonella Typhimurium to form multi-pathogen capture immunomagnetic beads (IMB-M). The efficacy of these beads was investigated and compared to the use of a mixture of IMB ag...

  11. A Criterion for the Complete Deposition of Magnetic Beads on the Walls of Microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Pallares, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes numerical simulations of the trajectories of magnetic beads in a microchannel, with a nearby permanent cubical magnet, under different flow and magnetic conditions. Analytically derived local fluid velocities and local magnetic forces have been used to track the particles. A centered position and a lateral position of the magnet above the microchannel are considered. The computed fractions of deposited particles on the walls are compared successfully with a new theoretically derived criterion that imposes a relation between the sizes of the magnet and the microchannel and the particle Stokes and Alfvén numbers to obtain the complete deposition of the flowing particles on the wall. In the cases in which all the particles, initially distributed uniformly across the section of the microchannel, are deposited on the walls, the simulations predict the accumulation of the major part of particles on the wall closest to the magnet and near the first half of the streamwise length of the magnet. PMID:27007336

  12. Specific detection of DNA using quantum dots and magnetic beads for large volume samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon S.; Kim, Byoung CHAN; Lee, Jin Hyung; Kim, Jungbae; Gu, Man Bock

    2006-10-01

    Here we present a sensitive DNA detection protocol using quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic beads (MBs) for large volume samples. In this study, QDs, conjugated with streptavidin, were used to produce fluorescent signals while magnetic beads (MBs) were used to isolate and concentrate the signals. The presence of target DNAs lead to the sandwich hybridization between the functionalized QDs, the target DNAs and the MBs. In fact, the QDs-MBs complex, which is bound using the target DNA, can be isolated and then concentrated. The binding of the QDs to the surface of the MBs was confirmed by confocal microscopy and Cd elemental analysis. It was found that the fluorescent intensity was proportional to concentration of the target DNA, while the presence of noncomplementary DNA produced no significant fluorescent signal. In addition, the presence of low copies of target DNAs such as 0.5 pM in large volume samples up to 40 ml were successfully detected by using a magnet-assisted concentration protocol which consequently results in the enhancement of the sensitivity more than 100-fold.

  13. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  14. Structure and Properties of Magnetic (Co, Fe, Fe{sub 3}C and Ni) Carbon Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Leonowicz, Marcin; Izydorzak, Marta; Pomogailo, Anatolii D.; Dzhardimalieva, Gulzhian I.

    2010-12-02

    Nanoparticles exhibit unique physical properties due to the surface or quantum-size effects. Particular attention has been focused on magnetic nanoparticles and substantial progress has been done in this field. In this work magnetic composites, consisting of elementary metals or carbides nanocrystallites, stabilized in carbon matrix, were prepared by the procedure comprising formation of appropriate metal acrylamide complexes, followed by frontal polymerization and pyrolysis of the polymer at various temperatures. Application of frontal polymerization and further pyrolysis enables formation of composite beads consisting of Co, Fe, Fe{sub 3}C or Ni nanocrystallites stabilized in carbon matrix. It was found that the lowest pyrolysis temperature, which enables the production of metallic nanocrystallites, was 673 K for Co and Ni, and 773 K for Fe. The magnetic properties of the beads, percentage of the metallic component, their composition and shape depended on the pyrolysis temperature. Extracts on the basis of composites containing Fe{sub 3}C showed no cytotoxicity, whereas those containing Co and Ni exhibited negligible cytotoxicity up to concentrations of 6.25 mg/ml.

  15. Electrochemical magnetic beads-based immunosensing platform for the determination of α-lactalbumin in milk.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Valdepeñas Montiel, Víctor; Campuzano, Susana; Torrente-Rodríguez, Rebeca M; Reviejo, A Julio; Pingarrón, José M

    2016-12-15

    Alpha-lactalbumin (α-LA) is one of the whey proteins in cows' milk that has been identified as allergenic. In this work, we present, for the first time, a very sensitive magnetic beads (MBs)-based immunosensor for the determination of α-LA. A sandwich configuration involving selective capture and horseradish peroxidase-labeled detector antibodies was implemented on carboxylic acid-modified magnetic beads, captured magnetically under the surface of a disposable screen-printed carbon electrode for amperometric detection using the hydroquinone (HQ)/H2O2 system. The α-LA immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range (37.0-5000pg/ml), a low limit of detection (LOD, 11.0pg/ml) and noteworthy selectivity against other non-target proteins. The MBs-based immunosensing platform was applied successfully for the determination of α-LA in several varieties of milk (raw and UHT cows' milk as well as human milk) and infant formulations. The results were corroborated with those obtained using a commercial ELISA method, thereby substantiating the analytical merits of this unique method.

  16. Self-assembled magnetic bead biosensor for measuring bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Paivo; McNaughton, Brandon H; Albertson, Theodore; Sinn, Irene; Mofakham, Sima; Elbez, Remy; Newton, Duane W; Hunt, Alan; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-08-20

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is one of the major concerns of modern healthcare worldwide, and the development of rapid, growth-based, antimicrobial susceptibility tests is key for addressing it. The cover image shows a self-assembled asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) biosensor developed for rapid detection of bacterial growth. Using the biosensors, the minimum inhibitory concentration of a clinical E. coli isolate can be measured within two hours, where currently tests take 6-24 hours. A 16-well prototype is also constructed for simple and robust observation of the self-assembled AMBR biosensors.

  17. Fabrication of a pen-shaped portable biochemical reaction system based on magnetic bead manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Inagaki, Noriyuki; Okochi, Mina; Honda, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kazuo

    2011-06-01

    A pen-shaped platform that is similar to a mechanical pencil is proposed for producing a portable reaction system. A reaction unit, as the key component in the system, was produced by using a heat shrinkable tube. A mechanical pencil supplied by Mitsubishi Pencil Co. Ltd was used as the pen-shaped platform for driving the reaction cylinder. It was actuated using an inchworm motion. We confirmed that the magnetic beads were successfully manipulated in the droplet in the cylinder-shaped reaction units.

  18. Low-Temperature Magnetic Force Microscopy on Single Molecule Magnet-Based Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serri, Michele; Mannini, Matteo; Poggini, Lorenzo; Vélez-Fort, Emilio; Cortigiani, Brunetto; Sainctavit, Philippe; Rovai, Donella; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2017-03-08

    The magnetic properties of some single molecule magnets (SMM) on surfaces can be strongly modified by the molecular packing in nanometric films/aggregates or by interactions with the substrate, which affect the molecular orientation and geometry. Detailed investigations of the magnetism of thin SMM films and nanostructures are necessary for the development of spin-based molecular devices, however this task is challenged by the limited sensitivity of laboratory-based magnetometric techniques and often requires access to synchrotron light sources to perform surface sensitive X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) investigations. Here we show that low-temperature magnetic force microscopy is an alternative powerful laboratory tool able to extract the field dependence of the magnetization and to identify areas of in-plane and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in microarrays of the SMM terbium(III) bis-phthalocyaninato (TbPc2) neutral complex grown as nanosized films on SiO2 and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), and this is in agreement with data extracted from nonlocal XMCD measurements performed on homogeneous TbPc2/PTCDA films.

  19. Fibrous polymer grafted magnetic chitosan beads with strong poly(cation-exchange) groups for single step purification of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Tekinay, Turgay; Ozalp, V Cengiz; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-05-15

    Lysozyme is an important polypetide used in medical and food applications. We report a novel magnetic strong cation exchange beads for efficient purification of lysozyme from chicken egg white. Magnetic chitosan (MCHT) beads were synthesized via phase inversion method, and then grafted with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (p(GMA)) via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Epoxy groups of the grafted polymer, were modified into strong cation-exchange groups (i.e., sulfonate groups) in the presence of sodium sulfite. The MCTH and MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads were characterized by ATR-FTIR, SEM, and VSM. The sulphonate groups content of the modified MCTH-g-p(GMA)-4 beads was found to be 0.53mmolg(-1) of beads by the potentiometric titration method. The MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads were first used as an ion-exchange support for adsorption of lysozyme from aqueous solution. The influence of different experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption process was evaluated. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 208.7mgg(-1) beads. Adsorption of lysozyme on the MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads fitted to Langmuir isotherm model and followed the pseudo second-order kinetic. More than 93% of the adsorbed lysozyme was desorbed using Na2CO3 solution (pH 11.0). The purity of the lysozyme was checked by HPLC and SDS gel electrophoresis. In addition, the MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads prepared in this work showed promising potential for separation of various anionic molecules.

  20. Degradation of synthetic pollutants in real wastewater using laccase encapsulated in core-shell magnetic copper alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Le, Thao Thanh; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Lee, Chung-Seop; Vu, Chi Huong; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Jeon, Jong-Rok

    2016-09-01

    Immobilization of laccase has been highlighted to enhance their stability and reusability in bioremediation. In this study, we provide a novel immobilization technique that is very suitable to real wastewater treatment. A perfect core-shell system composing copper alginate for the immobilization of laccase (Lac-beads) was produced. Additionally, nFe2O3 was incorporated for the bead recycling through magnetic force. The beads were proven to immobilize 85.5% of total laccase treated and also to be structurally stable in water, acetate buffer, and real wastewater. To test the Lac-beads reactivity, triclosan (TCS) and Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) were employed. The Lac-beads showed a high percentage of TCS removal (89.6%) after 8h and RBBR decolonization at a range from 54.2% to 75.8% after 4h. Remarkably, the pollutants removal efficacy of the Lac-beads was significantly maintained in real wastewater with the bead recyclability, whereas that of the corresponding free laccase was severely deteriorated.

  1. Viscoelastic Properties Measurement of Human Lymphocytes by Atomic Force Microscopy Based on Magnetic Beads Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xiao, Xiubin; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-03-28

    Cell mechanics has been proved to be an effective biomarker for indicating cellular states. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides an exciting instrument for measuring the mechanical properties of single cells. However, current AFM single-cell mechanical measurements are commonly performed on cell lines cultured in vitro which are quite different from the primary cells in the human body. Investigating the mechanical properties of primary cells from clinical environments can help us to better understand cell behaviors. Here, by combining AFM with magnetic beads cell isolation, the viscoelastic properties of human primary B lymphocytes were quantitatively measured. B lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers by density gradient centrifugation and CD19 magnetic beads cell isolation. The activity and specificity of the isolated cells were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. AFM imaging revealed the surface topography and geometric parameters of B lymphocytes. The instantaneous modulus and relaxation time of living B lymphocytes were measured by AFM indenting technique, showing that the instantaneous modulus of human normal B lymphocytes was 2~3 kPa and the relaxation times were 0.03~0.06 s and 0.35~0.55 s. The differences in cellular visocoelastic properties between primary B lymphocytes and cell lines cultured in vitro were analyzed. The study proves the capability of AFM in quantifying the viscoelastic properties of individual specific primary cells from the blood sample of clinical patients, which will improve our understanding of the behaviors of cells in the human body.

  2. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10 cm-1 was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12 ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background.

  3. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10  cm⁻¹ was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12  ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background.

  4. Improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer beads in aqueous media via dual-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuling; Liu, Ruijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Gongke

    2009-08-15

    In this study, a novel and simple dual-phase solvent system for the improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) beads in aqueous sample was proposed. The method integrated MIP extraction and micro-liquid-liquid extraction (micro-LLE) into only one step. A magnetic MIP beads using atrazine as template was synthesized, and was applied to aqueous media by adding micro-volume of n-hexane to form a co-extraction system. The magnetic MIP beads preferred to suspend in the organic phase, which shielded them from the disturbance of water molecule. The target analytes in the water sample was extracted into the organic phase by micro-LLE and then further bound to the solid-phase of magnetic MIP beads. The beads specificity was significantly improved with the imprinting efficiency of template increasing from 0.5 to 4.4, as compared with that in pure aqueous media. The extraction capacity, equilibration process and cross-selectivity of the MIP dual-phase solvent extraction system were investigated. The proposed method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was applied to the analysis of atrazine, simazine, propazine, simetryn, prometryne, ametryn and terbutryn in complicated sample such as tomato, strawberry juice and milk. The method is selective, sensitive and low organic solvent-consuming, and has potential to broaden the range of MIP application in biological and environmental sample.

  5. MicroRNA Sensor Based on Magnetic Beads and Enzymatic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhou, Dejian; He, Junhui

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs are associated with multiple cellular processes and diseases. Here, we designed a highly sensitive, magnetically retrievable biosensor using magnetic beads (MBs) as a model RNA sensor. The assay utilized two biotinylated probes, which were hybridized to the complementary target miRNA in a sandwich assay format. One of the biotinylated ends of the hybridization complex was immobilized onto the surface of a NeutrAvidin (NAV) coated MB and the other biotinylated end was conjugated to HRP via NAV-biotin interaction. The results were presented by colorimetric absorbance of the resorufin product from amplex red oxidation. We show that by combining the use of MBs as well as bio-specific immobilization, the sensitivity of miRNA detection is down to 100 pM. This model HRP-MBs system can be used for simple, rapid colorimetric quantification of low level DNA/RNA or other small molecules.

  6. Towards a programmable microfluidic valve: Formation dynamics of two-dimensional magnetic bead arrays in transient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittbracht, F.; Eickenberg, B.; Weddemann, A.; Hütten, A.

    2011-06-01

    The induction of dipolar coupling has proven to allow for the initiation of self-assembled, reconfigurable particle clusters of superparamagnetic microbeads suspended in a carrier liquid. The adjustment of the interplay between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces opens various possibilities for guiding strategies of these superstructures within microfluidic devices. In this work, the formation dynamics of such particle clusters under the influence of a rotating magnetic field are studied. Different agglomeration regimes are characterized by the dimensionality of the confined objects. The growth dynamics of the obtained agglomerates are analyzed quantitatively in order to deduce the microscopic growth mechanisms. The growth of two-dimensional clusters is governed by the addition of bead chains to previously formed agglomerates. Time scales for the cluster growth are characterized by the chain dissociation rate. Based on the experimental findings, we may conclude to a linear dependence of the chain dissociation rate on the rotation frequency of the applied magnetic field.

  7. A Magnetic Bead-Based Sensor for the Quantification of Multiple Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Chen, Zuxiong; Xu, Lingyun; Nolley, Rosalie; Chang, Edwin; Mitchell, Breeana; Brooks, James D.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2015-01-01

    Novel biomarker assays and upgraded analytical tools are urgently needed to accurately discriminate benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) from prostate cancer (CaP). To address this unmet clinical need, we report a piezeoelectric/magnetic bead-based assay to quantitate prostate specific antigen (PSA; free and total), prostatic acid phosphatase, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA1), osteonectin, IL-6 soluble receptor (IL-6sr), and spondin-2. We used the sensor to measure these seven proteins in serum samples from 120 benign prostate hypertrophy patients and 100 Gleason score 6 and 7 CaP using serum samples previously collected and banked. The results were analyzed with receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences between BPH and CaP patients in the PSA, CA1, and spondin-2 assays. The highest AUC discrimination was achieved with a spondin-2 OR free/total PSA operation—the area under the curve was 0.84 with a p value below 10−6. Some of these data seem to contradict previous reports and highlight the importance of sample selection and proper assay building in the development of biomarker measurement schemes. This bead-based system offers important advantages in assay building including low cost, high throughput, and rapid identification of an optimal matched antibody pair. PMID:26421725

  8. A replaceable dual-enzyme capillary microreactor using magnetic beads and its application for simultaneous detection of acetaldehyde and pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Zhao, Wenwen; Chen, Yuanfang; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2012-07-01

    A novel replaceable dual-enzyme capillary microreactor was developed and evaluated using magnetic fields to immobilize the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)- and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-coated magnetic beads at desired positions in the capillary. The dual-enzyme assay was achieved by measuring the two consumption peaks of the coenzyme β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which were related to the ADH reaction and LDH reaction. The dual-enzyme capillary microreactor was constructed using magnetic beads without any modification of the inner surface of the capillary, and showed great stability and reproducibility. The electrophoretic resolution for different analytes can be easily controlled by altering the relative distance of different enzyme-coated magnetic beads. The apparent K(m) values for acetaldehyde with ADH-catalyzed reaction and for pyruvate with LDH-catalyzed reaction were determined. The detection limits for acetaldehyde and pyruvate determination are 0.01 and 0.016 mM (S/N = 3), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to simultaneously determine the acetaldehyde and pyruvate contents in beer samples. The results indicated that combing magnetic beads with CE is of great value to perform replaceable and controllable multienzyme capillary microreactor for investigation of a series of enzyme reactions and determination of multisubstrates.

  9. Magnetic bead-liposome hybrids enable sensitive and portable detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using personal glucose meter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youna; Xue, Qingwang; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2017-01-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays a critical role in maintaining genome methylation patterns, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. This encouraged the need to develop highly sensitive, simple, and robust assays for DNA MTase detection and inhibitor screening. Herein, a simple, sensitive, and specific DNA MTase activity assay was developed based on magnetic beads-liposome hybrids combined with personal glucose meter (PGM) for quantitative detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. First, a magnetic beads-liposome hybrid probe is designed by the hybridization of p1DNA-functionalized magnetic bead with p2DNA-functionalized glucoamylase-encapsulated liposome (GEL). It integrates target recognition, magnetic separation and signal amplification within one multifunctional design. Then, in the presence of Dam MTase, the hybrids probe was methylated, and cleaved by methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I, making liposome separated from magnetic bead by magnetic separation. Finally, the separated liposome was decomposed, liberating the encapsulated glucoamylase to catalyze the hydrolysis of the signal substrate amylose with multiple turnovers, producing a large amount of glucose for quantitative readout by the PGM. In the proposed assay, the magnetic beads-liposome hybrids offered excellent sensitivity due to primary amplification via releasing numerous glucoamylase from a liposome followed by a secondary enzymatic amplification. The use of portable quantitative device PGM bypasses the requirement of complicated instruments and sophisticated operations, making the method simple and feasible for on-site detection. Moreover, the proposed assay was successfully applied in complex biological matrix and screen suitable inhibitor drugs for DAM for disease(s) treatment. The results reveal that the approach provides a simple, sensitive, and robust platform for DNA MTases detection and screening potential drugs in medical research and

  10. Separation of magnetic beads in a hybrid continuous flow microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Abhishek; Ganguly, Ranjan; Datta, Amitava; Modak, Nipu

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic separation of biological entities in microfluidic environment is a key task for a large number of bio-analytical protocols. In magnetophoretic separation, biochemically functionalized magnetic beads are allowed to bind selectively to target analytes, which are then separated from the background stream using a suitably imposed magnetic field. Here we present a numerical study, characterizing the performance of a magnetophoretic hybrid microfluidic device having two inlets and three outlets for immunomagnetic isolation of three different species from a continuous flow. The hybrid device works on the principle of split-flow thin (SPLITT) fractionation and field flow fractionation (FFF) mechanisms. Transport of the magnetic particles in the microchannel has been predicted following an Eulerian-Lagrangian model and using an in-house numerical code. Influence of the salient geometrical parameters on the performance of the separator is studied by characterizing the particle trajectories and their capture and separation indices. Finally, optimum channel geometry is identified that yields the maximum capture efficiency and separation index.

  11. Rapid Detection of Ricin in Serum Based on Cu-Chelated Magnetic Beads Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Song, Jian; Wang, Hong-Li; Xu, Bin; Liu, Feng; He, Kun; Wang, Na

    2016-04-01

    The protein toxin ricin obtained from castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) seeds is a potent biological warfare agent due to its ease of availability and acute toxicity. In this study, we demonstrated a rapid and simple method to detect ricin in serum in vitro. The ricin was mixed with serum and digested by trypsin, then all the peptides were efficiently extracted using Cu-chelated magnetic beads and were detected with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The specific ricin peptides were identified by Nanoscale Ultra Performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry according to their sequences. The assay required 2.5 hours, and a characteristic peptide could be detected down to 4 ng/μl and used as a biomarker to detect ricin in serum. The high sensitivity and simplicity of the procedure makes it valuable in clinical practice.

  12. Magnetic bead processor for rapid evaluation and optimization of parameters for phosphopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott B; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tomar, Maria N; Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Vincent J; Marto, Jarrod A

    2009-06-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of phosphorylation continues to be both an important and a challenging experimental paradigm in proteomics-based research. Unfortunately researchers face difficulties inherent to the optimization of complex, multivariable methods and their application to the analysis of rare and often experimentally intractable phosphorylated peptides. Here we describe a platform based on manipulation of magnetic beads in a 96-well format that facilitates rapid evaluation of experimental parameters required for enrichment of phosphopeptides. Optimized methods provided for automated enrichment and subsequent LC-MS/MS detection of over 1000 unique phosphopeptides (approximately 1% FDR) from 50 microg of cell lysates. In addition we demonstrate use of this platform for identification of phosphopeptides derived from proteins separated by SDS-PAGE and visualized near the detection limit of silver staining.

  13. Magnetic bead-based nucleic acid purification kit: Clinical application and performance evaluation in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihoon G; Kang, Jin Seok; Hwang, Seung Yong; Song, Jaewoo; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Two different methods - the semi-automated magnetic bead-based kit (SK, Stool DNA/RNA Purification kit®) and the manual membrane column-based kit (QS, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini kit) - for purifying nucleic acids from clinical stool samples were compared and evaluated. The SK kit was more user-friendly than QS due to the reduced manual processing, partial automation, and short turnaround time with half cost. Furthermore, SK produced high yields in both DNA and RNA extractions but poor purity in RNA extraction. In the assessment of rotavirus and Clostridium difficile infection, both kits had equivalent or more sensitive performance compared with the standard method. Although SK showed some interference and inhibition in nucleic acid extraction, the performance, including the repeatability, linearity, analytical sensitivity, and matrix effect, was sufficient for routine clinical use.

  14. Aptamer capturing of enzymes on magnetic beads to enhance assay specificity and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2011-12-15

    Activity and specificity of enzyme molecules are important to enzymatic reactions and enzyme assays. We describe an aptamer capturing approach that improves the specificity and the sensitivity of enzyme detection. An aptamer recognizing the target enzyme molecule is conjugated on a magnetic bead, increasing the local concentration, and serves as an affinity probe to capture and separate minute amounts of the enzyme. The captured enzymes catalyze the subsequent conversion of fluorogenic substrate to fluorescent products, enabling a sensitive measure of the active enzyme. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated through assays for human alpha thrombin and human neutrophil elastase (HNE), two important enzymes. Thrombin (2 fM) and 100 fM HNE can be detected. The incorporation of two binding events, substrate recognition and aptamer binding, greatly improves assay specificity. With its simplicity, this approach is applicable to biosensing and detection of disease biomarkers.

  15. Rapid Detection of Ricin in Serum Based on Cu-Chelated Magnetic Beads Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Song, Jian; Wang, Hong-Li; Xu, Bin; Liu, Feng; He, Kun; Wang, Na

    2016-04-01

    The protein toxin ricin obtained from castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) seeds is a potent biological warfare agent due to its ease of availability and acute toxicity. In this study, we demonstrated a rapid and simple method to detect ricin in serum in vitro. The ricin was mixed with serum and digested by trypsin, then all the peptides were efficiently extracted using Cu-chelated magnetic beads and were detected with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The specific ricin peptides were identified by Nanoscale Ultra Performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry according to their sequences. The assay required 2.5 hours, and a characteristic peptide could be detected down to 4 ng/μl and used as a biomarker to detect ricin in serum. The high sensitivity and simplicity of the procedure makes it valuable in clinical practice. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. The Application of Magnetic Bead Selection to Investigate Interactions between the Oral Microbiota and Salivary Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Madhwani, Tejal

    2016-01-01

    The effect of humoral immunity on the composition of the oral microbiota is less intensively investigated than hygiene and diet, in part due to a lack of simple and robust systems for investigating interactions between salivary immunoglobulins and oral bacteria. Here we report the application of an ex situ method to investigate the specificity of salivary immunoglobulins for salivary bacteria. Saliva collected from six volunteers was separated into immunoglobulin and microbial fractions, and the microbial fractions were then directly exposed to salivary immunoglobulins of “self” and “non-self” origin. Antibody-selected bacteria were separated from their congeners using a magnetic bead system, selective for IgA or IgG isotypes. The positively selected fractions were then characterized using gel-based eubacterial-specific DNA profiling. The eubacterial profiles of positively selected fractions diverged significantly from profiles of whole salivary consortia based on volunteer (P≤ 0.001%) and immunoglobulin origin (P≤ 0.001%), but not immunoglobulin isotype (P = 0.2). DNA profiles of separated microbial fractions were significantly (p≤ 0.05) less diverse than whole salivary consortia and included oral and environmental bacteria. Consortia selected using self immunoglobulins were generally less diverse than those selected with immunoglobulins of non-self origin. Magnetic bead separation facilitated the testing of interactions between salivary antibodies and oral bacteria, showing that these interactions are specific and may reflect differences in recognition by self and non-self immunoglobulins. Further development of this system could improve understanding of the relationship between the oral microbiota and the host immune system and of mechanisms underlying the compositional stability of the oral microbiota. PMID:27483159

  17. Rapid Isolation of Staphylococcus aureus Pathogens from Infected Clinical Samples Using Magnetic Beads Coated with Fc-Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, B.; Gamini, N.; Rodas, M.; Penary, M.; Giordano, G.; Oswald, E.; Super, M.; Ingber, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe how Staphylococcus aureus bacteria can be rapidly isolated from clinical samples of articular fluid and synovial tissue using magnetic beads coated with the engineered chimeric human opsonin protein, Fc-mannose-binding lectin (FcMBL). The FcMBL-beads were used to capture and magnetically remove bacteria from purified cultures of 12 S. aureus strains, and from 8 articular fluid samples and 4 synovial tissue samples collected from patients with osteoarthritis or periprosthetic infections previously documented by positive S. aureus cultures. While the capture efficiency was high (85%) with purified S. aureus strains grown in vitro, direct FcMBL-bead capture from the clinical samples was initially disappointing (< 5% efficiency). Further analysis revealed that inhibition of FcMBL binding was due to coating of the bacteria by immunoglobulins and immune cells that masked FcMBL binding sites, and to the high viscosity of these complex biological samples. Importantly, capture of pathogens using the FcMBL-beads was increased to 76% efficiency by pretreating clinical specimens with hypotonic washes, hyaluronidase and a protease cocktail. Using this approach, S. aureus bacteria could be isolated from infected osteoarthritic tissues within 2 hours after sample collection. This FcMBL-enabled magnetic method for rapid capture and concentration of pathogens from clinical samples could be integrated upstream of current processes used in clinical microbiology laboratories to identify pathogens and perform antibiotic sensitivity testing when bacterial culture is not possible or before colonies can be detected. PMID:27275840

  18. Construction of hydrodynamic bead models from high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed Central

    Byron, O

    1997-01-01

    Computer software such as HYDRO, based upon a comprehensive body of theoretical work, permits the hydrodynamic modeling of macromolecules in solution, which are represented to the computer interface as an assembly of spheres. The uniqueness of any satisfactory resultant model is optimized by incorporating into the modeling procedure the maximal possible number of criteria to which the bead model must conform. An algorithm (AtoB, for atoms to beads) that permits the direct construction of bead models from high resolution x-ray crystallographic or nuclear magnetic resonance data has now been formulated and tested. Models so generated then act as informed starting estimates for the subsequent iterative modeling procedure, thereby hastening the convergence to reasonable representations of solution conformation. Successful application of this algorithm to several proteins shows that predictions of hydrodynamic parameters, including those concerning solvation, can be confirmed. PMID:8994627

  19. Electrochemical biotin detection based on magnetic beads and a new magnetic flow cell for screen printed electrode.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Julien; González García, María Begoña; Costa García, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    The use of the first flow-cell for magnetic assays with an integrated magnet is reported here. The flow injection analysis system (FIA) is used for biotin determination. The reaction scheme is based on a one step competitive assay between free biotin and biotin labeled with horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP). The mixture of magnetic beads modified with streptavidin (Strep-MB), biotin and B-HRP is left 15 min under stirring and then a washing step is performed. After that, 100 μL of the mixture is injected and after 30s 100 μL of 3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) is injected and the FIAgram is recorded applying a potential of -0.2V. The linear range obtained is from 0.01 to 1 nM of biotin and the sensitivity is 758 nA/nM. The modification and cleaning of the electrode are performed in an easy way due to the internal magnet of the flow cell.

  20. Rotation-Driven Microfluidic Disc for White Blood Cell Enumeration Using Magnetic Bead Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yiwen; Li, Jingyi; Haverstick, Doris M; Landers, James P

    2016-11-15

    We recently defined a magnetic bead-based assay that exploited an agglutination-like response for DNA and applied it to DNA-containing cell enumeration using inexpensive benchtop hardware [ J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012 , 134 ( 12 ), 5689 - 96 ]. Although cost-efficient, the open-well format assay required numerous manual steps, and the magnetic field actuation scheme was not readily adaptable for integration. Here, we demonstrate a low-cost (<$2 in-lab), higher-throughput "pinwheel assay" platform that relies on a combination of a disposable rotation-driven microdisc (RDM), and a simple bidirectional rotating magnetic field (bi-RMF). The assay was transformed into an integrated microfluidic system using a multilayered polyester microfluidic disc created through laser print, cut and laminate fabrication, with fluid flow controlled by rotation speed without any mechanical valves. The RDM accepts four samples that undergo on-chip dilution to five different concentrations that cover the effective concentration range needed for downstream cell counting by pinwheel assay. We show that a bi-RMF is effective for the simultaneous actuation of pinwheel assays in 20 detection chambers. The optimization of the bi-RMF frequencies allows the RDM-based pinwheel assay detect human genomic DNA down to a mass of human genomic DNA (5.5 picograms) that is roughly equal to the mass in a single cell. For proof of principle, enumeration of the white blood cells in human blood samples on the RDM provided data correlating well (C.V. of 10%) with those obtained in a clinical lab. Fusing the cost-effective RDM with a simple bi-RMF provides a promising strategy for automation and multiplexing of magnetic particle-based agglutination assays.

  1. Magnetic Bead-Based Colorimetric Immunoassay for Aflatoxin B1 Using Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    A competitive colorimetric immunoassay for the detection of aflatoxin B1 (AFB) has been established using biofunctionalized magnetic beads (MBs) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Aflatoxin B1-bovine serum albumin conjugates (AFB-BSA) modified MBs were employed as capture probe, which could specifically bind with GNP-labeled anti-AFB antibodies through immunoreaction, while such specific binding was competitively inhibited by the addition of AFB. After magnetic separation, the supernatant solution containing unbound GNPs was directly tested by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The absorption intensity was directly proportional to the AFB concentration. The influence of GNP size, incubation time and pH was investigated in detail. After optimization, the developed method could detect AFB in a linear range from 20 to 800 ng/L, with the limit of detection at 12 ng/L. The recoveries for spiked maize samples ranged from 92.8% to 122.0%. The proposed immunoassay provides a promising approach for simple, rapid, specific and cost-effective detection of toxins in the field of food safety. PMID:25405511

  2. Sensitive DNA detection and SNP discrimination using ultrabright SERS nanorattles and magnetic beads for malaria diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoan T; Gandra, Naveen; Fales, Andrew M; Taylor, Steve M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-07-15

    One of the major obstacles to implement nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) and in resource-limited settings is the lack of sensitive and practical DNA detection methods that can be seamlessly integrated into portable platforms. Herein we present a sensitive yet simple DNA detection method using a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoplatform: the ultrabright SERS nanorattle. The method, referred to as the nanorattle-based method, involves sandwich hybridization of magnetic beads that are loaded with capture probes, target sequences, and ultrabright SERS nanorattles that are loaded with reporter probes. Upon hybridization, a magnet was applied to concentrate the hybridization sandwiches at a detection spot for SERS measurements. The ultrabright SERS nanorattles, composed of a core and a shell with resonance Raman reporters loaded in the gap space between the core and the shell, serve as SERS tags for signal detection. Using this method, a specific DNA sequence of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum could be detected with a detection limit of approximately 100 attomoles. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination of wild type malaria DNA and mutant malaria DNA, which confers resistance to artemisinin drugs, was also demonstrated. These test models demonstrate the molecular diagnostic potential of the nanorattle-based method to both detect and genotype infectious pathogens. Furthermore, the method's simplicity makes it a suitable candidate for integration into portable platforms for POC and in resource-limited settings applications.

  3. Assessment of methods for covalent binding of nucleic acids to magnetic beads, Dynabeads, and the characteristics of the bound nucleic acids in hybridization reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, V; Schmid, R; Rickwood, D; Hornes, E

    1988-01-01

    Dynabeads are magnetic monosized beads with high stability, high uniformity, unique paramagnetic properties, low particle-particle interaction, and high dispersibility. Different reactive groups; hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups can be attached to the surface. Several methods for covalent attachment of DNA or oligonucleotides to the beads were investigated. Best coupling yields were obtained by carbodiimide-mediated end-attachment of 5'-phosphate and 5'-NH2 modified nucleic acids to respectively amino and carboxyl beads. The carboxyl beads showed a low degree of non-specific binding, while a better yield of end-attached nucleic acids was obtained using the amino beads. The DNA-beads worked efficiently in hybridization experiments, and the kinetics of hybridization approach those of solution hybridization. PMID:3205723

  4. Angiotensin converting enzyme immobilized on magnetic beads as a tool for ligand fishing.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernando G; Vanzolini, Kenia L; Cass, Quezia B

    2017-01-05

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) presents an important role in blood pressure regulation, since that converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. Some commercially available ACE inhibitors are captopril, lisinopril and enalapril; due to their side effects, naturally occurring inhibitors have been prospected. In order to endorse this research field we have developed a new tool for ACE ligand screening. To this end, ACE was extracted from bovine lung, purified and chemically immobilized in modified ferrite magnetic beads (ACE-MBs). The ACE-MBs have shown a Michaelian kinetic behavior towards hippuryl-histidyl-leucine. Moreover, as proof of concept, the ACE-MBs was inhibited by lisinopril with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 10nM. At the fishing assay, ACE-MBs were able not only to fish out the reference inhibitor, but also one peptide from a pool of tryptic digested BSA. In conclusion, ACE-MBs emerge as new straightforward tool for ACE kinetics determination, inhibition and binder screening.

  5. Magnetic bead-based salivary peptidome profiling analysis during orthodontic treatment durations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jieni; Zhou, Shaonan; Zheng, Hui; Zhou, Yanheng; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jiuxiang

    2012-05-18

    Orthodontic treatment induces various biological responses, including tooth movement and remodeling of alveolar bone. Although some studies have investigated the contribution of orthodontic procedures to changes in saliva conditions, little is known about the effects of different treatment durations on the saliva proteome. To identify the discriminating protein profiles in unstimulated whole saliva of orthodontic patients with different treatment durations, we used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) combined with magnetic bead, and peptide mass fingerprints were created by scanning MS signals. Saliva samples from 40 patients (10 in each of four groups: the group without an appliance and groups under treatment for 2, 7, and 12 months) were analyzed. The results showed eight mass peaks with significant differences. Furthermore, mass peak intensities at proteins 1817.7, 2010.7, 2744 and 2710.2 Da represented a steady time-dependent increasing trend, whereas protein 4134 Da exhibited a decreasing tendency. Differential expression of the peptidome profile also occurred in the multiple comparisons, and we established a fitting model. Thus, the potential discriminating biomarkers investigated in this study reflected the complicated changes in periodontal tissues during orthodontic treatment and indicated dynamic interactions between orthodontic treatment and the saliva proteome. The results provide novel insights into alterations in salivary proteins due to different orthodontic treatment durations and may lead to the development of a therapeutic monitoring strategy for orthodontics.

  6. Enrichment and identification of glycoproteins in human saliva using lectin magnetic bead arrays.

    PubMed

    Caragata, Michael; Shah, Alok K; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hill, Michelle M; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-03-15

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and could provide diagnostic value in cancer detection. Human saliva is an ideal source of glycoproteins due to the relatively high proportion of glycosylated proteins in the salivary proteome. Moreover, saliva collection is noninvasive and technically straightforward, and the sample collection and storage is relatively easy. Although differential glycosylation of proteins can be indicative of disease states, identification of differential glycosylation from clinical samples is not trivial. To facilitate salivary glycoprotein biomarker discovery, we optimized a method for differential glycoprotein enrichment from human saliva based on lectin magnetic bead arrays (saLeMBA). Selected lectins from distinct reactivity groups were used in the saLeMBA platform to enrich salivary glycoproteins from healthy volunteer saliva. The technical reproducibility of saLeMBA was analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the glycosylated proteins enriched by each lectin. Our saLeMBA platform enabled robust glycoprotein enrichment in a glycoprotein- and lectin-specific manner consistent with known protein-specific glycan profiles. We demonstrated that saLeMBA is a reliable method to enrich and detect glycoproteins present in human saliva.

  7. Electrochemical immunoassay using magnetic beads for the determination of zearalenone in baby food: an anticipated analytical tool for food safety.

    PubMed

    Hervás, Miriam; López, Miguel Angel; Escarpa, Alberto

    2009-10-27

    In this work, electrochemical immunoassay involving magnetic beads to determine zearalenone in selected food samples has been developed. The immunoassay scheme has been based on a direct competitive immunoassay method in which antibody-coated magnetic beads were employed as the immobilisation support and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as enzymatic label. Amperometric detection has been achieved through the addition of hydrogen peroxide substrate and hydroquinone as mediator. Analytical performance of the electrochemical immunoassay has been evaluated by analysis of maize certified reference material (CRM) and selected baby food samples. A detection limit (LOD) of 0.011 microg L(-1) and EC(50) 0.079 microg L(-1) were obtained allowing the assessment of the detection of zearalenone mycotoxin. In addition, an excellent accuracy with a high recovery yield ranging between 95 and 108% has been obtained. The analytical features have shown the proposed electrochemical immunoassay to be a very powerful and timely screening tool for the food safety scene.

  8. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Viswan, Anchu; Chou, Han; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito‑borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave‑excited inductively‑coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody‑integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV‑infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1‑4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody‑integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV.

  9. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology

    PubMed Central

    SAKUDO, AKIKAZU; VISWAN, ANCHU; CHOU, HAN; SASAKI, TADAHIRO; IKUTA, KAZUYOSHI; NAGATSU, MASAAKI

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave-excited inductively-coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody-integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV-infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1–4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody-integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV. PMID:27221214

  10. Single functional magnetic-bead as universal biosensing platform for trace analyte detection using SERS-nanobioprobe.

    PubMed

    Xiao, R; Wang, C W; Zhu, A N; Long, F

    2016-05-15

    SERS biosensor has demonstrated remarkable potential to analyze various bio/chemical targets with ultrahigh sensitivity. However, the development of universal SERS biosensing platforms with a uniform and reproducible structure that can quantitatively detect a broad range of trace analytes remains a significant challenge. The production of SERS nanotags with abundant Raman reporters and rational structure to conjugate with detection biomolecules is another key to design SERS-nanobioprobes. Here, we introduce a facile single magnetic-bead biosensing platform, formed by combining the captured antibodies/antigens conjugated magnetic-beads and the Au@Raman-Reporters@Ag sandwich-based nanorod tags labeled nanobioprobes. The advantage of the robust sandwich-structure-based nanotags is attributed not only to the high density Raman reporters contained inside, with high EF value because of enhanced electromagnetic field density, but also to the flexibility for bioconjugation of the detection biomolecules. The 3-D structure of the functional magnetic-bead provides a perfect platform to rapidly capture and enrich biomolecules. Ultrasensitive detection of two small molecules and a protein was achieved in samples, respectively.

  11. Rapid detection of Clostridium difficile via magnetic bead aggregation in cost-effective polyester microdevices with cell phone image analysis.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Cabaniss, Scott T; Angotti, Morgan L; Moore, John H; Abhyankar, Mayuresh; Shukla, Nishant; Mills, Daniel L; Kessel, Bryan G; Garner, Gavin T; Swami, Nathan S; Landers, James P

    2016-10-07

    Pathogen detection has traditionally been accomplished by utilizing methods such as cell culture, immunoassays, and nucleic acid amplification tests; however, these methods are not easily implemented in resource-limited settings because special equipment for detection and thermal cycling is often required. In this study, we present a magnetic bead aggregation assay coupled to an inexpensive microfluidic fabrication technique that allows for cell phone detection and analysis of a notable pathogen in less than one hour. Detection is achieved through the use of a custom-built system that allows for fluid flow control via centrifugal force, as well as manipulation of magnetic beads with an adjustable rotating magnetic field. Cell phone image capture and analysis is housed in a 3D-printed case with LED backlighting and a lid-mounted Android phone. A custom-written application (app.) is employed to interrogate images for the extent of aggregation present following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) coupled to product-inhibited bead aggregation (PiBA) for detection of target sequences. Clostridium difficile is a pathogen of increasing interest due to its causative role in intestinal infections following antibiotic treatment, and was therefore chosen as the pathogen of interest in the present study to demonstrate the rapid, cost-effective, and sequence-specific detection capabilities of the microfluidic platform described herein.

  12. A novel automated device for rapid nucleic acid extraction utilizing a zigzag motion of magnetic silica beads.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Uehara, Masayuki; Honda, Takayuki; Saito, Yasunori

    2016-02-04

    We report a novel automated device for nucleic acid extraction, which consists of a mechanical control system and a disposable cassette. The cassette is composed of a bottle, a capillary tube, and a chamber. After sample injection in the bottle, the sample is lysed, and nucleic acids are adsorbed on the surface of magnetic silica beads. These magnetic beads are transported and are vibrated through the washing reagents in the capillary tube under the control of the mechanical control system, and thus, the nucleic acid is purified without centrifugation. The purified nucleic acid is automatically extracted in 3 min for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The nucleic acid extraction is dependent on the transport speed and the vibration frequency of the magnetic beads, and optimizing these two parameters provided better PCR efficiency than the conventional manual procedure. There was no difference between the detection limits of our novel device and that of the conventional manual procedure. We have already developed the droplet-PCR machine, which can amplify and detect specific nucleic acids rapidly and automatically. Connecting the droplet-PCR machine to our novel automated extraction device enables PCR analysis within 15 min, and this system can be made available as a point-of-care testing in clinics as well as general hospitals.

  13. Screening inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from natural products using enzyme immobilized magnetic beads by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Li, Dapeng; Yu, Boyang; Qi, Jin

    2017-03-06

    In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to assess the results of bioactive compound screening from natural products using immobilized enzyme magnetic beads. We compared three commercial magnetic beads with modified amino, carboxy and N-hydroxysuccinimide groups, respectively. Amino magnetic beads performed best for immobilization and were selected for further experiments. Xanthine oxidase was immobilized on amino magnetic beads and applied to screen potential inhibitors in fresh Zingiber officinale Roscoe, extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi and Pueraria lobata Ohwi. In total, 12 potential xanthine oxidase ligands were identified from fresh Zingiber root and Scutellaria root extracts, of which eight were characterized and the concentration required for 50% inhibition was determined. Preliminary structure-function relationships were discussed based on these results. A convenient and effective method was therefore developed for the identification of active compounds from complex natural product mixtures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Ni(2+)-zeolite/ferrosphere and Ni(2+)-silica/ferrosphere beads for magnetic affinity separation of histidine-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Vereshchagina, T A; Fedorchak, M A; Sharonova, O M; Fomenko, E V; Shishkina, N N; Zhizhaev, A M; Kudryavtsev, A N; Frank, L A; Anshits, A G

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic Ni(2+)-zeolite/ferrosphere and Ni(2+)-silica/ferrosphere beads (Ni-ferrosphere beads - NFB) of a core-shell structure were synthesized starting from coal fly ash ferrospheres having diameters in the range of 0.063-0.050 mm. The strategy of NFB fabrication is an oriented chemical modification of the outer surface preserving the magnetic core of parent beads with the formation of micro-mesoporous coverings. Two routes of ferrosphere modification were realized, such as (i) hydrothermal treatment in an alkaline medium resulting in a NaP zeolite layer and (ii) synthesis of micro-mesoporous silica on the glass surface using conventional methods. Immobilization of Ni(2+) ions in the siliceous porous shell of the magnetic beads was carried out via (i) the ion exchange of Na(+) for Ni(2+) in the zeolite layer or (ii) deposition of NiO clusters in the zeolite and silica pores. The final NFB were tested for affinity in magnetic separation of the histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) directly from a cell lysate. Results pointed to the high affinity of the magnetic beads towards the protein in the presence of 10 mM EDTA. The sorption capacity of the ferrosphere-based Ni-beads with respect to GFP was in the range 1.5-5.7 mg cm(-3).

  15. Optimization of magnetoresistive sensor current for on-chip magnetic bead detection using the sensor self-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the self-heating of magnetoresistive sensors used for measurements on magnetic beads in magnetic biosensors. The signal from magnetic beads magnetized by the field due to the sensor bias current is proportional to the bias current squared. Therefore, we aim to maximize the bias current while limiting the sensor self-heating. We systematically characterize and model the Joule heating of magnetoresistive sensors with different sensor geometries and stack compositions. The sensor heating is determined using the increase of the sensor resistance as function of the bias current. The measured temperature increase is in good agreement with a finite element model and a simple analytical thermal model. The heat conductance of our system is limited by the 1 μm thick electrically insulating silicon dioxide layer between the sensor stack and the underlying silicon wafer, thus the heat conductance is proportional to the sensor area and inversely proportional to the oxide thickness. This simple heat conductance determines the relationship between bias current and sensor temperature, and we show that 25 μm wide sensor on a 1 μm oxide can sustain a bias current of 30 mA for an allowed temperature increase of 5 °C. The method and models used are generally applicable for thin film sensor systems. Further, the consequences for biosensor applications of the present sensor designs and the impact on future sensor designs are discussed.

  16. Speed improvement of a pathogenic micro-organism population detection with LAPS system by a magnetic bead separation and a pH detection.

    PubMed

    Moon, H S; Ryu, S; Yum, D; Kim, H

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a magnetic bead based immobilization method and pH detection method is applied to the LAPS (light addressable potentiometric sensor) system to detect a pathogenic micro-organism population. Magnetic beads are very small, superparamagnetic particles (0.8 approximately 5.0 microm in diameter) that are able to sustain a magnetic domain under excitation and do not exhibit residual magnetization when the external field is removed. By using magnetic beads as an immobilization method, other bulky and complex method can be alternated. To verify the method, an urease labeled anti-salmonella typhimurium antibody is used to detect a pathogenic micro-organism( S. typhimurium ) population by a bias voltage maximum slope detection.

  17. Optimization of the virus concentration method using polyethyleneimine-conjugated magnetic beads and its application to the detection of human hepatitis A, B and C viruses.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Kogi, Mieko; Oshizawa, Tadashi; Furuta, Birei; Satoh, Koei; Iwata, Akiko; Murata, Mitsuhiro; Hikata, Mikio; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2007-07-01

    To enhance the sensitivity of virus detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), a novel virus concentration method using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-conjugated magnetic beads was developed in our previous study. However, several viruses could not be concentrated by this method. In this paper, the conditions of virus concentration were optimized to concentrate a wide range of viruses more efficiently. The PEI beads adsorbed viruses more efficiently than other cationic polymers, and the optimum virus concentration was obtained under weak acidic conditions. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that several serum proteins, such as complement type 3, complement type 4 and immunoglobulin M (IgM), were co-adsorbed by the PEI beads, suggesting that the beads may adsorb viruses not only by direct adsorption, but also via immune complex formation. This hypothesis was confirmed by the result that poliovirus, which PEI beads could not adsorb directly, could be concentrated by the beads via immune complex formation. On the other hand, hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viruses were adsorbed directly by PEI beads almost completely. Like poliovirus, hepatitis B virus (HBV) was concentrated efficiently by the addition of anti-HBV IgM. In conclusion, virus concentration using PEI beads is a useful method to concentrate a wide range of viruses and can be used to enhance the sensitivity of detection of HAV, HBV and HCV.

  18. Effects of a Strong Static Magnetic Field on Bacterium Shewanellaoneidensis: An Assessment by Using Whole Genome Microarray.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Liu, Y.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Hongjun, P.

    2007-04-02

    The effect of a strong static 14.1 T magnetic field on logphase cells of bacterial strain Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was evaluatedby using whole genome microarray of this bacterium. Although differenceswere not observed between the treatment and control by measuring theoptical density (OD), colony forming unit (CFU), as well as post-exposuregrowth of cells, transcriptional expression levels of 65 genes werealtered according to our microarray data. Among these genes, 21 wereupregulated while other 44were downregulated, compared withcontrol.

  19. Integration of antibody by surface functionalization of graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads using ammonia gas plasma technology for capturing influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Chou, Han; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2015-05-01

    Antibody-integrated magnetic beads have been functionalized for influenza A virus capture. First, ammonia plasma produced by a radio frequency power source was reacted with the surface of graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads to introduce amino groups. Anti-influenza A virus hemagglutinin antibody was then anchored by its surface sulfide groups to the amino groups on the beads via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate. After incubation with influenza A virus, adsorption of the virus to the beads was confirmed by immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and inoculation of chicken embryonated eggs, indicating that virus infectivity is maintained and that the proposed method is useful for the enhanced detection and isolation of influenza A virus.

  20. An Electrochemical Genosensing Assay Based on Magnetic Beads and Gold Nanoparticle-Loaded Latex Microspheres for Vibrio cholerae Detection.

    PubMed

    Low, Kim-Fatt; Rijiravanich, Patsamon; Singh, Kirnpal Kaur Banga; Surareungchai, Werasak; Yean, Chan Yean

    2015-04-01

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical genosensing assay was developed for the sequence-specific detection of Vibrio cholerae DNA using magnetic beads as the biorecognition surface and gold nanoparticle-loaded latex microspheres (latex-AuNPs) as a signal-amplified hybridization tag. This biorecognition surface was prepared by immobilizing specific biotinylated capturing probes onto the streptavidin-coupled magnetic beads. Fabricating a hybridization tag capable of amplifying the electrochemical signal involved loading multiple AuNPs onto polyelectrolyte multilayer film-coated poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) latex microspheres as carrier particles. The detection targets, single-stranded 224-bp asymmetric PCR amplicons of the V. cholerae lolB gene, were sandwich-hybridized to magnetic bead-functionalized capturing probes and fluorescein-labeled detection probes and tagged with latex-AuNPs. The subsequent electrochemical stripping analysis of chemically dissolved AuNPs loaded onto the latex microspheres allowed for the quantification of the target amplicons. The high-loading capacity of the AuNPs on the latex microspheres for sandwich-type dual-hybridization genosensing provided eminent signal amplification. The genosensing variables were optimized, and the assay specificity was demonstrated. The clinical applicability of the assay was evaluated using spiked stool specimens. The current signal responded linearly to the different V. cholerae concentrations spiked into stool specimens with a detection limit of 2 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. The proposed latex-AuNP-based magnetogenosensing platform is promising, exhibits an effective amplification performance, and offers new opportunities for the ultrasensitive detection of other microbial pathogens.

  1. An immune sandwich assay of carcinoembryonic antigen based on the joint use of upconversion phosphors and magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaohua; Wu, Zhengjun; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-06-21

    We herein report a sensitive and selective immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on the joint use of upconversion phosphors (UCPs) and magnetic beads (MBs). UCPs as the signal probe were designed with a core-shell structure which provided a 40-fold enhancement of the luminescence intensity. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-modified UCPs were covalently conjugated with the anti-CEA antibody (coating), and streptavidin functionalized magnetic beads were combined with another biotin-tagged anti-CEA antibody. With the assistance of a magnet, the as-formed immune sandwich in the presence of CEA can be readily separated from the assay matrix. The immunosensor showed a linear dynamic range for CEA within 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) in a buffered aqueous solution, and 0.1-20 ng mL(-1) in a human serum sample. The sensor was highly specific to CEA. Our results have suggested the potential application of the UCP-MB based immunoassay for CEA in clinical analysis.

  2. Validation of Flow Cytometry and Magnetic Bead-Based Methods to Enrich CNS Single Cell Suspensions for Quiescent Microglia.

    PubMed

    Volden, T A; Reyelts, C D; Hoke, T A; Arikkath, J; Bonasera, S J

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident mononuclear phagocytes within the CNS parenchyma that intimately interact with neurons and astrocytes to remodel synapses and extracellular matrix. We briefly review studies elucidating the molecular pathways that underlie microglial surveillance, activation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis; we additionally place these studies in a clinical context. We describe and validate an inexpensive and simple approach to obtain enriched single cell suspensions of quiescent parenchymal and perivascular microglia from the mouse cerebellum and hypothalamus. Following preparation of regional CNS single cell suspensions, we remove myelin debris, and then perform two serial enrichment steps for cells expressing surface CD11b. Myelin depletion and CD11b enrichment are both accomplished using antigen-specific magnetic beads in an automated cell separation system. Flow cytometry of the resultant suspensions shows a significant enrichment for CD11b(+)/CD45(+) cells (perivascular microglia) and CD11b(+)/CD45(-) cells (parenchymal microglia) compared to starting suspensions. Of note, cells from these enriched suspensions minimally express Aif1 (aka Iba1), suggesting that the enrichment process does not evoke significant microglial activation. However, these cells readily respond to a functional challenge (LPS) with significant changes in the expression of molecules specifically associated with microglia. We conclude that methods employing a combination of magnetic-bead based sorting and flow cytometry produce suspensions highly enriched for microglia that are appropriate for a variety of molecular and cellular assays.

  3. Peptidomic analysis of Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) hemolymph by magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOF MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baojie; Liu, Mei; Jiang, Keyong; Zhang, Guofan; Wang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    Peptides in shrimp hemolymph play an important role in the innate immune response. Analysis of hemolymph will help to detect and identify potential novel biomarkers of microbial infection. We used magnetic bead-based purification (ClinProt system) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to characterize shrimp hemolymph peptides. Shrimp serum and plasma were used as the source of samples for comparative analysis, and it was found that serum was more suitable for shrimp hemolymph peptidomic analysis. To screen potential specific biomarkers in serum of immune-challenged shrimps, we applied magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOF MS to serum samples from 10 immune-challenged and 10 healthy shrimps. The spectra were analyzed using FlexAnalysis 3.0 and ClinProTools 2.1 software. Thirteen peptide peaks significantly different between the two groups were selected as candidate biomarkers of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-infection. The diagnostic model established by genetic algorithm using five of these peaks was able to discriminate LPS-challenged shrimps from healthy control shrimps with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 100%. Our approach in MALDITOF MS-based peptidomics is a powerful tool for screening bioactive peptides or biomarkers derived from hemolymph, and will help to enable a better understanding of the innate immune response of shrimps.

  4. Ultra-fast synthesis of magnetic and luminescent silica beads for versatile bioanalytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Schulte, Detlef; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Borm, Paul

    2005-05-01

    A method for the synthesis of both spherically shaped micro/nano silica particles and silica hybrid particles using a novel inverse sol-gel suspension technique was developed. The technique enables the synthesis of beads within seconds and provides a simple basis for quantum dot and biosubstances encapsulation. The carriers can be used as DNA adsorbents, individually addressable optical codes for bioassays and biomolecule library screening as well as photonic crystals.

  5. Establishing a novel automated magnetic bead-based method for the extraction of DNA from a variety of forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Witt, Sebastian; Neumann, Jan; Zierdt, Holger; Gébel, Gabriella; Röscheisen, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    Automated systems have been increasingly utilized for DNA extraction by many forensic laboratories to handle growing numbers of forensic casework samples while minimizing the risk of human errors and assuring high reproducibility. The step towards automation however is not easy: The automated extraction method has to be very versatile to reliably prepare high yields of pure genomic DNA from a broad variety of sample types on different carrier materials. To prevent possible cross-contamination of samples or the loss of DNA, the components of the kit have to be designed in a way that allows for the automated handling of the samples with no manual intervention necessary. DNA extraction using paramagnetic particles coated with a DNA-binding surface is predestined for an automated approach. For this study, we tested different DNA extraction kits using DNA-binding paramagnetic particles with regard to DNA yield and handling by a Freedom EVO(®)150 extraction robot (Tecan) equipped with a Te-MagS magnetic separator. Among others, the extraction kits tested were the ChargeSwitch(®)Forensic DNA Purification Kit (Invitrogen), the PrepFiler™Automated Forensic DNA Extraction Kit (Applied Biosystems) and NucleoMag™96 Trace (Macherey-Nagel). After an extensive test phase, we established a novel magnetic bead extraction method based upon the NucleoMag™ extraction kit (Macherey-Nagel). The new method is readily automatable and produces high yields of DNA from different sample types (blood, saliva, sperm, contact stains) on various substrates (filter paper, swabs, cigarette butts) with no evidence of a loss of magnetic beads or sample cross-contamination.

  6. Switch on or switch off: an optical DNA sensor based on poly(p-phenylenevinylene) grafted magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Anupama R Gulur; Peng, Hui; Barker, David; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2012-05-15

    There has been an enormous demand for commercial label-free DNA sensors in a diverse range of fields including pre-emptive medicine, diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food industry. Addressing the need for sensitive, selective and facile DNA sensors, we demonstrate a novel switch on/off sensor design that utilizes sandwich hybridization between photoluminescent anionic conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) bound captureprobe coated onto magnetic beads, target and the signaling probe. The hybridization-readout in our sensor was monitored by either fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, switch-on) or superquenching (switch-off) depending on the type of signaling probe used. Moreover recent designs that utilize beads for sensing DNA have been limited towards using electrostatic interactions or intercalation of dyes to observe FRET. To our knowledge this is the first report of a switch on/off sensor utilizing either FRET or superquenching thus providing flexibility for future development of such rapid, facile and sensitive DNA sensors. The FRET-based sensor was investigated by optimizing the reaction parameters and selectivity. A low detection limit of 240 fmol in 2 mL of SSC buffer was achieved.

  7. A Rapid Detection Method of Brucella with Quantum Dots and Magnetic Beads Conjugated with Different Polyclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dandan; Qu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yushen; Li, Li; Yin, Dehui; Li, Juan; Xu, Kun; Xie, Renguo; Zhai, Yue; Zhang, Huiwen; Bao, Hao; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Juan; Song, Xiuling; Song, Wenzhi

    2017-03-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause zoonotic disease of brucellosis worldwide. Traditional methods for detection of Brucella spp. take 48-72 h that does not meet the need of rapid detection. Herein, a new rapid detection method of Brucella was developed based on polyclonal antibody-conjugating quantum dots and antibody-modified magnetic beads. First, polyclonal antibodies IgG and IgY were prepared and then the antibody conjugated with quantum dots (QDs) and immunomagnetic beads (IMB), respectively, which were activated by N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)- N'-ethylcar-bodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) to form probes. We used the IMB probe to separate the Brucella and labeled by the QD probe, and then detected the fluorescence intensity with a fluorescence spectrometer. The detection method takes 105 min with a limit of detection of 103 CFU/mL and ranges from 10 to 105 CFU/mL ( R 2 = 0.9983), and it can be well used in real samples.

  8. The on-bead digestion of protein corona on nanoparticles by trypsin immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-03-21

    Proteins interacting with nanoparticles would form the protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles in biological systems, which would critically impact the biological identities of nanoparticles and/or result in the physiological and pathological consequences. The enzymatic digestion of protein corona was the primary step to achieve the identification of protein components of the protein corona for the bottom-up proteomic approaches. In this study, the investigation on the tryptic digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin on a magnetic nanoparticle was carried out for the first time. As a comparison with the usual overnight long-time digestion and the severe self-digestion of free trypsin, the on-bead digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin could be accomplished within 1h, along with the significantly reduced self-digestion of trypsin and the improved reproducibility on the identification of proteins by the mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. It showed that the number of identified bovine serum (BS) proteins on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles was increased by 13% for the immobilized trypsin with 1h digestion as compared to that of using free trypsin with even overnight digestion. In addition, the on-bead digestion of using the immobilized trypsin was further applied on the identification of human plasma protein corona on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which leads the efficient digestion of the human plasma proteins and the identification of 149 human plasma proteins corresponding to putative critical pathways and biological processes.

  9. Liquid carry-over in an injection moulded all-polymer chip system for immiscible phase magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Skotte Sørensen, Karen; Wolff, Anders; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    We present an all-polymer, single-use microfluidic chip system produced by injection moulding and bonded by ultrasonic welding. Both techniques are compatible with low-cost industrial mass-production. The chip is produced for magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction facilitated by immiscible phase filtration and features passive liquid filling and magnetic bead manipulation using an external magnet. In this work, we determine the system compatibility with various surfactants. Moreover, we quantify the volume of liquid co-transported with magnetic bead clusters from Milli-Q water or a lysis-binding buffer for nucleic acid extraction (0.1 (v/v)% Triton X-100 in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride). A linear relationship was found between the liquid carry-over and mass of magnetic beads used. Interestingly, similar average carry-overs of 1.74(8) nL/μg and 1.72(14) nL/μg were found for Milli-Q water and lysis-binding buffer, respectively.

  10. Rapid screening and identification of α-glucosidase inhibitors from mulberry leaves using enzyme-immobilized magnetic beads coupled with HPLC/MS and NMR.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Zhang, Yufeng; Cheng, Yiyu; Wang, Yi

    2013-02-01

    α-Glucosidase plays important roles in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates in the small intestine. The inhibition of α-glucosidase is regarded as a potential way to treat diabetes. We established an approach to screening α-glucosidase inhibitors from medicinal plants using enzyme-coated magnetic bead. Using 1-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide as reaction reagents, α-glucosidase was immobilized on the magnetic beads by covalent linkage. The conjugation of α-glucosidase to the magnetic beads was characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The proposed approach was applied in fishing potential α-glucosidase inhibitors from extract of Morus alba, a Chinese medicinal plant. The structures of potential active compounds were identified via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The results demonstrated that two flavonoids (isoquercitrin and astragalin) could bind to α-glucosidase, which was confirmed via conventional α-glucosidase inhibitory assay. Our findings suggested that enzyme-coated magnetic beads may be suitable for discovering active compounds from medicinal plants.

  11. Heat generation ability in AC magnetic field of nano MgFe2O4-based ferrite powder prepared by bead milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Aono, Hiromichi; Naohara, Takashi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Sato, Mitsunori; Watanabe, Yuji

    2011-03-01

    Nanosized MgFe2O4-based ferrite powder having heat generation ability in an AC magnetic field was prepared by bead milling and studied for thermal coagulation therapy applications. The crystal size and the particle size significantly decreased by bead milling. The heat generation ability in an AC magnetic field improved with the milling time, i.e. a decrease in crystal size. However, the heat generation ability decreased for excessively milled samples with crystal sizes of less than 5.5 nm. The highest heat ability (ΔT=34 °C) in the AC magnetic field (370 kHz, 1.77 kA/m) was obtained for fine MgFe2O4 powder having a ca. 6 nm crystal size (the samples were milled for 6-8 h using 0.1 mm ϕ beads). The heat generation of the samples was closely related to hysteresis loss, a B-H magnetic property. The reason for the high heat generation properties of the samples milled for 6-8 h using 0.1 mm ϕ beads was ascribed to the increase in hysteresis loss by the formation of a single domain. Moreover, the improvement in heating ability was obtained by calcination of the bead-milled sample at low temperature. In this case, the maximum heat generation (ΔT=41 °C) ability was obtained for a ca. 11 nm crystal size sample was prepared by crystal growth during the sample calcination. On the other hand, the ΔT value for Mg0.5Ca0.5Fe2O4 was synthesized using a reverse precipitation method decreased by bead milling.

  12. Microgels at the Water/Oil Interface: In Situ Observation of Structural Aging and Two-Dimensional Magnetic Bead Microrheology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shilin; Gawlitza, Kornelia; von Klitzing, Regine; Gilson, Laurent; Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan; Steffen, Werner; Auernhammer, Günter K

    2016-01-26

    Stimuli-responsive microgels can be used as stabilizers for emulsions. However, the details of structure and the viscoelastic property of the microgel-laden interface are still not well-known. We synthesized fluorescently labeled microgels and used confocal microscopy to observe their arrangement at the water/oil interface. The microgels aggregated spontaneously at the interface, and the aggregated structure reorganized due to thermal motion. The structure of the interfacial layer formed by microgels depended on the microgel concentration at the interface. We suggest that the structure was controlled by the aggregation and adsorption of microgels at the interface. The interparticle separation between microgels at the interface decreased over time, implying a slow aging process of the microgels at the interface. Magnetic beads were introduced at the interface and used to trigger deformation of the microgel layer. Under compression and shear the microgels in the aggregated structure rearranged, leading to plastic deformation, and some elastic responses were also observed.

  13. Rapid Detection and Isolation of Escherichia coli O104:H4 from Milk Using Monoclonal Antibody-coated Magnetic Beads.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Mirella; Di Febo, Tiziana; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Armillotta, Gisella; Manna, Laura; Minelli, Fabio; Tittarelli, Manuela; Caprioli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli O104:H4 were produced by fusion of Sp2/O-Ag-14 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells of Balb/c mice, immunized with heat-inactivated and sonicated E. coli O104:H4 bacterial cells. Four MAbs specific for the E. coli O104:H4 LPS (1E6G6, 1F4C9, 3G6G7, and 4G10D2) were characterized and evaluated for the use in a method for the detection of E. coli O104:H4 in milk samples that involves antibody conjugation to magnetic microbeads to reduce time and increase the efficiency of isolation. MAb 1E6G6 was selected and coupled to microbeads, then used for immuno-magnetic separation (IMS); the efficiency of the IMS method for E. coli O104:H4 isolation from milk was evaluated and compared to that of the EU RL VTEC conventional culture-based isolation procedure. Milk suspensions also containing other pathogenic bacteria that could potentially be found in milk (Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus) were also tested to evaluate the specificity of MAb-coated beads. Beads coated with MAb 1E6G6 showed a good ability to capture the E. coli O104:H4, even in milk samples contaminated with other bacteria, with a higher number of E. coli O104:H4 CFU reisolated in comparison with the official method (121 and 41 CFU, respectively, at 10(3) E. coli O104:H4 initial load; 19 and 6 CFU, respectively, at 10(2) E. coli O104:H4 initial load; 1 and 0 CFU, respectively, at 10(1) E. coli O104:H4 initial load). The specificity was 100%.

  14. Application of porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic beads and polyethylene glycol goncentration and detection of human noroviruses from green onion and grape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To set up detection methods for norovirus in fruits and vegetables by using porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic beads (PGM-MB) and polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG8000) concentrating and detecting the norovirus in green onion and grape. Methods: The highest virus dilution given a posit...

  15. Planar Hall effect bridge sensors with NiFe/Cu/IrMn stack optimized for self-field magnetic bead detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2016-03-01

    The stack composition in trilayer Planar Hall effect bridge sensors is investigated experimentally to identify the optimal stack for magnetic bead detection using the sensor self-field. The sensors were fabricated using exchange-biased stacks Ni80Fe20(tFM)/Cu(tCu)/Mn80Ir20(10 nm) with tFM = 10, 20, and 30 nm, and 0 ≤ tCu ≤ 0.6 nm. The sensors were characterized by magnetic hysteresis measurements, by measurements of the sensor response vs. applied field, and by measurements of the sensor response to a suspension of magnetic beads magnetized by the sensor self-field due to the sensor bias current. The exchange bias field was found to decay exponentially with tCu and inversely with tFM. The reduced exchange field for larger values of tFM and tCu resulted in higher sensitivities to both magnetic fields and magnetic beads. We argue that the maximum magnetic bead signal is limited by Joule heating of the sensors and, thus, that the magnetic stacks should be compared at constant power consumption. For a fixed sensor geometry, the figure of merit for this comparison is the magnetic field sensitivity normalized by the sensor bias voltage. In this regard, we found that sensors with tFM = 20 nm or 30 nm outperformed those with tFM = 10 nm by a factor of approximately two, because the latter have a reduced AMR ratio. Further, the optimum layer thicknesses, tCu ≈ 0.6 nm and tFM = 20-30 nm, gave a 90% higher signal compared to the corresponding sensors with tCu = 0 nm.

  16. Improving of catalase stability properties by encapsulation in alginate/Fe3O4 magnetic composite beads for enzymatic removal of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin Ispirli; Çinar, Mürvet; Teke, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was enhancing of stability properties of catalase enzyme by encapsulation in alginate/nanomagnetic beads. Amounts of carrier (10-100 mg) and enzyme concentrations (0.25-1.5 mg/mL) were analyzed to optimize immobilization conditions. Also, the optimum temperature (25-50°C), optimum pH (3.0-8.0), kinetic parameters, thermal stability (20-70°C), pH stability (4.0-9.0) operational stability (0-390 min), and reusability were investigated for characterization of the immobilized catalase system. The optimum pH levels of both free and immobilized catalase were 7.0. At the thermal stability studies, the magnetic catalase beads protected 90% activity, while free catalase maintained only 10% activity at 70°C. The thermal profile of magnetic catalase beads was spread over a large area. Similarly, this system indicated the improving of the pH stability. The reusability, which is especially important for industrial applications, was also determined. Thus, the activity analysis was done 50 times in succession. Catalase encapsulated magnetic alginate beads protected 83% activity after 50 cycles.

  17. Online magnetic bead based dynamic protein affinity selection coupled to LC-MS for the screening of acetylcholine binding protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Pochet, Lionel; Heus, Ferry; Jonker, Niels; Lingeman, Henk; Smit, August B; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Kool, Jeroen

    2011-06-15

    A magnetic beads based affinity-selection methodology towards the screening of acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) binders in mixtures and pure compound libraries was developed. The methodology works as follows: after in solution incubation of His-tagged AChBP with potential ligands, and subsequent addition of cobalt (II)-coated paramagnetic beads, the formed bead-AChBP-ligand complexes are fetched out of solution by injection and trapping in LC tubing with an external adjustable magnet. Non binders are then washed to the waste followed by elution of ligands to a SPE cartridge by flushing with denaturing solution. Finally, SPE-LC-MS analysis is performed to identify the ligands. The advantage of the current methodology is the in solution incubation followed by immobilized AChBP ligand trapping and the capability of using the magnetic beads system as mobile/online transportable affinity SPE material. The system was optimized and then successfully demonstrated for the identification of AChBP ligands injected as pure compounds and for the fishing of ligands in mixtures. The results obtained with AChBP as target protein demonstrated reliable discrimination between binders with pK(i) values ranging from at least 6.26 to 8.46 and non-binders.

  18. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs in Feces through their Interaction with Paramagnetic Beads in a Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes Teixeira, Candida; Neuhauss, Erli; Ben, Renata; Romanzini, Juliano; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of intestinal schistosomiasis in low endemic areas is a problem because often control measures have reduced egg burdens in feces to below the detection limits of classical coproparasitological methods. Evaluation of molecular methods is hindered by the absence of an established standard with maximum sensitivity and specificity. One strategy to optimize method performance, where eggs are rare events, is to examine large amounts of feces. A novel diagnostic method for isolation of Schistosoma mansoni eggs in feces, and an initial evaluation of its performance is reported here. Methodology/Principal Findings Known amounts of S. mansoni eggs were seeded into 30 g of normal human feces and subjected to a sequence of spontaneous sedimentation, sieving, Ritchie method, incubation and isolation through interaction with paramagnetic beads. Preliminary tests demonstrated the efficacy of lectins as ligands, but they also indicated that the paramagnetic beads alone were sufficient to isolate the eggs under a magnetic field through an unknown mechanism. Eggs were identified by microscopic inspection, with a sensitivity of 100% at 1.3 eggs per gram of feces (epg). Sensitivity gradually decreased to 25% at a concentration of 0.1 epg. In a preliminary application of the new method to the investigation of a recently established focus in southern Brazil, approximately 3 times more eggs were detected than with the thick-smear Kato-Katz method. Conclusions/Significance The novel S. mansoni detection method may significantly improve diagnosis of infections with low burdens in areas of recent introduction of the parasite, areas under successful control of transmission, or in infected travelers. It may also improve the evaluation of new treatments and vaccines. PMID:18060086

  19. Adsorption and isolation of nucleic acids on cellulose magnetic beads using a three-dimensional printed microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Deraney, Rachel N; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-11-01

    While advances in genomics have enabled sensitive and highly parallel detection of nucleic acid targets, the isolation and extraction of the nucleic acids remain a critical bottleneck in the workflow. We present here a simple 3D printed microfluidic chip that allows for the vortex and centrifugation free extraction of nucleic acids. This novel microfluidic chip utilizes the presence of a water and oil interface to filter out the lysate contaminants. The pure nucleic acids, while bound on cellulose particles, are magnetically moved across the oil layer. We demonstrated efficient and rapid extraction of spiked Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 18 plasmids in specimen transport medium, in under 15 min. An overall extraction efficiency of 61% is observed across a range of HPV plasmid concentrations (5 × 10(1) to 5 × 10(6) copies/100 μl). The magnetic, interfacial, and viscous drag forces inside the microgeometries of the chip are modeled. We have also developed a kinetics model for the adsorption of nucleic acids on cellulose functionalized superparamagnetic beads. We also clarify here the role of carrier nucleic acids in the adsorption and isolation of nucleic acids. Based on the various mechanistic insights detailed here, customized microfluidic devices can be designed to meet the range of current and emerging point of care diagnostics needs.

  20. Magneto-optical biosensing platform based on light scattering from self-assembled chains of functionalized rotating magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Yoon; Handa, Hiroshi; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2010-02-10

    We describe a simple protocol for the rapid, highly sensitive, and quantitative measurement of the concentration of biomolecules in a solution by monitoring light scattered by self-assembled chains of functionalized superparamagnetic beads (SBs) rotating in the solution. A rotating external field (H(ex)) applied to an aqueous solution containing 250 nm diameter biotinylated SBs produced linear chains of SBs rotating in phase with Hex due to magnetically induced self-assembly. At constant Hex, the addition of avidin to the solution led to the formation of longer SB-chains than without the presence of avidin. The generation of longer SB-chains was revealed by increases in the amplitude of the oscillating optical transmittance signal of the magnetic colloid solution. Monitoring changes in the amplitude of the optical transmittance of the solution enabled quantitative determination of the concentration of avidin added to the solution with a sensitivity of 100 pM (6.7 ng/mL) and a dynamic range of at least 3 orders of magnitude. The rotating chains acted as biomolecule probes and micromagnetic mixers, enabling detection of biomolecular recognition in less than 30 s. This approach offers a rapid, highly sensitive, inexpensive, and homogeneous means for detecting biorecognition processes.

  1. A new gravity-driven microfluidic-based electrochemical assay coupled to magnetic beads for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Laschi, Serena; Miranda-Castro, Rebeca; González-Fernández, Eva; Palchetti, Ilaria; Reymond, Frédéric; Rossier, Joël S; Marrazza, Giovanna

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the characterisation and the optimisation of hybridisation assays based on a novel, rapid and sensitive micro-analytical, gravity-driven, flow device is reported. This device combines a special chip containing eight polymer microchannels, with a portable, computer-controlled instrument. The device is used as a platform for affinity experiments using oligonucleotide-modified paramagnetic particles. In our approach, both hybridisation and labelling events are performed on streptavidin-coated paramagnetic microparticles functionalized with a biotinylated capture probe. Modified particles, introduced in the microchannel inlet of the chip, accumulate near the electrode surface by virtue of a magnetic holder. After hybridisation with the complementary sequence, the hybrid is labelled with an alkaline phosphatase conjugate. The electrochemical substrate for alkaline phosphatase revelation is p-aminophenyl phosphate. Solutions and reagents are sequentially passed through the microchannels, until enzyme substrate is added for in situ signal detection. Upon readout, the magnet array is flipped away, beads are removed by addition of regeneration buffer, and the so-regenerated chip is ready for further analysis. This protocol has been applied to the analytical detection of specific DNA sequences of Legionella pneumophila, with an RSD=8.5% and a detection limit of 0.33 nM.

  2. Adsorption and isolation of nucleic acids on cellulose magnetic beads using a three-dimensional printed microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Deraney, Rachel N.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    While advances in genomics have enabled sensitive and highly parallel detection of nucleic acid targets, the isolation and extraction of the nucleic acids remain a critical bottleneck in the workflow. We present here a simple 3D printed microfluidic chip that allows for the vortex and centrifugation free extraction of nucleic acids. This novel microfluidic chip utilizes the presence of a water and oil interface to filter out the lysate contaminants. The pure nucleic acids, while bound on cellulose particles, are magnetically moved across the oil layer. We demonstrated efficient and rapid extraction of spiked Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 18 plasmids in specimen transport medium, in under 15 min. An overall extraction efficiency of 61% is observed across a range of HPV plasmid concentrations (5 × 101 to 5 × 106 copies/100 μl). The magnetic, interfacial, and viscous drag forces inside the microgeometries of the chip are modeled. We have also developed a kinetics model for the adsorption of nucleic acids on cellulose functionalized superparamagnetic beads. We also clarify here the role of carrier nucleic acids in the adsorption and isolation of nucleic acids. Based on the various mechanistic insights detailed here, customized microfluidic devices can be designed to meet the range of current and emerging point of care diagnostics needs. PMID:26734116

  3. Water dispersible cross-linked magnetic chitosan beads for increasing the antimicrobial efficiency of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Holban, Alina Maria; Ficai, Anton; Ficai, Denisa; Voicu, Georgeta; Grumezescu, Valentina; Balaure, Paul Cătălin; Chifiriuc, Carmen Mariana

    2013-09-15

    The aim of this study was to obtain a nano-active system to improve antibiotic activity of certain drugs by controlling their release. Magnetic composite nanomaterials based on magnetite core and cross-linked chitosan shell were synthesized via the co-precipitation method and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), infrared microscopy (IRM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The prepared magnetic composite nanomaterials exhibit a significant potentiating effect on the activity of two cationic (kanamycin and neomycin) drugs, reducing the amount of antibiotics necessary for the antimicrobial effect. The increase in the antimicrobial activity was explained by the fact that the obtained nanosystems provide higher surface area to volume ratio, resulting into higher surface charge density thus increasing affinity to microbial cell and also by controlling their release. In addition to the nano-effect, the positive zeta potential of the synthesized magnetite/cross-linked chitosan core/shell magnetic nanoparticles allows for a more favorable interaction with the usually negatively charged cell wall of bacteria. The novelty of the present contribution is just the revealing of this synergistic effect exhibited by the synthesized water dispersible magnetic nanocomposites on the activity of different antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. The results obtained in this study recommend these magnetic water dispersible nanocomposite materials for applications in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases.

  4. Magnet-Bead Based MicroRNA Delivery System to Modify CD133+ Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiekhorst, Frank; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Aim. CD133+ stem cells bear huge potential for regenerative medicine. However, low retention in the injured tissue and massive cell death reduce beneficial effects. In order to address these issues, we intended to develop a nonviral system for appropriate cell engineering. Materials and Methods. Modification of human CD133+ stem cells with magnetic polyplexes carrying microRNA was studied in terms of efficiency, safety, and targeting potential. Results. High microRNA uptake rates (~80–90%) were achieved without affecting CD133+ stem cell properties. Modified cells can be magnetically guided. Conclusion. We developed a safe and efficient protocol for CD133+ stem cell modification. Our work may become a basis to improve stem cell therapeutical effects as well as their monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27795713

  5. Mesoporous silica beads embedded with semiconductor quantum dots and iron oxide nanocrystals: dual-function microcarriers for optical encoding and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Tushar R; Agrawal, Amit; Nie, Shuming

    2006-08-15

    Mesoporous beads are promising materials for embedding functional nanoparticles because of their nanometer-sized pores and large surface areas. Here we report the development of silica microbeads embedded with both semiconductor quantum dots (QD) and iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanocrystals as a new class of dual-function carriers for optical encoding and magnetic separation. The embedding (doping) process is carried out by either simultaneous or sequential addition of quantum dots and iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanocrystals in solution. The doping process is fast and quantitative, but the incorporated iron oxide strongly attenuates the signal intensity of QD fluorescence. We find that this attenuation is not due to conventional fluorescence quenching but is caused by the broad optical absorption spectrum of mixed-valence Fe3O4. For improved biocompatibility and reduced nonspecific binding, the encoded beads are further coated with amphiphilic polymers such as octylamine poly(acrylic acid). The results indicate that the polymer-coated beads are well suited for target capturing and enrichment, yielding magnetic separation efficiencies higher than 99%. By combining the multiplexing capability of QDs with the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanocrystals, this class of encoded beads is expected to find broad applications in high-throughput and multiplexed biomolecular assays.

  6. Fabrication of magnetic alginate beads with uniform dispersion of CoFe2O4 by the polydopamine surface functionalization for organic pollutants removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoli; Lu, Haijun; Zhang, Yun; He, Fu; Jing, Lingyun; He, Xinghua

    2016-12-01

    A simple and efficient method for production of magnetic composites by decorating CoFe2O4 with polydopamine (PDA) through oxidative polymerization of dopamine was conducted. Further, magnetic alginate beads with porous structure containing well-dispersed CoFe2O4-PDA were fabricated by ionic crosslinking technology. The resulting SA@CoFe2O4-PDA beads were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffractometer, vibrating sample magnetometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Adsorption potential of SA@CoFe2O4-PDA beads for organic dyes including Methylene Blue (MB), Crystal Violet (CV) and Malachite Green (MG) was evaluated. SA@CoFe2O4-PDA beads exhibited excellent adsorption performances due to the composite effect, large surface area and porous structure. Organic dyes could be removed from water solution with high efficiency in a wide pH range of 4.0-9.0. Moreover, it exhibited much higher adsorptivity towards MB and CV with the maximum adsorption capacities of 466.60 and 456.52 mg/g, respectively, which were much higher than that of MG (248.78 mg/g). Ca-electrolyte had obvious adverse effects on MB and CV adsorption than MG. FTIR and XPS demonstrated that carboxylate, catechol, hydroxyl and amine groups might be involved in adsorption of organic dyes. The characteristics of wide pH range, high adsorption capacity and convenient magnetic separation would make SA@CoFe2O4-PDA beads as effective adsorbent for removal of organic dyes from wastewater.

  7. Rapid removal of copper with magnetic poly-acrylic weak acid resin: quantitative role of bead radius on ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lichun; Shuang, Chendong; Liu, Fuqiang; Li, Aimin; Li, Yan; Zhou, Yang; Song, Haiou

    2014-05-15

    A novel magnetic weak acid resin NDMC was self-synthesized for the removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solutions. NDMC showed superior properties on the removal of Cu(2+) compared to commercial resins C106 and IRC-748, which was deeply investigated by adsorption isotherms and kinetic tests. The equilibrium adsorption amount of Cu(2+) onto NDMC (267.2mg/g) was almost twice as large as that onto IRC-748 (120.0mg/g). The adsorption kinetics of Cu(2+) onto the three resins fitted well with the pseudo-second-order equation. The initial adsorption rate h of NDMC was about 4 times that of C106 and nearly 8 times that of IRC-748 at the initial concentration of 500mg/L. External surface area was determined to be the key factor in rate-controlling by further analyzing the adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics parameters and physicochemical properties of the resins. NDMC resin with the smallest bead radius possessed the largest external surface and therefore exhibited the fastest kinetics. The adsorption amount of Cu(2+) onto NDMC was not influenced as the concentration of Na(+) increased from 1.0 to 10.0mM/L. Dilute HCl solution could effectively desorb Cu(2+). NDMC demonstrated high stability during 10 adsorption/desorption cycles, showing great potential in the rapid removal of Cu(2+) from wastewater.

  8. Turn-on chemiluminescent sensing platform for label-free protease detection using streptavidin-modified magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanhuan; Yu, Dalong; Zhao, Yanjun; Fan, Aiping

    2014-11-15

    We report a label-free streptavidin-modified magnetic beads (SA-MBs)-based sensing platform for turn-on chemiluminescent (CL) detection of protease using trypsin as model analyte. In the assay, a biotinylated peptide containing an arginine and a terminal cysteine was used as the substrate of trypsin. Upon adding the peptide into a basic luminol-NaIO4 solution, the terminal cysteine induced a strong CL signal. Surprisingly a much lower CL was emitted when the peptide was immobilized on the surface of SA-MBs. Based on this phenomenon, we designed a turn-on CL sensing system for protease using trypsin as model and its inhibitors screening. In the absence of trypsin, the peptide was coupled to the SA-MBs surface, resulting in a low CL background. Upon the addition of trypsin, the peptide can be catalytically hydrolyzed at the C-terminus of arginine, resulting in the formation of free cysteine-containing residues and subsequent CL recovery with the addition of luminol and NaIO4. The simple method does not require washing or separating procedures. Trypsin at a concentration as low as 10 pM can be assayed using this new CL sensing system. Additionally, the proposed method can be employed for screening the inhibitors of trypsin. This new sensing strategy could be easily extended to assay other proteases by simply changing the peptide substrate.

  9. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  10. Development of an in situ magnetic beads based RT-PCR method for electrochemiluminescent detection of rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Fangfang; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    Rotaviruses are double-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the family of enteric pathogens. It is a major cause of diarrhoeal disease in infants and young children worldwide. Consequently, rapid and accurate detection of rotaviruses is of great importance in controlling and preventing food- and waterborne diseases and outbreaks. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a reliable method that possesses high specificity and sensitivity. It has been widely used to detection of viruses. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) can be considered as an important and powerful tool in analytical and clinical application with high sensitivity, excellent specificity, and low cost. Here we have developed a method for the detection of rotavirus by combining in situ magnetic beads (MBs) based RT-PCR with ECL. RT of rotavirus RNA was carried out in a traditional way and the resulting cDNA was directly amplified on MBs. Forward primers were covalently bounded to MBs and reverse primers were labeled with tris-(2, 2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR). During the PCR cycling, the TBR labeled products were directly loaded and enriched on the surface of MBs. Then the MBs-TBR complexes could be analyzed by a magnetic ECL platform without any post-modification or post-incubation which avoid some laborious manual operations and achieve rapid yet sensitive detection. In this study, rotavirus from fecal specimens was successfully detected within 2 h, and the limit of detection was estimated to be 104copies/μL. This novel in situ MBs based RT-PCR with ECL detection method can be used for pathogen detection in food safety field and clinical diagnosis.

  11. Facile fabrication of an electrochemical aptasensor based on magnetic electrode by using streptavidin modified magnetic beads for sensitive and specific detection of Hg(2.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Hongmin; Pang, Xuehui; Hu, Lihua; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical aptasensor was developed for sensitive and specific detection of Hg(2+) based on thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure via application of thionine (Th) as indicator signal. For the fabrication of the aptasensor, streptavidin modified magnetic beads (Fe3O4-SA) was firmly immobilized onto the magnetic glassy carbon electrode (MGCE) benefited from its magnetic character. Then biotin labeled T-riched single stranded DNA (Bio-ssDNA) connected with Fe3O4-SA specifically and steadily because of the specific binding capacity between streptavidin and biotin. The stable structure of T-Hg(2+)-T formed in the present of Hg(2+) provided convenience for the intercalation of Th. The detection of Hg(2+) was achieved by recording the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signal of Th. Under optimal experimental conditions, the linear range of the fabricated electrochemical aptasensor was 1-200nmol/L, with a detection limit of 0.33nmol/L. Furthermore, the proposed aptasensor may find a potential application for the detection of Hg(2+) in real water sample analysis.

  12. Comperative study of catalase immobilization on chitosan, magnetic chitosan and chitosan-clay composite beads.

    PubMed

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin; Dinçer, Ayşe; Becerik, Seda Çınar

    2013-12-01

    Catalase was immobilized on chitosan and modified chitosan. Studies were carried out on free-immobilized catalase concerning the determination of optimum temperature, pH, thermal, storage stability, reusability, and kinetic parameters. Optimum temperature and pH for free catalase and catalase immobilized were found as 35°C and 7.0, respectively. After 100 times of repeated tests, the immobilized catalases on chitosan-clay and magnetic chitosan maintain over 50% and 60% of the original activity, respectively. The ease of catalase immobilization on low-cost matrices and good stability upon immobilization in the present study make it a suitable product for further use in the food industry.

  13. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads® demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead® SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads® travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device. PMID:27571084

  14. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-08-26

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads(®) demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead(®) SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads(®) travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device.

  15. Magnetic-resonance imaging and simplified Kozeny-Carman-model analysis of glass-bead packs as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayong; Han, Dongyan; Li, Wenqiang; Zheng, Zhanpeng; Song, Yongchen

    2017-03-01

    Permeability variation in reservoir rocks results from the combined effects of various factors, and makes porosity-permeability (ϕ-k) relationships more complex, or, in some cases, non-existent. In this work, the ϕ-k relationship of macroscopically homogeneous glass-bead packs is deduced based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement and Kozeny-Carman (K-C) model analysis; these are used as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks. The results indicate: (1) most of the commonly used simplified K-C models (e.g. the simplified traditional (omitting specific surface area), high-order, threshold, and fractal models) are suitable for estimating permeability of glass-bead packs. The simplified traditional model does not present obvious dependence on rock samples. Whether for the glass-bead packs or clean natural sandstones, the sample coefficients almost remain invariant. Comparably, the high-order, the fractal, and the threshold models are strongly sample-specific and cannot be extrapolated from the glass-bead packs to natural sandstones; (2) the ϕ-k relationships of quartz sands and silty sandstones resemble those of the glass-bead packs, but they significantly deviate from the K-C models at low porosities due to small pore entry radius; (3) a small amount of intergranular cements (<10%v) does not affect the general variation trend of permeability with porosity but can potentially increase predictive errors of the K-C models, whereas in the case of more cements, the ϕ-k relationships of sandstones become uncertain and cannot be described by any of these K-C models.

  16. Magnetic bead and gold nanoparticle probes based immunoassay for β-casein detection in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Meng, X Y; Zhou, Y; Zhang, Y Y; Meng, X M; Yang, L; Hu, P; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Liu, Z S; Wang, X R

    2015-04-15

    In this work, a double-probe based immunoassay was developed for rapid and sensitive determination of β-casein in bovine milk samples. In the method, magnetic beads (MBs), employed as supports for the immobilization of anti-β-casein polyclonal antibody (PAb), were used as the capture probe. Colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), employed as a bridge for loading anti-β-casein monoclonal antibody (McAb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), were used as the amplification probe. The presence of β-casein causes the sandwich structures of MBs-PAb-β-casein-McAb-AuNPs through the interaction between β-casein and the anti-β-casein antibodies. The HRP, used as an enzymatic-amplified tracer, can catalytically oxidize the substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), generating optical signals that are proportional to the quantity of β-casein. The linear range of the immunoassay was from 6.5 to 1520ngmL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 4.8ngmL(-1) which was 700 times lower than that of MBs-antibody-HRP based immunoassay and 6-7 times lower than that from the microplate-antibody-HRP based assay. The recoveries of β-casein from bovine milk samples were from 95.0% to 104.3% that had a good correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.9956) with those obtained by an official standard Kjeldahl method. For higher sensitivity, simple sample pretreatment and shorter time requirement of the antigen-antibody reaction, the developed immunoassay demonstrated the viability for detection of β-casein in bovine milk samples.

  17. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity.

  18. A Highly Selective and Sensitive Fluorescence Detection Method of Glyphosate Based on an Immune Reaction Strategy of Carbon Dot Labeled Antibody and Antigen Magnetic Beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duo; Lin, Bixia; Cao, Yujuan; Guo, Manli; Yu, Ying

    2016-08-03

    A sensitive fluorescence detection method for glyphosate (GLY) was established based on immune reaction. First, carbon dot labeled antibodies (lgG-CDs) which were able to specifically identify glyphosate were prepared with the environmentally friendly carbon dots (CDs) and glyphosate antibody (lgG). lgG-CDs could be used to in situ visualize the distribution of glyphosate in plant tissues. In order to eliminate the effects of excess lgG-CDs on the determination of GLY, antigen magnetic beads Fe3O4-GLY based on magnetic nanoparticles Fe3O4 and glyphosate were constructed and utilized to couple with the excess lgG-CDs. After magnetic separation to remove antigen magnetic beads, there was a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity of lgG-CDs and the logarithmic concentration of glyphosate in the range of 0.01-80 μg/mL with a detection limit of 8 ng/mL. The method was used for the detection of glyphosate in Pearl River water, tea, and soil samples with satisfactory recovery ratio between 87.4% and 103.7%.

  19. Magnetic beads-based DNA hybridization chain reaction amplification and DNAzyme recognition for colorimetric detection of uranyl ion in seafood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Cheng, Xian; Chen, Lian; Mo, Fan; Xu, LiangJun; Fu, FengFu

    2017-03-01

    A novel colorimetric biosensor, which employs DNAzyme-functionalized magnetic beads (MBs) as recognition probe, enzyme-assisted catalytic oxidation of TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine sulfate) as signal and DNA hybridization chain reaction as amplification strategy, has been developed for detecting trace uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) in seafood and aqueous environment with high sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrated that UO2(2+) can specifically cleave DNAzyme immobilized on MBs surface to release a short single-strand DNA (primer), and the released primer trigger DNA hybridization chain reaction to form a long one dimensional DNA concatamer on the MBs surface. The resulting long DNA concatamer could capture a large amount of HRP to generate the one UO2(2+)-to-multiple HRP amplification effect. Upon the addition of TMB-H2O2 solution, the HRP-tagged DNA concatamer-MBs conjugates could catalyze the H2O2-mediated oxidation of TMB, and thus results in a color change from colorless to blue in solution. This provided a sensitive and selective sensing platform for the visual or colorimetric detection of UO2(2+). The proposed biosensor has high sensitivity and strong anti-interference capability, it can be used to detect as low as 2.5 ppb (9.25 nM) of UO2(2+) by naked-eye observation and 0.09 ppb (0.33 nM) of UO2(2+) by UV-visible spectrometry with no interference of other ions and a RSD ≤ 6% (n = 5). With the help of this method, we have successfully determined trace UO2(2+) in fish muscle and river water with a recovery of 93-106%. High sensitivity and specificity, as well operation convenience, low cost and strong resistibility to the matrix, which makes our method a potential approach for the on-site detection of UO2(2+) in seafood and aqueous environment.

  20. Magnetic bead fluorescent immunoassay for the rapid detection of the novel inflammation marker YKL40 at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Schmalenberg, Michael; Beaudoin, Christopher; Bulst, Ludwig; Steubl, Dominik; Luppa, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide.We present a magnetic bead fluorescent sandwich immunoassay that allows rapid serum measurement of the novel inflammation marker YKL40 (CHI3L1) at the point of care (POC) that could aid pneumonia diagnosis. The magnetic beads serve as the solid phase for separation of YKL40 from serum. The readout is performed using a small and robust fluorescence reader,which detects the turnover of a fluorescent substrate. The assay procedure, from sample addition to data retrieval, consists of three steps and is performed in less than 20 min. The presented assay has a linear range from 3 to 111 ng/mL, with a limit of detection of 2.9 ng/mL. The average recoveries were found between 101 and 111%. The developed method was applied in sera from healthy subjects (n= 14; c(YKL40)= 50 ± 49 ng/mL) and from pneumonia patients (n = 14; c(YKL40) = 333.6 ± 225 ng/mL). The elevated YKL40 concentrations in pneumonia-diseased patients are in good agreement with previously published data. The POC-ready device provides a simple immunoassay that could help to optimize pneumonia inflammation diagnostics in low-resource settings.

  1. A novel magnetic bead-based assay with high sensitivity and selectivity for analysis of telomerase in exfoliated cells from patients with bladder and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Rothacker, Julie; Ramsay, Robert G; Ciznadija, Daniel; Gras, Emma; Neylon, Craig B; Elwood, Ngaire J; Bouchier-Hayes, David; Gibbs, Peter; Rosenthal, Mark A; Nice, Edouard C

    2007-12-01

    Telomerase activity is elevated in more than 85% of cancer cells and absent in most of the normal cells and thus represents a potential cancer biomarker. We report its measurement in colon and bladder cancer cells captured using antibody-coated magnetic beads. The cells are lysed and telomerase activity is detected using a biosensor assay that employs an oligonucleotide containing the telomerase recognition sequence also covalently coupled to magnetic beads. Telomerase activity is measured by the incorporation of multiple biotinylated nucleotides at the 3'-end of the oligonucleotide strands during elongation which are then reacted with streptavidin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase. A luminescent signal is generated when hydrogen peroxidase is added in the presence of luminol and a signal enhancer. LOD experiments confirm sensitivity down to ten cancer cell equivalents. The telomerase assay reliably identified patient samples considered by an independent pathological review to contain cancer cells. Samples from normal healthy volunteers were all telomerase negative. The assay, which is amenable to automation, demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in a small clinical cohort, making it of potential benefit as a first line assay for detection and monitoring of colon and bladder cancer.

  2. Magnetic bead isolation of neutrophil plasma membranes and quantification of membrane-associated guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peter S; Absood, Afaf; Linderman, Jennifer J; Omann, Geneva M

    2004-02-15

    A protocol for isolation of neutrophil plasma membranes utilizing a plasma membrane marker antibody, anti-CD15, attached to superparamagnetic beads was developed. Cells were initially disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and then incubated with anti-CD15 antibody-conjugated superparamagnetic beads. The beads were then washed to remove unbound cellular debris and cytosol. Recovered plasma membranes were quantified by immunodetection of G(beta2) in Western blots. This membrane marker-based separation yielded highly pure plasma membranes. This protocol has advantages over standard density sedimentation protocols for isolating plasma membrane in that it is faster and easily accommodates cell numbers as low as 10(6). These methods were coupled with immunodetection methods and an adenosine 5(')-diphosphate-ribosylation assay to measure the amount of membrane-associated G(ialpha) proteins available for receptor coupling in neutrophils either stimulated with N-formyl peptides or treated to differing degrees with pertussis toxin. As expected, pertussis toxin treatment decreased the amount of membrane G protein available for signaling although total membrane G protein was not affected. In addition, activation of neutrophils with N-formyl peptides resulted in an approximately 50% decrease in G protein associated with the plasma membrane.

  3. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manufacturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microarrays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  4. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manu facturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthe-sized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microar-rays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  5. Lab-on-a-disc agglutination assay for protein detection by optomagnetic readout and optical imaging using nano- and micro-sized magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco; Fock, Jeppe; Creagh, Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Boisen, Anja

    2016-11-15

    We present a biosensing platform for the detection of proteins based on agglutination of aptamer coated magnetic nano- or microbeads. The assay, from sample to answer, is integrated on an automated, low-cost microfluidic disc platform. This ensures fast and reliable results due to a minimum of manual steps involved. The detection of the target protein was achieved in two ways: (1) optomagnetic readout using magnetic nanobeads (MNBs); (2) optical imaging using magnetic microbeads (MMBs). The optomagnetic readout of agglutination is based on optical measurement of the dynamics of MNB aggregates whereas the imaging method is based on direct visualization and quantification of the average size of MMB aggregates. By enhancing magnetic particle agglutination via application of strong magnetic field pulses, we obtained identical limits of detection of 25pM with the same sample-to-answer time (15min 30s) using the two differently sized beads for the two detection methods. In both cases a sample volume of only 10µl is required. The demonstrated automation, low sample-to-answer time and portability of both detection instruments as well as integration of the assay on a low-cost disc are important steps for the implementation of these as portable tools in an out-of-lab setting.

  6. Highly specific and rapid immuno-fluorescent visualization and detection of E. coli O104:H4 with protein-A coated magnetic beads based LST-MUG assay.

    PubMed

    Barizuddin, Syed; Balakrishnan, Baskar; Stringer, R Cody; Dweik, Majed

    2015-08-01

    A method combining immunomagnetic separation and fluorescent sensing was developed to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) O104:H4. The antibody specific to E. coli O104:H4 was immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. This protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4 complex was used to bind Fluorescein IsoThioCyanate (FITC) labeled E. coli O104:H4 antigen (whole cell) on it. The goal was to achieve a fluorescently detectable protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4-E. coli O104:H4 complex on the magnetic beads. Fluorescent microscopy was used to image the magnetic beads. The resulting fluorescence on the beads was due to the FITC labeled antigen binding on the protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4 immobilized magnetic beads. This visually proves the antigen-antibody binding. The fluorescent imaging results were obtained in 2 h if the minimum available bacteria in the sample were at least 10(5) CFU/ml. If no fluorescence was observed on the magnetic beads during fluorescent imaging, it indicates the bacterial concentration in the sample to be too low for it to have bound to the magnetic beads and hence no detection was possible. To detect bacterial concentration less than 10(5) CFU/ml in the sample, an additional step was required for detection. The magnetic bead complex was added to the LST-MUG (lauryl sulfate tryptose-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide), a signaling reporter. The E. coli O104:H4 grows in LST-MUG and releases β-glucuronidase enzyme. This enzyme cleaves the MUG substrate that produces 4-methylumbelliferone, a highly fluorescent species. This fluorescence was detected using a spectrofluorometer. The emission peak in the fluorescent spectrum was found to be at 450 nm. The lower and upper detection range for this LST-MUG assay was found to be 2.05×10(5)-4.09×10(8) CFU/ml. The results for the LST-MUG assay for concentrations below 10(5) CFU/ml were ascertained in 8h. The advantages of this technique include the specific detection of bacteria without an enrichment step and

  7. Removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution by resin loaded magnetic β-cyclodextrin bead and graphene oxide sheet: Synthesis, adsorption mechanism and separation properties.

    PubMed

    Cui, Limei; Wang, Yaoguang; Gao, Liang; Hu, Lihua; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2015-10-15

    Resin loaded magnetic β-cyclodextrin bead and graphene oxide sheet (MCD-GO-R) was synthesized successfully and found to be an excellent adsorbent for Hg(II) removal. The as-prepared adsorbent was characterized by SEM, FTIR, BET, magnetization curve and zeta potential analysis respectively. Good magnetic performance made MCD-GO-R simply recover from aqueous solution at low magnetic field within 30s. And also, the rich functional groups and outstanding dispersity play an important role in the adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity was 88.43 mg g(-1) at 323 K and pH 7.1. The as-prepared adsorbent could perform well in a wide pH range from 4.0 to 10.0. Static adsorption experimental data showed good correlation with pseudo-second-order model and Freundlich isotherm models. It was found that the contaminant adsorption was accomplished mainly via chelation or ion exchange and come to equilibrium in only 30 min. All experimental results, especially the excellent reproducibility and resistance to ion interference, suggest that MCD-GO-R has promising applications in water treatment.

  8. Asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) micro-viscometer for rapid, sensitive and label-free studies of bacterial growth and drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Irene; Albertson, Theodore; Kinnunen, Paivo; Breslauer, David N.; McNaughton, Brandon H.; Burns, Mark A.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    The long turnaround time in antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) endangers patients and encourages the administration of wide spectrum antibiotics, thus resulting in alarming increases of multi-drug resistant pathogens. A method for faster detection of bacterial proliferation presents one avenue towards addressing this global concern. We report on a label-free asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) based viscometry method that rapidly detects bacterial growth and determines drug sensitivity by measuring changes in the suspension’s viscosity. With this platform, we observed the growth of a uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate, with an initial concentration of 50 cells per drop, within 20 minutes; in addition, we determined the gentamicin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the E. coli isolate within 100 minutes. We thus demonstrated a label-free, micro-viscometer platform that can measure bacterial growth and drug susceptibility more rapidly, with lower initial bacterial counts than existing commercial systems, and potentially with any microbial strains. PMID:22507307

  9. Solid-state sensor incorporated in microfluidic chip and magnetic-bead enzyme immobilization approach for creatinine and glucose detection in serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Min-Hsien; Pan, Tung-Ming; Luo, Ji-Dung; Chiou, Chiuan-Chian

    2011-12-01

    Solid-state sensors are stable and inexpensive electric transducers for biomedical measurement. This study proposes a microfluidic chip incorporated with a solid-state sensor for measuring glucose and creatinine in blood serum. Magnetic beads are employed to immobilize enzymes and deliver them in a micro-channel. Glucose and creatinine can be measured at 2-8 mM and 10-2 to 10 mM, respectively, which is a meaningful range in human blood. The immobilization approach also addresses the issue of the long-term preservation of enzymes in microfluidic devices. The proposed device is suitable for multi-target measurement in a point-of-care system.

  10. Rapid and Specific Enrichment of Culturable Gram Negative Bacteria Using Non-Lethal Copper-Free Click Chemistry Coupled with Magnetic Beads Separation

    PubMed Central

    Fugier, Emilie; Dumont, Audrey; Malleron, Annie; Poquet, Enora; Mas Pons, Jordi; Baron, Aurélie; Vauzeilles, Boris; Dukan, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Currently, identification of pathogenic bacteria present at very low concentration requires a preliminary culture-based enrichment step. Many research efforts focus on the possibility to shorten this pre-enrichment step which is needed to reach the minimal number of cells that allows efficient identification. Rapid microbiological controls are a real public health issue and are required in food processing, water quality assessment or clinical pathology. Thus, the development of new methods for faster detection and isolation of pathogenic culturable bacteria is necessary. Here we describe a specific enrichment technique for culturable Gram negative bacteria, based on non-lethal click chemistry and the use of magnetic beads that allows fast detection and isolation. The assimilation and incorporation of an analog of Kdo, an essential component of lipopolysaccharides, possessing a bio-orthogonal azido function (Kdo-N3), allow functionalization of almost all Gram negative bacteria at the membrane level. Detection can be realized through strain-promoted azide-cyclooctyne cycloaddition, an example of click chemistry, which interestingly does not affect bacterial growth. Using E. coli as an example of Gram negative bacterium, we demonstrate the excellent specificity of the technique to detect culturable E. coli among bacterial mixtures also containing either dead E. coli, or live B. subtilis (as a model of microorganism not containing Kdo). Finally, in order to specifically isolate and concentrate culturable E. coli cells, we performed separation using magnetic beads in combination with click chemistry. This work highlights the efficiency of our technique to rapidly enrich and concentrate culturable Gram negative bacteria among other microorganisms that do not possess Kdo within their cell envelope. PMID:26061695

  11. Development of a single-antigen magnetic bead assay (SAMBA) for the sensitive detection of HPA-1a alloantibodies using tag-engineered recombinant soluble β3 integrin.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis; Battermann, Anja; Hiller, Oliver; Meyer, Oliver; Figueiredo, Constanca; Salama, Abdulgabar; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-05-31

    Timely and accurate testing for human platelet antigen 1a (HPA-1a) alloantibodies is vital for clinical diagnosis of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). Current antigen-specific assays used for the detection of HPA-1 alloantibodies are technically very complex and cumbersome for most diagnostic laboratories. Hence, we designed and applied recombinant soluble (rs) β3 integrins displaying HPA-1a or HPA-1b epitopes for the development of a single-antigen magnetic bead assay (SAMBA). Soluble HPA-1a and HPA-1b were produced recombinantly in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and differentially tagged. The recombinant soluble proteins were then immobilized onto paramagnetic beads and used for analysis of HPA-1 alloantibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HPA-1a serum samples (n=7) from NAIT patients, inert sera and sera containing non-HPA-1a antibodies were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the SAMBA. Fusion of V5-His or GS-SBP-His tags to the rsβ3 integrins resulted in high-yield expression. SAMBA was able to detect all HPA-1a and -1b alloantibodies recognized by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens assay (MAIPA). No cross-reactions between the sera were observed. Two out of seven of the HPA-1a alloantibody-containing sera demonstrated weak to moderate reactivity in MAIPA but strong signals in SAMBA. SAMBA provides a very reliable method for the detection of HPA-1 antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity. This simple and rapid assay can be adapted for use in any routine laboratory and can be potentially adapted for use on automated systems.

  12. Isolating Sperm from Cell Mixtures Using Magnetic Beads Coupled with an Anti-PH-20 Antibody for Forensic DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xing-Chun; Wang, Le; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Zhang, Er-Li; Ye, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal swabs taken in rape cases usually contain epithelial cells from the victim and sperm from the assailant and forensic DNA analysis requires separation of sperm from these cell mixtures. PH-20, which is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored hyaluronidase located on the head of sperm, has important functions in fertilization. Here we describe a newly developed method for sperm isolation using anti-PH-20 antibody-coupled immunomagnetic beads (anti-PH-20 IMBs). Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed the IMBs recognized the head of sperm specifically and exhibited a great capacity to capture sperm cells. However, we found it necessary to incubate the IMB–sperm complex with DNase I before sperm lysis in order to remove any female DNA completely. We compared the sensitivity of anti-PH-20 IMBs in sperm and epithelial cell discrimination to those coated with a different anti-sperm antibody (anti-SP-10, anti-ADAM2 or anti-JLP). Only the anti-PH-20 IMBs succeeded in isolating sperm from cell mixtures at a sperm/epithelial cell ratio of 103:105. Further, our method exhibited greater power and better stability for sperm isolation compared to the traditional differential lysis strategy. Taken together, the anti-PH-20 IMB method described here could be effective for the isolation of sperm needed to obtain a single-sourced DNA profile as an aid to identifying the perpetrator in sexual assault cases. PMID:27442128

  13. Generation of memory T cells for adoptive transfer using clinical-grade anti-CD62L magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Verfuerth, S; Sousa, P S E; Beloki, L; Murray, M; Peters, M D; O'Neill, A T; Mackinnon, S; Lowdell, M W; Chakraverty, R; Samuel, E R

    2015-10-01

    Pre-clinical studies of allogeneic stem cell transplantation suggest that depletion of naive T cells from donor lymphocytes will reduce the risk of GvHD but preserve immunity to infectious pathogens. In this study, we have established a clinical-grade protocol under good manufacturing practice conditions for purging CD62L(+) naive T cells from steady-state leukapheresis products using the CliniMACS system. The efficacy of immunomagnetic CD62L depletion was assessed by analysis of cell composition and functional immune responses. A median 2.9 log CD62L depletion was achieved with no evidence of CD62L shedding during the procedure and a mean T-cell yield of 47%. CD62L(-) cells comprised an equal mix of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, with elimination of B cells but maintenance of regulatory T cells and natural killer cell populations. CD62L-depleted T cells were predominantly CD45RA(-) and CD45RA(+) effector memory (>90%) and contained the bulk of pentamer-staining antivirus-specific T cells. Functional assessment of CD62L(-) cells revealed the maintenance of antiviral T-cell reactivity and a reduction in the alloreactive immune response compared with unmanipulated cells. Clinical-grade depletion of naive T cells using immunomagnetic CD62L beads from steady-state leukapheresis products is highly efficient and generates cells suitable for adoptive transfer in the context of clinical trials.

  14. Preparation of magnetic indole-3-acetic acid imprinted polymer beads with 4-vinylpyridine and β-cyclodextrin as binary monomer via microwave heating initiated polymerization and their application to trace analysis of auxins in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Yuanwen; Hu, Yuling; Li, Gongke; Chen, Yueqin

    2010-11-19

    Auxin is a crucial phytohormone for precise control of growth and development of plants. Due to its low concentration in plant tissues which are rich in interfering substances, the accurate determination of auxins remains a challenge. In this paper, a new strategy for isolation and enrichment of auxins from plant tissues was obtained by the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (mag-MIP) beads, which were prepared by microwave heating initiated suspension polymerization using indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as template. In order to obtain higher selective recognition cavities, an enhanced imprinting method based on binary functional monomers, 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), was adopted for IAA imprinting. The morphological and magnetic characteristics of the mag-MIP beads were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. A majority of resultant beads were within the size range of 80-150μm. Porous surface morphology and good magnetic property were observed. Furthermore, the mag-MIP beads fabricated with 4-VP and β-CD as binary functional monomers exhibited improved recognition ability to IAA, as compared with the mag-MIP beads prepared with the individual monomer separately. Competitive rebinding experiment results revealed that the mag-MIP beads exhibited a higher specific recognition for the template than the non-imprinted polymer (mag-NIP) beads. An extraction method by mag-MIP beads coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for determination of IAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) in plant tissues. Linear ranges for IAA and IBA were in the range of 7.00-100.0μgL(-1) and 10.0-100.0μgL(-1), and the detection limits were 3.9 and 7.4μgL(-1), respectively. The analytical performance was also estimated by seedlings or immature embryos samples from three different plant tissues, pea, rice and wheat. Recoveries were in the range of 70

  15. In vivo labeling and specific magnetic bead separation of RNA for biofilm characterization and stress-induced gene expression analysis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Nikolai; Gold, Andrea; Yüksel, Yousra; Berensmeier, Sonja; Schwartz, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The method of in vivo labeling and separation of bacterial RNA was developed as an approach to elucidating the stress response of natural bacterial populations. This technique is based on the incorporation of digoxigenin-11-uridine-5'-triphosphate (DIG-11-UTP) in the RNA of active bacteria. The digoxigenin fulfills a dual role as a label of de novo synthesized RNA and a target for magnetic bead separation from a total RNA extract. Depending on the growth conditions and the population's composition, the assembly rate of DIG-11-UTP ranged from 1.2% to 12.5% of the total RNA in gram-positive and gram-negative reference bacteria as well as in natural biofilms from drinking water, surface water, and lake sediment. Separation of DIG-RNA from total RNA extracts was performed with a biotinylated anti-digoxigenin antibody and streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles. The average separation yield from total RNA extracts was about 95% of labeled RNA. The unspecific bindings of non-labeled nucleic acids were smaller than 0.2%, as was evaluated by spiking experiments with an unmarked DNA amplicon. Applicability of the method developed was demonstrated by rRNA-directed PCR-DGGE population analysis of natural biofilms and expression profiling of two stress-induced genes (vanA and rpoS) in reference bacteria.

  16. Bead magnetorelaxometry with an on-chip magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Donolato, Marco; Strømme, Maria; Strömberg, Mattias; Svedlindh, Peter; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2011-01-21

    Magnetorelaxometry measurements on suspensions of magnetic beads are demonstrated using a planar Hall effect sensor chip embedded in a microfluidic system. The alternating magnetic field used for magnetizing the beads is provided by the sensor bias current and the complex magnetic susceptibility spectra are recorded as the 2nd harmonic of the sensor response. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal appears when a magnetic bead suspension is injected, it scales with the bead concentration, and it follows the Cole-Cole expression for Brownian relaxation. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal resembles that from conventional magnetorelaxometry done on the same samples apart from an offset in Brownian relaxation frequency. The time dependence of the signal can be rationalized as originating from sedimented beads.

  17. Development and Validation of a Novel Diagnostic Test for Human Brucellosis Using a Glyco-engineered Antigen Coupled to Magnetic Beads

    PubMed Central

    Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Rey Serantes, Diego A.; Melli, Luciano J.; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A.; Deodato, Bettina; Wallach, Jorge; Feldman, Mario F.; Ugalde, Juan E.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis and still a major human health problem in endemic areas of the world. Although several diagnostic tools are available, most of them are difficult to implement especially in developing countries where complex health facilities are limited. Taking advantage of the identical structure and composition of the Brucella spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 O-polysaccharide, we explored the application of a recombinant Y. enterocolitica O:9-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA) as a novel antigen for diagnosis of human brucellosis. We have developed and validated an indirect immunoassay using OAg-AcrA coupled to magnetic beads. OAg-AcrA was produced and purified with high yields in Y. enterocolitica O:9 cells co-expressing the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB and the protein acceptor AcrA of Campylobacter jejuni without the need for culturing Brucella. Expression of PglB and AcrA in Y. enterocolitica resulted in the transfer of the host O-polysaccharide from its lipid carrier to AcrA. To validate the assay and determine the cutoff values, a receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed using a panel of characterized serum samples obtained from healthy individuals and patients of different clinical groups. Our results indicate that, using this assay, it is possible to detect infection caused by the three main human brucellosis agents (B. abortus, B. melitensis and B. suis) and select different cutoff points to adjust sensitivity and specificity levels as needed. A cutoff value of 13.20% gave a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98.57%, and a cutoff value of 16.15% resulted in a test sensitivity and specificity of 93.48% and 100%, respectively. The high diagnostic accuracy, low cost, reduced assay time and simplicity of this new glycoconjugate-magnetic beads assay makes it an attractive diagnostic tool for using not only in clinics and brucellosis reference laboratories but also in locations with limited

  18. Development and validation of a novel diagnostic test for human brucellosis using a glyco-engineered antigen coupled to magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, Andrés E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Melli, Luciano J; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Deodato, Bettina; Wallach, Jorge; Feldman, Mario F; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis and still a major human health problem in endemic areas of the world. Although several diagnostic tools are available, most of them are difficult to implement especially in developing countries where complex health facilities are limited. Taking advantage of the identical structure and composition of the Brucella spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 O-polysaccharide, we explored the application of a recombinant Y. enterocolitica O:9-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA) as a novel antigen for diagnosis of human brucellosis. We have developed and validated an indirect immunoassay using OAg-AcrA coupled to magnetic beads. OAg-AcrA was produced and purified with high yields in Y. enterocolitica O:9 cells co-expressing the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB and the protein acceptor AcrA of Campylobacter jejuni without the need for culturing Brucella. Expression of PglB and AcrA in Y. enterocolitica resulted in the transfer of the host O-polysaccharide from its lipid carrier to AcrA. To validate the assay and determine the cutoff values, a receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed using a panel of characterized serum samples obtained from healthy individuals and patients of different clinical groups. Our results indicate that, using this assay, it is possible to detect infection caused by the three main human brucellosis agents (B. abortus, B. melitensis and B. suis) and select different cutoff points to adjust sensitivity and specificity levels as needed. A cutoff value of 13.20% gave a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98.57%, and a cutoff value of 16.15% resulted in a test sensitivity and specificity of 93.48% and 100%, respectively. The high diagnostic accuracy, low cost, reduced assay time and simplicity of this new glycoconjugate-magnetic beads assay makes it an attractive diagnostic tool for using not only in clinics and brucellosis reference laboratories but also in locations with limited

  19. Dual Recognition Strategy for Specific and Sensitive Detection of Bacteria Using Aptamer-Coated Magnetic Beads and Antibiotic-Capped Gold Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dan; Yu, Mengqun; Fu, Fei; Han, Weiye; Li, Gan; Xie, Jianping; Song, Yang; Swihart, Mark T; Song, Erqun

    2016-01-05

    Food poisoning and infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (SA) are serious public health concerns. A method of specific, sensitive, and rapid detection of such bacteria is essential and important. This study presents a strategy that combines aptamer and antibiotic-based dual recognition units with magnetic enrichment and fluorescent detection to achieve specific and sensitive quantification of SA in authentic specimens and in the presence of much higher concentrations of other bacteria. Aptamer-coated magnetic beads (Apt-MB) were employed for specific capture of SA. Vancomycin-stabilized fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs@Van) were prepared by a simple one-step process and used for sensitive quantification of SA in the range of 32-10(8) cfu/mL with the detection limit of 16 cfu/mL via a fluorescence intensity measurement. And using this strategy, about 70 cfu/mL of SA in complex samples (containing 3 × 10(8) cfu/mL of other different contaminated bacteria) could be successfully detected. In comparison to prior studies, the developed strategy here not only simplifies the preparation procedure of the fluorescent probes (AuNCs@Van) to a great extent but also could sensitively quantify SA in the presence of much higher concentrations of other bacteria directly with good accuracy. Moreover, the aptamer and antibiotic used in this strategy are much less expensive and widely available compared to common-used antibodies, making it cost-effective. This general aptamer- and antibiotic-based dual recognition strategy, combined with magnetic enrichment and fluorescent detection of trace bacteria, shows great potential application in monitoring bacterial food contamination and infectious diseases.

  20. Use of anti-CD3/CD28 mAb coupled magnetic beads permitting subsequent phenotypic analysis of activated human T cells by indirect immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Pène, Jérôme; Rahmoun, Massilva; Temmerman, Stéphane; Yssel, Hans

    2003-12-01

    Functional analysis of T lymphocytes requires in vitro stimulation of these cells under experimental conditions that mimic as closely as possible physiological in vivo stimulation and that involve antigen/T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation. Because of the low frequency of antigen-specific T cells in human clinical samples, stimulation with a combination of anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a preferred method. Interaction of these mAbs with their ligand results in modulation of the mAb-ligand complex from the cell surface. However, as a result of incomplete modulation, CD3/CD28 mAb complexes often remain at the cell surface, thereby precluding subsequent indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis using mouse immunoglobulin (Ig)-specific antibodies. This is of importance in situations in which no specific fluorochrome-conjugated mAbs are available, such as in screening procedures of Ig-containing hybridoma culture supernatants. We propose here the use of CD3/CD28 mAbs, linked to magnetic beads allowing standardization of the activation conditions, optimal activation of T cells and complete modulation of antigen-antibody complexes from the cell surface.

  1. Assessment of suitability of magnetic beads for purification of rat plasma in proteomic analyses by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS.

    PubMed

    Mohottalage, Susantha; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Plasma is a complex matrix and has to be clarified or fractionated to obtain informative MS data. Although there are a number of prefractionation methods to clean up complex biological matrixes before proteomic analysis, these methods require large sample volumes and are costly and time-consuming. Alternatively, recently introduced magnetic beads (MB) appear to be attractive in overcoming these difficulties. Therefore, we were interested in investigating the applicability of MB in the clarification of rat plasma samples for proteome analyses. For this purpose, we used complementary supports, such as hydrophobic interaction chromatography-based MB (MB-C18) and weak cation-exchange chromatography-based MB (MB-WCX). MB-based fractionated samples were either spotted directly or underwent tryptic digestion before matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) spotting. Samples from both MB separation techniques gave clean and well-resolved MALDI-time-of-flight MS spectra in the low molecular mass range of 1-10 kDa with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid as the matrix. Both techniques gave approximately 300 analyte peaks in this mass range. Our results showed that both MB-based separation procedures gave complementary mass spectral information. This approach provided information on the identity of a number of less-abundant and more-abundant proteins in plasma. Our findings suggest that this MB-based proteomic approach can be valuable in conducting faster screening of plasma samples for protein profiling.

  2. A Novel Assay for Screening Inhibitors Targeting HIV Integrase LEDGF/p75 Interaction Based on Ni2+ Coated Magnetic Agarose Beads

    PubMed Central

    Dawei, Zhang; Hongqiu, He; Mengmeng, Liu; Zhixia, Meng; Shunxing, Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an essential role in viral replication and thus serves as an important target for chemotherapeutic intervention against HIV-1 infection. However, the current three clinical IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir share the same inhibitory mechanism, resulting in a common clinical resistance profile which have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment. Therefore, it is important to develop small molecule inhibitors that impair IN function with distinct mechanisms of action. In this work, a magnetic-beads based biochemical assay targeting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 was developed for identification of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Furthermore, a library containing 1000 US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs currently used for human medication was screened to identify inhibitors targeting the PPI. The assay was proved to be quite robust and with the novel assay we successfully identified dexlansoprazole (IC50 of 4.8 μM), a FDA-approved proton pump inhibitor, as a potential inhibitor for the PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, which bound to the LEDGF/p75 partner with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 330 nM ± 2.6 nM. PMID:27633629

  3. Selective collection and detection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells using aptamer-functionalized magnetic beads and quantum dots based nano-bio-probes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xin; Zhou, Zhenxian; Yuan, Liang; Liu, Songqin

    2013-07-25

    A novel strategy for selective collection and detection of breast cancer cells (MCF-7) based on aptamer-cell interaction was developed. Mucin 1 protein (MUC1) aptamer (Apt1) was covalently conjugated to magnetic beads to capture MCF-7 cell through affinity interaction between Apt1 and MUC1 protein that overexpressed on the surface of MCF-7 cells. Meanwhile, a nano-bio-probe was constructed by coupling of nucleolin aptamer AS1411 (Apt2) to CdTe quantum dots (QDs) which were homogeneously coated on the surfaces of monodispersed silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs). The nano-bio-probe displayed similar optical and electrochemical performances to free CdTe QDs, and remained high affinity to nucleolin overexpressed cells through the interaction between AS1411 and nucleolin protein. Photoluminescence (PL) and square-wave voltammetric (SWV) assays were used to quantitatively detect MCF-7 cells. Improved selectivity was obtained by using these two aptamers together as recognition elements simultaneously, compared to using any single aptamer. Based on the signal amplification of QDs coated silica nanoparticles (QDs/SiO2), the detection sensitivity was enhanced and a detection limit of 201 and 85 cells mL(-1) by PL and SWV method were achieved, respectively. The proposed strategy could be extended to detect other cells, and showed potential applications in cell imaging and drug delivery.

  4. The identification of a novel SIRT6 modulator from Trigonella foenum-graecum using ligand fishing with protein coated magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Ravichandran, S; Spelman, K; Fugmann, S D; Moaddel, R

    2014-10-01

    SIRT6 is a histone deacetylase that has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders and the prevention of age-associated diseases. Thus the identification of compounds that modulate SIRT6 activity could be of great therapeutic importance. We have previously developed an H3K9 deacetylation guided assay with SIRT6 coated magnetic beads (SIRT6-MB). With the developed assay, we identified quercetin, naringenin and vitexin as SIRT6 inhibitors from T. foenum-graecum seed extract using a candidate approach. Currently, the predominant method for the identification of active compounds from a plant extract is carried out through a dereplication process. A novel targeted approach for the direct identification of active compounds from a complex matrix could save time and resources. Herein, we report the application of the SIRT6-MB for 'fishing' experiments utilizing T. foenum-graecum seed extract. In which orientin, and seventeen other compounds were identified as SIRT6 binders. This is the first use of this method for 'fishing' out active ligands from a botanical matrix, and sets the basis for the identification of active compounds from a complex matrix.

  5. Rapid Synthesis of a Long Double-Stranded Oligonucleotide from a Single-Stranded Nucleotide Using Magnetic Beads and an Oligo Library

    PubMed Central

    Pengpumkiat, Sumate; Koesdjojo, Myra; Rowley, Erik R.; Mockler, Todd C.; Remcho, Vincent T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides is a widely used tool in the field of biochemistry. Several methods for gene synthesis have been introduced in the growing area of genomics. In this paper, a novel method of constructing dsDNA is proposed. Short (28-mer) oligo fragments from a library were assembled through successive annealing and ligation processes, followed by PCR. First, two oligo fragments annealed to form a dsDNA molecule. The double-stranded oligo was immobilized onto magnetic beads (solid support) via streptavidin-biotin binding. Next, single-stranded oligo fragments were added successively through ligation to form the complete DNA molecule. The synthesized DNA was amplified through PCR and gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the product. Sanger sequencing showed that more than 97% of the nucleotides matched the expected sequence. Extending the length of the DNA molecule by adding single-stranded oligonucleotides from a basis set (library) via ligation enables a more convenient and rapid mechanism for the design and synthesis of oligonucleotides on the go. Coupled with an automated dispensing system and libraries of short oligo fragments, this novel DNA synthesis method would offer an efficient and cost-effective method for producing dsDNA. PMID:26930667

  6. Screening of inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3β from traditional Chinese medicines using enzyme-immobilized magnetic beads combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfang; Xu, Jia; Chen, Yu; Mei, Zhinan; Xiao, Yuxiu

    2015-12-18

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) was immobilized on magnetic beads (MBs) by affinity method for the first time. The enzyme-immobilized MBs were coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) technique to establish a cost-effective and reliable method for screening of inhibitors of GSK-3β. A peptide substrate of GSK-3β containing a tyrosine residue was employed since it can be sensitively detected by UV detector at 214nm. The substrate and its phosphorylated product were separated by baseline within 10min. The enzyme activity was determined by the quantification of peak area of the product. Parameters including enzyme immobilization, enzyme reaction and the performance of immobilized-enzyme were investigated. The immobilized enzyme can be reused for 10 times and remain stable for 4 days at 4°C. The inhibitory activities of extracts of 15 traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) were screened. As a result, three of them including Euonymus fortunei, Amygdalus communis and Garcinia xanthochymus were found possessing high inhibitory activities (inhibition rate >90%). From G. xanthochymus, a new inhibitor of GSK-3β, fukugetin, was discovered with an IC50 value of 3.18±0.07μM. Enzyme kinetics and molecular docking experiments further revealed the inhibitory mechanism, indicating fukugetin was a non-ATP competitive inhibitor interacting with the phosphate recognizing substrate binding site of GSK-3β.

  7. Magnetic beads-based DNAzyme recognition and AuNPs-based enzymatic catalysis amplification for visual detection of trace uranyl ion in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Lin, Ling; Zeng, Xiaoxue; Ruan, Yajuan; Wu, Yongning; Lin, Minggui; He, Ye; Fu, FengFu

    2016-04-15

    We herein developed a novel biosensor for the visual detection of trace uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) in aqueous environment with high sensitivity and specificity by using DNAzyme-functionalized magnetic beads (MBs) for UO2(2+) recognition and gold nano-particles (AuNPs)-based enzymatic catalysis oxidation of TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine sulfate) for signal generation. The utilization of MBs facilitates the magnetic separation and collection of sensing system from complex sample solution, which leads to more convenient experimental operation and more strong resistibility of the biosensor to the matrix of sample, and the utilization of AuNPs-based enzymatic catalysis amplification greatly improved the sensitivity of the biosensor. Compared with the previous DNAzyme-based UO2(2+) sensors, the proposed biosensor has outstanding advantages such as relative high sensitivity and specificity, operation convenience, low cost and more strong resistibility to the matrix of sample. It can be used to detect as low as 0.02 ppb (74 pM) of UO2(2+) in aqueous environment by only naked-eye observation and 1.89 ppt (7.0 pM) of UO2(2+) by UV-visible spectrophotometer with a recovery of 93-99% and a RSD ≤ 5.0% (n=6) within 3h. Especially, the visual detection limit of 0.02 ppb (74 pM) is much lower than the maximum allowable level of UO2(2+) (130 nM) in the drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), indicating that our method meets the requirement of rapid and on-site detection of UO2(2+) in the aqueous environment by only naked-eye observation.

  8. Bead mediated separation of microparticles in droplets

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki-Joo; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina; Burns, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Exchange of components such as particles and cells in droplets is important and highly desired in droplet microfluidic assays, and many current technologies use electrical or magnetic fields to accomplish this process. Bead-based microfluidic techniques offer an alternative approach that uses the bead’s solid surface to immobilize targets like particles or biological material. In this paper, we demonstrate a bead-based technique for exchanging droplet content by separating fluorescent microparticles in a microfluidic device. The device uses posts to filter surface-functionalized beads from a droplet and re-capture the filtered beads in a new droplet. With post spacing of 7 μm, beads above 10 μm had 100% capture efficiency. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system using targeted particles that bind onto the functionalized beads and are, therefore, transferred from one solution to another in the device. Binding capacity tests performed in the bulk phase showed an average binding capacity of 5 particles to each bead. The microfluidic device successfully separated the targeted particles from the non-targeted particles with up to 98% purity and 100% yield. PMID:28282412

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Pore-Scale Flow in a Bead Pack: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Mckinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental error in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods.

  10. Magnetic beads as an extraction medium for simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen and structurally related compounds in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bylda, Caroline; Velichkova, Vanya; Bolle, Jens; Thiele, Roland; Kobold, Uwe; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a sample preparation method that complements a previously published liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for acetaminophen and eight structurally-related compounds in human serum (C. Bylda, R. Thiele, U. Kobold, D.A. Volmer. Drug Test. Anal. 2014, 6, 451). The analytes (acetaminophen [APAP] + metabolites acetaminophen-glucuronide [APG], -cysteine [APC], -mercapturate [APM] and -cysteine [APC], structurally similar analogues phenacetin and p-phenetidine, as well as tricyclic antidepressants imipramine and amitryptiline) were extracted from serum using magnetized hyper-crosslinked polystyrene particles. The sample preparation protocol was developed by means of a design of experiments (DoE) statistical approach. Using three representative compounds from the analyte panel with different polarities (high, medium, and low), two screening designs were used to identify factors that exhibited significant impact on recovery of the analytes. These parameters were then optimized to permit extraction of the complete target panel exhibiting a broad range of chemical polarities. Liquid chromatographic separations were achieved by gradient elution using a pentafluorphenyl column with subsequent detection by electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The method was linear over the range 0.1-100 µg/mL for APAP, APG, p-phenetidine and phenacetin, 0.03-50 µg/mL for APS, and 0.01-10 µg/mL for APM, APC, imipramine and amitriptyline, with R(2)  > 0.99. The assay exhibited good precision with CVs ranging from 2 to 9% for all analytes; the accuracy was assessed by comparing two LC-MS/MS methods using a set of 68 patient samples.

  11. Highly Avid Magnetic Bead Capture: An Efficient Selection Method for de novo Protein Engineering Utilizing Yeast Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret; Levary, David; Tobon, Gabriel; Hackel, Benjamin; Davis Orcutt, Kelly; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2010-01-01

    Protein engineering relies on the selective capture of members of a protein library with desired properties. Yeast surface display technology routinely enables as much as million-fold improvements in binding affinity by alternating rounds of diversification and flow cytometry-based selection. However, flow cytometry is not well suited for isolating de novo binding clones from naïve libraries due to limitations in the size of the population that can be analyzed, the minimum binding affinity of clones that can be reliably captured, the amount of target antigen required, and the likelihood of capturing artifactual binders to the reagents. Here, we demonstrate a method for capturing rare clones that maintains the advantages of yeast as the expression host, while avoiding the disadvantages of FACS in isolating de novo binders from naïve libraries. The multivalency of yeast surface display is intentionally coupled with multivalent target presentation on magnetic beads—allowing isolation of extremely weak binders from billions of non-binding clones, and requiring far less target antigen for each selection, while minimizing the likelihood of isolating undesirable alternative solutions to the selective pressure. Multivalent surface selection allows 30,000-fold enrichment and almost quantitative capture of micromolar binders in a single pass using less than one microgram of target antigen. We further validate the robust nature of this selection method by isolation of de novo binders against lysozyme as well as its utility in negative selections by isolating binders to streptavidin-biotin that do not cross-react to streptavidin alone. PMID:19363813

  12. Rapid and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in milk and ground beef using magnetic bead-based immunoassay coupled with tyramide signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Muhsin; Herzig, Gene P D; Jeong, Kwang Cheol; Dunigan, Samantha; Shah, Parth; Ahn, Soohyoun

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a major foodborne pathogen that has posed serious problems for food safety and public health. Recent outbreaks and recalls associated with various foods contaminated by E. coli O157:H7 clearly indicate its deleterious effect on food safety. A rapid and sensitive detection assay is needed for this harmful organism to prevent foodborne illnesses and control outbreaks in a timely manner. We developed a magnetic bead-based immunoassay for detection of E. coli O157:H7 (the most well-known Shiga toxigenic E. coli strain) with a 96-well microplate as an assay platform. Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and tyramide signal amplification were coupled to the assay to increase its sensitivity and specificity. This immunoassay was able to detect E. coli O157:H7 in pure culture with a detection limit of 50 CFU/ml in less than 3 h without an enrichment step. The detection limit was decreased 10-fold to 5 CFU/ml with addition of a 3-h enrichment step. When this assay was tested with other nontarget foodborne pathogens and common enteric bacteria, no cross-reactivity was found. When tested with artificially contaminated ground beef and milk samples, the assay sensitivity decreased two- to fivefold, with detection limits of 250 and 100 CFU/ml, respectively, probably because of the food matrix effect. The assay results also were compared with those of a sandwich-type enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an ELISA coupled with IMS; the developed assay was 25 times and 4 times more sensitive than the standard ELISA and the IMS-ELISA, respectively. Tyramide signal amplification combined with IMS can improve sensitivity and specificity for detection of E. coli O157:H7. The developed assay could be easily adapted for other foodborne pathogens and will contribute to improved food safety and public health.

  13. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed.

  14. Crosslinked, porous, polyacrylate beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Uniformly-shaped, porous, round beads are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree. C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. Beads of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The beads will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.

  15. Small, porous polyacrylate beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping Siao (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Uniformly-shaped, porous, round beads are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree.C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. Beads of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The beads will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.

  16. Crosslinked, porous, polyacrylate beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping Siao (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Uniformly-shaped, porous, round beads are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree.C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. Beads of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The beads will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.

  17. Acupressure Bead in the Eustachian Tube.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Yu; Kakigi, Akinobu

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we aim to enlighten practitioners and patients involved with acupressure beads and to contribute to their safer use by reporting a unique case of insidious intrusion of an acupressure bead into the eustachian tube. A metallic object was found in the eustachian tube of a patient while conducting a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The object was later confirmed to be an auricular acupressure bead, and was successfully removed by performing a tympanoplasty and a canal wall down mastoidectomy. The bead was assumed to have passed through an existing perforation of the tympanic membrane. According to previously published literature, tympanic membrane perforations exist in ∼1% of the population. Therefore, middle-ear foreign bodies are relatively common occurrences for otolaryngologists. However, metallic objects such as acupressure beads are especially important in the sense that they can cause severe burns during MRI. To avoid potential complications, acupressure-bead practitioners should be aware of the possibility that intrusions through the tympanic membrane could go unnoticed.

  18. Automated Immunomagnetic Separation and Microarray Detection of E. coli O157:H7 from Poultry Carcass Rinse

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P. ); Brown, Jeremy D.; Call, Douglas R. ); Wunschel, Sharon C. ); Grate, Jay W. ); Holman, David A.; Olson, Lydia G.; Stottlemyer, Mark S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J. )

    2001-09-01

    We describe the development and application of a novel electromagnetic flow cell and fluidics system for automated immunomagnetic separation of E. coli directly from unprocessed poultry carcass rinse, and the biochemical coupling of automated sample preparation with nucleic acid microarrays without cell growth. Highly porous nickel foam was used as a magnetic flux conductor. Up to 32% recovery efficiency of 'total' E. coli was achieved within the automated system with 6 sec contact times and 15 minute protocol (from sample injection through elution), statistically similar to cell recovery efficiencies in > 1 hour 'batch' captures. The electromagnet flow cell allowed complete recovery of 2.8 mm particles directly from unprocessed poultry carcass rinse whereas the batch system did not. O157:H7 cells were reproducibly isolated directly from unprocessed poultry rinse with 39% recovery efficiency at 103 cells ml-1 inoculum. Direct plating of washed beads showed positive recovery of O 157:H7 directly from carcass rinse at an inoculum of 10 cells ml-1. Recovered beads were used for direct PCR amplification and microarray detection, with a process-level detection limit (automated cell concentration through microarray detection) of < 103 cells ml-1 carcass rinse. The fluidic system and analytical approach described here are generally applicable to most microbial detection problems and applications.

  19. Bead-based microfluidic immunoassay for diagnosis of Johne's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Foote, Robert; Shaw, Robert W; Eda, Shigetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidics technology offers a platform for development of point-of-care diagnostic devices for various infectious diseases. In this study, we examined whether serodiagnosis of Johne s disease (JD) can be conducted in a bead-based microfluidic assay system. Magnetic micro-beads were coated with antigens of the causative agent of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The antigen-coated beads were incubated with serum samples of JD-positive or negative serum samples and then with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody (SAB). To confirm binding of serum antibodies to the antigen, the beads were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. Different conditions (dilutions of serum and SAB, types of SAB, and types of magnetic beads) were optimized for a great degree of differentiation between the JD-negative and JD-positive samples. Using the optimized conditions, we tested a well-classified set of 155 serum samples from JD negative and JD-positive cattle by using the bead-based flow cytometric assay. Of 105 JD-positive samples, 63 samples (60%) showed higher antibody binding levels than a cut-off value determined by using antibody binding levels of JD-negative samples. In contrast, only 43-49 JD-positive samples showed higher antibody binding levels than the cut-off value when the samples were tested by commercially-available immunoassays. Microfluidic assays were performed by magnetically immobilizing a number of beads within a microchannel of a glass microchip and detecting antibody on the collected beads by laser-induced fluorescence. Antigen-coated magnetic beads treated with bovine serum sample and fluorescently-labeled SAB were loaded into a microchannel to measure the fluorescence (reflecting level of antibody binding) on the beads in the microfluidic system. When the results of five bovine serum samples obtained with the system were compared to those obtained with the flow cytometer, a high level of correlation (linear regression, r2 = 0.994) was

  20. Bead-Dazzled Baskets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used when teaching about North American Indians to fourth- and fifth-grade students. Explains that the students learn how to make baskets using a coil-wrap technique with colored yarns and beads. Provides a step-by-step explanation of how to create the baskets. (CMK)

  1. Weld-Bead Shaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal; Price, Daniel S.

    1990-01-01

    Hand-held power tool shaves excess metal from inside circumference of welded duct. Removes excess metal deposited by penetration of tungsten/inert-gas weld or by spatter from electron-beam weld. Produces smooth transition across joint. Easier to use and not prone to overshaving. Also cuts faster, removing 35 in. (89 cm) of weld bead per hour.

  2. Coated Aerogel Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  3. A superparamagnetic bead driven fluidic device (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, Benjamin; Melvin, Tracy; Evans, Alan G. R.

    2005-07-01

    Injection strategies have been employed in the field of fluidic MEMS using piezo electric or thermal actuators. A very popular application for such technology is inkjet printing. Largely this technology is used to produce droplets of fluid in air; the aim of this investigation is to produce an injection device for the precise dispensing of nanolitre volumes of fluid. A novel technique for dispensing fluid using superparamagnetic beads has been investigated. The beads used (Dynal Biotech) contain a homogeneous dispersion of Fe2O3, allowing for easy control with a magnet. This magnetic property is exploited, by a plug of approximately 60 000 beads within a micro channel. This is accomplished by applying a non-uniform magnetic field from a bullet magnet within close proximity of the bead plug. Once the plug is formed it can be moved along the micro channel by moving the magnet and thus, provide a plunger-like action. Previous work has demonstrated a bead plug device is able to dispense fluid from a micro channel at rates up to 7.2μlmin-1. This is an investigation using silicon and Pyrex fabricated micro channels with smaller dimensions, such that the dimensions will be similar to those which will be used to produce a pipette device. Here results are presented using these fabricated micro channels, where the effects of using differently sized bead plugs and varying velocities are examined. The results follow our proposed theory; further analysis is required to determine the operation of a bead plug during all states of movement.

  4. Basic Concepts of Microarrays and Potential Applications in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa B.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The introduction of in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, led by real-time PCR, into the clinical microbiology laboratory has transformed the laboratory detection of viruses and select bacterial pathogens. However, the progression of the molecular diagnostic revolution currently relies on the ability to efficiently and accurately offer multiplex detection and characterization for a variety of infectious disease pathogens. Microarray analysis has the capability to offer robust multiplex detection but has just started to enter the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Multiple microarray platforms exist, including printed double-stranded DNA and oligonucleotide arrays, in situ-synthesized arrays, high-density bead arrays, electronic microarrays, and suspension bead arrays. One aim of this paper is to review microarray technology, highlighting technical differences between them and each platform's advantages and disadvantages. Although the use of microarrays to generate gene expression data has become routine, applications pertinent to clinical microbiology continue to rapidly expand. This review highlights uses of microarray technology that impact diagnostic microbiology, including the detection and identification of pathogens, determination of antimicrobial resistance, epidemiological strain typing, and analysis of microbial infections using host genomic expression and polymorphism profiles. PMID:19822891

  5. Switchable cell trapping using superparamagnetic beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Smith, K. H.; Real, M. E.; Bashir, M. A.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Schrefl, T.; Allwood, D. A.; Haycock, J. W.

    2010-04-30

    Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} microwires are investigated as the basis of a switchable template for positioning magnetically-labeled neural Schwann cells. Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy and micromagnetic modeling show that magnetic domain walls can be created or removed in zigzagged structures by an applied magnetic field. Schwann cells containing superparamagnetic beads are trapped by the field emanating from the domain walls. The design allows Schwann cells to be organized on a surface to form a connected network and then released from the surface if required. As aligned Schwann cells can guide nerve regeneration, this technique is of value for developing glial-neuronal co-culture models in the future treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.

  6. Efficient, validated method for detection of mycobacterial growth in liquid culture media by use of bead beating, magnetic-particle-based nucleic acid isolation, and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Plain, Karren M; Waldron, Anna M; Begg, Douglas J; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria are difficult to culture, requiring specialized media and a long incubation time, and have complex and exceedingly robust cell walls. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease, a chronic wasting disease of ruminants, is a typical example. Culture of MAP from the feces and intestinal tissues is a commonly used test for confirmation of infection. Liquid medium offers greater sensitivity than solid medium for detection of MAP; however, support for the BD Bactec 460 system commonly used for this purpose has been discontinued. We previously developed a new liquid culture medium, M7H9C, to replace it, with confirmation of growth reliant on PCR. Here, we report an efficient DNA isolation and quantitative PCR methodology for the specific detection and confirmation of MAP growth in liquid culture media containing egg yolk. The analytical sensitivity was at least 10(4)-fold higher than a commonly used method involving ethanol precipitation of DNA and conventional PCR; this may be partly due to the addition of a bead-beating step to manually disrupt the cell wall of the mycobacteria. The limit of detection, determined using pure cultures of two different MAP strains, was 100 to 1,000 MAP organisms/ml. The diagnostic accuracy was confirmed using a panel of cattle fecal (n=54) and sheep fecal and tissue (n=90) culture samples. This technique is directly relevant for diagnostic laboratories that perform MAP cultures but may also be applicable to the detection of other species, including M. avium and M. tuberculosis.

  7. Efficient, Validated Method for Detection of Mycobacterial Growth in Liquid Culture Media by Use of Bead Beating, Magnetic-Particle-Based Nucleic Acid Isolation, and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Anna M.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria are difficult to culture, requiring specialized media and a long incubation time, and have complex and exceedingly robust cell walls. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease, a chronic wasting disease of ruminants, is a typical example. Culture of MAP from the feces and intestinal tissues is a commonly used test for confirmation of infection. Liquid medium offers greater sensitivity than solid medium for detection of MAP; however, support for the BD Bactec 460 system commonly used for this purpose has been discontinued. We previously developed a new liquid culture medium, M7H9C, to replace it, with confirmation of growth reliant on PCR. Here, we report an efficient DNA isolation and quantitative PCR methodology for the specific detection and confirmation of MAP growth in liquid culture media containing egg yolk. The analytical sensitivity was at least 104-fold higher than a commonly used method involving ethanol precipitation of DNA and conventional PCR; this may be partly due to the addition of a bead-beating step to manually disrupt the cell wall of the mycobacteria. The limit of detection, determined using pure cultures of two different MAP strains, was 100 to 1,000 MAP organisms/ml. The diagnostic accuracy was confirmed using a panel of cattle fecal (n = 54) and sheep fecal and tissue (n = 90) culture samples. This technique is directly relevant for diagnostic laboratories that perform MAP cultures but may also be applicable to the detection of other species, including M. avium and M. tuberculosis. PMID:25609725

  8. Dynamic micro-Hall detection of superparamagnetic beads in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Aledealat, K; Mihajlović, G; Chen, K; Field, M; Sullivan, G J; Xiong, P; Chase, P B; von Molnár, S

    2010-12-01

    We report integration of an InAs quantum well micro-Hall magnetic sensor with microfluidics and real-time detection of moving superparamagnetic beads. Beads moving within and around the Hall cross area result in positive and negative Hall voltage signals respectively. Relative magnitudes and polarities of the signals measured for a random distribution of immobilized beads over the sensor are in good agreement with calculated values and explain consistently the shape of the dynamic signal.

  9. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) beads for nattokinase purification from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengli; Xing, Jianmin; Guan, Yueping; Liu, Huizhou

    2006-09-01

    An effective method for purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth using magnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) beads immobilized with p-aminobenzamidine was proposed in this study. Firstly, magnetic PMMA beads with a narrow size distribution were prepared by spraying suspension polymerization. Then, they were highly functionalized via transesterification reaction with polyethylene glycol. The surface hydroxyl-modified magnetic beads obtained were further modified with chloroethylamine to transfer the surface amino-modified magnetic functional beads. The morphology and surface functionality of the magnetic beads were examined by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared. An affinity ligand, p-aminobenzamidine was covalently immobilized to the amino-modified magnetic beads by the glutaraldehyde method for nattokinase purification directly from the fermentation broth. The purification factor and the recovery of the enzyme activity were found to be 8.7 and 85%, respectively. The purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth by magnetic beads only took 40 min, which shows a very fast purification of nattokinase compared to traditional purification methods.

  10. A microfluidic chip-based fluorescent biosensor for the sensitive and specific detection of label-free single-base mismatch via magnetic beads-based "sandwich" hybridization strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZongWen; Fan, YingWei; Chen, JinFa; Guo, Ying; Wu, WeiHua; He, Ye; Xu, LiangJun; Fu, FengFu

    2013-08-01

    A novel microfluidic chip-based fluorescent DNA biosensor, which utilized the electrophoretic driving mode and magnetic beads-based "sandwich" hybridization strategy, was developed for the sensitive and ultra-specific detection of single-base mismatch DNA in this study. In comparison with previous biosensors, the proposed DNA biosensor has much more robust resistibility to the complex matrix of real saliva and serum samples, shorter analysis time, and much higher discrimination ability for the detection of single-base mismatch. These features, as well as its easiness of fabrication, operation convenience, stability, better reusability, and low cost, make it a promising alternative to the SNPs genotyping/detection in clinical diagnosis. By using the biosensor, we have successfully determined oral cancer-related DNA in saliva and serum samples without sample labeling and any preseparation or dilution with a detection limit of 5.6 × 10(-11) M, a RSD (n = 5) < 5% and a discrimination factor of 3.58-4.54 for one-base mismatch.

  11. Overview of Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Reymond Sutandy, FX; Qian, Jiang; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarray is an emerging technology that provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput way. Two major classes of protein microarrays are defined to describe their applications: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be fractionated and spotted on a slide to form a reverse-phase protein microarray. While the fabrication technology is maturing, applications of protein microarrays, especially functional protein microarrays, have flourished during the past decade. Here, we will first review recent advances in the protein microarray technologies, and then present a series of examples to illustrate the applications of analytical and functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. The research areas will include detection of various binding properties of proteins, study of protein posttranslational modifications, analysis of host-microbe interactions, profiling antibody specificity, and identification of biomarkers in autoimmune diseases. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:23546620

  12. Highly Sensitive Bacteria Quantification Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Electrochemical Detection of Guanine-Labeled Secondary Beads

    PubMed Central

    Jayamohan, Harikrishnan; Gale, Bruce K.; Minson, Bj; Lambert, Christopher J.; Gordon, Neil; Sant, Himanshu J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the ultra-sensitive indirect electrochemical detection of E. coli O157:H7 using antibody functionalized primary (magnetic) beads for capture and polyguanine (polyG) oligonucleotide functionalized secondary (polystyrene) beads as an electrochemical tag. Vacuum filtration in combination with E. coli O157:H7 specific antibody modified magnetic beads were used for extraction of E. coli O157:H7 from 100 mL samples. The magnetic bead conjugated E. coli O157:H7 cells were then attached to polyG functionalized secondary beads to form a sandwich complex (magnetic bead/E. coli/ secondary bead). While the use of magnetic beads for immuno-based capture is well characterized, the use of oligonucleotide functionalized secondary beads helps combine amplification and potential multiplexing into the system. The antibody functionalized secondary beads can be easily modified with a different antibody to detect other pathogens from the same sample and enable potential multiplexing. The polyGs on the secondary beads enable signal amplification up to 108 guanine tags per secondary bead (7.5 × 106 biotin-FITC per secondary bead, 20 guanines per oligonucleotide) bound to the target (E. coli). A single-stranded DNA probe functionalized reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was used to bind the polyGs on the secondary beads. Fluorescent imaging was performed to confirm the hybridization of the complex to the electrode surface. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to quantify the amount of polyG involved in the hybridization event with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) ( Ru(bpy)32+) as the mediator. The amount of polyG signal can be correlated to the amount of E. coli O157:H7 in the sample. The method was able to detect concentrations of E. coli O157:H7 down to 3 CFU/100 mL, which is 67 times lower than the most sensitive technique reported in literature. The signal to noise ratio for this work was 3. We also demonstrate the use of the

  13. Acceleration of microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion reactions by magnetite beads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-03-15

    In this study, we demonstrated that microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion could be greatly accelerated by multifunctional magnetite beads. The acceleration of microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion by the presence of the magnetite beads was attributable to several features of the beads. Their capacity to absorb microwave radiation leads to rapid heating of the beads. Furthermore, their negatively charged functionalities cause adsorption of proteins with opposite charges onto their surfaces by electrostatic interactions, leading to a concentration on the surfaces of the beads of proteins present in trace amounts in the solution. The adsorbed proteins are denatured and hence rendered vulnerable to enzymatic digestion and are digested on the beads. For microwave heating, 30 s was sufficient for carrying out the tryptic digestion of cytochrome c, in the presence of magnetite beads, while 1 min was adequate for tryptic digestion of myoglobin. The digestion products were characterized by MALDI-MS. This rapid enzymatic digestion allowed the entire time for identification of proteins to be greatly reduced. Furthermore, specific proteins present in trace quantities were enriched from the sample on the magnetite beads and could be rapidly isolated from the sample by employing an external magnetic field. These multiple roles of magnetite beads, as the absorber for microwave irradiation, the concentrating probe, and the agent for unfolding proteins, contributed to their capability of accelerating microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion. We also demonstrated that trypsin immobilized magnetite beads were suitable for use in microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion.

  14. "Micro-robots" pick up a glass bead

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    "Micro-robots", which are really collections of particles animated by magnetic fields, pick up a glass bead and move it around the screen. Each movement is precisely controlled. The "asters" were designed by Alexey Snezkho and Igor Aronson at Argonne National Laboratory. Video courtesy Nature Materials. Read the full story at http://go.usa.gov/KAT

  15. Magnetic bead based immuno-detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables using the Bio-Plex suspension array system.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Basavanna, U

    2015-04-01

    Listeriosis, a disease contracted via the consumption of foods contaminated with pathogenic Listeria species, can produce severe symptoms and high mortality in susceptible people and animals. The development of molecular methods and immuno-based techniques for detection of pathogenic Listeria in foods has been challenging due to the presence of assay inhibiting food components. In this study, we utilize a macrophage cell culture system for the isolation and enrichment of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables for subsequent identification using the Luminex xMAP technique. Macrophage monolayers were exposed to infant formula, lettuce and celery contaminated with L. monocytogenes or L. ivanovii. Magnetic microspheres conjugated to Listeria specific antibody were used to capture Listeria from infected macrophages and then analyzed using the Bio-Plex 200 analyzer. As few as 10 CFU/mL or g of L. monocytogenes was detected in all foods tested. The detection limit for L. ivanovii was 10 CFU/mL in infant formula and 100 CFU/g in leafy greens. Microsphere bound Listeria obtained from infected macrophage lysates could also be isolated on selective media for subsequent confirmatory identification. This method presumptively identifies L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii from infant formula, lettuce and celery in less than 28 h with confirmatory identifications completed in less than 48 h.

  16. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Bruce E; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-11-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed.

  17. Extended release of vitamins from magnetite loaded polyanionic polymeric beads.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Maria; Verisan, Cristina; Voicu, Georgeta; Ficai, Denisa; Ficai, Anton; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Vlad, Mihaela; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2016-08-30

    Here we explore a novel approach of increasing the release duration of folic and ascorbic acid from magnetite entrapped into calcium-alginate beads. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite-vitamins complexes are reported. The magnetite-vitamins complexes were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, BET and DTA-TG. Also calcium-alginate magnetic beads were prepared by dripping a mixture of sodium alginate with magnetite-vitamins complexes into calcium chloride solution. Extended release profile of the two experimental models was evaluated and quantified by UV-vis.

  18. Microarray in parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Misra, Shubham; Anand, Namrata; Sharma, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Modern biology and genomic sciences are rooted in parasitic disease research. Genome sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of new biological information that promises to have a major impact on our understanding of parasites. Microarrays provide one of the major high-throughput platforms by which this information can be exploited in the laboratory. Many excellent reviews and technique articles have recently been published on applying microarrays to organisms for which fully annotated genomes are at hand. However, many parasitologists work on organisms whose genomes have been only partially sequenced. This review is mainly focused on how to use microarray in these situations. PMID:23508469

  19. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  20. Glass-bead peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Peen plating of aluminum, copper, and nickel powders was investigated. Only aluminum was plated successfully within the range of peen plating conditions studied. Optimum plating conditions for aluminum were found to be: (1) bead/powder mixture containing 25 to 35% powder by weight, (2) peening intensity of 0.007A as measured by Almen strip, and (3) glass impact bead diameter of at least 297 microns (0.0117 inches) for depositing-100 mesh aluminum powder. No extensive cleaning or substrate preparation is required beyond removing loose dirt or heavy oil.

  1. Random glycopeptide bead libraries for seromic biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Kracun, Stjepan K; Cló, Emiliano; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B; Jensen, Knud J; Blixt, Ola

    2010-12-03

    Identification of disease-specific biomarkers is important to address early diagnosis and management of disease. Aberrant post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins such as O-glycosylations (O-PTMs) are emerging as triggers of autoantibodies that can serve as sensitive biomarkers. Here we have developed a random glycopeptide bead library screening platform for detection of autoantibodies and other binding proteins. Libraries were build on biocompatible PEGA beads including a safety-catch C-terminal amide linker (SCAL) that allowed mild cleavage conditions (I(2)/NaBH(4) and TFA) for release of glycopeptides and sequence determination by ESI-Orbitrap-MS(n). As proof-of-principle, tumor -specific glycopeptide reporter epitopes were built-in into the libraries and were detected by tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from cancer patients. Sequenced and identified glycopeptides were resynthesized at the preparative scale by automated parallel peptide synthesis and printed on microarrays for validation and broader analysis with larger sets of sera. We further showed that chemical synthesis of the monosaccharide O-glycopeptide library (Tn-glycoform) could be diversified to other tumor glycoforms by on-bead enzymatic glycosylation reactions with recombinant glycosyltransferases. Hence, we have developed a high-throughput flexible platform for rapid discovery of O-glycopeptide biomarkers and the method has applicability in other types of assays such as lectin/antibody/enzyme specificity studies as well as investigation of other PTMs.

  2. Improving detection of avalanches on a conical bead pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajpeyi, Avi; Lehman, Susan; Dahmen, Karin; Leblanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan

    A conical bead pile subject to slow driving and an external magnetic field is used as a simple system to investigate the variations in the avalanche size probability distribution function. Steel beads are dropped onto the pile from different heights and at different strengths of applied magnetic field. Avalanches are recorded by the change in mass as beads fall off the pile. Experimentally we observe an increasing deviation from power law behavior as the field and thus cohesion between the beads increases. We compare our experimental results for the probability distribution function to the results of an analytic theory from a mean-field model of slip avalanches [Dahmen, Nat Phys 7, 554 (2011)]. The model also makes predictions for avalanche duration, which is not measurable with the existing system. To more fully characterize the avalanching behavior of the pile over time, a high-speed camera has been added to the system to record the largest avalanches and allow more detailed analysis. The conical pile geometry presents a challenge for observation and particle tracking over the full pile. Our implementation scheme and preliminary results from the video analysis are presented. Research supported by NSF CBET 1336116 and 1336634.

  3. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  4. Seeds used for Bodhi beads in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bodhi beads are a Buddhist prayer item made from seeds. Bodhi beads have a large and emerging market in China, and demand for the beads has particularly increased in Buddhism regions, especially Tibet. Many people have started to focus on and collect Bodhi beads and to develop a Bodhi bead culture. But no research has examined the source plants of Bodhi beads. Therefore, ethnobotanical surveys were conducted in six provinces of China to investigate and document Bodhi bead plants. Reasons for the development of Bodhi bead culture were also discussed. Methods Six provinces of China were selected for market surveys. Information was collected using semi-structured interviews, key informant interviews, and participatory observation with traders, tourists, and local residents. Barkhor Street in Lhasa was focused on during market surveys because it is one of the most popular streets in China. Results Forty-seven species (including 2 varieties) in 19 families and 39 genera represented 52 types of Bodhi beads that were collected. The most popular Bodhi bead plants have a long history and religious significance. Most Bodhi bead plants can be used as medicine or food, and their seeds or fruits are the main elements in these uses. ‘Bodhi seeds’ have been historically used in other countries for making ornaments, especially seeds of the legume family. Many factors helped form Bodhi bead culture in China, but its foundation was in Indian Buddhist culture. Conclusions As one of the earliest adornment materials, seeds played an important role for human production and life. Complex sources of Bodhi beads have different cultural and historical significance. People bought and collected Bodhi beads to reflect their love and admiration for the plants. Thus, the documentation of Bodhi bead plants can serve as a basis for future investigation of Bodhi bead culture and modern Buddhist culture. PMID:24479788

  5. Gel bead composition for metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Woodward, C.A.; Byers, C.H.

    1990-12-18

    This patent describes a gel bead consisting essentially of a sufficient amount of water and propylene glycol alginate to allow for bead formation and a sufficient amount of bone gelatin to allow for metal absorption and chemically crosslinked in an alkaline medium to form a stable structure. A gel bead contained therein a biological absorbent capable of removing metals from solution.

  6. Thermal Profile of Metallic Beads in a Bead Sterilizer,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    another commonly used chairside sterilization method, principally for endodontic instruments. The bead sterilizer consists of a heated chamber containing...sterilization of endodontic instruments. However, several investigators have shown sterilization times ranging from 3 seconds to 14 minutes, are...et.al. The effect of autoclave sterilization on endodontic files. Oral Surg 55(2): 204-207, 1983. 3. Parkes, R. B. and Kolstad, R. A. Effects of

  7. Molecular diagnostics using magnetic nanobeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Strömberg, Mattias; Göransson, Jenny; Gunnarsson, Klas; Nilsson, Mats; Svedlindh, Peter; Strømme, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the volume-amplified magnetic nanobead detection assay with respect to bead size, bead concentration and bead oligonucleotide surface coverage in order to improve the understanding of the underlying microscopic mechanisms. It has been shown that: (i) the immobilization efficiency of the beads depends on the surface coverage of oligonucleotides, (ii) by using lower amounts of probe-tagged beads, detection sensitivity can be improved and (iii) using small enough beads enables both turn-off and turn-on detection. Finally, biplex detection was demonstrated.

  8. Multievidence microarray mining.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Martin; Scherf, Matthias; Epple, Anton; Werner, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    Microarray mining is a challenging task because of the superposition of several processes in the data. We believe that the combination of microarray data-based analyses (statistical significance analysis of gene expression) with array-independent analyses (literature-mining and promoter analysis) enables some of the problems of traditional array analysis to be overcome. As a proof-of-principle, we revisited publicly available microarray data derived from an experiment with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated fibroblasts. Our strategy revealed results beyond the detection of the major metabolic pathway known to be linked to the PDGF response: we were able to identify the crosstalking regulatory networks underlying the metabolic pathway without using a priori knowledge about the experiment.

  9. Validation of a mobile phone-assisted microarray decoding platform for signal-enhanced mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanbin; Li, Caixia; Lu, Yuan; Hu, Hua; Xiang, Guangxin; Liang, Zhiqing; Liao, Pu; Dai, Pu; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing

    2011-08-15

    We have established a mobile phone-assisted microarray decoding platform for signal-enhanced mutation detection. A large amount of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was obtained by combining symmetric PCR and magnetic isolation, and ssDNA prepared with magnetic bead as label was further allowed to hybridize against the tag-array for decoding purpose. High sensitivity and specificity was achieved with the detection of genomic DNA. When simultaneously genotyping nine common mutations associated with hereditary hearing loss, the detection limit of 1 ng genomic DNA was achieved. Significantly, a mobile phone was also used to record and decode the genotyping results through a custom-designed imaging adaptor and a dedicated mobile phone software. A total of 51 buccal swabs from patients probably with deafness-related mutations were collected and analyzed. The genotyping results were all confirmed by fluorescence-based laser confocal scanning and direct DNA sequencing. This mobile phone-assisted decoding platform provides an effective but economic mutation detection alternative for the future quicker and sensitive detection of virtually any mutation-related diseases in developing and underdeveloped countries.

  10. Dynamic trajectory analysis of superparamagnetic beads driven by on-chip micromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Lim, Byeonghwa; Yang, Ye; Howdyshell, Marci; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear dynamics of superparamagnetic beads moving around the periphery of patterned magnetic disks in the presence of an in-plane rotating magnetic field. Three different dynamical regimes are observed in experiments, including (1) phase-locked motion at low driving frequencies, (2) phase-slipping motion above the first critical frequency fc1, and (3) phase-insulated motion above the second critical frequency fc2. Experiments with Janus particles were used to confirm that the beads move by sliding rather than rolling. The rest of the experiments were conducted on spherical, isotropic magnetic beads, in which automated particle position tracking algorithms were used to analyze the bead dynamics. Experimental results in the phase-locked and phase-slipping regimes correlate well with numerical simulations. Additional assumptions are required to predict the onset of the phase-insulated regime, in which the beads are trapped in closed orbits; however, the origin of the phase-insulated state appears to result from local magnetization defects. These results indicate that these three dynamical states are universal properties of bead motion in non-uniform oscillators. PMID:26648596

  11. DNA microarray technology. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has revolutionized biological research by enabling genome-scale explorations. This chapter provides an overview of DNA microarray technology and its application to characterizing the physical genome, with a focus on cancer genomes. Specific areas discussed include investigations of DNA copy number alteration (and loss of heterozygosity), DNA methylation, DNA-protein (i.e., chromatin and transcription factor) interactions, DNA replication, and the integration of diverse genome-scale data types. Also provided is a perspective on recent advances and future directions in characterizing the physical genome.

  12. Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David A.; Ptacek, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Protein chips have emerged as a promising approach for a wide variety of applications including the identification of protein-protein interactions, protein-phospholipid interactions, small molecule targets, and substrates of proteins kinases. They can also be used for clinical diagnostics and monitoring disease states. This article reviews current methods in the generation and applications of protein microarrays. PMID:17126887

  13. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  14. Ionene modified small polymeric beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Linear ionene polyquaternary cationic polymeric segments are bonded by means of the Menshutkin reaction (quaternization) to biocompatible, extremely small, porous particles containing halide or tertiary amine sites which are centers for attachment of the segments. The modified beads in the form of emulsions or suspensions offer a large, positively-charged surface area capable of irreversibly binding polyanions such as heparin, DNA, RNA or bile acids to remove them from solution or of reversibly binding monoanions such as penicillin, pesticides, sex attractants and the like for slow release from the suspension.

  15. Analyzing Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-03-01

    Because there is no widely used software for analyzing RNA-seq data that has a graphical user interface, this protocol provides an example of analyzing microarray data using Babelomics. This analysis entails performing quantile normalization and then detecting differentially expressed genes associated with the transgenesis of a human oncogene c-Myc in mice. Finally, hierarchical clustering is performed on the differentially expressed genes using the Cluster program, and the results are visualized using TreeView.

  16. Membrane-based microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Elliott P.; Hudson, James; Steward, John; Donnell, Philip A.; Chan, Wing W.; Taylor, Richard F.

    1999-11-01

    Microarrays represent a new approach to the rapid detection and identification of analytes. Studies to date have shown that the immobilization of receptor molecules (such as DNA, oligonucleotides, antibodies, enzymes and binding proteins) onto silicon and polymeric substrates can result in arrays able to detect hundreds of analytes in a single step. The formation of the receptor/analyte complex can, itself, lead to detection, or the complex can be interrogated through the use of fluorescent, chemiluminescent or radioactive probes and ligands.

  17. BEADS: A Realistic Approach to Elementary Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Andy

    1983-01-01

    Having students gather their own statistics is promoted. The BEADS program provides an alternative; it simulated sampling from a binomial distribution. Illustrations from the program are included. (MNS)

  18. Adsorption of ochratoxin A from grape juice by yeast cells immobilised in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Farbo, Maria Grazia; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Fiori, Stefano; Marceddu, Salvatore; Jaoua, Samir; Migheli, Quirico

    2016-01-18

    Grape juice can be easily contaminated with ochratoxin A (OTA), one of the known mycotoxins with the greatest public health significance. Among the different approaches to decontaminate juice from this mycotoxin, microbiological methods proved efficient, inexpensive and safe, particularly the use of yeast or yeast products. To ascertain whether immobilisation of the yeast biomass would lead to successful decontamination, alginate beads encapsulating Candida intermedia yeast cells were used in our experiments to evaluate their OTA-biosorption efficacy. Magnetic calcium alginate beads were also prepared by adding magnetite in the formulation to allow fast removal from the aqueous solution with a magnet. Calcium alginate beads were added to commercial grape juice spiked with 20 μg/kg OTA and after 48 h of incubation a significant reduction (>80%), of the total OTA content was achieved, while in the subsequent phases (72-120 h) OTA was slowly released into the grape juice by alginate beads. Biosorption properties of alginate-yeast beads were tested in a prototype bioreactor consisting in a glass chromatography column packed with beads, where juice amended with OTA was slowly flowed downstream. The adoption of an interconnected scaled-up bioreactor as an efficient and safe tool to remove traces of OTA from liquid matrices is discussed.

  19. New Analysis Techniques for Avalanches in a Conical Bead Pile with Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieman, Catherine; Lehman, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Avalanche statistics and pile geometry for 3 mm steel spheres dropped on a conical bead pile were studied at different drop heights and different cohesion strengths. The pile is initially built on a circular base and is subsequently slowly driven by adding one bead at a time to the apex of the pile. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches off the pile over the course of tens of thousands of bead drops. The level of cohesion is tuned through use of an applied uniform magnetic field. Changes in the pile mass and geometry were investigated to determine the effect of cohesion and drop height on the angle of repose. The angle of repose increased with cohesion strength, and decreased somewhat for higher drop heights. The packing density of beads is expected to decrease as magnetic cohesion increases, but for our 20 000-bead pile, this effect has not been observed. The proportion of beads removed from the pile by different avalanche sizes was also calculated. Although larger avalanches are much rarer occurrences, they carry away a larger fraction of the total avalanched mass than small avalanches. As the pile cohesion increases, the number of small and medium avalanches decreases so that this mass loss distribution shifts more strongly to large sizes.

  20. Ultrasensitive carbohydrate-peptide SPR imaging microarray for diagnosing IgE mediated peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit A; Peczuh, Mark W; Kumar, Challa V; Rusling, James F

    2014-11-21

    Severity of peanut allergies is linked to allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in blood, but diagnostics from assays using glycoprotein allergen mixtures may be inaccurate. Measuring IgEs specific to individual peptide and carbohydrate epitopes of allergenic proteins is promising. We report here the first immunoarray for IgEs utilizing both peptide and carbohydrate epitopes. A surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) microarray was equipped with peptide and β-xylosyl glycoside (BXG) epitopes from major peanut allergen glycoprotein Arachis hypogaea h2 (Ara-h2). A monoclonal anti-IgE antibody was included as positive control. IgEs were precaptured onto magnetic beads loaded with polyclonal anti-IgE antibodies to enhance sensitivity and minimize non-specific binding. As little as 0.1 attomole (0.5 pg mL(-1)) IgE was detected from dilute serum in 45 min. IgEs binding to Ara-h2 peptide and BXG were quantified in 10 μL of patient serum and correlated with standard ImmunoCAP values.

  1. Bead Assembly Magnetorotation as a Signal Transduction Method for Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Ariel; Commiskey, Patrick; Shah, Nicholas; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a proof-of-principle for a new signal transduction method for protein detection called Bead Assembly Magnetorotation (BAM). In this paper, we chose to focus on the protein thrombin, a popular choice for proof-of-principle work in this field. BAM is based on using the protein target to mediate the formation of aptamer-coated 1 μm magnetic beads into a bead assembly, formed at the bottom of a 1 μL hanging droplet. The size, shape and fractal dimension of this bead assembly all depend on the protein concentration. The protein concentration can be measured in two ways: by magnetorotation, in which the rotational period of the assembly correlates with the protein concentration, or by fractal analysis. Additionally, a microscope-free magnetorotation detection method is introduced, based on a simple laser apparatus built from standard laboratory components. PMID:23639345

  2. Porous bead packings for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Woeller, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    Porous polyaromatic packing beads have low polarity, high efficiency, short retention time, and may be synthesized in size range of 50 to 150 micrometers (100 to 270 mesh). Mechanically strong beads may be produced using various materials depending on elements and compounds to be identified.

  3. Expanded polylactide bead foaming - A new technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofar, M.; Ameli, A.; Park, C. B.

    2015-05-01

    Bead foaming technology with double crystal melting peak structure has been recognized as a promising method to produce low-density foams with complex geometries. During the molding stage of the bead foams, the double peak structure generates a strong bead-to-bead sintering and maintains the overall foam structure. During recent years, polylactide (PLA) bead foaming has been of the great interest of researchers due to its origin from renewable resources and biodegradability. However, due to the PLA's low melt strength and slow crystallization kinetics, the attempts have been limited to the manufacturing methods used for expanded polystyrene. In this study, for the first time, we developed microcellular PLA bead foams with double crystal melting peak structure. Microcellular PLA bead foams were produced with expansion ratios and average cell sizes ranging from 3 to 30-times and 350 nm to 15 µm, respectively. The generated high melting temperature crystals during the saturation significantly affected the expansion ratio and cell density of the PLA bead foams by enhancing the PLA's poor melt strength and promoting heterogeneous cell nucleation around the crystals.

  4. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  5. Application of magnetic immobilized microorganisms. Ethanol production by saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, S.; Larsson, P.O.

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic Ca alginate yeast beads, made by incorporation of magnetite or the colloidal magnetic liquid ferrofluid, exhibited catalytic behavior similar to that of their nonmagnetic counterparts. The magnetic immobilized preparations short-term performance, long-term operational stability, and capacity for in-situ activation were unaffected by the inclusion of magnetic material. The magnetic quality of the alginate beads provides manipulatory advantages.

  6. Ultrasonic Characterization of Glass Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassila, I.; Siiriä, S.; Gates, F. K.; Hæggström, E.

    2008-02-01

    We report on the progress in developing a method for an in-line granule size measurement using ultrasonic through transmission method. The knowledge of granule size is important in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms where the current optical and rheological methods have limitations such as fouling of the optical windows. The phase velocity of a wave propagated through interstitial air between glass balls of 1, 2 and 10 mm in diameter was 254±5 m/s, 261±3 m/s and 320±9 m/s, respectively. The power spectral density of the received signals showed that high frequencies were attenuated more in case of smaller beads due to increased scattering.

  7. Fused Bead Analysis of Diogenite Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D.W.; Beck, B.W.; McSween, H.Y.; Lee, C.T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Bulk rock chemistry is an essential dataset in meteoritics and planetary science [1]. A common method used to obtain the bulk chemistry of meteorites is ICP-MS. While the accuracy, precision and low detection limits of this process are advantageous [2], the sample size used for analysis (approx.70 mg) can be a problem in a field where small and finite samples are the norm. Fused bead analysis is another bulk rock analytical technique that has been used in meteoritics [3]. This technique involves forming a glass bead from 10 mg of sample and measuring its chemistry using a defocused beam on a microprobe. Though the ICP-MS has lower detection limits than the microprobe, the fused bead method destroys a much smaller sample of the meteorite. Fused bead analysis was initially designed for samples with near-eutectic compositions and low viscosities. Melts generated of this type homogenize at relatively low temperatures and produce primary melts near the sample s bulk composition [3]. The application of fused bead analysis to samples with noneutectic melt compositions has not been validated. The purpose of this study is to test if fused bead analysis can accurately determine the bulk rock chemistry of non-eutectic melt composition meteorites. To determine this, we conduct two examinations of the fused bead. First, we compare ICP-MS and fused bead results of the same samples using statistical analysis. Secondly, we inspect the beads for the presence of crystals and chemical heterogeneity. The presence of either of these would indicate incomplete melting and quenching of the bead.

  8. Comparison of normalization methods for Illumina BeadChip HumanHT-12 v3

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Normalization of microarrays is a standard practice to account for and minimize effects which are not due to the controlled factors in an experiment. There is an overwhelming number of different methods that can be applied, none of which is ideally suited for all experimental designs. Thus, it is important to identify a normalization method appropriate for the experimental setup under consideration that is neither too negligent nor too stringent. Major aim is to derive optimal results from the underlying experiment. Comparisons of different normalization methods have already been conducted, none of which, to our knowledge, comparing more than a handful of methods. Results In the present study, 25 different ways of pre-processing Illumina Sentrix BeadChip array data are compared. Among others, methods provided by the BeadStudio software are taken into account. Looking at different statistical measures, we point out the ideal versus the actual observations. Additionally, we compare qRT-PCR measurements of transcripts from different ranges of expression intensities to the respective normalized values of the microarray data. Taking together all different kinds of measures, the ideal method for our dataset is identified. Conclusions Pre-processing of microarray gene expression experiments has been shown to influence further downstream analysis to a great extent and thus has to be carefully chosen based on the design of the experiment. This study provides a recommendation for deciding which normalization method is best suited for a particular experimental setup. PMID:20525181

  9. A Novel Approach for Purification and Selective Capture of Membrane Vesicles of the Periodontopathic Bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis: Membrane Vesicles Bind to Magnetic Beads Coated with Epoxy Groups in a Noncovalent, Species-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryoma; Kikushima, Kenji; Higuchi, Hideo; Obana, Nozomu; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Bai, Dongying; Ohnishi, Makoto; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2014-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) of Porphyromonas gingivalis are regarded as an offensive weapon of the bacterium, leading to tissue deterioration in periodontal disease. Therefore, isolation of highly purified MVs is indispensable to better understand the pathophysiological role of MVs in the progression of periodontitis. MVs are generally isolated by a conventional method based on ultracentrifugation of the bacterial culture supernatant. However, the resulting MVs are often contaminated with co-precipitating bacterial appendages sheared from the live bacteria. Here, we report an intriguing property of P. gingivalis MVs–their ability to bind superparamagnetic beads coated with epoxy groups (SB-Epoxy). Analysis of fractions collected during the purification revealed that all MVs of five tested P. gingivalis stains bound to SB-Epoxy. In contrast, free fimbriae in the crude MV preparation did not bind to the SB-Epoxy. The SB-Epoxy-bound MVs were easily dissociated from the SB-Epoxy using a mild denaturation buffer. These results suggest that the surface chemistry conferred by epoxy on the beads is responsible for the binding, which is mediated by noncovalent bonds. Both the structural integrity and purity of the isolated MVs were confirmed by electron microscopy. The isolated MVs also caused cell detachment from culture dishes at a physiologically relevant concentration. Assays of competitive binding between the SB-Epoxy and mixtures of MVs from five bacterial species demonstrated that only P. gingivalis MVs could be selectively eliminated from the mixtures. We suggest that this novel approach enables efficient purification and selective elimination of P. gingivalis MVs. PMID:24830438

  10. Microarrays in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Grant, Geraldine M; Fortney, Amanda; Gorreta, Francesco; Estep, Michael; Del Giacco, Luca; Van Meter, Amy; Christensen, Alan; Appalla, Lakshmi; Naouar, Chahla; Jamison, Curtis; Al-Timimi, Ali; Donovan, Jean; Cooper, James; Garrett, Carleton; Chandhoke, Vikas

    2004-01-01

    Microarray technology has presented the scientific community with a compelling approach that allows for simultaneous evaluation of all cellular processes at once. Cancer, being one of the most challenging diseases due to its polygenic nature, presents itself as a perfect candidate for evaluation by this approach. Several recent articles have provided significant insight into the strengths and limitations of microarrays. Nevertheless, there are strong indications that this approach will provide new molecular markers that could be used in diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. To achieve these goals it is essential that there is a seamless integration of clinical and molecular biological data that allows us to elucidate genes and pathways involved in various cancers. To this effect we are currently evaluating gene expression profiles in human brain, ovarian, breast and hematopoetic, lung, colorectal, head and neck and biliary tract cancers. To address the issues we have a joint team of scientists, doctors and computer scientists from two Virginia Universities and a major healthcare provider. The study has been divided into several focus groups that include; Tissue Bank Clinical & Pathology Laboratory Data, Chip Fabrication, QA/QC, Tissue Devitalization, Database Design and Data Analysis, using multiple microarray platforms. Currently over 300 consenting patients have been enrolled in the study with the largest number being that of breast cancer patients. Clinical data on each patient is being compiled into a secure and interactive relational database and integration of these data elements will be accomplished by a common programming interface. This clinical database contains several key parameters on each patient including demographic (risk factors, nutrition, co-morbidity, familial history), histopathology (non genetic predictors), tumor, treatment and follow-up information. Gene expression data derived from the tissue samples will be linked to this database, which

  11. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  12. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  13. Living-cell microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yarmush, Martin L; King, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment.

  14. The Clinical Utility of a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray in Patients With Epilepsy at a Tertiary Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hrabik, Sarah A; Standridge, Shannon M; Greiner, Hansel M; Neilson, Derek E; Pilipenko, Valentina V; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Connor, Jessica A; Spaeth, Christine G

    2015-11-01

    Microarray testing has revolutionized clinical cytogenetics, as it provides a significantly higher resolution and greater clinical yield than karyotype analysis. This study assessed the clinical utility of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray in patients with epilepsy. Study subjects were patients between the ages of birth to 23 years who were diagnosed with epilepsy and had a microarray performed at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Statistical analysis explored the association of microarray results and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), seizure type, and structural malformations. Approximately 17.7% (26/147) of participants had an abnormal microarray as defined by laboratory guidelines. There were no differences in frequency of abnormal brain MRI or seizure type between the abnormal and normal microarray groups. There was a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal malformations (P < .0035) and cardiovascular malformations (P < .0081) in subjects with abnormal microarrays. Clinicians should consider microarray analysis in individuals who have epilepsy, especially in combination with musculoskeletal malformation or cardiovascular malformation.

  15. Beads + String = Atoms You Can See.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Christine K. F.

    1998-01-01

    Presents hands-on activities that give students a head start in learning the vocabulary and basic theory involved in understanding atomic structure. Uses beads to represent protons, neutrons, and electrons and string to represent orbitals. (DDR)

  16. Modeling Aspects of Two-Bead Microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, Christel; Forest, M. Gregory

    2008-07-01

    We revisit the Mason and Weitz (Phys. Rev. Lett., 74, 1995) and Levine and Lubensky (Phys. Rev. Lett., 85, 2000) analysis for one- and two-bead microrheology. Our first motivation is the possibility of drawing inferences from experimental data about local diffusive properties of individual beads and nonlocal dynamic moduli of the medium separating the two beads. Our second motivation is the ability to perform direct numerical simulations of hydrodynamically coupled Brownian beads in soft matter. For both goals, we first must have a model for the coupling between these two transport properties. We reformulate the coupled generalized Langevin equations (GLE) following the scalar GLE analysis of Fricks et al. (J. Appl. Math., 2008), assuming an exponential series parametrization of both local and nonlocal memory kernels. We then show the two-bead GLE model can be represented as a vector Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, which allows for a fast and statistically accurate numerical simulation of coupled bead paths (time series) and of ensemble-averaged statistics of the process. In this proceedings, we announce the framework to accomplish these two goals of inversion and direct simulation.

  17. Microarray simulator as educational tool.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Nykter, Matti; Mäkiraatikka, Eeva; Lehmussola, Antti; Korpelainen, Tomi; Erkkilä, Timo; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2007-01-01

    As many real-world applications, microarray measurements are inapplicable for large-scale teaching purposes due to their laborious preparation process and expense. Fortunately, many phases of the array preparation process can be efficiently demonstrated by using a software simulator tool. Here we propose the use of microarray simulator as an aiding tool in teaching of computational biology. Three case studies on educational use of the simulator are presented, which demonstrate the effect of gene knock-out, synthetic time series, and effect of noise sources. We conclude that the simulator, used for teaching the principles of microarray measurement technology, proved to be a useful tool in education.

  18. NIST/ISAC standardization study: variability in assignment of intensity values to fluorescence standard beads and in cross calibration of standard beads to hard dyed beads.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert A; Wang, Lili; Bigos, Martin; Nolan, John P

    2012-09-01

    Results from a standardization study cosponsored by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are reported. The study evaluated the variability of assigning intensity values to fluorophore standard beads by bead manufacturers and the variability of cross calibrating the standard beads to stained polymer beads (hard-dyed beads) using different flow cytometers. Hard dyed beads are generally not spectrally matched to the fluorophores used to stain cells, and spectral response varies among flow cytometers. Thus if hard dyed beads are used as fluorescence calibrators, one expects calibration for specific fluorophores (e.g., FITC or PE) to vary among different instruments. Using standard beads surface-stained with specific fluorophores (FITC, PE, APC, and Pacific Blue™), the study compared the measured intensity of fluorophore standard beads to that of hard dyed beads through cross calibration on 133 different flow cytometers. Using robust CV as a measure of variability, the variation of cross calibrated values was typically 20% or more for a particular hard dyed bead in a specific detection channel. The variation across different instrument models was often greater than the variation within a particular instrument model. As a separate part of the study, NIST and four bead manufacturers used a NIST supplied protocol and calibrated fluorophore solution standards to assign intensity values to the fluorophore beads. Values assigned to the reference beads by different groups varied by orders of magnitude in most cases, reflecting differences in instrumentation used to perform the calibration. The study concluded that the use of any spectrally unmatched hard dyed bead as a general fluorescence calibrator must be verified and characterized for every particular instrument model. Close interaction between bead manufacturers and NIST is recommended to have reliable and uniformly assigned

  19. Chemistry of Natural Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycan microarrays have become indispensable tools for studying protein-glycan interactions. Along with chemo-enzymatic synthesis, glycans isolated from natural sources have played important roles in array development and will continue to be a major source of glycans. N- and O-glycans from glycoproteins, and glycans from glycosphingolipids can be released from corresponding glycoconjugates with relatively mature methods, although isolation of large numbers and quantities of glycans are still very challenging. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are less represented on current glycan microarrays. Glycan microarray development has been greatly facilitated by bifunctional fluorescent linkers, which can be applied in a “Shotgun Glycomics” approach to incorporate isolated natural glycans. Glycan presentation on microarrays may affect glycan binding by GBPs, often through multivalent recognition by the GBP. PMID:24487062

  20. The Beads of Translation: Using Beads to Translate mRNA into a Polypeptide Bracelet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Dacey; Patrick, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    During this activity, by making beaded bracelets that represent the steps of translation, students simulate the creation of an amino acid chain. They are given an mRNA sequence that they translate into a corresponding polypeptide chain (beads). This activity focuses on the events and sites of translation. The activity provides students with a…

  1. Beaded streams of Arctic permafrost landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, C. D.; Whitman, M. S.; Jones, B. M.; Grosse, G.; Gaglioti, B. V.; Heim, K. C.

    2014-07-01

    Beaded streams are widespread in permafrost regions and are considered a common thermokarst landform. However, little is known about their distribution, how and under what conditions they form, and how their intriguing morphology translates to ecosystem functions and habitat. Here we report on a Circum-Arctic inventory of beaded streams and a watershed-scale analysis in northern Alaska using remote sensing and field studies. We mapped over 400 channel networks with beaded morphology throughout the continuous permafrost zone of northern Alaska, Canada, and Russia and found the highest abundance associated with medium- to high-ice content permafrost in moderately sloping terrain. In the Fish Creek watershed, beaded streams accounted for half of the drainage density, occurring primarily as low-order channels initiating from lakes and drained lake basins. Beaded streams predictably transition to alluvial channels with increasing drainage area and decreasing channel slope, although this transition is modified by local controls on water and sediment delivery. Comparison of one beaded channel using repeat photography between 1948 and 2013 indicate relatively stable form and 14C dating of basal sediments suggest channel formation may be as early as the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Contemporary processes, such as deep snow accumulation in stream gulches effectively insulates river ice and allows for perennial liquid water below most beaded stream pools. Because of this, mean annual temperatures in pool beds are greater than 2 °C, leading to the development of perennial thaw bulbs or taliks underlying these thermokarst features. In the summer, some pools stratify thermally, which reduces permafrost thaw and maintains coldwater habitats. Snowmelt generated peak-flows decrease rapidly by two or more orders of magnitude to summer low flows with slow reach-scale velocity distributions ranging from 0.1 to 0.01 m s-1, yet channel runs still move water rapidly between pools

  2. Single bead-based electrochemical biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Schrlau, Michael G.; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    A simple, robust, single bead-based electrochemical biosensor was fabricated and characterized. The sensor’s working electrode consists of an electrochemically-etched platinum wire, with a nominal diameter of 25 μm, hermetically heat-fusion sealed in a pulled glass capillary (micropipette). The sealing process does not require any epoxy or glue. A commercially available, densely functionalized agarose bead was mounted on the tip of the etched platinum wire. The use of a pre-functionalized bead eliminates the tedious and complicated surface functionalization process that is often the bottleneck in the development of electrochemical biosensors. We report on the use of a biotin agarose bead-based, micropipette, electrochemical (Bio-BMP) biosensor to monitor H2O2 concentration and the use of a streptavidin bead-based, micropipette, electrochemical (SA-BMP) biosensor to detect DNA amplicons. The Bio-BMP biosensor’s response increased linearly as the H2O2 concentration increased in the range from 1×10−6 to 1.2×10−4 M with a detection limit of 5×10−7 M. The SA-BMP was able to detect the amplicons of 1 pg DNA template of B. Cereus bacteria, thus providing better detection sensitivity than conventional gel-based electropherograms. PMID:19767195

  3. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  4. Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergei D.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2003-06-01

    Molecular dynamics formulation of Bead-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the bead coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of beads and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of beads. The proposed Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.

  5. Digital magnetic tagging for multiplexed suspension-based biochemical assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrelias, T.; Trypiniotis, T.; Palfreyman, J. J.; Hong, B.; Vyas, K.; Hayward, T. J.; Llandro, J.; Kopper, K. P.; Bland, J. A. C.; Robertson, P. A.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2009-04-01

    Microarrays and suspension (or bead)-based technologies have attracted significant interest for their broad applications in high throughput molecular biology. However, the throughput of microarrays will always be limited by the array density and the slow diffusion of molecules to their binding sites. Suspension-based technologies, in which all the reactions take place directly on the surface of microcarriers functionalized with molecular probes, could offer true multiplexing due to the possibility of extending their detection capability by a straightforward expansion of the size of the chemical library of probes. To fully exploit their potential, the microcarriers must be tagged, but the number of distinct codes available from spectrometric/graphical/physical encoding methods is currently fairly limited. A digital magnetic tagging method based on magnetic microtags, which have been anisotropy engineered to provide stable magnetization directions which correspond to digital codes, is reported. The tags can be suspended in solution and functionalized with a variety of biological molecular probes. Magnetic tagging offers several benefits compared to the traditional optical encoding techniques currently employed. It offers minimal background signals, potential for a large number of distinct codes, miniaturization of devices, and the ability to write a code in situ. Experimental data showing the reading of individual magnetic microbars from samples comprising 50×20 μm2 Ni elements, as well as micromagnetic simulations that show the feasibility of stray field detection, are presented. The stray fields of the magnetic microbars spanning a range of 60 mOe were detected by a microfabricated fluxgate sensor scanned in a raster fashion over the sample that was placed about 70 μm away. Free floating tags have also been fabricated for use in microfluidic systems. A magnetic lab-on-a-chip device could be used for tagging biomolecular probes for applications in genome

  6. Control of microparticles packing density in a microfluidic channel for bead based immunoassays applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Robledo, Gabriel; Guevara-Pantoja, Pablo

    2014-11-01

    Bead based immunoassays in microfluidic devices have shown to greatly outperform conventional methods. But if functional point-of-care devices are to be developed, precise and reproducible control over the granulate packings inside microchannels is needed. In this work we study the efficiency of a nanoparticles magnetic trap previously developed by B. Teste et al. [Lab Chip 11, 4207 (2011)] when we vary the compaction of micrometric iron beads packed against a restriction inside a microfluidic channel. The packing density of the beads is finely and reproducibly changed by applying a vibrational protocol originally developed for macroscopic, dry granular systems. We find, counterintuitively, that the most compact and stable packings are up to four times less efficient in trapping nano particles than the loosest packings. This work has been supported by Conacyt, Mexico, under Grant No. 180873.

  7. Alternate polyelectrolyte coating of chitosan beads for extending drug release.

    PubMed

    Srinatha, A; Pandit, Jayanta K

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we addressed the factors modifying ciprofloxacin release from multiple coated beads. Beads were prepared by simple ionic cross-linking with sodium tripolyphoshate and coated with alginate and/or chitosan to prepare single, double, or multilayered beads. The water uptake capacity depended on the nature of beads (coated or uncoated) and pH of test medium. The number of coatings given to the beads influenced ciprofloxacin release rate. The coating significantly decreased the drug release from the beads in comparison to uncoated beads (p < 0.001). When the beads were given three coatings, viz., alginate, chitosan, and again alginate, the drug release appeared to follow the pattern exhibited by colon-targeted drug delivery systems with time dependent release behavior. The increase in coating formed a barrier for easy ingress of dissolution medium into the bead matrix, reducing the diffusion of drug.

  8. Extraction and labeling methods for microarrays using small amounts of plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Alexander J; Pereira, Rhea S; Kiss, John Z; Correll, Melanie J

    2009-03-01

    Procedures were developed to maximize the yield of high-quality RNA from small amounts of plant biomass for microarrays. Two disruption techniques (bead milling and pestle and mortar) were compared for the yield and the quality of RNA extracted from 1-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings (approximately 0.5-30 mg total biomass). The pestle and mortar method of extraction showed enhanced RNA quality at the smaller biomass samples compared with the bead milling technique, although the quality in the bead milling could be improved with additional cooling steps. The RNA extracted from the pestle and mortar technique was further tested to determine if the small quantity of RNA (500 ng-7 microg) was appropriate for microarray analyses. A new method of low-quantity RNA labeling for microarrays (NuGEN Technologies, Inc.) was used on five 7-day-old seedlings (approximately 2.5 mg fresh weight total) of Arabidopsis that were grown in the dark and exposed to 1 h of red light or continued dark. Microarray analyses were performed on a small plant sample (five seedlings; approximately 2.5 mg) using these methods and compared with extractions performed with larger biomass samples (approximately 500 roots). Many well-known light-regulated genes between the small plant samples and the larger biomass samples overlapped in expression changes, and the relative expression levels of selected genes were confirmed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, suggesting that these methods can be used for plant experiments where the biomass is extremely limited (i.e. spaceflight studies).

  9. Effects of Cohesion On the Dynamic Response of A Conical Bead Pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchoudhuri, Paroma; Lehman, Susan; Jacobs, D. T.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the critical behavior of a 3D conical bead pile built from uniform 3 mm steel spheres. The pile is initially built on a circular base and is subsequently slowly driven through the addition of one bead at a time to the apex of the pile. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches from the pile over the course of tens of thousands of bead drops, and determining the resulting distribution of avalanche size. In previous work, we have shown that dropping the beads onto the pile from a greater height causes the distribution to deviate from a simple power law due to a stark reduction in number of the largest avalanches. By placing the pile in a uniform magnetic field, we are now observing changes in the avalanche size distribution due to cohesion. When there is cohesion between beads, we find an increase in probability for the largest avalanches and a strong decrease in the probability of medium-sized avalanches. We also observe an increase in the time between avalanches as the cohesion of the system increases. Preliminary results on the effect of simultaneously increasing cohesion, which tends to make large avalanches more probable, and increasing drop height, which tends to make large avalanches less probable, will also be presented.

  10. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  11. Bead and Process for Removing Dissolved Metal Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Bobby L., Jr.; Bennett, Karen L.; Foster, Scott A.

    2005-01-18

    A bead is provided which comprises or consists essentially of activated carbon immobilized by crosslinked poly (carboxylic acid) binder, sodium silicate binder, or polyamine binder. The bead is effective to remove metal and other ionic contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions. A method of making metal-ion sorbing beads is provided, comprising combining activated carbon, and binder solution (preferably in a pin mixer where it is whipped), forming wet beads, and heating and drying the beads. The binder solution is preferably poly(acrylic acid) and glycerol dissolved in water and the wet beads formed from such binder solution are preferably heated and crosslinked in a convection oven.

  12. Two Year Old With Water Bead Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jami; Randell, Kimberly A; Knapp, Jane F

    2015-08-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common pediatric complaint. Two case reports describe intestinal obstruction in children from an ingestion of a single superabsorbent water ball, requiring surgical removal. We describe nonsurgical management of an asymptomatic child who ingested approximately 100 superabsorbent water beads.Because of the risk for subsequent intestinal obstruction, the patient was admitted for whole bowel irrigation. This case report is the first describing use of whole bowel irrigation in the management of an asymptomatic patient with multiple water beads ingestion.

  13. BACs-on-beads: a new robust and rapid detection method for prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Choy, Richard Kwong Wai; Chen, Ying; Sun, Xiao-Fang; Kwok, Yvonne Ka Yin; Leung, Tak Yeung

    2014-04-01

    Karyotyping, the gold standard used for diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities, is being progressively replaced by rapid aneuploidy testing (RAT) techniques such as quantitative fluorescence-PCR, FISH and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for diagnosing the common aneuploidies or chromosomal microarray analysis for comprehensive genome-wide testing. However, due to technical limitations, current RATs are confined to the detection of common aneuploidies 13, 18, 21 and sex chromosomes. To overcome the limitations of RATs, a bacterial artificial chromosomes-on-beads (BoBs™) assay technology has been introduced for the detection of the common aneuploidies as well as specific microdeletion syndromes. The BoBs assay is a bead-based multiplex assay using polystyrene beads impregnated with two spectrally distinct infrared fluorochromes to create a liquid array of up to 100 unique spectral signatures that supports the analysis of that scale of simultaneous hybridization assays on a minute DNA sample. This review gives an overview on the collective experiences of BoBs applications in prenatal diagnosis.

  14. Microarray Technologies in Fungal Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Microarray technologies have been a major research tool in the last decades. In addition they have been introduced into several fields of diagnostics including diagnostics of infectious diseases. Microarrays are highly parallelized assay systems that initially were developed for multiparametric nucleic acid detection. From there on they rapidly developed towards a tool for the detection of all kind of biological compounds (DNA, RNA, proteins, cells, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, etc.) or their modifications (methylation, phosphorylation, etc.). The combination of closed-tube systems and lab on chip devices with microarrays further enabled a higher automation degree with a reduced contamination risk. Microarray-based diagnostic applications currently complement and may in the future replace classical methods in clinical microbiology like blood cultures, resistance determination, microscopic and metabolic analyses as well as biochemical or immunohistochemical assays. In addition, novel diagnostic markers appear, like noncoding RNAs and miRNAs providing additional room for novel nucleic acid based biomarkers. Here I focus an microarray technologies in diagnostics and as research tools, based on nucleic acid-based arrays.

  15. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  16. Latex beads as probes of a neural crest pathway: effects of laminin, collagen, and surface charge on bead translocation

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    In the trunk region of avian embryos, neural crest cells migrate along two pathways: dorsally just under the ectoderm, and ventrally between the neural tube and the somites. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that uncoated latex beads are able to translocate along the ventral neural crest pathway after injection into young embryos; however, beads coated with fibronectin are restricted from the ventral route ( Bronner -Fraser, M.E., 1982, Dev. Biol., 91: 50-63). Here, we extend these observations to determine the effects of other macromolecules on bead distribution. The data show that laminin-coated beads, like fibronectin-coated beads, are restricted from the ventral pathway. In contrast, beads coated with type I collagen translocate ventrally after injection. Because macromolecules have characteristic charge properties, changes in surface charge caused by coating the beads may confound interpretation of the results. Electrostatic effects on bead movement were examined by coating the latex beads with polyamino acids in order to predictably alter the initial surface charge. The surface charge before injection was measured for beads coated with amino acid polymers or with various biologically important macromolecules; the subsequent translocation ability of these beads was then monitored in the embryo. Polylysine-coated beads (positively charged) were restricted from the ventral pathway as were fibronectin and laminin-coated beads, even though fibronectin and laminin beads were both negatively charged. In contrast, polytyrosine -coated beads ( neutrally charged) translocated ventrally as did negatively charged collagen-coated or uncoated beads. The results demonstrate that no correlation exists between the charge properties on the latex bead surface and their subsequent ability to translocate along the ventral pathway. Therefore, an adhesion mechanism independent of surface charge effects must explain the restriction or translocation of latex beads on a

  17. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  18. Monoclonal antibody selection for interleukin-4 quantification using suspension arrays and forward-phase protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Cole, K D; Peterson, A; He, Hua-Jun; Gaigalas, A K; Zong, Y

    2007-12-01

    A recombinant mouse interleukin-4 (IL-4) and three different purified rat antimouse IL-4 monoclonal antibodies (Mab) with different clonalities were employed as a model system. This system was used to examine monoclonal antibody effectiveness using both conventional and high-throughput measurement techniques to select antibodies for attaining the most sensitive detection of the recombinant IL-4 through the "sandwich-type" immunoassays. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements and two high-throughput methods, suspension arrays (also called multiplexed bead arrays) and forward-phase protein microarrays, predicted the same capture (BVD4-1D11) and detection (BVD6-24G2) antibody pair for the most sensitive detection of the recombinant cytokine. By using this antibody pair, we were able to detect as low as 2 pg/mL of IL-4 in buffer solution and 13.5 pg/mL of IL-4 spiked in 100% normal mouse serum with the multiplexed bead arrays. Due to the large amount of material required for SPR measurements, the study suggests that the multiplexed bead arrays and protein microarrays are both suited for the selection of numerous antibodies against the same analyte of interest to meet the need in the areas of systems biology and reproducible clinical diagnostics for better patient care.

  19. Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using immuno beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-I.; Gehring, Andrew

    2005-11-01

    A new fluorescent sandwich method for the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was developed. Strepavidin coated magnetic beads and fluorescence beads reacted with biotinylated anti E. coli O157 antibodies to form the immuno magnetic beads (IMB) and immuno fluorescence beads (IFB), respectively. The E. coli bacteria captured by IMB were further labeled with IFB to form IMBM-(E. coliO157:H7)N-IFBO sandwich complexes where the subscripts M, N and O were integral numbers. Using broth cultured E. coli O157:H7, the sandwich method was able to detect the bacteria at the level of ~ 103to 104 CFU/mL. Known quantity of freshly cultured E. coli O157:H7 cells were added to ground beef obtained from local markets. The bacteria in inoculated beef patties were enriched in EC broth containing novobiocin. After enriched for 4 h at 40 °C, the developed IMB-IFB method was applied to detect the presence of E. coli O157:H7. The results demonstrated that the developed method could detect the presence of 1 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 per gram of ground beef.

  20. Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David S.; Mcferrin, David C.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.; Coby, John B., Jr.; Dawson, Sidney G.

    1995-01-01

    Cutting tool proposed for use in shaving weld beads flush with adjacent surfaces of weldments. Modified version of commercial pneumatically driven rotary cutting tool, cutting wheel of which turns at speeds sufficient for machining nickel alloys, titanium, and stainless steels. Equipped with forward-mounted handle and rear-mounted skid plate to maximize control and reduce dependence on skill of technician.

  1. Gel bead composition for metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Charles D.; Woodward, Charlene A.; Byers, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    The invention is a gel bead comprising propylene glycol alginate and bone gelatin and is capable of removing metals such as Sr and Cs from solution without adding other adsorbents. The invention could have application to the nuclear industry's waste removal activities.

  2. Gel bead composition for metal adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Woodward, Charlene A.; Byers, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a gel bead comprising propylene glycol alginate and bone gelatin and is capable of removing metals such as Sr and Cs from solution without adding other adsorbents. The invention could have application to the nuclear industry's waste removal activities.

  3. Wood mimetic hydrogel beads for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Park, Saerom; Kim, Sung Hee; Won, Keehoon; Choi, Joon Weon; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-22

    Wood component-based composite hydrogels have potential applications in biomedical fields owing to their low cost, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. The controllable properties of wood mimetic composites containing three major wood components are useful for enzyme immobilization. Here, lipase from Candida rugosa was entrapped in wood mimetic beads containing cellulose, xylan, and lignin by dissolving wood components with lipase in [Emim][Ac], followed by reconstitution. Lipase entrapped in cellulose/xylan/lignin beads in a 5:3:2 ratio showed the highest activity; this ratio is very similar to that in natural wood. The lipase entrapped in various wood mimetic beads showed increased thermal and pH stability. The half-life times of lipase entrapped in cellulose/alkali lignin hydrogel were 31- and 82-times higher than those of free lipase during incubation under denaturing conditions of high temperature and low pH, respectively. Owing to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and controllable properties, wood mimetic hydrogel beads can be used to immobilize various enzymes for applications in the biomedical, bioelectronic, and biocatalytic fields.

  4. Effect of Cellulose Acetate Beads on Interleukin-23 Release.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23, which is released by activated monocytes and neutrophils, promotes production of high levels of IL-17 by T-helper 17 cells. Cellulose acetate (CA) beads are used as carriers for granulocyte and monocyte (GM) adsorptive apheresis using Adacolumn. Contact between blood and CA beads induces cytokine release; however, their inflammatory effects on IL-23 release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA beads on IL-23 release in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA beads and measured IL-23. Compared to blood samples incubated without CA beads, blood samples incubated with CA beads had significantly decreased amounts of IL-23. In conclusion, CA beads inhibited IL-23 release from adsorbed GMs. The biological effects of this decrease in IL-23 release during GM adsorption to CA beads need further clarification.

  5. Cell membrane deformations under magnetic force modulation characterized by optical tracking and non-interferometric widefield profilometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Jian, Hung-Jhang; Wu, Chih-Wei; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2008-08-01

    We measured cell membrane deformations under the modulation of piconewton magnetic force by using optical tracking and noninterferometric widefield optical profilometry. The magnetic force was applied to fibronectin-coated paramagnetic beads that bound to transmembrane protein integrins. At an image-acquisition rate of 20 frame/min, optical tracking provided positioning accuracy better than 70 nm for bead displacements on cell membranes, and optical profilometry obtained membrane topography with 20 nm depth resolution. We elucidated the correlation between the bead movements and membrane deformations. When the magnetic force dominated the bead movements, the membrane arose in front of the bead and the height increased with the bead velocity. On the other hand, when the bead was mainly driven by the cytoskeletons, the membrane profiles showed no relevance to the motion of the bead. In this case, the bead moved faster on smooth membranes. A model based on the dynamics of actin cytoskeletons is proposed to explain these observation results.

  6. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors for DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Yu, Heng; Han, Shu-Jen; Osterfeld, Sebastian; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are developed for a DNA microarray. Compared with the conventional fluorescent sensors, GMR sensors are cheaper, more sensitive, can generate fully electronic signals, and can be easily integrated with electronics and microfluidics. The GMR sensor used in this work has a bottom spin valve structure with an MR ratio of 12%. The single-strand target DNA detected has a length of 20 bases. Assays with DNA concentrations down to 10 pM were performed, with a dynamic range of 3 logs. A double modulation technique was used in signal detection to reduce the 1/f noise in the sensor while circumventing electromagnetic interference. The logarithmic relationship between the magnetic signal and the target DNA concentration can be described by the Temkin isotherm. Furthermore, GMR sensors integrated with microfluidics has great potential of improving the sensitivity to 1 pM or below, and the total assay time can be reduced to less than 1 hour. PMID:20824116

  7. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  8. Metal-Containing Polystyrene Beads as Standards for Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed I; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Kinach, Robert; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C; Tanner, Scott; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the suitability of metal-containing polystyrene beads for the calibration of a mass cytometer instrument, a single particle analyser based on an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a time of flight mass spectrometer. These metal-containing beads are also verified for their use as internal standards for this instrument. These beads were synthesized by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with acrylic acid as a comonomer. Acrylic acid acts as a ligand to anchor the metal ions within the interior of the beads. Mass cytometry enabled the bead-by-bead measurement of the metal-content and determination of the metal-content distribution. Beads synthesized by dispersion polymerization that involved three stages were shown to have narrower bead-to-bead variation in their lanthanide content than beads synthesized by 2-stage dispersion polymerization. The beads exhibited insignificant release of their lanthanide content to aqueous solutions of different pHs over a period of six months. When mixed with KG1a or U937 cell lines, metal-containing polymer beads were shown not to affect the mass cytometry response to the metal content of element-tagged antibodies specifically attached to these cells.

  9. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  10. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  11. Green stone beads at the dawn of agriculture.

    PubMed

    Bar-Yosef Mayer, Daniella E; Porat, Naomi

    2008-06-24

    The use of beads and other personal ornaments is a trait of modern human behavior. During the Middle and Upper Paleolithic periods, beads were made out of shell, bone, ivory, egg shell, and occasionally of minerals. During the transition to agriculture in the Near East, stone, in particular green stone, was used for the first time to make beads and pendants. We observed that a large variety of minerals of green colors were sought, including apatite, several copper-bearing minerals, amazonite and serpentinite. There seems to be an increase with time of distance from which the green minerals were sought. Because beads in white, red, yellow, brown, and black colors had been used previously, we suggest that the occurrence of green beads is directly related to the onset of agriculture. Green beads and bead blanks were used as amulets to ward off the evil eye and as fertility charms.

  12. Discrete dipole approximation simulation of bead enhanced diffraction grating biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Khalid Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    We present the discrete dipole approximation simulation of light scattering from bead enhanced diffraction biosensor and report the effect of bead material, number of beads forming the grating and spatial randomness on the diffraction intensities of 1st and 0th orders. The dipole models of gratings are formed by volume slicing and image processing while the spatial locations of the beads on the substrate surface are randomly computed using discrete probability distribution. The effect of beads reduction on far-field scattering of 632.8 nm incident field, from fully occupied gratings to very coarse gratings, is studied for various bead materials. Our findings give insight into many difficult or experimentally impossible aspects of this genre of biosensors and establish that bead enhanced grating may be used for rapid and precise detection of small amounts of biomolecules. The results of simulations also show excellent qualitative similarities with experimental observations.

  13. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  14. Sensitivity Enhancement of Bead-based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (BEIS) biosensor by electric field-focusing in microwells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Ji, Jae Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Jun, Seong Chan; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-11-15

    This paper reports a novel electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) biosensors that uses magnetic beads trapped in a microwell array to improve the sensitivity of conventional bead-based EIS (BEIS) biosensors. Unloading the previously measured beads by removing the magnetic bar enables the BEIS sensor to be used repeatedly by reloading it with new beads. Despite its recyclability, the sensitivity of conventional BEIS biosensors is so low that it has not attracted much attentions from the biosensor industry. We significantly improved the sensitivity of the BEIS system by introducing of a microwell array that contains two electrodes (a working electrode and a counter electrode) to concentrate the electric field on the surfaces of the beads. We confirmed that the performance of the BEIS sensor in a microwell array using an immunoassay of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in PBS buffer and human plasma. The experimental results showed that a low concentration of PSA (a few tens or hundreds of fg/mL) were detectable as a ratio of the changes in the impedance of the PBS buffer or in human plasma. Therefore, our BEIS sensor with a microwell array could be a promising platform for low cost, high-performance biosensors for applications that require high sensitivity and recyclability.

  15. Deterministic bead-in-droplet ejection utilizing an integrated plug-in bead dispenser for single bead–based applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hojin; Choi, In Ho; Lee, Sanghyun; Won, Dong-Joon; Oh, Yong Suk; Kwon, Donghoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Sangmin; Kim, Joonwon

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a deterministic bead-in-droplet ejection (BIDE) technique that regulates the precise distribution of microbeads in an ejected droplet. The deterministic BIDE was realized through the effective integration of a microfluidic single-particle handling technique with a liquid dispensing system. The integrated bead dispenser facilitates the transfer of the desired number of beads into a dispensing volume and the on-demand ejection of bead-encapsulated droplets. Single bead–encapsulated droplets were ejected every 3 s without any failure. Multiple-bead dispensing with deterministic control of the number of beads was demonstrated to emphasize the originality and quality of the proposed dispensing technique. The dispenser was mounted using a plug-socket type connection, and the dispensing process was completely automated using a programmed sequence without any microscopic observation. To demonstrate a potential application of the technique, bead-based streptavidin–biotin binding assay in an evaporating droplet was conducted using ultralow numbers of beads. The results evidenced the number of beads in the droplet crucially influences the reliability of the assay. Therefore, the proposed deterministic bead-in-droplet technology can be utilized to deliver desired beads onto a reaction site, particularly to reliably and efficiently enrich and detect target biomolecules. PMID:28393911

  16. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  17. DNA microarray technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, DNA microarray technology has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in a variety of skin diseases, including malignant melanoma, psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Many of the studies described herein confirmed earlier results on individual genes or functional groups of genes. However, a plethora of new candidate genes, gene patterns, and regulatory pathways have been identified. Major progresses were reached by the identification of a prognostic gene pattern in malignant melanoma, an immune signaling cluster in psoriasis, and a so-called interferon signature in systemic lupus erythematosus. In future, interference with genes or regulatory pathways with the use of different RNA interference technologies or targeted therapy may not only underscore the functional significance of microarray data but also may open interesting therapeutic perspectives. Large-scale gene expression analyses may also help to design more individualized treatment approaches of cutaneous diseases.

  18. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance.

  19. Lab-on-a-Chip Magneto-Immunoassays: How to Ensure Contact between Superparamagnetic Beads and the Sensor Surface

    PubMed Central

    Eickenberg, Bernhard; Meyer, Judith; Helmich, Lars; Kappe, Daniel; Auge, Alexander; Weddemann, Alexander; Wittbracht, Frank; Hütten, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip immuno assays utilizing superparamagnetic beads as labels suffer from the fact that the majority of beads pass the sensing area without contacting the sensor surface. Different solutions, employing magnetic forces, ultrasonic standing waves, or hydrodynamic effects have been found over the past decades. The first category uses magnetic forces, created by on-chip conducting lines to attract beads towards the sensor surface. Modifications of the magnetic landscape allow for additional transport and separation of different bead species. The hydrodynamic approach uses changes in the channel geometry to enhance the capture volume. In acoustofluidics, ultrasonic standing waves force µm-sized particles onto a surface through radiation forces. As these approaches have their disadvantages, a new sensor concept that circumvents these problems is suggested. This concept is based on the granular giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect that can be found in gels containing magnetic nanoparticles. The proposed design could be realized in the shape of paper-based test strips printed with gel-based GMR sensors. PMID:25586262

  20. Lab-on-a-Chip Magneto-Immunoassays: How to Ensure Contact between Superparamagnetic Beads and the Sensor Surface.

    PubMed

    Eickenberg, Bernhard; Meyer, Judith; Helmich, Lars; Kappe, Daniel; Auge, Alexander; Weddemann, Alexander; Wittbracht, Frank; Hütten, Andreas

    2013-09-17

    Lab-on-a-chip immuno assays utilizing superparamagnetic beads as labels suffer from the fact that the majority of beads pass the sensing area without contacting the sensor surface. Different solutions, employing magnetic forces, ultrasonic standing waves, or hydrodynamic effects have been found over the past decades. The first category uses magnetic forces, created by on-chip conducting lines to attract beads towards the sensor surface. Modifications of the magnetic landscape allow for additional transport and separation of different bead species. The hydrodynamic approach uses changes in the channel geometry to enhance the capture volume. In acoustofluidics, ultrasonic standing waves force µm-sized particles onto a surface through radiation forces. As these approaches have their disadvantages, a new sensor concept that circumvents these problems is suggested. This concept is based on the granular giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect that can be found in gels containing magnetic nanoparticles. The proposed design could be realized in the shape of paper-based test strips printed with gel-based GMR sensors.

  1. Demonstrations of the Action and Reaction Law and the Energy Conservation Law Using Fine Spherical Plastic Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khumaeni, A.; Tanaka, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Lee, Y. I.; Kurniawan, K. H.; Ishii, K.; Kagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Equipment for demonstrating Newton's third law and the energy conservation law in mechanics have successfully been constructed utilizing fine spherical plastic beads in place of metal ball bearings. To demonstrate Newton's third law, special magnetized Petri dishes were employed as objects, while to examine the energy conservation law, a…

  2. Analysis of inter-event times for avalanches on a conical bead pile with cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Susan; Johnson, Nathan; Tieman, Catherine; Wainwright, Elliot

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the critical behavior of a 3D conical bead pile built from uniform 3 mm steel spheres. Beads are added to the pile by dropping them onto the apex one at a time; avalanches are measured through changes in pile mass. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches from the pile over tens of thousands of bead drops. We have previously shown that the avalanche size distribution follows a power law for beads dropped onto the pile apex from a low drop height. We are now tuning the critical behavior of the system by adding cohesion from a uniform magnetic field and find an increase in both size and number for very large avalanches and decreases in the mid-size avalanches. The resulting bump in the avalanche distribution moves to larger avalanche size as the cohesion in the system is increased. We compare the experimental inter-event time distribution to both the Brownian passage-time and Weibull distributions, and observe a shift from the Weibull to Brownian passage-time as we raise the threshold from measuring time between events of all sizes to time between only the largest system-spanning events. These results are both consistent with those from a mean-field model of slip avalanches in a shear system [Dahmen, Nat Phys 7, 554 (2011)].

  3. Scaling Analysis And Tuning Parameters For Avalanches On A Slowly-Driven Conical Bead Pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Susan; Christman, Lilianna; Palchoudhuri, Paroma; Jacobs, D. T.

    2014-03-01

    We report the results of our investigation of the dynamic behavior of a 3D conical beadpile composed of 3 mm steel beads. Beads are added to the pile by dropping them onto the apex one at a time; avalanches are measured through changes in pile mass. We have previously shown that the avalanche size distribution generally follows a power law relation for beads dropped onto the pile apex from a low drop height; for higher drop heights or beads dropped over a larger region, the distribution deviates from a power law due to a reduction in the number of larger avalanches. We are now tuning the critical behavior of the system through the addition of cohesion from a uniform magnetic field, and we find an increase in the probability of very large avalanches and decreases in the mid-size avalanches. Similar distributions have been observed previously by other researchers in conical piles of sand, suggesting a possibility that cohesion may have been a factor. All our distributions without cohesion show universality by collapsing onto a common curve in a scaling analysis; so far no scaling has been found in the system with cohesion. The distribution of the time between avalanche events of various size has also been analyzed and shown to depend on both drop height and cohesion strength.

  4. Changes in the Distribution of Avalanches on a Conical Bead Pile with Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Justine; Lehman, Susan; Dahmen, Karin; Leblanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan

    The probability distributions for avalanches of varying size are experimentally determined for a slowly driven, conical bead pile. The pile is composed of roughly 20 000 steel spheres, 3 mm in diameter, atop a circular base; it is driven by adding one bead at a time to the apex of the pile. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches off the pile over the course of tens of thousands of bead drops. The avalanching behavior is studied at different drop heights and different amounts of cohesion between the beads. The level of cohesion is tuned through use of an applied uniform magnetic field. Smaller, local avalanches are distinguished from larger, non-local avalanches and the moments of the avalanche distribution are calculated separately for these different populations. The resulting moments scale with cohesion differently, and the results are compared to the scaling predictions from an analytic mean-field model and corresponding simulation of slip avalanches in a shear system [Dahmen, Nat Phys 7, 554 (2011)]. Research supported by NSF CBET 1336116 and 1336634.

  5. Tuning Parameters and Scaling For Avalanches On A Slowly-Driven Conical Bead Pile with Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Susan; Jacobs, D. T.; Palchoudhuri, Paroma; Vajpeyi, Avi; Walker, Justine; Dahmen, Karin; Leblanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan

    Slip avalanches on a slowly driven pile are investigated experimentally using a 3D conical pile built from uniform 3 mm steel beads. Beads are added to the pile by dropping them onto the apex one at a time; avalanches are measured through changes in pile mass. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches from the pile over the course of tens of thousands of bead drops. The statistical properties of the avalanches, including probability of particular avalanche sizes and the time between avalanches of given size, are well-characterized by universal power laws and scaling functions. By adding a uniform magnetic field, we may systematically vary the cohesion between the beads and tune the critical behavior of the system. As the cohesion increases we observe an increase in both size and number for very large avalanches and decreases in the mid-size avalanches, causing a deviation from the power law. A full study of the effect of cohesion on the size and time distributions is in process, combining the experimental results with predictions from an analytical mean-field model [Dahmen, Nat Phys 7, 554 (2011)]. Research supported by NSF CBET 1336116 and 1336634.

  6. Microarrays, antiobesity and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chávez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In this review, the microarray technology and especially oligonucleotide arrays are exemplified with a practical example taken from the perilipin−/− mice and using the dChip software, available for non-lucrative purposes. It was found that the liver of perilipin−/− mice was healthy and normal, even under high-fat diet when compared with the results published for the scd1−/− mice, which under high-fat diets had a darker liver, suggestive of hepatic steatosis. Scd1 is required for the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and plays a key role in the hepatic synthesis of triglycerides and of very-low-density lipoproteins. Both models of obesity resistance share many similar phenotypic antiobesity features, however, the perilipin−/− mice had a significant downregulation of stearoyl CoA desaturases scd1 and scd2 in its white adipose tissue, but a normal level of both genes inside the liver, even under high-fat diet. Here, different microarray methodologies are discussed, and also some of the most recent discoveries and perspectives regarding the use of microarrays, with an emphasis on obesity gene expression, and a personal remark on my findings of increased expression for hemoglobin transcripts and other hemo related genes (hemo-like), and for leukocyte like (leuko-like) genes inside the white adipose tissue of the perilipin−/− mice. In conclusion, microarrays have much to offer in comparative studies such as those in antiobesity, and also they are methodologies adequate for new astounding molecular discoveries [free full text of this article PMID:15657555

  7. Signal enhancement using a switchable magnetic trap

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald [Pleasanton, CA

    2012-05-29

    A system for analyzing a sample including providing a microchannel flow channel; associating the sample with magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads; moving the sample with said magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in the microchannel flow channel; holding the sample with the magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel; and analyzing the sample obtaining an enhanced analysis signal. An apparatus for analysis of a sample includes magnetic particles connected to the sample, a microchip, a flow channel in the microchip, a source of carrier fluid connected to the flow channel for moving the sample in the flow channel, an electromagnet trap connected to the flow line for selectively magnetically trapping the sample and the magnetic particles, and an analyzer for analyzing the sample.

  8. Discovery of novel integrin ligands from combinatorial libraries using a multiplex "beads on a bead" approach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Choi-Fong; Amadei, Giulio A; Breadner, Daniel; Luyt, Leonard G; Lewis, John D

    2012-11-14

    The development of screening approaches to identify novel affinity ligands has paved the way for a new generation of molecular targeted nanomedicines. Conventional methods typically bias the display of the target protein to ligands during the screening process. We have developed an unbiased multiplex "beads on a bead" strategy to isolate, characterize, and validate high affinity ligands from OBOC libraries. Novel non-RGD peptides that target α(v)β(3) integrin were discovered that do not affect cancer or endothelial cell biology. The peptides identified here represent novel integrin-targeted agents that can be used to develop targeted nanomedicines without the risk of increased tumor invasion and metastasis.

  9. A bead-based western for high-throughput cellular signal transduction analyses

    PubMed Central

    Treindl, Fridolin; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Beiter, Yvonne; Schultz, Silke; Döttinger, Anette; Staebler, Annette; Joos, Thomas O.; Kling, Simon; Poetz, Oliver; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans; Kuster, Bernhard; Templin, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Dissecting cellular signalling requires the analysis of large number of proteins. The DigiWest approach we describe here transfers the western blot to a bead-based microarray platform. By combining gel-based protein separation with immobilization on microspheres, hundreds of replicas of the initial blot are created, thus enabling the comprehensive analysis of limited material, such as cells collected by laser capture microdissection, and extending traditional western blotting to reach proteomic scales. The combination of molecular weight resolution, sensitivity and signal linearity on an automated platform enables the rapid quantification of hundreds of specific proteins and protein modifications in complex samples. This high-throughput western blot approach allowed us to identify and characterize alterations in cellular signal transduction that occur during the development of resistance to the kinase inhibitor Lapatinib, revealing major changes in the activation state of Ephrin-mediated signalling and a central role for p53-controlled processes. PMID:27659302

  10. Medical protein separation system using high gradient magnetic separation by superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, Y.; Agatsuma, K.; Kajikawa, K.; Ueda, H.; Furuse, M.; Fuchino, S.; Iitsuka, T.; Nakamura, S.

    2014-01-01

    A high gradient magnetic separation system for medical protein using affinity magnetic nano-beads has been developed. Medical protein such as monoclonal antibody or immunoglobulin is an important substance as a medicine for cancer etc. However; the separation system of these medical protein has very low separation rate and the cost of product is extremely high. The developed system shows very high separation efficiency and can achieve low cost by large production rate compared to the system now using in this field. The system consists of a 3T superconducting magnet cooled by a cryo-cooler, a filter made of fine magnetic metal wires of about 30μm diameter and a demagnetization circuit and a liquid circulation pump for solvent containing medical protein. Affinity magnetic nano-beads is covered with the medical protein after agitation of solvent containing the protein and nano-beads, then the solvent flows through the system and the beads are trapped in the filters by high gradient magnetic field. The beads are released and flow out of the system by the AC demagnetization of the filters using LC resonance circuits after discharge of the magnet. The test results shows 97.8% of the magnetic nano-beads in pure water were captured and 94.1% of total beads were collected.

  11. Assembly of ordered microsphere arrays: Platforms for microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wanling

    Microarrays are powerful tools in gene expression assessment, protein profiling, and protein function screening, as well as cell and tissue analysis. With thousands of small array spots assembled in an ordered array, these small devices makes it possible to screen for multiple targets in a fast, parallel, high-throughput manner. The well-developed technology of DNA microarrays, also called DNA chips, has proved successful in all kinds of biological experiments, including the human genome-sequencing project. The development of protein arrays has lagged behind that of DNA arrays mainly because of the greater complexity of proteins. Some parts of the microarray technology can be transplanted into the realm of protein arrays, while others cannot. The challenges from the complexity of protein targets demand more robust and powerful devices. Traditional planar arrays, in which proteins bind directly to a planar surface, have a drawback in that some proteins will be denatured or cluster together after immobilization. Microsphere-based microarrays represent a more advanced strategy. The functional proteins are first attached to microspheres; these microspheres are then immobilized in arrays on a planar surface. In this dissertation, two approaches to assembling arrays of microspheres will be discussed. The hydrodynamic approach uses surface micromachining and Deep Reactive Ion Etching techniques to form an array of channels through a silicon wafer. By drawing fluid containing the microspheres through the channels they become trapped in the channels and thereby immobilized. In the magnetic approach, permalloy films are deposited on a silicon substrate and subsequently patterned to form magnetic attachment sites. An external magnetic field is then applied and the magnetic microspheres then assemble on these sites. Both devices are able to immobilize microspheres in an ordered array, as opposed to coarsely grouping them in array spots. The assembled arrays are robust in that

  12. Multiplexed bead-based mesofluidic system for detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sheng-Quan; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2009-11-01

    In the present study, a simple and rapid multiplexed bead-based mesofluidic system (BMS) was developed for simultaneous detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Enterobacter sakazakii, Shigella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Campylobacter jejuni. This system is based on utilization of isothiocyanate-modified microbeads that are 250 mum in diameter, which were immobilized with specific amino-modified oligonucleotide probes and placed in polydimethylsiloxane microchannels. PCR products from the pathogens studied were pumped into microchannels to hybridize with the oligonucleotide-modified beads, and hybridization signals were detected using a conventional microarray scanner. The short sequences of nucleic acids (21 bases) and PCR products characteristic of bacterial pathogens could be detected at concentrations of 1 pM and 10 nM, respectively. The detection procedure could be performed in less than 30 min with high sensitivity and specificity. The assay was simple and fast, and the limits of quantification were in the range from 500 to 6,000 CFU/ml for the bacterial species studied. The feasibility of identification of food-borne bacteria was investigated with samples contaminated with bacteria, including milk, egg, and meat samples. The results demonstrated that the BMS method can be used for effective detection of multiple pathogens in different foodstuffs.

  13. Surface characterization of carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Scurr, David J; Horlacher, Tim; Oberli, Matthias A; Werz, Daniel B; Kroeck, Lenz; Bufali, Simone; Seeberger, Peter H; Shard, Alexander G; Alexander, Morgan R

    2010-11-16

    Carbohydrate microarrays are essential tools to determine the biological function of glycans. Here, we analyze a glycan array by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to gain a better understanding of the physicochemical properties of the individual spots and to improve carbohydrate microarray quality. The carbohydrate microarray is prepared by piezo printing of thiol-terminated sugars onto a maleimide functionalized glass slide. The hyperspectral ToF-SIMS imaging data are analyzed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to discern secondary ions from regions of the array containing saccharide, linker, salts from the printing buffer, and the background linker chemistry. Analysis of secondary ions from the linker common to all of the sugar molecules employed reveals a relatively uniform distribution of the sugars within the spots formed from solutions with saccharide concentration of 0.4 mM and less, whereas a doughnut shape is often formed at higher-concentration solutions. A detailed analysis of individual spots reveals that in the larger spots the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) salts are heterogeneously distributed, apparently resulting in saccharide concentrated at the rim of the spots. A model of spot formation from the evaporating sessile drop is proposed to explain these observations. Saccharide spot diameters increase with saccharide concentration due to a reduction in surface tension of the saccharide solution compared to PBS. The multivariate analytical partial least squares (PLS) technique identifies ions from the sugars that in the complex ToF-SIMS spectra correlate with the binding of galectin proteins.

  14. Dispersion of fine phosphor particles by newly developed beads mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joni, I. Made; Panatarani, C.; Maulana, Dwindra W.

    2016-02-01

    Fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles has advanced properties compare to conventional particles applied for compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) as three band phosphor. However, suspension of fine particles easily agglomerated during preparation of spray coating of the CFL tube. Therefore, it is introduced newly developed beads mill system to disperse fine phosphor. The beads mill consist of glass beads, dispersing chamber (impellers), separator chamber, slurry pump and motors. The first important performance of beads mill is the performance of the designed on separating the beads with the suspended fine particles. We report the development of beads mill and its separation performance vary in flow rate and separator rotation speeds. The 27 kg of glass beads with 30 µm in size was poured into dispersing chamber and then water was pumped continuously through the slurry pump. The samples for the separation test was obtained every 1 hours vary in rotation speed and slurry flow rate. The results shows that the separation performance was 99.99 % obtained for the rotation speed of >1000 rpm and flow rate of 8 L/minute. The performances of the system was verified by dispersing fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles with concentration 1 wt.%. From the observed size distribution of particles after beads mill, it is concluded that the current design of bead mill effectively dispersed fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+.

  15. Adsorption of CO2 by alginate immobilized zeolite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kunarti, E. S.; Aprilita, N. H.; Pamurtya, I. C.

    2017-03-01

    Immobilized zeolit in alginate beads for adsorption of CO2 was developed. Alginate immobilized zeolit beads was generated by dropping the mixture of Na-alginate and zeolite solution into Ca2+ solution. The adsorption efficacy such as the influence of contact time, mass of zeolite, flowrate of CO2, and mass of adsorbent was evaluated. The adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolit beads was investigated by performing both equilibrium and kinetic batch test. Bead was characterized by FTIR and SEM. Alginate immobilized zeolit beads demonstrated significantly higher sorption efficacy compared to plain alginate beads and zeolite with 0.25 mmol CO2 adsorbed /g adsorbent. Optimum condition was achieved with mass composition of alginate:zeolite (3:1), flowrate 50 mL/min for 20 minutes. The alginate immobilized zeolit beads showed that adsorption of CO2 followed Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolite beads is a physisorption with adsorption energy of 6.37 kJ/mol. This results indicates that the alginate immobilized zeolit beads can be used as promising adsorbents for CO2.

  16. Diagnostic challenges for multiplexed protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Master, Stephen R; Bierl, Charlene; Kricka, Larry J

    2006-11-01

    Multiplexed protein analysis using planar microarrays or microbeads is growing in popularity for simultaneous assays of antibodies, cytokines, allergens, drugs and hormones. However, this new assay format presents several new operational issues for the clinical laboratory, such as the quality control of protein-microarray-based assays, the release of unrequested test data and the use of diagnostic algorithms to transform microarray data into diagnostic results.

  17. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  18. A highly sensitive and accurate gene expression analysis by sequencing ("bead-seq") for a single cell.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Hiroko; Goto, Mari; Arikawa, Koji; Shirai, Masataka; Tsunoda, Hiroyuki; Huang, Huan; Kambara, Hideki

    2015-02-15

    Analyses of gene expressions in single cells are important for understanding detailed biological phenomena. Here, a highly sensitive and accurate method by sequencing (called "bead-seq") to obtain a whole gene expression profile for a single cell is proposed. A key feature of the method is to use a complementary DNA (cDNA) library on magnetic beads, which enables adding washing steps to remove residual reagents in a sample preparation process. By adding the washing steps, the next steps can be carried out under the optimal conditions without losing cDNAs. Error sources were carefully evaluated to conclude that the first several steps were the key steps. It is demonstrated that bead-seq is superior to the conventional methods for single-cell gene expression analyses in terms of reproducibility, quantitative accuracy, and biases caused during sample preparation and sequencing processes.

  19. Magnetophoretic bead trapping in a high-flowrate biological detection system.

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul C.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Rahimian, Kamayar; Martin, James Ellis; Anderson, G. Ronald; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea; Lemp, Thomas; Derzon, Mark Steven; James, Conrad D.

    2005-03-01

    This report contains the summary of the 'Magnetophoretic Bead Trapping in a High-Flowrate Biological Detection System' LDRD project 74795. The objective of this project is to develop a novel biodetection system for high-throughput sample analysis. The chief application of this system is in detection of very low concentrations of target molecules from a complex liquid solution containing many different constituents--some of which may interfere with identification of the target molecule. The system is also designed to handle air sampling by using an aerosol system (for instance a WESP - Wet Electro-Static Precipitator, or an impact spray system) to get air sample constituents into the liquid volume. The system described herein automatically takes the raw liquid sample, whether air converted or initially liquid matrix, and mixes in magnetic detector beads that capture the targets of interest and then performs the sample cleanup function, allowing increased sensitivity and eliminating most false positives and false negatives at a downstream detector. The surfaces of the beads can be functionalized in a variety of ways in order to maximize the number of targets to be captured and concentrated. Bacteria and viruses are captured using antibodies to surface proteins on bacterial cell walls or viral particle coats. In combination with a cell lysis or PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), the beads can be used as a DNA or RNA probe to capture nucleic acid patterns of interest. The sample cleanup capability of this system would allow different raw biological samples, such as blood or saliva to be analyzed for the presence of different infectious agents (e.g. smallpox or SARS). For future studies, we envision functionalizing bead surfaces to bind to chemical weapons agents, radio-isotopes, and explosives. The two main objectives of this project were to explore methods for enhancing the mixing of the capture microspheres in the sample, and to develop a novel high-throughput magnetic

  20. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  1. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  2. Clustering Short Time-Series Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Loh Wei; Hasan, Yahya Abu

    2008-01-01

    Most microarray analyses are carried out on static gene expressions. However, the dynamical study of microarrays has lately gained more attention. Most researches on time-series microarray emphasize on the bioscience and medical aspects but few from the numerical aspect. This study attempts to analyze short time-series microarray mathematically using STEM clustering tool which formally preprocess data followed by clustering. We next introduce the Circular Mould Distance (CMD) algorithm with combinations of both preprocessing and clustering analysis. Both methods are subsequently compared in terms of efficiencies.

  3. ROMPgel beads in IRORI format: acylations revisited.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard S

    2005-01-01

    Functionalized "designer" polymers derived from ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMPgels) are attractive for their high loading, high purity, and ease of synthesis. Their physical state may vary from liquid to gel to granular solid, making a general method of handling these polymers difficult. By incorporating a suitable norbornene-substituted linker on standard Wang beads, ROMPgels can be easily grafted onto the resin, adding the convenience of a bead format while still maintaining the high loading and excellent site accessibility. This advantage is demonstrated by the use of an N-hydroxysuccinimide ROMPgel (3.3 mmol g(-1), a 3-fold increase from the parent linker resin) in IRORI Kan format. Conditions for the acylation of these IRORI-formatted ROMPgels are reported, along with the scope and limitations of the choice of acylating reagents. Yields are greatly improved by the use of perfluorinated solvents as a nonparticipating cosolvent in the acylation process. A simple titration method for the quantification of the acylated ROMPgels is also reported. Spent Kans are regenerated after each use without apparent loss of activity or purity after several cycles. Due to the high loading and reduced swelling of the ROMPgel resin, up to 0.39 mmol acyl group has successfully been recovered from a single IRORI miniKan, demonstrating the high capacity of the resin and applicability to both lead discovery and optimization programs.

  4. Development of a novel bead-based 96-well filtration plate competitive immunoassay for the detection of Gentamycin.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tien Yu Jessica; Chan, Chia-Chung; Chan, KinGho; Wang, Yu Chieh; Lin, Jing-Tang; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2013-11-15

    We developed a sensitive, simple, inexpensive and rapid bead-based immunoassay platform, composed of liposomal nanovesicle amplification system, Gentamycin sulfate beads and 96-well filtration plates. In the beginning of the assay, Gentamycin sulfate beads, Gentamycin sulfate and Gentamycin specific antibody were incubated in a bottom-sealed 96-well filtration plate. After incubation, washing was done by running washing buffer through the unsealed filtration plate with only gravity and the antibody-Gentamycin bead complexes were retained in the plate. Fluorescent dye-loaded protein G-liposomal nanovesicles were then added to specifically bind to antibodies on the retained beads. After washing unbound nanovesicles, millions of fluorescent dye molecules were released by adding a detergent solution to lyse liposomal nanovesicles. The limit of detection (LOD) of this novel detection platform in TBS and in skim milk were 52.65 ng/mL and 14.16 ng/mL, which are both sufficient for detecting the 200 ng/mL Codex maximum residual level (MRL). The dynamic ranges were both from each of their LODs to 100 μg/mL. The 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) in TBS and skim milk were 199.66 ng/mL and 360.81 ng/mL, respectively. We also demonstrated the good specificity of this platform by comparing detection results between pure Gentamycin solution and a mixture solution of 6 different antibiotics including Gentamycin in skim milk. The entire assay with 60 samples was conducted within 2h. In sum, this novel biosensing platform not only fulfilled most benefits of magnetic bead-based assays, but also was inexpensive and convenient by replacing the magnetic separation with filtration plate separation.

  5. Characterization of a novel intrinsically radiopaque Drug-eluting Bead for image-guided therapy: DC Bead LUMI™.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Koorosh; Tang, Yiqing; Britton, Hugh; Domenge, Orianne; Blino, Delphine; Bushby, Andrew J; Shuturminska, Kseniya; den Hartog, Mark; Radaelli, Alessandro; Negussie, Ayele H; Mikhail, Andrew S; Woods, David L; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh; Levy, Elliot B; Wood, Bradford J; Willis, Sean L; Dreher, Matthew R; Lewis, Andrew L

    2017-03-28

    We have developed a straightforward and efficient method of introducing radiopacity into Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) hydrogel beads (DC Bead™) that are currently used in the clinic to treat liver malignancies. Coupling of 2,3,5-triiodobenzaldehyde to the PVA backbone of pre-formed beads yields a uniformly distributed level of iodine attached throughout the bead structure (~150mg/mL) which is sufficient to be imaged under standard fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities used in treatment procedures (DC Bead LUMI™). Despite the chemical modification increasing the density of the beads to ~1.3g/cm(3) and the compressive modulus by two orders of magnitude, they remain easily suspended, handled and administered through standard microcatheters. As the core chemistry of DC Bead LUMI™ is the same as DC Bead™, it interacts with drugs using ion-exchange between sulfonic acid groups on the polymer and the positively charged amine groups of the drugs. Both doxorubicin (Dox) and irinotecan (Iri) elution kinetics for all bead sizes evaluated were within the parameters already investigated within the clinic for DC Bead™. Drug loading did not affect the radiopacity and there was a direct relationship between bead attenuation and Dox concentration. The ability (Dox)-loaded DC Bead LUMI™ to be visualized in vivo was demonstrated by the administration of into hepatic arteries of a VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit under fluoroscopy, followed by subsequent CT imaging.

  6. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  7. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  8. Bead Collage: An Arts-Based Research Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, "bead collage," an arts-based research method that invites participants to reflect, communicate and construct their experience through the manipulation of beads and found objects is explained. Emphasizing the significance of one's personal biography and experiences as a researcher, I discuss how my background as an…

  9. Tests show that aluminum welds are improved by bead removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Tests with 2218-T87 aluminum alloy plate indicate improvements in strength, ductility, fatigue properties, and burst pressure result when one or both of the top and bottom weld beads are removed. There is, however, a drop in yield strength. The consistency of test data is considerably improved by weld bead removal.

  10. Method for preparing spherical ferrite beads and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.

    2002-01-01

    The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense, highly polished spherical beads of hexagonal ferrites with selected compositions for use in nonreciprocal microwave and mm-wave devices as well as in microwave absorbent or reflective coatings, composites, and the like. A porous, generally spherical bead of hydrous iron oxide is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid bead having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel bead is washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure to convert the bead into a mixed hydrous iron-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. This mixed oxide bead is then washed, dried, and calcined to produce the desired (BaFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 or SrFe.sub.12 O.sub.19) crystal structure. The calcined bead is then sintered to form a dense bead of the BaFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 and SrFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 phase suitable for polishing and incorporation into various microwave devices and components.

  11. Artificial induction of autophagy around polystyrene beads in nonphagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Kojidani, Tomoko; Osakada, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular event that acts as an innate cellular defense mechanism to kill invading bacteria such as group A Streptococcus in nonphagocytic epithelial-like cells. The cellular events underlying autophagosome formation upon bacterial invasion remain unclear due to the biochemical complexity associated with uncharacterized bacterial components, and the difficulty of predicting the location as well as the timing of where/when autophagosome formation will take place. To overcome these problems, we monitored autophagosome formation in living nonphagocytic cells by inducing autophagy around artificial micrometer-sized beads instead of bacteria. Beads conjugated with bio-reactive molecules provide a powerful tool for examining biochemical properties in vitro. However, this technique has not been applied to living cells, except for phagocytes, because the beads cannot be easily incorporated into nonphagocytic cells. Here we report that micrometer-sized polystyrene beads coated with transfection reagents containing cationic lipids can be incorporated into nonphagocytic cells, and that autophagy can be efficiently induced around the beads in these cells. Monitoring the process of autophagosome formation for pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (pHrodo)-conjugated beads by fluorescence live cell imaging combined with correlative light and electron microscopy, we found that autophagosomes are formed around the beads after partial breakdown of the endosomal membrane. In addition, the beads were subsequently transferred to lysosomes within a couple of hours. Our findings demonstrate the cellular responses that lead to autophagy in response to pathogen invasion.

  12. Activities to Grow On: Buttons, Beads, and Beans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzolis, Amy; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents new ideas for using buttons, beans, and beads as teaching manipulatives for elementary school children. The ideas include a button scavenger hunt, a button count, a cup puppet bean game, a numbers guessing game with beans in jars, and a bead stringing activity. (SM)

  13. Nanofibrous polymeric beads from aramid fibers for efficient bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Luo, Jiyue; Nie, Chuanxiong; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-08-16

    Polymer based hemoperfusion has been developed as an effective therapy to remove the extra bilirubin from patients. However, the currently applied materials suffer from either low removal efficiency or poor blood compatibility. In this study, we report the development of a new class of nanofibrous absorbent that exhibited high bilirubin removal efficiency and good blood compatibility. The Kevlar nanofiber was prepared by dissolving micron-sized Kevlar fiber in proper solvent, and the beads were prepared by dropping Kevlar nanofiber solutions into ethanol. Owing to the nanofiborous structure of the Kevlar nanofiber, the beads displayed porous structures and large specific areas, which would facilitate the adsorption of toxins. In the adsorption test, it was noticed that the beads possessed an adsorption capacity higher than 40 mg g(-1) towards bilirubin. In plasma mimetic solutions, the beads still showed high bilirubin removal efficiency. Furthermore, after incorporating with carbon nanotubes, the beads were found to have increased adsorption capacity for human degradation waste. Moreover, the beads showed excellent blood compatibility in terms of a low hemolysis ratio, prolonged clotting times, suppressed coagulant activation, limited platelet activation, and inhibited blood related inflammatory activation. Additionally, the beads showed good compatibility with endothelial cells. In general, the Kevlar nanofiber beads, which integrated with high adsorption capacity, good blood compatibility and low cytotoxicity, may have great potential for hemoperfusion and some other applications in biomedical fields.

  14. Self-encoding resin beads of combinatorial library screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Du; Zhao, Yuandi; Cheng, Tongsheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2003-07-01

    The latest self-encoding resin bead is a novel technology for solid phase synthesis combinatorial library screening. A new encode-positional deconvolution strategy which was based on that technology been illustrated compared with positional scanning and iterative strategies. The self-encoding resin beads technology provides an efficient method for improving the high-throughput screening of combinatorial library.

  15. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  16. Validation of a DNA methylation microarray for 850,000 CpG sites of the human genome enriched in enhancer sequences

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Sebastian; Arribas, Carles; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Aim: DNA methylation is the best known epigenetic mark. Cancer and other pathologies show an altered DNA methylome. However, delivering complete DNA methylation maps is compromised by the price and labor-intensive interpretation of single nucleotide methods. Material & methods: Following the success of the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Infinium) methylation microarray (450K), we report the technical and biological validation of the newly developed MethylationEPIC BeadChip (Infinium) microarray that covers over 850,000 CpG methylation sites (850K). The 850K microarray contains >90% of the 450K sites, but adds 333,265 CpGs located in enhancer regions identified by the ENCODE and FANTOM5 projects. Results & conclusion: The 850K array demonstrates high reproducibility at the 450K CpG sites, is consistent among technical replicates, is reliable in the matched study of fresh frozen versus formalin-fixed paraffin-embeded samples and is also useful for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. These results highlight the value of the MethylationEPIC BeadChip as a useful tool for the analysis of the DNA methylation profile of the human genome. PMID:26673039

  17. Hollow polydimethylsiloxane beads with a porous structure for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myeong-Jin; Ryu, Tae-Kyoung; Choi, S-W

    2013-11-01

    Based on a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion system, porous and hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) beads containing cells using a simple fluidic device with three flow channels are fabricated. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in the PDMS oil phase is served as a porogen for pore development. The feasibility of the porous PDMS beads prepared with different PEG concentrations (10, 20, and 30 wt%) for cell encapsulation in terms of pore size, protein diffusion, and cell proliferation inside the PDMS beads is evaluated. The PDMS beads prepared with PEG 30 wt% are exhibited a highly porous structure and facilitated fast diffusion of protein from the core domain to the outer phase, eventually leading to enhanced cell proliferation. The results clearly indicate that hollow PDMS beads with a porous structure could provide a favorable microenvironment for cell survival due to the large porous structure.

  18. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  19. Analysis of DNA microarray expression data.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard

    2009-06-01

    DNA microarrays are powerful tools for studying biological mechanisms and for developing prognostic and predictive classifiers for identifying the patients who require treatment and are best candidates for specific treatments. Because microarrays produce so much data from each specimen, they offer great opportunities for discovery and great dangers or producing misleading claims. Microarray based studies require clear objectives for selecting cases and appropriate analysis methods. Effective analysis of microarray data, where the number of measured variables is orders of magnitude greater than the number of cases, requires specialized statistical methods which have recently been developed. Recent literature reviews indicate that serious problems of analysis exist a substantial proportion of publications. This manuscript attempts to provide a non-technical summary of the key principles of statistical design and analysis for studies that utilize microarray expression profiling.

  20. Microarray Applications in Microbial Ecology Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; Zhou, J.

    2006-04-06

    Microarray technology has the unparalleled potential tosimultaneously determine the dynamics and/or activities of most, if notall, of the microbial populations in complex environments such as soilsand sediments. Researchers have developed several types of arrays thatcharacterize the microbial populations in these samples based on theirphylogenetic relatedness or functional genomic content. Several recentstudies have used these microarrays to investigate ecological issues;however, most have only analyzed a limited number of samples withrelatively few experiments utilizing the full high-throughput potentialof microarray analysis. This is due in part to the unique analyticalchallenges that these samples present with regard to sensitivity,specificity, quantitation, and data analysis. This review discussesspecific applications of microarrays to microbial ecology research alongwith some of the latest studies addressing the difficulties encounteredduring analysis of complex microbial communities within environmentalsamples. With continued development, microarray technology may ultimatelyachieve its potential for comprehensive, high-throughput characterizationof microbial populations in near real-time.

  1. In control: systematic assessment of microarray performance.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Holstege, Frank C P

    2004-10-01

    Expression profiling using DNA microarrays is a powerful technique that is widely used in the life sciences. How reliable are microarray-derived measurements? The assessment of performance is challenging because of the complicated nature of microarray experiments and the many different technology platforms. There is a mounting call for standards to be introduced, and this review addresses some of the issues that are involved. Two important characteristics of performance are accuracy and precision. The assessment of these factors can be either for the purpose of technology optimization or for the evaluation of individual microarray hybridizations. Microarray performance has been evaluated by at least four approaches in the past. Here, we argue that external RNA controls offer the most versatile system for determining performance and describe how such standards could be implemented. Other uses of external controls are discussed, along with the importance of probe sequence availability and the quantification of labelled material.

  2. Chaotic mixer improves microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    McQuain, Mark K; Seale, Kevin; Peek, Joel; Fisher, Timothy S; Levy, Shawn; Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, Frederick R

    2004-02-15

    Hybridization is an important aspect of microarray experimental design which influences array signal levels and the repeatability of data within an array and across different arrays. Current methods typically require 24h and use target inefficiently. In these studies, we compare hybridization signals obtained in conventional static hybridization, which depends on diffusional target delivery, with signals obtained in a dynamic hybridization chamber, which employs a fluid mixer based on chaotic advection theory to deliver targets across a conventional glass slide array. Microarrays were printed with a pattern of 102 identical probe spots containing a 65-mer oligonucleotide capture probe. Hybridization of a 725-bp fluorescently labeled target was used to measure average target hybridization levels, local signal-to-noise ratios, and array hybridization uniformity. Dynamic hybridization for 1h with 1 or 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities approximately threefold over a 24-h static hybridization. Similarly, a 10- or 60-min dynamic hybridization of 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities fourfold over a 24h static hybridization. In time course studies, static hybridization reached a maximum within 8 to 12h using either 1 or 10ng of target. In time course studies using the dynamic hybridization chamber, hybridization using 1ng of target increased to a maximum at 4h and that using 10ng of target did not vary over the time points tested. In comparison to static hybridization, dynamic hybridization reduced the signal-to-noise ratios threefold and reduced spot-to-spot variation twofold. Therefore, we conclude that dynamic hybridization based on a chaotic mixer design improves both the speed of hybridization and the maximum level of hybridization while increasing signal-to-noise ratios and reducing spot-to-spot variation.

  3. Manipulation of Superparamagnetic Beads on Patterned Exchange-Bias Layer Systems for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ehresmann, Arno; Koch, Iris; Holzinger, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    A technology platform based on a remotely controlled and stepwise transport of an array arrangement of superparamagnetic beads (SPB) for efficient molecular uptake, delivery and accumulation in the context of highly specific and sensitive analyte molecule detection for the application in lab-on-a-chip devices is presented. The near-surface transport of SPBs is realized via the dynamic transformation of the SPBs’ magnetic potential energy landscape above a magnetically stripe patterned Exchange-Bias (EB) thin film layer systems due to the application of sub-mT external magnetic field pulses. In this concept, the SPB velocity is dramatically influenced by the magnitude and gradient of the magnetic field landscape (MFL) above the magnetically stripe patterned EB substrate, the SPB to substrate distance, the magnetic properties of both the SPBs and the EB layer system, respectively, as well as by the properties of the external magnetic field pulses and the surrounding fluid. The focus of this review is laid on the specific MFL design in EB layer systems via light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning (IBMP). A numerical approach is introduced for the theoretical description of the MFL in comparison to experimental characterization via scanning Hall probe microscopy. The SPB transport mechanism will be outlined in terms of the dynamic interplay between the EB substrate’s MFL and the pulse scheme of the external magnetic field. PMID:26580625

  4. Immobilized OBOC combinatorial bead array to facilitate multiplicative screening.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenwu; Bononi, Fernanda C; Townsend, Jared; Li, Yuanpei; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S

    2013-07-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library screening has been broadly utilized for the last two decades to identify small molecules, peptides or peptidomimetics targeting variable screening probes such as cell surface receptors, bacteria, protein kinases, phosphatases, proteases etc. In previous screening methods, library beads were suspended in solution and screened against one single probe. Only the positive beads were tracked and isolated for additional screens and finally selected for chemical decoding. During this process, the remaining negative beads were not tracked and discarded. Here we report a novel bead immobilization method such that a bead library array can be conveniently prepared and screened in its entirety, sequentially many times with a series of distinct probes. This method not only allows us to increase the screening efficiency but also permits us to determine the binding profile of each and every library bead against a large number of target receptors. As proof of concept, we serially screened a random OBOC disulfide containing cyclic heptapeptide library with three water soluble dyes as model probes: malachite green, bromocresol purple and indigo carmine. This multiplicative screening approach resulted in a rapid determination of the binding profile of each and every bead respective to each of the three dyes. Beads that interacted with malachite green only, bromocresol purple only, or both indigo carmine and bromocresol purple were isolated, and their peptide sequences were determined with microsequencer. Ultimately, the novel OBOC multiplicative screening approach could play a key role in the enhancement of existing on-bead assays such as whole cell binding, bacteria binding, protein binding, posttranslational modifications etc. with increased efficiency, capacity, and specificity.

  5. TiO₂ beads and TiO₂-chitosan beads for urease immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ispirli Doğaç, Yasemin; Deveci, Ilyas; Teke, Mustafa; Mercimek, Bedrettin

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to synthesize TiO2 beads for urease immobilization. Two different strategies were used to immobilize the urease on TiO2 beads. In the first method (A), urease enzyme was immobilized onto TiO2 beads by adsorption and then crosslinking. In the second method (B), TiO2 beads were coated with chitosan-urease mixture. To determine optimum conditions of immobilization, different parameters were investigated. The parameters of optimization were initial enzyme concentration (0.5; 1; 1.5; 2mg/ml), alginate concentration (1; 2; 3%), glutaraldehyde concentration (1; 2; 3% v/v) and chitosan concentration (2; 3; 4 mg/ml). The optimum enzyme concentrations were determined as 1.5mg/ml for A and 1.0mg/ml for B. The other optimum conditions were found 2.0% (w/v) for alginate concentration (both A and B); 3.0mg/ml for chitosan concentration (B) and 2.0% (v/v) for glutaraldehyde concentration (A). The optimum temperature (20-60°C), optimum pH (3.0-10.0), kinetic parameters, thermal stability (4-70°C), pH stability (4.0-9.0), operational stability (0-230 min) and reusability (20 times) were investigated for characterization. The optimum temperatures were 30°C (A), 40°C (B) and 35°C (soluble). The temperature profiles of the immobilized ureases were spread over a large area. The optimum pH values for the soluble urease and immobilized urease prepared by using methods (A) and (B) were found to be 7.5, 7.0, 7.0, respectively. The thermal stabilities of immobilized enzyme sets were studied and they maintained 50% activity at 65°C. However, at this temperature free urease protected only 15% activity.

  6. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  7. Whole-Proteome Peptide Microarrays for Profiling Autoantibody Repertoires within Multiple Sclerosis and Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Zandian, Arash; Forsström, Björn; Häggmark-Månberg, Anna; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Ayoglu, Burcu

    2017-02-09

    The underlying molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases are poorly understood. To unravel the autoimmune processes across diseases, comprehensive and unbiased analyses of proteins targets recognized by the adaptive immune system are needed. Here we present an approach starting from high-density peptide arrays to characterize autoantibody repertoires and to identify new autoantigens. A set of ten plasma and serum samples from subjects with multiple sclerosis, narcolepsy, and without any disease diagnosis were profiled on a peptide array representing the whole proteome, hosting 2.2 million 12-mer peptides with a six amino acid lateral shift. On the basis of the IgG reactivities found on these whole-proteome peptide microarrays, a set of 23 samples was then studied on a targeted array with 174 000 12-mer peptides of single amino acid lateral shift. Finally, verification of IgG reactivities was conducted with a larger sample set (n = 448) using the bead-based peptide microarrays. The presented workflow employed three different peptide microarray formats to discover and resolve the epitopes of human autoantibodies and revealed two potentially new autoantigens: MAP3K7 in multiple sclerosis and NRXN1 in narcolepsy. The presented strategy provides insights into antibody repertoire reactivity at a peptide level and may accelerate the discovery and validation of autoantigens in human diseases.

  8. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  9. MARS: Microarray analysis, retrieval, and storage system

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Michael; Molidor, Robert; Sturn, Alexander; Hartler, Juergen; Hackl, Hubert; Stocker, Gernot; Prokesch, Andreas; Scheideler, Marcel; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2005-01-01

    Background Microarray analysis has become a widely used technique for the study of gene-expression patterns on a genomic scale. As more and more laboratories are adopting microarray technology, there is a need for powerful and easy to use microarray databases facilitating array fabrication, labeling, hybridization, and data analysis. The wealth of data generated by this high throughput approach renders adequate database and analysis tools crucial for the pursuit of insights into the transcriptomic behavior of cells. Results MARS (Microarray Analysis and Retrieval System) provides a comprehensive MIAME supportive suite for storing, retrieving, and analyzing multi color microarray data. The system comprises a laboratory information management system (LIMS), a quality control management, as well as a sophisticated user management system. MARS is fully integrated into an analytical pipeline of microarray image analysis, normalization, gene expression clustering, and mapping of gene expression data onto biological pathways. The incorporation of ontologies and the use of MAGE-ML enables an export of studies stored in MARS to public repositories and other databases accepting these documents. Conclusion We have developed an integrated system tailored to serve the specific needs of microarray based research projects using a unique fusion of Web based and standalone applications connected to the latest J2EE application server technology. The presented system is freely available for academic and non-profit institutions. More information can be found at . PMID:15836795

  10. Formulation of controlled release gellan gum macro beads of amoxicillin.

    PubMed

    Babu, R Jayachandra; Sathigari, Sateesh; Kumar, M Thilek; Pandit, J K

    2010-01-01

    Gellan gum has been reported to have wide pharmaceutical applications such as tablet binder, disintegrant, gelling agent and as a controlled release polymer. Multiparticulate delivery systems spread out more uniformly in the gastrointestinal tract and reduce the local irritation. The purpose of this study is to explore possible applicability of gellan macro beads as an oral controlled release system of a sparingly soluble drug, amoxicillin. Gellan gum beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation with calcium ions. The effect of drug loading, stirring time, polymer concentration, electrolyte (CaCl2) concentration, curing time etc. influencing the preparation of the gellan gum macro beads and the drug release from gellan gum beads were investigated in this study. Optimal preparation conditions allowed very high incorporation efficiency for amoxicillin (91%) The release kinetics of amoxicillin from gellan beads followed the diffusion model for an inert porous matrix in the order: 0.1 N HCl > phosphate buffer > distilled water. Change in curing time did not significantly affect the release rate constant, but drug concentration, polymer concentration and electrolyte concentration significantly affect the release rate of amoxicillin from the beads. The gellan macro beads may be suitable for gastro retentive controlled delivery of amoxicillin.

  11. Microarray assessment of the influence of the conceptus on gene expression in the mouse uterus during decidualization.

    PubMed

    McConaha, M E; Eckstrum, K; An, J; Steinle, J J; Bany, B M

    2011-04-01

    During pregnancy in several species including humans and rodents, the endometrium undergoes decidualization. This process of differentiation from endometrial to decidual tissue occurs only after the onset of implantation in mice. It can also be artificially induced causing the formation of deciduomal tissue. The purpose of this study was to compare the gene expression profile of the developing decidua in pregnant mice with the deciduoma formed after artificial induction in an effort to identify conceptus-influenced changes in uterine gene expression during decidualization. We induced decidualization artificially by transferring blastocyst-sized ConA-coated agarose beads into the uterus on day 2.5 of pseudopregnancy. Recently published work has found this model to be more 'physiological' than other methods. Total RNA was isolated from blastocyst and bead-induced 'implantation' sites of the uteri of day 7.5 pregnant (decidua) and pseudopregnant (deciduoma) mice respectively. This RNA was then used for microarray analysis using Mouse Illumina BeadArray chips. This analysis revealed potential differential mRNA levels of only 45 genes between the decidua and bead-induced deciduoma tissues. We confirmed the differential mRNA levels of 31 of these genes using quantitative RT-PCR. Finally, the level and localization of some of the mRNAs for select genes (Aldh3a1, Bcmo1, Guca2b, and Inhbb) identified by our microarray analysis were examined in more detail. This study provides the identity of a small set of genes whose expression in the uterus during decidualization may be influenced by molecular signals from the conceptus.

  12. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  13. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  14. Optical trapping force reduction and manipulation of nanoporous beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Fan; Oehrlein, Stefan; Zeng, Erliang; Kershner, Ryan; Cerrina, Franco

    2012-04-01

    We studied the interaction of infrared optical traps with controlled-pore glass (CPG) beads in aqueous medium. The lateral optical trapping force and stiffness were experimentally found considerably smaller than those of their solid counterparts. The simulation using an average refractive index revealed significant losses of effective trapping efficiency, which quantitatively agreed well with experimentally fitted curves. This effect was ascribed to the reduced relative refractive index of medium-filled CPG beads with respect to the medium. Combining optical trapping with mechanical confinements, we demonstrated a microfluidic platform allowing for the synthesis of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences on individual beads of interest.

  15. High-throughput screening of one-bead-one-compound libraries: identification of cyclic peptidyl inhibitors against calcineurin/NFAT interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Ziqing; Xiao, Qing; Pei, Dehua

    2011-09-12

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries provide a powerful tool for drug discovery as well as biomedical research. However, screening a large number of beads/compounds (>1 million) and rank ordering the initial hits (which are covalently attached to a solid support) according to their potencies still post significant technical challenges. In this work, we have integrated some of the latest technical advances from our own as well as other laboratories to develop a general methodology for rapidly screening large OBOC libraries. The methodology has been applied to synthesize and screen a cyclic peptide library that features: (1) spatially segregated beads containing cyclic peptides on the surface layer and linear encoding peptides in their interior; (2) rapid on-bead screening of the library (>1 million) by a multistage procedure (magnetic bead sorting, enzyme-linked assay, and fluorescence based screening); (3) selective release of cyclic peptides from single positive beads for solution-phase determination of their binding affinities; and (4) hit identification by partial Edman degradation/mass spectrometry (PED/MS). Screening of the library against protein phosphatase calcineurin (Cn) identified a series of cyclic peptides that bind to the substrate-docking site for nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) with K(D) values of ∼1 μM. Further improvement of the affinity and specificity of these compounds may lead to a new class of immunosuppressive agents that are more selective and therefore less toxic than cyclosporine A and FK506.

  16. K Basin sludge/resin bead separation test report

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, D.M.

    1998-08-25

    The K Basin sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt and minor amounts of other organic material. The sludge will be collected and treated for storage and eventual disposal. This process will remove the large solid materials by a 1/4 inch screen. The screened material will be subjected to nitric acid in a chemical treatment process. The organic ion exchange resin beads produce undesirable chemical reactions with the nitric acid. The resin beads must be removed from the bulk material and treated by another process. An effective bead separation method must extract 95% of the resin bead mass without entraining more than 5% of the other sludge component mass. The test plan I-INF-2729, ``Organic Ion Exchange Resin Separation Methods Evaluation,`` proposed the evaluation of air lift, hydro cyclone, agitated slurry and elutriation resin bead separation methods. This follows the testing strategy outlined in section 4.1 of BNF-2574, ``Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process``. Engineering study BNF-3128, ``Separation of Organic Ion Exchange Resins from Sludge,`` Rev. 0, focused the evaluation tests on a method that removed the fine sludge particles by a sieve and then extracted the beads by means of a elutriation column. Ninety-nine percent of the resin beads are larger than 125 microns and 98.5 percent are 300 microns and larger. Particles smaller than 125 microns make up the largest portion of sludge in the K Basins. Eliminating a large part of the sludge`s non-bead component will reduce the quantity that is lifted with the resin beads in the elutriation column. Resin bead particle size distribution measurements are given in Appendix A The Engineering Testing Laboratory conducted measurements of a elutriation column`s ability to extract resin beads from a sieved, non-radioactive sludge

  17. Behavior of multi-component magnetic colloidal systems in tunable magnetic fields and applications in biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye; Li, Zhengcao; Ko, Pil Ju; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2012-03-01

    A system consisting of multiple-component beads, such as superparamagnetic beads, nonmagnetic beads and magnetorheological (MR) fluid, can display some very amazing and special properties when subjected to an external magnetic field because the MR fluid can act on both types of beads synchronously as a magnetic medium. Some novel structures and phenomena were discovered and are discussed in our work, including 'ring-structures', 'small-ring' and 'ring-chains' in static or rotational magnetic fields. If both probe and target molecules are attached consisting of functionalized superparamagnetic beads and non-magnetic beads, respectively, the ring-structure could be maintained due to biomolecular bonding, even after removing the external magnetic field. Using these remnant rings, we raised two protocols for biosensing: a two-dimensional biosensor using a magnetic self-assembled colloidal ring-structure, and an improved magneto-optical transmittance (MT) method. In the former protocol, we define the small nonmagnetic particles as "petals" because the whole structure looks like a flower. It was proved that the number of remnant ring petals was a function of the concentration of the target molecules', with a concentration range from 0.0768 ng/mL ~ 3.8419 ng/mL, making it a promising technology for applications involving biosensing. In the latter protocol, the use of larger individual units made the magnetic particle chain longer, which was considered to be a promising way of improving the sensitivity of the MT method.

  18. Magnetic forces produced by rectangular permanent magnets in static microsystems.

    PubMed

    Gassner, Anne-Laure; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Chen, Hong-Xu; Morandini, Jacques; Josserand, Jacques; Rossier, Joel S; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-08-21

    Finite element numerical simulations were carried out in 2D geometries to map the magnetic field and force distribution produced by rectangular permanent magnets as a function of their size and position with respect to a microchannel. A single magnet, two magnets placed in attraction and in repulsion have been considered. The goal of this work is to show where magnetic beads are preferentially captured in a microchannel. These simulations were qualitatively corroborated, in one geometrical case, by microscopic visualizations of magnetic bead plug formation in a capillary. The results show that the number of plugs is configuration dependent with: in attraction, one plug in the middle of the magnets; in repulsion, two plugs near the edges of the magnets; and with a single magnet, a plug close to the center of the magnet. The geometry of the magnets (h and l are the height and length of the magnets respectively) and their relative spacing s has a significant impact on the magnetic flux density. Its value inside a magnet increases with the h/l ratio. Consequently, bar magnets produce larger and more uniform values than flat magnets. The l/s ratio also influences the magnetic force value in the microchannel, both increasing concomitantly for all the configurations. In addition, a zero force zone in the middle appears in the attraction configuration as the l/s ratio increases, while with a single magnet, the number of maxima and minima goes from one to two, producing two focusing zones instead of only one.

  19. A two-channel detection method for autofluorescence correction and efficient on-bead screening of one-bead one-compound combinatorial libraries using the COPAS fluorescence activated bead sorting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintersteiner, Martin; Auer, Manfred

    2013-03-01

    One-bead one-compound combinatorial library beads exhibit varying levels of autofluorescence after solid phase combinatorial synthesis. Very often this causes significant problems for automated on-bead screening using TentaGel beads and fluorescently labeled target proteins. Herein, we present a method to overcome this limitation when fluorescence activated bead sorting is used as the screening method. We have equipped the COPAS bead sorting instrument with a high-speed profiling unit and developed a spectral autofluorescence correction method. The correction method is based on a simple algebraic operation using the fluorescence data from two detection channels and is applied on-the-fly in order to reliably identify hit beads by COPAS bead sorting. Our method provides a practical tool for the fast and efficient isolation of hit beads from one-bead one-compound library screens using either fluorescently labeled target proteins or biotinylated target proteins. This method makes hit bead identification easier and more reliable. It reduces false positives and eliminates the need for time-consuming pre-sorting of library beads in order to remove autofluorescent beads.

  20. Mutational analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hacia, J.; Collins, F.

    1999-01-01

    The development of inexpensive high throughput methods to identify individual DNA sequence differences is important to the future growth of medical genetics. This has become increasingly apparent as epidemiologists, pathologists, and clinical geneticists focus more attention on the molecular basis of complex multifactorial diseases. Such undertakings will rely upon genetic maps based upon newly discovered, common, single nucleotide polymorphisms. Furthermore, candidate gene approaches used in identifying disease associated genes necessitate screening large sequence blocks for changes tracking with the disease state. Even after such genes are isolated, large scale mutational analyses will often be needed for risk assessment studies to define the likely medical consequences of carrying a mutated gene.
This review concentrates on the use of oligonucleotide arrays for hybridisation based comparative sequence analysis. Technological advances within the past decade have made it possible to apply this technology to many different aspects of medical genetics. These applications range from the detection and scoring of single nucleotide polymorphisms to mutational analysis of large genes. Although we discuss published scientific reports, unpublished work from the private sector12 could also significantly affect the future of this technology.


Keywords: mutational analysis; oligonucleotide microarrays; DNA chips PMID:10528850

  1. Integrating Microarray Data and GRNs.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, L; Potamias, G; Tsiknakis, M; Zervakis, M; Moustakis, V

    2016-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the emergence of high-throughput technologies, a vast amount of molecular and biological data are being produced. Two of the most important and significant data sources come from microarray gene-expression experiments and respective databanks (e,g., Gene Expression Omnibus-GEO (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo)), and from molecular pathways and Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs) stored and curated in public (e.g., Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes-KEGG (http://www.genome.jp/kegg/pathway.html), Reactome (http://www.reactome.org/ReactomeGWT/entrypoint.html)) as well as in commercial repositories (e.g., Ingenuity IPA (http://www.ingenuity.com/products/ipa)). The association of these two sources aims to give new insight in disease understanding and reveal new molecular targets in the treatment of specific phenotypes.Three major research lines and respective efforts that try to utilize and combine data from both of these sources could be identified, namely: (1) de novo reconstruction of GRNs, (2) identification of Gene-signatures, and (3) identification of differentially expressed GRN functional paths (i.e., sub-GRN paths that distinguish between different phenotypes). In this chapter, we give an overview of the existing methods that support the different types of gene-expression and GRN integration with a focus on methodologies that aim to identify phenotype-discriminant GRNs or subnetworks, and we also present our methodology.

  2. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  3. Ultrasensitive proteome analysis using paramagnetic bead technology

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christopher S; Foehr, Sophia; Garfield, David A; Furlong, Eileen E; Steinmetz, Lars M; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain a systems-level understanding of a complex biological system, detailed proteome information is essential. Despite great progress in proteomics technologies, thorough interrogation of the proteome from quantity-limited biological samples is hampered by inefficiencies during processing. To address these challenges, here we introduce a novel protocol using paramagnetic beads, termed Single-Pot Solid-Phase-enhanced Sample Preparation (SP3). SP3 provides a rapid and unbiased means of proteomic sample preparation in a single tube that facilitates ultrasensitive analysis by outperforming existing protocols in terms of efficiency, scalability, speed, throughput, and flexibility. To illustrate these benefits, characterization of 1,000 HeLa cells and single Drosophila embryos is used to establish that SP3 provides an enhanced platform for profiling proteomes derived from sub-microgram amounts of material. These data present a first view of developmental stage-specific proteome dynamics in Drosophila at a single-embryo resolution, permitting characterization of inter-individual expression variation. Together, the findings of this work position SP3 as a superior protocol that facilitates exciting new directions in multiple areas of proteomics ranging from developmental biology to clinical applications. PMID:25358341

  4. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  5. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  6. Protein Microarrays: Novel Developments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Garcia, Angie E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarray technology possesses some of the greatest potential for providing direct information on protein function and potential drug targets. For example, functional protein microarrays are ideal tools suited for the mapping of biological pathways. They can be used to study most major types of interactions and enzymatic activities that take place in biochemical pathways and have been used for the analysis of simultaneous multiple biomolecular interactions involving protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-DNA and protein-small molecule interactions. Because of this unique ability to analyze many kinds of molecular interactions en masse, the requirement of very small sample amount and the potential to be miniaturized and automated, protein microarrays are extremely well suited for protein profiling, drug discovery, drug target identification and clinical prognosis and diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the production, applications and analysis of protein microarrays. PMID:21116694

  7. Molecular Interactions between the Specialist Herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and Its Natural Host Nicotiana attenuata: V. Microarray Analysis and Further Characterization of Large-Scale Changes in Herbivore-Induced mRNAs1

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Dequan; Iqbal, Javeed; Lehmann, Katja; Gase, Klaus; Saluz, Hans Peter; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2003-01-01

    We extend our analysis of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs when the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, is attacked by Manduca sexta larvae by cloning 115 transcripts by mRNA differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subtractive hybridization using magnetic beads (SHMB) from the M. sexta-responsive transcriptome. These transcripts were spotted as cDNA with eight others, previously confirmed to be differentially regulated by northern analysis on glass slide microarrays, and hybridized with Cy3- and Cy5-labeled probes derived from plants after 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of continuous attack. Microarray analysis proved to be a powerful means of verifying differential expression; 73 of the cloned genes (63%) were differentially regulated (in equal proportions from differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and SHMB procedures), and of these, 24 (32%) had similarity to known genes or putative proteins (more from SHMB). The analysis provided insights into the signaling and transcriptional basis of direct and indirect defenses used against herbivores, suggesting simultaneous activation of salicylic acid-, ethylene-, cytokinin-, WRKY-, MYB-, and oxylipin-signaling pathways and implicating terpenoid-, pathogen-, and cell wall-related transcripts in defense responses. These defense responses require resources that could be made available by decreases in four photosynthetic-related transcripts, increases in transcripts associated with protein and nucleotide turnover, and increases in transcripts associated with carbohydrate metabolism. This putative up-regulation of defense-associated and down-regulation of growth-associated transcripts occur against a backdrop of altered transcripts for RNA-binding proteins, putative ATP/ADP translocators, chaperonins, histones, and water channel proteins, responses consistent with a major metabolic reconfiguration that underscores the complexity of response to herbivore attack

  8. More About Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter A.; Davis, William M.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes modification and testing of proposed tool discussed in "Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld Beads" (MFS-30056). Modified version of commercial pneumatically driven rotary cutting tool removes such hard metals as nickel alloys, titanium, and stainless steels.

  9. 8. INTERIOR BEADED WALL BOARDING SHOWING TRIAL MARKS FROM DIES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR BEADED WALL BOARDING SHOWING TRIAL MARKS FROM DIES MADE IN CARPENTER'S SHOP Ph: Jack E, Boucher - March 1961 - Joseph Carpenter Silversmith Shop, 71 East Town Street, Norwichtown, New London County, CT

  10. 7. Detail, beaded mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, beaded mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the east portal of Tunnel 18, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 18, Milepost 410, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  11. Application of Magnetic and Luminescent Metal Oxide Particles to Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichkova, M.; Dosev, D.; Ma, Z.; Gee, S.; Hammock, B.; Kennedy, I.

    2007-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based platforms for high-throughput, multiplexed detection of proteins and DNA promise to bring substantial advances in molecular medicine, environmental monitoring and security against terrorist attack. It is possible to replace current chip-based microarray technologies with nanoparticle-based technologies by shifting the immobilizing probe DNA or antibody from the surface of a chip to the surface of a nanoparticle. By incorporating magnetic properties and luminescent properties into the same particle, it is possible to manipulate these materials within tailored magnetic fields, and to achieve sensitive read-out by making use of the non-photobleaching properties of the base lanthanide particle. It is possible to synthesize a large range of uniquely encoded particles using a spray pyrolysis technique that has been perfected in our laboratory, with much greater ease than is offered by embedding quantum dots in polymer beads. In particular, we make use of the unique properties of lanthanide phosphors doped into suitable crystal hosts to synthesize particles with a wide range of ratios of different phosphor signals that encode for unique probe oligonucleotides or antibody probes.

  12. Next Generation Gene Synthesis by targeted retrieval of bead-immobilized, sequence verified DNA clones from a high throughput pyrosequencing device

    PubMed Central

    Matzas, Mark; Stähler, Peer F.; Kefer, Nathalie; Siebelt, Nicole; Boisguérin, Valesca; Leonard, Jack T.; Keller, Andreas; Stähler, Cord F.; Häberle, Pamela; Gharizadeh, Baback; Babrzadeh, Farbod; Church, George

    2012-01-01

    The setup of synthetic biological systems involving millions of bases is still limited by the required high quality of synthetic DNA. Important drivers to further open up the field are the accuracy and scale of chemical DNA synthesis and the downstream processing of longer DNA assembled from short fragments. We developed a new, highly parallel and miniaturized method for the preparation of high quality DNA termed “Megacloning” by using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology in a preparative way. We demonstrate our method by processing both conventional and microarray-derived DNA oligonucleotides in combination with a bead-based high throughput pyrosequencing platform, gaining a 500-fold error reduction for microarray oligonucleotides in a first embodiment. We also show the assembly of synthetic genes as part of the Megacloning process. In principle, up to millions of DNA fragments can be sequenced, characterized and sorted in a single Megacloner run, enabling many new applications. PMID:21113166

  13. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  14. PATMA: parser of archival tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Roszkowiak, Lukasz; Lopez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Tissue microarrays are commonly used in modern pathology for cancer tissue evaluation, as it is a very potent technique. Tissue microarray slides are often scanned to perform computer-aided histopathological analysis of the tissue cores. For processing the image, splitting the whole virtual slide into images of individual cores is required. The only way to distinguish cores corresponding to specimens in the tissue microarray is through their arrangement. Unfortunately, distinguishing the correct order of cores is not a trivial task as they are not labelled directly on the slide. The main aim of this study was to create a procedure capable of automatically finding and extracting cores from archival images of the tissue microarrays. This software supports the work of scientists who want to perform further image processing on single cores. The proposed method is an efficient and fast procedure, working in fully automatic or semi-automatic mode. A total of 89% of punches were correctly extracted with automatic selection. With an addition of manual correction, it is possible to fully prepare the whole slide image for extraction in 2 min per tissue microarray. The proposed technique requires minimum skill and time to parse big array of cores from tissue microarray whole slide image into individual core images.

  15. PATMA: parser of archival tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tissue microarrays are commonly used in modern pathology for cancer tissue evaluation, as it is a very potent technique. Tissue microarray slides are often scanned to perform computer-aided histopathological analysis of the tissue cores. For processing the image, splitting the whole virtual slide into images of individual cores is required. The only way to distinguish cores corresponding to specimens in the tissue microarray is through their arrangement. Unfortunately, distinguishing the correct order of cores is not a trivial task as they are not labelled directly on the slide. The main aim of this study was to create a procedure capable of automatically finding and extracting cores from archival images of the tissue microarrays. This software supports the work of scientists who want to perform further image processing on single cores. The proposed method is an efficient and fast procedure, working in fully automatic or semi-automatic mode. A total of 89% of punches were correctly extracted with automatic selection. With an addition of manual correction, it is possible to fully prepare the whole slide image for extraction in 2 min per tissue microarray. The proposed technique requires minimum skill and time to parse big array of cores from tissue microarray whole slide image into individual core images. PMID:27920955

  16. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner’s laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube’s voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  17. Couple Beads: An integrated method of natural family planning

    PubMed Central

    Mulcaire-Jones, George; Fehring, Richard J.; Bradshaw, Megan; Brower, Karen; Lubega, Gonzaga; Lubega, Paskazia

    2016-01-01

    Various fertility indicators are used by natural family planning methods to identify the fertile and infertile phases of a woman's menstrual cycle: mucus observations, cycle-day probabilities, basal body temperature readings, and hormonal measures of LH and estrogen. Simplified NFP methods generally make use of a single fertility indicator such as cycle-day probabilities (Standard Days Method) or mucus observations (Billings Ovulation Method). The Couple Bead Method integrates the two simplest fertility indicators, cycle-day probabilities and mucus observations, expanding its applicability to all women, regardless of cycle regularity and length. In determining cycle-day probabilities, the Couple Bead Method relies on a new data set from ultrasound-derived determinants of gestational age that more directly define the day of conception and the fertile window. By using a visual-based system of inexpensive colored beads, the Couple Bead Method can be used by couples of all educational and income levels. Lay Summary: Natural family planning methods provide education in regard to the signs of a woman's body which indicate if she is possibly fertile or not. Two important signs are the day of her menstrual cycle and her observations of bleeding and cervical mucus or dryness. The Couple Bead Method teaches a couple how to observe these signs and chart them with a system of colored beads. The Couple Bead Method can be used by women with regular or irregular cycles. The bead sets are inexpensive and consist of a length of plastic cord, colored “pony beads” and safety pins. PMID:27833183

  18. Application of paramagnetic beads for purifying Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zarzecka, A; Bartoszcze, M

    2006-10-01

    Paramagnetic beads coated with Protein G and Tosylactivated-280 dynabeads have been used to purify Bacillus anthracis protective antigen from a liquid culture. The obtained protein was used in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test to detect B. anthracis protective antigen antibodies in human sera collected from immunized individuals. The purification method using paramagnetic beads is very effective. It is fast, easy and may be carried out practically in any laboratory.

  19. Bead-rod-spring models in random flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plan, Emmanuel Lance Christopher Medillo, VI; Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Bead-rod-spring models are the foundation of the kinetic theory of polymer solutions. We derive the diffusion equation for the probability density function of the configuration of a general bead-rod-spring model in short-correlated Gaussian random flows. Under isotropic conditions, we solve this equation analytically for the elastic rhombus model introduced by Curtiss, Bird, and Hassager [Adv. Chem. Phys. 35, 31 (1976)].

  20. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Borba, Juliane C; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M; Feldman, Sanford H; Landers, James P

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer 'trigger' DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use.

  1. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A.; Borba, Juliane C.; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Landers, James P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer ‘trigger’ DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  2. Optimization of polyphenol oxidase immobilization in copper alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Kocaturk, Selin; Yagar, Hulya

    2010-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1) was isolated from artichoke head (Cynara scolymus L.) by using 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0), concentrated by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, and immobilized in copper-alginate beads. Immobilization yield was determined to be 70%. The cresolase and catecholase activities of enzyme immobilized at optimum immobilization conditions were found to be 13.3 and 670 U g beads min(-1), respectively. Effects of immobilization conditions such as alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration, amount of loading enzyme, bead size, and amount of beads on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CuCl2 concentration were found to be 2 % and 3 % (w/v), respectively. Using bead (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.25 g maximum enzyme activities were observed for both polyphenol activities. The initial concentrations of loading free enzyme were 6.5 U mL(-1) and 5815 U mL(-1) for cresolase activity and catecholase activities, respectively. Beads prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 8 repeated uses.

  3. Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Defined Protein Beads

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Amanda W.; Bush, Jeff A.; Plopper, George E.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    There is a need to develop improved methods for directing and maintaining the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) for regenerative medicine. Here, we present a method for embedding cells in defined protein microenvironments for the directed osteogenic differentiation of hMSC. Composite matrices of collagen I and agarose were produced by emulsification and simultaneous polymerization in the presence of hMSC to produce 30–150 μm diameter hydrogel “beads.” The proliferation, morphology, osteogenic gene expression, and calcium deposition of hMSC in bead environments were compared to other two- and three-dimensional culture environments over 14–21 days in culture. Cells embedded within 40% collagen beads exhibited equivalent proliferation rates to those in gel disks, but showed upregulation of bone sialoprotein and increased calcium deposition over 2D controls. Osteocalcin gene expression was not changed in 3D beads and disks, while collagen type I gene expression was downregulated relative to cells in 2D culture. The hydrogel bead format allows controlled cell differentiation and is a cell delivery vehicle that may also enhance vascular invasion and host incorporation. Our results indicate that the application of such beads can be used to promote the osteogenic phenotype in hMSC, which is an important step toward using them in bone repair applications. PMID:18431753

  4. Vane Rheology of Cohesionless Glass Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Poloski, Adam P.; Saez, Avelino E.

    2008-02-12

    The rheology of a single coarse granular powder has been studied with shear vane rotational viscometry. The torque required to maintain constant rotation of a vane tool in a confined bed of glass beads (with a mean particle size of 203 micrometers) is measured as a function of vane immersion depth and rotational speed. The resulting torque profiles exhibit both Coulombic behavior at low rotational rates and fluid-like behavior at high rotational rates. Analyzing vane shaft and end effects allows the flow dynamics at the cylindrical and top and bottom disk surfaces of vane rotation to be determined. Disk surfaces show a uniform torque profile consistent with Coulombic friction over most of the rotational rates studied. In contrast, cylindrical surfaces show both frictional and collisional torque contributions, with significant dynamic torque increases at deep immersion depths and fast vane rotation. A recently proposed constitutive equation is used to model the flow behavior. Semi-quantitative prediction is achieved at rotational rates both below 0.5 rad/s and above 10 rad/s. At slow vane speeds, the bed appears to be governed by a Janssen type normal stress distribution such that pressure saturates at deep immersions. This occurs because internal stresses are transmitted to the vane and container walls. For fast vane rotation, the particles in the vicinity of the vane behave as if they were fully fluidized, and the normal stress distributions influencing granular rheology are primarily lithostatic. Prediction at rotational rates from 0.5 rad/s to 10 rad/s is complicated by changes in the granular microstructure and stress fields resulting from partial fluidization of the bed. Overall, it is possible to characterize the quasi-static and partially fluidized flow regimes with a vane rheometer. Knowledge of how the granular normal stress profile changes as the granular material is fluidized could enable prediction in the intermediate flow regime.

  5. Organic-inorganic hybrid polymer-encapsulated magnetic nanobead catalysts.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takayoshi; Sato, Toru; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Katsumi; Oguma, Koichi; Yanagisawa, Akira

    2008-01-01

    A new strategy for the encapsulation of magnetic nanobeads was developed by using the in situ self-assembly of an organic-inorganic hybrid polymer. The hybrid polymer of {[Cu(bpy)(BF(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](bpy)}(n) (bpy=4,4'-bipyridine) was constructed on the surface of amino-functionalized magnetic beads and the resulting hybrid-polymer-encapsulated beads were utilized as catalysts for the oxidation of silyl enolates to provide the corresponding alpha-hydroxy carbonyl compounds in high yield. After the completion of the reaction, the catalyst was readily recovered by magnetic separation and the recovered catalyst could be reused several times. Because the current method did not require complicated procedures for incorporating the catalyst onto the magnetic beads, the preparation and the application of various other types of organic-inorganic hybrid-polymer-coated magnetic beads could be possible.

  6. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  7. On-chip immunomagnetic separation of bacteria by in-flow dynamic manipulation of paramagnetic beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shakil; Noh, Jong Wook; Hoyland, James; de Oliveira Hansen, Roana; Erdmann, Helmut; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2016-11-01

    Every year, millions of people all over the world fall ill due to the consumption of unsafe food, where consumption of contaminated and spoiled animal origin product is the main cause for diseases due to bacterial growth. This leads to an intense need for efficient methods for detection of food-related bacteria. In this work, we present a method for integration of immunomagnetic separation of bacteria into microfluidic technology by applying an alternating magnetic field, which manipulates the paramagnetic beads into a sinusoidal path across the whole microchannel, increasing the probability for bacteria capture. The optimum channel geometry, flow rate and alternating magnetic field frequency were investigated, resulting in a capture efficiency of 68 %.

  8. Modeling Analyte Transport and Capture in Porous Bead Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jie; Lennart, Alexis; Wong, Jorge; Ali, Mehnaaz F.; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Camp, James; McDevitt, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Porous agarose microbeads, with high surface to volume ratios and high binding densities, are attracting attention as highly sensitive, affordable sensor elements for a variety of high performance bioassays. While such polymer microspheres have been extensively studied and reported on previously and are now moving into real-world clinical practice, very little work has been completed to date to model the convection, diffusion, and binding kinetics of soluble reagents captured within such fibrous networks. Here, we report the development of a three-dimensional computational model and provide the initial evidence for its agreement with experimental outcomes derived from the capture and detection of representative protein and genetic biomolecules in 290μm porous beads. We compare this model to antibody-mediated capture of C-reactive protein and bovine serum albumin, along with hybridization of oligonucleotide sequences to DNA probes. These results suggest that due to the porous interior of the agarose bead, internal analyte transport is both diffusion- and convection-based, and regardless of the nature of analyte, the bead interiors reveal an interesting trickle of convection-driven internal flow. Based on this model, the internal to external flow rate ratio is found to be in the range of 1:3100 to 1:170 for beads with agarose concentration ranging from 0.5% to 8% for the sensor ensembles here studied. Further, both model and experimental evidence suggest that binding kinetics strongly affect analyte distribution of captured reagents within the beads. These findings reveal that high association constants create a steep moving boundary in which unbound analytes are held back at the periphery of the bead sensor. Low association constants create a more shallow moving boundary in which unbound analytes diffuse further into the bead before binding. These models agree with experimental evidence and thus serve as a new tool set for the study of bio-agent transport processes

  9. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  10. BACs-on-Beads technology: a reliable test for rapid detection of aneuploidies and microdeletions in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    García-Herrero, Sandra; Campos-Galindo, Inmaculada; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Serra, Vicente; Olmo, Inés; Lara, Coral; Simón, Carlos; Rubio, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The risk of fetal aneuploidies is usually estimated based on high resolution ultrasound combined with biochemical determination of criterion in maternal blood, with invasive procedures offered to the population at risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a new rapid aneuploidy screening test on amniotic fluid (AF) or chorionic villus (CV) samples based on BACs-on-Beads (BoBs) technology and to compare the results with classical karyotyping by Giemsa banding (G-banding) of cultured cells in metaphase as the gold standard technique. The prenatal-BoBs kit was used to study aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y as well as nine microdeletion syndromes in 321 AF and 43 CV samples. G-banding of metaphase cultured cells was performed concomitantly for all prenatal samples. A microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was also carried out in a subset of samples. Prenatal-BoBs results were widely confirmed by classical karyotyping. Only six karyotype findings were not identified by Prenatal-BoBs, all of them due to the known limitations of the technique. In summary, the BACs-on-Beads technology was an accurate, robust, and efficient method for the rapid diagnosis of common aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes in prenatal samples.

  11. BACs-on-Beads Technology: A Reliable Test for Rapid Detection of Aneuploidies and Microdeletions in Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Serra, Vicente; Olmo, Inés; Lara, Coral; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The risk of fetal aneuploidies is usually estimated based on high resolution ultrasound combined with biochemical determination of criterion in maternal blood, with invasive procedures offered to the population at risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a new rapid aneuploidy screening test on amniotic fluid (AF) or chorionic villus (CV) samples based on BACs-on-Beads (BoBs) technology and to compare the results with classical karyotyping by Giemsa banding (G-banding) of cultured cells in metaphase as the gold standard technique. The prenatal-BoBs kit was used to study aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y as well as nine microdeletion syndromes in 321 AF and 43 CV samples. G-banding of metaphase cultured cells was performed concomitantly for all prenatal samples. A microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was also carried out in a subset of samples. Prenatal-BoBs results were widely confirmed by classical karyotyping. Only six karyotype findings were not identified by Prenatal-BoBs, all of them due to the known limitations of the technique. In summary, the BACs-on-Beads technology was an accurate, robust, and efficient method for the rapid diagnosis of common aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes in prenatal samples. PMID:24795887

  12. Controlled antiseptic release by alginate polymer films and beads.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Bayer, Ilker S; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-01-30

    Biodegradable polymeric materials based on blending aqueous dispersions of natural polymer sodium alginate (NaAlg) and povidone iodine (PVPI) complex, which allow controlled antiseptic release, are presented. The developed materials are either free standing NaAlg films or Ca(2+)-cross-linked alginate beads, which properly combined with PVPI demonstrate antibacterial and antifungal activity, suitable for therapeutic applications, such as wound dressing. Glycerol was used as the plasticizing agent. Film morphology was studied by optical and atomic force microscopy. It was found that PVPI complex forms well dispersed circular micro-domains within the NaAlg matrix. The beads were fabricated by drop-wise immersion of NaAlg/PVPI/glycerol solutions into aqueous calcium chloride solutions to form calcium alginate beads encapsulating PVPI solution (CaAlg/PVPI). Controlled release of PVPI was possible when the composite films and beads were brought into direct contact with water or with moist media. Bactericidal and fungicidal properties of the materials were tested against Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi. The results indicated very efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity within 48 h. Controlled release of PVPI into open wounds is highly desired in clinical applications to avoid toxic doses of iodine absorption by the wound. A wide variety of applications are envisioned such as external and internal wound dressings with controlled antiseptic release, hygienic and protective packaging films for medical devices, and polymer beads as water disinfectants.

  13. Bead temperature effects on FCAW heat-affected zone hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Hardness limits for welding procedure qualification are often imposed to lessen the chances of delayed hydrogen cracking during production fabrication. Temper bead techniques have been used by fabricators during these qualifications to improve their chances of success. This practice involves using the heat of additional weld beads to soften the heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness in the base metal next to the weld where the hardness is the greatest. The technique works under controlled conditions, but the consistency for field use was questionable. This report describes an investigate of the effect of welding parameters, base metal chemical composition, and weld bead placement on HAZ softening. An empirical formula developed from base plate chemical composition, weld cooling time, and temper bead placement can be used to estimate the amount of HAZ tempering. Combined with an appropriate hardness prediction formula, it can help find the welding procedure needed to achieve a desired maximum HAZ hardness, or predict the HAZ hardness of existing welds. Based on the results of the study, bead temperature is not recommended for HAZ hardness control on large scale fabrications.

  14. Metal bead crystals for easy heating by direct current.

    PubMed

    Voigtländer, Bert; Cherepanov, Vasily; Elsaesser, Christa; Linke, Udo

    2008-03-01

    The preparation of metal bead crystals with two wires attached to the crystal is described. These crystals allow for a very easy and efficient method to heat metal single crystals by direct current heating through the connecting wires of the bead crystal. This heating of the bead crystal is sufficient to clean metal surfaces such as the surfaces of Pt and Au as confirmed by Auger spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). There is no need for any ion sputtering which is conventionally used to clean metal single crystal surfaces. The bead crystals with two leads fabricated from a wide range metals and metal alloys such as Cu, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ta, W, Re, Ir, Pt, Au, PtPd, PtRh, AuAg, and PtIr can be used as general purpose metal substrates for surface science studies and other applications. Additionally, these bead crystals can be used to reshape STM tips by indentation of the tip into the soft metal in order to recover atomic resolution imaging on hard substrates.

  15. Posttranslational Modification Assays on Functional Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Neiswinger, Johnathan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Cox, Eric; Rho, HeeSool; Jeong, Jun Seop; Zhu, Heng

    2016-10-03

    Protein microarray technology provides a straightforward yet powerful strategy for identifying substrates of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and studying the specificity of the enzymes that catalyze these reactions. Protein microarray assays can be designed for individual enzymes or a mixture to establish connections between enzymes and substrates. Assays for four well-known PTMs-phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation-have been developed and are described here for use on functional protein microarrays. Phosphorylation and acetylation require a single enzyme and are easily adapted for use on an array. The ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cascades are very similar, and the combination of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes plus ubiquitin or SUMO protein and ATP is sufficient for in vitro modification of many substrates.

  16. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  17. Overview of DNA microarrays: types, applications, and their future.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Roger

    2013-01-01

    This unit provides an overview of DNA microarrays. Microarrays are a technology in which thousands of nucleic acids are bound to a surface and are used to measure the relative concentration of nucleic acid sequences in a mixture via hybridization and subsequent detection of the hybridization events. This overview first discusses the history of microarrays and the antecedent technologies that led to their development. This is followed by discussion of the methods of manufacture of microarrays and the most common biological applications. The unit ends with a brief description of the limitations of microarrays and discusses how microarrays are being rapidly replaced by DNA sequencing technologies.

  18. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  19. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  20. Rapid and continuous magnetic separation in droplet microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Brouzes, Eric; Kruse, Travis; Kimmerling, Robert; Strey, Helmut H.

    2014-12-03

    Here, we present a droplet microfluidic method to extract molecules of interest from a droplet in a rapid and continuous fashion. We accomplish this by first marginalizing functionalized super-paramagnetic beads within the droplet using a magnetic field, and then splitting the droplet into one droplet containing the majority of magnetic beads and one droplet containing the minority fraction. We quantitatively analysed the factors which affect the efficiency of marginalization and droplet splitting to optimize the enrichment of magnetic beads. We first characterized the interplay between the droplet velocity and the strength of the magnetic field and its effect on marginalization. We found that marginalization is optimal at the midline of the magnet and that marginalization is a good predictor of bead enrichment through splitting at low to moderate droplet velocities. Finally, we focused our efforts on manipulating the splitting profile to improve the enrichment provided by asymmetric splitting. We designed asymmetric splitting forks that employ capillary effects to preferentially extract the bead-rich regions of the droplets. Our strategy represents a framework to optimize magnetic bead enrichment methods tailored to the requirements of specific droplet-based applications. We anticipate that our separation technology is well suited for applications in single-cell genomics and proteomics. In particular, our method could be used to separate mRNA bound to poly-dT functionalized magnetic microparticles from single cell lysates to prepare single-cell cDNA libraries.

  1. Rapid and continuous magnetic separation in droplet microfluidic devices

    DOE PAGES

    Brouzes, Eric; Kruse, Travis; Kimmerling, Robert; ...

    2014-12-03

    Here, we present a droplet microfluidic method to extract molecules of interest from a droplet in a rapid and continuous fashion. We accomplish this by first marginalizing functionalized super-paramagnetic beads within the droplet using a magnetic field, and then splitting the droplet into one droplet containing the majority of magnetic beads and one droplet containing the minority fraction. We quantitatively analysed the factors which affect the efficiency of marginalization and droplet splitting to optimize the enrichment of magnetic beads. We first characterized the interplay between the droplet velocity and the strength of the magnetic field and its effect on marginalization.more » We found that marginalization is optimal at the midline of the magnet and that marginalization is a good predictor of bead enrichment through splitting at low to moderate droplet velocities. Finally, we focused our efforts on manipulating the splitting profile to improve the enrichment provided by asymmetric splitting. We designed asymmetric splitting forks that employ capillary effects to preferentially extract the bead-rich regions of the droplets. Our strategy represents a framework to optimize magnetic bead enrichment methods tailored to the requirements of specific droplet-based applications. We anticipate that our separation technology is well suited for applications in single-cell genomics and proteomics. In particular, our method could be used to separate mRNA bound to poly-dT functionalized magnetic microparticles from single cell lysates to prepare single-cell cDNA libraries.« less

  2. Rapid and continuous magnetic separation in droplet microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Brouzes, Eric; Kruse, Travis; Kimmerling, Robert; Strey, Helmut H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a droplet microfluidic method to extract molecules of interest from a droplet in a rapid and continuous fashion. We accomplish this by first marginalizing functionalized super-paramagnetic beads within the droplet using a magnetic field, and then splitting the droplet into one droplet containing the majority of magnetic beads and one droplet containing the minority fraction. We quantitatively analysed the factors which affect the efficiency of marginalization and droplet splitting to optimize the enrichment of magnetic beads. We first characterized the interplay between the droplet velocity and the strength of the magnetic field and its effect on marginalization. We found that marginalization is optimal at the midline of the magnet and that marginalization is a good predictor of bead enrichment through splitting at low to moderate droplet velocities. Finally, we focused our efforts on manipulating the splitting profile to improve the enrichment provided by asymmetric splitting. We designed asymmetric splitting forks that employ capillary effects to preferentially extract the bead-rich regions of the droplets. Our strategy represents a framework to optimize magnetic bead enrichment methods tailored to the requirements of specific droplet-based applications. We anticipate that our separation technology is well suited for applications in single-cell genomics and proteomics. In particular, our method could be used to separate mRNA bound to poly-dT functionalized magnetic microparticles from single cell lysates to prepare single-cell cDNA libraries. PMID:25501881

  3. A Pneumatic Actuated Microfluidic Beads-Trapping Device

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Cai, Ziliang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-08-20

    The development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic microbeads trapping device is reported in this paper. Besides fluid channels, the proposed device includes a pneumatic control chamber and a beads-trapping chamber with a filter array structure. The pneumatic flow control chamber and the beads-trapping chamber are vertically stacked and separated by a thin membrane. By adjusting the pressure in the pneumatic control chamber, the membrane can either be pushed against the filter array to set the device in trapping mode or be released to set the device in releasing mode. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to optimize the geometry design of the filter array structure; the device fabrication was also carried out. The prototype device was tested and the preliminary experimental results showed that it can be used as a beads-trapping unit for various biochemistry and analytical chemistry applications, especially for flow injection analysis systems.

  4. Ex vivo mucoadhesion of different zinc-pectinate hydrogel beads.

    PubMed

    Hagesaether, Ellen; Bye, Ragnar; Sande, S Arne

    2008-01-22

    The objective of this study was to investigate the mucoadhesive properties of pre-swelled hydrogel beads made of six types of pectin from three manufacturers. The types of pectin differed mainly in the degree of methoxylation and degree of amidation. Zinc ions were used as cross-linking agent. The mucoadhesive properties were tested on an inverted fresh porcine small intestine attached to a rotating cylinder. Beads made of pectin with a high degree of methoxylation (70%) showed superior mucoadhesive results compared to the other formulations, which could be correlated to the lower amount of zinc in this formulation, subsequently leading to a lower amount of cross-linking and higher mobility of the polymer chains of these beads. This study therefore also indicated the importance of doing mucoadhesive measurements on relevant formulations, and not basing the understanding solely on investigating polymer solutions. Samples from different manufacturers produced the same results.

  5. Ion Exchange Resin Bead Decoupled High-Pressure Electroosmotic Pump

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bingcheng; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Liu, Shaorong

    2009-01-01

    We describe an electroosmotic pump (EOP) that utilizes a cation exchange resin bead as the electric field decoupler. The resin bead serves as a electrical grounding joint without fluid leakage, thus eliminating electrolytic gas interference from the flow channels. The arrangement is easy to practice from readily available components, displays a very low electrical resistance, and is capable of bearing high backpressure (at least 3200 psi). We use a silica xerogel column as the EOP element to pump water and demonstrate a complete capillary ion chromatograph (CIC), which uses a similar bead based microelectrodialytic generator (μ-EDG) to generate a KOH eluent from the pumped water. We observed good operational stability of the complete arrangement over long periods. PMID:19449862

  6. Integrated capture, transport, and magneto-mechanical resonant sensing of superparamagnetic microbeads using magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, E; Montana, D; Beach, G S D

    2012-11-07

    An integrated platform for the capture, transport, and detection of individual superparamagnetic microbeads is described for lab-on-a-chip biomedical applications. Magnetic domain walls in magnetic tracks have previously been shown to be capable of capturing and transporting individual beads through a fluid at high speeds. Here it is shown that the strong magnetostatic interaction between a bead and a domain wall leads to a distinct magneto-mechanical resonance that reflects the susceptibility and hydrodynamic size of the trapped bead. Numerical and analytical modeling is used to quantitatively explain this resonance, and the magneto-mechanical resonant response under sinusoidal drive is experimentally characterized both optically and electrically. The observed bead resonance presents a new mechanism for microbead sensing and metrology. The dual functionality of domain walls as both bead carriers and sensors is a promising platform for the development of lab-on-a-bead technologies.

  7. Preparation and cytotoxicity of N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan/alginate beads containing gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alessandro F; Facchi, Suelen P; Monteiro, Johny P; Nocchi, Samara R; Silva, Cleiser T P; Nakamura, Celso V; Girotto, Emerson M; Rubira, Adley F; Muniz, Edvani C

    2015-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte complex beads based on N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) and sodium alginate (ALG) were obtained. This biomaterial was characterised by FTIR, TGA/DTG, DSC and SEM analysis. The good properties of polyelectrolyte complex hydrogel beads were associated, for the first time, with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Through a straightforward methodology, AuNPs were encapsulated into the beads. The in vitro cytotoxicity assays on the Caco-2 colon cancer cells and healthy VERO cells showed that the beads presented good biocompatibility on both cell lines, whereas the beads loaded with gold nanoparticles (beads/AuNPs) was slightly cytotoxic on the Caco-2 and VERO cells.

  8. High-efficiency microarray of 3-D carbon MEMS electrodes for pathogen detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassegne, Sam; Wondimu, Berhanu; Majzoub, Mohammad; Shin, Jiae

    2008-11-01

    Molecular diagnostic applications for pathogen detections require the ability to separate pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, etc., from a biological sample of blood or saliva. Over the past several years, conventional two-dimensional active microarrays have been used with success for the manipulation of biomolecules including DNA. However, they have a major drawback of inability to process relatively 'largevolume' samples useful in infectious disease diagnostics applications. This paper presents an active microarray of three-dimensional carbon electrodes that exploits electrokinetic forces for transport, accumulation, and hybridization of charged bio-molecules with an added advantage of large volume capability. Tall 3-dimensional carbon microelectrode posts are fabricated using C-MEMS (Carbon MEMS) technology that is emerging as a very exciting research area since carbon has fascinating physical, chemical, mechanical and electrical properties in addition to its low cost. The chip fabricated using CMEMS technology is packaged and its efficiency of separation and accumulation of charged particle established by manipulating negatively charged polycarboxylate 2 μm beads in 50 mM histidine buffer.

  9. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  10. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout.

  11. Annotating nonspecific SAGE tags with microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Jung, Yong-Chul; Wu, Qingfa; Kibbe, Warren A; Wang, San Ming

    2006-01-01

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) detects transcripts by extracting short tags from the transcripts. Because of the limited length, many SAGE tags are shared by transcripts from different genes. Relying on sequence information in the general gene expression database has limited power to solve this problem due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the deposited sequences. Considering that the complexity of gene expression at a single tissue level should be much simpler than that in the general expression database, we reasoned that by restricting gene expression to tissue level, the accuracy of gene annotation for the nonspecific SAGE tags should be significantly improved. To test the idea, we developed a tissue-specific SAGE annotation database based on microarray data (). This database contains microarray expression information represented as UniGene clusters for 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The nonspecific SAGE tag is first matched to the database by the same tissue type used by both SAGE and microarray analysis; then the multiple UniGene clusters assigned to the nonspecific SAGE tag are searched in the database under the matched tissue type. The UniGene cluster presented solely or at higher expression levels in the database is annotated to represent the specific gene for the nonspecific SAGE tags. The accuracy of gene annotation by this database was largely confirmed by experimental data. Our study shows that microarray data provide a useful source for annotating the nonspecific SAGE tags.

  12. Analytical Protein Microarrays: Advancements Towards Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Protein microarrays represent a powerful technology with the potential to serve as tools for the detection of a broad range of analytes in numerous applications such as diagnostics, drug development, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Key features of analytical protein microarrays include high throughput and relatively low costs due to minimal reagent consumption, multiplexing, fast kinetics and hence measurements, and the possibility of functional integration. So far, especially fundamental studies in molecular and cell biology have been conducted using protein microarrays, while the potential for clinical, notably point-of-care applications is not yet fully utilized. The question arises what features have to be implemented and what improvements have to be made in order to fully exploit the technology. In the past we have identified various obstacles that have to be overcome in order to promote protein microarray technology in the diagnostic field. Issues that need significant improvement to make the technology more attractive for the diagnostic market are for instance: too low sensitivity and deficiency in reproducibility, inadequate analysis time, lack of high-quality antibodies and validated reagents, lack of automation and portable instruments, and cost of instruments necessary for chip production and read-out. The scope of the paper at hand is to review approaches to solve these problems. PMID:28146048

  13. Analytical Protein Microarrays: Advancements Towards Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula

    2017-01-29

    Protein microarrays represent a powerful technology with the potential to serve as tools for the detection of a broad range of analytes in numerous applications such as diagnostics, drug development, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Key features of analytical protein microarrays include high throughput and relatively low costs due to minimal reagent consumption, multiplexing, fast kinetics and hence measurements, and the possibility of functional integration. So far, especially fundamental studies in molecular and cell biology have been conducted using protein microarrays, while the potential for clinical, notably point-of-care applications is not yet fully utilized. The question arises what features have to be implemented and what improvements have to be made in order to fully exploit the technology. In the past we have identified various obstacles that have to be overcome in order to promote protein microarray technology in the diagnostic field. Issues that need significant improvement to make the technology more attractive for the diagnostic market are for instance: too low sensitivity and deficiency in reproducibility, inadequate analysis time, lack of high-quality antibodies and validated reagents, lack of automation and portable instruments, and cost of instruments necessary for chip production and read-out. The scope of the paper at hand is to review approaches to solve these problems.

  14. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The…

  15. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  16. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  17. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  18. Beading and spiking phenomena in the M551 metals melting experiment. [Skylab program to analyze beading phenomenon under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C.; Brashears, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    A study was made regarding the beading and spiking phenomena observed in the M551 metals melting experiment conducted during the Skylab I mission in June 1973. An analysis was made of the beading phenomenon based on the Karman vortex shedding theory. The results tend to support the hypothesis that beading which occurred in the stainless and tantalum samples was a Karman vortex street formation. A dynamic model of cavity oscillation is discussed to explain the spiking phenomenon which was observed in the stainless steel and tantalum samples. Calculations of spiking frequency indicate that the intensity of spiking depends primarily on the vapor pressure and surface tension properties of the material, and is only slightly affected by the level of gravitation acceleration.

  19. A Method of Microarray Data Storage Using Array Data Type

    PubMed Central

    Tsoi, Lam C.; Zheng, W. Jim

    2009-01-01

    A well-designed microarray database can provide valuable information on gene expression levels. However, designing an efficient microarray database with minimum space usage is not an easy task since designers need to integrate the microarray data with the information of genes, probe annotation, and the descriptions of each microarray experiment. Developing better methods to store microarray data can greatly improve the efficiency and usefulness of such data. A new schema is proposed to store microarray data by using array data type in an object-relational database management system – PostgreSQL. The implemented database can store all the microarray data from the same chip in an array data structure. The variable length array data type in PostgreSQL can store microarray data from same chip. The implementation of our schema can help to increase the data retrieval and space efficiency. PMID:17392028

  20. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  1. Shrink-induced sorting using integrated nanoscale magnetic traps.

    PubMed

    Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Norouzi, Nazila; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Sharac, Nicholas; Grant, Ted; Chen, Aaron; Strayer, Scott; Ragan, Regina; Khine, Michelle

    2013-02-11

    We present a plastic microfluidic device with integrated nanoscale magnetic traps (NSMTs) that separates magnetic from non-magnetic beads with high purity and throughput, and unprecedented enrichments. Numerical simulations indicate significantly higher localized magnetic field gradients than previously reported. We demonstrated >20 000-fold enrichment for 0.001% magnetic bead mixtures. Since we achieve high purity at all flow-rates tested, this is a robust, rapid, portable, and simple solution to sort target species from small volumes amenable for point-of-care applications. We used the NSMT in a 96 well format to extract DNA from small sample volumes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).

  2. Xanthan-alginate composite gel beads: molecular interaction and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2007-02-22

    Xanthan gum (XG), a trisaccharide branched polymer, was applied to reinforce calcium alginate beads in this study. Composite beads consisting of XG and sodium alginate (SA) were prepared using ionotropic gelation method. Diclofenac calcium-alginate (DCA) beads incorporated with different amounts of XG were produced as well. Molecular interaction between SA and XG in the composite beads and the XG-DCA beads was investigated using FTIR spectroscopy. Physical properties of the XG-DCA beads such as entrapment efficiency of diclofenac sodium (DS), thermal property, water uptake, swelling and DS release in various media were examined. XG could form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with SA in the composite beads with or without DS. Differential scanning calorimetric study indicated that XG did not affect thermal property of the DCA beads. The DS entrapment efficiency of the DCA beads increased with increasing amount of XG added. The XG-DCA beads showed higher water uptake and swelling in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer and distilled water than the DCA beads. A longer lag time and a higher DS release rate of the XG-DCA beads in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer were found. In contrast, the 0.3%XG-DCA beads could retard the drug release in distilled water because interaction between XG and SA gave higher tortuosity of the bead matrix. However, higher content of XG in the DCA beads increased the release rate of DS. This can be attributed to erosion of small aggregates of XG on the surface of the DCA beads. This finding suggested that XG could modulate physicochemical properties and drug release of the DCA beads, which based on the existence of molecular interaction between XG and SA.

  3. Examining microarray slide quality for the EPA using SNL's hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Rachel M.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes research performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess microarray quality on arrays from two platforms of interest to the EPA. Custom microarrays from two novel, commercially produced array platforms were imaged with SNL's unique hyperspectral imaging technology and multivariate data analysis was performed to investigate sources of emission on the arrays. No extraneous sources of emission were evident in any of the array areas scanned. This led to the conclusions that either of these array platforms could produce high quality, reliable microarray data for the EPA toxicology programs. Hyperspectral imaging results are presented and recommendations for microarray analyses using these platforms are detailed within the report.

  4. A new device for efficient preparation of standard antibiotic bead chains and customized antibiotic delivery.

    PubMed

    Qi, Baochang; Ju, Weina; Yu, Tiecheng; Wang, Tiejun; Zhao, Yi; Sun, Dahui

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic-loaded polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads are widely used in orthopedic practice for the prevention of infections after open fractures and in the management of osteomyelitis. The use of commercial beads is limited by insufficient flexibility, lack of provision for selection of specific antibiotic, and short drug-release time. Further, the manual procedure for the preparation of PMMA beads is slow, and the products are not uniform in size. Uniformity of the bead size is crucial because the placement of oversized beads place at sites with limited space (e.g., narrow medullary canal) is difficult, and their retrieval from such sites is painful to the patient. To overcome the limitations of commercial beads and manually prepared beads, we developed a simple device for the efficient preparation of antibiotic-loaded PMMA beads of uniform sizes. We describe the device, bead preparation, and the characteristics of the beads prepared using our device, and the preliminary clinical results. The beads obtained using this device were relatively small, had excellent flexibility, and were suitable for implantation in small spaces. The device permits the selection of the antibiotic to be loaded on to the beads. The results of preliminary studies of the beads prepared using our device have been positive, highlighting the need for more large-scale and longitudinal investigations.

  5. Does antibiotic elution from PMMA beads deteriorate after 1-year shelf storage?

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Luke H; Whiddon, David R; Simpson, R Bruce

    2007-09-01

    Antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate beads are widely used as an adjunct in the treatment of orthopaedic infections. Because there is no commercially available bead in the United States, surgeons must manufacture bead sets at the time of implantation. This can be time consuming and wasteful. We hypothesized antibiotic-impregnated beads would maintain consistent elution for up to 1 year after manufacturing and storage. Tobramycin-impregnated antibiotic beads were manufactured using a bead mold. The antibiotic was either hand-mixed into the polymethylmethacrylate powder (1.2 g/40 g) or came premixed from the factory (1 g/40 g). Packages of beads were gas-sterilized and stored at room temperature. Beads were tested at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months. Antibiotic levels in the eluent from each day of the month were measured. We were unable to detect any difference in the amount of antibiotic elution between beads tested immediately after manufacture and beads manufactured and stored for 6 or 12 months. Beads with hand-mixed antibiotics eluted higher levels of antibiotics than the beads prepared with factory-mixed antibiotics. We conclude antibiotic beads can be made, sterilized, and used after 1 year of storage with no deleterious effect on antibiotic elution characteristics.

  6. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  7. Chitosan-starch beads prepared by ionotropic gelation as potential matrices for controlled release of fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jonas J; Francois, Nora J

    2016-09-05

    The present study examines the agrochemical application of macrospheres prepared with chitosan and chitosan-starch blends by an easy dripping technique, using a sodium tripolyphosphate aqueous solution as the crosslinking agent. These biopolymers form hydrogels that could be a viable alternative method to obtain controlled-release fertilizers (CRFs). Three different concentrations (ranging from 20 to 100wt/wt% of chitosan) and two crosslinking times (2 or 4h) were used. The resulting polymeric matrices were examined by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Ionotropic gelation and neutralization induced the formation of the macrospheres. The crosslinking time and the composition of the polymeric hydrogel controlled the crosslinking degree, the swelling behavior and the fertilizer loading capability. Potassium nitrate-loaded beads were shown to be useful as a controlled-release fertilizer. After 14days of continuous release into distilled water, the cumulative concentration in the release medium reached between 70 and 93% of the initially loaded salt, depending on the matrix used. The prepared beads showed properties that make them suitable for use in the agrochemical industry as CRFs.

  8. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  9. Design of a covalently bonded glycosphingolipid microarray.

    PubMed

    Arigi, Emma; Blixt, Ola; Buschard, Karsten; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are well known ubiquitous constituents of all eukaryotic cell membranes, yet their normal biological functions are not fully understood. As with other glycoconjugates and saccharides, solid phase display on microarrays potentially provides an effective platform for in vitro study of their functional interactions. However, with few exceptions, the most widely used microarray platforms display only the glycan moiety of GSLs, which not only ignores potential modulating effects of the lipid aglycone, but inherently limits the scope of application, excluding, for example, the major classes of plant and fungal GSLs. In this work, a prototype "universal" GSL-based covalent microarray has been designed, and preliminary evaluation of its potential utility in assaying protein-GSL binding interactions investigated. An essential step in development involved the enzymatic release of the fatty acyl moiety of the ceramide aglycone of selected mammalian GSLs with sphingolipid N-deacylase (SCDase). Derivatization of the free amino group of a typical lyso-GSL, lyso-G(M1), with a prototype linker assembled from succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-diethyleneglycol] ester and 2-mercaptoethylamine, was also tested. Underivatized or linker-derivatized lyso-GSL were then immobilized on N-hydroxysuccinimide- or epoxide-activated glass microarray slides and probed with carbohydrate binding proteins of known or partially known specificities (i.e., cholera toxin B-chain; peanut agglutinin, a monoclonal antibody to sulfatide, Sulph 1; and a polyclonal antiserum reactive to asialo-G(M2)). Preliminary evaluation of the method indicated successful immobilization of the GSLs, and selective binding of test probes. The potential utility of this methodology for designing covalent microarrays that incorporate GSLs for serodiagnosis is discussed.

  10. Spring loaded beaded cable makes efficient wire puller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    An efficient wire puller consists of a steel probe with a hole in one end fastened to a steel cable which is strung with metal beads compressed by spring loaded ferrules. This device allows cables to be pulled or forced around bends and elbows in pipes or tubes.

  11. Collection Development: From Beads to Bangles (Jewelry Making)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanrahan, Katie

    2010-01-01

    Jewelry making began exploding as a hobby about ten years ago, largely because the flush economy gave individuals more leisure time and disposable income. Jewelry classes, bead stores, and special events have multiplied like craft shows at Christmas time. While the recent economic downturn has slowed the growth of the hobby, it is still as popular…

  12. Hydraulic and acoustic investigation of sintered glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueven, Ibrahim; Luding, Stefan; Steeb, Holger

    2013-06-01

    In the present contribution, we are focussing on the hydraulical and acoustical charcterization of sintered glass beads. For the experiments sintered mono-and weakly polydisperse glass bead samples were applied. Depending on the particle size, degree of particle dispersion and sample treatment during the sintering process, the produced cylindircal samples exhibit different hydraulic and acoustic properties. The more general focus of our research lies on the physical behaviour of oil-water emulsions in porous media by means of combined electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation. For this purpose, a hydraulic multi-task measuring cell was developed. This cell allows carrying out simple hydraulic permeability and challenging ultrasound experiments in porous materials saturated with Pickering emulsions. In the first phase of our experiments, hydraulical and acoustical measurements of cylindrical sintered glass bead samples were performed in order to determine their intrinsic permeabilities and effective ultrasound velocities. The intrinsic permeability ks, a coupling parameter between the solid matrix and the pore fluid, has a huge influence on wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. For the assessment of permeabilities, particle size distributions and porosities of the investigated glass beads were determined.

  13. Antimicrobial N-brominated hydantoin and uracil grafted polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Farah, Shady; Aviv, Oren; Laout, Natalia; Ratner, Stanislav; Domb, Abraham J

    2015-10-28

    Hydantoin-N-halamine derivatives conjugated on polystyrene beads are promising disinfectants with broad antimicrobial activity affected by the gradual release of oxidizing halogen in water. The objective of this work was to identify and test of hydantoin-like molecules possessing urea moiety, which may provide N-haloamines releasing oxidizing halogens when exposed to water at different rates and release profiles for tailored antimicrobial agents. In this work, several hydantoin (five member ring) and for the first time reported, uracil (six member ring) derivatives have been conjugated to polystyrene beads and tested for their lasting antimicrobial activity. Four molecules of each series were conjugated onto polystyrene beads from the reaction of the N-potassium hydantoin or uracil derivatives onto chloromethylated polystyrene beads. A distinct difference in bromine loading capacity and release profiles was found for the different conjugated derivatives. All tested materials exhibit strong antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and bacteriophages MS2 of 7 and ~4 log reduction, respectively. These results highlight the antimicrobial potential of halogenated cyclic molecules containing urea groups as water disinfection agents.

  14. Preparation of alginate beads containing a prodrug of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Tsai; Di Pasqua, Anthony J.; He, Weiling; Tsai, Tsuimin; Sueda, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Yong; Jay, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A penta-ethyl ester prodrug of the radionuclide decorporation agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), which exists as an oily liquid, was encapsulated in alginate beads by the ionotropic gelation method. An optimal formulation was found by varying initial concentrations of DTPA pentaethyl ester, alginate polymer, Tween 80 surfactant and calcium chloride. All prepared alginate beads were ~1.6 mm in diameter, and the optimal formulation had loading and encapsulation efficiencies of 91.0 ± 1.1 and 72.6 ± 2.2%, respectively, and only 3.2 ± 0.8% water absorption after storage at room temperature in ~80% relative humidity. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that DTPA penta-ethyl ester did not react with excipients during formation of the DTPA penta-ethyl ester-containing alginate beads. Release of prodrug from alginate beads was via anomalous transport, and its stability enhanced by encapsulation. Collectively, these data suggest that this solid dosage form may be suitable for oral administration after radionuclide contamination. PMID:23399237

  15. Purification of Lysozyme by Intrinsically Shielded Hydrogel Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Zhang, R.; Wang, L.; Bowyer, A.; Eisenthal, R.; Shen, Yehua; Hubble, J.

    2013-07-01

    Macro-sized intrinsically shielded hydrogel beads have been prepared from BSA and CM-dextran grafted with CB using a technique based on freeze-thawing gelation method. The size of the beads lies in around 500 μm. Isothemal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed that the relative binding affinities of the lysozyme for CB, compared with BSA, at pH 3.0 was stronger than that at pH 7.4. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme using chromatography column. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme at pH 3.0 is higher than that at pH 9. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the beads showed very high selectivity toward lysozyme. Lysozyme of very high purity (> 93%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and 85% from egg white solution. The results indicate that the macro-sized bead can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme in a chromatograph column.

  16. Bead Roller, at right, used for preparing flume sheeting (still ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bead Roller, at right, used for preparing flume sheeting (still in use, 2004); on left is a pipe cutter. Facing southeast - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Childs Powerhouse, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  17. Quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Wang, Huan; Dong, Shujun; Zhu, Peizhi; Diao, Guowang; Yang, Zhanjun

    2014-12-04

    Novel quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads were fabricated for multiplex detection of tumor markers via self-assembly of quantum dot-embedded polystyrene nanospheres into photonic crystal beads through a microfluidic device.

  18. Potential use of scrap expanded polystyrene beads for the control of Aedes triseriatus.

    PubMed

    Beehler, J W; DeFoliart, G R

    1991-06-01

    The potential use of expanded polystyrene (EPS) beads for control of Aedes triseriatus was tested in the laboratory and the field. Laboratory studies showed that beads present in amounts which persisted throughout a season significantly reduced the emergence of Ae. triseriatus adults by preventing normal eclosion from the pupae. In the field, tree holes containing EPS beads had significantly fewer larvae present than untreated controls. These field data suggest that EPS beads may mechanically prevent oviposition by mosquitoes.

  19. Apparatus for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Scott, T.C.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-03-19

    An apparatus is described for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column. 1 fig.

  20. Apparatus for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Scott, Timothy C.; Davison, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column.

  1. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  2. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  3. Latex bead immobilisation in PDMS matrix for the detection of p53 gene point mutation and anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Christophe A; Degiuli, Agnès; Imbert-Laurenceau, Emmanuelle; Mallet, Francois; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Blum, Loïc J

    2005-03-01

    Two diagnostic chemiluminescent biochips were developed for either the detection of p53 gene point mutation or the serological detection of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein. Both biochips were composed of 24 microarrays of latex beads spots (4x4) (150 microm in diameter, 800 microm spacing) entrapped in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer (PDMS). The latex beads, bearing oligonucleotide sequences or capsid protein, were spotted with a conventional piezoelectric spotter and subsequently transferred at the PDMS interface. The electron microscopy observation of the biochips showed how homogeneous and well distributed the spots could be. Point mutation detection on the codon 273 of the p53 gene was performed on the basis of the melting temperature difference between the perfect match sequence and the one base pair mismatch sequence. The hybridisation of a 20-mer oligonucleotide form the codon 273 including a one base pair mutation in its sequence on a biochip arrayed with non-muted and the muted complementary sequences, enabled a clear discrimination at 56 degrees C between muted and wild sequences. Moreover, the quantitative measurement of the amount of muted sequence in a sample was possible in the range 0.4-4 pmol. Serological measurement of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein on the biochip, prepared with 1-microm-diameter latex beads, enabled the detection of monoclonal antibodies in the range 1.55-775 ng mL(-1). Such a range could be lowered to 0.775 ng mL(-1) when using 50-nm-diameter beads, which generated a higher specific surface. The validation of the biochip for the detection of anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies was performed in human sera from seropositive and seronegative patients. The positivity of the sera was easily discriminated at serum dilutions below 1:1,000.

  4. Integrated analysis of microarray data and gene function information.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan; Zhou, Mi; Wong, Wing Hung

    2004-01-01

    Microarray data should be interpreted in the context of existing biological knowledge. Here we present integrated analysis of microarray data and gene function classification data using homogeneity analysis. Homogeneity analysis is a graphical multivariate statistical method for analyzing categorical data. It converts categorical data into graphical display. By simultaneously quantifying the microarray-derived gene groups and gene function categories, it captures the complex relations between biological information derived from microarray data and the existing knowledge about the gene function. Thus, homogeneity analysis provides a mathematical framework for integrating the analysis of microarray data and the existing biological knowledge.

  5. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation. PMID:26912948

  6. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation.

  7. 49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric beads (or granules), expandable, evolving flammable vapor and...

  8. 49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric beads (or granules), expandable evolving flammable vapor and...

  9. 49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric beads (or granules), expandable, evolving flammable vapor and...

  10. 49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric beads (or granules), expandable evolving flammable vapor and...

  11. 49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric beads (or granules), expandable, evolving flammable vapor and...

  12. Alginate/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite beads prepared using Gluconacetobacter xylinus and their application in lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Saerom; Kim, Hyungsup; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Kim, Yong Hwan; Jung, Sang-Kyu; Kan, Eunsung; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2017-02-10

    Alginate/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite beads, with well-controlled size and regular spherical shapes, were prepared in a simple manner by entrapping Gluconacetobacter xylinus in barium alginate hydrogel beads, followed by cultivation of the entrapped cells in culture media with a low sodium ion concentration. The entire surface of the alginate hydrogel beads containing the cells was covered with cellulose fibers (∼30nm) after 36h of cultivation. The cellulose crystallinity index of the alginate/bacterial cellulose beads was 0.7, which was slightly lower than that of bacterial cellulose prepared by cultivating dispersed cells. The water vapor sorption capacity of the alginate/bacterial cellulose beads increased significantly from 0.07 to 38.00 (g/g dry bead) as cultivation time increased. These results clearly indicate that alginate/bacterial cellulose beads have a much higher surface area, crystallinity, and water-holding capacity than alginate beads. The immobilization of lipase on the surface of the nanocomposite beads was also investigated as a potential application of this system. The activity and specific activity of lipase immobilized on alginate/bacterial cellulose beads were 2.6- and 3.8-fold higher, respectively, than that of lipase immobilized on cellulose beads. The alginate/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite beads prepared in this study have several potential applications in the biocatalytic, biomedical, and pharmaceutical fields because of their biocompatibility, biodegradability, high crystallinity, and large surface area.

  13. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF R3f GARNET BEAD FILTRATION AND MULTIMEDIA FILTRATION SYSTEMS; FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of tests conducted to date at the EPA T&E Facility on the R3f filtration system utilizing fine beads (such as garnet beads or glass beads) and a conventional multimedia filtration system. Both systems have been designed and built by Enprotec, a...

  14. A Renewable Electrochemical Magnetic Immunosensor Based on Gold Nanoparticle Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-05-24

    A particle-based renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor was developed by using magnetic beads and a gold nanoparticle label. Anti-IgG antibody-modified magnetic beads were attached to a renewable carbon paste transducer surface by magnets that were fixed inside the sensor. A gold nanoparticle label was capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads by sandwich immunoassay. Highly sensitive electrochemical stripping analysis offers a simple and fast method to quantify the capatured gold nanoparticle tracer and avoid the use of an enzyme label and substrate. The stripping signal of gold nanoparticle is related to the concentration of target IgG in the sample solution. A transmission electron microscopy image shows that the gold nanoparticles were successfully capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads through sandwich immunoreaction events. The parameters of immunoassay, including the loading of magnetic beads, the amount of gold nanoparticle conjugate, and the immunoreaction time, were optimized. The detection limit of 0.02 μg ml-1of IgG was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. Such particle-based electrochemical magnetic immunosensors could be readily used for simultaneous parallel detection of multiple proteins by using multiple inorganic metal nanoparticle tracers and are expected to open new opportunities for disease diagnostics and biosecurity.

  15. Respiratory Tularemia: Francisella Tularensis and Microarray Probe Designing

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Mammina, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) is the etiological microorganism for tularemia. There are different forms of tularemia such as respiratory tularemia. Respiratory tularemia is the most severe form of tularemia with a high rate of mortality; if not treated. Therefore, traditional microbiological tools and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) are not useful for a rapid, reliable, accurate, sensitive and specific diagnosis. But, DNA microarray technology does. DNA microarray technology needs to appropriate microarray probe designing. Objective: The main goal of this original article was to design suitable long oligo microarray probes for detection and identification of F. tularensis. Method: For performing this research, the complete genomes of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC198, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS, F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, F. tularensis subsp. novicida (F. novicida U112), and F. philomiragia subsp. philomiragia ATCC 25017 were studied via NCBI BLAST tool, GView and PanSeq Servers and finally the microarray probes were produced and processed via AlleleID 7.7 software and Oligoanalyzer tool, respectively. Results: In this in silico investigation, a number of long oligo microarray probes were designed for detecting and identifying F. tularensis. Among these probes, 15 probes were recognized as the best candidates for microarray chip designing. Conclusion: Calibrated microarray probes reduce the biasis of DNA microarray technology as an advanced, rapid, accurate and cost-effective molecular diagnostic tool with high specificity and sensitivity. Professional microarray probe designing provides us with much more facility and flexibility regarding preparation of a microarray diagnostic chip. PMID:28077973

  16. Detecting outlier samples in microarray data.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Albert D; Hung, Yeung Sam

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of detecting outlier samples with highly different expression patterns in microarray data. Although outliers are not common, they appear even in widely used benchmark data sets and can negatively affect microarray data analysis. It is important to identify outliers in order to explore underlying experimental or biological problems and remove erroneous data. We propose an outlier detection method based on principal component analysis (PCA) and robust estimation of Mahalanobis distances that is fully automatic. We demonstrate that our outlier detection method identifies biologically significant outliers with high accuracy and that outlier removal improves the prediction accuracy of classifiers. Our outlier detection method is closely related to existing robust PCA methods, so we compare our outlier detection method to a prominent robust PCA method.

  17. Molecular diagnosis and prognosis with DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wiltgen, Marco; Tilz, Gernot P

    2011-05-01

    Microarray analysis makes it possible to determine thousands of gene expression values simultaneously. Changes in gene expression, as a response to diseases, can be detected allowing a better understanding and differentiation of diseases at a molecular level. By comparing different kinds of tissue, for example healthy tissue and cancer tissue, the microarray analysis indicates induced gene activity, repressed gene activity or when there is no change in the gene activity level. Fundamental patterns in gene expression are extracted by several clustering and machine learning algorithms. Certain kinds of cancer can be divided into subtypes, with different clinical outcomes, by their specific gene expression patterns. This enables a better diagnosis and tailoring of individual patient treatments.

  18. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  19. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn. PMID:26813635

  20. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-Hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-01-27

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn.

  1. Ultrahigh density microarrays of solid samples.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Crismon, Heidi R; Utama, Fransiscus E; Neilson, Lynn M; Sultan, Ahmed S; Johnson, Kevin J; Andersson, Eva C; Rui, Hallgeir

    2005-07-01

    We present a sectioning and bonding technology to make ultrahigh density microarrays of solid samples, cutting edge matrix assembly (CEMA). Maximized array density is achieved by a scaffold-free, self-supporting construction with rectangular array features that are incrementally scalable. This platform technology facilitates arrays of >10,000 tissue features on a standard glass slide, inclusion of unique sample identifiers for improved manual or automated tracking, and oriented arraying of stratified or polarized samples.

  2. Metadata management and semantics in microarray repositories.

    PubMed

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-12-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework.

  3. Methods for fabricating microarrays of motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Sergey; Shen, Clifton K-F; Littler, Pey-Lih H; Fan, Zhifang; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A; Holz, Richard C

    2005-04-01

    Motile bacterial cell microarrays were fabricated by attaching Escherichia coli K-12 cells onto predesigned 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid patterned microarrays, which were covalently functionalized with E. coli antibodies or poly-L-lysine. By utilizing 11-mercaptoundecyl-penta(ethylene glycol) or 11-mercapto-1-undecanol as passivating molecules, nonspecific binding of E. coli was significantly reduced. Microcontact printing and dip-pen nanolithography were used to prepare microarrays for bacterial adhesion, which was studied by optical fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. These data indicate that single motile E. coli can be attached to predesigned line or dot features and binding can occur via the cell body or the flagella of bacteria. Adherent bacteria are viable (remain alive and motile after adhesion to patterned surface features) for more than four hours. Individual motile bacterial cells can be placed onto predesigned surface features that are at least 1.3 microm in diameter or larger. The importance of controlling the adhesion of single bacterial cell to a surface is discussed with regard to biomotor design.

  4. A New Distribution Family for Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Diana Mabel; Ricci, Lila

    2017-02-10

    The traditional approach with microarray data has been to apply transformations that approximately normalize them, with the drawback of losing the original scale. The alternative stand point taken here is to search for models that fit the data, characterized by the presence of negative values, preserving their scale; one advantage of this strategy is that it facilitates a direct interpretation of the results. A new family of distributions named gpower-normal indexed by p∈R is introduced and it is proven that these variables become normal or truncated normal when a suitable gpower transformation is applied. Expressions are given for moments and quantiles, in terms of the truncated normal density. This new family can be used to model asymmetric data that include non-positive values, as required for microarray analysis. Moreover, it has been proven that the gpower-normal family is a special case of pseudo-dispersion models, inheriting all the good properties of these models, such as asymptotic normality for small variances. A combined maximum likelihood method is proposed to estimate the model parameters, and it is applied to microarray and contamination data. Rcodes are available from the authors upon request.

  5. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  6. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  7. DNA microarray for detection of gastrointestinal viruses.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Soto-Del Río, María de Los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 10(3) virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  8. Self-assembly of colloidal pyramids in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Helseth, L E

    2005-08-02

    We study routes toward the construction of 2D colloidal pyramids. We find that magnetic beads may self-assemble into pyramids near a nonmagnetic 1D boundary as long as the number of beads in the pyramid does not exceed 10. We have also found that a strong magnetic field gradient could act as a boundary, thus assisting the self-assembly of magnetic colloids in water, and have observed the formation of stable microscopic pyramids within a certain magnetic field range. Our results indicate that colloidal pyramids can be formed in a number of ways by utilizing external fields.

  9. Platelet retention by albuminated glass and polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D L; Atwood, A I; Andrade, J D

    1976-11-01

    Ex vivo platelet retention by albuminated glass and polystyrene beads has been evaluated as a function of flow rate, bead surface area, blood exposure time and albumin treatment. The stability of the albumin coatings as well as scanning electron microscopy of the various surfaces before and after blood exposure has also been included. Results indicate that platelet retention is sensitive to changes in the above parameters and that albumin pretreatment of different substrates can decrease platelet retention. This decrease is substrate dependent in that platelet retention is different for the albuminated glass and polystyrene substrates. Chemical analysis of the substrate materials by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as bulk chemical analysis is also reported.

  10. Bile salt-reinforced alginate-chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Takka, Sevgi; Cali, Aybige Gürel

    2012-01-01

    A polymeric delayed release protein delivery system was investigated with albumin as the model drug. The polysaccharide chitosan was reacted with sodium alginate in the presence of calcium chloride to form beads with a polyelectrolyte. In this study, attempts were made to extend albumin release in the phosphate buffer at pH 6.8 from the alginate-chitosan beads by reinforcing the matrix with bile salts. Sodium taurocholate was able to prevent albumin release at pH 1.2, protecting the protein from the acidic environment and extending the total albumin release at pH 6.8. This effect was explained by an interaction between the permanent negatively charged sulfonic acid of sodium taurocholate with the amino groups of chitosan. Mild formulation conditions, high bovine serum albumin (BSA) entrapment efficiency, and resistance to gastrointestinal release seem to be synergic and promising factors toward the development of an oral protein delivery form.

  11. An Abiotic Glass-Bead Collector Exhibiting Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Youhei; Kanda, Masato; Yamamoto, Daigo; Shioi, Akihisa

    2015-09-01

    Animals relocate objects as needed by active motion. Active transport is ubiquitous in living organisms but has been difficult to realize in abiotic systems. Here we show that a self-propelled droplet can gather scattered beads toward one place on a floor and sweep it clean. This is a biomimetic active transport with loadings and unloadings, because the transport was performed by a carrier and the motion of the carrier was maintained by the energy of the chemical reaction. The oil droplet produced fluctuation of the local number density of the beads on the floor, followed by its autocatalytic growth. This mechanism may inspire the technologies based on active transport wherein chemical and physical substances migrate as in living organisms.

  12. Frictionless Demonstration Using Fine Plastic Beads For Teaching Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, K.; Kagawa, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kurniawan, K. H.

    2010-07-28

    New equipment for demonstrating laws of mechanics have successfully been constructed utilizing fine sphere plastic beads (0.3 mm in diameter). Fine plastic beads function as ball bearings to reduce the friction between the object and the plate surface. By this method, a quantitative measurement of energy conservation law has successfully been carried out with a small error of less 3%. The strong advantage of this frictionless method is that we can always use the same objects like Petri dishes for demonstrating many kinds of mechanics laws, such as the first, second, and the third laws of motion, momentum conservation law, and energy conservation law. This demonstration method surely has a beneficial effect for students, who can then understand mechanics laws systematically with a unified concept and no confusion.

  13. Plasticity of an Amorphous Assembly of Elastic Gel Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosshans, D.; Knaebel, A.; Lequeux, F.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the rheological properties of an assembly of swollen gel beads in a lack of solvent. The system is an amorphous assembly of packed soft spheres in a given volume. We have studied the plastic behavior of the system, and interpreted it in terms of bead rearrangements within the assembly. Nous avons étudié les propriétés rhéologiques d'un assemblage de billes de gel gonflées en défaut de solvant. Le système est donc une assemblée amorphe de sphères molles écrasées à volume total constant. Nous avons étudié divers aspects du comportement plastique et nous l'avons interprété en termes de réorganisations de billes dans l'assemblage.

  14. Shape optimization and characterization of polysaccharide beads prepared by ionotropic gelation.

    PubMed

    Smrdel, Polona; Bogataj, Marija; Zega, Anamarija; Planinsek, Odon; Mrhar, Ales

    2008-03-01

    The shape of drug loaded polysaccharide beads produced by ionotropic gelation has been optimized, with the aim of producing spherical beads suitable for further technological operations, such as coating. The optimization was performed on a model system sodium alginate/theophylline by inclusion of various fillers. Incorporation of excipients markedly influenced the morphological characteristics of the beads. The undesired irregular shape of beads caused by incorporation of the drug could only be improved by incorporating a combination of polycarbophil (PK) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The spherical shape of these beads was stabilized mechanically by numerous air bubbles trapped inside the beads, which prevented the collapse of the beads during drying. The optimized method was shown to be applicable to a target system of pectin and an anti-inflammatory drug, LK-423.

  15. Adsorption of congo red by chitosan hydrogel beads impregnated with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sudipta; Lee, Min W; Woo, Seung H

    2010-03-01

    The adsorption performance of chitosan (CS) hydrogel beads was investigated after multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) impregnation for the removal of congo red (CR) as an anionic dye. The study of the adsorption capacity of CS/CNT beads as a function of the CNT concentration indicated that 0.01% CNT impregnation was the most useful for enhancing the adsorption capacity. The sulfur (%) in the CS/CNT beads measured by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) was 2.5 times higher than that of normal CS beads after CR adsorption. Equilibrium adsorption isotherm data of the CS/CNT beads exhibited better fit to the Langmuir isotherm model than to the Freundlich isotherm model, and the heterogeneity factor (n) value of the CS/CNT beads calculated from the Sips isotherm model was close to unity (0.98). The maximum adsorption capacity of CS/CNT beads obtained from the Langmuir model was 450.4 mg g(-1).

  16. Residual gentamicin-release from antibiotic-loaded polymethylmethacrylate beads after 5 years of implantation.

    PubMed

    Neut, Daniëlle; van de Belt, Hilbrand; van Horn, Jim R; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2003-05-01

    In infected joint arthroplasty, high local levels of antibiotics are achieved through temporary implantation of non-biodegradable gentamicin-loaded polymethylmethacrylate beads. Despite their antibiotic release, these beads act as a biomaterial surface to which bacteria preferentially adhere, grow and potentially develop antibiotic resistance. In routine clinical practice, these beads are removed after 14 days, but for a variety of reasons, we were confronted with a patient in which these beads were left in situ for 5 years. Retrieval of gentamicin-loaded beads from this patient constituted an exceptional case to study the effects of long-term implantation on potentially colonizing microflora and gentamicin release. Gentamicin-release test revealed residual antibiotic release after being 5 years in situ and extensive microbiological sampling resulted in recovery of a gentamicin-resistant staphylococcal strain from the bead surface. This case emphasizes the importance of developing biodegradable antibiotic-loaded beads as an antibiotic delivery system.

  17. Effect of Cellulose Acetate Beads on the Release of Transforming Growth Factor-β.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Rika; Mizumoto, Naoko; Kanno, Nana; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is released by activated platelets and induces the differentiation of T-helper 17 from naïve T cells. Contact between blood and cellulose acetate (CA) beads induces cytokine release, although their inflammatory effects on TGF-β release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA beads on the release of TGF-β in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA beads and measured platelets and TGF-β. Compared with blood samples incubated without beads, the platelet count and amount of TGF-β significantly decreased in blood samples incubated with CA beads. In conclusion, CA beads inhibited the release of TGF-β from adsorbed platelets. The biological effects of this reduction of TGF-β release during platelet adsorption to CA beads need further clarification.

  18. Structural response of bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall

    1991-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the structural response and failure characteristics of selected bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear-webs are presented. Results are given for specimens with one stiffeneer, with two stiffeners, and different stiffener geometries. Selected analytical results that were obtained with the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed computer code are presented. Analytical results that describe normal and transverse shear stress are also presented.

  19. Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip

    Cancer.gov

    The HumanMethylation450 BeadChip offers a unique combination of comprehensive, expert-selected coverage and high throughput at a low price, making it ideal for screening large sample populations such as those used in genome-wide association study cohorts. By providing quantitative methylation measurement at the single-CpG–site level for normal and FFPE samples, this assay offers powerful resolution for understanding epigenetic changes.

  20. Antibiotic-loaded cement beads for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    The concomitant presence of osteomyelitis and diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle places those patients affected at increased risk for limb loss. Antibiotic-loaded cement has been reported to be useful in the treatment of deep soft tissue and joint infections. The authors present an overview of this adjunctive treatment modality and present a case report using antibiotic-loaded cement beads in staged reconstruction for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.