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Sample records for magnetic biocidal screening

  1. Spectral, magnetic, biocidal screening, DNA binding and photocleavage studies of mononuclear Cu(II) and Zn(II) metal complexes of tricoordinate heterocyclic Schiff base ligands of pyrazolone and semicarbazide/thiosemicarbazide based derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Selvan, A.; Manisankar, P.

    2010-07-01

    We depict the synthesis and characterization of copper(II) and zinc(II) coordination compounds of 4-(3',4'-dimethoxybenzaldehydene)2-3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-semicarbazone ( 1a), 4-(3',4'-dimethoxybenzaldehydene)2-3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-thiosemicarbazone ( 1b), 4-(3'-hydroxy-4'-nitrobenzaldehydene)2-3-dimeth yl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-semicarbazone ( 1c) and 4-(3'-hydroxy-4'-nitrobenzal dehydene)2-3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-thiosemicarbazone ( 1d). All the remote compounds have the general composition [ML 2] (M = Cu(II) and Zn(II)); L = Schiff base ( 1a- 1d). All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, IR, 1H NMR, UV-vis, ESI-Mass, magnetic susceptibility measurements, cyclic voltammetric measurements, and EPR spectral studies. It has been originated that the Schiff bases with Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions form mononuclear complexes on 1:2 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry. Distorted octahedral environment is suggested for the metal complexes. The conductivity data confirm the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes. The interaction of CuL 21a- 1d complexes with CT DNA was investigated by spectroscopic, electrochemical and viscosity measurements. Results suggest that the copper complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative mode. Moreover, the complexes have been found to promote the photocleavage of plasmid DNA pBR322 under irradiation at 365 nm. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes were screened for their antifungal and antibacterial activities against different species of pathogenic fungi and bacteria and their biopotency has been discussed.

  2. DNA incision evaluation, binding investigation and biocidal screening of novel metallonucleases of 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione based Knoevenagel condensate having methionine: Synthesis and structural validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Thiravidamani; Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Raman, Natarajan

    2015-02-01

    Four new metallonucleases of the composition [MLCl] (where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Co(II); L = Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base, obtained by the condensation reaction of 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione with p-nitrobenzaldehyde and methionine amino acid) have been synthesised and characterized thoroughly by microanalytical data, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductivity, UV-Vis., IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and EPR spectral techniques. Their geometry is investigated and established to have square planar geometry. Electronic absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements reveal that the complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via an intercalation mechanism. DNA cleavage efficiency of these complexes is explored by gel electrophoresis, and they are found to endorse the cleavage of pBR322 DNA in presence of oxidant H2O2. These results reveal that all the complexes show better nuclease activity. Moreover, the biological screening against few pathogens reveals that that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligand.

  3. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  4. Thermodynamics of emergent magnetic charge screening in artificial spin ice

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Alan; Scholl, Andreas; Petersen, Charlotte F.; Anghinolfi, Luca; Wuth, Clemens; Dhuey, Scott; Chopdekar, Rajesh V.; Mellado, Paula; Alava, Mikko J.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Electric charge screening is a fundamental principle governing the behaviour in a variety of systems in nature. Through reconfiguration of the local environment, the Coulomb attraction between electric charges is decreased, leading, for example, to the creation of polaron states in solids or hydration shells around proteins in water. Here, we directly visualize the real-time creation and decay of screened magnetic charge configurations in a two-dimensional artificial spin ice system, the dipolar dice lattice. By comparing the temperature dependent occurrence of screened and unscreened emergent magnetic charge defects, we determine that screened magnetic charges are indeed a result of local energy reduction and appear as a transient minimum energy state before the system relaxes towards the predicted ground state. These results highlight the important role of emergent magnetic charges in artificial spin ice, giving rise to screened charge excitations and the emergence of exotic low-temperature configurations. PMID:27581972

  5. Thermodynamics of emergent magnetic charge screening in artificial spin ice.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Alan; Scholl, Andreas; Petersen, Charlotte F; Anghinolfi, Luca; Wuth, Clemens; Dhuey, Scott; Chopdekar, Rajesh V; Mellado, Paula; Alava, Mikko J; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Electric charge screening is a fundamental principle governing the behaviour in a variety of systems in nature. Through reconfiguration of the local environment, the Coulomb attraction between electric charges is decreased, leading, for example, to the creation of polaron states in solids or hydration shells around proteins in water. Here, we directly visualize the real-time creation and decay of screened magnetic charge configurations in a two-dimensional artificial spin ice system, the dipolar dice lattice. By comparing the temperature dependent occurrence of screened and unscreened emergent magnetic charge defects, we determine that screened magnetic charges are indeed a result of local energy reduction and appear as a transient minimum energy state before the system relaxes towards the predicted ground state. These results highlight the important role of emergent magnetic charges in artificial spin ice, giving rise to screened charge excitations and the emergence of exotic low-temperature configurations.

  6. Thermodynamics of emergent magnetic charge screening in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, Alan; Scholl, Andreas; Petersen, Charlotte F.; Anghinolfi, Luca; Wuth, Clemens; Dhuey, Scott; Chopdekar, Rajesh V.; Mellado, Paula; Alava, Mikko J.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-09-01

    Electric charge screening is a fundamental principle governing the behaviour in a variety of systems in nature. Through reconfiguration of the local environment, the Coulomb attraction between electric charges is decreased, leading, for example, to the creation of polaron states in solids or hydration shells around proteins in water. Here, we directly visualize the real-time creation and decay of screened magnetic charge configurations in a two-dimensional artificial spin ice system, the dipolar dice lattice. By comparing the temperature dependent occurrence of screened and unscreened emergent magnetic charge defects, we determine that screened magnetic charges are indeed a result of local energy reduction and appear as a transient minimum energy state before the system relaxes towards the predicted ground state. These results highlight the important role of emergent magnetic charges in artificial spin ice, giving rise to screened charge excitations and the emergence of exotic low-temperature configurations.

  7. Thermodynamics of emergent magnetic charge screening in artificial spin ice.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Alan; Scholl, Andreas; Petersen, Charlotte F; Anghinolfi, Luca; Wuth, Clemens; Dhuey, Scott; Chopdekar, Rajesh V; Mellado, Paula; Alava, Mikko J; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Electric charge screening is a fundamental principle governing the behaviour in a variety of systems in nature. Through reconfiguration of the local environment, the Coulomb attraction between electric charges is decreased, leading, for example, to the creation of polaron states in solids or hydration shells around proteins in water. Here, we directly visualize the real-time creation and decay of screened magnetic charge configurations in a two-dimensional artificial spin ice system, the dipolar dice lattice. By comparing the temperature dependent occurrence of screened and unscreened emergent magnetic charge defects, we determine that screened magnetic charges are indeed a result of local energy reduction and appear as a transient minimum energy state before the system relaxes towards the predicted ground state. These results highlight the important role of emergent magnetic charges in artificial spin ice, giving rise to screened charge excitations and the emergence of exotic low-temperature configurations. PMID:27581972

  8. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The Microbial Check Valve (MCV) is used on the Space Shuttle to impart an iodine residual to the drinking water to maintain microbial control. Approximately twenty MCV locations have been identified in the Space Station Freedom design, each with a 90-day life. This translates to 2400 replacement units in 30 years of operation. An in situ regeneration concept has been demonstrated that will reduce this replacement requirement to less than 300 units based on data to date. A totally automated system will result in significant savings in crew time, resupply requirements, and replacement costs. An additional feature of the device is the ability to provide a concentrated biocide source (200 mg/liter of I2) that can be used to superiodinate systems routinely or after a microbial upset.

  9. Role of cationic and nonionic surfactants on biocidal efficiency in diesel-water interface.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, N; Maruthamuthu, S; Palaniswamy, N

    2007-06-15

    Biodegradation occurs at the interface between diesel and water. The microbial contamination can result in inhibitor/fuel degradation that leads to the unacceptable level of turbidity, filter plugging, corrosion of storage tanks, pipeline and souring of stored products. Hence, selection of biocides/inhibitors is an important aspect in petroleum product transporting pipeline. Three biocides (cationic and nonionic) were employed to study the biodegradation of diesel in diesel-water interface. The biocidal efficiency on biodegradation of diesel was examined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Polyoxyethyleneglycol dodecyl ether [BRIJ-35] and polyethylene glycol-p-isooctylphenyl ether [TRITON-X-100] had higher bactericidal efficiency than Dodecyl ethyl dimethyl ammonium bromide [DDAB]. But the cationic biocide (DDAB) gave good biocidal efficiency at the interface. The data are explained in terms of a model that postulates the formation of "micelle" at the diesel-water interface. PMID:17363228

  10. Consumer exposure to biocides - identification of relevant sources and evaluation of possible health effects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Products containing biocides are used for a variety of purposes in the home environment. To assess potential health risks, data on products containing biocides were gathered by means of a market survey, exposures were estimated using a worst case scenario approach (screening), the hazard of the active components were evaluated, and a preliminary risk assessment was conducted. Methods Information on biocide-containing products was collected by on-site research, by an internet inquiry as well as research into databases and lists of active substances. Twenty active substances were selected for detailed investigation. The products containing these substances were subsequently classified by range of application; typical concentrations were derived. Potential exposures were then estimated using a worst case scenario approach according to the European Commission's Technical Guidance Document on Risk Assessment. Relevant combinations of scenarios and active substances were identified. The toxicological data for these substances were compiled in substance dossiers. For estimating risks, the margins of exposure (MOEs) were determined. Results Numerous consumer products were found to contain biocides. However, it appeared that only a limited number of biocidal active substances or groups of biocidal active substances were being used. The lowest MOEs for dermal exposure or exposure by inhalation were obtained for the following scenarios and biocides: indoor pest control using sprays, stickers or evaporators (chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos) and spraying of disinfectants as well as cleaning of surfaces with concentrates (hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, glutardialdehyde). The risk from aggregate exposure to individual biocides via different exposure scenarios was higher than the highest single exposure on average by a factor of three. From the 20 biocides assessed 10 had skin-sensitizing properties. The biocides isothiazolinone (mixture of 5-chloro-2-methyl-2H

  11. Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gang Sun; Worley, S. Dave

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial textiles can be categorized into two groups, biocidal and biostatic materials, according to their functions. Biostatic functions refer to inhibiting growth of microorganisms on textiles and preventing the materials from biodegradation and biocidal materials are able to kill microorganisms, thus eliminating their growth, sterilizing…

  12. Risks of using antifouling biocides in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Francisco Antonio; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, Maria Angeles

    2012-01-01

    Biocides are chemical substances that can deter or kill the microorganisms responsible for biofouling. The rapid expansion of the aquaculture industry is having a significant impact on the marine ecosystems. As the industry expands, it requires the use of more drugs, disinfectants and antifoulant compounds (biocides) to eliminate the microorganisms in the aquaculture facilities. The use of biocides in the aquatic environment, however, has proved to be harmful as it has toxic effects on the marine environment. Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to the organotin compounds found in antifouling products after restrictions were imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT). The replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. The biocides that are most commonly used in antifouling paints include chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, DCOIT (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, Sea-nine 211(®)), Diuron, Irgarol 1051, TCMS pyridine (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl pyridine), zinc pyrithione and Zineb. There are two types of risks associated with the use of biocides in aquaculture: (i) predators and humans may ingest the fish and shellfish that have accumulated in these contaminants and (ii) the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. This paper provides an overview of the effects of antifouling (AF) biocides on aquatic organisms. It also provides some insights into the effects and risks of these compounds on non-target organisms. PMID:22408407

  13. Risks of Using Antifouling Biocides in Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Guardiola, Francisco Antonio; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, Maria Angeles

    2012-01-01

    Biocides are chemical substances that can deter or kill the microorganisms responsible for biofouling. The rapid expansion of the aquaculture industry is having a significant impact on the marine ecosystems. As the industry expands, it requires the use of more drugs, disinfectants and antifoulant compounds (biocides) to eliminate the microorganisms in the aquaculture facilities. The use of biocides in the aquatic environment, however, has proved to be harmful as it has toxic effects on the marine environment. Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to the organotin compounds found in antifouling products after restrictions were imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT). The replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. The biocides that are most commonly used in antifouling paints include chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, DCOIT (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, Sea-nine 211®), Diuron, Irgarol 1051, TCMS pyridine (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl pyridine), zinc pyrithione and Zineb. There are two types of risks associated with the use of biocides in aquaculture: (i) predators and humans may ingest the fish and shellfish that have accumulated in these contaminants and (ii) the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. This paper provides an overview of the effects of antifouling (AF) biocides on aquatic organisms. It also provides some insights into the effects and risks of these compounds on non-target organisms. PMID:22408407

  14. Risks of using antifouling biocides in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Francisco Antonio; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, Maria Angeles

    2012-01-01

    Biocides are chemical substances that can deter or kill the microorganisms responsible for biofouling. The rapid expansion of the aquaculture industry is having a significant impact on the marine ecosystems. As the industry expands, it requires the use of more drugs, disinfectants and antifoulant compounds (biocides) to eliminate the microorganisms in the aquaculture facilities. The use of biocides in the aquatic environment, however, has proved to be harmful as it has toxic effects on the marine environment. Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to the organotin compounds found in antifouling products after restrictions were imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT). The replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. The biocides that are most commonly used in antifouling paints include chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, DCOIT (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, Sea-nine 211(®)), Diuron, Irgarol 1051, TCMS pyridine (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl pyridine), zinc pyrithione and Zineb. There are two types of risks associated with the use of biocides in aquaculture: (i) predators and humans may ingest the fish and shellfish that have accumulated in these contaminants and (ii) the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. This paper provides an overview of the effects of antifouling (AF) biocides on aquatic organisms. It also provides some insights into the effects and risks of these compounds on non-target organisms.

  15. Copper as a biocidal tool.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Copper ions, either alone or in copper complexes, have been used to disinfect liquids, solids and human tissue for centuries. Today copper is used as a water purifier, algaecide, fungicide, nematocide, molluscicide as well as an anti-bacterial and anti-fouling agent. Copper also displays potent anti-viral activity. This article reviews (i) the biocidal properties of copper; (ii) the possible mechanisms by which copper is toxic to microorganisms; and (iii) the systems by which many microorganisms resist high concentrations of heavy metals, with an emphasis on copper. PMID:16101497

  16. Aspects of cooling tower biocides and protozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Ashburn, R.J.; Ting, R.S.

    1998-12-31

    Previous work has shown that certain cooling tower amoebae and ciliated protozoa are resistant to several cooling tower biocides, even at the manufacturer`s recommended dosages. For the present study, an Acunthumoeba species was isolated from a cooling tower in Australia. Suspensions of the trophozoites (feeding stages) were exposed to isothiazolones. Cysts were tested separately. The minimum lethal concentration (MLC) for trophozoites was between 31-62 ppm of the biocide product, which is slightly less than the MLC for an amoebae species from the United States; and cyst forms were twofold more resistant than those of the US species, with a MLC of 62,500 ppm. A ciliate and an amoeba species were also exposed to bromochlorodimethylhydantoin. The MLC for the ciliate species was 1 ppm of the biocide product, and the MLC was 30--40 ppm for the amoeba trophozoites. Since amoebae can expel vesicles containing live Legionella, experiments were conducted to determine whether exposure of Acunthamoebu polyphugu to biocides influenced release of such potentially infectious particles. Vesicle release was not inhibited by any of the three biocides: quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), isothiazolones, and a thiocarbamate compound. These results suggest that amoebae from various sources are resistant to recommended levels of biocides, and the amoebae may continue to release potentially infectious vesicles in the presence of biocides.

  17. Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Worley, S. Dave

    2005-01-01

    Unlike the widely used slow-releasing biocidal mechanism now employed in biocidal textiles, a novel regenerable process, based on a regeneration principle and halamine chemistry, has been developed in antimicrobial finishing of textiles. Halamine-modified textile materials demonstrate durable and regenerable antimicrobial functions and execute rapid inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms by contact without yielding drug resistance. The unique properties of the products render them useful materials for medical-use and hygienic textiles. The chemistry of the biocidal materials is be discussed. See Featured Molecules .

  18. Silver biocide's real-world success.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Although temperature control has been the UK's longest-serving means of controlling the growth and proliferation of Legionella in hot and cold water systems, there are other factors, including major rises in energy costs, that warrant the use of biocides--including in the healthcare sector. In 2000, the HSE's new 'L8' guidelines took this into account, giving equal weight to both temperature reg~mes and biocides, such as chlorine dioxide, as control methods. Susan Pearson BSc reports on one potentially effective biocide- silver hydrogen peroxide, explains how it 'works' in practice, and highlights the recent 'real-world' evidence of its effectiveness and advantages. PMID:26268029

  19. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  20. Antiplaque biocides and bacterial resistance: a review.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Prem; Gaffar, Abdul

    2002-11-01

    Modern dentistry emphasizes the importance of dental plaque control to improve oral health. The use of oral care formulations with antiplaque biocides plays a crucial role in patient-directed approaches for plaque control. The antiplaque efficacies of these formulations have been extensively studied in many long-term clinical studies designed in accordance with well-accepted guidelines. The results from these studies conclusively demonstrate that long-term use of oral care formulations with well-known antiplaque biocides such as chlorhexidine and triclosan reduce supragingival plaque and gingivitis. This review summarizes microbiological results from clinical studies conducted with oral care formulations containing antiplaque biocides. Results from a number of long-term clinical studies conducted under real-life use conditions indicate no adverse alterations in the bacteria found in dental plaque or emergent microbial resistance. Additionally, microbial sampling of dental plaque subsequent to extended use of antiplaque biocides reveals no increase in resistant microflora. Large numbers of common oral bacteria isolated from patients using chlorhexidine indicate no increase in microbial resistance to chlorhexidine or to commonly used antibiotics. The effects of antiplaque biocides containing oral care formulations on dental plaque that exists naturally as a biofilm are examined. These formulations contain biocide, surfactants, polymers and other components that are effective against the biofilm. In summary, the results of studies on the real-life use of oral care formulations with antiplaque biocides show no emergence of resistant microflora or alterations of the oral microbiota, while such formulations have been found to provide the benefits of reducing plaque and gingivitis. PMID:12472989

  1. Antiplaque biocides and bacterial resistance: a review.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Prem; Gaffar, Abdul

    2002-11-01

    Modern dentistry emphasizes the importance of dental plaque control to improve oral health. The use of oral care formulations with antiplaque biocides plays a crucial role in patient-directed approaches for plaque control. The antiplaque efficacies of these formulations have been extensively studied in many long-term clinical studies designed in accordance with well-accepted guidelines. The results from these studies conclusively demonstrate that long-term use of oral care formulations with well-known antiplaque biocides such as chlorhexidine and triclosan reduce supragingival plaque and gingivitis. This review summarizes microbiological results from clinical studies conducted with oral care formulations containing antiplaque biocides. Results from a number of long-term clinical studies conducted under real-life use conditions indicate no adverse alterations in the bacteria found in dental plaque or emergent microbial resistance. Additionally, microbial sampling of dental plaque subsequent to extended use of antiplaque biocides reveals no increase in resistant microflora. Large numbers of common oral bacteria isolated from patients using chlorhexidine indicate no increase in microbial resistance to chlorhexidine or to commonly used antibiotics. The effects of antiplaque biocides containing oral care formulations on dental plaque that exists naturally as a biofilm are examined. These formulations contain biocide, surfactants, polymers and other components that are effective against the biofilm. In summary, the results of studies on the real-life use of oral care formulations with antiplaque biocides show no emergence of resistant microflora or alterations of the oral microbiota, while such formulations have been found to provide the benefits of reducing plaque and gingivitis.

  2. Microwave assisted synthesis, characterization and biocidal activities of some new chelates of carbazole derived Schiff bases of cadmium and tin metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Manju; Mishra, Neelima; Sharma, Nutan; Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-11-01

    This study is planned to report the advancement of green microwave approach in the fabrication of a new series of biologically potent (N^X, where X = O/S) donor Schiff bases and their cadmium(II) and tin(II) complexes. The ligands and their metal complexes have been characterized in terms of elemental analysis, molar ionic conductance, magnetic moment and spectral (IR, UV-Vis, NMR (1H, 119Sn), FAB-mass, thermal and XRD) data. The data revealed that the ligands coordinated to the metal center via nitrogen and oxygen/sulfur atoms and form an octahedral arrangement of the ligands around central metal atom. All compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against two pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and two fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus by standard disc diffusion method. The discs were stored in an incubator at 37 °C. The compounds were dissolved in DMF at 500 and 1000 ppm concentrations for screening biocidal activity. The compounds were dissolved in DMF to get the 100 and 200 ppm concentration of test solutions for screening fungicidal activity. The inhibition zone around each disc was measured (in mm) after 24 h and 96 h for biocidal and fungicidal activities respectively.

  3. Microwave assisted synthesis, characterization and biocidal activities of some new chelates of carbazole derived Schiff bases of cadmium and tin metals.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manju; Mishra, Neelima; Sharma, Nutan; Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-11-11

    This study is planned to report the advancement of green microwave approach in the fabrication of a new series of biologically potent (N^X, where X=O/S) donor Schiff bases and their cadmium(II) and tin(II) complexes. The ligands and their metal complexes have been characterized in terms of elemental analysis, molar ionic conductance, magnetic moment and spectral (IR, UV-Vis, NMR ((1)H, (119)Sn), FAB-mass, thermal and XRD) data. The data revealed that the ligands coordinated to the metal center via nitrogen and oxygen/sulfur atoms and form an octahedral arrangement of the ligands around central metal atom. All compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against two pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and two fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus by standard disc diffusion method. The discs were stored in an incubator at 37°C. The compounds were dissolved in DMF at 500 and 1000 ppm concentrations for screening biocidal activity. The compounds were dissolved in DMF to get the 100 and 200 ppm concentration of test solutions for screening fungicidal activity. The inhibition zone around each disc was measured (in mm) after 24 h and 96 h for biocidal and fungicidal activities respectively.

  4. Numerical simulation of screening current distribution in HTS tape of high field magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryusei; Oga, Yuki; Noguchi, So; Igarashi, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, especially in-field performance and mechanical strength, have been continuously improved. The HTS tapes have been widely used for high field (>20 T) magnet researches and there are several technical challenges including field attenuation of an HTS magnet by screening currents induced within the HTS tapes. Several publications reported that the screening currents, induced by penetration of self magnetic fields into HTS tapes within an HTS magnet, weakened a field constant of the HTS magnet. The result may demonstrate that the screening current changes an overall current density distribution in HTS tapes and, as a consequence, the generated magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the screening current distribution in an HTS tape. This paper reports numerical simulation of the screening current distribution in an HTS tape of high field magnets using 2D finite element method with the E-J characteristic of the HTS tape taken into account. Self magnetic field distribution and its orientation to the HTS tape are also considered to compute critical currents and locally generated electric fields, two key components to figure out the distribution of screening currents.

  5. The Potential of Antimicrobial Peptides as Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides constitute a diverse class of naturally occurring antimicrobial molecules which have activity against a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides are exciting leads in the development of novel biocidal agents at a time when classical antibiotics are under intense pressure from emerging resistance, and the global industry in antibiotic research and development stagnates. This review will examine the potential of antimicrobial peptides, both natural and synthetic, as novel biocidal agents in the battle against multi-drug resistant pathogen infections. PMID:22072905

  6. Occurrence of organic and inorganic biocides in the museum environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieweck, A.; Delius, W.; Siwinski, N.; Vogtenrath, W.; Genning, C.; Salthammer, T.

    In the museum environment organic and inorganic chemicals can be found, which originate from both outside and inside the building. Many of the contaminants may cause adverse effects on works of art and human health, but in the past, pollution research in museums has focused on the protection of artifacts, while the risk assessment for humans has been neglected. Especially, the application of biocides leads to a conflict of interest: on the one hand cultural assets have to be protected against microorganisms, insects and rodents while on the other hand it is essential to provide healthy conditions for museum staff and visitors. It has recently been shown that the release of organic indoor pollutants from building products is one of the main reasons for deterioration of artifacts. In this work, we present the results of screening measurements on biocides in different locations of German museums. The major components that could be identified were DDT, PCP, lindane, methoxychlor, naphthalene, chlorinated naphthalenes, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, PCBs and arsenic. It is demonstrated that the application of chlorinated organic compounds and arsenic for preventive conservation is one of the prime reasons for indoor pollution in museums and provides a potential for exposure. However, the concentrations in air, dust and material are widely different and a health risk for humans has to be evaluated case by case.

  7. Biocides: Capturing bugs and bigger markets

    SciTech Connect

    Hairston, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    Deep in the dark interior of cooling water towers, intake streams and purifiers, there is a jungle. Hundreds of thousands of microorganisms dwell in algae and biofilm, breeding mutant and increasingly resistant strains of bacteria. For biocide manufacturers, the imperative is to find better ways to control the proliferation of the microscopic bugs. Some of the most robust demand for biocides is in the cooling water market, particularly as industrial water treatment continues to switch from gaseous chlorine to bromine compounds. The trend toward closed-loop and faster cycles for process water treatment will require more biological control. Biocides are expected to benefit from that trend, but in pulp and paper operations, chlorine dioxide may reap the biggest gains. Also making inroads is an electrolytic system that uses ClO{sub 2} to control microorganisms in cooling towers. Despite growing demand for safe and more-effective biocides in Europe and the US, new product development is stymied by the rigorous and costly process of getting regulatory approval. In the US, EPA registration can cost $5--10 million and take 5 to 10 years.

  8. Screened Coulomb potential in a flowing magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joost, J.-P.; Ludwig, P.; Kählert, H.; Arran, C.; Bonitz, M.

    2015-02-01

    The electrostatic potential of a moving dust grain in a complex plasma with magnetized ions is computed using linear response theory, thereby extending our previous work for unmagnetized plasmas (Ludwig et al 2012 New J. Phys. 14 053016). In addition to the magnetic field, our approach accounts for a finite ion temperature as well as ion-neutral collisions. Our recently introduced code Kielstream is used for an efficient calculation of the dust potential. Increasing the magnetization of the ions, we find that the shape of the potential crucially depends on the Mach number M. In the regime of subsonic ion flow (M < 1), a strong magnetization gives rise to a potential distribution that is qualitatively different from the unmagnetized limit, while for M > 1 the magnetic field effectively suppresses the plasma wakefield.

  9. Use of hydrogen peroxide as a biocide: new consideration of its mechanisms of biocidal action.

    PubMed

    Linley, Ezra; Denyer, Stephen P; McDonnell, Gerald; Simons, Claire; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is extensively used as a biocide, particularly in applications where its decomposition into non-toxic by-products is important. Although increasing information on the biocidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide is available, there is still little understanding of its biocidal mechanisms of action. This review aims to combine past and novel evidence of interactions between hydrogen peroxide and the microbial cell and its components, while reflecting on alternative applications that make use of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. It is currently believed that the Fenton reaction leading to the production of free hydroxyl radicals is the basis of hydrogen peroxide action and evidence exists for this reaction leading to oxidation of DNA, proteins and membrane lipids in vivo. Investigations of DNA oxidation suggest that the oxidizing radical is the ferryl radical formed from DNA-associated iron, not hydroxyl. Investigations of protein oxidation suggest that selective oxidation of certain proteins might occur, and that vapour-phase hydrogen peroxide is a more potent oxidizer of protein than liquid-phase hydrogen peroxide. Few studies have investigated membrane damage by hydrogen peroxide, though it is suggested that this is important for the biocidal mechanism. No studies have investigated damage to microbial cell components under conditions commonly used for sterilization. Despite extensive studies of hydrogen peroxide toxicity, the mechanism of its action as a biocide requires further investigation.

  10. 50 Hz rotating superconducting magnet for screening studies

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.G.; Stoll, R.; Stovold, R.

    1981-09-01

    A superconducting rotor facility has been constructed to study the magnetic shielding of superconducting ac machines. The superconducting dipolar magnet 128 mm diam, 515 mm long, 40 kg weight, is capable of providing a field of 1.5 T at a radius of 100 mm with 525 amp energizing current. Novel features include helical vapor-cooled current leads, antirecirculation baffles in the vapor space, vapor dump valves and liquid nitrogen cooling.

  11. Produced water exposure alters bacterial response to biocides.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Amit; Lipus, Daniel; Bibby, Kyle

    2014-11-01

    Microbial activity during the holding and reuse of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations, termed produced water, may lead to issues with corrosion, sulfide release, and fouling. Biocides are applied to control biological activity, often with limited efficacy, which is typically attributed to chemical interactions with the produced water. However, it is unknown whether there is a biologically driven mechanism to biocide tolerance in produced water. Here, we demonstrate that produced water exposure results in an enhanced tolerance against the typically used biocide glutaraldehyde and increased susceptibility to the oxidative biocide hypochlorite in a native and a model bacteria and that this altered resistance is due to the salinity of the produced water. In addition, we elucidate the genetic response of the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens to produced water exposure to provide a mechanistic interpretation of the altered biocide resistance. The RNA-seq data demonstrated the induction of genes involved in osmotic stress, energy production and conversion, membrane integrity, and protein transport following produced water exposure, which facilitates bacterial survival and alters biocide tolerance. Efforts to fundamentally understand biocide resistance mechanisms, which enable the optimization of biocide application, hold significant implications for greening of the fracturing process through encouraging produced water recycling. Specifically, these results suggest the necessity of optimizing biocide application at the level of individual shale plays, rather than historical experience, based upon produced water characteristics and salinity. PMID:25279933

  12. Modeling of screening currents in coated conductor magnets containing up to 40000 turns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, E.

    2016-08-01

    Screening currents caused by varying magnetic fields degrade the homogeneity and stability of the magnetic fields created by REBCO coated conductor coils. They are responsible for the AC loss; which is also important for other power applications containing windings, such as transformers, motors and generators. Since real magnets contain coils exceeding 10000 turns, accurate modeling tools for this number of turns or above are necessary for magnet design. This article presents a fast numerical method to model coils with no loss of accuracy. We model a 10400-turn coil for its real number of turns and coils of up to 40000 turns with continuous approximation, which introduces negligible errors. The screening currents, the screening current induced field (SCIF) and the AC loss is analyzed in detail. The SCIF is at a maximum at the remnant state with a considerably large value. The instantaneous AC loss for an anisotropic magnetic-field dependent J c is qualitatively different than for a constant J c , although the loss per cycle is similar. Saturation of the magnetization currents at the end pancakes causes the maximum AC loss at the first ramp to increase with J c . The presented modeling tool can accurately calculate the SCIF and AC loss in practical computing times for coils with any number of turns used in real windings, enabling parameter optimization.

  13. Magnetic Suspension Array Technology: Controlled Synthesis and Screening in Microfluidic Networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gungun; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy D; Bermúdez, Gilbert Santiago Cañón; Schmidt, Oliver G; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Information tagging and processing are vital in information-intensive applications, e.g., telecommunication and high-throughput drug screening. Magnetic suspension array technology may offer intrinsic advantages to screening applications by enabling high distinguishability, the ease of code generation, and the feasibility of fast code readout, though the practical applicability of magnetic suspension array technology remains hampered by the lack of quality administration of encoded microcarriers. Here, a logic-controlled microfluidic system enabling controlled synthesis of magnetic suspension arrays in multiphase flow networks is realized. The smart and compact system offers a practical solution for the quality administration and screening of encoded magnetic microcarriers and addresses the universal need of process control for synthesis in microfluidic networks, i.e., on-demand creation of droplet templates for high information capacity. The demonstration of magnetic suspension array technology enabled by magnetic in-flow cytometry opens the avenue toward point-of-care multiplexed bead-based assays, clinical diagnostics, and drug discovery. PMID:27426124

  14. Screen-printing of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles produced by carbon combustion synthesis of oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Dannangoda, Chamath; Galstyan, Eduard; Litvinov, Dmitri

    2012-05-01

    The feasibility of screen-printing process of hard ferrite magnetic nanoparticles produced by carbon combustion synthesis of oxides (CCSO) is investigated. In CCSO, the exothermic oxidation of carbon generates a smolder thermal reaction wave that propagates through the solid reactant mixture converting it to the desired oxides. The complete conversion of hexaferrites occurs using reactant mixtures containing 11 wt. % of carbon. The BaFe12O19 and SrFe12O19 hexaferrites had hard magnetic properties with coercivity of 3 and 4.5 kOe, respectively. It was shown that the synthesized nanoparticles could be used to fabricate permanent magnet structures by consolidating them using screen-printing techniques.

  15. Peracetic acid: A new biocide for industrial water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.F.

    1997-12-01

    Peracetic acid is rapidly cidal at low concentrations against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, and algae under a wide variety of conditions. It is also effective against anaerobic and spore forming bacteria. Peracetic acid is effective at killing biofilm microorganisms at low concentrations and short contact times. Unlike a number of other biocides, the biocidal activity of peracetic acid is not affected by pH or water hardness and biocidal activity is retained even in the presence of organic matter. For these reasons, peracetic acid is well suited as a biocide in industrial cooling water and papermaking systems. Peracetic acid is compatible with additives commonly used in these systems. Although peracetic acid is a potent biocide, it is unique in that it does not produce toxic byproducts and its decomposition products, acetic acid, water and oxygen, are innocuous and environmentally acceptable.

  16. Screening of external magnetic perturbation fields due to sheared plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liang, Y.; Wang, N.; Luan, Q.; Zhong, F. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Within the single fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, systematic toroidal modelling efforts are devoted to investigate the plasma response induced screening of the applied external 3D magnetic field perturbations in the presence of sheared toroidal flow. One particular issue of interest is addressed, when the local flow speed approaches zero at the perturbation rational surface inside the plasma. Subtle screening physics, associated with the favourable averaged toroidal curvature effect (the GGJ effect (Glasser et al 1975 Phys. Fluids 7 875)), is found to play an essential role during slow flow near the rational surface by enhancing the screening at reduced flow. A strong cancellation effect between different terms of Ohm’s law is discovered, leading to different screening physics in the GGJ regime, as compared to that of conventional screening of the typical resistive-inertial regime occurring at faster flow. These modelling results may be applicable to interpret certain mode locking experiments, as well as type-I edge localized mode suppression experiments, with resonant magnetic field perturbations being applied to tokamak plasmas at low input toroidal torque.

  17. Triclosan as a surrogate for household biocides: an investigation into biocides in aquatic environments of a highly urbanized region.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, You-Sheng; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Jun; Peng, Feng-Jiao; Lai, Hua-Jie; Pan, Chang-Gui

    2014-07-01

    Biocides are widely formulated in household and personal care products. We investigated the distribution and ecological risks of 16 household biocides in aquatic environments of a highly urbanized region in South China, evaluated triclosan as a chemical indicator for this group of household chemicals, and proposed a novel approach to predict the environmental occurrence and fate of these household biocides by using triclosan usage data and a level-III fugacity model. Eleven biocides were quantitatively detected at concentrations up to 264 ± 15.3 ng/L for climbazole in surface water, and up to 5649 ± 748 ng/g for triclocarban in sediment of four rivers in the region. The distribution of biocides in the aquatic environments was significantly correlated with environmental variables such as total nitrogen, total phosphorus and population. Domestic sewage in the region was the dominant pollution source for most biocides such as azole fungicides (fluconazole, climbazole, clotrimazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, and carbendazim) and disinfectants (triclosan and triclocarban). Preliminary risk assessment showed high ecological risks posed by two biocides carbendazim and triclosan in river waters. Mostly important, triclosan was found to be a reliable chemical indicator to surrogate household biocides both in water and sediment based on the correlation analysis. In addition, the fugacity modeling could provide simulated concentrations comparable to the monitoring results. Therefore, with the usage data of the chemical indicator triclosan and correlation formula with other biocides, this model can be applied for predicting the occurrence and fate of various household biocides in a catchment. PMID:24793342

  18. Triclosan as a surrogate for household biocides: an investigation into biocides in aquatic environments of a highly urbanized region.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, You-Sheng; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Jun; Peng, Feng-Jiao; Lai, Hua-Jie; Pan, Chang-Gui

    2014-07-01

    Biocides are widely formulated in household and personal care products. We investigated the distribution and ecological risks of 16 household biocides in aquatic environments of a highly urbanized region in South China, evaluated triclosan as a chemical indicator for this group of household chemicals, and proposed a novel approach to predict the environmental occurrence and fate of these household biocides by using triclosan usage data and a level-III fugacity model. Eleven biocides were quantitatively detected at concentrations up to 264 ± 15.3 ng/L for climbazole in surface water, and up to 5649 ± 748 ng/g for triclocarban in sediment of four rivers in the region. The distribution of biocides in the aquatic environments was significantly correlated with environmental variables such as total nitrogen, total phosphorus and population. Domestic sewage in the region was the dominant pollution source for most biocides such as azole fungicides (fluconazole, climbazole, clotrimazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, and carbendazim) and disinfectants (triclosan and triclocarban). Preliminary risk assessment showed high ecological risks posed by two biocides carbendazim and triclosan in river waters. Mostly important, triclosan was found to be a reliable chemical indicator to surrogate household biocides both in water and sediment based on the correlation analysis. In addition, the fugacity modeling could provide simulated concentrations comparable to the monitoring results. Therefore, with the usage data of the chemical indicator triclosan and correlation formula with other biocides, this model can be applied for predicting the occurrence and fate of various household biocides in a catchment.

  19. The use of magnetic nanoparticles in thermal therapy monitoring and screening: Localization and imaging (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A method termed magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion (MSB) was developed to interrogate in vivo the microscopic environment surrounding magnetic nanoparticles. We can monitor several effects that are important in thermal therapy and screening including temperature measurement and the bound state distribution. Here we report on simulations of nanoparticle localization. Measuring the spatial distribution of nanoparticles would allow us to identify ovarian cancer much earlier when it is still curable or monitor thermal therapies more accurately. We demonstrate that with well-designed equipment superior signal to noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved using only two harmonics rather than using all the harmonics containing signal. Alternatively, smaller magnetic field amplitudes can be used to achieve the same SNR. The SNR is improved using fewer harmonics because the noise is limited.

  20. Parallel evolutionary pathways to antibiotic resistance selected by biocide exposure

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Mark A.; Whitehead, Rebekah N.; Mount, Manuella; Loman, Nick J.; Pallen, Mark J.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biocides are widely used to prevent infection. We aimed to determine whether exposure of Salmonella to various biocides could act as a driver of antibiotic resistance. Methods Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was exposed to four biocides with differing modes of action. Antibiotic-resistant mutants were selected during exposure to all biocides and characterized phenotypically and genotypically to identify mechanisms of resistance. Results All biocides tested selected MDR mutants with decreased antibiotic susceptibility; these occurred randomly throughout the experiments. Mutations that resulted in de-repression of the multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC were seen in MDR mutants. A novel mutation in rpoA was also selected and contributed to the MDR phenotype. Other mutants were highly resistant to both quinolone antibiotics and the biocide triclosan. Conclusions This study shows that exposure of bacteria to biocides can select for antibiotic-resistant mutants and this is mediated by clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance prevalent in human pathogens. PMID:25953808

  1. Searching for “Environmentally-Benign” Antifouling Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan Ting; Teo, Serena L. M.; Leong, Wai; Chai, Christina L. L.

    2014-01-01

    As the result of the ecological impacts from the use of tributyltins (TBT) in shipping, environmental legislation for the registration of chemicals for use in the environment has grown to a monumental challenge requiring product dossiers to include information on the environmental fate and behavior of any chemicals. Specifically, persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity, collectively known as PBT, are properties of concern in the assessment of chemicals. However, existing measurements of PBT properties are a cumbersome and expensive process, and thus not applied in the early stages of the product discovery and development. Inexpensive methods for preliminary PBT screening would minimize risks arising with the subsequent registration of products. In this article, we evaluated the PBT properties of compounds reported to possess anti-fouling properties using QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) prediction programs such as BIOWIN™ (a biodegradation probability program), KOWWIN™ (log octanol-water partition coefficient calculation program) and ECOSAR™ (Ecological Structure Activity Relationship Programme). The analyses identified some small (Mr < 400) synthetic and natural products as potential candidates for environmentally benign biocides. We aim to demonstrate that while these methods of estimation have limitations, when applied with discretion, they are powerful tools useful in the early stages of research for compound selection for further development as anti-foulants. PMID:24865489

  2. Screening of the Coulomb field in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A.

    2009-05-15

    The quantum theory is constructed for screening of the Coulomb field of a point charge in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder. The asymptotics of the screened potential are calculated for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases. It is demonstrated that, in the degenerate case, apart from the known quasi-classical monotonic part, the result contains the quantum oscillating part, which corresponds to Friedel oscillations. The Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the screened Coulomb interaction of electrons on a cylindrical surface are described analytically. It is shown that the Friedel oscillations can be represented as a superposition of oscillations with different frequencies which are determined by the macroscopic properties of the nanotube.

  3. Regenerable biocide delivery unit, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Microbial Check Valve (MCV), which is currently used aboard the Shuttle Orbiter for disinfection of the potable water supply, is an expendable flow-through canister containing iodinated ion exchange resin. Means for extension of MCV life are desirable to avoid resupply penalties. The Phase 1 Regenerable Biocide Delivery Unit program demonstrated the feasibility of regenerating an MCV in situ, using a strong aqueous elemental iodine solution resulting from diversion of the MCV influent to a packed bed containing iodine crystals. In small column tests, eight manual regenerations of an MCV resin were accomplished. The term Regenerative Microbial Check Valve (RMCV) was adopted describing this new technology. The Phase 2 program resulted in the development of a full scale and fully autonomous prototype RMCV, capable of maintaining residual I(sub 2) levels between 2.0 - 4.0 mg/L for prolonged periods. During six months of testing at the Space Station baseline flow rate of 120 cm(sup 3)/min, the prototype RMCV underwent nine regenerations. RMCV life cycle tests, using a variety of influent streams, were conducted over an eighteen month period to determine the useful lives of MCV's incorporating this new technology and to determine ultimate failure mechanisms. MCV life extensions of 130 fold were demonstrated, limited only by the Phase 2 performance period. Based upon this work, it is certain that RMCV units can be developed to provide unattended biocide addition for the thirty year life of Space Station Freedom, or for other longer duration applications such as a Lunar Base or Mars mission. RMCV technology was also demonstrated capable of delivering, on demand, a concentrated aqueous I(sub 2) solution for potential use as a disinfectant during transient episodes of microbial surface contamination, for the control of biofilm formation, or as a preventative measure in systems which are particularly susceptible to the growth of microorganisms.

  4. Magnetic Alignment of Microelements Containing Cultured Neuronal Networks for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kent R.; Wang, Yuli; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Taylor, Anne Marion

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) on neurons presents unique difficulties because they are postmitotic, limited in supply, and challenging to harvest from animals or generate from stem cells. These limitations have hindered neurological drug discovery, leaving an unmet need to develop cost-effective technology for HTS using neurons. Traditional screening methods use up to 20,000 neurons per well in 384-well plates. To increase throughput, we use “microraft” arrays, consisting of 1600 square, releasable, paramagnetic, polystyrene microelements (microrafts), each providing a culture surface for 500–700 neurons. These microrafts can be detached from the array and transferred to 384-well plates for HTS; however, they must be centered within wells for automated imaging. Here, we developed a magnet array plate, compatible with HTS fluid-handling systems, to center microrafts within wells. We used finite element analysis to select an effective size of the magnets and confirmed that adjacent magnetic fields do not interfere. We then experimentally tested the plate’s centering ability and found a centering efficiency of 100%, compared with 4.35% using a flat magnet. We concluded that microrafts could be centered after settling randomly within the well, overcoming friction, and confirmed these results by centering microrafts containing hippocampal neurons cultured for 8 days. PMID:26250488

  5. Magnetic Alignment of Microelements Containing Cultured Neuronal Networks for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Kent R; Wang, Yuli; Allbritton, Nancy L; Taylor, Anne Marion

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) on neurons presents unique difficulties because they are postmitotic, limited in supply, and challenging to harvest from animals or generate from stem cells. These limitations have hindered neurological drug discovery, leaving an unmet need to develop cost-effective technology for HTS using neurons. Traditional screening methods use up to 20,000 neurons per well in 384-well plates. To increase throughput, we use "microraft" arrays, consisting of 1600 square, releasable, paramagnetic, polystyrene microelements (microrafts), each providing a culture surface for 500-700 neurons. These microrafts can be detached from the array and transferred to 384-well plates for HTS; however, they must be centered within wells for automated imaging. Here, we developed a magnet array plate, compatible with HTS fluid-handling systems, to center microrafts within wells. We used finite element analysis to select an effective size of the magnets and confirmed that adjacent magnetic fields do not interfere. We then experimentally tested the plate's centering ability and found a centering efficiency of 100%, compared with 4.35% using a flat magnet. We concluded that microrafts could be centered after settling randomly within the well, overcoming friction, and confirmed these results by centering microrafts containing hippocampal neurons cultured for 8 days.

  6. Magnetic Alignment of Microelements Containing Cultured Neuronal Networks for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Kent R; Wang, Yuli; Allbritton, Nancy L; Taylor, Anne Marion

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) on neurons presents unique difficulties because they are postmitotic, limited in supply, and challenging to harvest from animals or generate from stem cells. These limitations have hindered neurological drug discovery, leaving an unmet need to develop cost-effective technology for HTS using neurons. Traditional screening methods use up to 20,000 neurons per well in 384-well plates. To increase throughput, we use "microraft" arrays, consisting of 1600 square, releasable, paramagnetic, polystyrene microelements (microrafts), each providing a culture surface for 500-700 neurons. These microrafts can be detached from the array and transferred to 384-well plates for HTS; however, they must be centered within wells for automated imaging. Here, we developed a magnet array plate, compatible with HTS fluid-handling systems, to center microrafts within wells. We used finite element analysis to select an effective size of the magnets and confirmed that adjacent magnetic fields do not interfere. We then experimentally tested the plate's centering ability and found a centering efficiency of 100%, compared with 4.35% using a flat magnet. We concluded that microrafts could be centered after settling randomly within the well, overcoming friction, and confirmed these results by centering microrafts containing hippocampal neurons cultured for 8 days. PMID:26250488

  7. Encapsulation of biocides by cyclodextrins: toward synergistic effects against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Summary Host–guest chemistry is useful for the construction of nanosized objects. Some of the widely used hosts are probably the cyclodextrins (CDs). CDs can form water-soluble complexes with numerous hydrophobic compounds. They have been widespread used in medicine, drug delivery and are of interest for the biocides encapsulation. Indeed, this enables the development of more or less complex systems that release antimicrobial agents with time. In this paper, the general features of CDs and their applications in the field of biocides have been reviewed. As the key point is the formation of biocide–CD inclusion complexes, this review deals with this in depth and the advantages of biocide encapsulation are highlighted throughout several examples from the literature. Finally, some future directions of investigation have been proposed. We hope that scientists studying biocide applications receive inspiration from this review to exploit the opportunities offered by CDs in their respective research areas. PMID:25550722

  8. Evolution in the Lab: Biocide Resistance in E.coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welden, Charles W.; Hossler, Rex A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment on resistance to teach about evolution and issues of misuse of antimicrobial compounds. Investigates Escherichia coli's response to treatment of triclosan, a biocide used in consumer products. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  9. Peracetic acid: A new biocide for industrial water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    Peracetic acid is rapidly cidal at low concentrations against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, and algae under a wide variety of conditions. It is also effective against anaerobic and spore-forming bacteria. Peracetic acid is effective at killing biofilm microorganisms at low concentrations and short contact times. Unlike a number of other biocides, the biocidal activity of peracetic acid is not affected by pH or water hardness and is retained even in the presence of organic matter. For these reasons, peracetic acid is well-suited as a biocide in industrial cooling water and paper-making systems. It is also compatible with additives commonly used in these systems. Although peracetic acid is a potent biocide, it is unique in that it does not produce toxic byproducts and its decomposition products (acetic acid, water, and oxygen) are innocuous and environmentally acceptable.

  10. Strategies for application of non-oxidizing biocides

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.F.

    1995-06-01

    The usage of non-oxidizing biocides to control zebra mussels is one of the primary chemical treatment methods available. Due to varying plant configurations several differing strategies are employed for the application of non-oxidizing biocides. These methods include targeted treatments, entire system treatments and forebay treatments. Treatments are coordinated with veliger and mussel settlement data to minimize the frequency of applications. To properly perform a treatment, the necessity of planning and contingencies will be discussed.

  11. No evidence for intracellular magnetite in putative vertebrate magnetoreceptors identified by magnetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Nathaniel B.; Fritz, Tanja; Nimpf, Simon; Pichler, Paul; Lauwers, Mattias; Hickman, Robert W.; Papadaki-Anastasopoulou, Artemis; Ushakova, Lyubov; Heuser, Thomas; Resch, Guenter P.; Saunders, Martin; Shaw, Jeremy A.; Keays, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular basis of the magnetic sense remains an unsolved scientific mystery. One theory that aims to explain how animals detect the magnetic field is the magnetite hypothesis. It argues that intracellular crystals of the iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4) are coupled to mechanosensitive channels that elicit neuronal activity in specialized sensory cells. Attempts to find these primary sensors have largely relied on the Prussian Blue stain that labels cells rich in ferric iron. This method has proved problematic as it has led investigators to conflate iron-rich macrophages with magnetoreceptors. An alternative approach developed by Eder et al. [Eder SH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(30):12022–12027] is to identify candidate magnetoreceptive cells based on their magnetic moment. Here, we explore the utility of this method by undertaking a screen for magnetic cells in the pigeon. We report the identification of a small number of cells (1 in 476,000) with large magnetic moments (8–106 fAm2) from various tissues. The development of single-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) permitted subcellular analysis of magnetic cells. This revealed the presence of extracellular structures composed of iron, titanium, and chromium accounting for the magnetic properties of these cells. Application of single-cell CLEM to magnetic cells from the trout failed to identify any intracellular structures consistent with biogenically derived magnetite. Our work illustrates the need for new methods to test the magnetite hypothesis of magnetosensation. PMID:25535350

  12. Combined magnetic screen made of Bi-2223 bulk cylinder and YBCO tape rings—Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomków, Ł.; Ciszek, M.; Chorowski, M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the measurements with sensitive magnetic field sensors made the issue of magnetic shielding important. The application of high temperature superconductors allows to obtain full shielding in zero field cooling conditions for DC and low frequency magnetic fields by the means of the Meissner effect. However, currently used conventional bulk magnetic shields maintain full shielding only in low magnetic fields—up to approximately 10 mT. In this paper, it is proposed to apply an additional screen made of a coated superconducting tape in order to increase the magnetic field interval of full shielding region. Computer model of such set of screens was created in Matlab and validated experimentally. Improvement of shielding quality was observed experimentally and calculated with the model.

  13. Preparation, bioactivity, and application of novel biocidal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rong

    In this study, several novel N-halamine precursors were synthesized. These surface coupling agents were bonded to the surfaces of cotton fabric, cotton gauze, paper, glass, and sand. Once they were activated using household bleach, the surfaces and materials became biocidal. Possible uses for the biocidal cotton are in protective garments for hospital personnel and those who must fight against bioterrorism. The treated cotton gauze may be used to make an antimicrobial mask to stop infective pathogen transcontamination. Biocidal sand has the potential to be used as a disinfectant in a filter for wastewater or municipal water treatment. In fact, the N-halamine siloxanes can be applied to many other surfaces. The results of biocidal efficacy of some of the treated surfaces will be presented in this study. Several new hydantoinyl diols and quaternary ammonium hydantoinyl diols were prepared in this work also. They were copolymerized with commercial water borne acrylic polyol and commercial isocyanate to form polyurethane coatings. The biocidal polyurethane coatings were produced after activation by chlorination. Those diols also reacted with a two-component epoxy paint to render the paint antimicrobial. Several novel biocidal polymeric resins were synthesized by attachment of N-halamine moieties to the commercial polymer supported beads such as Merrifield resin and Amberlite IRA-67 ionic resin. The Merrifield resin and Amberlite IRA-67 ionic resin also were grafted with N-halamine functionality as well as with the N,N-dimethyl-dodecylamine moiety via 1,2-dichloroethane. Finally, several quaternary ammonium N-halamine polymers were prepared. Direct copolymerization of (triethoxysilyl)propyl-7,7,9,9-tetramethyl-1,3,8-triazaspiro-[4,5]-decane-2,4-dione (TTDD-Si), or 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (BA-1 ') with 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)dimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride (DC 5700) produced dual functionality and water soluble biocidal materials and

  14. Modelling inorganic biocide emission from treated wood in water.

    PubMed

    Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a chemical model for explaining the leaching behaviour of inorganic biocides from treated wood. The standard leaching test XP CEN/TS14429 was applied to a commercial construction material made of treated Pinus sylvestris (Copper Boron Azole preservative). The experimental results were used for developing a chemical model under PHREEQC(®) (a geochemical software, with LLNL, MINTEQ data bases) by considering the released species detected in the eluates: main biocides Cu and B, other trace biocides (Cr and Zn), other elements like Ca, K, Cl, SO(4)(-2), dissolved organic matter (DOC). The model is based on chemical phenomena at liquid/solid interfaces (complexation, ion exchange and hydrolysis) and is satisfactory for the leaching behaviour representation. The simulation results confronted with the experiments confirmed the hypotheses of: (1) biocide fixation by surface complexation reactions with wood specific sites (carboxyl and phenol for Cu, Zn, Cr(III), aliphatic hydroxyl for B, ion exchange to a lesser extent) and (2) biocide mobilisation by extractives (DOC) coming from the wood. The maximum of Cu, Cr(III) and Zn fixation occurred at neutral pH (including the natural pH of wood), while B fixation was favoured at alkaline pH.

  15. Importance of Porins for Biocide Efficacy against Mycobacterium smegmatis▿

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Elrike; Schmidt, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael; Steinhauer, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria are among the microorganisms least susceptible to biocides but cause devastating diseases, such as tuberculosis, and increasingly opportunistic infections. The exceptional resistance of mycobacteria to toxic solutes is due to an unusual outer membrane, which acts as an efficient permeability barrier, in synergy with other resistance mechanisms. Porins are channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of mycobacteria. In this study we used the alamarBlue assay to show that the deletion of Msp porins in isogenic mutants increased the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis to isothiazolinones (methylchloroisothiazolinone [MCI]/methylisothiazolinone [MI] and octylisothiazolinone [2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; OIT]), formaldehyde-releasing biocides {hexahydrotriazine [1,3,5-tris (2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydrotriazine; HHT] and methylenbisoxazolidine [N,N′-methylene-bis-5-(methyloxazolidine); MBO]}, and the lipophilic biocides polyhexamethylene biguanide and octenidine dihydrochloride 2- to 16-fold. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the porin triple mutant against a complex disinfectant was decreased 8-fold compared to wild-type (wt) M. smegmatis. Efficacy testing in the quantitative suspension test EN 14348 revealed 100-fold improved survival of the porin mutant in the presence of this biocide. These findings underline the importance of porins for the susceptibility of M. smegmatis to biocides. PMID:21398489

  16. Screening of a charged impurity in graphene in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, O. O.; Pyatkovskiy, P. K.; Gorbar, E. V.; Gusynin, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    The electron states in the field of a charged impurity in graphene in a magnetic field are studied numerically. It is shown that a charged impurity removes the degeneracy of Landau levels converting them into bandlike structures. As the charge of impurity grows, the repulsion of sublevels of different Landau levels with the same value of orbital momentum takes place leading to the redistribution of the wave function profiles of these sublevels near the impurity. By studying the polarization effects, it is shown in agreement with the recent experiments that the effective charge of impurity can be very effectively tuned by chemical potential. If the chemical potential is situated inside a Landau level, then the charge of impurity is strongly diminished. In addition, the polarization function in this case has a peak at zero momentum, which leads to the sign-changing oscillations of the screened potential as a function of distance. If the chemical potential lies between the Landau levels, then the screened potential does not change sign, the screening is minimal, and the charged impurity can strongly affect the electron spectrum.

  17. Performance of stabilized halogen biocides in cooling water

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmier, A.W.; Martens, J.D.; McCoy, W.F.

    1997-12-01

    Halogen-based biocides have been used for many years in cooling water to control microbial fouling. Potential problems associated with the misapplication of halogen-based biocides in cooling water are increased corrosion, degradation of scale and corrosion inhibitors, and poor storage stability. Advances and innovations in this field have led to products in which the oxidizing effects and degradative properties of the halogen are stabilized. This provides much more effective control of the microbial fouling process in cooling water shile being less aggressive towards other system components. Methods used to measure increased effectiveness of stabilized halogen biocides are presented and discussed in this paper. Laboratory and field experiments of a stabilized halogen antimicrobial control program are detailed. Performance of this stabilized halogen program for Legionella pneumophila control is also discussed.

  18. The dam breakage of Baia Mare??a pilot study of magnetic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehland, F.; Panaiotu, C.; Appel, E.; Hoffmann, V.; Jordanova, D.; Jordanova, N.; Denut, I.

    Magnetic screening in the area of Baia Mare (Romania) was carried out in June 2000 in order to detect the degree of environmental pollution and to test the applicability of this method in this area. With a long tradition of mining activities, a gradual pollution of soil, air and rivers took place continuously in addition to smaller accidents in this area until the dam breakage on the 30.1.2000. During this accident, about 100,000 m 3 of mud containing cyanide and heavy metals leaked out and moved over fields and through a village into the river system of Lapûs, Someş, Tisza and Danube. Initial magnetic monitoring carried out during the translocation of the polluted waters along the Bulgarian part of the Danube revealed the effectiveness of the method for a proper and fast identification of pollution both in time and space even at remote distances from the source. For the later pilot project magnetic ( χ) screening was performed using a portable Bartington MS2 kappameter with a D-loop sensor. In addition fine-grained material (<0.5 mm) was sampled from the fields and river sediments and measured in the laboratory using a MS2 B-sensor. The results of the collected samples show a clear decrease in χ with increasing distance from the dams and mining areas in a regional and local scale, while the results gained by the MS2-D strongly depend on the nature of the ground. The dynamic geological setting around Baia Mare (fluvial sediments and valley fills), produces a heterogeneous background signal. A continuous monitoring system controlling the basic conditions could overcome these limitations.

  19. Impact of screening of resonant magnetic perturbations in three dimensional edge plasma transport simulations for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Frerichs, H.; Reiter, D.; Schmitz, O.; Cahyna, P.; Feng, Y.; Nardon, E.

    2012-05-15

    The impact of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the plasma edge can be analyzed in detail by three dimensional computer simulations, which take the underlying magnetic field structure as input. Previously, the 'vacuum approximation' has been used to calculate the magnetic field structure although plasma response effects may result in a screening (or even an amplification) of the external perturbations. Simulation results for an ITER similar shape plasma at the DIII-D tokamak are presented for the full vacuum perturbation field and an ad hoc screening case in comparison to the unperturbed configuration. It is shown that the RMP induced helical patterns in the plasma edge and on the divertor target shrink once screening is taken into account. However, a flat temperature profile is still found in the 'open field line domain' inside the separatrix, while the 'density pump out effect' found in the vacuum RMP case is considerably weakened.

  20. Assessment of Rock Magnetic Parameters for Fly Ash Pollution Screening in Topsoil of the Deccan Trap Basalt Area, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, U.; Basavaiah, N.; Das, P. K.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2012-04-01

    Rock magnetic parameters of highly magnetic topsoil of the Deccan Trap basalt area are evaluated for their suitability for efficient environmental magnetic pollution screening. Parameters, such as magnetic susceptibility (χ), frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility (κ fd%), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), soft isothermal remanent magnetization (Soft IRM), as well as thermo-magnetic analysis (κ-T) are compared and assessed for best depiction of topsoil contamination due to ash deposition around the Nashik thermal power station (NTPS). Fifty-five topsoil samples, collected along north-south and west-east stretching transects of 24 km length, are the basis for evaluation of the specific ash distribution pattern around the plant and its adjacent ash pond. Similar decline of the magnetic signals with increasing distance from the point source is observed in the concentration dependent magnetic parameters and can be modeled. The magnetic grain size parameters instead reveal increasing trends with increasing distance. Verwey-transition and Hopkinson peak obtained from κ-T analyses demonstrate to be important parameters to prove fly ash accumulation in soils of basaltic origin. The importance of magnetic parameters for indirect tracing of pollutants, such as heavy metals, is shown by Pb, Zn and Cu data, revealing similar distribution pattern as obtained from the concentration dependent magnetic parameters. Confirmation of the presence of a very high amount of ash particles in the vicinity of the NTPS and a low number of particles in more distant areas is provided by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on quantitatively extracted magnetic particles at 5.5 km and 11.9 km distance in eastern direction. The investigation demonstrates that the majority of the rock magnetic parameters has the potential to be successfully applied in environmental magnetic studies in areas with high magnetic background

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variations of a Screening Current Induced Magnetic Field in a Double-Pancake HTS Insert of an LTS/HTS NMR Magnet

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Min Cheol; Yagai, Tsuyoshi; Hahn, Seungyong; Ando, Ryuya; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and simulation results of a screening current induced magnetic field (SCF) in a high temperature superconductor (HTS) insert that constitutes a low-/high-temperature superconductor (LTS/HTS) NMR magnet. In this experiment, the HTS insert, a stack of 50 double-pancake coils, each wound with Bi2223 tape, was operated at 77 K. A screening current was induced in the HTS insert by three magnetic field sources: 1) a self field from the HTS insert; 2) an external field from a 5-T background magnet; and 3) combinations of 1) and 2). For each field excitation, which induced an SCF, its axial field distribution and temporal variations were measured and compared with simulation results based on the critical state model. Agreement on field profile between experiment and simulation is satisfactory but more work is needed to make the simulation useful for designing shim coils that will cancel the SCF. PMID:20401187

  2. Brain magnetic resonance imaging screening is not useful for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Teruya, Katsuji; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Oka, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the diagnostic usefulness of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening in HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms in detecting intracranial diseases at early stages. In this retrospective analysis, the study patients were HIV-1-infected patients who underwent brain MRI scan in clinical practice between 2001 and 2013. We excluded patients with MRI for (1) follow-up examination for prediagnosed intracranial diseases, (2) cancer staging, (3) screening mycobacterium/bacteria/fungi disease proliferation in the brain, and (4) evaluation for meningitis/encephalitis. The study patients (n=485) were classified into two groups: those who underwent brain MRI scan without any neurological symptoms/signs (asymptomatic patients, n=158) and those who underwent MRI due to such symptoms (symptomatic patients, n=327). Asymptomatic patients had lower CD4 counts than symptomatic patients (median 78 versus 241/μl). Intracranial diseases were detected in three (2%) of the asymptomatic patients [two toxoplasmosis and one progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)] compared to 58 (19%) of the symptomatic patients (the χ(2) test, p<0.01). The latter included toxoplasmosis (n=10), PML (n=7), cytomegalovirus encephalitis (n=3), primary central nervous system lymphoma (n=3), cryptococcoma/meningitis (n=3), and HIV-associated dementia (n=17). Among symptomatic patients, intracranial diseases were common in those with slurred speech (3/6, 50%), seizure (4/10, 40%), eyesight/vision abnormality (5/16, 31%), altered mental status (8/31, 26%), and hemiplegia/numbness (13/50, 26%). For patients with CD4 count <200/μl, intracranial diseases were detected in only 3 (3%) of 144 asymptomatic patients, compared with 46 (32%) of 113 symptomatic patients (p<0.01). Brain MRI screening for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms is of little value.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  4. Linking the Physicochemical Properities of Titania with Its Biocidal Properities

    EPA Science Inventory

    LINKING THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF TITANIA WITH ITS BIOCIDAL PROPERTIES. C. Han1, L. Putvin2, M. Pelaez1, H. Zamankhan3, H. Choi3, D. Betancourt4a, D. Dionysiou1. B. Veronesi4b, 1 Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati...

  5. Prion protein-coated magnetic beads: synthesis, characterization and development of a new ligands screening method.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Santos, Juliana Bosco; Dos Anjos, Daniel Meira; Rangel, Luciana Pereira; Vieira, Tuane Cristine Ramos Gonçalves; Moaddel, Ruin; da Silva, Jerson Lima

    2015-01-30

    Prion diseases are characterized by protein aggregation and neurodegeneration. Conversion of the native prion protein (PrP(C)) into the abnormal scrapie PrP isoform (PrP(Sc)), which undergoes aggregation and can eventually form amyloid fibrils, is a critical step leading to the characteristic path morphological hallmark of these diseases. However, the mechanism of conversion remains unclear. It is known that ligands can act as cofactors or inhibitors in the conversion mechanism of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc). Within this context, herein, we describe the immobilization of PrP(C) onto the surface of magnetic beads and the morphological characterization of PrP(C)-coated beads by fluorescence confocal microscopy. PrP(C)-coated magnetic beads were used to identify ligands from a mixture of compounds, which were monitored by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS. This affinity-based method allowed the isolation of the anti-prion compound quinacrine, an inhibitor of PrP aggregation. The results indicate that this approach can be applied to not only "fish" for anti-prion compounds from complex matrixes, but also to screening for and identify possible cellular cofactors involved in the deflagration of prion diseases. PMID:25576041

  6. Magnetic induction imaging with optical atomic magnetometers: towards applications to screening and surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Deans, Cameron; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new approach, based on optical atomic magnetometers and magnetic induction tomography (MIT), for remote and non-invasive detection of conductive targets. Atomic magnetometers overcome the main limitations of conventional MIT instrumentation, in particular their poor low-frequency sensitivity, their large size and their limited scalability. Moreover, atomic magnetometers have been proven to reach extremely high sensitivities, with an improvement of up to 7 orders of magnitude in the 50 MHz to DC band, with respect to a standard pick-up coil of the same size. In the present scheme, an oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in a conductive target and laser-pumped atomic magnetometers, either stand-alone or in an array, detect the response of the objects. A phase-sensitive detection scheme rejects the background, allowing remote detection of the secondary field and, thus, mapping of objects, hidden in cargos, underwater or underground. The potential for extreme sensitivity, miniaturization, dynamic range and array operation paves the way to a new generation of non-invasive, active detectors for surveillance, as well as for real-time cargo screening.

  7. Prion protein-coated magnetic beads: Synthesis, characterization and development of a new ligands screening method☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Santos, Juliana Bosco; dos Anjos, Daniel Meira; Rangel, Luciana Pereira; Vieira, Tuane Cristine Ramos Gonçalves; Moaddel, Ruin; da Silva, Jerson Lima

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by protein aggregation and neurodegeneration. Conversion of the native prion protein (PrPC) into the abnormal scrapie PrP isoform (PrPSc), which undergoes aggregation and can eventually form amyloid fibrils, is a critical step leading to the characteristic path morphological hallmark of these diseases. However, the mechanism of conversion remains unclear. It is known that ligands can act as cofactors or inhibitors in the conversion mechanism of PrPC into PrPSc. Within this context, herein, we describe the immobilization of PrPC onto the surface of magnetic beads and the morphological characterization of PrPC-coated beads by fluorescence confocal microscopy. PrPC-coated magnetic beads were used to identify ligands from a mixture of compounds, which were monitored by UHPLC–ESI-MS/MS. This affinity-based method allowed the isolation of the anti-prion compound quinacrine, an inhibitor of PrP aggregation. The results indicate that this approach can be applied to not only “fish” for anti-prion compounds from complex matrixes, but also to screening for and identify possible cellular cofactors involved in the deflagration of prion diseases. PMID:25576041

  8. Prion protein-coated magnetic beads: synthesis, characterization and development of a new ligands screening method.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Santos, Juliana Bosco; Dos Anjos, Daniel Meira; Rangel, Luciana Pereira; Vieira, Tuane Cristine Ramos Gonçalves; Moaddel, Ruin; da Silva, Jerson Lima

    2015-01-30

    Prion diseases are characterized by protein aggregation and neurodegeneration. Conversion of the native prion protein (PrP(C)) into the abnormal scrapie PrP isoform (PrP(Sc)), which undergoes aggregation and can eventually form amyloid fibrils, is a critical step leading to the characteristic path morphological hallmark of these diseases. However, the mechanism of conversion remains unclear. It is known that ligands can act as cofactors or inhibitors in the conversion mechanism of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc). Within this context, herein, we describe the immobilization of PrP(C) onto the surface of magnetic beads and the morphological characterization of PrP(C)-coated beads by fluorescence confocal microscopy. PrP(C)-coated magnetic beads were used to identify ligands from a mixture of compounds, which were monitored by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS. This affinity-based method allowed the isolation of the anti-prion compound quinacrine, an inhibitor of PrP aggregation. The results indicate that this approach can be applied to not only "fish" for anti-prion compounds from complex matrixes, but also to screening for and identify possible cellular cofactors involved in the deflagration of prion diseases.

  9. Spin noise and magnetic screening of impurities in a BCS superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Dall, Matthias; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias; de Sousa, Rogério

    The coupling of a localized impurity to a BCS superconductor (SC) leads to the formation of impurity Cooper-pairs via the proximity effect, generating two bound states within the SC energy gap, the so-called Yu-Rusinov-Shiba (YSR) states. They are similar to the Andreev Bound States that originate from Andreev reflection, e.g. when the impurity is hosted in a Josephson junction, and are known to produce sharp sub-gap resonances in charge noise [de Sousa et al., PRB 2009], providing a natural explanation for the observation of microresonators in superconducting devices [Simmonds et al., PRL 2004]. Here we present a theory for the spin noise generated by magnetic impurities in a SC, and discuss the impact of the Shiba states on models of flux noise in superconducting qubits. We use a combination of analytical methods and the numerical renormalization group technique to calculate the spin noise of an Anderson impurity in a SC, unveiling the competition between the proximity effect and Kondo correlations. Both mechanisms produce magnetic screening and a corresponding reduction in spin noise, giving rise to new insights on the kinds of impurities that are responsible for the observed 1 /fα flux noise in superconducting circuits. This research is supported by NSERC CRD/478366-2015.

  10. Acetylcholinesterase immobilized capillary reactors coupled to protein coated magnetic beads: A new tool for plant extract ligand screening

    PubMed Central

    Vanzolini, Kenia Lourenço; Jiang, Zhengjin; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Vieira, Lucas Campos Curcino; Corrêa, Arlene Gonçalvez; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Moaddel, Ruin

    2013-01-01

    The use of immobilized capillary enzyme reactors (ICERs) and enzymes coated to magnetic beads ((NT or CT)-MB) for ligand screening has been adopted as a new technique of high throughput screening (HTS). In this work the selected target was the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which acts on the central nervous system and is a validated target for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as for new insecticides. A new approach for the screening of plant extracts was developed based on the ligand fishing experiments and zonal chromatography. For that, the magnetic beads were used for the ligand fishing experiments and capillary bioreactors for the activity assays. The latter was employed also under non-linear conditions to determine the affinity constants of known ligands, for the first time, as well as for the active fished ligand. PMID:24148457

  11. Competition between Kondo screening and magnetism at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhman, Jonathan; Joshua, Arjun; Ilani, Shahal; Altman, Ehud

    2014-09-01

    We present a theory of magnetic and magnetotransport phenomena at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces, which as a central ingredient includes coupling between the conduction bands and local magnetic moments originating from charge traps at the interface. Tuning the itinerant electron density in the model drives transitions between a heavy Fermi liquid phase with screened moments and various magnetic states. The dependence of the magnetic phenomena on the electron density or gate voltage stems from competing magnetic interactions between the local moments and the different conduction bands. At low densities only the lowest conduction band, composed of the dxy orbitals of Ti, is occupied. Its antiferromagnetic interaction with the local moments leads to screening of the moments at a Kondo scale that increases with density. However, above a critical density, measured in experiments to be nc≈1.7×1013cm-2, the dxz and dyz bands begin to populate. Their ferromagnetic interaction with the local moments competes with the antiferromagnetic interaction of the dxy band leading to eventual reduction of the Kondo scale with density. We explain the distinct magnetotransport regimes seen in experiments as manifestations of the magnetic phase diagram computed from the model. We present data showing a relation between the anomalous Hall effect and the resistivity in the system. The data strongly suggest that the concentration of local magnetic moments affecting the transport in the system is much lower than the carrier density, in accord with the theoretical model.

  12. The role of acoustic screens in distribution of technogenic magnetic particles and chemical pollution in roadside soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawer, Małgorzata; Magiera, Tadeusz; Szuszkiewicz, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Roads constructed nowadays should by all means be functional for their motorized users but at the same time their effect on the environment ought to be limited to the minimum. Despite the existence of various methods for preventing from negative influence of roads on the environment, there is still lack of adequate techniques to monitor and reduce the spreading of roadside pollution in the air and soils. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of acoustic screens on spreading and deposition of solid pollutants deriving from car emissions, based on their quantitative and qualitative analysis. During this study, measurements of magnetic susceptibility and analyses of heavy metals as well as Pt and Rh contents in soil and plant samples (Taraxacum officinale, Plantago major, Parthenocissus quinquefolia) collected near different kinds of acoustic screens ("green walls", Plexiglass, sawdust concrete, steel panels and earth embankments) have been done. Previous investigations showed showed that most of traffic emission is deposited in the close vicinity of the roads (up to 10 m) and the level of contamination decreased with increasing distance from the road edge. However, the results of this project indicate that, in the area where the acoustic screens are located, this distribution is disturbed and the additional enrichment of heavy metals in soil about 10 - 15 m behind screens is observed. Spatial distribution of heavy metal contents in soil samples corresponds to its magnetic susceptibility values. High contents of Fe, Zn, Mn and Pb was observed next to acoustic screens made of sawdust concrete and steel panels. Additionally, concentration of Zn in soil samples collected close to these screens exceeded threshold value. Analyses of plants showed that the highest content of examined elements and highest values of magnetic susceptibility were recorded near road edge. What is more, samples of Parthenocissus quinquefolia collected at height 0.2 m were characterized

  13. Utility of Early Screening Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Extensive Hip Osteonecrosis in Pediatric Patients Treated With Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kaste, Sue C.; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Neel, Michael D.; Bowman, W. Paul; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Metzger, Monika L.; Bhojwani, Deepa; Inaba, Hiroto; Campbell, Patrick; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Jeha, Sima; Sandlund, John T.; Downing, James R.; Relling, Mary V.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hip osteonecrosis frequently complicates treatment with glucocorticoids. When extensive (affecting ≥ 30% of the epiphyseal surface), 80% of joints collapse within 2 years, so interventions are needed to prevent this outcome. Patients and Methods This prospective cohort magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening study included all consecutive children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on a single protocol. Hip MRI was performed at 6.5 and 9 months from diagnosis (early screening) and at completion of chemotherapy (final evaluation) to determine whether screening could identify extensive hip osteonecrosis before symptom development. Results Of 498 patients, 462 underwent screening MRI. Extensive asymptomatic osteonecrosis was identified by early screening in 26 patients (41 hips); another four patients (seven hips) were detected after the screening period, such that screening sensitivity was 84.1% and specificity was 99.4%. The number of joints screened to detect one lesion was 20.1 joints for all patients, 4.4 joints for patients older than 10 years, and 198 joints for patients ≤ 10 years old (P < .001). Of the 40 extensive lesions in patients older than 10 years, 19 required total hip arthroplasty and none improved. Of eight extensive lesions in younger patients, none required arthroplasty and four improved. Conclusion In patients age 10 years old or younger who require prolonged glucocorticoid therapy, screening for extensive hip osteonecrosis is unnecessary because their risk is low and lesions tend to heal. In children older than 10 years, early screening successfully identifies extensive asymptomatic lesions in patients who would be eligible for studies of interventions to prevent or delay joint collapse. PMID:25605853

  14. Screening and edge states in two-dimensional metals in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Shikin, V. B. Nazin, S. S.

    2011-08-15

    The length {lambda}{sub 0} at which the lateral electric-field component E{sub Up-Tack} perpendicular to the boundary is conserved near the boundary of two-dimensional (2D) samples, which is covered by 2D electrons, has been determined. The existence of the finite such length follows from the self-consistent process of the screening of the external fields forming the boundaries of real 2D systems by the electrons of the metal. The effect of E{sub Up-Tack} on the structure of magnetic edge states has been taken into account in the mean field approximation in a wide range of the external field from the semiclassical limit ({epsilon}{sub F} Much-Greater-Than h{omega}{sub c}), where {epsilon}{sub F} is the Fermi energy of the 2D system and h{omega}{sub c} is the cyclotron energy to the quantum Hall effect (QHE) region ({epsilon}{sub F} Much-Less-Than h{omega}{sub c}). The positions of the magnetic edge state peaks against the background of their ideal distribution along the perimeter of the 2D circle in the known problem of transverse magnetic focusing have been determined in the semiclassical limit. The systematic description of the structure of the skin layer with {lambda}{sub H} {>=} {lambda}{sub 0}, consisting of the set of the so-called integer strips (overlapping or independent), which are carriers of the universal quantum conductance, has been proposed in the QHE regime. A relatively large probability of the overlapping of the fields of adjacent strips, as well as the possibility of describing coupled integer cascades, is remarkable. The existing data on the tunneling current through integer strips in the {lambda}{sub H} layer providing suitable information on the actual state of the boundary of the 2D system have been commented. A natural analogy between the properties of magnetic edge states and a well-known problem of the details of the ballistic conductance {sigma}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }(H) of narrow electron channels in the magnetic field H has been

  15. Modelling biofilm-induced formation damage and biocide treatment in subsurface geosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ezeuko, C C; Sen, A; Gates, I D

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm growth in subsurface porous media, and its treatment with biocides (antimicrobial agents), involves a complex interaction of biogeochemical processes which provide non-trivial mathematical modelling challenges. Although there are literature reports of mathematical models to evaluate biofilm tolerance to biocides, none of these models have investigated biocide treatment of biofilms growing in interconnected porous media with flow. In this paper, we present a numerical investigation using a pore network model of biofilm growth, formation damage and biocide treatment. The model includes three phases (aqueous, adsorbed biofilm, and solid matrix), a single growth-limiting nutrient and a single biocide dissolved in the water. Biofilm is assumed to contain a single species of microbe, in which each cell can be a viable persister, a viable non-persister, or non-viable (dead). Persisters describe small subpopulation of cells which are tolerant to biocide treatment. Biofilm tolerance to biocide treatment is regulated by persister cells and includes ‘innate’ and ‘biocide-induced’ factors. Simulations demonstrate that biofilm tolerance to biocides can increase with biofilm maturity, and that biocide treatment alone does not reverse biofilm-induced formation damage. Also, a successful application of biological permeability conformance treatment involving geologic layers with flow communication is more complicated than simply engineering the attachment of biofilm-forming cells at desired sites. PMID:23164434

  16. Competition between Kondo screening and Magnetism in the LaAlO3 /SrTiO3 Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhman, Jonathan; Joshua, Arjun; Ilani, Shahal; Altman, Ehud

    2014-03-01

    We present a theory of magnetic phenomena at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces, which includes coupling between the conduction bands and local magnetic moments originating from charge traps at the interface. Tuning the itinerant electron density drives transitions between a heavy Fermi liquid phase with screened moments and various magnetic states. The dependence of the magnetic phenomena on the electron density stems from competing magnetic interactions between the local moments and the different conduction bands. At low densities only the lowest conduction band, composed of the dxy orbitals of Ti, is occupied. Its antiferromagnetic interaction with the local moments leads to screening of the moments at a Kondo scale that increases with density. However, above a critical density the dxz /dyz bands begin to populate. Their ferromagnetic interaction with the local moments competes with the antiferromagnetic interaction of the dxy band leading to eventual reduction of the Kondo scale with density. We explain the distinct magneto transport regimes seen in experiments as manifestations of the magnetic phase diagram computed from the model. We also present interpretation of previously unpublished data supporting the theoretical model.

  17. New approaches to biocide effectiveness monitoring using on-site biocide active analysis, ATP analysis, and on-line dosage/monitoring control

    SciTech Connect

    Borchardt, S.A.; Wetegrove, R.L.; Martens, J.D.

    1997-09-01

    Accurate monitoring and control of antimicrobial agents (biocides) are necessary to maintain optimum performance of industrial water systems. Evaluation of many biocides on-site is often difficult due to a lack of accurate field methods. For many non-oxidizing biocides, no field methods are available. The use of a bioluminescence bioassay allows on-site measurement of actual effective toxicant. This technology is based on a bioluminescence bioassay that measures the decrease in light output of a specific bacterium over a given time period in the presence of a toxicant. This response can be accurately correlated to the concentration of toxicant present. This system can also be used to monitor the response of microbiological populations to treatment programs by monitoring shifts in ATP levels. On-line dosage/monitoring control of a biocide product can be achieved by the addition of an inert fluorescent tracer molecule to a biocide formulation. The benefits of these traced biocides include precise documentation and on-line control of product feed and discharge, measurement of system consumption, and measurement of biocide concentration gradients throughout a system. The attributes of these new approaches to biocide effectiveness monitoring allow for more efficient and economical microbiological treatment of industrial water systems.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and biocidal activities of Schiff base polychelates containing polyurethane links in the main chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnain, Sumaiya; Nishat, Nahid

    The concept of combining metallo-polymers with urethanes offers a versatile approach for the synthesis of new polymeric materials. Polyurethane containing transition metals was synthesized by the reaction of Schiff base metal complex with toluene 2,4 diisocyanate. The proposed structures were confirmed by elemental analysis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FT-IR. The geometry is determined by UV-Visible spectra and magnetic moment measurements, which reveals that the Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes have octahedral geometry while square planer geometry is reported for Cu(II) and tetrahedral for Zn(II) complex. The antimicrobial activities are determined using the agar well diffusion method with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis (bacteria), Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus (yeast). All the polymeric metal complexes show comparatively good biocidal activity, which is further enhanced after polymerization.

  19. Research and development of an electrochemical biocide reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, G. G.; Bodo, C. A.; Glennon, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    An alternate disinfecting process to chemical agents, heat, or radiation in an aqueous media has been studied. The process is called an electrochemical biocide and employs cyclic, low-level voltages at chemically inert electrodes to pass alternating current through water and, in the process, to destroy microorganisms. The paper describes experimental hardware, methodology, and results with a tracer microorganism (Escherichia coli). The results presented show the effects on microorganism kill of operating parameters, including current density (15 to 55 mA/sq cm (14 to 51 ASF)), waveform of applied electrical signal (square, triangular, sine), frequency of applied electrical signal (0.5 to 1.5 Hz), process water flow rate (100 to 600 cc/min (1.6 to 9.5 gph)), and reactor resident time (0 to 4 min). Comparisons are made between the disinfecting property of the electrochemical biocide and chlorine, bromine, and iodine.

  20. Silver-enhanced block copolymer membranes with biocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Poornima; Hong, Pei-Ying; Sougrat, Rachid; Nunes, Suzana P

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface and pore walls of block copolymer membranes with highly ordered pore structure. Pyridine blocks constitute the pore surfaces, complexing silver ions and promoting a homogeneous distribution. Nanoparticles were then formed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The morphology varied with the preparation conditions (pH and silver ion concentration), as confirmed by field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Silver has a strong biocide activity, which for membranes can bring the advantage of minimizing the growth of bacteria and formation of biofilm. The membranes with nanoparticles prepared under different pH values and ion concentrations were incubated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and compared with the control. The strongest biocidal activity was achieved with membranes containing membranes prepared under pH 9. Under these conditions, the best distribution with small particle size was observed by microscopy.

  1. Microbial consortium from nuclear plants show tolerance to biocides

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, J.H.; Burke-Holst, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    Biocides over the last three to four decades have gained in popularity and widespread use in water systems. Industries today routinely incorporate chemical agents into water systems for the purpose of controlling microbial populations. Microorganisms can cause a number of unwanted problems, e.g., fouling, odor, spoilage, corrosion, and health problems in water treatment, manufacturing, food processing, energy production industries. The nuclear industry is no exception to the problems that can be initiated by microbial populations. In some areas the nuclear industry is more susceptible due to the vast number of water systems present and the regulatory limits placed on the water chemistry. Their work has shown that a number of biocides appear to be ineffective in controlling populations that have been isolated from nuclear powerplant water systems.

  2. Biocidal properties of metal oxide nanoparticles and their halogen adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggstrom, Johanna A.; Klabunde, Kenneth J.; Marchin, George L.

    2010-03-01

    Nanosized metal oxide halogen adducts possess high surface reactivities due to their unique surface morphologies. These adducts have been used as reactive materials against vegetative cells, such as Escherichia coli as well as bacterial endospores, including Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis (Δ Sterne strain). Here we report high biocidal activities against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and endospores. The procedure consists of a membrane method. Transmission electron micrographs are used to compare nanoparticle-treated and untreated cells and spores. It is proposed that the abrasive character of the particles, the oxidative power of the halogens/interhalogens, and the electrostatic attraction between the metal oxides and the biological material are responsible for high biocidal activities. While some activity was demonstrated, bacterial endospores were more resistant to nanoparticle treatment than the vegetative bacteria.

  3. Evaluation of Biofilms and the Effects of Biocides Thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Koenig, David W. (Inventor); Mishra, Saroj K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Biofilm formation is monitored by real-time continuous measurement. Images are formed of sessile cells on a surface and planktonic cells adjacent the surface. The attachment of cells to the surface is measured and quantitated, and sessile and planktonic cells are distinguished using image processing techniques. Single cells as well as colonies are monitored on or adjacent a variety of substrates. Flowing streams may be monitored. The effects of biocides on biofilms commonly isolated from recyclable water systems are measured.

  4. Effects of three oxidizing biocides on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1

    SciTech Connect

    Domingue, E.L.; Tyndall, R.L.; Mayberry, W.R.; Pancorbo, O.C.

    1988-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine the bactericidal effects of ozone and hydrogen peroxide relative to that of free chlorine on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. In laboratory batch-type experiments, organisms seeded at various densities were exposed to different concentrations of these biocides in demand-free buffers. Bactericidal effects were measured by determining the ability of L. pneumophila to grow on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar supplemented with ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate. Ozone was the most potent of the three biocide, with a greater than 99% kill of L. pneumophila occurring during a 5-min exposure to 0.10 to 0.30 ..mu..g of O/sub 3/ per ml. The bactericidal action of O/sub 3/ was not markedly affected by changes in pH or temperature. Concentrations of 0.30 and 0.40 /sup +/g of free chlorine per ml killed 99% of the L. pneumophila after 30- and 5-min exposures, respectively. A 30-min exposure to 1000 ..mu..g of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ per ml was required to effect a 99% reduction of the viable L. pneumophila population. However, no viable L. pneumophila could be detected after a 24-h exposure to 100 or 300 ..mu..g of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ per ml. Attempts were made to correlate the biocidal effects of O/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ with the oxidation of L. pneumophila fatty acids. These tests indicated that certain biocidal concentrations of O/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resulted in a loss or severe reduction of L. pneumophila unsaturated fatty acids.

  5. Recent advances in the potential interconnection between antimicrobial resistance to biocides and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oggioni, Marco R; Furi, Leonardo; Coelho, Joana R; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Martínez, José L

    2013-04-01

    Interconnection between microbial resistance to biocides and antibiotics is a topic of increasing interest given the recent changes in European legislation and claims of a risk of biocide use on bacterial resistance. In the second International Conference on Antimicrobial Research held in Lisbon in November 2012, a workshop specifically addressed this topic, presentations included approaches to risk assessment and investigations into the molecular mechanisms of biocide resistance and co- and cross-resistance to antibiotics. The overall conclusion was that, even if each biocide represents a specific case, there is scientific evidence that biocides select for biocide resistance, but that there is, so far, no conclusive evidence that this also determined or will determine an increase in antibiotic resistance.

  6. Biocides in the Yangtze River of China: spatiotemporal distribution, mass load and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wang-Rong; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, You-Sheng; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-05-01

    Nineteen biocides were investigated in the Yangtze River to understand their spatiotemporal distribution, mass loads and ecological risks. Fourteen biocides were detected, with the highest concentrations up to 166 ng/L for DEET in surface water, and 54.3 ng/g dry weight (dw) for triclocarban in sediment. The dominant biocides were DEET and methylparaben, with their detection frequencies of 100% in both phases. An estimate of 152 t/y of 14 biocides was carried by the Yangtze River to the East China Sea. The distribution of biocides in the aquatic environments was significantly correlated to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN), suggesting dominant input sources from domestic wastewater of the cities along the river. Risk assessment showed high ecological risks posed by carbendazim in both phases and by triclosan in sediment. Therefore, proper measures should be taken to reduce the input of biocides into the river systems.

  7. New filtering antimicrobial nonwovens with various carriers for biocides as respiratory protective materials against bioaerosol.

    PubMed

    Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata; Brochocka, Agnieszka; Brycki, Bogumił

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the bioactivity of polypropylene melt-blown filtering nonwovens used in respiratory protective devices (RPD) with a biocidal agent (alkylammonium microbiocides) on 2 mineral carriers. Two types of carriers were tested: a bentonite, with an aluminosilicate base, and a perlite, volcanic glass. High biostatic and biocidal effects of modified nonwovens with biocides were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria. Nonwovens modified with a biocide on a bentonite carrier showed an opposite reaction to a biocide on a perlite. The research also showed that 10% concentration of a biocidal agent on a perlite carrier was sufficient to inhibit the growth of bacteria (100% reduction) placed in the structure of a filtering material during normal use of RPD. A comparison of the biological activity of 2 filtering materials, each containing 10% of a perlite and produced in a laboratory and industrial conditions, showed no statistically significant differences.

  8. [Low field nuclear magnetic resonance for rapid quantitation of microalgae lipid and its application in high throughput screening].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Yang, Yi; Wang, Zejian; Zhuang, Yingping; Chu, Ju; Guoi, Meijin

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and accurate determination method of lipids in microalgae plays a significant role in an efficient breeding process for high-lipid production of microalgae. Using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR), we developed a direct quantitative method for cellular lipids in Chlorella protothecoides cells. The LF-NMR signal had a linear relationship with the lipid content in the microalgae cells for both dry cell samples and algal broth samples (R2 > 0.99). These results indicated that we could use this method for accurate determination of microalgal lipids. Although LF-NMR is a rapid and easy lipid determination method in comparison to conventional methods, low efficiency would limit its application in high throughput screening. Therefore, we developed a novel combined high throughput screening method for high-lipid content mutants of C. protothecoides. Namely, we initially applied Nile red staining method for semi-quantification of lipid in the pre-screening process, and following with LF-NMR method for accurate lipid determination in re-screening process. Finally, we adopted this novel screening method in the breeding process of high-lipid content heterotrophic cells of C. protothecoides. From 3 098 mutated strains 108 high-lipid content strains were selected through pre-screening process, and then 9 mutants with high-lipid production were obtained in the re-screening process. In a consequence, with heterotrophical cultivation of 168 h, the lipid concentration could reach 5 g/L, and the highest lipid content exceeded 20% (W/W), which was almost two-fold to that of the wild strain. All these results demonstrated that the novel breeding process was reliable and feasible for improving the screening efficiency. PMID:27349121

  9. Synergistic activity of biocides and antibiotics on resistant bacteria from organically produced foods.

    PubMed

    Fernández Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Abriouel, Hikmate; Gadea, Rebeca; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio; Ortega, Elena

    2014-10-01

    Synergism between biocides and antibiotics was investigated in 20 biocide and antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains that were previously isolated from organically produced foods, according to their antimicrobial resistance profiles. Most of the antibiotic/biocide combinations yielded synergistic interactions, reducing the inhibitory concentrations of biocides and antibiotics by 4- to 16-fold. Among enterococci, synergism with biocides was detected for amoxicillin (AM), cefuroxime (CX), erythromycin (EM), ciprofloxacin (CP), and trimethoprim/sulphametoxazol (T/S). Among staphylococci, interactions were synergistic (AM) and either synergistic or indifferent (CX and EM, depending on biocide). Among the three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical strains included in the study, the combinations of methicillin and triclosan or hexachlorophene acted synergistically in all strains, but interactions were either synergistic or indifferent for the other biocides, depending on the strain. All combinations tested were synergistic for Lactobacillus (AM, CX, EM, and CP) and Micrococcus (AM, EM). In Salmonella, interactions were indifferent (AM, CX, EM, and CP) or synergistic (T/S). Synergism with biocides was also detected in Klebsiella isolates (AM, CX, and T/S), Enterobacter sp. (AM, CX, EM, and T/S), Pantoea (AM, CX, EM, CP, and T/S), and Chryseobacterium sp. (EM). These results suggest that combinations of biocides and antibiotics may open new possibilities to combat antimicrobial resistance. PMID:24660956

  10. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  11. Supramolecular assistance between cyclodextrins and didecyldimethylammonium chloride against enveloped viruses: Toward eco-biocidal formulations.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Loïc; Dewilde, Anny; Aubry, Jean-Marie; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2016-10-15

    Nosocomial infections have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals. In this respect, biocides are widely used in hospitals leading to resistant microorganisms. We show here that cyclodextrins can remarkably boost the virucidal activity of di-n-decyldimethylammonium chloride. These oligosaccharides synergistically work with the biocide affording a noticeable reduction of the active virucide concentration between 40 and 85%. Partial replacement of a significant amount of the biocide by eco- and bio-compatible cyclodextrins whilst maintaining the same activity is of great interest as it allows the reduction of the toxicological drawbacks of classical biocide mixtures. PMID:27576667

  12. High-Throughput Screening by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HTS by NMR) for the Identification of PPIs Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bainan; Barile, Elisa; De, Surya K; Wei, Jun; Purves, Angela; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the ever so complex field of drug discovery has embraced novel design strategies based on biophysical fragment screening (fragment-based drug design; FBDD) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and/or structure-guided approaches, most often using X-ray crystallography and computer modeling. Experience from recent years unveiled that these methods are more effective and less prone to artifacts compared to biochemical high-throughput screening (HTS) of large collection of compounds in designing protein inhibitors. Hence these strategies are increasingly becoming the most utilized in the modern pharmaceutical industry. Nonetheless, there is still an impending need to develop innovative and effective strategies to tackle other more challenging targets such as those involving protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While HTS strategies notoriously fail to identify viable hits against such targets, few successful examples of PPIs antagonists derived by FBDD strategies exist. Recently, we reported on a new strategy that combines some of the basic principles of fragment-based screening with combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening. The approach, termed HTS by NMR, combines the advantages of combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening to rapidly and unambiguously identify bona fide inhibitors of PPIs. This review will reiterate the critical aspects of the approach with examples of possible applications.

  13. High-throughput screening by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HTS by NMR) for the identification of PPIs antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bainan; Barile, Elisa; De, Surya K.; Wei, Jun; Purves, Angela; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the ever so complex field of drug discovery has embraced novel design strategies based on biophysical fragment screening (fragment-based drug design; FBDD) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and/or structure-guided approaches, most often using X-ray crystallography and computer modeling. Experience from recent years unveiled that these methods are more effective and less prone to artifacts compared to biochemical high-throughput screening (HTS) of large collection of compounds in designing protein inhibitors. Hence these strategies are increasingly becoming the most utilized in the modern pharmaceutical industry. Nonetheless, there is still an impending need to develop innovative and effective strategies to tackle other more challenging targets such as those involving protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While HTS strategies notoriously fail to identify viable hits against such targets, few successful examples of PPIs antagonists derived by FBDD strategies exist. Recently, we reported on a new strategy that combines some of the basic principles of fragment-based screening with combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening. The approach, termed HTS by NMR, combines the advantages of combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening to rapidly and unambiguously identify bona fide inhibitors of PPIs. This review will reiterate the critical aspects of the approach with examples of possible applications. PMID:25986689

  14. High-Throughput Screening by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HTS by NMR) for the Identification of PPIs Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bainan; Barile, Elisa; De, Surya K; Wei, Jun; Purves, Angela; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the ever so complex field of drug discovery has embraced novel design strategies based on biophysical fragment screening (fragment-based drug design; FBDD) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and/or structure-guided approaches, most often using X-ray crystallography and computer modeling. Experience from recent years unveiled that these methods are more effective and less prone to artifacts compared to biochemical high-throughput screening (HTS) of large collection of compounds in designing protein inhibitors. Hence these strategies are increasingly becoming the most utilized in the modern pharmaceutical industry. Nonetheless, there is still an impending need to develop innovative and effective strategies to tackle other more challenging targets such as those involving protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While HTS strategies notoriously fail to identify viable hits against such targets, few successful examples of PPIs antagonists derived by FBDD strategies exist. Recently, we reported on a new strategy that combines some of the basic principles of fragment-based screening with combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening. The approach, termed HTS by NMR, combines the advantages of combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening to rapidly and unambiguously identify bona fide inhibitors of PPIs. This review will reiterate the critical aspects of the approach with examples of possible applications. PMID:25986689

  15. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood - a mechanistic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Lupsea, Maria; Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2013-02-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper-boron-azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: - Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. - Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. - The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. - Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with \\OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives.

  16. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood - a mechanistic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Lupsea, Maria; Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2013-02-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper-boron-azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: - Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. - Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. - The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. - Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with \\OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. PMID:23295179

  17. SOLUBILITY OF ORGANIC BIOCIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CO2 AND CO2+ COSOLVENT MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solubilities of four organic biocides in supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) were measured using a dynamic flowr apparatus over a pressure range of 10 to 30 MPa and temperature of 35-80 degrees C. The biocides studied were: Amical-48 (diiodomethyl p-tolyl sulfone), chlorothalo...

  18. Enhanced Biocide Mitigation of Field Biofilm Consortia by a Mixture of D-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingchao; Jia, Ru; Al-Mahamedh, Hussain H; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in the oil and gas industry as well as in many other industries. Current treatment methods rely mostly on pigging and biocide dosing. Biocide resistance is a growing concern. Thus, it is desirable to use biocide enhancers to improve the efficacy of existing biocides. D-Amino acids are naturally occurring. Our previous work demonstrated that some D-amino acids are biocide enhancers. Under a biocide stress of 50 ppm (w/w) hydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfate (THPS) biocide, 1 ppm D-tyrosine and 100 ppm D-methionine used separately successfully mitigated the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm on carbon steel coupons. The data reported in this work revealed that 50 ppm of an equimolar mixture of D-methionine, D-tyrosine, D-leucine, and D-tryptophan greatly enhanced 50 ppm THPS biocide treatment of two recalcitrant biofilm consortia containing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB), and fermentative bacteria, etc., from oil-field operations. The data also indicated that individual D-amino acids were inadequate for the biofilm consortia. PMID:27379039

  19. Enhanced Biocide Mitigation of Field Biofilm Consortia by a Mixture of D-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchao; Jia, Ru; Al-Mahamedh, Hussain H.; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in the oil and gas industry as well as in many other industries. Current treatment methods rely mostly on pigging and biocide dosing. Biocide resistance is a growing concern. Thus, it is desirable to use biocide enhancers to improve the efficacy of existing biocides. D-Amino acids are naturally occurring. Our previous work demonstrated that some D-amino acids are biocide enhancers. Under a biocide stress of 50 ppm (w/w) hydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfate (THPS) biocide, 1 ppm D-tyrosine and 100 ppm D-methionine used separately successfully mitigated the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm on carbon steel coupons. The data reported in this work revealed that 50 ppm of an equimolar mixture of D-methionine, D-tyrosine, D-leucine, and D-tryptophan greatly enhanced 50 ppm THPS biocide treatment of two recalcitrant biofilm consortia containing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB), and fermentative bacteria, etc., from oil-field operations. The data also indicated that individual D-amino acids were inadequate for the biofilm consortia. PMID:27379039

  20. Enhanced Biocide Mitigation of Field Biofilm Consortia by a Mixture of D-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingchao; Jia, Ru; Al-Mahamedh, Hussain H; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in the oil and gas industry as well as in many other industries. Current treatment methods rely mostly on pigging and biocide dosing. Biocide resistance is a growing concern. Thus, it is desirable to use biocide enhancers to improve the efficacy of existing biocides. D-Amino acids are naturally occurring. Our previous work demonstrated that some D-amino acids are biocide enhancers. Under a biocide stress of 50 ppm (w/w) hydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfate (THPS) biocide, 1 ppm D-tyrosine and 100 ppm D-methionine used separately successfully mitigated the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm on carbon steel coupons. The data reported in this work revealed that 50 ppm of an equimolar mixture of D-methionine, D-tyrosine, D-leucine, and D-tryptophan greatly enhanced 50 ppm THPS biocide treatment of two recalcitrant biofilm consortia containing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB), and fermentative bacteria, etc., from oil-field operations. The data also indicated that individual D-amino acids were inadequate for the biofilm consortia.

  1. Hazard identification of commercially available biocides to control zebra mussels and Asiatic clams. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, G.L.; Doherty, F.G.; Michalenko, E.M.; Odin, M.

    1993-10-01

    This report summarizes data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicology and mammalian toxicology of selected biocides used to control zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). Toxic levels of each biocide or active ingredient are compared to benchmark effluent concentrations (estimates of possible biocide concentrations at the end of cooling water discharge pipes based on doses or residual concentrations at point of fouling recommended by the manufacturer). Comparison of the available data on toxicity to non-target aquatic species shows that the commercial products promoted as molluscicides for control of macrobiological fouling of freshwater cooling systems are relatively non-specific biocides. Toxic effect levels for the most sensitive non-target species for all the biocides exceeded their respective benchmark effluent levels. Data on the mammalian toxicity of the biocides are limited in scope and of poor quality; critical effects were not identified and data were inadequate to assess carcinogenicity or developmental or reproductive toxicity for most of the biocides (ACTI-BROM 1338 and Bulab 6002 appear to be developmental and reproductive toxicants in mammals). Given these limitations in the data, considerable uncertainty is attached to the toxic effect levels selected for comparisons to benchmark effluent levels. Acute toxic effect levels for mammals exceeded benchmark effluent levels for all biocides by factors of 100--1000. Chronic toxic effect levels were closer to benchmark levels, and exceeded benchmarks by less than a factor of 10 for some of the active ingredients of Bulab 6009 and Clam-Trol CT-1.

  2. Predicting herbicide and biocide concentrations in rivers across Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemyss, Devon; Honti, Mark; Stamm, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Pesticide concentrations vary strongly in space and time. Accordingly, intensive sampling is required to achieve a reliable quantification of pesticide pollution. As this requires substantial resources, loads and concentration ranges in many small and medium streams remain unknown. Here, we propose partially filling the information gap for herbicides and biocides by using a modelling approach that predicts stream concentrations without site-specific calibration simply based on generally available data like land use, discharge and nation-wide consumption data. The simple, conceptual model distinguishes herbicide losses from agricultural fields, private gardens and biocide losses from buildings (facades, roofs). The herbicide model is driven by river discharge and the applied herbicide mass; the biocide model requires precipitation and the footprint area of urban areas containing the biocide. The model approach allows for modelling concentrations across multiple catchments at the daily, or shorter, time scale and for small to medium-sized catchments (1 - 100 km2). Four high resolution sampling campaigns in the Swiss Plateau were used to calibrate the model parameters for six model compounds: atrazine, metolachlor, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, diuron and mecoprop. Five additional sampled catchments across Switzerland were used to directly compare the predicted to the measured concentrations. Analysis of the first results reveals a reasonable simulation of the concentration dynamics for specific rainfall events and across the seasons. Predicted concentration ranges are reasonable even without site-specific calibration. This indicates the transferability of the calibrated model directly to other areas. However, the results also demonstrate systematic biases in that the highest measured peaks were not attained by the model. Probable causes for these deviations are conceptual model limitations and input uncertainty (pesticide use intensity, local precipitation, etc

  3. Benchmarking extended MHD modeling of resonant magnetic perturbations against measurements of islands and screening on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. W.; Canik, J. M.; Hirshman, S. P.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments where resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied to L-mode plasmas are used to test the fundamental plasma response physics on island formation in resistive MHD models. Fine torque scans reveal that large RMP-induced n=1 islands open at multiple mode-rational surfaces (m=2,3,4) at low rotation, but are screened elsewhere. Time-independent linear resistive MHD simulations with the M3D-C1 code predict a narrow region centered at at ωe⊥ < 0 where resonant fields are found to be weakly screened, though strongly screened elsewhere. Experimentally, the island formation window is wider and centered at ωe⊥ < 0. Nonlinear resistive MHD simulations in the absence of rotation are performed with the SIESTA code. A series of meta-stable equilibria are modeled with an increasing helical 2/1 perturbation. These meta-stable equilibria demonstrate the transition from even-parity screening currents at the rational surface at low perturbation levels to odd-pairty Pfirsch-Schlüter currents when a large island is present. Supported by US DOE DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  4. A green triple biocide cocktail consisting of a biocide, EDDS and methanol for the mitigation of planktonic and sessile sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wen, J; Xu, D; Gu, T; Raad, I

    2012-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) cause souring and their biofilms are often the culprit in Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The two most common green biocides for SRB treatment are tetrakis-hydroxymethylphosphonium sulfate (THPS) and glutaraldehyde. It is unlikely that there will be another equally effective green biocide in the market any time soon. This means more effective biocide treatment probably will rely on biocide cocktails. In this work a triple biocide cocktail consisting of glutaraldehyde or THPS, ethylenediaminedisuccinate (EDDS) and methanol was used to treat planktonic SRB and to remove established SRB biofilms. Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757), a corrosive SRB was used as an example in the tests. Laboratory results indicated that with the addition of 10-15% (v/v) methanol to the glutaraldehyde and EDDS double combination, mitigation of planktonic SRB growth in ATCC 1249 medium and a diluted medium turned from inhibition to a kill effect while the chelator dosage was cut from 2,000 to 1,000 ppm. Biofilm removal was achieved when 50 ppm glutaraldehyde combined with 15% methanol and 1,000 ppm EDDS was used. THPS showed similar effects when it was used to replace glutaraldehyde in the triple biocide cocktail to treat planktonic SRB.

  5. Influence of antibiotic adsorption on biocidal activities of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Chandni; Vala, Anjana K; Andhariya, Nidhi; Pandey, O P; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2016-04-01

    Excessive use of antibiotics has posed two major challenges in public healthcare. One of them is associated with the development of multi-drug resistance while the other one is linked to side effects. In the present investigation, the authors report an innovative approach to tackle the challenges of multi-drug resistance and acute toxicity of antibiotics by using antibiotics adsorbed metal nanoparticles. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles (SNPs) have been synthesised by two-step process. In the first step, SNPs were prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO3 with oleylamine and in the second step, oleylamine capped SNPs were phase-transferred into an aqueous medium by ligand exchange. Antibiotics - tetracycline and kanamycin were further adsorbed on the surface of SNPs. Antibacterial activities of SNPs and antibiotic adsorbed SNPs have been investigated on gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis), and gram-negative (Proteus vulgaris, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacterial strains. Synergistic effect of SNPs on antibacterial activities of tetracycline and kanamycin has been observed. Biocidal activity of tetracycline is improved by 0-346% when adsorbed on SNPs; while for kanamycin, the improvement is 110-289%. This synergistic effect of SNPs on biocidal activities of antibiotics may be helpful in reducing their effective dosages.

  6. Infectious Disease: Connecting Innate Immunity to Biocidal Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Gregory J.; Som, Abhigyan; Madkour, Ahmad E.; Eren, Tarik; Tew, Gregory N.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious disease is a critically important global healthcare issue. In the U.S. alone there are 2 million new cases of hospital-acquired infections annually leading to 90,000 deaths and 5 billion dollars of added healthcare costs. Couple these numbers with the appearance of new antibiotic resistant bacterial strains and the increasing occurrences of community-type outbreaks, and clearly this is an important problem. Our review attempts to bridge the research areas of natural host defense peptides (HDPs), a component of the innate immune system, and biocidal cationic polymers. Recently discovered peptidomimetics and other synthetic mimics of HDPs, that can be short oligomers as well as polymeric macromolecules, provide a unique link between these two areas. An emerging class of these mimics are the facially amphiphilic polymers that aim to emulate the physicochemical properties of HDPs but take advantage of the synthetic ease of polymers. These mimics have been designed with antimicrobial activity and, importantly, selectivity that rivals natural HDPs. In addition to providing some perspective on HDPs, selective mimics, and biocidal polymers, focus is given to the arsenal of biophysical techniques available to study their mode of action and interactions with phospholipid membranes. The issue of lipid type is highlighted and the important role of negative curvature lipids is illustrated. Finally, materials applications (for instance, in the development of permanently antibacterial surfaces) are discussed as this is an important part of controlling the spread of infectious disease. PMID:18160969

  7. Influence of antibiotic adsorption on biocidal activities of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Chandni; Vala, Anjana K; Andhariya, Nidhi; Pandey, O P; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2016-04-01

    Excessive use of antibiotics has posed two major challenges in public healthcare. One of them is associated with the development of multi-drug resistance while the other one is linked to side effects. In the present investigation, the authors report an innovative approach to tackle the challenges of multi-drug resistance and acute toxicity of antibiotics by using antibiotics adsorbed metal nanoparticles. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles (SNPs) have been synthesised by two-step process. In the first step, SNPs were prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO3 with oleylamine and in the second step, oleylamine capped SNPs were phase-transferred into an aqueous medium by ligand exchange. Antibiotics - tetracycline and kanamycin were further adsorbed on the surface of SNPs. Antibacterial activities of SNPs and antibiotic adsorbed SNPs have been investigated on gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis), and gram-negative (Proteus vulgaris, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacterial strains. Synergistic effect of SNPs on antibacterial activities of tetracycline and kanamycin has been observed. Biocidal activity of tetracycline is improved by 0-346% when adsorbed on SNPs; while for kanamycin, the improvement is 110-289%. This synergistic effect of SNPs on biocidal activities of antibiotics may be helpful in reducing their effective dosages. PMID:27074856

  8. Quantification of map similarity to magnetic pre-screening for heavy metal pollution assessment in top soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Appel, E.; Roesler, W.; Ojha, G.

    2013-12-01

    From numerous published results, the link between magnetic concentration and heavy metal (HM) concentrations is well established. However, bivariate correlation analysis does not imply causality, and if there are extreme values, which often appear in magnetic data, they can lead to seemingly excellent correlation. It seems clear that site selection for chemical sampling based on magnetic pre-screening can deliver a superior result for outlining HM pollution, but this conclusion has only been drawn from qualitative evaluation so far. In this study, we use map similarity comparison techniques to demonstrate the usefulness of a combined magnetic-chemical approach quantitatively. We chose available data around the 'Schwarze Pumpe', a large coal burning power plant complex located in eastern Germany. The site of 'Schwarze Pumpe' is suitable for a demonstration study as soil in its surrounding is heavy fly-ash polluted, the magnetic natural background is very low, and magnetic investigations can be done in undisturbed forest soil. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) of top soil was measured by a Bartington MS2D surface sensor at 180 locations and by a SM400 downhole device in ~0.5m deep vertical sections at 90 locations. Cores from the 90 downhole sites were also studied for HM analysis. From these results 85 sites could be used to determine a spatial distribution map of HM contents reflecting the 'True' situation of pollution. Different sets comprising 30 sites were chosen by arbitrarily selection from the above 85 sample sites (we refer to four such maps here: S1-4). Additionally, we determined a 'Targeted' map from 30 sites selected on the basis of the pre-screening MS results. The map comparison process is as follows: (1) categorization of all absolute values into five classes by the Natural Breaks classification method; (2) use Delaunay triangulation for connecting the sample locations in the x-y plane; (3) determination of a distribution map of triangular planes with

  9. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. METHODS We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. RESULTS Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. Cancer 2014;120:2507–2513. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. Screening female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma for breast cancer with MRI and mammography detected tumors at an earlier stage than prior studies of mammography alone, although a substantial proportion of

  10. Information Technologies in Public Health Management: A Database on Biocides to Improve Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Roman, C; Scripcariu, L; Diaconescu, RM; Grigoriu, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Biocides for prolonging the shelf life of a large variety of materials have been extensively used over the last decades. It has estimated that the worldwide biocide consumption to be about 12.4 billion dollars in 2011, and is expected to increase in 2012. As biocides are substances we get in contact with in our everyday lives, access to this type of information is of paramount importance in order to ensure an appropriate living environment. Consequently, a database where information may be quickly processed, sorted, and easily accessed, according to different search criteria, is the most desirable solution. The main aim of this work was to design and implement a relational database with complete information about biocides used in public health management to improve the quality of life. Methods: Design and implementation of a relational database for biocides, by using the software “phpMyAdmin”. Results: A database, which allows for an efficient collection, storage, and management of information including chemical properties and applications of a large quantity of biocides, as well as its adequate dissemination into the public health environment. Conclusion: The information contained in the database herein presented promotes an adequate use of biocides, by means of information technologies, which in consequence may help achieve important improvement in our quality of life. PMID:23113190

  11. Biocides in hydraulic fracturing fluids: a critical review of their usage, mobility, degradation, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Genevieve A; Blotevogel, Jens; Stewart, Philip S; Borch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biocides are critical components of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") fluids used for unconventional shale gas development. Bacteria may cause bioclogging and inhibit gas extraction, produce toxic hydrogen sulfide, and induce corrosion leading to downhole equipment failure. The use of biocides such as glutaraldehyde and quaternary ammonium compounds has spurred a public concern and debate among regulators regarding the impact of inadvertent releases into the environment on ecosystem and human health. This work provides a critical review of the potential fate and toxicity of biocides used in hydraulic fracturing operations. We identified the following physicochemical and toxicological aspects as well as knowledge gaps that should be considered when selecting biocides: (1) uncharged species will dominate in the aqueous phase and be subject to degradation and transport whereas charged species will sorb to soils and be less bioavailable; (2) many biocides are short-lived or degradable through abiotic and biotic processes, but some may transform into more toxic or persistent compounds; (3) understanding of biocides' fate under downhole conditions (high pressure, temperature, and salt and organic matter concentrations) is limited; (4) several biocidal alternatives exist, but high cost, high energy demands, and/or formation of disinfection byproducts limits their use. This review may serve as a guide for environmental risk assessment and identification of microbial control strategies to help develop a sustainable path for managing hydraulic fracturing fluids.

  12. Development of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli adapted to biocides.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Ana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The potential for adaptive resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli after step-wise exposure to increasing sub-inhibitory concentrations of five biocides as triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate and trisodium phosphate, was investigated, to identify the mechanisms underlying resistance. The biocide resistance and cross-resistance to the antimicrobials erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, and to sodium dodecyl sulphate, were examined according to the broth microdilution method. The presence of active efflux was studied on the basis of restored sensitivity in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitors phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine, cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone, verapamil and reserpine. Changes in the outer membrane protein profiles and morphological changes in adapted strains were studied, as compared with the parent strains. Repeated exposure of C. jejuni and C. coli to biocides resulted in partial increases in tolerance to biocides itself, to other biocides and antimicrobial compounds. The developed resistance was stable for up to 10 passages in biocide-free medium. More than one type of active efflux was identified in adapted strains. These adapted strains showed different alterations to their outer membrane protein profiles, along with morphological changes. The data presented here suggest that different mechanisms are involved in adaptation to biocides and that this adaptation is unique to each strain of Campylobacter and does not result from a single species-specific mechanism.

  13. Biocides in hydraulic fracturing fluids: a critical review of their usage, mobility, degradation, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Genevieve A; Blotevogel, Jens; Stewart, Philip S; Borch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biocides are critical components of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") fluids used for unconventional shale gas development. Bacteria may cause bioclogging and inhibit gas extraction, produce toxic hydrogen sulfide, and induce corrosion leading to downhole equipment failure. The use of biocides such as glutaraldehyde and quaternary ammonium compounds has spurred a public concern and debate among regulators regarding the impact of inadvertent releases into the environment on ecosystem and human health. This work provides a critical review of the potential fate and toxicity of biocides used in hydraulic fracturing operations. We identified the following physicochemical and toxicological aspects as well as knowledge gaps that should be considered when selecting biocides: (1) uncharged species will dominate in the aqueous phase and be subject to degradation and transport whereas charged species will sorb to soils and be less bioavailable; (2) many biocides are short-lived or degradable through abiotic and biotic processes, but some may transform into more toxic or persistent compounds; (3) understanding of biocides' fate under downhole conditions (high pressure, temperature, and salt and organic matter concentrations) is limited; (4) several biocidal alternatives exist, but high cost, high energy demands, and/or formation of disinfection byproducts limits their use. This review may serve as a guide for environmental risk assessment and identification of microbial control strategies to help develop a sustainable path for managing hydraulic fracturing fluids. PMID:25427278

  14. Screening Magnetic Resonance Imaging Recommendations and Outcomes in Patients at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Sima; Strigel, Roberta M; Pettke, Erica; Wilke, Lee; Tevaarwerk, Amye J; DeMartini, Wendy; Wisinski, Kari B

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine MRI screening recommendations and the subsequent outcomes in women with increased risk for breast cancer evaluated by oncology subspecialists at an academic center. Patients and Methods Patients evaluated between 1/1/2007– 3/1/2011 under diagnosis codes for family history of breast or ovarian cancer, genetic syndromes, lobular carcinoma in situ or atypical hyperplasia were included. Patients with a history of breast cancer were excluded. Retrospective review of prospectively acquired demographics, lifetime risk of breast cancer and screening recommendations were obtained from the medical record. Retrospective review of the results of prospectively interpreted breast imaging examinations and image-guided biopsies were analyzed. Results 282 women were included. The majority of patients were premenopausal with a median age of 43. Most (69%) were referred due to a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. MRI was recommended for 84% of patients based on a documented lifetime risk > 20%. Most women referred for MRI screening (88%) were compliant with this recommendation. A total of 299 breast MRI examinations were performed in 146 patients. Biopsy was performed for 32 (11%) exams and 10 cancers were detected for a PPV of 31% (based on biopsy performed) and an overall per exam cancer yield of 3.3%. Three cancers were detected in patients who did not undergo screening MRI. The 13 cancers were Stage 0-II; all patients were without evidence of disease with a median follow-up of 22 months. Conclusion In a cohort of women seen by breast subspecialty providers, screening breast MRI was recommended according to guidelines, and used primarily premenopausal women with a family history or genetic predisposition to breast cancer. Adherence to MRI screening recommendations was high and cancer yield from breast MRI was similar to that in clinical trials. PMID:25789917

  15. Method for Reduction of Silver Biocide Plating on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Nalette, Timothy; Beringer, Durwood

    2013-01-01

    Silver ions in aqueous solutions (0.05 to 1 ppm) are used for microbial control in water systems. The silver ions remain in solution when stored in plastic containers, but the concentration rapidly decreases to non-biocidal levels when stored in metal containers. The silver deposits onto the surface and is reduced to non-biocidal silver metal when it contacts less noble metal surfaces, including stainless steel, titanium, and nickel-based alloys. Five methods of treatment of contact metal surfaces to deter silver deposition and reduction are proposed: (1) High-temperature oxidation of the metal surface; (2) High-concentration silver solution pre-treatment; (3) Silver plating; (4) Teflon coat by vapor deposition (titanium only); and (5) A combination of methods (1) and (2), which proved to be the best method for the nickel-based alloy application. The mechanism associated with surface treatments (1), (2), and (5) is thought to be the development of a less active oxide layer that deters ionic silver deposition. Mechanism (3) is an attempt to develop an equilibrium ionic silver concentration via dissolution of metallic silver. Mechanism (4) provides a non-reactive barrier to deter ionic silver plating. Development testing has shown that ionic silver in aqueous solution was maintained at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 15 months with method (5) (a combination of methods (1) and (2)), before the test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Method (1) resulted in the maintenance of a biocidal level (approximately 0.05 ppm) for up to 10 months before that test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Methods (1) and (2) used separately were able to maintain ionic silver in aqueous solution at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 10 months before the test was discontinued for stainless steel alloys. Method (3) was only utilized for titanium alloys, and was successful at maintaining ionic silver in aqueous solution at

  16. Effects of Material Choice on Biocide Loss in Orion Water Storage Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, W. T.; Wallace, S. L.; Gazda, D. B.; Lewis, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    When preparing for long-duration spaceflight missions, maintaining a safe supply of potable water is of the utmost importance. One major aspect of that is ensuring that microbial growth is minimized. Historically, this challenge has been addressed through the use of biocides. When using biocides, the choice of materials for the storage containers is important, because surface reactions can reduce biocide concentrations below their effective range. In the water storage system baselined for the Orion vehicle, the primary wetted materials are stainless steel (316 L) and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Previous testing with these materials has shown that the biocide selected for use in the system (ionic silver) will plate out rapidly upon initial wetting of the system. One potential approach for maintaining an adequate biocide concentration is to spike the water supply with high levels of biocide in an attempt to passivate the surface. To evaluate this hypothesis, samples of the wetted materials were tested individually and together to determine the relative loss of biocide under representative surface area-to-volume ratios after 24 hours. Additionally, we have analyzed the efficacy of disinfecting a system containing these materials by measuring reductions in bacterial counts in the same test conditions. Preliminary results indicate that the use of titanium, either individually or in combination with stainless steel, can result in over 95% loss of biocide, while less than 5% is lost when using stainless steel. In bacterial testing, viable organisms were recovered from samples exposed to the titanium coupons after 24 hours. By comparison, no organisms were recovered from the test vessels containing only stainless steel. These results indicate that titanium, while possessing some favorable attributes, may pose additional challenges when used in water storage tanks with ionic silver biocide.

  17. Effects of Material Choice on Biocide Loss in Orion Water Storage Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Castro-Wallace, Sarah L.; Kuo, C. K. Mike; Loh, Leslie J.; Hudson, Edgar; Gazda, Daniel B.; Lewis, John F.

    2016-01-01

    When preparing for long-duration spaceflight missions, maintaining a safe supply of potable water is of the utmost importance. A major risk factor, potentially jeopardizing the safety of the water supply, is the presense of microorganisms. Historically, the challenge of controlling microbial proliferation has been addressed through the maintenance of residual biocide levels. While chemical biocides are effective, their use requires carefeul consideration towards materials selection for the water storage containers, as surface reactions can reduce biocide concentrations below their effective range. In the water storage system baselined for the Orion vehicle, the primary wetted materials are passivated stainless steel (316 L) and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Previous testing with these materials has shown that the biocide selected for use in the system, ionic silver, will plate out rapidly upon initial wetting. One potential approach for maintaining an adequate biocide concentration is to spike the water supply with high levels of biocide in an attempt to passivate the surface. To evaluate this hypothesis, samples of the wetted materials were tested individually and together to determine the relative loss of biocide under representative surface area-to-volume ratios after 24 hours. Additionally, we have analyzed the efficacy of disinfecting a system containing these materials by measuring reductions in bacterial counts in the same test conditions. Preliminary results indicate that the use of titanium alloy, either individually or in combination with stainless steel, can result in over 95% loss of biocide, while less than 5% is lost when using stainless steel. In bacterial testing, viable organisms were recovered from samples exposed to the titanium coupons after 24 hours. By comparison, no organisms were recovered from the test vessels containing only stainless steel. These results indicate that titanium alloys, while possessing some favorable attributes, may pose

  18. Magnetic dipolar and quadrupolar transitions in two-electron atoms under exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Canuto, Sylvio; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.

    2015-03-15

    A detailed investigation of the magnetic dipolar and quadrupolar excitation energies and transition probabilities of helium isoelectronic He, Be{sup 2+}, C{sup 4+}, and O{sup 6+} have been performed under exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential generated in a plasma environment. The low-lying excited states 1s{sup 2}:{sup 1}S{sup e} → 1sns:{sup 3}S{sup e}{sub 0}, and 1snp:{sup 3}P{sup o}{sub 2} (n = 2, 3, 4, and 5) are considered. The variational time-dependent coupled Hartree-Fock scheme has been used. The effect of the confinement produced by the potential on the structural properties is investigated for increasing coupling strength of the plasma. It is noted that there is a gradual destabilization of the energy of the system with the reduction of the ionization potential and the number of excited states. The effect of the screening enhancement on the excitation energies and transition probabilities has also been investigated and the results compared with those available for the free systems and under the simple screened Coulomb potential.

  19. Naphthoquinones as broad spectrum biocides for treatment of ship's ballast water: toxicity to phytoplankton and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wright, D A; Dawson, R; Cutler, S J; Cutler, H G; Orano-Dawson, C E; Graneli, E

    2007-03-01

    Current UN International Maritime Organization legislation mandates the phased introduction of ballast water treatment technologies capable of complying with rigorous standards related to removal of waterborne organisms. Doubts concerning mechanical treatments at very high ballasting rates have renewed interest in chemical treatment for very large vessels. High removal rates for biota require broad spectrum biocides that are safe to transport and handle and pose no corrosion problems for ships' structure. The current study focuses on the naphthoquinone group of compounds and extends a previously reported set of screening bioassays with an investigation of the toxicity of four naphthoquinones to select protists and prokaryotes, representative of typical ballast water organisms. Vegetative dinoflagellate cysts exposed to 2.0 mg/L of the naphthoquinones juglone, plumbagin, menadione and naphthazarin showed varying degrees of chloroplast destruction, with menadione demonstrating the most potency. Laboratory and mesocosm exposures of various phytoplankton genera to menadione showed toxicity at 1.0 mg/L. Juglone demonstrated the most bactericidal activity as judged by a Deltatox assay (Vibrio fischeri) and by acridine orange counts of natural bacterial populations.

  20. Glass-(nAg, nCu) Biocide Coatings on Ceramic Oxide Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram−, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1–2 µg/cm2 in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10–15 µg/cm2 for the copper nanoparticles. PMID:22427967

  1. Biocidal Efficacy of a Flocculating Emergency Water Purification Tablet

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Edmund M.; Hernandez, C.; Boutros, S. N.; Harper, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    Chlor-Floc (CF) emergency water purification tablets were tested for bactericidal, virucidal, and cysticidal efficacy in water at temperatures ranging from 5 to 25°C. The minimal required log reduction was achieved for bacteria, Giardia muris, and rotavirus, but CF did not achieve the required log reduction of poliovirus at any of the temperatures or times investigated. The biocidal properties of the CF tablet were equivalent to if not greater than those of the Globaline iodine tablet, and the CF tablet was a more rapid cysticide under several potential use conditions. Therefore, it is a suitable substitute for iodine tablets for emergency purification of drinking water. Clarification of turbid waters was effective, but filtration through a cloth is necessary to prevent flocculated sediment from entering the canteen. The CF tablets met military requirements for emergency water purification and are safe and acceptable for use by the military. PMID:16349318

  2. Revival of biocide-treated spores of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Williams, N D; Russell, A D

    1993-07-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis NCTC 8236 were treated with biocides and then subjected to various revival procedures. Sodium hydroxide (optimum concentration 25 mmol l-1) revived a small portion of glutaraldehyde-treated spores but not of spores exposed to formaldehyde, polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I), Lugol's iodine, sodium hypochlorite or sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC). Post-treatment heat shock (at 70 degrees or 80 degrees C) increased the numbers of colony-forming units (cfu) of formaldehyde-injured spores. Coat-extraction procedures had the greatest effect on iodine-pretreated spores. The uptake of iodine and chlorine was more rapid and occurred to a greater extent with outgrowing, germinating and especially coat-deficient spores than with mature, resting spores. PMID:7690020

  3. Polyurethane-based leukocyte-inspired biocidal materials.

    PubMed

    Amitai, Gabriel; Andersen, Jill; Wargo, Sara; Asche, Gemma; Chir, Jonelle; Koepsel, Richard; Russell, Alan J

    2009-11-01

    During the neutrophil respiratory burst myeloperoxidase uses hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion to generate hypochlorite which kills pathogens. Synthetic antimicrobial materials based on this chemistry are described herein. The oxidizing enzymes glucose oxidase (GOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyze two reactions in tandem using glucose, hydrogen peroxide and sodium halide (iodide or bromide). The final product of these two consecutive enzymatic reactions is either iodine or bromine. HRP, acting as haloperoxidase, utilizes the H(2)O(2) generated by GOX to oxidize halide ions into free halogens. Typically, 15 units/ml HRP and 25 units/ml GOX reacted with 0.8mm NaI and 5mm glucose to generate 5-7 ppm free iodine within 30 min. Medical grade polyurethane ChronoFlex AR (CF) was electrospun together with GOX and HRP. The electrospun fibers were collected as a uniform, water-insoluble, flexible elastomeric matrix with an average fiber diameter of 1+/-0.2 microm. Biocidal activity of CF/enzyme fibers resulted in >6-log unit reduction of both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus challenges. A time-course of biocidal activity displayed a 3-4 log reduction of E. coli and S. aureus within the first 5 min and complete kill (>6 logs) within 15 min. A dose-response study of fiber weight (0.5-30 mg/ml) exhibited complete kill of E. coli (>6 logs) and at least 99.99% S. aureus kill (>4 logs) with as little as 1mg fiber. The fibers were reusable with slightly less activity on the second use and significant activity after continuous soaking in buffer for up to 7 days. Electrospun CF/GOX/HRP fibers adhered to a thin film with embedded NaI and glucose caused a complete kill of E. coli (>7-log units) and MRSA (6-log unit reduction) within 1h at 37 degrees C.

  4. Polyurethane-based leukocyte-inspired biocidal materials.

    PubMed

    Amitai, Gabriel; Andersen, Jill; Wargo, Sara; Asche, Gemma; Chir, Jonelle; Koepsel, Richard; Russell, Alan J

    2009-11-01

    During the neutrophil respiratory burst myeloperoxidase uses hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion to generate hypochlorite which kills pathogens. Synthetic antimicrobial materials based on this chemistry are described herein. The oxidizing enzymes glucose oxidase (GOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyze two reactions in tandem using glucose, hydrogen peroxide and sodium halide (iodide or bromide). The final product of these two consecutive enzymatic reactions is either iodine or bromine. HRP, acting as haloperoxidase, utilizes the H(2)O(2) generated by GOX to oxidize halide ions into free halogens. Typically, 15 units/ml HRP and 25 units/ml GOX reacted with 0.8mm NaI and 5mm glucose to generate 5-7 ppm free iodine within 30 min. Medical grade polyurethane ChronoFlex AR (CF) was electrospun together with GOX and HRP. The electrospun fibers were collected as a uniform, water-insoluble, flexible elastomeric matrix with an average fiber diameter of 1+/-0.2 microm. Biocidal activity of CF/enzyme fibers resulted in >6-log unit reduction of both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus challenges. A time-course of biocidal activity displayed a 3-4 log reduction of E. coli and S. aureus within the first 5 min and complete kill (>6 logs) within 15 min. A dose-response study of fiber weight (0.5-30 mg/ml) exhibited complete kill of E. coli (>6 logs) and at least 99.99% S. aureus kill (>4 logs) with as little as 1mg fiber. The fibers were reusable with slightly less activity on the second use and significant activity after continuous soaking in buffer for up to 7 days. Electrospun CF/GOX/HRP fibers adhered to a thin film with embedded NaI and glucose caused a complete kill of E. coli (>7-log units) and MRSA (6-log unit reduction) within 1h at 37 degrees C. PMID:19733392

  5. Alkyl ammonium cation stabilized biocidal polyiodides with adaptable high density and low pressure.

    PubMed

    He, Chunlin; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2014-05-26

    The effective application of biocidal species requires building the active moiety into a molecular back bone that can be delivered and decomposed on demand under conditions of low pressure and prolonged high-temperature detonation. The goal is to destroy storage facilities and their contents while utilizing the biocidal products arising from the released energy to destroy any remaining harmful airborne agents. Decomposition of carefully selected iodine-rich compounds can produce large amounts of the very active biocides, hydroiodic acid (HI) and iodine (I2). Polyiodide anions, namely, I3(-), I5(-), which are excellent sources of such biocides, can be stabilized through interactions with large, symmetric cations, such as alkyl ammonium salts. We have designed and synthesized suitable compounds of adaptable high density up to 3.33 g cm(-3) that are low-pressure polyiodides with various alkyl ammonium cations, deliverable iodine contents of which range between 58.0-90.9%.

  6. Affinity states of biocides determine bioavailability and release rates in marine paints.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Mia; Sjögren, Martin; Jonsson, Per R; Göransson, Ulf; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Pinori, Emiliano; Elwing, Hans; Berglin, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    A challenge for the next generation marine antifouling (AF) paints is to deliver minimum amounts of biocides to the environment. The candidate AF compound medetomidine is here shown to be released at very low concentrations, ie ng ml(-1) day(-1). Moreover, the release rate of medetomidine differs substantially depending on the formulation of the paint, while inhibition of barnacle settlement is independent of release to the ambient water, ie the paint with the lowest release rate was the most effective in impeding barnacle colonisation. This highlights the critical role of chemical interactions between biocide, paint carrier and the solid/aqueous interface for release rate and AF performance. The results are discussed in the light of differential affinity states of the biocide, predicting AF activity in terms of a high surface affinity and preserved bioavailability. This may offer a general framework for the design of low-release paint systems using biocides for protection against biofouling on marine surfaces. PMID:25775096

  7. Effects of biocidal treatments to inhibit the growth of legionellae and other microorganisms in cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Ezaki, T; Ikedo, M; Yabuuchi, E

    1991-01-01

    The effects of biocidal treatments for cooling towers were examined through the use of chemicals and ultraviolet irradiation to inhibit the growth of legionellae and other microorganisms. In the water of cooling towers without continuous biocidal treatments, heterotrophic bacteria and bacterivorous protozoan first appeared, and then legionellae increased up to 10(4) CFU/100 ml. When a UV sterilizer was connected to the cooling tower, the legionellae count was 1/10 or 1/100 of that in the nontreated tower water. In the water of towers supplemented continuously with the biocidal chemicals, legionellae were not found during a 4-month period. The biocidal treatments tested were proved to suppress the increase of legionellae in cooling-tower water, and thus are useful in preventing the outbreak of legionellosis due to inhalation of contaminated aerosol from the cooling tower system.

  8. Screened α decay in dense astrophysical plasmas and superstrong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liolios, Theodore E.

    2003-07-01

    This paper shows that ultrastrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) and dense astrophysical plasmas can reduce the half-life of α-decaying nuclei by many orders of magnitude. In such environments, the conventional Geiger-Nuttall law is modified so that all relevant half-lives are shifted to dramatically lower values.

  9. A Disposable Organophosphorus Pesticides Enzyme Biosensor Based on Magnetic Composite Nano-Particles Modified Screen Printed Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Yang, Xin; Xie, Donghua; Wu, Yuanzhao; Wen, Weigang

    2010-01-01

    A disposable organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) enzyme biosensor based on magnetic composite nanoparticle-modified screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCE) has been developed. Firstly, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-coated Fe3O4/Au (GMP) magnetic nanoparticulate (GMP-AChE) was synthesized. Then, GMP-AChE was absorbed on the surface of a SPCE modified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/nano-ZrO2/prussian blue (PB)/Nafion (Nf) composite membrane by an external magnetic field. Thus, the biosensor (SPCE│CNTs/ZrO2/PB/Nf│GMP-AChE) for OPs was fabricated. The surface of the biosensor was characterized by scanning electron micrography (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometery (XRFS) and its electrochemical properties were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The degree of inhibition (A%) of the AChE by OPs was determined by measuring the reduction current of the PB generated by the AChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (ATCh). In pH = 7.5 KNO3 solution, the A was related linearly to the concentration of dimethoate in the range from 1.0 × 10−3–10 ng·mL−1 with a detection limit of 5.6 × 10−4 ng·mL−1. The recovery rates in Chinese cabbage exhibited a range of 88%–105%. The results were consistent with the standard gas chromatography (GC) method. Compared with other enzyme biosensors the proposed biosensor exhibited high sensitivity, good selectivity with disposable, low consumption of sample. In particular its surface can be easily renewed by removal of the magnet. The convenient, fast and sensitive voltammetric measurement opens new opportunities for OPs analysis. PMID:22315558

  10. Bioassays and selected chemical analysis of biocide-free antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Watermann, B T; Daehne, B; Sievers, S; Dannenberg, R; Overbeke, J C; Klijnstra, J W; Heemken, O

    2005-09-01

    Over the years several types of biocide-free antifouling paints have entered the market. The prohibition of biocidal antifouling paints in special areas of some European countries such as Sweden, Denmark and Germany has favoured the introduction of these paints to the market. Several types of biocide-free antifouling paints were subjected to bioassays and selected chemical analysis of leachate and incorporated substances. Both non-eroding coatings (silicones, fibre coats, epoxies, polyurethane, polyvinyl) and eroding coatings (SPCs, ablative) were tested to exclude the presence of active biocides and dangerous compounds. The paints were subjected to the luminescent bacteria test and the cypris larvae settlement assay, the latter delivering information on toxicity as well as on efficacy. The following chemical analyses of selected compounds of dry-film were performed: The results of the bioassays indicated that none of the coatings analysed contained leachable biocides. Nevertheless, some products contained or leached dangerous compounds. The analyses revealed leaching of nonylphenol (up to 74.7 ng/cm2/d after 48 h) and bisphenol A (up to 2.77 ng/cm2/d after 24 h) from epoxy resins used as substitutes for antifouling paints. The heavy metal, zinc, was measured in dry paint film in quantities up to 576,000 ppm in erodable coatings, not incorporated as a biocide but to control the rate of erosion. Values for TBT in silicone elutriates were mostly below the detection limit of 0.005 mg/kg. Values for DBT ranged between <0.005 and 6.28 mg/kg, deriving from catalysts used as curing agents. Some biocide-free paints contained leachable, toxic and dangerous compounds in the dry film, some of which may act as substitutes for biocides or are incorporated as plasticizers or catalysts. Implications to environmental requirements and legislation are discussed. PMID:15878605

  11. Quaternary ammonium biocides as antimicrobial agents protecting historical wood and brick.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Koziróg, Anna; Otlewska, Anna; Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Nowicka-Krawczyk, Paulina; Brycki, Bogumił; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are widely used in disinfection of water, surfaces and instruments as well as in textile, leather and food industries because of their relatively low toxicity, broad antimicrobial spectrum, non-volatility and chemical stability. Due to these advantages, QACs are also used in restoration and can be applied on historical material. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of biocides based on quaternary ammonium salts and containing various excipients in the protection of historical materials against microbial growth. The study determined the antimicrobial activity of three biocides against bacteria: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Staphylococcus equorum, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus muralis, Sporosarcina aquimarina and Rhodococcus fascians, and moulds: Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium citreonigrum, Cladosporium cladosporioides I, Acremonium strictum, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cladosporium cladosporioides II, all isolated from historical wood and brick. Staphylococcus equorum, Bacillus cereus, Sporosarcina aquimarina and Rhodococcus fascians bacteria, and Cladosporium cladosporioides I and Acremonium strictum moulds showed high sensitivity to quaternary ammonium biocides. Historical wood can be effectively disinfected by three applications of biocide A (30% v/v) containing dodecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC), citric acid, propiconazole and propanol. Disinfection of historical brick can be carried out by three applications of 6% v/v solutions of biocide B (based on DDAC and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid - EDTA) or biocide C (containing a non-ionic surfactant, DDAC and EDTA). Effective protection of historical building materials against microbial growth for a period of seven days can be achieved by the application of biocide A (30% v/v) on the wood surface and biocide B (6% v/v) on the brick surface.

  12. Laboratory observations of biocide efficiency against Legionella in model cooling tower systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.M.; Eccles, J.; Fricker, C.

    1999-07-01

    The efficacy of specific oxidizing and non-oxidizing biocides was examined using a model cooling system inoculated with a microcosm containing an environmental isolate of Legionella pneumophila. The microcosm was prepared in a two-stage chemostat, which provided a consistent source of microbiological inoculum for the study. The microcosm consisted of both sessile (within biofilms) and planktonic Legionella in association with other microorganisms, including Pseudomonas species and cyst-forming ameobae. A procedure was established to successfully transfer the chemostat grown inoculum to the model cooling system and establish both sessile and planktonic forms of Legionella in the model cooling system. The greatest biocidal effect for all of the biocides was observed immediately after dosing. This effect was relatively short-lived even for the slow acting biocides such isothiazolin (as 8 ppm active) where an effect was only observed over the first 12 hours. The faster acting biocides, DBNPA (as 8 ppm active) and gluteraldehyde (as 27 ppm active), did initially reduce Legionella populations but did not totally eliminate Legionella or provide lasting control. Chlorine and bromine (as 0.5--1.5 ppm free halogen), and ozone (as 0.1--0.5 ppm free reserve) reduced and controlled Legionella populations so long as a free reserve of oxidant was maintained. Legionella recovered quickly after biocide dosing, reestablishing similar levels to those observed before dosing.

  13. Predicting dermal permeability of biocides in commercial cutting fluids using a LSER approach.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Vikrant; Yeatts, James L; Riviere, Jim E; Baynes, Ronald E

    2007-12-10

    The aim of this study is to predict dermal permeability of four phenolic biocides in four different formulations using a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) approach, with a calibrated flow through diffusion cell system. Mathematical descriptors were determined in the laboratory, by mathematical computations, and by statistical methods. Infinite doses of 4 biocides and 25 probe chemicals in water, 17% methanol and 2 commercial metalworking fluids namely Astrocut-C and Tapfree 2 were applied to porcine skin flow through diffusion cells. The strength coefficients for the 25 probe compounds for each system were determined from multiple linear regression analysis and plugged into the Abraham's LSER equation to predict permeability values for biocides. Biocide permeability significantly decreased in methanol, Astrocut-C and Tapfree 2 when compared to water. The strength coefficients revealed that hydrophobicity played an important role in explaining the reduced permeability in vehicles compared to water. This finding is important for selection of biocides and cutting fluids formulation. The R(2) between experimental and predicted log Kp of probe solutes for water, methanol, Astrocut-C and Tapfree 2 were 0.70, 0.78, 0.89 and 0.84, respectively. In conclusion, the LSER approach adequately predicted the dermal permeability of four biocides in commercial cutting fluids and also shed light on the chemical interactions resulting in reduced permeability.

  14. Constituents of magnetic anisotropy and a screening of spin-orbit coupling in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Antropov, Vladimir; Ke, Liqin; Aberg, Daniel

    2014-07-11

    Using quantum mechanical perturbation theory (PT) we analyze how the energy of perturbation of different orders is renormalized in solids. We test the validity of PT analysis by considering a specific case of spin-orbit coupling as a perturbation. We further compare the relativistic energy and the magnetic anisotropy from the PT approach with direct density functional calculations in FePt, CoPt, FePd, MnAl, MnGa, FeNi, and tetragonally strained FeCo. In addition using decomposition of anisotropy into contributions from individual sites and different spin components we explain the microscopic origin of high anisotropy in FePt and CoPt magnets.

  15. Magnetically responsive polycaprolactone nanoparticles for progesterone screening in biological and environmental samples using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Nezhadali, Azizollah; Khatibi, Aram-Dokht

    2016-08-01

    A new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite nanocomposite was fabricated and used as a sorbent for magnetically mediated PCL microspheres solid-phase extraction (MM-PCL-SPE) followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for monitoring of progesterone (PGN) hormone in biological and environmental matrices, namely blood serum, tap water, urine, and hospital wastewater. The nanomagnetite core of the sorbent was synthesized by a co-precipitation method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were then microencapsulated with PCL microspheres using emulsion polymerization. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The magnetite sorbent can be effectively dispersed in aqueous solution and attracted to an external magnetic field. The MM-PCL-SPE process for PGN assay involved (a) dispersion of the sorbent in the donor phase aqueous solution with sonication, (b) exposure to a magnetic field to collect sorbent that had adsorbed the analyte, and (c) solvent desorption of extracted PGN for GC-FID analysis. The work demonstrates the usefulness of MM-PCL-SPE in the rapid and sensitive monitoring of trace amounts of PGN in real samples. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 1.00 and 3.30 ng/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries in real samples were adequate. Linearity was observed over a wide range of 2.2-10,000.0 ng/mL in aqueous media and urine and 0.01-70.0 μg/mL in blood serum. Graphical Abstract In this research new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite microspheres were developed as an efficient sorbent for solid-phase extraction of progesterone hormone in biological and environmental matrices. PMID:27299775

  16. Inhalational and dermal exposures during spray application of biocides.

    PubMed

    Berger-Preiss, Edith; Boehncke, Andrea; Könnecker, Gustav; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Holthenrich, Dagmar; Koch, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Data on inhalational and potential dermal exposures during spray application of liquid biocidal products were generated. On the one hand, model experiments with different spraying devices using fluorescent tracers were carried out to investigate the influence of parameters relevant to the exposure (e.g. spraying equipment, nozzle size, direction of application). On the other hand, measurements were performed at selected workplaces (during disinfection operations in food and feed areas; pest control operations for private, public and veterinary hygiene; wood protection and antifouling applications) after application of biocidal products such as Empire 20, Responsar SC, Omexan-forte, Actellic, Perma-forte; Fendona SC, Pyrethrum mist; CBM 8, Aldekol Des 03, TAD CID, Basileum, Basilit. The measurements taken in the model rooms demonstrated dependence of the inhalation exposure on the type of spraying device used, in the following order: "spraying with low pressure" < "airless spraying" < "fogging" indicating that the particle diameter of the released spray droplets is the most important parameter. In addition inhalation exposure was lowest when the spraying direction was downward. Also for the potential dermal exposure, the spraying direction was of particular importance: overhead spraying caused the highest contamination of body surfaces. The data of inhalational and potential dermal exposures gained through workplace measurements showed considerable variation. During spraying procedures with low-pressure equipments, dose rates of active substances inhaled by the operators ranged from 7 to 230 microg active substance (a.s.)/h. An increase in inhaled dose rates (6-33 mg a.s./h) was observed after use of high application volumes/time unit during wood protection applications indoors. Spraying in the veterinary sector using medium-pressure sprayers led to inhaled dose rates between 2 and 24mga.s./h. The highest inhaled dose rates were measured during fogging (114 mg a

  17. Biocides in hydraulic fracturing: hazard and vulnerability with respect to potential groundwater pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Fred; Wilson, Miles; Davies, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Biocides are one possible chemical additive to frack fluids and their role is to control bacterial growth. Bacterial growth might lead to biofilm build up; and acid sulfide species and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production: biofilm build up may reduce formation permeability and hinder gas extraction. Kahrilas et al. (2014) published a review of common biocides used in fracking in the USA. The biocides assessed in the review were the sixteen most commonly used in the USA, based on the hydraulic fracturing chemical registry Frac Focus (Frac Focus, 2015). However, the review of Kahrilas et al. (2014) contained no data or observations and so the objective of this study was to consider whether biocides proposed for use in hydrofacturing could be a threat to English groundwater. The study considered all groundwater samples analysed for biocides in English groundwater between 2005 and 2014. The monitoring records were compared to: records of application (both amount and area); and chemical and molecular data for the biocides. The study did not use traditional adsorption and degradation data as these parameters are to prone to variability and are not pure molecular parameters. The study then used the approach of Worrall and Thomsen (2004) to consider the hazard represented by proposed frack biocides and the approach of Worrall and Kolpin (2003) to consider the vulnerability of the areas of potential shale gas exploitation. The study showed that of the 113 biocides tested for in English groundwaters in the decade 2005 - 2014 that 95 were detected above 0.1 g/l . Of these 95, 41 were compounds that were not recorded as being applied during the period of record and the detection of these 41 compounds did not decline over the 10 year period which implies very long residence times and that once compounds do pollute an aquifer then they will be a persistent problem. Furthermore, the solubility of the range of biocides used in frack fluids would imply a potentially higher hazard

  18. One-pot facile green synthesis of biocidal silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nudrat Hazarika, Shabiha; Gupta, Kuldeep; Shamin, Khan Naseem Ahmed Mohammed; Bhardwaj, Pushpender; Boruah, Ratan; Yadav, Kamlesh K.; Naglot, Ashok; Deb, P.; Mandal, M.; Doley, Robin; Veer, Vijay; Baruah, Indra; Namsa, Nima D.

    2016-07-01

    The plant root extract mediated green synthesis method produces monodispersed spherical shape silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with a size range of 15–30 nm as analyzed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. The material showed potent antibacterial and antifungal properties. Synthesized AgNPs display a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak at 420 nm in UV–Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffractometer analysis revealed the crystalline and face-centered cubic geometry of in situ prepared AgNPs. Agar well diffusion and a colony forming unit assay demonstrated the potent biocidal activity of AgNPs against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas diminuta and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Intriguingly, the phytosynthesized AgNPs exhibited activity against pathogenic fungi, namely Trichophyton rubrum, Aspergillus versicolor and Candida albicans. Scanning electron microscopy observations indicated morphological changes in the bacterial cells incubated with silver nanoparticles. The genomic DNA isolated from the bacteria was incubated with an increasing concentration of AgNPs and the replication fidelity of 16S rDNA was observed by performing 18 and 35 cycles PCR. The replication efficiency of small (600 bp) and large (1500 bp) DNA fragments in the presence of AgNPs were compromised in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that the Thalictrum foliolosum root extract mediated synthesis of AgNPs could be used as a promising antimicrobial agent against clinical pathogens.

  19. Biocide silver nanoparticles in two different silica-based coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babapour, A.; Yang, B.; Bahang, S.; Cao, W.

    2012-09-01

    Silica-based coatings containing biocide silver nanoparticles have been synthesized using low temperature sol-gel method. Two different silane based matrices, phenyltriethoxysilane (PhTEOS) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), were selected as precursor to prepare silica-based film. The films were analyzed by using UV-visible spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their optical, surface morphological as well as structural properties. Optical properties of nanosilver in these two matrices showed that the peak absorption observed at different wavelength, which is due to the fact that optical absorption of nanoparticles is affected by the surrounding medium. It is also found that the silver absorption has higher intensity in PhTEOS than in TEOS matrix, indicating higher concentration of silver nanoparticles being loaded into the coating. To study silver release property, the films were immersed in water for 12 and 20 days. AFM and SEM analyzes present that higher concentration of silver nanoparticles and smaller particle sizes were synthesis in PhTEOS coating and consequently, more particles remains on the surfaces after 20 days which leads to longer antibacterial activity of PhTEOS coating.

  20. Ceramic/metal biocidal nanocomposites for bone-related applications.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Miriam; Fernández, Adolfo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Malpartida, Francisco; Moya, José S; Torrecillas, Ramón

    2012-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite/silver nanocomposites have been designed and synthesized as an engineering material for biomedical applications. The hydroxyapatite matrix was synthesized by a sol-gel method and, subsequently, the Ag nanoparticles were deposited by heterogeneous precipitation followed by two different reduction routes: thermal or chemical. Both sets were studied and compared and, in all cases, the metal nanoparticles appear perfectly isolated and attached to the surface of the hydroxyapatite. The average metal particle size is below 10 nm, allowing an important contact surface between silver and the microorganisms. The antimicrobial behavior against common bacteria showed a high effectiveness, well above the commercial level, as well as against yeast, in the case of the chemically reduced sample. Due to the nanocomposite microstructure, only a negligible portion of metal was released to the lixiviated liquid after the biocide tests, minimizing the risk of toxicity. These nanocomposites offer a solution to the infections on the surface of implants, one of the main problems in reaching a suitable level of osseointegration.

  1. One-pot facile green synthesis of biocidal silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nudrat Hazarika, Shabiha; Gupta, Kuldeep; Shamin, Khan Naseem Ahmed Mohammed; Bhardwaj, Pushpender; Boruah, Ratan; Yadav, Kamlesh K.; Naglot, Ashok; Deb, P.; Mandal, M.; Doley, Robin; Veer, Vijay; Baruah, Indra; Namsa, Nima D.

    2016-07-01

    The plant root extract mediated green synthesis method produces monodispersed spherical shape silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with a size range of 15-30 nm as analyzed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. The material showed potent antibacterial and antifungal properties. Synthesized AgNPs display a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak at 420 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffractometer analysis revealed the crystalline and face-centered cubic geometry of in situ prepared AgNPs. Agar well diffusion and a colony forming unit assay demonstrated the potent biocidal activity of AgNPs against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas diminuta and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Intriguingly, the phytosynthesized AgNPs exhibited activity against pathogenic fungi, namely Trichophyton rubrum, Aspergillus versicolor and Candida albicans. Scanning electron microscopy observations indicated morphological changes in the bacterial cells incubated with silver nanoparticles. The genomic DNA isolated from the bacteria was incubated with an increasing concentration of AgNPs and the replication fidelity of 16S rDNA was observed by performing 18 and 35 cycles PCR. The replication efficiency of small (600 bp) and large (1500 bp) DNA fragments in the presence of AgNPs were compromised in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that the Thalictrum foliolosum root extract mediated synthesis of AgNPs could be used as a promising antimicrobial agent against clinical pathogens.

  2. Biocide tolerance in Salmonella from meats in Southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Antonio Marin; Burgos, Mª Jose Grande; Márquez, Mª Luisa Fernández; Aguayo, Mª Carmen López; Pulido, Rubén Pérez; del Árbol, Julia Toledo; Gálvez, Antonio; López, Rosario Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars sampled from meat products in Southern Spain (Andalucía) during the period 2002-2007 were analyzed in this study. The serovars most frequently detected (in order) were Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Derby, Anatum and Rissen. Isolates (n = 43) were tested for sensitivity to biocides, including the quaternary ammonium compounds benzalkonium chloride (BC), cetrimide (CT) and hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HDP), and the bisphenols triclosan (TC) and hexachlorophene (CF). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the quaternary ammonium compounds was in the range of 25 to 50 mg/L for most isolates, although a few isolates required much higher concentrations, up to 250 mg/L. Bisphenols showed higher inhibitory activity, with a MIC of 2.5 to 25 mg/L. A few isolates showed a “non-wildtype” MIC for TC of up to 250 mg/L. These results indicate a low incidence of tolerance towards quaternary ammonium compounds and triclosan among Salmonella from meats and meat products. PMID:26691479

  3. Extent of fungal growth on fiberglass duct liners with and without biocides under challenging environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Behzad S; Ross, Kristen

    2003-03-01

    Eight brands of fiberglass duct liners, including three that contained biocides, were exposed to challenging environmental conditions that would promote fungal growth. Twenty-four rectangular sheet metal ducts in three groups of eight ducts per group were lined with the eight selected liners. Each group of ducts was exposed to one of the three test conditions within an environmental chamber for a period of 15 days. These conditions were a) 75 percent RH, b) 75 percent RH plus water spray, c) 75 percent RH plus dry nutrient, and d) 75 percent RH plus water plus nutrient. Viable spores of Aspergillus niger were aerosolized into each duct as seed. On the 16th day, air and surface samples for fungal spores were collected from inside ducts. The results of air sampling using N6 sampler and visual inspection indicated that two out of three biocide-containing liners, Permacote and Toughgard, inhibited fungal growth but only under condition A. The third biocide-containing liner, Aeroflex Plus, was effective even when it was wet (conditions A and B). All three biocide-containing liners failed to inhibit fungal growth under conditions C and D. Among the five other types of liners that did not contain biocides, ATCO Flex with a smooth Mylar coating was more preferable, exhibiting lower fungal activity during conditions A, B, and C. All liners failed under condition D when nutrient and water were added together. Surface sampling using adhesive tape failed to produce representative results, apparently due to rough/porous surface of duct liners. It was concluded that duct liners with biocide treatment could be less promoting to microbial growth under high humidity as long as their surfaces remain clean and water-free. A liner with an impermeable and smooth surface seems to be less subject to microbial growth under most conditions than biocide-containing liners having porous and/or rough surfaces. PMID:12573965

  4. A New, Sensitive Marine Microalgal Recombinant Biosensor Using Luminescence Monitoring for Toxicity Testing of Antifouling Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Leroy, Fanny; Bouget, François-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose the use of the marine green alga Ostreococcus tauri, the smallest free-living eukaryotic cell known to date, as a new luminescent biosensor for toxicity testing in the environment. Diuron and Irgarol 1051, two antifouling biocides commonly encountered in coastal waters, were chosen to test this new biosensor along with two degradation products of diuron. The effects of various concentrations of the antifoulants on four genetic constructs of O. tauri (based on genes involved in photosynthesis, cell cycle, and circadian clock) were compared using 96-well culture microplates and a luminometer to automatically measure luminescence over 3 days. This was compared to growth inhibition of O. tauri wild type under the same conditions. Luminescence appeared to be more sensitive than growth inhibition as an indicator of toxicity. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA), a protein involved in the cell cycle, fused to luciferase (CDKA-Luc) was found to be the most sensitive of the biosensors, allowing an accurate determination of the 50% effective concentration (EC50) after only 2 days (diuron, 5.65 ± 0.44 μg/liter; Irgarol 1015, 0.76 ± 0.10 μg/liter). The effects of the antifoulants on the CDKA-Luc biosensor were then compared to growth inhibition in natural marine phytoplankton. The effective concentrations of diuron and Irgarol 1051 were found to be similar, indicating that this biosensor would be suitable as a reliable ecotoxicological test. The advantage of this biosensor over cell growth inhibition testing is that the process can be easily automated and could provide a high-throughput laboratory approach to perform short-term toxicity tests. The ability to genetically transform and culture recombinant O. tauri gives it huge potential for screening many other toxic compounds. PMID:23144143

  5. Magnetic bacteria against MIC

    SciTech Connect

    Javaherdashti, R.

    1997-12-01

    In this article, it is suggested to use the sensitivity of magnetotactic bacteria to changes of magnetic field direction and the natural ability of this bacteria in rapid growth during relatively short time intervals against corrosion-enhancing bacteria and especially sulfate-reducing bacteria. If colonies of sulfate-reducing bacteria could be packed among magnetotactic bacteria, then, by applying sufficiently powerful magnetic field (about 0.5 gauss), all of these bacteria (magnetic and non-magnetic) will be oriented towards an Anti-bacteria agent (oxygen or biocide). So, Microbiologically-Influenced Corrosion in the system would be controlled to a large extent.

  6. Evaluation of the Applicability of Environmental Magnetic Pollution Screening in Soils of Basaltic Origin: Results from Nashik Thermal Power Station, Maharashtra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, U.; Nathani, B.; Das, P. K.; Kannan, D.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic parameters and heavy metal contents of highly magnetic topsoil of the Deccan Trap basalt region were investigated for their potential to be used for environmental magnetic pollution screening. Data of magnetic susceptibility (χ) and soft isothermal remanent magnetization (Soft IRM) of 55 soil samples from N-S and W-E transects reveal a significant input of anthropogenic magnetic particulate matter within a range of 6 km around both the coal fired power plant and its adjacent ash pond. Less developed and thin topsoil layers as well as limited contribution from the fly ash sources in N direction pose difficulties for unambiguous assessment of the magnetic parameters. Heavy metal data, i.e. Pb, Zn and Cu concentrations of the soil grain size of <63 μm reveal similar distribution patterns as obtained from the magnetic parameters of all directions. Fluctuations are observed in magnetic as well as in heavy metal data and are primarily attributed to soil development. Thermo-magnetic measurements identify magnetite of anthropogenic origin in the vicinity of the pollution source based on Verwey-Transition and Hopkinson peak. The quantitative decrease of the anthropogenic ferrimagnetic mineral concentration with distance is proven by Soft IRM. Confirmation of the presence of extremely high and low amounts of ash particles in the magnetically and chemically distinguished zones is provided by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on quantitatively extracted magnetic particles at 5.5 km and 11.9 km distance. Evaluation of magnetic and chemical data including pollution load indices (PLIS) of Pb, Zn and Cu reveals good relationship of χ with the metal contents. The highest of the PLIS for Pb, Zn and Cu reveals threefold enhancement of concentration with respect to the natural background at 12 km distance and is obtained close to the fly ash sources.

  7. Susceptibility of Mycobacterium immunogenum and Pseudomonas fluorescens to formaldehyde and non-formaldehyde biocides in semi-synthetic metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Khan, Izhar U H; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium immunogenum, a newly identified member of the Mycobacterium chelonae_M. abscessus complex is considered a potential etiological agent for hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in machine workers exposed to contaminated metalworking fluid (MWF). This study investigated the biocidal efficacy of the frequently applied commercial formaldehyde-releasing (HCHO) biocides Grotan and Bioban CS 1135 and non-HCHO type biocides Kathon 886 MW (isothiazolone) and Preventol CMK 40 (phenolic) toward this emerging mycobacterial species (M. immunogenum) in HP-linked MWFs, alone and in presence of a representative of the Gram-negative bacterial contaminants, Pseudomonas fluorescens, using two semi-synthetic MWF matrices (designated Fluid A and Fluid B). Relative biocide susceptibility analysis indicated M immunogenum to be comparatively more resistant (2-1600 fold) than P. fluorescens to the tested biocides under the varied test conditions. In terms of minimum inhibitory concentration, Kathon was the most effective biocide against M. immunogenum. Fluid factors had a major effect on the biocide susceptibility. Fluid A formulation provided greater protective advantage to the test organisms than Fluid B. Fluid dialysis (Fluid A) led to an increased biocidal efficacy of Grotan, Kathon and Preventol against M. immunogenum further implying the role of native fluid components. Used fluid matrix, in general, increased the resistance of the two test organisms against the biocides, with certain exceptions. M. immunogenum resistance increased in presence of the co-contaminant P. fluorescens. Collectively, the results show a multifactorial nature of the biocide susceptibility of MWF-colonizing mycobacteria and highlight the importance of more rigorous efficacy testing and validation of biocides prior to and during their application in metalworking fluid operations. PMID:21340010

  8. Exploring the sensitivity of the zone of inhibition test for leachable biocides from paper and board food contact materials, and improvements thereof.

    PubMed

    Castle, L; Kelly, J; Jickells, S M; Johns, S M; Mountfort, K A

    2012-01-01

    The zone of inhibition method to test the release of biocides from paper and board food contact materials was evaluated. The method tests the paper by placing a small specimen directly onto culture plates of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger. The principle is that any extractable biocide will diffuse from the paper into the surrounding nutrient medium and so inhibit growth of the microorganism in the vicinity. The test was found to have insufficient sensitivity for assuring food safety, where detection limits for migration at or below the mg l(-1) (parts per million) level are needed. Also, the test does not mimic the actual or foreseeable conditions of use since most paper/board materials are not intended for direct contact with an aqueous medium for up to 3 days at 30°C (B. subtilis) or 25°C (A. niger), which are the incubation conditions used. The sensitivity of the test was increased approximately 100-fold by preparing a concentrated extract of the paper to be tested and applying this extract to the assay via a blank paper carrier. This was done using methanol as a good solvent for most biocides, as a proof of principle. Other solvents or food simulants could be used to mimic the conditions of use intended for the particular paper/board samples under examination, e.g. contact with dry, fatty, aqueous or acidic foods, hot or cold. Twenty-four plain (unconverted) paper and board samples and 100 food packaging samples were evaluated using the modified procedure. The results revealed that the method has been developed to the stage where background cytotoxic action of normal paper constituents gives a weak response. Unlike the original method, therefore, the modified method with its improved sensitivity and the facility to link with the intended food contact conditions may be considered a suitable bioassay screening test to complement chemical analysis of paper/board for composition and migration.

  9. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: combining physiological and microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Speranza, M; Wierzchos, J; De Los Rios, A; Perez-Ortega, S; Souza-Egipsy, V; Ascaso, C

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment. PMID:23063916

  10. Introduction of biocides into clinical practice and the impact on antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Russell, A D

    2002-01-01

    Biocides and other antimicrobial agents have been employed for centuries. Much later, iodine found use as a wound disinfectant, chlorine water in obstetrics, alcohol as a hand disinfectant and phenol as a wound dressing and in antiseptic surgery. In the early part of the twentieth century, other chlorine-releasing agents (CRAs), and acridine and other dyes were introduced, as were some quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs, although these were only used as biocides from the 1930s). Later still, various phenolics and alcohols, formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide were introduced and subsequently (although some had actually been produced at an earlier date) biguanides, iodophors, bisphenols, aldehydes, diamidines, isocyanurates, isothiazolones and peracetic acid. Antibiotics were introduced clinically in the 1940s, although sulphonamides had been synthesized and used previously. After penicillin came streptomycin and other aminoglycosides-aminocyclitols, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, macrolides, semi-synthetic beta-lactams, glycopeptides, lincosamides, 4-quinolones and diaminopyrimidines. Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is causing great concern. Mechanisms of such resistance include cell impermeability, target site mutation, drug inactivation and drug efflux. Bacterial resistance to biocides was described in the 1950s and 1960s and is also apparently increasing. Of the biocides listed above, cationic agents (QACs, chlorhexidine, diamidines, acridines) and triclosan have been implicated as possible causes for the selection and persistence of bacterial strains with low-level antibiotic resistance. It has been claimed that the chronological emergence of qacA and qacB determinants in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus mirrors the introduction and usage of cationic biocides.

  11. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: combining physiological and microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Speranza, M; Wierzchos, J; De Los Rios, A; Perez-Ortega, S; Souza-Egipsy, V; Ascaso, C

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment.

  12. Evaluation of the Biocidal Efficacy of Different Forms of Silver Against Cupriavidus (formerly Wautersia) Species Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Wong, Wing; Algate, Michelle T.; Bryant, Becky; Castro, Victoria A.

    2009-01-01

    Contingency Water Containers (CWCs) are used to store potable and technical water that is transferred to the International Space Station (ISS) from the Shuttle orbiter vehicles. When CWCs are filled, water from the orbiter galley is passed through an ion exchange/activated carbon cartridge that removes the residual iodine biocide used on Shuttle before silver biocide is added. Removal of iodine and addition of silver is necessary to inhibit microbial growth inside CWCs and maintain compatibility with the water systems in the Russian segment of ISS. As part of nominal water transfer activities, crewmembers collect samples from several CWCs for postflight analysis. Results from the analysis of water transfer samples collected during the docked phases of STS-118/13A.1 and STS-120/10A showed that several of the CWCs contained up to 10(exp 4) CFU/mL of bacteria despite the fact that the silver concentrations in the CWCs were within acceptable limits. The samples contained pure cultures of a single bacteria, a Cupriavidus (formerly Wautersia) species that has been shown to be resistant to metallic biocides. As part of the investigation into the cause and remediation of the bacterial contamination in these CWCs, ground studies were initiated to evaluate the resistance of the Cupriavidus species to the silver biocides used on ISS and to determine the minimum effective concentration for the different forms of silver present in the biocides. The initial findings from those experiments are discussed herein.

  13. Determining the biofilm penetrating ability of various biocides utilizing an artificial biofilm matrix

    SciTech Connect

    McIlwaine, D.B.; Diemer, J.; Grab, L.

    1997-12-01

    The efficacy of many commonly used biocides is often determined by laboratory evaluations against a variety of planktonic microorganisms. While these tests provide some information as to the performance of a biocide against a particular microorganism, they may not predict how well the biocide will perform under actual field conditions against the more problematic sissile form of the organisms. In order to address the issue of how well a biocide penetrates and kills the problematic microorganisms contained within a biofilm, an artificial biofilm system utilizing microorganisms embedded in alginate beads has been used to compare the efficacy of biocide treatments against both the planktonic and sessile form of the same organism. Pure cultures of Enterobacter aerogenes, as well as mixed field isolates, were used in the experiments. In addition, the alginate beads were prepared with actual system waters taken from a variety of industrial applications. In that way, all of the scale and corrosion inhibitors and other contaminants which are present in the actual system are also present in the model biofilm system. In all cases, the organisms contained within the artificial biofilm were significantly more difficult to kill than the corresponding planktonic microbes.

  14. Light-induced biocidal action of conjugated polyelectrolytes supported on colloids.

    PubMed

    Chemburu, Sireesha; Corbitt, Thomas S; Ista, Linnea K; Ji, Eunkyung; Fulghum, Julia; Lopez, Gabriel P; Ogawa, Katsu; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2008-10-01

    A series of water soluble, cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) with backbones based on a poly(phenylene ethynylene) repeat unit structure and tetraakylammonium side groups exhibit a profound light-induced biocidal effect. The present study examines the biocidal activity of the CPEs, correlating this activity with the photophysical properties of the polymers. The photophysical properties of the CPEs are studied in solution, and the results demonstrate that direct excitation produces a triplet excited-state in moderate yield, and the triplet is shown to be effective at sensitizing the production of singlet oxygen. Using the polymers in a format where they are physisorbed or covalently grafted to the surface of colloidal silica particles (5 and 30 microm diameter), we demonstrate that they exhibit light-activated biocidal activity, effectively killing Cobetia marina and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The light-induced biocidal activity is also correlated with a requirement for oxygen suggesting that interfacial generation of singlet oxygen is the crucial step in the light-induced biocidal activity.

  15. Is hepatitis B-virucidal validation of biocides possible with the use of surrogates?

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is considered to be a major public health problem worldwide, and a significant number of reports on nosocomial outbreaks of HBV infections have been reported. Prevention of indirect HBV transmission by contaminated objects is only possible through the use of infection-control principles, including the use of chemical biocides, which are proven to render the virus non-infectious. The virucidal activity of biocides against HBV cannot be predicted; therefore, validation of the virucidal action of disinfectants against HBV is essential. However, feasible HBV infectivity assays have not yet been established. Thus, surrogate models have been proposed for testing the efficacy of biocides against HBV. Most of these assays do not correlate with HBV infectivity. Currently, the most promising and feasible assay is the use of the taxonomically related duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), which belongs to the same Hepadnaviridae virus family. This paper reviews the application of DHBV, which can be propagated in vitro in primary duck embryonic hepatocytes, for the testing of biocides and describes why this model can be used as reliable method to evaluate disinfectants for efficacy against HBV. The susceptibility levels of important biocides, which are often used as ingredients for commercially available disinfectants, are also described. PMID:24574712

  16. How I report breast magnetic resonance imaging studies for breast cancer staging and screening.

    PubMed

    Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is the most sensitive imaging technique for the diagnosis and local staging of primary breast cancer and yet, despite the fact that it has been in use for 20 years, there is little evidence that its widespread uncritical adoption has had a positive impact on patient-related outcomes.This has been attributed previously to the low specificity that might be expected with such a sensitive modality, but with modern techniques and protocols, the specificity and positive predictive value for malignancy can exceed that of breast ultrasound and mammography. A more likely explanation is that historically, clinicians have acted on MRI findings and altered surgical plans without prior histological confirmation. Furthermore, modern adjuvant therapy for breast cancer has improved so much that it has become a very tall order to show a an improvement in outcomes such as local recurrence rates.In order to obtain clinically useful information, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the technique and the physiological processes reflected in breast MRI. An appropriate indication for the scan, proper patient preparation and good scan technique, with rigorous quality assurance, are all essential prerequisites for a diagnostically relevant study.The use of recognised descriptors from a standardised lexicon is helpful, since assessment can then dictate subsequent recommendations for management, as in the American College of Radiology BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) lexicon (Morris et al., ACR BI-RADS® Atlas, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, 2013). It also enables audit of the service. However, perhaps the most critical factor in the generation of a meaningful report is for the reporting radiologist to have a thorough understanding of the clinical question and of the findings that will influence management. This has never been more important than at present, when we are in the throes of a

  17. Nanopatterned antimicrobial enzymatic surfaces combining biocidal and fouling release properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qian; Ista, Linnea K.; López, Gabriel P.

    2014-04-01

    Surfaces incorporating the antimicrobial enzyme, lysozyme, have been previously demonstrated to effectively disrupt bacterial cellular envelopes. As with any surface active antimicrobial, however, lysozyme-expressing surfaces become limited in their utility by the accumulation of dead bacteria and debris. Surfaces modified with environmentally responsive polymers, on the other hand, have been shown to reversibly attach and release both live and dead bacterial cells. In this work, we combine the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme with the fouling release capability of the thermally responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), which has a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water at ~32 °C. Nanopatterned PNIPAAm brushes were fabricated using interferometric lithography followed by surface-initiated polymerization. Lysozyme was then adsorbed into the polymer-free regions of the substrate between the brushes to achieve a hybrid surface with switchable antimicrobial activity and fouling-release ability in response to the change of temperature. The temperature triggered hydration and conformational change of the nanopatterned PNIPAAm brushes provide the ability to temporally regulate the spatial concealment and exposure of adsorbed lysozyme. The biocidal efficacy and release properties of the hybrid surface were tested against Escherichia coli K12 and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The hybrid surfaces facilitated the attachment of bacteria at 37 °C for E. coli and 25 °C for S. epidermidis and when the temperature is above the LCST, collapsed and dehydrated PNIPAAm chains expose lysozyme to kill attached bacteria. Changing temperature across the LCST of PNIPAAm (e.g. from 37 °C to 25 °C for E. coli or from 25 °C to 37 °C for S. epidermidis) to induce a hydration transition of PNIPAAm promoted the release of dead bacteria and debris from the surfaces upon mild shearing. These results suggest that nano-engineered surfaces can provide an effective

  18. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-05-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization.

  19. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  20. Screening and characterization of anti-SEB peptides using a bacterial display library and microfluidic magnetic sorting

    PubMed Central

    Kogot, Joshua M; Pennington, Joseph M; Sarkes, Deborah A; Kingery, David A; Pellegrino, Paul M; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial peptide display libraries enable the rapid and efficient selection of peptides that have high affinity and selectivity toward their targets. Using a 15-mer random library on the outer surface of Escherichia coli (E.coli), high-affinity peptides were selected against a staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) protein after four rounds of biopanning. On-cell screening analysis of affinity and specificity were measured by flow cytometry and directly compared to the synthetic peptide, off-cell, using peptide-ELISA. DNA sequencing of the positive clones after four rounds of microfluidic magnetic sorting (MMS) revealed a common consensus sequence of (S/T)CH(Y/F)W for the SEB-binding peptides R338, R418, and R445. The consensus sequence in these bacterial display peptides has similar amino acid characteristics with SEB peptide sequences isolated from phage display. The Kd measured by peptide-ELISA off-cell was 2.4 nM for R418 and 3.0 nM for R445. The bacterial peptide display methodology using the semiautomated MMS resulted in the discovery of selective peptides with affinity for a food safety and defense threat. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Molecular Recognition published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25319622

  1. Theoretical screening of intermetallic ThMn12-type phases for new hard-magnetic compounds with low rare earth content.

    PubMed

    Körner, Wolfgang; Krugel, Georg; Elsässer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on theoretical investigations of intermetallic phases derived from the ThMn12-type crystal structure. Our computational high-throughput screening (HTS) approach is extended to an estimation of the anisotropy constant K1, the anisotropy field Ha and the energy product (BH)max. The calculation of K1 is fast since it is based on the crystal field parameters and avoids expensive total-energy calculations with many k-points. Thus the HTS approach allows a very efficient search for hard-magnetic materials for which the magnetization M and the coercive field Hc connected to Ha represent the key quantities. Besides for NdFe12N which has the highest magnetization we report HTS results for several intermetallic phases based on Cerium which are interesting as alternative hard-magnetic phases because Cerium is a less ressource-critical element than Neodymium. PMID:27098547

  2. Theoretical screening of intermetallic ThMn12-type phases for new hard-magnetic compounds with low rare earth content

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Wolfgang; Krugel, Georg; Elsässer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on theoretical investigations of intermetallic phases derived from the ThMn12-type crystal structure. Our computational high-throughput screening (HTS) approach is extended to an estimation of the anisotropy constant K1, the anisotropy field Ha and the energy product (BH)max. The calculation of K1 is fast since it is based on the crystal field parameters and avoids expensive total-energy calculations with many k-points. Thus the HTS approach allows a very efficient search for hard-magnetic materials for which the magnetization M and the coercive field Hc connected to Ha represent the key quantities. Besides for NdFe12N which has the highest magnetization we report HTS results for several intermetallic phases based on Cerium which are interesting as alternative hard-magnetic phases because Cerium is a less ressource-critical element than Neodymium. PMID:27098547

  3. Acute toxicities of five commonly used antifouling booster biocides to selected subtropical and cosmopolitan marine species.

    PubMed

    Bao, Vivien W W; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Lam, Michael H W

    2011-05-01

    Since 1990s, various booster biocides have been increasingly used as substitutes of organotins. However, knowledge about their toxicities on tropical/sub-tropical marine species is significantly lacking. This study comprehensively investigated the acute toxicities of copper, tributyltin (TBT), and five commonly used booster biocides including Irgarol, diuron, zinc pyrithione (ZnPT), copper pyrithione (CuPT) and chlorothalonil on the growth or survival of 12 marine species in which eight of them are native species of subtropical Hong Kong. We found that Irgarol was more toxic than TBT on the growth of autotrophic species. The toxicity of CuPT was comparable to that of TBT on almost all test species, while it showed higher toxicity than TBT on medaka fish larvae. As the usage of these biocides is expected to further increase worldwide, accurate assessments of their ecological risks are required for better informed decision on their management. This study provided useful datasets for such purposes. PMID:21420693

  4. Susceptibilities of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and avirulent Bacillus anthracis spores to liquid biocides.

    PubMed

    Hilgren, J; Swanson, K M J; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Cords, B

    2009-02-01

    The susceptibility of spores of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and avirulent Bacillus anthracis to treatment with hydrogen peroxide, peroxyacetic acid, a peroxy-fatty acid mixture, sodium hypochlorite, and acidified sodium chlorite was investigated. Results indicated that B. cereus spores may be reasonable predictors of B. anthracis spore inactivation by peroxyacetic acid-based biocides. However, B. cereus was not a reliable predictor of B. anthracis inactivation by the other biocides. In studies comparing B. cereus and B. subtilis, B. cereus spores were more resistant (by 1.5 to 2.5 log CFU) than B. subtilis spores to peroxyacetic acid, the peroxy-fatty acid mixture, and acidified sodium chlorite. Conversely, B. subtilis spores were more resistant than B. cereus spores to hydrogen peroxide. These findings indicated the relevance of side-by-side testing of target organisms and potential surrogates against categories of biocides to determine whether both have similar properties and to validate the use of the surrogate microorganisms.

  5. Control of Microbial Sulfide Production with Biocides and Nitrate in Oil Reservoir Simulating Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuan; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Oil reservoir souring by the microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide is unwanted, because it enhances corrosion of metal infrastructure used for oil production and processing. Reservoir souring can be prevented or remediated by the injection of nitrate or biocides, although injection of biocides into reservoirs is not commonly done. Whether combined application of these agents may give synergistic reservoir souring control is unknown. In order to address this we have used up-flow sand-packed bioreactors injected with 2 mM sulfate and volatile fatty acids (VFA, 3 mM each of acetate, propionate and butyrate) at a flow rate of 3 or 6 pore volumes (PV) per day. Pulsed injection of the biocides glutaraldehyde (Glut), benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and cocodiamine was used to control souring. Souring control was determined as the recovery time (RT) needed to re-establish an aqueous sulfide concentration of 0.8-1 mM (of the 1.7-2 mM before the pulse). Pulses were either for a long time (120 h) at low concentration (long-low) or for a short time (1 h) at high concentration (short-high). The short-high strategy gave better souring control with Glut, whereas the long-low strategy was better with cocodiamine. Continuous injection of 2 mM nitrate alone was not effective, because 3 mM VFA can fully reduce both 2 mM nitrate to nitrite and N2 and, subsequently, 2 mM sulfate to sulfide. No synergy was observed for short-high pulsed biocides and continuously injected nitrate. However, use of continuous nitrate and long-low pulsed biocide gave synergistic souring control with BAC and Glut, as indicated by increased RTs in the presence, as compared to the absence of nitrate. Increased production of nitrite, which increases the effectiveness of souring control by biocides, is the most likely cause for this synergy. PMID:26696994

  6. Control of Microbial Sulfide Production with Biocides and Nitrate in Oil Reservoir Simulating Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Oil reservoir souring by the microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide is unwanted, because it enhances corrosion of metal infrastructure used for oil production and processing. Reservoir souring can be prevented or remediated by the injection of nitrate or biocides, although injection of biocides into reservoirs is not commonly done. Whether combined application of these agents may give synergistic reservoir souring control is unknown. In order to address this we have used up-flow sand-packed bioreactors injected with 2 mM sulfate and volatile fatty acids (VFA, 3 mM each of acetate, propionate and butyrate) at a flow rate of 3 or 6 pore volumes (PV) per day. Pulsed injection of the biocides glutaraldehyde (Glut), benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and cocodiamine was used to control souring. Souring control was determined as the recovery time (RT) needed to re-establish an aqueous sulfide concentration of 0.8–1 mM (of the 1.7–2 mM before the pulse). Pulses were either for a long time (120 h) at low concentration (long-low) or for a short time (1 h) at high concentration (short-high). The short-high strategy gave better souring control with Glut, whereas the long-low strategy was better with cocodiamine. Continuous injection of 2 mM nitrate alone was not effective, because 3 mM VFA can fully reduce both 2 mM nitrate to nitrite and N2 and, subsequently, 2 mM sulfate to sulfide. No synergy was observed for short-high pulsed biocides and continuously injected nitrate. However, use of continuous nitrate and long-low pulsed biocide gave synergistic souring control with BAC and Glut, as indicated by increased RTs in the presence, as compared to the absence of nitrate. Increased production of nitrite, which increases the effectiveness of souring control by biocides, is the most likely cause for this synergy. PMID:26696994

  7. Biocide and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from the swine meat chain.

    PubMed

    Rizzotti, Lucia; Rossi, Franca; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-12-01

    In this study nine strains of Enterococcus faecalis and 12 strains of Enterococcus faecium, isolated from different sample types in the swine meat chain and previously characterized for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes, were examined for phenotypic tolerance to seven biocides (chlorexidine, benzalkonium chloride, triclosan, sodium hypochlorite, 2-propanol, formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide) and resistance to nine antibiotics (ampicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol). Moreover, the presence of efflux system encoding genes qacA/B, qacC, qacE, qacEΔ1, emeA, and stress response genes, sigV and gsp65, involved in the tolerance to biocides, was analysed. Most strains were not tolerant to the biocides, but showed minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) higher than the recommended cut-off values for all the antibiotics tested, except for vancomycin and chloramphenicol. Only weak correlations, if any, were found between biocide and antibiotic resistance data. One E. faecalis strain was tolerant to triclosan and one E. faecium strain, with higher tolerance to chlorexidine than the other strains tested, was found to carry a qacA/B gene. Our results indicated that phenotypic resistance to antibiotics is very frequent in enterococcal isolates from the swine meat chain, but phenotypic tolerance to biocides is not common. On the other hand, the gene qacA/B was found for the first time in the species E. faecium, an indication of the necessity to adopt measures suitable to control the spread of biocide resistance determinants among enterococci. PMID:27554158

  8. Efficacy and environmental acceptability of two ballast water treatment chemicals and an alkylamine based-biocide.

    PubMed

    La Carbona, Stéphanie; Viitasalo-Frösen, Satu; Masson, Daniel; Sassi, Jukka; Pineau, Samuel; Lehtiniemi, Maiju; Corroler, David

    2010-12-15

    Ship's ballast waters transport large numbers of organisms which may become invasive in coastal regions. One option to address this problem is the use of biocides as ballast water treatment (BWT). Efficacy and environmental acceptability of three commercial active substances (the BWT biocides Peraclean(®) Ocean and Seakleen(®), and alkylamine-based biocide Mexel(®) 432/336) were tested against three bacteria species, two vegetative microalgae and one zooplanktonic larva, in 10 and 30 Practical Salinity Unit (PSU) waters. In both salinities, PeraClean(®) Ocean was the most effective biocide against bacteria causing >90% mortality at 20mg/l, compared with 50mg/l for Mexel(®) 432/336 and >500 mg/l for Seakleen(®). Regarding zooplankton, Seakleen(®) was the most effective chemical causing 90% mortality in 24h at concentrations <6 mg/l (LC90(24h)) in both salinities, compared with 23 and 26 mg/l for Mexel(®) 432/336 and 370 and 480 mg/l for PeraClean(®) Ocean in 10 and 30 PSU, respectively. Similar pattern of efficacy was obtained for microalgae in 30 PSU: effective concentrations inducing 50% growth inhibition in 4 days were ≤ 1.6 mg/l for Seakleen(®), ≤ 10.1mg/l for Mexel(®) 432/336 and ≤ 30.9 mg/l for PeraClean(®) Ocean. Our work highlighted that treated waters displayed residual toxicity after 24h still inducing mortality depending on the organism and biocide. However Mexel(®) 432/336 is the only biocide which had no impact on oyster larvae development at effective concentration. Altogether our data showed that Mexel(®) 432/336 was the only biocide displaying a broad spectrum efficacy in concentrations <50mg/l and not toxic for oyster larvae development at this concentration. However residual toxicity of treated waters for any organism should be taken into account in BWT systems utilising biocides. PMID:21056457

  9. High Prevalence of Biocide Resistance Determinants in Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Three African Countries.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Teresa; Coelho, Céline; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of six biocide resistance genes among 82 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 219 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates from three African countries; the prevalence was very high for sepA (95.3%), mepA (89.4%), and norA (86.4%), intermediate for lmrS (60.8%) and qacAB (40.5%), and low for smr (3.7%). A significant association between biocide resistance genes and antibiotic resistance was observed, and a new cutoff MIC of ≥1 mg/liter for chlorhexidine nonsusceptibility was defined. PMID:26552979

  10. A tiered procedure for assessing the formation of biotransformation products of pharmaceuticals and biocides during activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Kern, Susanne; Baumgartner, Rebekka; Helbling, Damian E; Hollender, Juliane; Singer, Heinz; Loos, Martin J; Schwarzenbach, René P; Fenner, Kathrin

    2010-11-01

    Upon partial degradation of polar organic micropollutants during activated sludge treatment, transformation products (TPs) may be formed that enter the aquatic environment in the treated effluent. However, TPs are rarely considered in prospective environmental risk assessments of wastewater-relevant compound classes such as pharmaceuticals and biocides. Here, we suggest and evaluate a tiered procedure, which includes a fast initial screening step based on high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HR-MS/MS) and a subsequent confirmatory quantitative analysis, that should facilitate consideration of TPs formed during activated sludge treatment in the exposure assessment of micropollutants. At the first tier, potential biotransformation product structures of seven pharmaceuticals (atenolol, bezafibrate, ketoprofen, metoprolol, ranitidine, valsartan, and venlafaxine) and one biocide (carbendazim) were assembled using computer-based biotransformation pathway prediction and known human metabolites. These target structures were screened for in sludge-seeded batch reactors using HR-MS/MS. The 12 TPs found to form in the batch experiments were then searched for in the effluents of two full-scale, municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to confirm the environmental representativeness of this first tier. At the second tier, experiments with the same sludge-seeded batch reactors were carried out to acquire kinetic data for major TPs that were then used as input parameters into a cascaded steady-state completely-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model for predicting TP effluent concentrations. Predicted effluent concentrations of four parent compounds and their three major TPs were corroborated by comparison to 3-day average influent and secondary effluent mass flows from one municipal WWTP. CSTR model-predicted secondary effluent mass flows agreed within a factor of two with measured mass flows and confidence intervals of predicted and measured mass flows overlapped in all

  11. Possible underestimations of risks for the environment due to unregulated emissions of biocides from households to wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wieck, Stefanie; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of household products as possible sources of biocidal active substances in municipal wastewater and their regulation under the Biocidal Products Regulation (EU) 528/2012. In 131 households, we investigated the prevalence of products used to control pests, washing and cleaning agents and select personal care products with high release to wastewater. Inventories of these products were established with the help of barcode scanning. All uses of biocidal active substances were evaluated regarding their assessment under the Biocidal Products Regulation. 2963 products were scanned in total, with 48% being washing and cleaning agents, 43% personal care products and 9% products used to control pests. Biocidal active substances were found in each household. These were observed primarily in washing and cleaning agents and personal care products (90%), while only a small percentage of the observations of biocidal active substances was in biocidal products. 64% of the observations of biocidal active substances were in applications that do not fall under the Biocidal Products Regulation and are thus not subject to its environmental risk assessment. This study shows clearly that risks for the environment are underestimated because unregulated emissions to wastewater occur. It demonstrates that there are gaps in the current chemical legislation that lead to a release of substances into wastewater that were not subject to environmental risk assessment under the Biocidal Products Regulation. This is one example of the limitations of scientific risk assessment of chemicals - its complexity is immense. From our point of view, the results underline the importance of a sustainable use of the substances as this is the only way to decrease yet unidentified risks. PMID:27448707

  12. Towards beyond 1 GHz NMR: Mechanism of the long-term drift of screening current-induced magnetic field in a Bi-2223 coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Y.; Takao, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Nakagome, H.; Hamada, M.; Kiyoshi, T.; Takahashi, M.; Maeda, H.

    2009-07-01

    The screening current-induced magnetic field in the (Bi,Pb) 2Sr 2Ca 2Cu 3O x (Bi-2223) insert coil proposed for a beyond 1 GHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer may generate a long-term field drift, resulting in a loss of field-frequency lock operation and an inability to make high resolution NMR measurements. The measured screening current-induced magnetic field of a Bi-2223 double-pancake coil exhibits a hysteresis effect at 4.2 K that is reproduced by a numerical simulation based on a finite thickness rectangular superconductor bar model. The screening current-induced field at the coil center is of opposite polarity to that generated by the coil current, and thus the apparent field intensity shows a positive drift with time. On the contrary, the field at a coil end is of the same polarity as the coil field, and the apparent field intensity decreases with time. If we wait for ∼1000 h after coil excitation, the field drift rate approaches the field decay rate of the persistent current of 10 -8 h -1, suitable for a long-term NMR measurement in a beyond 1 GHz NMR spectrometer.

  13. Usefulness of screening cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to detect aortic abnormalities after repair of coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shane F; Trivedi, Mira; Boettner, Bethany; Daniels, Curt J

    2011-01-15

    Guidelines recommend screening cardiovascular magnetic resonance (Sc-CMR) imaging for all patients after coarctation of the aorta repair, although there are limited data verifying its clinical utility. Therefore, we sought to assess the value of Sc-CMR in detecting aortic complications and at-risk abnormalities after coarctation of the aorta repair and to identify significant risk factors. We reviewed 76 patients (mean age 31 ± 10 years), including 40 with symptomatically indicated CMR (Sx-CMR) and 36 with Sc-CMR studies. CMR angiograms were evaluated for aortic abnormalities. Recoarctation was defined as residual narrowing/descending aorta at the diaphragm ≤0.5 (at risk ≤0.75), ascending aorta aneurysm as maximum ascending cross-sectional area/height ≥10 (at risk ≥5), and descending aorta aneurysm as maximum descending diameter/descending aorta at the diaphragm ≥1.5 (at risk ≥1.25). Aortic complications or abnormalities were found in 45 patients (59%). No patient met criteria for recoarctation (at risk 10 Sx-CMR vs 5 Sc-CMR). Significant risk factors included heart failure symptoms and female gender (p <0.05). One patient (Sc-CMR) had ascending aneurysm (at risk 17 Sx-CMR vs 8 Sc-CMR). Time from repair was a significant predictor (p <0.05). There were 10 patients (6 Sx-CMR vs 4 Sc-CMR) with descending aneurysm (at risk 8 Sx-CMR vs 7 Sc-CMR). Cardiovascular symptoms, hypertension, and echocardiogram were not predictive. In conclusion, >50% of patients undergoing Sc-CMR had aortic abnormalities, which was not significantly different from those undergoing Sx-CMR. In particular, Sc-CMR identified descending aorta aneurysms that were not predicted by clinical parameters or echocardiogram.

  14. A Label-Free Impedance Immunosensor Using Screen-Printed Interdigitated Electrodes and Magnetic Nanobeads for the Detection of E. coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ronghui; Lum, Jacob; Callaway, Zach; Lin, Jianhan; Bottje, Walter; Li, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the leading bacterial pathogens causing foodborne illness. In this study, an impedance immunosensor based on the use of magnetic nanobeads and screen-printed interdigitated electrodes was developed for the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7. Magnetic nanobeads coated with anti-E. coli antibody were mixed with an E. coli sample and used to isolate and concentrate the bacterial cells. The sample was suspended in redox probe solution and placed onto a screen-printed interdigitated electrode. A magnetic field was applied to concentrate the cells on the surface of the electrode and the impedance was measured. The impedance immunosensor could detect E. coli O157:H7 at a concentration of 104.45 cfu·mL−1 (~1400 bacterial cells in the applied volume of 25 μL) in less than 1 h without pre-enrichment. A linear relationship between bacteria concentration and impedance value was obtained between 104 cfu·mL−1 and 107 cfu·mL−1. Though impedance measurement was carried out in the presence of a redox probe, analysis of the equivalent circuit model showed that the impedance change was primarily due to two elements: Double layer capacitance and resistance due to electrode surface roughness. The magnetic field and impedance were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics software. PMID:26694478

  15. A Label-Free Impedance Immunosensor Using Screen-Printed Interdigitated Electrodes and Magnetic Nanobeads for the Detection of E. coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ronghui; Lum, Jacob; Callaway, Zach; Lin, Jianhan; Bottje, Walter; Li, Yanbin

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the leading bacterial pathogens causing foodborne illness. In this study, an impedance immunosensor based on the use of magnetic nanobeads and screen-printed interdigitated electrodes was developed for the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7. Magnetic nanobeads coated with anti-E. coli antibody were mixed with an E. coli sample and used to isolate and concentrate the bacterial cells. The sample was suspended in redox probe solution and placed onto a screen-printed interdigitated electrode. A magnetic field was applied to concentrate the cells on the surface of the electrode and the impedance was measured. The impedance immunosensor could detect E. coli O157:H7 at a concentration of 10(4.45) cfu·mL(-1) (~1400 bacterial cells in the applied volume of 25 μL) in less than 1 h without pre-enrichment. A linear relationship between bacteria concentration and impedance value was obtained between 10(4.45) cfu·mL(-1) and 10(7) cfu·mL(-1). Though impedance measurement was carried out in the presence of a redox probe, analysis of the equivalent circuit model showed that the impedance change was primarily due to two elements: Double layer capacitance and resistance due to electrode surface roughness. The magnetic field and impedance were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics software. PMID:26694478

  16. A Label-Free Impedance Immunosensor Using Screen-Printed Interdigitated Electrodes and Magnetic Nanobeads for the Detection of E. coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ronghui; Lum, Jacob; Callaway, Zach; Lin, Jianhan; Bottje, Walter; Li, Yanbin

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the leading bacterial pathogens causing foodborne illness. In this study, an impedance immunosensor based on the use of magnetic nanobeads and screen-printed interdigitated electrodes was developed for the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7. Magnetic nanobeads coated with anti-E. coli antibody were mixed with an E. coli sample and used to isolate and concentrate the bacterial cells. The sample was suspended in redox probe solution and placed onto a screen-printed interdigitated electrode. A magnetic field was applied to concentrate the cells on the surface of the electrode and the impedance was measured. The impedance immunosensor could detect E. coli O157:H7 at a concentration of 10(4.45) cfu·mL(-1) (~1400 bacterial cells in the applied volume of 25 μL) in less than 1 h without pre-enrichment. A linear relationship between bacteria concentration and impedance value was obtained between 10(4.45) cfu·mL(-1) and 10(7) cfu·mL(-1). Though impedance measurement was carried out in the presence of a redox probe, analysis of the equivalent circuit model showed that the impedance change was primarily due to two elements: Double layer capacitance and resistance due to electrode surface roughness. The magnetic field and impedance were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics software.

  17. N-halamine biocidal coatings via a layer-by-layer assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Cerkez, Idris; Kocer, Hasan B; Worley, S D; Broughton, R M; Huang, T S

    2011-04-01

    Two N-halamine copolymer precursors, poly(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid potassium salt) and poly(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidyl methacrylate-co-trimethyl-2-methacryloxyethylammonium chloride) have been synthesized and successfully coated onto cotton fabric via a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. A multilayer thin film was deposited onto the fiber surfaces by alternative exposure to polyelectrolyte solutions. The coating was rendered biocidal by a dilute household bleach treatment. The biocidal efficacies of tested swatches composed of treated fibers were evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. It was determined that chlorinated samples inactivated both S. aureus and E. coli O157:H7 within 15 min of contact time, whereas the unchlorinated control samples did not exhibit significant biocidal activities. Stabilities of the coatings toward washing and ultraviolet light exposure have also been studied. It was found that the stability toward washing was superior, whereas the UVA light stability was moderate compared to previously studied N-halamine moieties. The layer-by-layer assembly technique can be used to attach N-halamine precursor polymers onto cellulose surfaces without using covalently bonding tethering groups which limit the structure designs. In addition, ionic precursors are very soluble in water, thus promising for biocidal coatings without the use of organic solvents. PMID:21348478

  18. The nature and site of biocide-induced sublethal injury in Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Williams, N D; Russell, A D

    1992-12-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis NCTC 8236 exposed at 22 degrees C to test biocides (alkaline glutaraldehyde, an iodophor, Lugol's solution, sodium hypochlorite and sodium dichloroisocyanurate) demonstrated varying degrees of injury to stressing agents (sodium hydroxide, sodium lauryl sulphate, polymyxin B sulphate or cetylpyridinium chloride) incorporated into a recovery agar medium. This injury to stressing agents was expressed mainly during outgrowth. PMID:1490611

  19. Susceptibility of 194 Salmonella Isolates to 17 Chemicals used as Sanitizers and Biocides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illnesses in the United States. Meat processing facilities use a wide variety of antimicrobial interventions to reduce Salmonella contamination. The objective of this study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sanitizers and biocides...

  20. THE BIOCIDE TRIBUTYLTIN ALTERS TESTOSTERONE ESTERIFICATION IN MUD SNAILS (ILYANASSA OBSOLETA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Biocide Tributyltin Alters Testosterone Esterification in Mud Snails (Ilyanassa obsoleta)

    Meredith P. Gooding and Gerald A. LeBlanc
    Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7633

    Tributyltin (TBT...

  1. Comparative surface antimicrobial properties of synthetic biocides and novel human apolipoprotein E derived antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; McBain, Andrew J; Felton-Smith, Susan; Jowitt, Thomas A; Birchenough, Holly L; Dobson, Curtis B

    2013-07-01

    Medical device infection remains a major clinical concern. Biocidal compounds have been incorporated into medical device materials ideally to inhibit bacterial colonisation whilst exhibiting relatively low cytotoxicity. We compared the antibacterial activity, anti-biofilm efficacy and cytotoxicity of a novel peptide derivative of human apolipoprotein E (apoEdpL-W) to that of commonly used biocides, before and after coating onto a range of standard polymers. Since the antimicrobial function of most biocides frequently involves associations with cellular membranes, we have also studied the detailed interactions of the test antimicrobials with phospholipid bilayers, using the quartz crystal microbalance device combined with dual-polarisation interferometry. ApoEdpL-W displayed broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and marked efficacy against nascent Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Compounds showed better antimicrobial activity when combined with hydrogel materials than with non-porous materials. The membrane interactions of apoEdpL-W were most similar to that of PHMB, with both agents appearing to readily bind and insert into lipid bilayers, possibly forming pores. However apoEdpL-W showed lower cytotoxicity than PHMB, its efficacy was less affected by the presence of serum, and it demonstrated the highest level of biocompatibility of all the biocides, as indicated by our measurement of its antimicrobial biocompatibility index. This work shows the potential of apoEdpL-W as an effective antiseptic coating agent. PMID:23623325

  2. Reduced susceptibility of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae to biocides: An emerging threat.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M; Loomba, P S; Mishra, B; Dogra, V; Thakur, A

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-Kp) strains, which are generally pan-drug resistant, is an uphill task for health care professionals. Owing to limited therapeutic options and the possibility of development of resistance to commonly used biocides in hospital settings, CR-Kp infections pose a serious threat of emergence of a dreaded pandemic. The aim of the study was to highlight the possibility of emergence of biocide resistance among CR-Kp strains. A case study was conducted in a Super-specialty Hospital in September 2015. A 65-year-old female patient post-laparotomy was admitted to the General Intensive Care Unit of a Super-specialty Hospital. CR-Kp was isolated from the blood and mucus trap samples of this patient. Susceptibility testing of three commonly used biocides in our hospital, namely sodium hypochlorite (4% available chlorine), 5% w/v povidone iodine (0.5% w/v of available iodine) and absolute ethanol (99.9%), respectively, was carried out using K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 as control. The test isolate showed reduced susceptibility to sodium hypochlorite in comparison to K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603. The possibility of emergence of biocide resistance among CR-Kp strains poses a threat of disrupting our ongoing efforts for implementation of effective infection control measures. PMID:27514961

  3. Correlation between antibiotic and biocide resistance in mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. isolated from slaughterhouse surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biocide susceptibility in mesophilic and psychrotrophic pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which was representative of the region. To determine biocide resistance in pseudomonads, we determined for the first time the epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) of benzalkonium, cetrimide, chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene, P3 oxonia, polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMG), topax 66 and triclosan being generally very similar in different Pseudomonas spp. with some exceptions. Thus, resistance of pseudomonads was mainly shown to triclosan, and in lesser extent to cetrimide and benzalkonium chloride depending on the species, however they were highly susceptible to industrial formulations of biocides. By means of statistical analysis, positive correlations between antibiotics, biocides and both antimicrobials in pseudomonads were detected suggesting a co- or cross resistance between different antimicrobials in goat and lamb slaughterhouse environment. Cross-resistance between biocides and antibiotics in pseudomonads were especially detected between PHMG or triclosan and different antibiotics depending on the biocide and the population type. Thus, the use of those biocides as disinfectant in slaughterhouse zones must be carefully evaluated because of the selection pressure effect of antimicrobials on the emergence of resistant bacteria which could be spread to the consumer. It is noteworthy that specific industrial formulations such as topax 66 and oxonia P3 showed few correlations with antibiotics (none or 1-2 antibiotics) which should be taken into consideration for disinfection practices in goat and lamb slaughterhouse. PMID:26187825

  4. Dermal permeation of biocides and aromatic chemicals in three generic formulations of metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Vikrant; White, Eugene M; Kaminski, Michael D; Riviere, Jim E; Baynes, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWF) are complex mixtures consisting of a variety of components and additives. A lack of scientific data exists regarding the dermal permeation of its components, particularly biocides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dermal permeation of biocides and other aromatic chemicals in water and in three generic soluble oil, semi-synthetic, and synthetic MWF types in order to evaluate any differences in their permeation profiles. An in vitro flow-through diffusion cell study was performed to determine dermal permeation. An infinite dose of different groups of chemicals (6 biocides and 29 aromatic chemicals) was applied to porcine skin, with perfusate samples being collected over an 8-h period. Perfusate samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS), and permeability was calculated from the analysis of the permeated chemical concentration-time profile. In general, the permeation of chemicals was highest in aqueous solution, followed by synthetic, semi-synthetic, and soluble oil MWF. The absorption profiles of most of the chemicals including six biocides were statistically different among the synthetic and soluble oil MWF formulations, with reduced permeation occurring in oily formulations. Permeation of almost all chemicals was statistically different between aqueous and three MWF formulation types. Data from this study show that permeation of chemicals is higher in a generic synthetic MWF when compared to a soluble oil MWF. This indicates that a soluble oil MWF may be safer than a synthetic MWF in regard to dermal permeation of chemicals to allow for an increased potential of systemic toxicity. Therefore, one may conclude that a synthetic type of formulation has more potential to produce contact dermatitis and induce systemic toxicological effects. The dilution of these MWF formulations with water may increase dermal permeability of biocides

  5. Reduced lung cancer mortality and exposure to synthetic fluids and biocide in the auto manufacturing industry

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amar J; Malloy, Elizabeth J; Applebaum, Katie M; Schwartz, Joel; Christiani, David C; Eisen, Ellen A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Water-based soluble and synthetic metalworking fluids (MWF) used in auto manufacturing may be contaminated by endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria, a possible anticarcinogen via increased immuno-surveillance. The effectiveness of biocide, generally added to limit bacterial growth is unknown. We investigated whether an inverse relationship between lung cancer and synthetic MWF and biocide – as surrogates of endotoxin exposure – persisted in an extended follow-up of autoworkers. Methods A nested case–control analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort study of 46 399 auto manufacturing workers. Follow-up began in 1941 and was extended from 1985–1995. Mortality rate ratios (MRR) were estimated in Cox regression models for lung cancer as discrete and smoothed functions of cumulative exposure to synthetic MWF (mg/m3 per year) and years exposed to biocide with both synthetic and soluble MWF. The analysis was also restricted to the subcohort hired on or after 1941 and stratified by follow-up period. Results The splines suggested a non-linear inverse exposure–response for lung cancer mortality with increasing endotoxin exposure. Overall, the greatest reduction in mortality was observed among those with the highest exposure [MRR 0.63, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.39–0.98] at the 99th percentile of exposure (15.8 mg/m3 per year). Evidence for an inverse effect was limited to the earlier follow-up period. Effect modification by biocide was marginally significant (P=0.07); the protective effect of synthetic MWF was observed only for those who were co-exposed. Conclusions The protective effect of synthetic MWF against lung cancer mortality persisted through the extended period of follow-up, although attenuated, and was observed only among workers with co-exposure to biocide and synthetic MWF. PMID:20835688

  6. Adhesion and biocides inactivation of Salmonella on stainless steel and polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Tondo, Eduardo Cesar; Machado, Taís Raquel Marcon; Malheiros, Patrícia da Silva; Padrão, Débora Kruger; de Carvalho, Ana Lyl; Brandelli, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    The adhesion of Salmonella (S.) strains to stainless steel and polyethylene and their inactivation by biocides used in food industry was investigated. Coupons of stainless steel and polyethylene were immersed in bacterial suspensions of S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, and S. Bredeney during 15, 30, and 60 minutes, and submitted to different concentrations of peracetic acid (PAA), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and quaternary ammonium (Quat) sanitizers. Hydrophobicity of the surfaces was evaluated by contact angle measurements using the sessile drop method and bacterial adhesion was accompanied through bacterial counts and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicated that the three serovars of Salmonella presented similar adhesion to both materials (5.0 to 6.5 log cfu cm-2). The time of exposure did not influence the counts of adhered cells on both surfaces, however SEM revealed larger clusters of S. Enteritidis on both materials, not found for the other serovars. S. Enteritidis presented lower sessile drop angle on polyethylene, indicating hydrophilic properties of this material. The biocides were not able to inactivate all the microorganisms adhered on both surfaces. At least 1 log cfu cm-2 of all serovars tested remained viable after the exposure to different biocide concentrations. In general, higher counts of survivors were observed on polyethylene disinfected with different concentrations of biocides. S. Bredeney e S. Typhimurium were more resistant than S. Enteritidis to PAA, whilst S. Enteritidis presented smaller reduction rates to NaOCl. This last biocide was able to reduce Salmonella counts in approximately 3.0 to 4.0 log cm-2. When adhered to polyethylene, the serovars S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis were more resistant to Quat than S. Bredeney in all concentrations tested, and the numbers of S. Enteritidis remained almost unaltered. On stainless steel disinfected by Quat, S. Bredeney presented higher numbers of survivors. PMID:24031583

  7. Rapid screening and identification of α-glucosidase inhibitors from mulberry leaves using enzyme-immobilized magnetic beads coupled with HPLC/MS and NMR.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Zhang, Yufeng; Cheng, Yiyu; Wang, Yi

    2013-02-01

    α-Glucosidase plays important roles in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates in the small intestine. The inhibition of α-glucosidase is regarded as a potential way to treat diabetes. We established an approach to screening α-glucosidase inhibitors from medicinal plants using enzyme-coated magnetic bead. Using 1-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide as reaction reagents, α-glucosidase was immobilized on the magnetic beads by covalent linkage. The conjugation of α-glucosidase to the magnetic beads was characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The proposed approach was applied in fishing potential α-glucosidase inhibitors from extract of Morus alba, a Chinese medicinal plant. The structures of potential active compounds were identified via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The results demonstrated that two flavonoids (isoquercitrin and astragalin) could bind to α-glucosidase, which was confirmed via conventional α-glucosidase inhibitory assay. Our findings suggested that enzyme-coated magnetic beads may be suitable for discovering active compounds from medicinal plants.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 adapted to 2-phenoxyethanol shows cross-resistance to dissimilar biocides and increased susceptibility to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Abdel Malek, S M A; Badran, Y R

    2010-11-01

    The growth adaptability to increasing concentration of the biocide 2-phenoxyethanol (PE) was determined in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (P.a.) as part of efforts to understand and control the biocide tolerance and its effect on cross-resistance to other biocides and resistance to antibiotics. After repeated subculturing in media containing increasing sub-minimum-inhibitory PE concentration, P.a. exhibited an adaptive resistance indicated by two-fold increase in MIC at the 10th passage. The resistance was stable and remained after passaging the strain in further 7 successive passages in PE-free growth media. The strain showed cross-resistance towards dissimilar biocides and displayed increased susceptibility to antibiotics, which was not influenced by the presence of the efflux inhibitor 'carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone'. Outer membranes of adapted strain showed altered protein profile when examined by SDS-PAGE.

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Biocides on the Viable Masses and Matrices of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms▿

    PubMed Central

    Toté, K.; Horemans, T.; Berghe, D. Vanden; Maes, L.; Cos, P.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria and matrix are essential for the development of biofilms, and assays should therefore target both components. The current European guidelines for biocidal efficacy testing are not adequate for sessile microorganisms; hence, alternative discriminatory test protocols should be used. The activities of a broad range of biocides on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were evaluated using such in vitro assays. Nearly all selected biocides showed a significant decrease in S. aureus biofilm viability, with sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid as the most active biocides. Only hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite showed some inhibitory effect on the matrix. Treatment of P. aeruginosa biofilms was roughly comparable to that of S. aureus biofilms. Peracetic acid was the most active on viable mass within 1 min of contact. Isopropanol ensured a greater than 99.999% reduction of P. aeruginosa viability after at least 30 min of contact. Comparable to results with S. aureus, sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide markedly reduced the P. aeruginosa matrix. This study clearly demonstrated that despite their aspecific mechanisms of action, most biocides were active only against biofilm bacteria, leaving the matrix undisturbed. Only hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite were active on both the biofilm matrix and the viable mass, making them the better antibiofilm agents. In addition, this study emphasizes the need for updated and standardized guidelines for biofilm susceptibility testing of biocides. PMID:20363795

  10. Comprehensive Evaluation of Biological Growth Control by Chlorine-Based Biocides in Power Plant Cooling Systems Using Tertiary Effluent.

    PubMed

    Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that treated municipal wastewater can be a reliable cooling water alternative to fresh water. However, elevated nutrient concentration and microbial population in wastewater lead to aggressive biological proliferation in the cooling system. Three chlorine-based biocides were evaluated for the control of biological growth in cooling systems using tertiary treated wastewater as makeup, based on their biocidal efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Optimal chemical regimens for achieving successful biological growth control were elucidated based on batch-, bench-, and pilot-scale experiments. Biocide usage and biological activity in planktonic and sessile phases were carefully monitored to understand biological growth potential and biocidal efficiency of the three disinfectants in this particular environment. Water parameters, such as temperature, cycles of concentration, and ammonia concentration in recirculating water, critically affected the biocide performance in recirculating cooling systems. Bench-scale recirculating tests were shown to adequately predict the biocide residual required for a pilot-scale cooling system. Optimal residuals needed for proper biological growth control were 1, 2-3, and 0.5-1 mg/L as Cl2 for NaOCl, preformed NH2Cl, and ClO2, respectively. Pilot-scale tests also revealed that Legionella pneumophila was absent from these cooling systems when using the disinfectants evaluated in this study. Cost analysis showed that NaOCl is the most cost-effective for controlling biological growth in power plant recirculating cooling systems using tertiary-treated wastewater as makeup. PMID:23781129

  11. Synergistic sub-lethal effects of a biocide mixture on the springtail Folsomia fimetaria.

    PubMed

    Schnug, Lisbeth; Leinaas, Hans Petter; Jensen, John

    2014-03-01

    The toxicity of three biocides, esfenvalerate, picoxystrobin and triclosan, on adult survival and recruitment of juveniles was studied in the springtail Folsomia fimetaria, both in single and mixture experiments. Recruitment of juveniles was more sensitive to biocide exposure than adult survival. The concepts of concentration addition and independent action returned almost identical toxicity predictions, though both models failed to predict the observed toxicity due to synergistic deviations at high exposure concentrations. A comparison with a similar study on earthworms showed that response-patterns were species-specific. Consequently, there is no single reference concept which is applicable for all species of one ecosystem, which in turn questions the usefulness of such mixture prediction concepts in ecological risk assessment. PMID:24374376

  12. Leaching of biocides from polymer renders under wet/dry cycles--Rates and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Bollmann, Ulla E; Bester, Kai

    2015-11-01

    In this study it was tested, which mechanism for the transport of biocides in polymeric renders is more relevant: (1) evaporative transports (meaning there is a flow of water through the material due to evaporation on the surface), which transports also the biocides to the surface, (2) transport through the polymer and (3) transport through water filled pores. It turned out that under the experimental conditions evaporative transport was not relevant, while transport through soaked (constantly wetted) renders was considerably faster than by other means. Additionally it turned out that also the equilibria were influenced by the water content. Differences in equilibria can be up to factor 10 between constantly wetted (soaked) and un-wetted materials. The two tested materials (one silicone and one acrylate render) had significantly different leaching behavior concerning equilibria and dynamics of mass flows, but for both the pre-wetted materials leached most. PMID:26210026

  13. Biocidal properties study of silver nanoparticles used for application in green housing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küünal, Siim; Kutti, Sander; Rauwel, Protima; Guha, Mithu; Wragg, David; Rauwel, Erwan

    2016-07-01

    We report on the study of surfactant-free silver nanoparticles synthesized using non-hydrolytic sol-gel methods for applications in straw bale constructions. Micro-organism infestation in green constructions is of concern as their proliferation tends to induce health problems. We demonstrate the biocidal properties of these Ag nanoparticles and their efficacy against fungi. Outdoor tests with Ag nanoparticles have demonstrated the effective protection of straw against micro-organisms. Indoor tests using broth liquid are compared with a method of testing we recently developed where the possible nature of the biocidal properties of the silver nanoparticles are further probed. In contrast to the commonly reported results, this study shows that Ag nanoparticles synthesized using non-hydrolytic sol-gel methods have antifungal properties against common fungi in outdoor conditions which demonstrate high potential in related applications.

  14. An investigation into the antimicrobial mechanisms of action of two contact lens biocides using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Codling, Caroline E; Hann, Anthony C; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Russell, A Denver

    2005-12-01

    Polyquaternium-1 (PQ-1) and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (MAPD) are biocides used commercially in a contact lens disinfecting solutions. Electron microscopy was used to provide further evidence on the mechanism(s) of action of these agents against a wide range of ocular pathogens including bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Both PQ-1 and MAPD caused multiple forms of damage to the organisms tested, evidenced by structural alterations, blebbing, leakage and cell destruction. The extent of damage and the selectivity against specific type of microorganisms was consistent with the antimicrobial activity of these agents. Although electron microscopy is a powerful tool, it has its limitations when used to examine the mode of action of biocides. Indeed, there was no evidence of gross structural alteration to Acanthamoeba castellani or Aspergillus fumigatus following treatment.

  15. An investigation into the antimicrobial mechanisms of action of two contact lens biocides using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Codling, Caroline E; Hann, Anthony C; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Russell, A Denver

    2005-12-01

    Polyquaternium-1 (PQ-1) and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (MAPD) are biocides used commercially in a contact lens disinfecting solutions. Electron microscopy was used to provide further evidence on the mechanism(s) of action of these agents against a wide range of ocular pathogens including bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Both PQ-1 and MAPD caused multiple forms of damage to the organisms tested, evidenced by structural alterations, blebbing, leakage and cell destruction. The extent of damage and the selectivity against specific type of microorganisms was consistent with the antimicrobial activity of these agents. Although electron microscopy is a powerful tool, it has its limitations when used to examine the mode of action of biocides. Indeed, there was no evidence of gross structural alteration to Acanthamoeba castellani or Aspergillus fumigatus following treatment. PMID:16332500

  16. Micro-Biocidal Activity of Yeast Cells by Needle Plasma Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurumi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Taima, Tomohito; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    In this study, we report on the biocidal activity technique by needle helium plasma irradiation at atmospheric pressure using borosilicate capillary nozzle to apply for the oral surgery. The diameter of needle plasma was less than 50 µm, and temperature of plasma irradiated area was less than body temperature. Needle plasma showed emission due to OH and O radical. Raman spectra and methylene blue stain showed yeast cells were inactivated by needle plasma irradiation.

  17. The impact of coating hardness on the anti-barnacle efficacy of an embedded antifouling biocide.

    PubMed

    Pinori, Emiliano; Elwing, Hans; Berglin, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of antifouling coatings designed to minimise the release of biocide, either by embedded (non-covalent) or tethered (covalently bonded) biocides, relies on sufficient bioavailability of the active compound upon contact between the organism and the coating. This investigation is focused on whether coating hardness affects the efficacy of embedded coating systems. Two experimental, non-eroding and waterborne latex paint formulations composed mainly of polystyrene (PS) or polyvinyl versatate (PV) were chosen for their difference in mechanical properties measured in terms of Buchholz indentation resistance. Ivermectin was added to both formulations to a final concentration of 0.1% (w/v) and the steady state release rate was measured according to ISO 15181 at between 34 and 70 ng cm(-2) day(-1) for both formulations. Field trials conducted over 3 months showed significant differences in anti-barnacle efficacy between the formulations despite their similar release profiles. The softer PV coating showed complete anti-barnacle efficacy, ie no barnacles were detected, while the harder PS coating showed no efficacy against barnacle colonisation during the same time period. The results indicate a new antifouling strategy whereby a route of intoxication is triggered by the organism itself upon interaction with the coating and its embedded biocide. This finding opens new possibilities in controlling macrofouling by low emission antifouling coatings.

  18. Leaching of biocides from façades under natural weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, M; Zuleeg, S; Vonbank, R; Bester, K; Carmeliet, J; Boller, M; Wangler, T

    2012-05-15

    Biocides are included in organic building façade coatings as protection against biological attack by algae and fungi but have the potential to enter the environment via leaching into runoff from wind driven rain. The following field study correlates wind driven rain to runoff and measured the release of several commonly used organic biocides (terbutryn, Irgarol 1051, diuron, isoproturon, OIT, DCOIT) in organic façade coatings from four coating systems. During one year of exposure of a west oriented model house façade in the Zurich, Switzerland area, an average of 62.7 L/m(2), or 6.3% of annual precipitation came off the four façade panels installed as runoff. The ISO method for calculating wind driven rain loads is adapted to predict runoff and can be used in the calculation of emissions in the field. Biocide concentrations tend to be higher in the early lifetime of the coatings and then reach fairly consistent levels later, generally ranging on the order of mg/L or hundreds of μg/L. On the basis of the amount remaining in the film after exposure, the occurrence of transformation products, and the calculated amounts in the leachate, degradation plays a significant role in the overall mass balance.

  19. Construction of a D-amino acid oxidase reactor based on magnetic nanoparticles modified by a reactive polymer and its application in screening enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Juan; Qi, Li; Liu, Ying; Ma, Huimin

    2014-08-13

    Developing facile and high-throughput methods for exploring pharmacological inhibitors of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) has triggered increasing interest. In this work, DAAO was immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticles, which were modified by a biocompatible reactive polymer, poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) via an atom transfer radical polymerization technique. Interestingly, the enzyme immobilization process was greatly promoted with the assistance of a lithium perchlorate catalyst. Meanwhile, a new amino acid ionic liquid (AAIL) was successfully synthesized and employed as the efficient chiral ligand in a chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis (CLE-CE) system for chiral separation of amino acids (AAs) and quantitation of methionine, which was selected as the substrate of DAAO. Then, the apparent Michaelis-Menten constants in the enzyme system were determined with the proposed CLE-CE method. The prepared DAAO-PGMA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibited excellent reusability and good stability. Moreover, the enzyme reactor was successfully applied in screening DAAO inhibitors. These results demonstrated that the enzyme could be efficiently immobilized on the polymer-grafted magnetic nanoparticles and that the obtained enzyme reactor has great potential in screening enzyme inhibitors, further offering new insight into monitoring the relevant diseases.

  20. Screening and identification of BSA bound ligands from Puerariae lobata flower by BSA functionalized Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanoparticles coupled with HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liangliang; Ma, Yongjian; Chen, Xiaoqing; Xiong, Xiang; Shi, Shuyun

    2012-03-01

    Puerariae lobata flower (Willdenow) has a long history used to treat alcoholic intoxication in China, which contains a series of isoflavones as its chief pharmacologically active constituents. In this study, bovine serum albumin (BSA) functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄ MNPs) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) were used to screen and identify active compounds from ethanolic extract of P. lobata flower. Thirteen active isoflavones were screened and identified as glycitin (1), tectoridin (2), daidzin (3), 3'-methoxy daidzin (4), ononin (5), 3'-hydroxyl daidzein (6), tectorigenin (7), biochanin A (8), prunetin (9), genistein (10), 3'-methoxy daidzein (11), irisolidone (12) and 5,7-dihydroxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyisoflavone (13), while compounds 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 were identified from this plant for the first time. Furthermore, the activity of each bound ligand was evaluated on-line. The results indicated that the binding affinities of compounds with BSA were highly dependent on chemical structures and the methoxylation and hydroxylation on B-ring could improve the activity. The effective method could be widely applied for rapid screening and identification of active compounds from complex mixtures. PMID:22305973

  1. Biocide tolerance, phenotypic and molecular response of lactic acid bacteria isolated from naturally-fermented Aloreña table to different physico-chemical stresses.

    PubMed

    Casado Muñoz, María Del Carmen; Benomar, Nabil; Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Knapp, Charles W; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2016-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated throughout the fermentation process of Aloreña table olives were found to be resistant at least to three antibiotics (Casado Muñoz et al., 2014); however, most were sensitive to the biocides tested in this study (with minimum inhibitory concentrations [MIC] below the epidemiological cut-off values). 2-15% of the isolates were found to be biocide resistant: Leuconostoc Pseudomesenteroides, which were resistant to hexachlorophene, and Lactobacillus pentosus to cetrimide and hexadecylpiridinium. We analyzed the effect of different physico-chemical stresses, including antimicrobials, on the phenotypic and genotypic responses of LAB, providing new insights on how they become resistant in a changing environment. Results indicated that similar phenotypic responses were obtained under three stress conditions: antimicrobials, chemicals and UV light. Susceptibility patterns to antibiotics changed: increasing MICs for ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, teicoplanin and tetracycline, and decreasing the MICs for clindamycin, erythromycin, streptomycin and trimethoprim in most strains. Statistically, cross resistance between different antibiotics was detected in all stress conditions. However, expression profiles of selected genes involved in stress/resistance response (rpsL, recA, uvrB and srtA) differed depending on the stress parameter, LAB species and strain, and the target gene. We conclude that, despite the uniform phenotypic response to stresses, the repertoire of induced and repressed genes differs. So, a search for a target to improve stress tolerance of LAB, especially those of importance as starter/protective cultures or probiotics, may depend on the individual screening of each strain, even though we could predict the antibiotic phenotypic response to all stresses. PMID:27554140

  2. Resistance to Biocides in Listeria monocytogenes Collected in Meat-Processing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Conficoni, Daniele; Losasso, Carmen; Cortini, Enzo; Di Cesare, Andrea; Cibin, Veronica; Giaccone, Valerio; Corno, Gianluca; Ricci, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of microorganisms exerting resistance to biocides is a challenge to meat-processing environments. Bacteria can be intrinsically resistant to biocides but resistance can also be acquired by adaptation to their sub-lethal concentrations. Moreover, the presence of biocide resistance determinants, which is closely linked to antibiotic resistance determinants, could lead to co-selection during disinfection practices along the food chain, and select cross-resistant foodborne pathogens. The purpose of this work was to test the resistance of wild strains of Listeria monocytogenes, isolated from pork meat processing plants, toward benzalkonium chloride (BC), used as proxy of quaternary ammonium compounds. Furthermore, the expression of two non-specific efflux pumps genes (lde and mdrL) under biocide exposure was evaluated. L. monocytogenes were isolated from five processing plants located in the Veneto region (northeast of Italy) before and after cleaning and disinfection (C&D) procedures. A total of 45 strains were collected: 36 strains before and nine after the C&D procedures. Collected strains were typed according to MLST and ERIC profiles. Strains sampled in the same site, isolated before, and after the C&D procedures and displaying the same MLST and ERIC profiles were tested for their sensitivity to different concentrations of BC, in a time course assay. The expression of non-specific efflux pumps was evaluated at each time point by qPCR using tufA gene as housekeeping. A differential expression of the two investigated genes was observed: lde was found to be more expressed by the strains isolated before C&D procedures while its expression was dose-dependent in the case of the post C&D procedures strain. On the contrary, the expression of mdrL was inhibited under low biocidal stress (10 ppm BC) and enhanced in the presence of high stress (100 ppm BC). These findings suggests a possible role for C&D procedures to select L. monocytogenes persisters, pointing

  3. Dispersive solid-phase extraction based on magnetic dummy molecularly imprinted microspheres for selective screening of phthalates in plastic bottled beverages.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jindong; Wang, Mingyu; Yan, Hongyuan; Yang, Gengliang

    2014-04-01

    A new magnetic dummy molecularly imprinted dispersive solid-phase extraction (MAG-MIM-dSPE) coupled with gas chromatography-FID was developed for selective determination of phthalates in plastic bottled beverages. The new magnetic dummy molecularly imprinted microspheres (MAG-MIM) using diisononyl phthalate as a template mimic were synthesized by coprecipitation coupled with aqueous suspension polymerization and were successfully applied as the adsorbents for MAG-MIM-dSPE to extract and isolate five phthalates from plastic bottled beverages. Validation experiments showed that the MAG-MIM-dSPE method had good linearity at 0.0040-0.40 μg/mL (0.9991-0.9998), good precision (3.1-6.9%), and high recovery (89.5-101.3%), and limits of detection were obtained in a range of 0.53-1.2 μg/L. The presented MAG-MIM-dSPE method combines the quick separation of magnetic particles, special selectivity of MIM, and high extraction efficiency of dSPE, which could potentially be applied to selective screening of phthalates in beverage products.

  4. Comparison of the efficacy of natural-based and synthetic biocides to disinfect silicone and stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gomes, I B; Malheiro, J; Mergulhão, F; Maillard, J-Y; Simões, M

    2016-06-01

    New biocidal solutions are needed to combat effectively the evolution of microbes developing antibiotic resistance while having a low or no environmental toxicity impact. This work aims to assess the efficacy of commonly used biocides and natural-based compounds on the disinfection of silicone and stainless steel (SS) surfaces seeded with differentStaphylococcus aureusstrains. Minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for synthetic (benzalkonium chloride-BAC, glutaraldehyde-GTA,ortho-phthalaldehyde-OPA and peracetic acid-PAA) and natural-based (cuminaldehyde-CUM), eugenol-EUG and indole-3-carbinol-I3C) biocides by the microdilution method. The efficacy of selected biocides at MIC, 10 × MIC and 5500 mg/L (representative in-use concentration) on the disinfection of sessileS. aureuson silicone and SS was assessed by viable counting. Silicone surfaces were harder to disinfect than SS. GTA, OPA and PAA yielded complete CFU reduction of sessile cells for all test concentrations as well as BAC at 10 × MIC and 5500 mg/L. CUM was the least efficient compound. EUG was efficient for SS disinfection, regardless of strains and concentrations tested. I3C at 10 × MIC and 5500 mg/L was able to cause total CFU reduction of silicone and SS deposited bacteria. Although not so efficient as synthetic compounds, the natural-based biocides are promising to be used in disinfectant formulations, particularly I3C and EUG. PMID:26926153

  5. Efficacy of selected biocides in the decontamination of common nosocomial bacterial pathogens in biofilm and planktonic forms.

    PubMed

    El-Azizi, Mohamed; Farag, Noha; Khardori, Nancy

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy and use of biocides to eliminate pathogens in the health care environment are based on their testing against planktonic bacteria. In the environment, bacteria exist in biofilms, as they do on medical devices, and as planktonic or viable non-culturable forms as well. This work aimed to evaluate the efficacy of four biocides against the biofilm and planktonic phases of nine common nosocomial bacteria. The bactericidal activity of the biocides against bacteria in the planktonic form was assessed using a broth microdilution technique. The killing activity of the biocides against biofilms was evaluated using cells grown on polyethylene tubes under a dynamic flow-cell system that was designed for biofilm growth. All biocides completely killed the planktonic bacteria at all concentrations; however, they did not eradicate the biofilms of the same pathogens. Our study highlights the need for an alternative strategy, one that utilizes chemicals that have been tested to disrupt or prevent biofilm growth, in order to enhance current disinfection practice. PMID:27477508

  6. Screening of inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3β from traditional Chinese medicines using enzyme-immobilized magnetic beads combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfang; Xu, Jia; Chen, Yu; Mei, Zhinan; Xiao, Yuxiu

    2015-12-18

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) was immobilized on magnetic beads (MBs) by affinity method for the first time. The enzyme-immobilized MBs were coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) technique to establish a cost-effective and reliable method for screening of inhibitors of GSK-3β. A peptide substrate of GSK-3β containing a tyrosine residue was employed since it can be sensitively detected by UV detector at 214nm. The substrate and its phosphorylated product were separated by baseline within 10min. The enzyme activity was determined by the quantification of peak area of the product. Parameters including enzyme immobilization, enzyme reaction and the performance of immobilized-enzyme were investigated. The immobilized enzyme can be reused for 10 times and remain stable for 4 days at 4°C. The inhibitory activities of extracts of 15 traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) were screened. As a result, three of them including Euonymus fortunei, Amygdalus communis and Garcinia xanthochymus were found possessing high inhibitory activities (inhibition rate >90%). From G. xanthochymus, a new inhibitor of GSK-3β, fukugetin, was discovered with an IC50 value of 3.18±0.07μM. Enzyme kinetics and molecular docking experiments further revealed the inhibitory mechanism, indicating fukugetin was a non-ATP competitive inhibitor interacting with the phosphate recognizing substrate binding site of GSK-3β.

  7. Release and environmental impact of silver nanoparticles and conventional organic biocides from coated wooden façades.

    PubMed

    Künniger, Tina; Gerecke, Andreas C; Ulrich, Andrea; Huch, Anja; Vonbank, Roger; Heeb, Markus; Wichser, Adrian; Haag, Regula; Kunz, Petra; Faller, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This study represents for the first time a comprehensive assessment of functionality and environmental impacts of metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) compared to conventional organic biocides. Four different transparent, hydrophobic coatings of wooden outdoor façades were tested during one year outdoor weathering. The total silver release from products with Ag-NP was proportional to the overall erosion of the coating. The results indicate that the Ag-NPs are likely transformed to silver complexes, which are considerably less toxic than ionic silver. The protective effect of the silver containing coatings against mold, blue stain and algae was insufficient, even in immaculate and non-weathered conditions. The release of organic biocides from conventional coatings was dependent on the weather conditions, the type of biocide and the use in the base or top coat. The conventional coating showed a good overall performance free from mold, blue stain and algae until the end of the test period.

  8. Biocidal efficacy, biofilm-controlling function, and controlled release effect of chloromelamine-based bioresponsive fibrous materials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaobin; Luo, Jie; Sun, Yuyu

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 2-amino-4-chloro-6-hydroxy-s-triazine (ACHT) was synthesized through controlled hydrolysis of 2-amino-4,6-dichloro-s-triazine (ADCT). A simple paddry-cure approach was employed to immobilize ACHT onto cellulosic fibrous materials. After treatment with diluted chlorine bleach, the covalently bound ACHT moieties were transformed into chloromelamines. The structures of the samples were fully characterized with NMR, UV/VIS, DSC, TG, iodometric titration and elemental analyses. The chloromelamine-based fibrous materials provided potent, durable, and rechargeable biocidal functions against bacteria (including multi-drug resistant species), yeasts, viruses, and bacterial spores. SEM studies demonstrated that the new fibrous materials could effectively prevent the formation of biofilms, and controlled release investigations in vitro suggested that the biocidal activities were bioresponsive. Biocidal mechanisms of the chloromelamine-based fibrous materials were further discussed. PMID:17184837

  9. Impact of biocide treatments on the bacterial communities of the Lascaux Cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Fabiola; Alabouvette, Claude; Jurado, Valme; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-07-01

    The Lascaux Cave contains a remarkable set of paintings from the Upper Palaeolithic. Shortly after discovery in 1940, the cave was modified for public viewing and, in 2001, was invaded by a Fusarium solani species complex. Benzalkonium chloride was used from 2001 to 2004 to eliminate the fungal outbreak. In this study, we carried out a sampling in most of the cave halls and galleries. Sequence analysis and isolation methods detected that the most abundant genera of bacteria were Ralstonia and Pseudomonas. We suggest that, as a result of years of benzalkonium chloride treatments, the indigenous microbial community has been replaced by microbial populations selected by biocide application.

  10. Significance of urban and agricultural land use for biocide and pesticide dynamics in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, I K; Bader, H-P; Scheidegger, R; Singer, H; Lück, A; Hanke, I; Carlsson, C; Stamm, C

    2010-05-01

    Biocides and pesticides are designed to control the occurrence of unwanted organisms. From their point of application, these substances can be mobilized and transported to surface waters posing a threat to the aquatic environment. Historically, agricultural pesticides have received substantially more attention than biocidal compounds from urban use, despite being used in similar quantities. This study aims at improving our understanding of the influence of mixed urban and agricultural land use on the overall concentration dynamics of biocides and pesticides during rain events throughout the year. A comprehensive field study was conducted in a catchment within the Swiss plateau (25 km(2)). Four surface water sampling sites represented varying combinations of urban and agricultural sources. Additionally, the urban drainage system was studied by sampling the only wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in the catchment, a combined sewer overflow (CSO), and a storm sewer (SS). High temporal resolution sampling was carried out during rain events from March to November 2007. The results, based on more than 600 samples analyzed for 23 substances, revealed distinct and complex concentration patterns for different compounds and sources. Five types of concentration patterns can be distinguished: a) compounds that showed elevated background concentrations throughout the year (e.g. diazinon >50 ng L(-1)), indicating a constant household source; b) compounds that showed elevated concentrations driven by rain events throughout the year (e.g. diuron 100-300 ng L(-1)), indicating a constant urban outdoor source such as facades; c) compounds with seasonal peak concentrations driven by rain events from urban and agricultural areas (e.g. mecoprop 1600 ng L(-1) and atrazine 2500 ng L(-1) respectively); d) compounds that showed unpredictably sharp peaks (e.g. atrazine 10,000 ng L(-1), diazinon 2500 ng L(-1)), which were most probably due to improper handling or even disposal of products; and

  11. Biocide and antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella isolates obtained before and after cleaning at six Danish pig slaughterhouses.

    PubMed

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Pedersen, Karl; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella sp. continues to be one of the most important foodborne pathogens. Control measures in terms of cleaning and disinfection on food production plants are very important for limiting the risk of contaminated food products to reach the consumer. In the last decade concern has arisen that bacteria exposed to disinfectants can develop resistance toward disinfectants and can have a higher risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of biocide resistant Salmonella sp. in Danish pig slaughterhouses, to evaluate if there was a correlation between susceptibilities to biocides and antibiotics, and to examine if cleaning and disinfection select isolates with changed susceptibility toward biocides or antibiotics. Salmonella sp. was isolated from the environment in Danish pig slaughterhouses before and after cleaning and disinfection. The susceptibility toward three different biocides, triclosan and two commercial disinfection products: Desinfect Maxi, a quaternary ammonium compound, and Incimaxx DES, an acetic compound, was determined. We found no resistance toward the biocides tested, but we did find that isolates obtained after cleaning had higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values toward one of the disinfectants (Incimaxx DES) compared to isolates obtained before cleaning and disinfection. This could indicate selection of strains that are more tolerant, due to the cleaning and disinfection. Furthermore, we found that there was a weak statistical correlation between MICs toward the biocides and some antibiotics, but no difference in log(MIC)s toward antibiotics between isolates obtained before and after cleaning, nor did we find any difference in the number of resistances of isolates obtained before and after cleaning and disinfection. PMID:24819413

  12. Suitability of small environmental chambers to test the emission of biocides from treated materials into the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver; Wilke, Olaf

    Biocides are used to protect materials that might be damaged by fungal, microbial or insect activity. The aim of this study is to develop a method for the measurement of these organic compounds, which generally have low or moderate vapor pressures. The biocides considered in this study are permethrin, dichlofluanid, tolylfluanid, iodpropinylbutylcarbamat, octylisothiazolinone, tebuconazole and propiconazole. The emission from two commercial products (plastic foil, wool carpet) containing biocides and of seven types of biocidal formulations applied to wood or clay tiles were investigated in 20-l glass emission test chambers. Each chamber test was performed over a period of 100-200 days, and one investigation was conducted over several years. Compared to volatile organic compounds, low-volatility compounds show totally different emission curves in chamber tests; maximal emission values may be reached in days or weeks. A period of 3 months is sometimes necessary for the determination of area-specific emission rates (SER a's). The SER a's (μg m -2 h -1) from biocide-containing products were determined for permethrin (0.006), propiconazole (0.3), dichlofluanid (2.0), tolylfluanid (1.0), octylisothiazolinone (2.5) and iodpropinylbutylcarbamat (2). In most cases, the SER a stayed at its maximum value or declined slowly over the test period. Additionally, a chamber test begun in 1994 with a piece of wood treated with a typical mixture of biocides dissolved in a technical solvent was continued. SER a's (μg m -2 h -1) for dichlofluanid (0.20), tebuconazole (0.49) and permethrin (0.08) remained detectable after the period of nearly 9 years during which the sample remained continuously in the chamber. This test proved the very slow decrease of emission of low-volatility compounds like permethrin and tebuconazole.

  13. Magnetic high throughput screening system for the development of nano-sized molecularly imprinted polymers for controlled delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Piletska, Elena V; Abd, Bashar H; Krakowiak, Agata S; Parmar, Anitha; Pink, Demi L; Wall, Katie S; Wharton, Luke; Moczko, Ewa; Whitcombe, Michael J; Karim, Kal; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2015-05-01

    Curcumin is a versatile anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent known for its low bioavailability, which could be improved by developing materials capable of binding and releasing drug in a controlled fashion. The present study describes the preparation of magnetic nano-sized Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (nanoMIPs) for the controlled delivery of curcumin and their high throughput characterisation using microtitre plates modified with magnetic inserts. NanoMIPs were synthesised using functional monomers chosen with the aid of molecular modelling. The rate of release of curcumin from five polymers was studied under aqueous conditions and was found to correlate well with the binding energies obtained computationally. The presence of specific monomers was shown to be significant in ensuring effective binding of curcumin and to the rate of release obtained. Characterisation of the polymer particles was carried out using dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to establish the relationship between irradiation time and particle size. The protocols optimised during this study could be used as a blueprint for the development of nanoMIPs capable of the controlled release of potentially any compound of interest.

  14. Dynamics of the emergence of genetic resistance to biocides among asexual and sexual organisms.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, K; Issa, S; Daniels, E; Haile, D

    1997-10-01

    A stochastic, agent based, evolutionary algorithm, modeling mating, reproduction, genetic variation, phenotypic expression and selection was used to study the dynamic interactions affecting a multiple-gene system. The results suggest that strong irreversible constraints affect the evolution of resistance to biocides. Resistant genes evolve differently in asexual organisms compared with sexual ones in response to various patterns of biocide applications. Asexual populations (viruses and bacteria) are less likely to develop genetic resistance in response to multiple pesticides or if pesticides are used at low doses, whereas sexual populations (insects for example) are more likely to become resistant to pesticides if susceptibility to the pesticide relates to mate selection. The adaptation of genes not related to the emergence of resistance will affect the dynamics of the evolution of resistance. Increasing the number of pesticides reduces the probability of developing resistance to any of them in asexual organisms but much less so in sexual organisms. Sequential applications of toxins, were slightly less efficient in slowing emergence of resistance compared with simultaneous application of a mix in both sexual and asexual organisms. Targeting only one sex of the pest speeds the development of resistance. The findings are consistent to most of the published analytical models but are closer to known experimental results, showing that nonlinear, agent based simulation models are more powerful in explaining complex processes.

  15. Green biocides, a promising technology: current and future applications to industry and industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Ullah, Saleem; Ahmad, Irshad; Qureshi, Ahmad Kaleem; Balkhair, Khaled S; Abdur Rehman, Muhammad

    2014-02-01

    The study of biofilms has skyrocketed in recent years due to increased awareness of the pervasiveness and impact of biofilms. It costs the USA literally billions of dollars every year in energy losses, equipment damage, product contamination and medical infections. But biofilms also offer huge potential for cleaning up hazardous waste sites, filtering municipal and industrial water and wastewater, and forming biobarriers to protect soil and groundwater from contamination. The complexity of biofilm activity and behavior requires research contributions from many disciplines such as biochemistry, engineering, mathematics and microbiology. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive analysis of emerging novel antimicrobial techniques, including those using myriad organic and inorganic products as well as genetic engineering techniques, the use of coordination complex molecules, composite materials and antimicrobial peptides and the use of lasers as such or their modified use in combination treatments. This review also addresses advanced and recent modifications, including methodological changes, and biocide efficacy enhancing strategies. This review will provide future planners of biofilm control technologies with a broad understanding and perspective on the use of biocides in the field of green developments for a sustainable future.

  16. First evaluation of the threat posed by antifouling biocides in the Southern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Sonia; Ansanelli, Giuliana; Parrella, Luisa; Di Landa, Giuseppe; Massanisso, Paolo; Schiavo, Simona; Minopoli, Carmine; Lanza, Bruno; Boggia, Raffaella; Aleksi, Pellumb; Tabaku, Afrim

    2014-08-01

    The CARISMA project (characterization and ecological risk analysis of antifouling biocides in the Southern Adriatic Sea) aims to appraise the quality of the Southern Adriatic Sea between Italy (Apulia region) and Albania and, in particular, the impact due to the use of biocidal antifouling coatings. Under this project, a preliminary survey at the main hot spots of contamination (e.g. ports and marinas) was conducted at the end of the nautical season in 2012. Chemical seawater analyses were complemented with ecotoxicological assays and the results were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). As expected, PCA splits the Albanian and Italian ports, according to the different degrees of contamination indicated for the two countries by the experimental data, highlighting the most critical situation in one port of Apulia. In addition, in order to assess the potential adverse ecological effects posed by antifouling agents (i.e. tributyltin (TBT)-irgarol-diuron) on non-target marine organisms, hazard quotients (HQ) were calculated. The results showed a low risk posed by irgarol and diuron whereas the probability of adverse effects was high in the case of TBT.

  17. [Environmental study on toxicity of water resulting from pesticide and biocide pollution].

    PubMed

    Broussard, G; Bramanti, O; Marchese, F M

    2003-01-01

    A chemical product has a level of danger or security which depends on the concentration and on the exposure time. The toxicity of the water is established by the answer (survival) of an animal organism in contact with a specific chemical product in short time. There are several reliable methods in the world; in any case the most significant aspect is given by the mortal concentration of the substance (mg/L) in connection with the organism dimensions. Among the methods we can point out:--% of mortality;--N.O.E.L. (No Observed Effect Level);--LC50. We must know the following data too:--responsable for the product;--registration of the pesticide/biocide;--risk valuation;--T.E.R. (Toxicity Exposure Ratio);--P.E.C. (Predicted Environmental Concentration); measures of detoxication;--ratio product toxicity/usage. The chronic effects concern the health the growth, the survival and the reproduction. These data are used for the management of the risk, the preparation of chemical substance in security, the treatment of accidental poisoning, the determination of TLV and safety level (LD50-LC50) of the substances (pesticide, biocide).

  18. Biocide-containing varnish for the protection of sandstone: comparison of formulations and laboratory test methods.

    PubMed

    Barrionuevo, Martín R E; Gaylarde, Christine C

    2011-06-01

    Two formulations of acrylic varnish, with and without either of two dry film biocides--one a mixture of isothiazolinones and benzimidazole derivatives, and the other a carbamate--were tested in vitro for their activity against mixtures of filamentous fungi and cyanobacteria found on sandstone buildings. Growth on filter-paper squares coated with the varnishes was assessed semi-quantitatively by naked eye, quantitatively by image analysis and chemically by measurement of ergosterol and chlorophyll a. The lower solvent content (higher resin) varnish was more inhibitory to cyanobacteria than the higher varnish content, whilst the opposite was true for the fungal inoculum. The carbamate biocide was effective against cyanobacteria, unlike the isothiazolinone mixture, but the latter produced more inhibition of fungal growth. The three assay methods produced generally similar results, although visual observation was obviously the most imprecise. There was an anomaly in the ergosterol measurements, which was considered to be caused by the varying ergosterol content and unequal inhibition of the three fungal genera used in the inoculum. Fusarium sp. was shown to contain higher levels of this membrane component than Cladosporium sp. and Penicillium sp. For this reason, the most appropriate method overall, giving reliable quantitative results, was deemed to be the image analysis.

  19. Understanding the biocide action of poly(hexamethylene biguanide) using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Souza, Adriano L; Ceridório, Lucinéia F; Paula, Gustavo F; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2015-08-01

    The disinfectant activity of poly(hexamethylene biguanide) (PHMB) has been explored in industrial applications, in agriculture and in food manipulation, but this biocide action is not completely understood. It is believed to arise from electrostatic interactions between the polyhexanide group and phosphatidylglycerol, which is the main phospholipid on the bacterial membrane. In this study, we investigated the molecular-level interactions between PHMB and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) in Langmuir monolayers that served as cell membrane models. PHMB at a concentration of 2×10(-4) g L(-1) in a Theorell-Stenhagen at pH 3.0 and in a phosphate at pH 7.4 was used as a subphase to prepare the DPPG monolayers. Surface pressure-area isotherms showed that PHMB adsorbs and penetrates into the DPPG monolayers, expanding them and increasing their elasticity under both conditions examined. Results from polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) indicated that PHMB induces disorder in the DPPG chains and dehydrates their C=O groups, especially for the physiological medium. Overall, these findings point to hydrophobic interactions and dehydration being as relevant as electrostatic interactions to explain changes in membrane fluidity and permeability, believed to be responsible for the biocide action of PHMB.

  20. Poly(lactic acid)/TiO₂ nanocomposites as alternative biocidal and antifungal materials.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Carmen; Ochoa, Almudena; Ulloa, Maria Teresa; Alvarez, Eduardo; Canales, Daniel; Zapata, Paula A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composites with titanium oxide (TiO2) ~10-nm nanoparticles were produced by the melting process and their main properties were evaluated. The nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed in the matrix with a low degree of agglomeration, as seen by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallinity temperature increased ~12% when 5 wt.% of TiO2 was added, showing that the nanoparticles acted as nucleating agents this trend was confirmed by optical images. The elastic modulus increased ~54% compared to neat PLA at 5 wt.% of nanoparticles. Despite these improvements, PLA/TiO2 nanocomposites showed lower shear viscosity than neat PLA, possibly reflecting degradation of the polymer due to the particles. Regarding biocidal properties, after 2h of contact the PLA/TiO2 composites with 8 wt.% TiO2 showed a reduction of Escherichia coli colonies of ~82% under no UVA irradiation compared to pure PLA. This biocidal characteristic can be increased under UVA irradiation, with nanocomposites containing 8 wt.% TiO2 killing 94% of the bacteria. The PLA/TiO2 nanocomposites with 8 wt.% were also 99.99% effective against Aspergillus fumigatus under the UVA irradiation. PMID:26354270

  1. Benzalkonium runoff from roofs treated with biocide products - In situ pilot-scale study.

    PubMed

    Gromaire, M C; Van de Voorde, A; Lorgeoux, C; Chebbo, G

    2015-09-15

    Roof maintenance practices often involve the application of biocide products to fight against moss, lichens and algae. The main component of these products is benzalkonium chloride, a mixture of alkyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chlorides with mainly C12 and C14 alkyl chain lengths, which is toxic for the aquatic environment. This paper describes, on the basis of an in-situ pilot scale study, the evolution of roof runoff contamination over a one year period following the biocide treatment of roof frames. Results show a major contamination of roof runoff immediately after treatment (from 5 to 30 mg/L), followed by an exponential decrease. 175-375 mm of cumulated rainfall is needed before the runoff concentrations become less than EC50 values for fish (280 μg/l). The residual concentration in the runoff water remains above 4 μg/L even after 640 mm of rainfall. The level of benzalkonium ions leaching depends on the roofing material, with lower concentrations and total mass leached from ceramic tiles than from concrete tiles, and on the state of the tile (new or worn out). Mass balance calculations indicate that a large part of the mass of benzalkonium compounds applied to the tiles is lost, probably due to biodegradation processes.

  2. Dynamics of the emergence of genetic resistance to biocides among asexual and sexual organisms.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, K; Issa, S; Daniels, E; Haile, D

    1997-10-01

    A stochastic, agent based, evolutionary algorithm, modeling mating, reproduction, genetic variation, phenotypic expression and selection was used to study the dynamic interactions affecting a multiple-gene system. The results suggest that strong irreversible constraints affect the evolution of resistance to biocides. Resistant genes evolve differently in asexual organisms compared with sexual ones in response to various patterns of biocide applications. Asexual populations (viruses and bacteria) are less likely to develop genetic resistance in response to multiple pesticides or if pesticides are used at low doses, whereas sexual populations (insects for example) are more likely to become resistant to pesticides if susceptibility to the pesticide relates to mate selection. The adaptation of genes not related to the emergence of resistance will affect the dynamics of the evolution of resistance. Increasing the number of pesticides reduces the probability of developing resistance to any of them in asexual organisms but much less so in sexual organisms. Sequential applications of toxins, were slightly less efficient in slowing emergence of resistance compared with simultaneous application of a mix in both sexual and asexual organisms. Targeting only one sex of the pest speeds the development of resistance. The findings are consistent to most of the published analytical models but are closer to known experimental results, showing that nonlinear, agent based simulation models are more powerful in explaining complex processes. PMID:9344733

  3. Surface-attached cells, biofilms and biocide susceptibility: implications for hospital cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Otter, J A; Vickery, K; Walker, J T; deLancey Pulcini, E; Stoodley, P; Goldenberg, S D; Salkeld, J A G; Chewins, J; Yezli, S; Edgeworth, J D

    2015-01-01

    Microbes tend to attach to available surfaces and readily form biofilms, which is problematic in healthcare settings. Biofilms are traditionally associated with wet or damp surfaces such as indwelling medical devices and tubing on medical equipment. However, microbes can survive for extended periods in a desiccated state on dry hospital surfaces, and biofilms have recently been discovered on dry hospital surfaces. Microbes attached to surfaces and in biofilms are less susceptible to biocides, antibiotics and physical stress. Thus, surface attachment and/or biofilm formation may explain how vegetative bacteria can survive on surfaces for weeks to months (or more), interfere with attempts to recover microbes through environmental sampling, and provide a mixed bacterial population for the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. The capacity of existing detergent formulations and disinfectants to disrupt biofilms may have an important and previously unrecognized role in determining their effectiveness in the field, which should be reflected in testing standards. There is a need for further research to elucidate the nature and physiology of microbes on dry hospital surfaces, specifically the prevalence and composition of biofilms. This will inform new approaches to hospital cleaning and disinfection, including novel surfaces that reduce microbial attachment and improve microbial detachment, and methods to augment the activity of biocides against surface-attached microbes such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides. Future strategies to address environmental contamination on hospital surfaces should consider the presence of microbes attached to surfaces, including biofilms.

  4. Poly(lactic acid)/TiO₂ nanocomposites as alternative biocidal and antifungal materials.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Carmen; Ochoa, Almudena; Ulloa, Maria Teresa; Alvarez, Eduardo; Canales, Daniel; Zapata, Paula A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composites with titanium oxide (TiO2) ~10-nm nanoparticles were produced by the melting process and their main properties were evaluated. The nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed in the matrix with a low degree of agglomeration, as seen by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallinity temperature increased ~12% when 5 wt.% of TiO2 was added, showing that the nanoparticles acted as nucleating agents this trend was confirmed by optical images. The elastic modulus increased ~54% compared to neat PLA at 5 wt.% of nanoparticles. Despite these improvements, PLA/TiO2 nanocomposites showed lower shear viscosity than neat PLA, possibly reflecting degradation of the polymer due to the particles. Regarding biocidal properties, after 2h of contact the PLA/TiO2 composites with 8 wt.% TiO2 showed a reduction of Escherichia coli colonies of ~82% under no UVA irradiation compared to pure PLA. This biocidal characteristic can be increased under UVA irradiation, with nanocomposites containing 8 wt.% TiO2 killing 94% of the bacteria. The PLA/TiO2 nanocomposites with 8 wt.% were also 99.99% effective against Aspergillus fumigatus under the UVA irradiation.

  5. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  6. A mechanism for inducing climatic variations through ozone destruction: Screening of galactic cosmic rays by solar and terrestrial magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A perturbation analysis, allowing for temperature and opacity feedbacks, is developed to calculate depletions in the O3 abundance and reductions of stratospheric solar heating that result from increases in NOx concentration. A pair of perturbation coefficients give the reduction in O3 and temperature through the stratosphere for a specified NOx increase. This type of analysis illustrates the tendency for various levels to self-heal when a perturbation occurs. Physical arguments indicate that the expected sign of the climatic effect is correct, with colder surface temperatures produced by reduced magnetic shielding. In addition, four qualitative reasons are suggested for thinking that significant ozone reductions by cosmic ray influxes will lead to an increased terrestrial albedo from stratospheric condensation. In this view, long-term (approximately 10,000 years) climatic changes have resulted from secular geomagnetic variations while shorter (approximately 100 years) excursions are related to changes in solar activity.

  7. Quantitative mass spectrometry combined with separation and enrichment of phosphopeptides by titania coated magnetic mesoporous silica microspheres for screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liyun; Wu, Jian-Hong; Luo, Qun; Li, Xianchan; Zheng, Wei; Zhai, Guijin; Wang, Fuyi; Lü, Shuang; Feng, Yu-Qi; Liu, Jianan; Xiong, Shaoxiang

    2012-03-01

    We describe herein the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) approach for screening of protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs). MS quantification of phosphopeptides, the kinase-catalyzed products of nonphosphorylated substrates, is a great challenge due to the ion suppression effect of highly abundant nonphosphorylated peptides in enzymatic reaction mixtures. To address this issue, a novel type of titania coated magnetic hollow mesoporous silica spheres (TiO(2)/MHMSS) material was fabricated for capturing phosphopeptides from the enzymatic reaction mixtures prior to MS analysis. Under optimized conditions, even in the presence of 1000-fold of a substrate peptide of tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the phosphorylated substrates at the femtomole level can be detected with high accuracy and reproducibility. With a synthetic nonisotopic labeled phosphopeptide, of which the sequence is similar to that of the phosphorylated substrate, as the internal standard, the MS signal ratio of the phosphorylated substrate to the standard is linearly correlated with the molar ratio of the two phosphopeptides in peptide mixtures over the range of 0.1 to 4 with r(2) being 0.99. The IC(50) values of three EGFR inhibitors synthesized in our laboratory were then determined, and the results are consistent with those determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The developed method is sensitive, cost/time-effective, and operationally simple and does not require isotope/radioative-labeling, providing an ideal alterative for screening of PKIs as therapeutic agents. PMID:22304342

  8. Comparative efficiency of macroalgal extracts and booster biocides as antifouling agents to control growth of three diatom species.

    PubMed

    Silkina, Alla; Bazes, Alexandra; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Bourgougnon, Nathalie

    2012-10-01

    The application of 'booster biocides' Diuron, Tolylfluanid and Copper thiocyanate inbantifouling paints, used to prevent development of biofouling, needs to be monitored before assessing their impacts on the environment. An alternative approach aims to propose eco-friendly and effective antifoulants isolated from marine organisms such as seaweeds. In this study, the effects of 'booster biocides' and the ethanol and dichloromethane extracts from a brown (Sargassum muticum) and a red alga (Ceramium botryocarpum) have been compared by algal growth inhibition tests of marine diatoms. The most efficient extracts were ethanol fraction of S. muticum and C. botryocarpum extracts with growth EC(50)=4.74 and 5.3μg mL(-1) respectively, with reversible diatom growth effect. The booster biocides are more efficient EC(50)=0.52μg mL(-1), but are highly toxic. Results validate the use of macroalgal extracts as non toxic antifouling compounds, and they represent valuable environmentally friendly alternatives in comparison with currently used biocides. PMID:22853990

  9. Compatibility Study of Silver Biocide in Drinking Water with Candidate Metals for Crew Exploration Vehicle Potable Water System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Niklas M.

    2009-01-01

    The stability of silver biocide, used to keep drinking water on the CEV potable water sterile, is unknown as the system design is still in progress. Silver biocide in water can deplete rapidly when exposed to various metal surfaces. Additionally, silver depletion rates may be affected by the surface-area-to-volume (SA/V) ratios in the water system. Therefore, to facilitate the CEV water system design, it would be advantageous to know the biocide depletion rates in water exposed to the surfaces of these candidate metals at various SA/V ratios. Certain surface treatments can be employed to reduce the depletion rates of silver compared to the base metal. The purpose of this work is to determine the compatibility of specific spaceflight-certified metals that could used in the design of the CEV potable water system with silver biocide as well as understand the effect of surface are to volume ratios of metals used in the construction of the potable water system on the silver concentration.

  10. Bifunctional fluorescent benzimidazo[1,2-α]quinolines for Candida spp. biofilm detection and biocidal activity.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Igor O P; Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Lopes, William; Orru, Romano V A; Hranjec, Marijana; Perin, Nataša; Machado, Michel; Oliveira, Luís F; Donato, Ricardo K; Stefani, Valter; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Schrekker, Henri S

    2016-10-01

    Biofilms provide an ideal environment for protecting the microbial cells from damage caused by humoral and cellular immune system components, promoting resistance, infections and increasing mortality and morbidity of patients in health facilities. In an attempt to provide an innovative solution for preventing contamination in hospital environments, this study evaluated nine structural complementary fluorescent benzimidazo[1,2-α]quinolines as bifunctional agents that both detect and have biocidal activity against yeast biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. The benzimidazoles' staining capability was determined by a fluorescence microscopy study and spraying the substance on yeast biofilm contaminated stainless steel surfaces. Furthermore, their in vitro human leukocyte cytotoxicity was evaluated with trypan blue and their biocidal activity was determined as the minimum inhibitory concentration against Candida tropicalis, C. albicans and C. parapsilosis strains. Moreover, scanning electron micrographs were recorded to study the biocidal activity. This resulted in the identification of 7, which presents all the desired characteristics (such as solubility) and capabilities (staining and biocide activity against all tested biofilm forming yeast strains) at the same time. As such, benzimidazole 7 has the potential to guarantee the use of disinfected medical and surgical instruments in clinical and surgical procedures, consequently, contributing to an increased safety for patients. PMID:27614242

  11. PCR amplification from single DNA molecules on magnetic beads in emulsion: application for high-throughput screening of transcription factor targets

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Takaaki; Takei, Yoshiaki; Ohtsuka, Miharu; Kawarasaki, Yasuaki; Yamane, Tsuneo; Nakano, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel method of genetic library construction on magnetic microbeads based on solid-phase single-molecule PCR in a fine and robust water-phase compartment formed in water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. In this method, critically diluted DNA fragments were distributed over the emulsion as templates, where beads crosslinked with multiple primers and other PCR components were encapsulated to form multiple reaction compartments. The delivered DNA was then amplified and covalently immobilized on the beads in parallel, within individual compartments, to construct a genetic library on beads (GLOBE), which was readily applicable to a genomewide global scanning of genetic elements recognized by a defined DNA-binding protein. We constructed a GLOBE of Paracoccus denitrificans and selected gene beads that were bound to the His-tagged transcription factor PhaR by flow cytometry. As a result of flow cytometry screening with an anti-His fluorescent antibody, the PhaR target fragments were enriched 1200-fold from this library with this system. Therefore, this system is a powerful tool for analyzing the transcription network on a genomewide scale. PMID:16214800

  12. A Novel Assay for Screening Inhibitors Targeting HIV Integrase LEDGF/p75 Interaction Based on Ni2+ Coated Magnetic Agarose Beads

    PubMed Central

    Dawei, Zhang; Hongqiu, He; Mengmeng, Liu; Zhixia, Meng; Shunxing, Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an essential role in viral replication and thus serves as an important target for chemotherapeutic intervention against HIV-1 infection. However, the current three clinical IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir share the same inhibitory mechanism, resulting in a common clinical resistance profile which have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment. Therefore, it is important to develop small molecule inhibitors that impair IN function with distinct mechanisms of action. In this work, a magnetic-beads based biochemical assay targeting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 was developed for identification of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Furthermore, a library containing 1000 US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs currently used for human medication was screened to identify inhibitors targeting the PPI. The assay was proved to be quite robust and with the novel assay we successfully identified dexlansoprazole (IC50 of 4.8 μM), a FDA-approved proton pump inhibitor, as a potential inhibitor for the PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, which bound to the LEDGF/p75 partner with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 330 nM ± 2.6 nM. PMID:27633629

  13. A Novel Assay for Screening Inhibitors Targeting HIV Integrase LEDGF/p75 Interaction Based on Ni(2+) Coated Magnetic Agarose Beads.

    PubMed

    Dawei, Zhang; Hongqiu, He; Mengmeng, Liu; Zhixia, Meng; Shunxing, Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an essential role in viral replication and thus serves as an important target for chemotherapeutic intervention against HIV-1 infection. However, the current three clinical IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir share the same inhibitory mechanism, resulting in a common clinical resistance profile which have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment. Therefore, it is important to develop small molecule inhibitors that impair IN function with distinct mechanisms of action. In this work, a magnetic-beads based biochemical assay targeting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 was developed for identification of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Furthermore, a library containing 1000 US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs currently used for human medication was screened to identify inhibitors targeting the PPI. The assay was proved to be quite robust and with the novel assay we successfully identified dexlansoprazole (IC50 of 4.8 μM), a FDA-approved proton pump inhibitor, as a potential inhibitor for the PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, which bound to the LEDGF/p75 partner with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 330 nM ± 2.6 nM. PMID:27633629

  14. A Novel Assay for Screening Inhibitors Targeting HIV Integrase LEDGF/p75 Interaction Based on Ni(2+) Coated Magnetic Agarose Beads.

    PubMed

    Dawei, Zhang; Hongqiu, He; Mengmeng, Liu; Zhixia, Meng; Shunxing, Guo

    2016-09-16

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an essential role in viral replication and thus serves as an important target for chemotherapeutic intervention against HIV-1 infection. However, the current three clinical IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir share the same inhibitory mechanism, resulting in a common clinical resistance profile which have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment. Therefore, it is important to develop small molecule inhibitors that impair IN function with distinct mechanisms of action. In this work, a magnetic-beads based biochemical assay targeting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 was developed for identification of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Furthermore, a library containing 1000 US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs currently used for human medication was screened to identify inhibitors targeting the PPI. The assay was proved to be quite robust and with the novel assay we successfully identified dexlansoprazole (IC50 of 4.8 μM), a FDA-approved proton pump inhibitor, as a potential inhibitor for the PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, which bound to the LEDGF/p75 partner with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 330 nM ± 2.6 nM.

  15. Turbo STIR magnetic resonance imaging as a whole-body screening tool for metastases in patients with breast carcinoma: preliminary clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, R; Kessar, P; Blanchard, R; Dimasi, M; Harper, K; DeCarvalho, V; Yucel, E K; Patriquin, L; Eustace, S

    2000-04-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the utility of whole-body turbo short tau inversion recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect metastases to liver, brain, and bone as a single examination in women with breast cancer. Seventeen patients with biopsy-proven breast cancer and suspected metastatic disease attending over a 12-month period referred for both conventional imaging and whole-body MRI were included in the study. Three patients were found to be free of metastases at both conventional and MR imaging. Appendicular or axial skeletal metastases were identified in 11 of 17 patients, with correlation between findings at whole-body MRI and scintigraphy in 15 of the 17 patients. Five patients had evidence of hepatic metastases on whole-body MRI, of which metastases were identified in only three patients at CT despite contrast enhancement. Four patients had brain abnormalities (metastases in three patients, meningioma in one patient) detected on both whole-body and dedicated brain MRI. Preliminary clinical experience suggests that turbo STIR whole-body MRI may represent a convenient and cost-effective method of total body screening for metastases in patients with breast carcinoma.

  16. A reference protocol for comparing the biocidal properties of gas plasma generating devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A.; Seri, P.; Borghi, C. A.; Shama, G.; Iza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Growing interest in the use of non-thermal, atmospheric pressure gas plasmas for decontamination purposes has resulted in a multiplicity of plasma-generating devices. There is currently no universally approved method of comparing the biocidal performance of such devices and in the work described here spores of the Gram positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) are proposed as a suitable reference biological agent. In order to achieve consistency in the form in which the biological agent in question is presented to the plasma, a polycarbonate membrane loaded with a monolayer of spores is proposed. The advantages of the proposed protocol are evaluated by comparing inactivation tests in which an alternative microorganism (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus—MRSA) and the widely-used sample preparation technique of directly pipetting cell suspensions onto membranes are employed. In all cases, inactivation tests with either UV irradiation or plasma exposure were more reproducible when the proposed protocol was followed.

  17. Occurrence and distribution of antifouling biocide Irgarol-1051 in coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hassan Rashid; Arifin, Marinah Mohd; Sheikh, Mohammed Ali; Mohamed Shazili, Noor Azhar; Bachok, Zainudin

    2013-05-15

    Emerging booster biocides contamination raises particular attention in the marine ecosystem health. This study provides the baseline data on the occurrence of Irgarol-1051 (2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-6-cyclopropylamiono-s-triazine) in the selected coastal water around Malaysia. The maximum detected concentration of Irgarol was 2021 ng/L at Klang West, commercial and cargo port. Coral reef Islands (Redang and Bidong) were relatively less contaminated compared to other coastal areas. The temporal variation revealed that only 1% of 28 stations sampled on November, 2011 was above the environmental risk limit of 24 ng/L as suggested by Dutch Authorities, while in January and April, 2012; 46% and 92% of the stations were above the limit respectively. The present findings demonstrate the wide detection of novel antifouling materials Irgarol-1051 which advocates the need for proper monitoring and conservation strategies for the coastal resources. PMID:23490347

  18. Metal Iodate-Based Energetic Composites and Their Combustion and Biocidal Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Jian, G; Zhou, W; DeLisio, J B; Lee, V T; Zachariah, M R

    2015-08-12

    The biological agents that can be weaponized, such as Bacillus anthracis, pose a considerable potential public threat. Bacterial spores, in particular, are highly stress resistant and cannot be completely neutralized by common bactericides. This paper reports on synthesis of metal iodate-based aluminized electrospray-assembled nanocomposites which neutralize spores through a combined thermal and chemical mechanism. Here metal iodates (Bi(IO3)3, Cu(IO3)2, and Fe(IO3)3) act as a strong oxidizer to nanoaluminum to yield a very exothermic and violent reaction, and simultaneously generate iodine as a long-lived bactericide. These microparticle-assembled nanocomposites when characterized in terms of reaction times and temporal pressure release show significantly improved reactivity. Furthermore, sporicidal performance superior to conventional metal-oxide-based thermites clearly shows the advantages of combining both a thermal and biocidal mechanism in spore neutralization.

  19. Acanthamoeba encystment: multifactorial effects of buffers, biocides, and demulcents present in contact lens care solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Christopher J; Lynch, Shawn C; Rah, Marjorie J; Millard, Kimberly A; Morris, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether agents which are purportedly capable of inducing encystment of Acanthamoeba can recapitulate the signal when tested in differing formulations. Methods In accordance with the International Standard ISO 19045, Acanthamoeba castellanii ATCC 50370 trophozoites were cultured in antibiotic-free axenic medium, treated with test solutions, and encystment rates plus viability were measured via bright field and fluorescent microscopy. Test solutions included phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), borate-buffered saline, biguanide- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based biocides, propylene glycol (PG) and povidone (POV) ophthalmic demulcents, and one-step H2O2-based contact lens disinfection systems. Results Only PBS solutions with 0.25 ppm polyaminopropyl biguanide (PAPB) and increasing concentrations of PG and POV stimulated A. castellanii encystment in a dose-dependent manner, whereas PBS solutions containing 3% H2O2 and increasing concentrations of PG and POV did not stimulate encystment. Borate-buffered saline and PBS/citrate solutions containing PG also did not stimulate encystment. In addition, no encystment was observed after 24 hours, 7 days, or 14 days of exposures of trophozoites to one-step H2O2 contact lens disinfection products or related solutions. Conclusion The lack of any encystment observed when trophozoites were treated with existing or new one-step H2O2 contact lens care products, as well as when trophozoites were exposed to various related test solutions, confirms that Acanthamoeba encystment is a complex process which depends upon simultaneous contributions of multiple factors including buffers, biocides, and demulcents. PMID:26508829

  20. Designing N-halamine based antibacterial surface on polymers: Fabrication, characterization, and biocidal functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Han, Qiuxia

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate a valuable method to generate reactive groups on inert polymer surfaces and bond antibacterial agents for biocidal ability. Polystyrene (PS) surfaces were functionalized by spin coating of sub-monolayer and monolayer films of poly(styrene- b- tert-butyl acrylate) (PS-P tBA) block copolymer from solutions in toluene. PS-P tBA self-assembled to a bilayer structure on PS that contains a surface layer of the P tBA blocks ordering at the air-polymer interface and a bottom layer of the PS blocks entangling with the PS substrate. The thickness of P tBA layer could be linearly controlled by the concentration of the spin coating solution and a 2.5 nm saturated monolayer coverage of P tBA was achieved at 0.35% (w/w). Carboxyl groups were generated by exposing the tert-butyl ester groups of P tBA on saturated surface to trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) to bond tert-butylamine via amide bonds that were further chlorinated to N-halamine with NaOCl solution. The density of N-halamine on the chlorinated surface was calculated to be 1.05 × 10 -5 mol/m 2 by iodimetric/thiosulfate titration. Presented data showed the N-halamine surface provided powerful antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Over 50% of the chlorine lost after UVA irradiation could be regained upon rechlorination. This design concept can be virtually applied to any inert polymer by choosing appropriate block copolymers and antibacterial agents to attain desirable biocidal activity.

  1. Toxic indole alkaloids avrainvillamide and stephacidin B produced by a biocide tolerant indoor mold Aspergillus westerdijkiae.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, Raimo; Andersson, Maria A; Hautaniemi, Maria; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2015-06-01

    Toxic Aspergillus westerdijkiae were present in house dust and indoor air fall-out from a residence and a kindergarten where the occupants suffered from building related ill health. The A. westerdijkiae isolates produced indole alkaloids avrainvillamide (445 Da) and its dimer stephacidin B (890 Da). It grew and sporulated in presence of high concentrations of boron or polyguanidine (PHMB, PHMG) based antimicrobial biocides used to remediate mold infested buildings. The boar sperm cells were used as sensor cells to purify toxins from HPLC fractions of the fungal biomass. Submicromolar concentrations (EC50 0.3-0.4 μM) blocked boar spermatozoan motility and killed porcine kidney tubular epithelial cells (PK-15). Plate grown hyphal mass of the A. westerdijkiae isolates contained 300-750 ng of avrainvillamide and 30-300 ng of stephacidin B per mg (wet weight). The toxins induced rapid (30 min) loss of boar sperm motility, followed (24 h) by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Apoptotic cell death was observed in PK-15 cell monolayers, prior to cessation of glucose uptake or loss of ΔΨm. Avrainvillamide and stephacidin B were 100-fold more potent towards the porcine cells than the mycotoxins stephacidin A, ochratoxin A, sterigmatocystin and citrinin. The high toxicity of stephacidin B indicates a role of nitrone group in the mechanism of toxicity. Avrainvillamide and stephacidin B represent a new class of toxins with possible a threat to human health in buildings. Furthermore, the use of biocides highly enhanced the growth of toxigenic A. westerdijkiae.

  2. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores by Liquid Biocides in the Presence of Food Residue▿

    PubMed Central

    Hilgren, J.; Swanson, K. M. J.; Diez-Gonzalez, F.; Cords, B.

    2007-01-01

    Biocide inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores in the presence of food residues after a 10-min treatment time was investigated. Spores of nonvirulent Bacillus anthracis strains 7702, ANR-1, and 9131 were mixed with water, flour paste, whole milk, or egg yolk emulsion and dried onto stainless-steel carriers. The carriers were exposed to various concentrations of peroxyacetic acid, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 10 min at 10, 20, or 30°C, after which time the survivors were quantified. The relationship between peroxyacetic acid concentration, H2O2 concentration, and spore inactivation followed a sigmoid curve that was accurately described using a four-parameter logistic model. At 20°C, the minimum concentrations of peroxyacetic acid, H2O2, and NaOCl (as total available chlorine) predicted to inactivate 6 log10 CFU of B. anthracis spores with no food residue present were 1.05, 23.0, and 0.78%, respectively. At 10°C, sodium hypochlorite at 5% total available chlorine did not inactivate more than 4 log10 CFU. The presence of the food residues had only a minimal effect on peroxyacetic acid and H2O2 sporicidal efficacy, but the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite was markedly inhibited by whole-milk and egg yolk residues. Sodium hypochlorite at 5% total available chlorine provided no greater than a 2-log10 CFU reduction when spores were in the presence of egg yolk residue. This research provides new information regarding the usefulness of peroxygen biocides for B. anthracis spore inactivation when food residue is present. This work also provides guidance for adjusting decontamination procedures for food-soiled and cold surfaces. PMID:17720823

  3. Concentration patterns of agricultural pesticides and urban biocides in surface waters of a catchment of mixed land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, C.; Wittmer, I.; Bader, H.-P.; Scheidegger, R.; Alder, A.; Lück, A.; Hanke, I.; Singer, H.

    2009-04-01

    Organic pesticides and biocides that are found in surface waters, can originate from agricultural and urban sources. For a long time, agricultural pesticides have received substantially more attention than biocidal compounds from urban use like material protection or in-can preservatives (cosmetics etc.). Recent studies however revealed that the amounts of urban biocides used may exceed those of agricultural pesticides. This study aims at comparing the input of several important pesticides and biocides into a small Swiss stream with a special focus on loss events triggered by rainfall. A set of 16 substances was selected to represent urban and agricultural sources. The selected substances are either only used as biocides (irgarol, isothiazolinones, IPBC), as pesticides (atrazine, sulcotrione, dichlofluanid, tolylfluanid) or have a mixed use (isoproturon, terbutryn, terbutylazine, mecoprop, diazinon, carbendazim) The study catchment has an area of 25 km2 and is inhabited by about 12'000 people. Four sampling sites were selected in the river system in order to reflect different urban and agricultural sources. Additionally, we sampled a combined sewer overflow, a rain sewer and the outflow of a wastewater treatment plant. At each site discharge was measured continuously from March to November 2007. During 16 rain events samples were taken by automatic devices at a high temporal resolution. The results, based on more than 500 analyzed samples, revealed distinct concentration patterns for different compounds and sources. Agricultural pesticides exhibited a strong seasonality as expected based on the application periods. During the first one or two rain events after application the concentrations reached up to several thousand ng/l during peak flow (atrazine, isoproturon). The temporal patterns of urban biocides were more diverse. Some compounds obviously stem from permanent sources independent of rainfall because they were found mostly in the outlet of the wastewater

  4. Biocides in urban wastewater treatment plant influent at dry and wet weather: concentrations, mass flows and possible sources.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Tang, Camilla; Eriksson, Eva; Jönsson, Karin; Vollertsen, Jes; Bester, Kai

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, exterior thermal insulation systems became more and more important leading to an increasing amount of houses equipped with biocide-containing organic façade coatings or fungicide treated wood. It is known that these biocides, e.g. terbutryn, carbendazim, and diuron, as well as wood preservatives as propiconazole, leach out of the material through contact with wind driven rain. Hence, they are present in combined sewage during rain events in concentrations up to several hundred ng L(-1). The present study focused on the occurrence of these biocides in five wastewater treatment plants in Denmark and Sweden during dry and wet weather. It was discovered, that biocides are detectable not only during wet weather but also during dry weather when leaching from façade coatings can be excluded as source. In most cases, the concentrations during dry weather were in the same range as during wet weather (up to 100 ng L(-1)); however, for propiconazole noteworthy high concentrations were detected in one catchment (4.5 μg L(-1)). Time resolved sampling (12 × 2 h) enabled assessments about possible sources. The highest mass loads during wet weather were detected when the rain was heaviest (e.g. up to 116 mg h(-1) carbendazim or 73 mg h(-1) mecoprop) supporting the hypothesis that the biocides were washed off by wind driven rain. Contrary, the biocide emissions during dry weather were rather related to household activities than with emissions from buildings, i.e., emissions were highest during morning and evening hours (up to 50 mg h(-1)). Emissions during night were significantly lower than during daytime. Only for propiconazole a different emission behaviour during dry weather was observed: the mass load peaked in the late afternoon (3 g h(-1)) and declined slowly afterwards. Most likely this emission was caused by a point source, possibly from inappropriate cleaning of spray equipment for agriculture or gardening.

  5. Biocides in urban wastewater treatment plant influent at dry and wet weather: concentrations, mass flows and possible sources.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Tang, Camilla; Eriksson, Eva; Jönsson, Karin; Vollertsen, Jes; Bester, Kai

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, exterior thermal insulation systems became more and more important leading to an increasing amount of houses equipped with biocide-containing organic façade coatings or fungicide treated wood. It is known that these biocides, e.g. terbutryn, carbendazim, and diuron, as well as wood preservatives as propiconazole, leach out of the material through contact with wind driven rain. Hence, they are present in combined sewage during rain events in concentrations up to several hundred ng L(-1). The present study focused on the occurrence of these biocides in five wastewater treatment plants in Denmark and Sweden during dry and wet weather. It was discovered, that biocides are detectable not only during wet weather but also during dry weather when leaching from façade coatings can be excluded as source. In most cases, the concentrations during dry weather were in the same range as during wet weather (up to 100 ng L(-1)); however, for propiconazole noteworthy high concentrations were detected in one catchment (4.5 μg L(-1)). Time resolved sampling (12 × 2 h) enabled assessments about possible sources. The highest mass loads during wet weather were detected when the rain was heaviest (e.g. up to 116 mg h(-1) carbendazim or 73 mg h(-1) mecoprop) supporting the hypothesis that the biocides were washed off by wind driven rain. Contrary, the biocide emissions during dry weather were rather related to household activities than with emissions from buildings, i.e., emissions were highest during morning and evening hours (up to 50 mg h(-1)). Emissions during night were significantly lower than during daytime. Only for propiconazole a different emission behaviour during dry weather was observed: the mass load peaked in the late afternoon (3 g h(-1)) and declined slowly afterwards. Most likely this emission was caused by a point source, possibly from inappropriate cleaning of spray equipment for agriculture or gardening. PMID:24830785

  6. A novel bioassay for evaluating the efficacy of biocides to inhibit settling and early establishment of marine biofilms.

    PubMed

    Arrhenius, Åsa; Backhaus, Thomas; Hilvarsson, Annelie; Wendt, Ida; Zgrundo, Aleksandra; Blanck, Hans

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a novel assay that allows a quick and robust assessment of the effects of biocides on the initial settling and establishment of marine photoautotrophic biofilms including the multitude of indigenous fouling organisms. Briefly, biofilms are established in the field, sampled, comminuted and re-settled on clean surfaces, after 72h chlorophyll a is measured as an integrating endpoint to reflect both settling and growth. Eight antifoulants were used to evaluate the assay. Efficacy ranking, based on EC98 values from most to least efficacious compound is: copper pyrithione>TPBP>DCOIT>tolylfluanid>zinc pyrithione>medetomidine>copper (Cu(2+)), while ecotoxicological ranking (based on EC10 values) is irgarol, copper pyrithione>zinc pyrithione>TPBP>tolylfluanid>DCOIT>copper (Cu(2+))>medetomidine. The algaecide irgarol did not cause full inhibition. Instead the inhibition leveled out at 95% effect at 30 nmoll(-)(1), a concentration that was clearly lower than for any other of the tested biocides. PMID:25150894

  7. Distribution of butyltins and alternative antifouling biocides in sediments from shipping and shipbuilding areas in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Sook; Hong, Sang Hee; An, Joon Geon; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Shim, Won Joon

    2015-06-15

    The occurrence and distribution of tributyltin (TBT) and alternative biocides were investigated in sediment from semi-enclosed bays, fishing ports, and large commercial harbors in Korea. Extremely high concentration of TBT (55,264ngSn/g) was detected near a large shipyard, even after a total ban on its use in Korea. Diuron was the biocide with the highest detection frequency and concentration levels, followed by Irgarol 1051. Sea-Nine 211 was detected at 3 of 32 stations surveyed. Dichlofluanid, zinc and copper pyrithiones levels were below the detection limits at all the stations surveyed. The relatively high levels of Diuron (9-62.3ng/g) and Irgarol 1051 (1.5-11.5ng/g) were detected in harbor and shipyard areas. Diuron and Irgarol 1051 levels including TBT in sediments from hot spots in Korea exceeded global sediment quality guidelines.

  8. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Minnoş, Bihter; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Çotuk, Ayşın; Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Cansever, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor was investigated over a 10-month period in a hotel. Planktonic and sessile numbers of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic bacteria were monitored. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method. The corrosion products were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A mineralized, heterogeneous biofilm was observed on the coupons. Although a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor were regularly added to the cooling water, the results showed that microorganisms, such as SRB in the mixed species biofilm, caused corrosion of galvanized steel. It was observed that Zn layers on the test coupons were completely depleted after 3 months. The Fe concentrations in the biofilm showed significant correlations with the weight loss and carbohydrate concentration (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01). PMID:23439037

  9. Fungal colonization of soil-buried plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) and the impact of incorporated biocides.

    PubMed

    Sabev, H A; Handley, P S; Robson, G D

    2006-06-01

    Plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) with or without incorporated biocides was buried in grassland and forest soil for up to 10 months. The change with time in viable counts of fungi on the plastic surface was followed, together with the percentage capable of clearing the two plasticizers dioctyl adipate (DOA) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP). With time fungal total viable counts (TVC) on control pPVC increased and the fraction able to clear DOA was considerably higher than the average estimated in both soil types. A total of 92 fungal morphotypes were isolated from grassland soil and 42 from forest soil with the greatest variety of fungal isolates observed on control pPVC. The incorporation of biocides into pPVC affected both fungal TVC and the richness of species isolated. The biocides NCMP [n-(trichloromethylthio)phthalimide], OBPA (10,10'-oxybisphenoxarsine) and OIT (2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one) were the most effective in grassland soil, and TCMP [2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4-(methylsulphonyl)pyridine] and NCMP the most effective in forest soil. In grassland soil, Penicillium janthinellum established as a principal colonizer and was recovered from all pPVC types. DOP clearers were found at much lower levels than DOA clearers, with Doratomyces spp. being the most efficient. At the end of 10 months the physical properties of the pPVC were altered; changes in stiffness were the most significant for heavily colonized grassland-buried pPVC samples, whereas in forest soil, the extensibility of the pPVC was affected more than the stiffness. These results suggest that fungi are important colonizers of pPVC buried in soil and that enrichment of soil fungi capable of clearing DOA occurs during colonization of the plastic surface. The results also demonstrate that incorporated biocides have a marked impact on the richness of species colonizing the pPVC surface.

  10. Prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and/or biocides on meat processing plant surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2013-02-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of resistant bacteria to biocides and/or antibiotics throughout meat chain production from sacrifice till end of production line, samples from various surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse representative of the region were analyzed by the culture dependent approach. Resistant Psychrotrophs (n=255 strains), Pseudomonas sp. (n=166 strains), E. coli (n=23 strains), Staphylococcus sp. (n=17 strains) and LAB (n=82 represented mainly by Lactobacillus sp.) were isolated. Resistant psychrotrophs and pseudomonads (47 and 29%, respectively) to different antimicrobials were frequently detected in almost all areas of meat processing plant regardless the antimicrobial used, although there was a clear shift in the spectrum of other bacterial groups and for this aim such resistance was determined according to several parameters: antimicrobial tested, sampling zone and the bacterial group. Correlation of different parameters was done using a statistical tool "Principal component analysis" (PCA) which determined that quaternary ammonium compounds and hexadecylpyridinium were the most relevant biocides for resistance in Pseudomonas sp., while ciprofloxacin and hexachlorophene were more relevant for psychrotrophs, LAB, and in lesser extent Staphylococcus sp. and Escherichia coli. On the other hand, PCA of sampling zones determined that sacrifice room (SR) and cutting room (CR) considered as main source of antibiotic and/or biocide resistant bacteria showed an opposite behaviour concerning relevance of antimicrobials to determine resistance being hexadecylpyridinium, cetrimide and chlorhexidine the most relevant in CR, while hexachlorophene, oxonia 6P and PHMG the most relevant in SR. In conclusion, rotational use of the relevant biocides as disinfectants in CR and SR is recommended in an environment which is frequently disinfected. PMID:23279818

  11. Control filamentous bulking caused by chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria through adding a biocide CTAB.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianhua; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Zhongwei; Yuan, Zhiguo; Yang, Xiong; Wang, Shuying

    2012-12-01

    Filamentous bulking sludge due to excessive growth of filamentous bacteria is a serious operational problem in activated sludge plants. The addition of chemicals is one of widespread ways to control filamentous bulking. In this study, filamentous bulking in a continuous activated sludge system was found to be mainly caused by Eikelboom Type 021N filamentous bacteria likely due to low substrate concentration gradients. These Type 021N bacteria were found to be resistant to chlorination, maintaining cell integrity at a dosage of up to 80 mg Cl/gSS. An alternative biocidal agent, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), exhibited a much stronger biocidal effect on these filaments, which significantly improved sludge settleability. Type 021N with filamentous index of 5 was selectively killed, but floc-formers recovery their activity after CTAB termination. The study implied that CTAB might have more penetration capacity to cell wall of chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria. We therefore suggest the penetration property of filament cell wall should be considered or tested before the selection of biocide type in practice. PMID:23079128

  12. Acute toxicity and synergism of binary mixtures of antifouling biocides with heavy metals to embryos of sea urchin Glyptocidaris crenularis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue; Wang, Xia; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua; Wang, Yuan

    2011-08-01

    Acute toxicity and synergism of four antifouling biocides (Irgarol 1051, dichlofluanid, tolylfluanid and Sea-Nine 211) and five heavy metals (Ni, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu) are investigated using the sea urchin embryos of Glyptocidaris crenularis (G. crenularis) at six typical developmental stages, that is, 2-cell, 4-cell, 8-cell, blastula, gastrula and 4-arm pluteus. Our results show that the toxicity of the four biocides is in an order of Sea-Nine 211 > tolylfluanid > dichlofluanid > Irgarol 1051 and their -log EC(50) values at all stages are strongly linearly correlated with the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) values (correlation coefficients R > 0.72) indicating the importance of hydrophobicity for the embryonic toxicity. For the five heavy metals, the EC(50) ranges from 0.36 to 30.78 μM and the toxicity follows an order of Cu > Pb > Zn > Cd >Ni. The significant correlation (R > 0.79) between the -log EC50 and the bioconcentration factor (log BCF) values of metals also indicate that the bioaccumulation property of metals contributes to their aquatic toxicity. In addition, the joint effects of the biocides with the heavy metals in embryonic development are assessed by using a concentration addition model. Synergistic effects are observed in almost all 25 mixtures, showing that Cu yields the strongest while Ni the weakest synergistic toxic effects on the embryos development. PMID:20930027

  13. Effects of five antifouling biocides on settlement and growth of zoospores from the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca L.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Ida; Arrhenius, Åsa; Backhaus, Thomas; Hilvarsson, Annelie; Holm, Kristina; Langford, Katherine; Tunovic, Timur; Blanck, Hans

    2013-10-01

    Antifouling biocides are found in the marine ecosystem were they can affect non-target organisms. In this study the effects of five antifouling biocides on the settlement and growth of Ulva lactuca zoospores were investigated. The biocides investigated were copper (Cu(2+)), 4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-3(2H)-isothiazolone (DCOIT), triphenylborane pyridine (TPBP), tolylfluanid and medetomidine. Full concentration-response curves where determined for each compound. EC50 values were determined for copper, DCOIT, TPBP and tolylfluanid, all of which inhibited settlement and growth in a concentration dependent manner with the following toxicity ranking; tolylfluanid (EC50 80 nmol L(-1)) ~ DCOIT (EC50 83 nmol L(-1)) > TPBP (EC50 400 nmol L(-1)) > Cu(2+) (EC50 2,000 nmol L(-1)). Medetomidine inhibited settlement and growth only at the extreme concentration of 100,000 nmol L(-1) (93% effect). The low toxicity is possibly a consequence of a lack of receptors that medetomidine can bind to in the U. lactuca zoospores. PMID:23846394

  14. Impact of the biocide Irgarol on meiofauna and prokaryotes from the sediments of the Bizerte lagoon-an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Hannachi, Amel; Elarbaoui, Soumaya; Khazri, Abdelhafidh; Sellami, Badreddine; Rastelli, Eugenio; D'Agostino, Fabio; Beyrem, Hamouda; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The biocide Irgarol 1051 has been reported to have negative effects on a large number of living components including non-target organisms, but information on its impact on the marine meiofauna and benthic prokaryotes is completely lacking. Here, we report the results of long-term experimental studies in which we determined the effects of increasing Irgarol concentrations (from 11.5 to 315 ng g(-1) sediment dry weight) on meiofauna and benthic prokaryotes. We found that this biocide had a significant impact on meiofauna abundance, even at the lowest concentrations, causing a drastic decline in the abundance of nematodes (the dominant meiofaunal taxon) and an increase of the relative importance of oligochaetes. Even if no direct effects of Irgarol were found on prokaryotic abundance and biomass, the molecular fingerprinting analyses (automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) showed that the prokaryotic diversity was significantly altered by the biocide. The results of the present study indicate that Irgarol 1051 in marine sediments has a significant impact on the smallest eukaryotic and microbial components also at very low concentrations (ca 12 ng g(-1)). PMID:26746401

  15. Airport Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  16. Health Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  17. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? MRSA Screening Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture At a Glance ...

  18. Effect of biocides on S. cerevisiae: relationship between short-term membrane affliction and long-term cell killing.

    PubMed

    Chládková, K; Hendrych, T; Gásková, D; Goroncy-Bermes, P; Sigler, K

    2004-01-01

    The long-term action of recommended (RC) and near-recommended concentrations of several commercial biocides (Lonzabac 12.100, Genamin CS302D, benzalkonium chloride and 2-phenoxyethanol) on cells of S. cerevisiae wild-type strain DTXII was described using plating tests while short-term effects were determined using the potentiometric fluorescent probe diS-C3(3) that detects both changes in membrane potential and impairment of membrane integrity. A 2-d plating of cells exposed to 0.5xRC of benzalkonium chloride and Genamin CS302D for 15 min showed a complete long-term cell killing, with 2-phenoxyethanol the killing was complete only at 2xRC and Lonzabac caused complete killing at RC but not at 0.5xRC. The diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay performed immediately after a 10-min biocide exposure revealed several concentration-dependent modes of action: Lonzabac at 0.5xRC caused a mere depolarization, higher concentrations causing gradually increasing cell damage; benzalkonium chloride and Genamin CS302D rapidly damaged the membrane of some cells and depolarized the rest whereas 2-phenoxyethanol, which had the lowest effect in the plating test, produced a concentration-dependent fraction of cells with impaired membranes. Cell staining slightly increased during the diS-C3(3) assay; addition of a protonophore showed that part of the remaining undamaged cells retained their membrane potential. Comparison of short-term and long-term data implies that membrane depolarization alone is not sufficient for complete long-term killing of yeast cells under the action of a biocide unless it is accompanied by perceptible impairment of membrane integrity. The results show that the diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay, which reflects the short-term effects of a biocide on cell membranes, can be successfully used to assess the microbicidal efficiency of biocides.

  19. Antimicrobial efficacy of a novel eucalyptus oil, chlorhexidine digluconate and isopropyl alcohol biocide formulation.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Emma; Conway, Barbara; Worthington, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Effective surface disinfection is a fundamental infection control strategy within healthcare. This study assessed the antimicrobial efficacy of novel biocide formulations comprising 5% and 2% eucalyptus oil (EO) combined with 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) and 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) contained within a wipe. The efficacy of this novel antimicrobial formulation to remove and eliminate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Candida albicans from steel surfaces was investigated. Adpression studies of pre-contaminated wipes were also utilised to assess their potential to induce cross-contamination between hard surfaces. Furthermore, the bactericidal nature of the EO-formulation was established in addition to time-kill. The EO-containing formulations demonstrated bactericidal antimicrobial efficacy against all microorganisms and did not induce surface cross-contamination. There was no significant difference (p < 0.05) between the 5% and 2% EO formulations in their ability to remove microorganisms from steel surfaces, however both significantly (p < 0.05) removed more than the control formulations. Microbial biofilms were eliminated within 10 min (p < 0.05) when exposed to the EO formulations. Our novel EO-formulation demonstrated rapid antimicrobial efficacy for potential disinfection and elimination of microbial biofilms from hard surfaces and may therefore be a useful adjunct to current infection control strategies currently employed within healthcare facilities.

  20. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Novel Eucalyptus Oil, Chlorhexidine Digluconate and Isopropyl Alcohol Biocide Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Emma; Conway, Barbara; Worthington, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Effective surface disinfection is a fundamental infection control strategy within healthcare. This study assessed the antimicrobial efficacy of novel biocide formulations comprising 5% and 2% eucalyptus oil (EO) combined with 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) and 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) contained within a wipe. The efficacy of this novel antimicrobial formulation to remove and eliminate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Candida albicans from steel surfaces was investigated. Adpression studies of pre-contaminated wipes were also utilised to assess their potential to induce cross-contamination between hard surfaces. Furthermore, the bactericidal nature of the EO-formulation was established in addition to time-kill. The EO-containing formulations demonstrated bactericidal antimicrobial efficacy against all microorganisms and did not induce surface cross-contamination. There was no significant difference (p < 0.05) between the 5% and 2% EO formulations in their ability to remove microorganisms from steel surfaces, however both significantly (p < 0.05) removed more than the control formulations. Microbial biofilms were eliminated within 10 min (p < 0.05) when exposed to the EO formulations. Our novel EO-formulation demonstrated rapid antimicrobial efficacy for potential disinfection and elimination of microbial biofilms from hard surfaces and may therefore be a useful adjunct to current infection control strategies currently employed within healthcare facilities. PMID:23203047

  1. [Determination of three isothiazolinone biocides in water-borne adhesives by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Li, Xiaolan; Chen, Zhiyan; Ye, Changwen; Zhou, Yun; Meng, Dongling

    2015-01-01

    A rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the quantitative analysis of three isothiazolinone biocides (2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (MI), 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (CMI) and 1, 2-benzylisothiazolin-3-one (BIT)) in water-borne adhesives. The sample was extracted with methanol-water (1:1, v/v), and purified by centrifugation and filtration. The isothiazolones were separated on a C18 column with methanol-water as mobile phases under gradient elution and detected with a diode array detector (DAD). The pretreatment factors such as extraction solvent, extraction method, dilution ratio, extraction time were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the targets had good linearities (r2H > or = 0.9992) in the range of 0.25-10.0 mg/L. The recoveries were between 92% and 103% with the relative standard deviations not more than 4%. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.43 mg/kg and 1.14 mg/kg. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 1.44 mg/kg and 3.81 mg/kg. The results showed that the method can achieve the purpose of quantitative detection. The analyses of real samples verified the reliability of this method.

  2. Essential Oils of Plants as Biocides against Microorganisms Isolated from Cuban and Argentine Documentary Heritage.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Sofía; Valdés, Oderlaise; Vivar, Isbel; Lavin, Paola; Guiamet, Patricia; Battistoni, Patricia; Gómez de Saravia, Sandra; Borges, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Natural products obtained from plants with biocidal activity represent an alternative and useful source in the control of biodeterioration of documentary heritage, without negative environmental and human impacts. In this work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of seven essential oils against microorganisms associated with the biodeterioration of documentary heritage. The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed using the agar diffusion method against 4 strains of fungi and 6 bacterial strains isolated from repositories air and documents of the National Archive of the Republic of Cuba and the Historical Archive of the Museum of La Plata, Argentina. Anise and garlic oils showed the best antifungal activity at all concentrations studied, while oregano oil not only was effective against fungi tested but also prevented sporulation of them all. Orange sweet and laurel oils were ineffective against fungi. Clove, garlic, and oregano oils showed the highest antibacterial activity at 25% against Enterobacter agglomerans and Streptomyces sp., while only clove and oregano oils were effective against Bacillus sp. at all concentrations studied. This study has an important implication for the possible use of the natural products from plants in the control of biodeterioration of documentary heritage. PMID:23762760

  3. [Effects of specific microbial biocides on N transformation in soil with glucose amendment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Xudong; Li, Jiandong; Han, Lin; Wang, Jingkuan

    2006-05-01

    In an incubation test of soil with glucose amendment, two kinds of nitrogenous fertilizer and three kinds of specific microbial biocides were applied, and the contents of soil NH(4+)-N, NO3(-)-N, glucosamine and muramic acid were measured to differentiate the relative contribution and timing characteristics of soil microbes in nitrogen immobilization. The results showed that penicillin and streptomycin decreased the transformation rate of NH(4+)-N markedly, with more significant effects than actidione. The amount ratio of glucosamine to muramic acid after applying penicillin and streptomycin rapidly increased first, and tended to equilibrium then. With the application of actidione, the transformation rate of NO3(-)-N decreased continuously, and the synthesis of glucosamine was inhibited, while penicillin and streptomycin had no significant effects on them. At the early stage of incubation, bacteria could rapidly immobilize both NH(4+)-N and NO3(-)-N, with NH(4+)-N preferred, while at the later stage of incubation, fungi were the dominant contributor to nitrogen transformation, and had much stronger ability of utilizing NO3(-)-N than bacteria. PMID:16883809

  4. Relation between Intensity of Biocide Practice and Residues of Anticoagulant Rodenticides in Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Geduhn, Anke; Jacob, Jens; Schenke, Detlef; Keller, Barbara; Kleinschmidt, Sven; Esther, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are commonly used to control rodent infestations for biocidal and plant protection purposes. This can lead to AR exposure of non-target small mammals and their predators, which is known from several regions of the world. However, drivers of exposure variation are usually not known. To identify environmental drivers of AR exposure in non-targets we analyzed 331 liver samples of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) for residues of eight ARs and used local parameters (percentage of urban area and livestock density) to test for associations to residue occurrence. 59.8% of samples collected across Germany contained at least one rodenticide, in 20.2% of cases at levels at which biological effects are suspected. Second generation anticoagulants (mainly brodifacoum and bromadiolone) occurred more often than first generation anticoagulants. Local livestock density and the percentage of urban area were good indicators for AR residue occurrence. There was a positive association between pooled ARs and brodifacoum occurrence with livestock density as well as of pooled ARs, brodifacoum and difenacoum occurrence with the percentage of urban area on administrative district level. Pig holding drove associations of livestock density to AR residue occurrence in foxes. Therefore, risk mitigation strategies should focus on areas of high pig density and on highly urbanized areas to minimize non-target risk. PMID:26418154

  5. Determination of diffusion coefficients of biocides on their passage through organic resin-based renders.

    PubMed

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Kupiec, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    In this study the diffusion coefficients of isoproturon, diuron and cybutryn in acrylate and silicone resin-based renders were determined. The diffusion coefficients were determined using measuring concentrations of biocides in the liquid phase after being in contact with renders for specific time intervals. The mathematical solution of the transient diffusion equation for an infinite plate contacted on one side with a limited volume of water was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficients through the acrylate render were 8.10·10(-9) m(2) s(-1) for isoproturon, 1.96·10(-9) m(2) s(-1) for diuron and 1.53·10(-9) m(2) s(-1) for cybutryn. The results for the silicone render were lower by one order of magnitude. The compounds with a high diffusion coefficient for one polymer had likewise high values for the other polymer. PMID:27391050

  6. Essential Oils of Plants as Biocides against Microorganisms Isolated from Cuban and Argentine Documentary Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, Sofía; Valdés, Oderlaise; Vivar, Isbel; Lavin, Paola; Guiamet, Patricia; Battistoni, Patricia; Gómez de Saravia, Sandra; Borges, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Natural products obtained from plants with biocidal activity represent an alternative and useful source in the control of biodeterioration of documentary heritage, without negative environmental and human impacts. In this work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of seven essential oils against microorganisms associated with the biodeterioration of documentary heritage. The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed using the agar diffusion method against 4 strains of fungi and 6 bacterial strains isolated from repositories air and documents of the National Archive of the Republic of Cuba and the Historical Archive of the Museum of La Plata, Argentina. Anise and garlic oils showed the best antifungal activity at all concentrations studied, while oregano oil not only was effective against fungi tested but also prevented sporulation of them all. Orange sweet and laurel oils were ineffective against fungi. Clove, garlic, and oregano oils showed the highest antibacterial activity at 25% against Enterobacter agglomerans and Streptomyces sp., while only clove and oregano oils were effective against Bacillus sp. at all concentrations studied. This study has an important implication for the possible use of the natural products from plants in the control of biodeterioration of documentary heritage. PMID:23762760

  7. Mechanical performance of a biocompatible biocide soda-lime glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    López-Esteban, S; Bartolomé, J F; Dí Az, L A; Esteban-Tejeda, L; Prado, C; López-Piriz, R; Torrecillas, R; Moya, J S

    2014-06-01

    A biocompatible soda-lime glass-ceramic in the SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-B2O3 system containing combeite and nepheline as crystalline phases, has been obtained at 750°C by two different routes: (i) pressureless sintering and (ii) Spark Plasma Sintering. The SPS glass-ceramic showed a bending strength, Weibull modulus, and toughness similar values to the cortical human bone. This material had a fatigue limit slightly superior to cortical bone and at least two times higher than commercial dental glass-ceramics and dentine. The in vitro studies indicate that soda-lime glass-ceramic is fully biocompatible. The in vivo studies in beagle jaws showed that implanted SPS rods presented no inflammatory changes in soft tissues surrounding implants in any of the 10 different cases after four months implantation. The radiological analysis indicates no signs of osseointegration lack around implants. Moreover, the biocide activity of SPS glass-ceramic versus Escherichia coli, was found to be >4log indicating that it prevents implant infections. Because of this, the SPS new glass-ceramic is particularly promising for dental applications (inlay, crowns, etc). PMID:24667693

  8. Designing a biocidal reverse osmosis membrane coating: Synthesis and biofouling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Kang, Seoktae; Adout, Atar; Altman, Susan J.; Elimelech, Menachem; Cornelius, Chris J.

    2015-12-04

    In this study, a biocidal coating was developed in order to reduce biofouling on a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using a quaternary ammonium (QA) functionalized polymer. The synthesis of a series of polysulfone (PS) ionomers with QA groups is described, and a method for spraying these QA ionomers as an alcoholic solution, which dried into water insoluble coatings. Contact angle and streaming potential were used to analyze the coating's hydrophilicity and surface charge. Both PS-QA1 and the commercial RO membrane had an apparent contact angle of 68° that increased to 126° for PS-QA12 corresponding to alkyl chain length. A negatively charged particle-probe was used to measure coated and uncoated RO membrane interaction forces. Measured interaction forces correlated strongly with the length of alkyl chains or hydrophobicity of the coated surfaces. Uncoated RO membranes and ones coated with PS-QA were exposed to suspensions of Escherichia coli cells. All four PS-QA coatings showed significant biotoxicity and killed 100% of the E. coli cells, but uncoated RO membranes had metabolically active biofilms. However, coatings tested in a RO crossflow system showed a flux reduction that is attributed to mass transfer resistance due to excessively thick films.

  9. Designing a biocidal reverse osmosis membrane coating: Synthesis and biofouling properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hibbs, Michael R.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Kang, Seoktae; Adout, Atar; Altman, Susan J.; Elimelech, Menachem; Cornelius, Chris J.

    2015-12-04

    In this study, a biocidal coating was developed in order to reduce biofouling on a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using a quaternary ammonium (QA) functionalized polymer. The synthesis of a series of polysulfone (PS) ionomers with QA groups is described, and a method for spraying these QA ionomers as an alcoholic solution, which dried into water insoluble coatings. Contact angle and streaming potential were used to analyze the coating's hydrophilicity and surface charge. Both PS-QA1 and the commercial RO membrane had an apparent contact angle of 68° that increased to 126° for PS-QA12 corresponding to alkyl chain length. A negativelymore » charged particle-probe was used to measure coated and uncoated RO membrane interaction forces. Measured interaction forces correlated strongly with the length of alkyl chains or hydrophobicity of the coated surfaces. Uncoated RO membranes and ones coated with PS-QA were exposed to suspensions of Escherichia coli cells. All four PS-QA coatings showed significant biotoxicity and killed 100% of the E. coli cells, but uncoated RO membranes had metabolically active biofilms. However, coatings tested in a RO crossflow system showed a flux reduction that is attributed to mass transfer resistance due to excessively thick films.« less

  10. Disorder in milk proteins: structure, functional disorder, and biocidal potentials of lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Almehdar, Hussein A; El-Fakharany, Esmail M; Uversky, Vladimir N; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2015-01-01

    This article continues a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. Besides caseins, which are the major proteinaceous constituents of any milk that can be isolated by isoelectric precipitation, milk contains a set of soluble whey proteins, such as β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, serum albumin, immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, glycomacropeptide, and proteose peptone (the last two are soluble casein derivatives). Lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are known to possess prominent biocidal activity, serving as efficient antibiotics and antiviral agents against a wide spectrum of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. LPO is a heme-containing peroxidase expressed as preproprotein. The mature protein has a single catalytic domain, structure of which is known for a protein isolated from several species. Functionally, LPO is a crucial component of the LPO system that includes LPO, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and thiocyanate (SCN(-)), being a well-studied, naturally occurring antimicrobial system in milk that is effective against many microorganisms and some viruses. Although various aspects of LPO structure and function are rather well studied and were subjects of several recent reviews, the abundance and potential functional roles of intrinsically disordered regions in this protein have never being addressed as of yet. The major goal of this article is to fill this gap and to show how intrinsic disorder is encoded in the amino acid sequence of LPO, and how intrinsic disorder is related to functions of this important milk protein.

  11. Relation between Intensity of Biocide Practice and Residues of Anticoagulant Rodenticides in Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    PubMed Central

    Geduhn, Anke; Jacob, Jens; Schenke, Detlef; Keller, Barbara; Kleinschmidt, Sven; Esther, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are commonly used to control rodent infestations for biocidal and plant protection purposes. This can lead to AR exposure of non-target small mammals and their predators, which is known from several regions of the world. However, drivers of exposure variation are usually not known. To identify environmental drivers of AR exposure in non-targets we analyzed 331 liver samples of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) for residues of eight ARs and used local parameters (percentage of urban area and livestock density) to test for associations to residue occurrence. 59.8% of samples collected across Germany contained at least one rodenticide, in 20.2% of cases at levels at which biological effects are suspected. Second generation anticoagulants (mainly brodifacoum and bromadiolone) occurred more often than first generation anticoagulants. Local livestock density and the percentage of urban area were good indicators for AR residue occurrence. There was a positive association between pooled ARs and brodifacoum occurrence with livestock density as well as of pooled ARs, brodifacoum and difenacoum occurrence with the percentage of urban area on administrative district level. Pig holding drove associations of livestock density to AR residue occurrence in foxes. Therefore, risk mitigation strategies should focus on areas of high pig density and on highly urbanized areas to minimize non-target risk. PMID:26418154

  12. Mechanical performance of a biocompatible biocide soda-lime glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    López-Esteban, S; Bartolomé, J F; Dí Az, L A; Esteban-Tejeda, L; Prado, C; López-Piriz, R; Torrecillas, R; Moya, J S

    2014-06-01

    A biocompatible soda-lime glass-ceramic in the SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-B2O3 system containing combeite and nepheline as crystalline phases, has been obtained at 750°C by two different routes: (i) pressureless sintering and (ii) Spark Plasma Sintering. The SPS glass-ceramic showed a bending strength, Weibull modulus, and toughness similar values to the cortical human bone. This material had a fatigue limit slightly superior to cortical bone and at least two times higher than commercial dental glass-ceramics and dentine. The in vitro studies indicate that soda-lime glass-ceramic is fully biocompatible. The in vivo studies in beagle jaws showed that implanted SPS rods presented no inflammatory changes in soft tissues surrounding implants in any of the 10 different cases after four months implantation. The radiological analysis indicates no signs of osseointegration lack around implants. Moreover, the biocide activity of SPS glass-ceramic versus Escherichia coli, was found to be >4log indicating that it prevents implant infections. Because of this, the SPS new glass-ceramic is particularly promising for dental applications (inlay, crowns, etc).

  13. Putting copper into action: copper-impregnated products with potent biocidal activities.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2004-11-01

    Copper ions, either alone or in copper complexes, have been used for centuries to disinfect liquids, solids, and human tissue. Today copper is used as a water purifier, algaecide, fungicide, nematocide, molluscicide, and antibacterial and antifouling agent. Copper also displays potent antiviral activity. We hypothesized that introducing copper into clothing, bedding, and other articles would provide them with biocidal properties. A durable platform technology has been developed that introduces copper into cotton fibers, latex, and other polymeric materials. This study demonstrates the broad-spectrum antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal) and antimite activities of copper-impregnated fibers and polyester products. This technology enabled the production of antiviral gloves and filters (which deactivate HIV-1 and other viruses), antibacterial self-sterilizing fabrics (which kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci), antifungal socks (which alleviate symptoms of athlete's foot), and anti-dust mite mattress covers (which reduce mite-related allergies). These products did not have skin-sensitizing properties, as determined by guine pig maximization and rabbit skin irritation tests. Our study demonstrates the potential use of copper in new applications. These applications address medical issues of the greatest importance, such as viral transmissions; nosocomial, or healthcare-associated, infections; and the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:15345689

  14. Biocide activity of Annona coriacea seeds extract on Rhodnius neglectus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Carneirol, Angela Pinheiro; Pereira, Mônica Josene Barbosa; Galbiati, Carla

    2013-03-01

    The use of synthetic insecticides for insect control may lead to different kind of problems, such as vector resistance to insecticides. To avoid these problems, a new research area to study botanical products as possible disease vectors controls, has become a feasible alternative. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the biocide activity of the ethanol extract of seeds of Annona coriacea on Rhodnius neglectus (Chagas disease vector) nymphs and adults. For this, different concentrations extracts were evaluated: 25, 50, 100 and 200mg/ mL, and water in DMSO (20%) was used as control. The experimental design was completely randomized and we conducted the bioassay with nymphs and adults, with 10 nymphs and 10 adults (five males and five females) per treatment. Extract action was evaluated in both bioassays, in order to identify possible effects of mortality and life cycle interruption of nymphs and adults during a 28-day-period. The results obtained showed that the extract of A. coriacea was able to disrupt the development of nymphs and adults of R. neglectus, with a mortality rate of more than 90%, 36% and 100%, at the highest concentrations, respectively. There was also molting inhibition in nymphs, lower reproductive capacity in females, feeding deterrence and morphological changes in nymphs and adults. We concluded that the extract of A. coriacea has insecticide action on nymphs and adults of R. neglectus.

  15. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  16. International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) New Biocide Selection, Qualification and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Rector, Tony; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    The Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is primarily responsible for the removal of heat loads from payload and system racks. The IATCS is a water based system which works in conjunction with the EATCS (External ATCS), an ammonia based system, which are interfaced through a heat exchanger to facilitate heat transfer. On-orbit issues associated with the aqueous coolant chemistry began to occur with unexpected increases in CO2 levels in the cabin. This caused an increase in total inorganic carbon (TIC), a reduction in coolant pH, increased corrosion, and precipitation of nickel phosphate. These chemical changes were also accompanied by the growth of heterotrophic bacteria that increased risk to the system and could potentially impact crew health and safety. Studies were conducted to select a biocide to control microbial growth in the system based on requirements for disinfection at low chemical concentration (effectiveness), solubility and stability, material compatibility, low toxicity to humans, compatibility with vehicle environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS), ease of application, rapid on-orbit measurement, and removal capability. Based on these requirements, ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), an aromatic dialdehyde compound, was selected for qualification testing. This paper presents the OPA qualification test results, development of hardware and methodology to safely apply OPA to the system, development of a means to remove OPA, development of a rapid colorimetric test for measurement of OPA, and the OPA on-orbit performance for controlling the growth of microorganisms in the ISS IATCS since November 3, 2007.

  17. International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) New Biocide Selection, Qualification and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold E.; Rector, Tony; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    The Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is primarily responsible for the removal of heat loads from payload and system racks. The IATCS is a water based system which works in conjunction with the EATCS (External ATCS), an ammonia based system, which are interfaced through a heat exchanger to facilitate heat transfer. On-orbit issues associated with the aqueous coolant chemistry began to occur with unexpected increases in CO2 levels in the cabin. This caused an increase in total inorganic carbon (TIC), a reduction in coolant pH, increased corrosion, and precipitation of nickel phosphate. These chemical changes were also accompanied by the growth of heterotrophic bacteria that increased risk to the system and could potentially impact crew health and safety. Studies were conducted to select a biocide to control microbial growth in the system based on requirements for disinfection at low chemical concentration (effectiveness), solubility and stability, material compatibility, low toxicity to humans, compatibility with vehicle environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS), ease of application, rapid on-orbit measurement, and removal capability. Based on these requirements, ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), an aromatic dialdehyde compound, was selected for qualification testing. This paper presents the OPA qualification test results, development of hardware and methodology to safely apply OPA to the system, development of a means to remove OPA, development of a rapid colorimetric test for measurement of OPA, and the OPA on-orbit performance for controlling the growth of microorganisms in the ISS IATCS since November 3, 2007.

  18. Features of microbiological behavior and biocide properties of electrosynthesized polymethylolacrylamide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzunova, Lidia G.

    2016-05-01

    The biocide properties of an electrosynthesized of acrylamide, N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide and formaldehyde copolymer films against the Staphylococcus aureus and bacterial association extracted from seawater (marine biological organisms) were investigated. Copolymer films were stable in organic solvents, acids and alkali and insoluble in water, though capable to swelling ability. Besides, the polymer is thermally stable up to 237°C. It was established that the anti-bacterial effect of the films started to be expressed after two days and was maintained from 2 up to 45 days. It was established that the degree of polymer films toxicity depended on the polymer synthesis conditions, pre-treatment method and duration of the biological object exposure to the effect. It was shown that antiseptic properties of the polymer material under study were imparted by formaldehyde both as sorbed by the polymer and as included into the copolymer composition. The toxicological effect of the polymethylolacrylamide films under study on microorganisms can be applied as in medicine (antiseptic materials and implants) as for equipment protection from bio-fouling and bio-corrosion. Microbiological stability and sterilizing effect of electrosynthesized polymethylolacrylamide ultrafiltration membranes enables one not only to prolong the operation time of film membranes, but also to provide partial sterilization of organic solutions to be filtered. It was established that polymer waste can be utilized by means of microbial destruction. It was found that the washed out polymer induced a specific bacteria behavior consisting of a complex of reactions directed to search, capture and consume nutrients.

  19. Pesticides and biocides in a karst catchment: Identification of contaminant sources and related flow components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Bollmann, Ulla E.; Bester, Kai; Birk, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    Karst aquifers are widely used as drinking water resources. However, their high vulnerability to chemical and bacterial contamination due to the heterogeneity in aquifer properties (highly conductive solution conduits embedded in the less conductive fissured rock) is difficult to assess and thus poses major challenges to the management of karst water resources. Contamination of karst springs by organic micro-pollutants has been observed in recent studies. Within this study the water from different springs draining one karst aquifer as well as the main sinking stream replenishing it were analysed before, during and after a storm water event in order to examine the occurrence of different pesticides and biocides. Contaminants from both urban as well as agricultural origin could be detected in the water with concentrations in the low ng/L range (tebuconazole, carbendazim, diuron, isoproturon, terbutryn, atrazine, dichlorobenzamide (BAM), which is a metabolite of dichlobenil). While some compounds could be followed from the sinking stream to the springs (e.g. dichlorobenzamide) some seem to have a source in the autogenic recharge from the karst plateau (Tebuconazole: wood preservative in buildings). These compounds appear to be related to fast flow components with residence times in the order of days, which are known from a number of tracer tests with fluorescent dyes. However, the occurrence of the pesticide atrazine (banned since 1995 in Austria) in the springs, while on the other hand no current input into the karst occurs, shows that some compounds have long residence times in the karst aquifer. These differences in residence times can hardly be attributed to differences in physico-chemical properties of the compounds and must thus be due to the presence of slow and fast flow components. This is in agreement with the duality of karst aquifers due to highly conductive networks of solution conduits embedded in less conductive fissured carbonate rocks.

  20. Patch testing with preservatives, antimicrobials and industrial biocides. Results from a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Schnuch, A; Geier, J; Uter, W; Frosch, P J

    1998-03-01

    Preservatives are biologically reactive substances, and their allergenic potential has been known for a long time. This study examined the role of different preservatives in a large number of patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis. Patch test data and data from the patients' history were collected from the 24 departments participating in the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 1994. Patch test data from 28,349 patients tested with preservatives of the standard series (SS), from 11,485 patients tested additionally with a preservative series (PS), and from 1787 patients tested with an industrial biocide tray (IB) were evaluated. Sensitization rates (standardized) of the SS preservatives were all > 1%, with thiomersal rating highest (5.3%), the parabens lowest (1.6%), and the remainder (chlormethylisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone, formaldehyde and methyldibromoglutaronitrile/phenoxyethanol (MDBGN/PE)) in the range of 2%. The most important allergens of the PS were, in women, alkylaminobenzoate (contained in milking fat) (2.5%), MDBGN/PE (2.2%), benzalkonium chloride (1.8%), chloracetamide (1.4%), diazolidinyl urea (1.3%), octylgallate (1.2%) and Bronopol (1.1%). In men rates differed only with regard to alkylaminobenzoate (0.9%). Patients tested with the IB series reacted most often to methylene-bis-thiocyanate (5%), but with a reaction index of -0.7, many reactions were most probably false positives. A further seven preservatives, mostly formaldehyde-releasers used in cutting fluids, gave sensitization rates of between 1% and 3%. Glutaraldehyde, not contained in the series but often tested additionally, showed a remarkable increase in sensitization during the study period. Health care personnel were frequently affected. Altogether, this study identified areas of concern within the different groups of preservatives. The overall impact of most of the preservatives on public health seems to be low, but

  1. In-Vitro Archaeacidal Activity of Biocides against Human-Associated Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Khelaifia, Saber; Michel, Jean Brunel; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Several methanogenic archaea have been detected in the human intestinal microbiota. These intestinal archaea may contaminate medical devices such as colonoscopes. However, no biocide activity has been reported among these human-associated archaea. Methodology The minimal archaeacidal concentration (MAC) of peracetic acid, chlorhexidine, squalamine and twelve parent synthetic derivatives reported in this study was determined against five human-associated methanogenic archaea including Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanobrevibacter oralis, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilicus, Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and two environmental methanogens Methanobacterium beijingense and Methanosaeta concilii by using a serial dilution technique in Hungates tubes. Principal Findings MAC of squalamine derivative S1 was 0.05 mg/L against M. smithii strains, M. oralis, M. arboriphilicus, M. concilii and M. beijingense whereas MAC of squalamine and derivatives S2–S12 varied from 0.5 to 5 mg/L. For M. stadtmanae and M. luminyensis, MAC of derivative S1 was 0.1 mg/L and varied from 1 to ≥10 mg/L for squalamine and its parent derivatives S2–S12. Under the same experimental conditions, chlorhexidine and peracetic acid lead to a MAC of 0.2 and 1.5 mg/L, respectively against all tested archaea. Conclusions/Significance Squalamine derivative S1 exhibited a 10–200 higher archaeacidal activity than other tested squalamine derivatives, on the majority of human-associated archaea. As previously reported and due to their week corrosivity and their wide spectrum of antibacterial and antifungal properties, squalamine and more precisely derivative S1 appear as promising compounds to be further tested for the decontamination of medical devices contaminated by human-associated archaea. PMID:23658767

  2. Assessment of the risk posed by the antifouling booster biocides Irgarol 1051 and diuron to freshwater macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, S J; Thomas, K V; Davy, A J

    2006-05-01

    Antifouling paints are used to reduce the attachment of living organisms to the submerged surfaces of ships, boats and aquatic structures, usually by the release of a biocide. Two 'booster' biocides in common use are the triazine herbicide Irgarol 1051 (N-2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-6-cyclopropylamino-s-triazine), and diuron (1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3,3-dimethylurea), which are designed to inhibit algal photosynthesis. Previous research has been directed at the effects of these compounds in marine and estuarine environments. In 2001 we sampled the main rivers and shallow freshwater lakes (Broads) of East Anglia UK for Irgarol 1051, its metabolite GS26575 (2-methylamino-4-tert-butylamino-6-amino-s-triazine) and diuron in order to establish the baseline environmental concentrations of these compounds in freshwater systems of eastern UK and to investigate their possible effects on aquatic plants. Irgarol 1051, GS26575 and diuron were found in water samples collected from 21 locations. The highest concentrations were found in the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads in May. The rivers Great Ouse, Wissey, Bure and Yare also contained all three compounds, as did the Great Ouse Cut-off Channel. The toxicity of these biocides to three macrophyte species (Apium nodiflorum, Chara vulgaris, and Myriophyllum spicatum) was investigated. Deleterious effects on relative growth rate, the maximum quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm) of photosystem II and, for Apium, root mass production were found. C. vulgaris was generally most sensitive; growth, especially of roots, was strongly affected in A. nodiflorum; growth rate of M. spicatum was sensitive to diuron. No observed effect concentrations (NOEC) were interpolated using standard toxicological analysis. These were compared with measured environmental concentrations (MEC) to determine the ranges of risk quotients (MEC/NOEC). Both Irgarol 1051 and diuron represented significant risks to A. nodiflorum and C. vulgaris in this area.

  3. Combined effects of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, biocides and organic contaminants on the growth of Skeletonema pseudocostatum.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karina; Heiaas, Harald Hasle; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-05-01

    Organisms in the environment are exposed to a number of pollutants from different compound groups. In addition to the classic pollutants like the polychlorinated biphenyls, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, biocides, etc. other compound groups of concern are constantly emerging. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) can be expected to co-occur with other organic contaminants like biocides, PAHs and alkylphenols in areas affected by wastewater, industrial effluents and intensive recreational activity. In this study, representatives from these four different compound groups were tested individually and in mixtures in a growth inhibition assay with the marine algae Skeletonema pseudocostatum (formerly Skeletonema costatum) to determine whether the combined effects could be predicted by models for additive effects; the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) prediction model. The eleven tested compounds reduced the growth of S. pseudocostatum in the microplate test in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of toxicity of these chemicals were irgarol>fluoxetine>diuron>benzo(a)pyrene>thioguanine>triclosan>propranolol>benzophenone 3>cetrimonium bromide>4-tert-octylphenol>endosulfan. Several binary mixtures and a mixture of eight compounds from the four different compound groups were tested. All tested mixtures were additive as model deviation ratios, the deviation between experimental and predicted effect concentrations, were within a factor of 2 from one or both prediction models (e.g. CA and IA). Interestingly, a concentration dependent shift from IA to CA, potentially due to activation of similar toxicity pathways at higher concentrations, was observed for the mixture of eight compounds. The combined effects of the multi-compound mixture were clearly additive and it should therefore be expected that PPCPs, biocides, PAHs and alkylphenols will collectively contribute to the risk in areas contaminated by such complex

  4. A capillary liquid chromatography method for benzalkonium chloride determination as a component or contaminant in mixtures of biocides.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Blanco, M C; Argente-García, A; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2016-01-29

    A method for quantifying benzalkonium chloride (BAK), an alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium compound, in several biocides formulations is proposed. A tertiary amine like N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (TA) and a straight-chain alkyl ammonium compound like trimethyl-tetradecyl ammonium chloride (TMTDAC), have been employed as trade surfactants besides BAK. Two capillary analytical columns with different polarities are tested: inertsil CN-3 capillary column (150mm×0.5mm i.d., 3μm particle diameter) and a non endcapped Zorbax C18 capillary column (35mm×0.5mm i.d., 5μm particle diameter). This latter column provided the best separation of the BAK homologues in less than 12min using acetonitrile:acetate buffer (50mM, pH 5) 85:15 at 20μLmin(-1). The proposed method combines on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME) coupled to capillary liquid chromatography (CapLC) and UV diode array detection. Matrix effect was present when TA were in excess to BAK. If TMTDAC is the co-biocide, matrix effect is always present. A decreasing of analytical response mainly for C12-BAK homologue was found using both chromatographic columns. The charged amount of mixture in the system was the most important parameter for obtaining reliable results. 1mL was the on line processed sample volume optimum for concentrations lower than 35μgmL(-1) of total surfactants. LODs were 0.03μgmL(-1) and 0.006μgmL(-1) for C12-BAK and C14-BAK, respectively. This method is also of use to evaluate the unwanted presence of BAK in biocide formulations due to industrial processes.

  5. Resistance of two temperate Lactobacillus paracasei bacteriophages to high pressure homogenization, thermal treatments and chemical biocides of industrial application.

    PubMed

    Mercanti, D J; Guglielmotti, D M; Patrignani, F; Reinheimer, J A; Quiberoni, A

    2012-02-01

    Temperate bacteriophages ф iLp84 and ф iLp1308, previously isolated from mitomycin C-induction of Lactobacillus paracasei strains 84 and CNRZ1308, respectively, were tested for their resistance to several physical and chemical treatments applied in dairy industry. Long-term survival at 4 °C, -20 °C and -80 °C, resistance to either thermal treatments of 63 °C, 72 °C and 90 °C, high pressure homogenization (HPH, 100 MPa) or classic (ethanol, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid) and new commercial sanitizers, namely A (quaternary ammonium chloride), B (hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid and peroctanoic acid), C (alkaline chloride foam), D (p-toluensulfonchloroamide, sodium salt) and E (ethoxylated nonylphenol and phosphoric acid), were determined. Phages were almost completely inactivated after eight months of storage at 25 °C, but viability was not affected at 4 °C, -20 °C or -80 °C. Both phages tolerated well HPH treatments. Phage iLp1308 showed higher thermal resistance than ф iLp84, but neither resisted 90 °C for 2 min. Best chemical inactivation was accomplished using peracetic acid or biocides A, C and E, whereas biocides B and D were completely ineffective. These results help to improve selection of chemical agents and physical treatments to effectively fight against phage infections in dairy plants.

  6. Characterizing the microbial colonization of a dolostone quarry: implications for stone biodeterioration and response to biocide treatments.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Beatriz; De los Ríos, Asuncion; Urizal, Marta; de Buergo, Mónica Alvarez; Varas, Maria Jose; Fort, Rafael; Ascaso, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    This study examines the microbial colonization of three fronts of an abandoned dolostone quarry (Redueña, Madrid, Spain) exposed to atmospheric conditions for different time periods since Roman times to the present. Through scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE), endolithic colonization was predominantly detected in the most recently exposed front, while in the longer exposed quarry fronts, epilithic forms of growth were most often observed. These observations were confirmed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. Based on the distribution pattern of microbial colonization in the different quarry fronts, we then established a sequence of colonization events that took place over this long time frame. Bioalteration processes related to this sequential colonization were also identified. Characterizing these sequential processes can be useful for interpreting biodeterioration processes in historic dolostone monuments, especially those affecting constructions in the area of the Redueña stone quarry. In a second experimental stage, different biocide treatments were tested on this quarry rock to find the best way to avoid the microbial colonization effects identified. Through combined SEM-BSE/DGGE analysis, the efficacy of several biocides against the microorganisms inhabiting the dolostones was assessed after 4 and 16 months treatment. In general, all treatments were effective at reducing around 80% of the lichen cover, although effects on endolithic lithobiontic communities were dependent on how well the rock surface had been mechanically cleaned prior to treatment and gradually disappeared over time. PMID:21359558

  7. Durability of silver nanoparticulate films within a silica matrix by flame assisted chemical vapour deposition for biocidal applications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian; Shee, David W; Foster, Howard A; Varghese, Sajnu

    2011-09-01

    Healthcare acquired infection (HCAI) rates have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years and been a major priority for health professionals in the UK and elsewhere. Of particular concern is the rise of so called 'superbugs', or those resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The reasons for this rise are many and complex, but one important factor is bacterial survival rates on wards and other hospital areas. In this respect, nanostructured biocidal surfaces offer a potentially powerful weapon in the fight against HCAI. In addition to providing a toxic environment to a range of infectious disease-causing bacteria (while remaining harmless to human health), any potential bioactive coated surface is required to be durable enough to withstand regular hospital cleaning methods without a reduction in biocidal activity over time and be economically viable to mass produce. The flame assisted chemical vapour deposition (FACVD) of silver and silver/silica films offer a means of producing such surfaces. In this work, we report investigations into a wide range of experimental factors and parameters affecting film durability, including burner head design and relative water vapour content in the flame environment. The produced films were assessed in terms of durability (by scratch testing) and relative silver content using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). PMID:22097580

  8. From Broad-Spectrum Biocides to Quorum Sensing Disruptors and Mussel Repellents: Antifouling Profile of Alkyl Triphenylphosphonium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J.; Babarro, Jose M. F.; Lahoz, Fernando; Sansón, Marta; Martín, Víctor S.; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Onium’ compounds, including ammonium and phosphonium salts, have been employed as antiseptics and disinfectants. These cationic biocides have been incorporated into multiple materials, principally to avoid bacterial attachment. In this work, we selected 20 alkyl-triphenylphosphonium salts, differing mainly in the length and functionalization of their alkyl chains, in fulfilment of two main objectives: 1) to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the antifouling profile of these molecules with relevant marine fouling organisms; and 2) to shed new light on their potential applications, beyond their classic use as broad-spectrum biocides. In this regard, we demonstrate for the first time that these compounds are also able to act as non-toxic quorum sensing disruptors in two different bacterial models (Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio harveyi) as well as repellents in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In addition, their inhibitory activity on a fouling-relevant enzymatic model (tyrosinase) is characterized. An analysis of the structure-activity relationships of these compounds for antifouling purposes is provided, which may result useful in the design of targeted antifouling solutions with these molecules. Altogether, the findings reported herein provide a different perspective on the biological activities of phosphonium compounds that is particularly focused on, but, as the reader will realize, is not limited to their use as antifouling agents. PMID:25897858

  9. Changes in the biocide susceptibility of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli cells associated with rapid attachment to plastic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Das, J R; Bhakoo, M; Jones, M V; Gilbert, P

    1998-05-01

    Differences in opacity between wells of a microtitre plate containing different volumes of inoculated growth medium reflected planktonic growth without any contribution from cells attached at the well surface. Simple algebra and a knowledge of the dependence of optical density upon sample path length (volume) for suspensions of differing cell density enables the generation of growth curves for attached populations (biofilms). In this manner, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined at various stages of growth (0-20 h), both for cells growing attached to the bases of the plate wells and, simultaneously, for cells growing in suspension above them. Biocides included cetrimide, polyhexamethylene biguanide, peracetic acid, phenoxyethanol and chloroxylenol. Results, expressed as planktonic:biofilm MIC ratios, showed susceptibility to change, not only as a function of attachment and biofilm formation, but also with respect to the nature of the chemical agent. In some instances, changes in susceptibility greater than twofold occurred immediately on attachment and could occur in the presence of biocide concentrations which exceeded the MIC.

  10. Characterizing the microbial colonization of a dolostone quarry: implications for stone biodeterioration and response to biocide treatments.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Beatriz; De los Ríos, Asuncion; Urizal, Marta; de Buergo, Mónica Alvarez; Varas, Maria Jose; Fort, Rafael; Ascaso, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    This study examines the microbial colonization of three fronts of an abandoned dolostone quarry (Redueña, Madrid, Spain) exposed to atmospheric conditions for different time periods since Roman times to the present. Through scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE), endolithic colonization was predominantly detected in the most recently exposed front, while in the longer exposed quarry fronts, epilithic forms of growth were most often observed. These observations were confirmed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. Based on the distribution pattern of microbial colonization in the different quarry fronts, we then established a sequence of colonization events that took place over this long time frame. Bioalteration processes related to this sequential colonization were also identified. Characterizing these sequential processes can be useful for interpreting biodeterioration processes in historic dolostone monuments, especially those affecting constructions in the area of the Redueña stone quarry. In a second experimental stage, different biocide treatments were tested on this quarry rock to find the best way to avoid the microbial colonization effects identified. Through combined SEM-BSE/DGGE analysis, the efficacy of several biocides against the microorganisms inhabiting the dolostones was assessed after 4 and 16 months treatment. In general, all treatments were effective at reducing around 80% of the lichen cover, although effects on endolithic lithobiontic communities were dependent on how well the rock surface had been mechanically cleaned prior to treatment and gradually disappeared over time.

  11. Design of Material Pretreatment Procedures using Ionic Silver as a Biocide for Long-Duration Spaceflight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlar, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of different materials on the concentration of aqueous silver ions over time and its efficacy as a biocide. Historically, iodine has been used to control microbial proliferation in water aboard the U.S. Segment of the International Space Station (ISS). However, iodine presents potential health concerns to humans at the levels needed to be an effective biocide. Therefore, the iodine must be removed from the water prior to consumption, and careful monitoring must be performed to ensure safe drinking water aboard the ISS. This makes iodic biocides undesirable for use in long-duration space-flight missions. Currently, ionic silver is projected to be used as the biocide for Orion missions. The wetted materials of the water storage containers of the Orion vehicle are designed to be constructed of stainless steel (316 L) and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Preliminary testing indicated that the use of titanium alloy could result in over 95% loss of biocide, and microbial organisms were recovered after 24 hours of exposure. Many non-microbial studies to examine silver ion concentrations over time in the presence of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and stainless steel (316 L) were implemented. Variables included titanium alloy and stainless steel combinations; and solutions and concentrations of titanium passivation and metal disinfection procedures. All variable groups were submerged in an ionic silver solution with an initial concentration of 400 ppb Ag+. The projected surface area-to-volume ratios for the water storage tanks aboard the Orion vehicle were used throughout the experiment. Changes in ionic silver concentration were measured at various time intervals using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry ICP-MS. Following completion of the material testing, a microbial study was performed to examine the effects of silver ion solution on microbial growth in the presence of titanium alloy and stainless steel. The optimized

  12. 42. VIEW OF SYMONS 3 BY 6 FEET VIBRATING SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. VIEW OF SYMONS 3 BY 6 FEET VIBRATING SCREEN FROM NORTHWEST. SCREEN IS BELOW AND FED BY DINGS MAGNETIC PULLEY - DRIVE GEAR VISIBLE. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. Streptococcal screen

    MedlinePlus

    A negative strep screen most often means group A streptococcus is not present. It is unlikely that you have strep throat. If your provider still thinks that you may have strep throat, a throat culture will be done.

  14. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  15. Developmental Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Learn More about Your Child’s Development: Developmental Monitoring and Screening Taking a first step, waving “bye-bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, ...

  16. TORCH screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it can also ... to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections may ...

  17. Get Screened

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Ready 3 of 4 sections Take Action: Cost and Insurance What about cost? Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get screening tests at no cost to you. Most insurance plans, including Medicaid and ...

  18. Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulse Oximetry Screening for CCHDs Sickle Cell Disease Laboratory SCID Quality Assurance Training and Resources For Lab Professionals Data and Reports Laboratory Reports National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) Resources ...

  19. Effect of the nematode biocide Dbx-1003 in controlling citrus nematode infecting Mandarin, and interrelationship with the co-inhabitant fungi.

    PubMed

    Noweer, E M A

    2013-01-01

    In a field experiment, the nematode-biocide, Dbx-1003, was evaluated against the citrus nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans infecting Mandarin, Citrus reticulata, Dbx-1003 20% G., was applied in October 2008 at the rate 1/2 kg/tree, and root and soil samples were collected monthly until the next October, 2009. Successive treatment of the same biocide was added in May 2009. For the comparison, Vydate 24% L, was applied as well as non-treated check trees were left. Data revealed that the biocide treatment greatly affected the citrus nematode numbers both in soil and roots, in comparing with those of Vydate or induced by Dbx-1003 was 97% and 70%; respectively in soil and roots. Rates of reproduction increase of the citrus nematode also reached 3% and 30% in both soil and roots; respectively. Vydate treatment resulted in a relatively lesser percentages. Growth of the concomitant fungus, Trichoderma sp. was increased specially in the last samples of October 2009, however those of fungi; Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium sp. and Rhizopus sp. were reduced, due to Dbx-1003 treatment. Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. were not affected by the presence of the biocide. Vydate did not affect the co-inhabitant fungi to a great extent. PMID:25151818

  20. Modulated expression and enzymatic activity of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) in response to environmental biocides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Jin Wuk; Seo, Jung Soo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-02-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are important antioxidant enzymes whose expression levels are often used as biomarkers for oxidative stress. To investigate the biomarker potential of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus SOD genes, the full-length Cu/Zn-SOD (Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD) and Mn-SOD (Bk-Mn-SOD) genes were cloned from genomic DNA and characterized. All amino acid residues involved in the formation of tertiary structure and metal binding in Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD and Bk-Mn-SOD were highly conserved across species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Bk-Mn-SOD, in particular, was closely clustered with mitochondrial Mn-SOD. Transcript analysis after exposure to six different biocides (alachlor, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, endosulfan, lindane, and molinate) revealed that the transcriptional level of Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the level of Bk-Mn-SOD transcript was significantly increased compared with control cells in response to chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, and molinate at their no observed effect concentrations (NOECs). However, exposure to alachlor, chlorpyrifos, and molinate significantly reduced the enzymatic activity of total SOD protein, while a decreased pattern was observed in all biocide treatments. Taken together, these results indicate that exposure to waterborne environmental biocides induces the transcription of Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD and Bk-Mn-SOD, but inhibits the enzymatic activity of Bk-SODs. These results contribute to our understanding of the modes of action of oxidative stress-mediating biocides on rotifer.

  1. Development of a novel concept for fate monitoring of biocides in liquid manure and manured soil taking 14C-imazalil as an example.

    PubMed

    Kreuzig, Robert; Hartmann, Constanze; Teigeler, Jennifer; Höltge, Sibylla; Cvetković, Benjamin; Schlag, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Biocides are frequently applied in animal houses for veterinary hygiene or pest control. Thus, they may reach liquid manure tanks. Biocides that are not transformed during manure storage enter soil by the application of manure as organic fertilizer. Due to this environmentally relevant entry route, biocidal substances and products undergo a regulatory fate monitoring in liquid manure and soil. According to this, a novel concept was developed investigating the biocide imazalil as an example. For this purpose, excrements of test animals individually kept in experimental animal houses under standard nutrition were sampled. After matrix characterization, bovine and pig reference manures of defined dry substance contents were prepared. They were used for long-term transformation tests of (14)C-imazalil under strictly anaerobic conditions typical for manure storage in tanks. During the 177-d incubation period, however, imazalil was not substantially transformed. Furthermore, test manures with 7-d aged (14)C-imazalil residues were applied to study aerobic transformation and sorption in manured soil. Both concentration determining processes in soil were affected by the manure matrices. Comparing disappearance times (DT(50)) and sorption coefficients (K(OC)) after standard application (DT(50): 83 d; K(OC): 4059 L kg(-1)), (14)C-imazalil disappeared more rapidly after test manure application. DT(50) values were 29 or 48 d depending on whether bovine or pig test manure was applied. Mobility was slightly enhanced revealed by K(OC) of 1852 and 1385 L kg(-1), respectively.

  2. Mixed hemi/ad-micelles coated magnetic nanoparticles for the entrapment of hemoglobin at the surface of a screen-printed carbon electrode and its direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Aref, Mohaddeseh; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Kiekens, Filip; De Wael, Karolien

    2015-12-15

    An efficient procedure for the physical entrapment of proteins within a biocompatible matrix and their immobilization on electrode surfaces is of utmost importance in the fabrication of biosensors. In this work, the magnetic entrapment of hemoglobin (Hb) at the surface of a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE), through mixed hemi/ad-micelles (MHAM) array of positively charged surfactant supported iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Mag-NPs), is reported. The Hb/MHAM@Mag-NPs biocomposite is captured at SPCE by a super magnet (Hb/MHAM@Mag-NPs/SPCE). To gain insight in the configuration of the mixed hemi/ad-micelles of CTAB at Mag-NPs, zeta-potential measurements were performed. The entrapment of Hb at MHAM@Mag-NPs was confirmed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Direct electron transfer of the Hb intercalated into the composite film showed a pair of well-defined quasi-reversible redox peak at formal potential of -0.255 V vs. Ag/AgCl corresponding to heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple. It shows that the MHAM@Mag-NPs composite could increase the adsorption ability for Hb, thus provides a facile direct electron transfer between the Hb and the substrate. The proposed biosensor showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to the H2O2 reduction in the wide concentration range from 5.0 to 300.0 µM obtained by amperometric measurement. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) value of Hb at the modified electrode is 55.4 µM, showing its high affinity. Magnetic entrapment offers a promising design for fast, convenient and effective immobilization of protein within a few minutes for determination of the target molecule in low sample volume at disposable cost-effective SPCE.

  3. Risk assessment of herbicides and booster biocides along estuarine continuums in the Bay of Vilaine area (Brittany, France).

    PubMed

    Caquet, Th; Roucaute, M; Mazzella, N; Delmas, F; Madigou, C; Farcy, E; Burgeot, Th; Allenou, J-P; Gabellec, R

    2013-02-01

    A 2-year study was implemented to characterize the contamination of estuarine continuums in the Bay of Vilaine area (NW Atlantic Coast, Southern Brittany, France) by 30 pesticide and biocide active substances and metabolites. Among these, 11 triazines (ametryn, atrazine, desethylatrazine, desethylterbuthylazine, desisopropyl atrazine, Irgarol 1051, prometryn, propazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, and terbutryn), 10 phenylureas (chlortoluron, diuron, 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea, fenuron, isoproturon, 1-(4-isopropylphenyl)-3-methylurea, 1-(4-isopropylphenyl)-urea, linuron, metoxuron, and monuron), and 4 chloroacetanilides (acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and metazachlor) were detected at least once. The objectives were to assess the corresponding risk for aquatic primary producers and to provide exposure information for connected studies on the responses of biological parameters in invertebrate sentinel species. The risk associated with contaminants was assessed using risk quotients based on the comparison of measured concentrations with original species sensitivity distribution-derived hazardous concentration values. For EU Water Framework Directive priority substances, results of monitoring were also compared with regulatory Environmental Quality Standards. The highest residue concentrations and risks for primary producers were recorded for diuron and Irgarol 1051 in Arzal reservoir, close to a marina. Diuron was present during almost the all survey periods, whereas Irgarol 1051 exhibited a clear seasonal pattern, with highest concentrations recorded in June and July. These results suggest that the use of antifouling biocides is responsible for a major part of the contamination of the lower part of the Vilaine River course for Irgarol 1051. For diuron, agricultural sources may also be involved. The presence of isoproturon and chloroacetanilide herbicides on some dates indicated a significant contribution of the use of plant protection products in

  4. Polymorphic Variation in Susceptibility and Metabolism of Triclosan-Resistant Mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains Obtained after Exposure to Biocides and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R.; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRIr) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRIhs) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRIr mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRIr mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRIr mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRIr mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRIr mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive traits. PMID

  5. Micropollutants in closed life-support systems: the case of triclosan, a biocide excreted via urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroleo, Felice; Pycke, Benny; Boon, Nico; de Wever, Heleen; Hendrickx, Larissa; Mastroleo, Felice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Mergeay, Max; Verstraete, Willy

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of triclosan on the growth and physiology of the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum was studied in the frame of the regenerative life-support system, Micro- Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA). A wide range of compounds, such as steroid hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, might enter the life support system via the excrements that are to be treated and recycled. Triclosan was chosen as the first compound to be tested because MELiSSA is a closed system, which is consequently particularly sensitive to compounds inhibiting the microbial metabolism. Because triclosan is increasingly used as an antimicrobial biocide in hygienic formulations (such as toothpaste, mouthwash, deodorants, etc.) and due to its chemical stability, it is considered an emerging pollutant in terrestrial ecosystems. METHODS: In a first phase, the triclosan concentration expected in the life-support system was estimated, the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined via plating, and the effect on growth kinetics was assessed by comparing growth parameters in the Gompertz model. In a second phase, the secondary effects of triclosan on cell physiology and gene expression were studied through flow-cytometry and microarray analyses, respectively. RESULTS: Based on the pharmacokinetic data from literature, the predicted concentration range is estimated to be 6-25µg/L triclosan in the Rhodospirillum rubrum compartment of the MELiSSA. The minimal inhibitory concentration of triclosan was determined to be 71 µg/L after 7 days of exposure on Sistrom medium. Upon exposure to 50-200µg/L triclosan, triclosan-resistant mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum arose spontaneously at high frequency (3.1 ∗ 10 - 4). Analysis of the growth kinetics of the wild-type revealed that triclosan causes an important elongation of the lag-phase and a decrease in growth rate. At concentrations higher than 75mg/L(LD = 500mg/L), triclosan is bactericidal to wild

  6. Screening for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains three sections: Fundamentals of Screening, Screening Tests, and Screening for Specific Cancer Sites. Each section consists of several chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Principles of Screening and of the Evaluation of Screening Programs; Economic Aspects of Screening; Cervical Cytology; Screening Tests for Bladder Cancer; Fecal Occult Blood Testing; Screening for Cancer of the Cervix; Screening for Gastric Cancer; and Screening for Oral Cancer.

  7. Efficacy of burning, tillage, and biocides in controlling bacteria released at field sites and effects on indigenous bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Donegan, K; Fieland, V; Fowles, N; Ganio, L; Seidler, R

    1992-04-01

    Decontamination treatments of burning and biocide application, alone and in combination with tillage, were evaluated for their ability to reduce populations of bacteria applied to the leaves of plants in field plots. In addition, the effects of these control methods on indigenous leaf and soil bacteria and fungi were assessed. Field plots of bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), sprayed with the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, or Erwinia herbicola, received the following treatments: (i) control, (ii) tillage, (iii) burning, (iv) burning plus tillage (burn-tillage), (v) Kocide (cupric hydroxide), (vi) Kocide plus tillage, (vii) Agri-Strep (streptomycin sulfate), and (viii) Agri-Strep plus tillage. Leaves and soil from the plots were sampled at 1 day before and at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 30 days after application of the decontamination treatments. The burn and burn-tillage treatments produced the most significant reductions in bacterial populations. The Agri-Strep treatment was more effective than the Kocide treatment in eliminating applied bacteria, but neither biocide produced consistent or persistent control. In contrast, the tillage treatment, alone or in combination with the Agri-Strep or Kocide treatments, had a short-term stimulatory effect and increased populations of applied bacteria and also levels of indigenous fungi and bacteria. Agri-Strep and Kocide treatments caused significant reductions in indigenous bacterial populations up to 14 days after application and in indigenous fungal populations on day 7 after application. Our results suggest that conventional plant disease control methods may not provide satisfactory control of genetically engineered microorganisms and indicate a need for further development of effective and selective methods to control release microorganisms at field sites. PMID:1599240

  8. Efficacy of burning, tillage, and biocides in controlling bacteria released at field sites and effects on indigenous bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Donegan, K; Fieland, V; Fowles, N; Ganio, L; Seidler, R

    1992-01-01

    Decontamination treatments of burning and biocide application, alone and in combination with tillage, were evaluated for their ability to reduce populations of bacteria applied to the leaves of plants in field plots. In addition, the effects of these control methods on indigenous leaf and soil bacteria and fungi were assessed. Field plots of bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), sprayed with the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, or Erwinia herbicola, received the following treatments: (i) control, (ii) tillage, (iii) burning, (iv) burning plus tillage (burn-tillage), (v) Kocide (cupric hydroxide), (vi) Kocide plus tillage, (vii) Agri-Strep (streptomycin sulfate), and (viii) Agri-Strep plus tillage. Leaves and soil from the plots were sampled at 1 day before and at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 30 days after application of the decontamination treatments. The burn and burn-tillage treatments produced the most significant reductions in bacterial populations. The Agri-Strep treatment was more effective than the Kocide treatment in eliminating applied bacteria, but neither biocide produced consistent or persistent control. In contrast, the tillage treatment, alone or in combination with the Agri-Strep or Kocide treatments, had a short-term stimulatory effect and increased populations of applied bacteria and also levels of indigenous fungi and bacteria. Agri-Strep and Kocide treatments caused significant reductions in indigenous bacterial populations up to 14 days after application and in indigenous fungal populations on day 7 after application. Our results suggest that conventional plant disease control methods may not provide satisfactory control of genetically engineered microorganisms and indicate a need for further development of effective and selective methods to control release microorganisms at field sites. PMID:1599240

  9. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  10. Triclosan and methyl-triclosan monitoring study in the northeast of Spain using a magnetic particle enzyme immunoassay and confirmatory analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantiani, Lina; Farré, Marinella; Asperger, Danijela; Rubio, Fernando; González, Susana; López de Alda, Maria J.; Petrović, Mira; Shelver, Weilin L.; Barceló, Damià

    2008-10-01

    SummaryFor the first time, the occurrence of triclosan and its metabolite methyl-triclosan was investigated in a typical Mediterranean area using a two-step methodology based on screening using a magnetic particle immunoassay (IA) and confirmatory analysis by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this study, 95 environmental samples were analyzed. A commercial immunoassay was assessed for use in the different types of water selected for this study. A large monitoring study was performed on the influent and the effluent of eight wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), water samples from Ebro and Llobregat rivers, and drinking water. All wastewater samples tested in this study (influents and effluents) showed the presence of triclosan, with concentrations for raw influents being high (10 μg/L as average value). The percentages of triclosan removal for the WWTPs were evaluated (30-70%) along the different treatment processes showing that the best removal rates were obtained by the processes equipped with membrane bioreactors (MBRs). However, important concentrations of triclosan were detected even after treatment by MBRs. The presence of this biocide was confirmed in 50% of the river samples analyzed. Twenty two drinking water samples from the Barcelona city area were investigated, and in this case no triclosan was detected. Due to its properties and the widespread usage of triclosan, there is a need for monitoring and controlling the amounts present in wastewater effluents, river water, drinking water catchments areas, and drinking water. To this end, we present a feasible methodology using a magnetic particle-based immunoassay as a screening, followed by confirmatory analysis using solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-MS).

  11. Ethical issues for cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Ustun, Cagatay; Ceber, Esin

    2003-01-01

    In recent years medical ethics has become an undisputed part of medical studies. Many people believe that modern advances in medical technology - such as the development of dialysis machines, respirators, magnetic resonance imaging and genetic testing and types of cancer screenings - have created bioethical dilemmas that confront physicians in the 21st century. Debates over research and screening ethics have until recently revolved around two related questions: the voluntary, informed consent of subjects, and the appropriate relationship between risk and benefit to subjects. Every patient has a right to full and accurate information about his or her medical condition. This legal principle arose primarily through court decisions concerning informed consent, but over time physicians recognized that most patients prefer to learn the truth about their condition and use the information well. To screen is to search for disease in the absence of symptoms or, in other words, to attempt to find disease in someone not thought to have a disease. Examples of screening include routine mammography to detect breast cancer, routine pap smears to detect cervical cancer, and routine Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) testing to detect prostate cancer. Ethical principles to be followed in cancer screening programmes are intended mainly to minimize unnecessary harm for the participating individuals. Numerous ethical questions can be raised about the practice of screening for disease. Here, we examine four leading cancer killers worldwide and we review the screening of protocols of these cancer types and their possible ethics. PMID:14728598

  12. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  13. Wireless power transfer magnetic couplers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Gilchrist, Aaron; Sealy, Kylee

    2016-01-19

    A magnetic coupler is disclosed for wireless power transfer systems. A ferrimagnetic component is capable of guiding a magnetic field. A wire coil is wrapped around at least a portion of the ferrimagnetic component. A screen is capable of blocking leakage magnetic fields. The screen may be positioned to cover at least one side of the ferrimagnetic component and the coil. A distance across the screen may be at least six times an air gap distance between the ferrimagnetic component and a receiving magnetic coupler.

  14. Long-term changes in Prosobranchia (Gastropoda) abundances on the German North Sea coast: the role of the anti-fouling biocide tributyltin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehring, S.

    2000-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a biocide in marine anti-fouling paints since the early 1970s. Due to its strong ecotoxicity and the relatively high levels in the water column as well as in port sediments on the German North Sea coast, it probably has negative ecological effects on organisms other than those targeted. An analysis of the long-term development of prosobranch stocks in the inner German Bight reveals a decrease in abundance of many species. For most species the decline cannot be attributed to TBT, but in four prosobranch species ( Buccinum undatum, Hydrobia ulvae, Littorina littorea and Nucella lapillus) significant ecological effects by TBT pollution are very probable. Although research for alternative non-TBT anti-fouling paints (e.g. biocide-free types on the basis of silicone) has been intensified, the potential threats to ecosystems and the ecotoxicological profiles of these alternatives have to be carefully evaluated.

  15. Effects of efflux-pump inducers and genetic variation of the multidrug transporter cmeB in biocide resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Ana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2013-03-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps, such as CmeABC and CmeDEF, are involved in the resistance of Campylobacter to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of two putative efflux-pump inducers, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate, on the resistance of Campylobacter to biocides (triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and trisodium phosphate), SDS and erythromycin. The involvement of the CmeABC and CmeDEF efflux pumps in this resistance was studied on the basis of the effects of bile salts and sodium deoxycholate in Campylobacter cmeB, cmeF and cmeR mutants. The genetic variation in the cmeB gene was also examined, to see whether this polymorphism is related to the function of the efflux pump. In 15 Campylobacter jejuni and 23 Campylobacter coli strains, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate increased the MICs of benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and SDS, and decreased the MICs of triclosan, trisodium phosphate and erythromycin. Bile salts and sodium deoxycholate further decreased or increased the MICs of biocides and erythromycin in the cmeF and cmeR mutants. For cmeB polymorphisms, 17 different cmeB-specific PCR-RFLP patterns were identified: six within C. jejuni only, nine within C. coli only and two in both species. In conclusion, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate can increase or decrease bacterial resistance to structurally unrelated antimicrobials. The MIC increases in the cmeF and cmeR mutants indicated that at least one non-CmeABC efflux system is involved in resistance to biocides. These results indicate that the cmeB gene polymorphism identified is not associated with biocide and erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter.

  16. Combined effects of NaCl, NaOH, and biocides (monolaurin or lauric acid) on inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, C; Rigaud, N; Hébraud, M; Labadie, J

    2001-09-01

    This study highlighted combinations of chemical stresses that could decrease or eliminate Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas spp. surviving in food processing plants. Strains of L. monocytogenes, Pseudomonas fragi, and Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from processing environments (meat and milk) were grown at 20 degrees C up to the early stationary phase. The strains were then subjected to 30 min of physicochemical treatments. These treatments included individual or combined acid (acetic acid), alkaline (NaOH), osmotic (NaCl), and biocides (fatty acids) challenges. Survival of the strains was studied after individual or combined acid (acetic acid), alkaline (NaOH), osmotic (NaCl), and biocides (monolaurin, lauric acid) challenges. Individual pH shocks had lower efficiencies than those used in combinations with other parameters. The treatment pH 5.4 followed by pH 10.5 had a low efficiency against L. monocytogenes. The opposite combination, pH 10.5 followed by pH 5.4, led to a 3-log reduction of the L. monocytogenes population. Pseudomonas spp. strains were much more sensitive than L. monocytogenes, and population reductions of 5 and 8 log (total destruction), respectively, were observed after the same treatments. As for L. monocytogenes, the combination pH 10.5 followed by pH 5.4 is more deleterious than the opposite. Whatever the bacterial species, the most efficient treatments were combinations of alkaline, osmotic, and biocide shocks. For instance, the combination pH 10.5 and 10% NaCl plus biocides showed reductions of 5 to 8 log for both bacteria. The origins of the observed lethal effects are discussed. PMID:11563526

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of a potentially probiotic Lactobacillus pentosus MP-10 for the identification of key proteins involved in antibiotic resistance and biocide tolerance.

    PubMed

    Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Benomar, Nabil; Ennahar, Saïd; Horvatovich, Peter; Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Knapp, Charles W; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2016-04-01

    Probiotic bacterial cultures require resistance mechanisms to avoid stress-related responses under challenging environmental conditions; however, understanding these traits is required to discern their utility in fermentative food preparations, versus clinical and agricultural risk. Here, we compared the proteomic responses of Lactobacillus pentosus MP-10, a potentially probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from brines of naturally fermented Aloreña green table olives, exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics (amoxicillin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline) and biocides (benzalkonium chloride and triclosan). Several genes became differentially expressed depending on antimicrobial exposure, such as the up-regulation of protein synthesis, and the down-regulation of carbohydrate metabolism and energy production. The antimicrobials appeared to have altered Lb. pentosus MP-10 physiology to achieve a gain of cellular energy for survival. For example, biocide-adapted Lb. pentosus MP-10 exhibited a down-regulated phosphocarrier protein HPr and an unexpressed oxidoreductase. However, protein synthesis was over-expressed in antibiotic- and biocide-adapted cells (ribosomal proteins and glutamyl-tRNA synthetase), possibly to compensate for damaged proteins targeted by antimicrobials. Furthermore, stress proteins, such as NADH peroxidase (Npx) and a small heat shock protein, were only over-expressed in antibiotic-adapted Lb. pentosus MP-10. Results showed that adaptation to sub-lethal concentrations of antimicrobials could be a good way to achieve desirable robustness of the probiotic Lb. pentosus MP-10 to various environmental and gastrointestinal conditions (e.g., acid and bile stresses).

  18. Structure, tribocorrosion and biocide characterization of Ca, P and I containing TiO2 coatings developed by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Viteri, V. Sáenz; Bayón, R.; Igartua, A.; Barandika, G.; Moreno, J. Esteban; Peremarch, C. Pérez-Jorge; Pérez, M. Martínez

    2016-03-01

    In hip joint implants, in particular in the stems, wear-corrosion effects can accelerate the degradation of the biomaterial. The lack of osseointegration and the risk of contracting implant-associated infections may be other reasons for a premature failure of the implant. In this work, TiO2 coatings have been developed by means of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique in order to achieve wear-resistant hard coatings with osseointegration ability and biocide characteristics. During the PEO process, elements that favor cell growth, like Ca and P, were introduced into the coating. With the purpose of providing the coating with antibacterial properties iodine was added like biocide agent. The microstructure and chemical composition of the developed coatings were analyzed in order to see if the surface of the films was suitable for the cell attachment. The effect of wear-corrosion synergy was studied by means of tribocorrosion tests. Finally, the biocide capacity of iodine against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was analyzed through bacterial adhesion tests. High wear and corrosion resistance was shown in one of the developed coatings. The achieved surface microstructures seem to be appropriate to improve the osseointegration with proper pore size and porosity index. The antibacterial capacity of iodine was confirmed for S. epidermidis.

  19. A novel resistance mechanism to triclosan that suggests horizontal gene transfer and demonstrates a potential selective pressure for reduced biocide susceptibility in clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ciusa, Maria Laura; Furi, Leonardo; Knight, Daniel; Decorosi, Francesca; Fondi, Marco; Raggi, Carla; Coelho, Joana Rosado; Aragones, Luis; Moce, Laura; Visa, Pilar; Freitas, Ana Teresa; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Fani, Renato; Viti, Carlo; Orefici, Graziella; Martinez, Jose Luis; Morrissey, Ian; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo

    2012-09-01

    The widely used biocide triclosan selectively targets FabI, the NADH-dependent trans-2-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, which is an important target for narrow-spectrum antimicrobial drug development. In relation to the growing concern about biocide resistance, we compared in vitro mutants and clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced triclosan susceptibility. Clinical isolates of S. aureus as well as laboratory-generated mutants were assayed for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) phenotypes and genotypes related to reduced triclosan susceptibility. A potential epidemiological cut-off (ECOFF) MBC of >4 mg/L was observed for triclosan in clinical isolates of S. aureus. These showed significantly lower MICs and higher MBCs than laboratory mutants. These groups of strains also had few similarities in the triclosan resistance mechanism. Molecular analysis identified novel resistance mechanisms linked to the presence of an additional sh-fabI allele derived from Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The lack of predictive value of in-vitro-selected mutations for clinical isolates indicates that laboratory tests in the present form appear to be of limited value. More importantly, detection of sh-fabI as a novel resistance mechanism with high potential for horizontal gene transfer demonstrates for the first time that a biocide could exert a selective pressure able to drive the spread of a resistance determinant in a human pathogen.

  20. Polymorphic variation in susceptibility and metabolism of triclosan-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains obtained after exposure to biocides and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRI(r)) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRI(hs)) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRI(r) mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRI(r) mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRI(r) mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRI(r) mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRI(r) mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive

  1. Amoebas as mimivirus bunkers: increased resistance to UV light, heat and chemical biocides when viruses are carried by amoeba hosts.

    PubMed

    Boratto, Paulo V M; Dornas, Fábio P; Andrade, Kétyllen R; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Peixoto, Felipe; Silva, Lorena C F; La Scola, Bernard; Costa, Adriana Oliveira; de Almeida, Gabriel Magno Freitas; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2014-05-01

    Amoebas of the genus Acanthamoeba are protists that are associated with human disease and represent a public health concern. They can harbor pathogenic microorganisms, acting as a platform for pathogen replication. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV), the type species of the genus Mimivirus, family Mimiviridae, represents the largest group of amoeba-associated viruses that has been described to date. Recent studies have demonstrated that APMV and other giant viruses may cause pneumonia. Amoebas can survive in most environments and tolerate various adverse conditions, including UV light irradiation, high concentrations of disinfectants, and a broad range of temperatures. However, it is unknown how the amoebal intracellular environment influences APMV stability and resistance to adverse conditions. Therefore, in this work, we evaluated the stability of APMV, either purified or carried by the amoeba host, under extreme conditions, including UV irradiation, heat and exposure to six different chemical biocides. After each treatment, the virus was titrated in amoebas using the TCID50 method. APMV was more stable in all resistance tests performed when located inside its host. Our results demonstrate that Acanthamoeba acts as a natural bunker for APMV, increasing viral resistance to extreme physical and chemical conditions. The data raise new questions regarding the survival of APMV in nature and in hospital environments.

  2. Effects of antifouling booster biocide Irgarol 1051 on the structure of free living nematodes: a laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Hannachi, Amel; Elarbaoui, Soumaya; Khazri, Abdelhafidh; D'Agostino, Fabio; Sellami, Badreddine; Beyrem, Hamouda; Gambi, Cristina; Danovaro, Roberto; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine

    2016-07-13

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of Irgarol on nematode diversity, composition and trophic structure. Sediment samples were experimentally contaminated using four increasing Irgarol concentrations [I1 (11.5 ng g(-1)), I2 (35 ng g(-1)), I3 (105 ng g(-1)) and I4 (315 ng g(-1))] and compared to non-contaminated sediments (controls). Nematode diversity as the number of nematodes species (S) and species richness (d) was significantly lower in all Irgarol treatments than in the controls while the evenness (J') increased significantly in I4 treated mesocosms. The nematode species composition significantly changed following Irgarol concentrations. Paracomesoma dubiun and Terschellingia longicaudata appeared as "tolerant" species to the highest Irgarol concentration. Additionally, Chromadorina germanica and Microlaimus cyatholaimoides appeared as "opportunistic" species. In contrast, Daptonema normandicum seemed to be a "sensitive" species to Irgarol contamination. Irgarol modified also the nematode trophic structure where the relative abundance of deposit feeders decreased significantly in all the treatments compared to control mesocosms and optional predators decreased only in treated mesocosms with I3. Epigrowth feeders increased significantly in treated mesocosms with I3 and I4 and the microvores increased with I1 and decreased with I4. The relative abundance of ciliate consumers appeared unaffected by the presence of Irgarol contamination. Our results open new perspectives on the potential impact of antifouling booster biocide Irgarol 1051 on nematode biodiversity and functional diversity as trophic structures.

  3. Influence of a triazine derivative-based biocide on microbial biofilms of cutting fluids in contact with different substrates.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, Eliane G; Eguchi, Sílvia Y; Moraes, Angela M

    2012-05-01

    Although biofilms are often associated with hospital infection problems owing to their high resistance to antimicrobial agents, in recent years biofilms have also been studied in the industrial sector, mainly because they are a major cause of contamination outbreaks in facilities and products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether different materials commonly found in the metalworking industries have different biofilm formation characteristics when in contact with contaminated cutting fluid as well as to establish an optimal concentration of a triazine-based antimicrobial agent to protect the oil/water emulsion and also to delay or interrupt the development of biofilms. Biofilms grown on the surface of carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum, polyvinyl chloride, and glass were analyzed in terms of cell growth and susceptibility to the tested biocide. The results showed that the type of material used had little influence on cell adhesion or on the microbicide concentration required to control and eradicate microorganisms suspended in the emulsion and in the biofilms. PMID:22270891

  4. Direct growth inhibition assay of total airborne fungi with application of biocide-treated malt extract agar.

    PubMed

    Er, Chin Ming; Sunar, N M; Leman, A M; Othman, N

    2015-01-01

    Indoor air pollution by airborne fungi has risen to become a common issue all over the world and it is hazardous to indoor occupants' health as it is associated with a series of respiratory-related and skin-related diseases. Selected bioactive compounds from the food industry have been suggested to be effective against individual fungus isolated from indoor environment. However, the techniques used to evaluate these compounds were lengthy and unsuitable against total airborne fungi. Therefore, this paper describes an assay to assess the effectiveness of a bioactive compound to inhibit growth of total airborne fungi.•A combination and modification of previous methods and the NIOSH Manual Analytical Standard Method (NMAM 0800) is proposed.•This method concurrently samples the total airborne fungi and evaluates the ability of bioactive compounds (potassium sorbate in this paper), as a biocide, to treat these indoor airborne fungi.•The current method shortens the time of evaluation from 30 days to only 5 days and employs the counting of colony forming units (CFUs) to ease the measurement of the growth of fungi. PMID:27077051

  5. Direct growth inhibition assay of total airborne fungi with application of biocide-treated malt extract agar

    PubMed Central

    Er, Chin Ming; Sunar, N.M.; Leman, A.M.; Othman, N.

    2015-01-01

    Indoor air pollution by airborne fungi has risen to become a common issue all over the world and it is hazardous to indoor occupants’ health as it is associated with a series of respiratory-related and skin-related diseases. Selected bioactive compounds from the food industry have been suggested to be effective against individual fungus isolated from indoor environment. However, the techniques used to evaluate these compounds were lengthy and unsuitable against total airborne fungi. Therefore, this paper describes an assay to assess the effectiveness of a bioactive compound to inhibit growth of total airborne fungi.•A combination and modification of previous methods and the NIOSH Manual Analytical Standard Method (NMAM 0800) is proposed.•This method concurrently samples the total airborne fungi and evaluates the ability of bioactive compounds (potassium sorbate in this paper), as a biocide, to treat these indoor airborne fungi.•The current method shortens the time of evaluation from 30 days to only 5 days and employs the counting of colony forming units (CFUs) to ease the measurement of the growth of fungi. PMID:27077051

  6. Co-Selection of Resistance to Antibiotics, Biocides and Heavy Metals, and Its Relevance to Foodborne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wales, Andrew D.; Davies, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns have been raised in recent years regarding co-selection for antibiotic resistance among bacteria exposed to biocides used as disinfectants, antiseptics and preservatives, and to heavy metals (particularly copper and zinc) used as growth promoters and therapeutic agents for some livestock species. There is indeed experimental and observational evidence that exposure to these non-antibiotic antimicrobial agents can induce or select for bacterial adaptations that result in decreased susceptibility to one or more antibiotics. This may occur via cellular mechanisms that are protective across multiple classes of antimicrobial agents or by selection of genetic determinants for resistance to non-antibiotic agents that are linked to genes for antibiotic resistance. There may also be relevant effects of these antimicrobial agents on bacterial community structure and via non-specific mechanisms such as mobilization of genetic elements or mutagenesis. Notably, some co-selective adaptations have adverse effects on fitness in the absence of a continued selective pressure. The present review examines the evidence for the significance of these phenomena, particularly in respect of bacterial zoonotic agents that commonly occur in livestock and that may be transmitted, directly or via the food chain, to human populations. PMID:27025641

  7. Analysis of isothiazolinone biocides in paper for food packaging by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q-B; Wang, T-J; Song, H; Li, B

    2010-12-01

    A novel and simple method to detect isothiazolinone-type biocides (2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (MI), 5-chloro-2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (CMI), 1,2-benzisothiazolinone (BIT) and 2-octyl-3-isothiazolinone (OIT)) in paper used for food packaging by ultrasonic extraction coupled with UPLC-MS/MS was developed. Parameters affecting process efficiency such as extraction solvents, UPLC mobile phase, gradient elution procedure and MS/MS conditions were studied to optimise the operating conditions. Using the optimised gradient elution procedure, the retention time was less than 6 min. The limits of detection (LODs) were found to be between 0.001 and 0.010 mg kg⁻¹, which was validated using actual concentrations. After diluting the standard solution with a blank matrix, the linear calibration curve ranges were 0.002-1.000 mg kg⁻¹ for BIT and OIT, 0.005-1.000 mg kg⁻¹ for MI, and 0.020-1.000 mg kg⁻¹ for CMI, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9985 (n = 6). A good level of precision with a mean recovery greater than 81.3% and a relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 6.2% were also obtained. A methodology has been proposed for the analysis of isothiazolinones in paper.

  8. Effects of antifouling booster biocide Irgarol 1051 on the structure of free living nematodes: a laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Hannachi, Amel; Elarbaoui, Soumaya; Khazri, Abdelhafidh; D'Agostino, Fabio; Sellami, Badreddine; Beyrem, Hamouda; Gambi, Cristina; Danovaro, Roberto; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine

    2016-07-13

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of Irgarol on nematode diversity, composition and trophic structure. Sediment samples were experimentally contaminated using four increasing Irgarol concentrations [I1 (11.5 ng g(-1)), I2 (35 ng g(-1)), I3 (105 ng g(-1)) and I4 (315 ng g(-1))] and compared to non-contaminated sediments (controls). Nematode diversity as the number of nematodes species (S) and species richness (d) was significantly lower in all Irgarol treatments than in the controls while the evenness (J') increased significantly in I4 treated mesocosms. The nematode species composition significantly changed following Irgarol concentrations. Paracomesoma dubiun and Terschellingia longicaudata appeared as "tolerant" species to the highest Irgarol concentration. Additionally, Chromadorina germanica and Microlaimus cyatholaimoides appeared as "opportunistic" species. In contrast, Daptonema normandicum seemed to be a "sensitive" species to Irgarol contamination. Irgarol modified also the nematode trophic structure where the relative abundance of deposit feeders decreased significantly in all the treatments compared to control mesocosms and optional predators decreased only in treated mesocosms with I3. Epigrowth feeders increased significantly in treated mesocosms with I3 and I4 and the microvores increased with I1 and decreased with I4. The relative abundance of ciliate consumers appeared unaffected by the presence of Irgarol contamination. Our results open new perspectives on the potential impact of antifouling booster biocide Irgarol 1051 on nematode biodiversity and functional diversity as trophic structures. PMID:27285609

  9. Environmental risks associated with booster biocides leaching from spent anti-fouling paint particles in coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Chowdhury K; Turner, Andrew; Readman, James; Frickers, Trish

    2014-12-01

    Boat maintenance facilities in coastal areas contribute a significant amount of antifouling paint particles (APP) to coastal environments. Very few studies have concentrated on the leaching of booster biocides embedded in old paint particles. Therefore, this study attempted to assess the leaching of Dichlofluanid and Irgarol 1051 from APP collected from Mayflower Marina in southwest England. They were analyzed by GC-MS. A leaching experiment revealed that a considerable amount of Dichlofluanid (ca. 24 μg/L) leached from 0.4 g/L of APP after the first hour, followed by a marked decline in the amount measured in the water over time, almost degrading after 24 h in seawater, affording less of an environmental threat to non-target organisms. Conversely, Irgarol 1051 appeared to be persistent and continuously leached from the 0.4 g/L of APP even after 10 days, yielding a concentration of 0.61 μg/L in seawater, potentially posing a significant threat to the aquatic environment through leaching from APP.

  10. Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Linda L.; Ballard, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women and, until recently surpassed by lung cancer, was the leading cause of cancer-related death in women. It is the leading cause of death in women aged 39 to 44 years. The American Cancer Society has estimated that there will be 135,000 new cases of breast cancer and 42,300 breast cancer-related deaths in 1988. It is now predicted that breast cancer will develop in one out of every ten women in the United States. Given the clinical and public health significance of breast cancer, annual screening with mammography and clinical breast examination is recommended for women aged 50 and older to reduce breast cancer mortality. PMID:3407172

  11. Breast cancer screening controversies: who, when, why, and how?

    PubMed

    Chetlen, Alison; Mack, Julie; Chan, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Mammographic screening is effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The issue is not whether mammography is effective, but whether the false positive rate and false negative rates can be reduced. This review will discuss controversies including the reduction in breast cancer mortality, overdiagnosis, the ideal screening candidate, and the optimal imaging modality for breast cancer screening. The article will compare and contrast screening mammography, tomosynthesis, whole-breast screening ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular breast imaging. Though supplemental imaging modalities are being utilized to improve breast cancer diagnosis, mammography still remains the gold standard for breast cancer screening.

  12. Flexible magnetic planning boards are easily transported

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Easily transportable preprinted magnetic planning boards are made by coating thin sheet steel with clear plastic. Flexible magnetic boards used with paper charts are constructed from close mesh steel screen.

  13. Antioxidant and biocidal activities of Carum nigrum (seed) essential oil, oleoresin, and their selected components.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurdip; Marimuthu, Palanisamy; de Heluani, Carola S; Catalan, Cesar A N

    2006-01-11

    In the present study, chemical constituents of the essential oil and oleoresin of the seed from Carum nigrum obtained by hydrodistillation and Soxhlet extraction using acetone, respectively, have been studied by GC and GC-MS techniques. The major component was dillapiole (29.9%) followed by germacrene B (21.4%), beta-caryophyllene (7.8%), beta-selinene (7.1%), and nothoapiole (5.8%) along with many other components in minor amounts. Seventeen components were identified in the oleoresin (Table 2) with dillapiole as a major component (30.7%). It also contains thymol (19.1%), nothoapiole (15.2.3%), and gamma-elemene (8.0%). The antioxidant activity of both the essential oil and oleoresin was evaluated in mustard oil by monitoring peroxide, thiobarbituric acid, and total carbonyl and p-anisidine values of the oil substrate. The results showed that both the essential oil and oleoresin were able to reduce the oxidation rate of the mustard oil in the accelerated condition at 60 degrees C in comparison with synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene at 0.02%. In addition, individual antioxidant assays such as linoleic acid assay, DPPH scavenging activity, reducing power, hydroxyl radical scavenging, and chelating effects have been used. The C. nigrum seed essential oil exhibited complete inhibition against Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 2000 and 3000 ppm, respectively, by agar well diffusion method. Antifungal activity was determined against a panel of foodborne fungi such as Aspergillus niger, Penicillium purpurogenum, Penicillium madriti, Acrophialophora fusispora, Penicillium viridicatum, and Aspergillus flavus. The fruit essential oil showed 100% mycelial zone inhibition against P. purpurogenum and A. fusispora at 3000 ppm in the poison food method. Hence, both oil and oleoresin could be used as an additive in food and pharmaceutical preparations after screening.

  14. Groundwater Screen

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore » the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  15. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S.; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-01

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification.3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and

  16. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes.

    PubMed

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-21

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification.

  17. QSAR analysis and specific endpoints for classifying the physiological modes of action of biocides in synchronous green algae.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Junghans, Marion; Koller, Mirjam; Escher, Beate I

    2008-10-20

    We propose the use of additional physiological endpoints in the 24h growth inhibition test with synchronous cultures of Scenedesmus vacuolatus for the classification of physiological modes of toxic action of chemicals in green algae. The classification scheme is illustrated on the example of one baseline toxicant (3-nitroaniline) and five biocides (irgarol, diuron, Sea-Nine, tributyltin (TBT) and norflurazon). The well-established endpoint of inhibition of reproduction is used for an analysis of the degree of specificity of toxicity by comparing the experimental data with predictions from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for baseline toxicity (narcosis). For those compounds with a toxic ratio greater than 10, i.e. a 10 times higher effect in reproduction than predicted by baseline toxicity, additionally the physiological endpoints inhibition of photosynthesis, cell division and cell volume growth were experimentally assessed. Depending on the relative sensitivity of the different endpoints the chemicals were classified into five different classes of modes of toxic action using a flow chart that was developed in the present study. The advantage of the novel classification scheme is the simplicity of the experimental approach. For the determination of the inhibition of reproduction, the cell size and numbers are quantified with a particle analyzer. This information can be used to derive also the physiological endpoints of cell volume growth and inhibition of cell division. The only additional measurement is the inhibition of the photosynthesis efficiency, which can be easily performed using the non-invasive saturation pulse method and pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorometry with the Tox-Y-PAM instrument. This mechanistic approach offers a great future potential in ecotoxicology for the physiological mode of action classification of chemicals in algae, which should be a crucial step considered in the risk assessment of chemicals.

  18. QSAR analysis and specific endpoints for classifying the physiological modes of action of biocides in synchronous green algae.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Junghans, Marion; Koller, Mirjam; Escher, Beate I

    2008-10-20

    We propose the use of additional physiological endpoints in the 24h growth inhibition test with synchronous cultures of Scenedesmus vacuolatus for the classification of physiological modes of toxic action of chemicals in green algae. The classification scheme is illustrated on the example of one baseline toxicant (3-nitroaniline) and five biocides (irgarol, diuron, Sea-Nine, tributyltin (TBT) and norflurazon). The well-established endpoint of inhibition of reproduction is used for an analysis of the degree of specificity of toxicity by comparing the experimental data with predictions from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for baseline toxicity (narcosis). For those compounds with a toxic ratio greater than 10, i.e. a 10 times higher effect in reproduction than predicted by baseline toxicity, additionally the physiological endpoints inhibition of photosynthesis, cell division and cell volume growth were experimentally assessed. Depending on the relative sensitivity of the different endpoints the chemicals were classified into five different classes of modes of toxic action using a flow chart that was developed in the present study. The advantage of the novel classification scheme is the simplicity of the experimental approach. For the determination of the inhibition of reproduction, the cell size and numbers are quantified with a particle analyzer. This information can be used to derive also the physiological endpoints of cell volume growth and inhibition of cell division. The only additional measurement is the inhibition of the photosynthesis efficiency, which can be easily performed using the non-invasive saturation pulse method and pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorometry with the Tox-Y-PAM instrument. This mechanistic approach offers a great future potential in ecotoxicology for the physiological mode of action classification of chemicals in algae, which should be a crucial step considered in the risk assessment of chemicals. PMID:18789546

  19. Combined biocidal action of silver nanoparticles and ions against Chlorococcales (Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris) and filamentous algae (Klebsormidium sp.).

    PubMed

    Zouzelka, Radek; Cihakova, Pavlina; Rihova Ambrozova, Jana; Rathousky, Jiri

    2016-05-01

    Despite the extensive research, the mechanism of the antimicrobial and biocidal performance of silver nanoparticles has not been unequivocally elucidated yet. Our study was aimed at the investigation of the ability of silver nanoparticles to suppress the growth of three types of algae colonizing the wetted surfaces or submerged objects and the mechanism of their action. Silver nanoparticles exhibited a substantial toxicity towards Chlorococcales Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris, and filamentous algae Klebsormidium sp., which correlated with their particle size. The particles had very good stability against agglomeration even in the presence of multivalent cations. The concentration of silver ions in equilibrium with nanoparticles markedly depended on the particle size, achieving about 6 % and as low as about 0.1 % or even less for the particles 5 nm in size and for larger ones (40-70 nm), respectively. Even very limited proportion of small particles together with larger ones could substantially increase concentration of Ag ions in solution. The highest toxicity was found for the 5-nm-sized particles, being the smallest ones in this study. Their toxicity was even higher than that of silver ions at the same silver concentration. When compared as a function of the Ag(+) concentration in equilibrium with 5-nm particles, the toxicity of ions was at least 17 times higher than that obtained by dissolving silver nitrite (if not taking into account the effect of nanoparticles themselves). The mechanism of the toxicity of silver nanoparticles was found complex with an important role played by the adsorption of silver nanoparticles and the ions released from the particles on the cell surface. This mechanism could be described as some sort of synergy between nanoparticles and ions. While our study clearly showed the presence of this synergy, its detailed explanation is experimentally highly demanding, requiring a close cooperation between materials scientists

  20. Health Screenings and Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... your primary doctor. Blood Tests – A Common Screening Method (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Click ... tests, see What Are Blood Tests? Other Screening Methods Doctors can't screen for all diseases and ...

  1. Screen time and children

    MedlinePlus

    "Screen time" is a term used for activities done in front of a screen, such as watching TV, working on a computer, or playing video games. Screen time is sedentary activity, meaning you are being physically ...

  2. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  3. What Is Carrier Screening?

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Carrier screening You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... help you make the decision. What Is Carrier Screening? Carrier screening checks if a person is a " ...

  4. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores by a combination of biocides and heating under high-temperature short-time pasteurization conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sa; Labuza, Theodore P; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2008-06-01

    The milk supply is considered a primary route for a bioterrorism attack with Bacillus anthracis spores because typical high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization conditions cannot inactivate spores. In the event of intentional contamination, an effective method to inactivate the spores in milk under HTST processing conditions is needed. This study was undertaken to identify combinations and concentrations of biocides that can inactivate B. anthracis spores at temperatures in the HTST range in less than 1 min. Hydrogen peroxide (HP), sodium hypochlorite (SH), and peroxyacetic acid (PA) were evaluated for their efficacy in inactivating spores of strains 7702, ANR-1, and 9131 in milk at 72, 80, and 85 degrees C using a sealed capillary tube technique. Strains ANR-1 and 9131 were more resistant to all of the biocide treatments than strain 7702. Addition of 1,260 ppm SH to milk reduced the number of viable spores of each strain by 6 log CFU/ml in less than 90 and 60 s at 72 and 80 degrees C, respectively. After neutralization, 1,260 ppm SH reduced the time necessary to inactivate 6 log CFU/ml (TTI6-log) at 80 degrees C to less than 20 s. Treatment of milk with 7,000 ppm HP resulted in a similar level of inactivation in 60 s. Combined treatment with 1,260 ppm SH and 1,800 ppm HP inactivated spores of all strains in less than 20 s at 80 degrees C. Mixing 15 ppm PA with milk containing 1,260 ppm SH resulted in TTI6-log of 25 and 12 s at 72 and 80 degrees C, respectively. TTI6-log of less than 20 s were also achieved at 80 degrees C by using two combinations of biocides: 250 ppm SH, 700 ppm HP, and 150 ppm PA; and 420 ppm SH (pH 7), 1,100 ppm HP, and 15 ppm PA. These results indicated that different combinations of biocides could consistently result in 6-log reductions in the number of B. anthracis spores in less than 1 min at temperatures in the HTST range. This information could be useful for developing more effective thermal treatment strategies which could be

  5. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores by a Combination of Biocides and Heating under High-Temperature Short-Time Pasteurization Conditions ▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sa; Labuza, Theodore P.; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    The milk supply is considered a primary route for a bioterrorism attack with Bacillus anthracis spores because typical high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization conditions cannot inactivate spores. In the event of intentional contamination, an effective method to inactivate the spores in milk under HTST processing conditions is needed. This study was undertaken to identify combinations and concentrations of biocides that can inactivate B. anthracis spores at temperatures in the HTST range in less than 1 min. Hydrogen peroxide (HP), sodium hypochlorite (SH), and peroxyacetic acid (PA) were evaluated for their efficacy in inactivating spores of strains 7702, ANR-1, and 9131 in milk at 72, 80, and 85°C using a sealed capillary tube technique. Strains ANR-1 and 9131 were more resistant to all of the biocide treatments than strain 7702. Addition of 1,260 ppm SH to milk reduced the number of viable spores of each strain by 6 log CFU/ml in less than 90 and 60 s at 72 and 80°C, respectively. After neutralization, 1,260 ppm SH reduced the time necessary to inactivate 6 log CFU/ml (TTI6-log) at 80°C to less than 20 s. Treatment of milk with 7,000 ppm HP resulted in a similar level of inactivation in 60 s. Combined treatment with 1,260 ppm SH and 1,800 ppm HP inactivated spores of all strains in less than 20 s at 80°C. Mixing 15 ppm PA with milk containing 1,260 ppm SH resulted in TTI6-log of 25 and 12 s at 72 and 80°C, respectively. TTI6-log of less than 20 s were also achieved at 80°C by using two combinations of biocides: 250 ppm SH, 700 ppm HP, and 150 ppm PA; and 420 ppm SH (pH 7), 1,100 ppm HP, and 15 ppm PA. These results indicated that different combinations of biocides could consistently result in 6-log reductions in the number of B. anthracis spores in less than 1 min at temperatures in the HTST range. This information could be useful for developing more effective thermal treatment strategies which could be used in HTST milk plants to process

  6. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores by a combination of biocides and heating under high-temperature short-time pasteurization conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sa; Labuza, Theodore P; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2008-06-01

    The milk supply is considered a primary route for a bioterrorism attack with Bacillus anthracis spores because typical high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization conditions cannot inactivate spores. In the event of intentional contamination, an effective method to inactivate the spores in milk under HTST processing conditions is needed. This study was undertaken to identify combinations and concentrations of biocides that can inactivate B. anthracis spores at temperatures in the HTST range in less than 1 min. Hydrogen peroxide (HP), sodium hypochlorite (SH), and peroxyacetic acid (PA) were evaluated for their efficacy in inactivating spores of strains 7702, ANR-1, and 9131 in milk at 72, 80, and 85 degrees C using a sealed capillary tube technique. Strains ANR-1 and 9131 were more resistant to all of the biocide treatments than strain 7702. Addition of 1,260 ppm SH to milk reduced the number of viable spores of each strain by 6 log CFU/ml in less than 90 and 60 s at 72 and 80 degrees C, respectively. After neutralization, 1,260 ppm SH reduced the time necessary to inactivate 6 log CFU/ml (TTI6-log) at 80 degrees C to less than 20 s. Treatment of milk with 7,000 ppm HP resulted in a similar level of inactivation in 60 s. Combined treatment with 1,260 ppm SH and 1,800 ppm HP inactivated spores of all strains in less than 20 s at 80 degrees C. Mixing 15 ppm PA with milk containing 1,260 ppm SH resulted in TTI6-log of 25 and 12 s at 72 and 80 degrees C, respectively. TTI6-log of less than 20 s were also achieved at 80 degrees C by using two combinations of biocides: 250 ppm SH, 700 ppm HP, and 150 ppm PA; and 420 ppm SH (pH 7), 1,100 ppm HP, and 15 ppm PA. These results indicated that different combinations of biocides could consistently result in 6-log reductions in the number of B. anthracis spores in less than 1 min at temperatures in the HTST range. This information could be useful for developing more effective thermal treatment strategies which could be

  7. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  8. Screening Substitute Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakkuri, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The screening process a school district uses in hiring substitute teachers is critical to striking a balance between required qualifications and immediate need. Typically, screening involves at least one of the following: pre-screening, paper and pencil screening, interviews, and background checks, each of which is used to different degrees…

  9. Suppressor Screens in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screens have proven to be a useful tool in the dissection of biological processes in plants. Specifically, suppressor screens have been widely used to study signal transduction pathways. Here we provide a detailed protocol for ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis used in our suppressor screens in Arabidopsis and discuss the basic principles behind suppressor screen design and downstream analyses. PMID:26577776

  10. Defining responsibility for screening.

    PubMed

    Sifri, R; Wender, R

    1999-10-01

    Patients commonly receive medical care from multiple providers and confusion as to who is responsible for cancer screening undoubtedly contributes to inadequate recommendations. Effective screening requires successful implementation of a series of steps that begin with the initial discussion of a screening test and proceed through obtaining results and instituting appropriate follow-up. Clear definition of generalist and specialist physician roles are necessary to optimally screen the public. This article explores the differences in how generalists and specialists approach screening, describes models of care that facilitate shared responsibility for screening, and suggests strategies on how to improve communication between physicians to maximize screening performance. PMID:10452930

  11. A rapid and simple capillary electrophoresis method for indirect determination of the biocide 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilo-propionamide (DBNPA) in cooling waters.

    PubMed

    Shiroma, Letícia S; Marques, Thaís T; Jesus, Dosil P

    2015-01-01

    A capillary zone electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for the determination of the biocide 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilo-propionamide (DBNPA) in water used in cooling systems. The biocide is indirectly determined by CE measurement of the concentration of bromide ions produced by the reaction between the DBNPA and bisulfite. The relationship between the bromide peak areas and the DBNPA concentrations showed a good linearity and a coefficient of determination (R²) of 0.9997 in the evaluated concentration range of 0-75 μmol L⁻¹. The detection and quantification limits for DBNPA were 0.23 and 0.75 μmol L⁻¹, respectively. The proposed CE method was successfully applied for the analysis of samples of tap water and cooling water spiked with DBNPA. The intra-day and inter-day (intermediary) precisions were lower than 2.8 and 6.2%, respectively. The DBNPA concentrations measured by the CE method were compared to the values obtained by a spectrophotometric method and were found to agree well.

  12. Frequency of biocide-resistant genes and susceptibility to chlorhexidine in high-level mupirocin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MuH MRSA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingzhong; Zhao, Huanqiang; Han, Lizhong; Shu, Wen; Wu, Qiong; Ni, Yuxing

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of biocide-resistant determinants and the susceptibility to chlorhexidine in high-level mupirocin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MuH MRSA). Fifty-three MuH MRSA isolates were analyzed for plasmid-borne genes (qacA/B, smr, qacG, qacH, and qacJ) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); for chromosome-mediated genes (norA, norB, norC, mepA, mdeA, sepA, and sdrM) by PCR and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR); and for susceptibility to chlorhexidine by MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Furthermore, disinfectant efficacy was tested in the presence of 3.0% bovine serum albumin (BSA) in MBC detection. The plasmid-borne genes qacA/B (83.0%) and smr (77.4%) and overexpressions of chromosome-mediated genes norA (49.0%) and norB (28.8%) were predominantly found in isolates studied, and 90.6% of the isolates revealed tolerance to chlorhexidine. In the presence of BSA, the average MBC of chlorhexidine for these isolates rose to 256 μg/mL. Altogether, our results suggest that surveillance of sensitivity to biocides among MuH MRSA isolates is essential for hospital infection control.

  13. New priority substances of the European Water Framework Directive: biocides, pesticides and brominated flame retardants in the aquatic environment of Denmark.

    PubMed

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Bossi, Rossana; Bester, Kai; Bollmann, Ulla E; Boutrup, Susanne

    2014-02-01

    The biocides cybutryn (Irgarol) and terbutryn, the herbicides aclonifen and bifenox, the insecticides cypermethrin and heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide and the brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) are new priority substances of the Water Framework Directive of the European Union. In order to gain knowledge about their presence in the aquatic environment in an off-season situation with regard to pesticide and biocide applications, these substances were analysed in freshwater, seawater and fish samples from Denmark. Aclonifen, bifenox, cypermethrin and heptachlor were below the limits of detection (LODs) in all samples. However, the LODs for cypermethrin and heptachlor exceeded the annual average environmental quality standards (AA-EQSs). Cybutryn, terbutryn, heptachlor epoxide and HBCD were detected in the majority of samples, with detection frequencies of 100% for heptachlor epoxide and HBCD in water and 90% in fish. No concentration was above maximum allowable concentration (MAC)-EQS values, but AA-EQS values were exceeded for all four compounds by several samples, including 100% of the water samples with regard to heptachlor epoxide. Methodological issues remain for cypermethrin, and to a certain extent for heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide, for which water LODs were above AA-EQSs although a water volume of 12L was combined with very sensitive high resolution mass spectrometry.

  14. In-Flight Water Quality Monitoring on the International Space Station (ISS): Measuring Biocide Concentrations with Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (CSPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Siperko, Lorraine M.; Porter, Marc D.; Lipert, Robert J.; Flint, Stephanie M.; McCoy, J. Torin

    2011-01-01

    The colorimetric water quality monitoring kit (CWQMK) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) on STS-128/17A and was initially deployed in September 2009. The kit was flown as a station development test objective (SDTO) experiment to evaluate the acceptability of colorimetric solid phase extraction (CSPE) technology for routine water quality monitoring on the ISS. During the SDTO experiment, water samples from the U.S. water processor assembly (WPA), the U.S. potable water dispenser (PWD), and the Russian system for dispensing ground-supplied water (SVO-ZV) were collected and analyzed with the CWQMK. Samples from the U.S. segment of the ISS were analyzed for molecular iodine, which is the biocide added to water in the WPA. Samples from the SVOZV system were analyzed for ionic silver, the biocide used on the Russian segment of the ISS. In all, thirteen in-flight analysis sessions were completed as part of the SDTO experiment. This paper provides an overview of the experiment and reports the results obtained with the CWQMK. The forward plan for certifying the CWQMK as operational hardware and expanding the capabilities of the kit are also discussed.

  15. Development and application of a microwave-assisted extraction and LC/MS/MS methodology to the determination of antifouling booster biocides in sea mullets (Mugil cephalus) organisms.

    PubMed

    Franco-Barrios, Alejandro; Torres-Padrón, María Esther; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2014-01-01

    A method is presented for the extraction, preconcentration, and determination of two commonly used booster biocides, Irgarol 1051 and diuron, in samples of muscle and liver tissues from Mugil cephalus by microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) followed by SPE for the preconcentration and cleanup step, coupled with LC/MS/MS. The optimum conditions for MAE were established as power 200 W and irradiation time 4 min. Using these conditions, the LOD was 0.13 ng/g for diuron and 0.10 ng/g for Irgarol 1051. The recoveries calculated at three concentration levels (0.5, 5, and 50 ng/g) were greater than 74%. Repeatability was less than 7.5% and reproducibility less than 12.7%. The optimized method was used to monitor these compounds in M. cephalus from different harbors of Gran Canaria Island. The samples were collected bimonthly and processed following the optimized method. High levels of Irgarol 1051 (6.9 +/- 1.03 ng/g) were found in the liver, while diuron was undetected. However, diuron was found in the muscle (1.41 +/- 0.45 ng/g). The proposed sentinel organism could be used in tropical and subtropical regions to continuously biomonitor for booster biocides over long periods of time. This technique could be a useful tool for improving the management of ocean and coastal waters. PMID:24672878

  16. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F.; Pak, Donald J.

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  17. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  18. Effect of substituent of terpyridines on the in vitro antioxidant, antitubercular, biocidal and fluorescence studies of copper(II) complexes with clioquinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharadi, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    An octahedral complexes of copper with clioquinol(CQ) and substituted terpyridine have been synthesized. The Cu(II) complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses, magnetic moment measurements, FT-IR, electronic, 1H NMR and FAB mass spectra. Antimycobacterial screening of ligand and its copper compound against Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows clear enhancement in the antitubercular activity upon copper complexation. Ferric-reducing anti-oxidant power of all complexes were measured. The fluorescence spectra of complexes show red shift, which may be due to the chelation by the ligands to the metal ion. It enhances ligand ability to accept electrons and decreases the electron transition energy. The antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes were tested on five different microorganisms and showed good biological activity.

  19. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  20. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Colombo, Gerald V. (Inventor); Jolly, Clifford D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for maintaining continuous, long-term microbial control in the water supply for potable, hygiene, and experimental water for space activities, as well as treatment of water supplies on Earth. The water purification is accomplished by introduction of molecular iodine into the water supply to impart a desired iodine residual. The water is passed through an iodinated anion exchange resin bed. The iodine is bound as I-(sub n) at the anion exchange sites and releases I(sub 2) into the water stream flowing through the bed. The concentration of I(sub 2) in the flowing water gradually decreases and, in the prior art, the ion-exchange bed has had to be replaced. In a preferred embodiment, a bed of iodine crystals is provided with connections for flowing water therethrough to produce a concentrated (substantially saturated) aqueous iodine solution which is passed through the iodinated resin bed to recharge the bed with bound iodine. The bed of iodine crystals is connected in parallel with the iodinated resin bed and is activated periodically (e.g., by timer, by measured flow of water, or by iodine residual level) to recharge the bed. Novelty resides in the capability of inexpensively and repeatedly regenerating the ion-exchange bed in situ.

  1. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  2. Screening for Breast Problems

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ178 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Mammography and Other Screening Tests for Breast Problems • What ... used to screen for breast problems? • What is mammography? • Why is mammography done? • When should I start ...

  3. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  4. Screening Tests and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Text size | Print | Screening Tests and Vaccines This information in Spanish ( en español ) Getting important screening tests and vaccines can save your life. Check this section of ...

  5. Screening for Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for gestational diabetes: (1) All women ... not enough evidence to judge the benefits and harms of screening women before 24 weeks of pregnancy. ...

  6. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  7. Health Screenings at School

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Health Screenings at School Page Content Article Body In most ... child's ability to learn. In some states these screening tests are mandated by law and may also ...

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases HPV-Associated Cancers Gynecologic Cancers Redirect CDC - Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You are being redirected to the HPV Cancer Screening page. Please update your bookmarks to the link ...

  9. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity and ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  11. Screening Tests for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... questions you have. Make sure to ask about: Alcohol use Depression Weight Screening tests Screening tests Screening tests Ages ... for high cholesterol, and ways to improve cholesterol levels through lifestyle changes. ... Sheets - Alcohol Use and Health - This fact sheet talks about ...

  12. Cancer Screening: How Do Screening Tests Become Standard Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer symptoms. There are different kinds of screening tests. Screening tests include the following: Physical exam and ... are linked to some types of cancer. Screening tests have risks. Not all screening tests are helpful ...

  13. Alternatives to petroleum-based biocides for protecting hardwood lumber and manufactured products. Transferring technologies for industry No. 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, C.W.

    1993-03-30

    The report addresses the current and prospective mechanisms for developing environmentally responsible treatments for wood products that prevent stain, decay, and insect damage. The author examines various aspects of the problem and current prevention techniques, including an extended discussion of the attributes and shortcomings of six treatments reviewed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, US Department of Agriculture, in An Efficacy Review of Control Measures for Potential Pests of Imported Soviet Timber. The portion of the report labeled Uncommercialized Technologies presents the new, uncommercialized technologies discovered through this project. They include: guayule shrub-derived wood preservative; biological control strategies; tannins derived from tree bark; insect-specific toxins from arthropod and vertebrate venoms; and natural biocidal repellents.

  14. Newborn screening: current status.

    PubMed

    Arn, Pamela H

    2007-01-01

    Newborn screening, which represents one of the major advances in child health of the past century, has been carried out in all fifty U.S. states since the 1970s. Newborn screening programs are state-run, and decisions are left to the individual states regarding the conditions to be screened for, the mechanism for confirmatory testing, follow-up care, and financing of the programs. Laboratory advances in tandem mass spectrometry make it possible to screen newborns for many rare inborn errors of metabolism. This raises many policy issues including screening's cost-effectiveness, ethics, quality, and oversight.

  15. Monitoring the performance of innovative and traditional biocides mixed with consolidants and water-repellents for the prevention of biological growth on stone.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Daniela; Salvadori, Barbara; Galeotti, Monica

    2012-04-15

    In this study, some mixtures of consolidants or water-repellent products and biocides developed to prevent biological growth, were tested over time on three stone substrates with different bioreceptivity. The performance of both traditional (tetraethylorthosilicate, methylethoxy polysiloxane, Paraloid B72, tributyltin oxide, dibutyltin dilaurate) and innovative compounds (copper nanoparticles) was assessed using colour measurements, the water absorption by contact sponge method, and observation under stereo and optical microscopes. The application of the mixtures had also the purpose of controlling re-colonization on stone after a conservation treatment. The study site was the archaeological Area of Fiesole; the mixtures were applied in situ to sandstone, marble and plaster which had been cleaned beforehand. An innovative aspect of the study is that, by using non-invasive methods, it also permitted monitoring the mixtures' effectiveness in preventing biological growth. The monitoring results made it possible to assess the bioreceptivity of the treated stones (sandstone, marble, plaster) over a period of almost three years. The results showed that the mixtures of consolidants or water-repellent products with biocides were effective in preventing biological growth on both a substrate with low bioreceptivity like plaster and a substrate with high bioreceptivity such as marble. The innovative mixture of nano-Cu particles with a water-repellent yielded good results in terms of preventing biological colonization. Moreover, they apparently did not affect the substrates' colour. Mixtures of nano-Cu particles with a consolidant and a water-repellent hold great promise for preventing re-colonization of stone after conservation treatment. PMID:22401787

  16. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus sp. obtained from an Algerian oilfield and chemical biocide THPS against sulfate-reducing bacteria consortium inducing corrosion in the oil industry.

    PubMed

    Gana, Mohamed Lamine; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Touzi, Abdelkader; Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Pauss, André; Lounici, Hakim; Mameri, Nabil

    2011-03-01

    The present study enlightens the role of the antagonistic potential of nonpathogenic strain B21 against sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium. The inhibitor effects of strain B21 were compared with those of the chemical biocide tetrakishydroxymethylphosphonium sulfate (THPS), generally used in the petroleum industry. The biological inhibitor exhibited much better and effective performance. Growth of SRB in coculture with bacteria strain B21 antagonist exhibited decline in SRB growth, reduction in production of sulfides, with consumption of sulfate. The observed effect seems more important in comparison with the effect caused by the tested biocide (THPS). Strain B21, a dominant facultative aerobic species, has salt growth requirement always above 5% (w/v) salts with optimal concentration of 10-15%. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain B21 is a member of the genus Bacillus, being most closely related to Bacillus qingdaonensis DQ115802 (94.0% sequence similarity), Bacillus aidingensis DQ504377 (94.0%), and Bacillus salarius AY667494 (92.2%). Comparative analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequence data plus physiological, biochemical, and phenotypic features of the novel isolate and related species of Bacillus indicated that strain B21 may represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, named Bacillus sp. (EMBL, FR671419). The results of this study indicate the application potential of Bacillus strain B21 as a biocontrol agent to fight corrosion in the oil industry.

  17. Characterization and quantification of N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine biocide by NMR, HPLC/MS and titration techniques.

    PubMed

    Mondin, Andrea; Bogialli, Sara; Venzo, Alfonso; Favaro, Gabriella; Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The present paper reports the determination of the tri-amine N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (TA) present in a raw material called LONZABAC used to formulate various, widely used commercial biocides. The active principle, TA, is present in LONZABAC together with other molecules at lower concentration levels. Three independent analytical approaches, namely solution NMR spectroscopy, liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC/HRMS) and acid-base titration in mixed solvent, were used to overcome the problem of the non-availability of the active principle as high purity standard. NMR analysis of raw material, using a suitable internal standard, evidenced in all analyzed lots the presence of the active principle, the N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (DA) and the n-dodecylamine (MA) and the absence of non-organic, NMR-inactive species. NMR peak integration led to a rough composition of the MA:DA:TA as 1:9:90. The LC/HRMS analysis allowed the accurate determination of DA and MA and confirmed in all samples the presence of the TA, which was estimated by difference: MA=1.4±0.3%, DA=11.1±0.7%, TA=87.5±1.3%. The obtained results were used to setup an easy, rapid and cheap acid-base titration method able to furnish a sufficiently accurate evaluation of the active principle both in the raw material and in diluted commercial products. For the raw material the results were: TA+MA=91.1±0.8% and DA-MA=8.9±0.8%, statistically coherent with LC/MS ones. The LC/MS approach demonstrated also its great potentialities to recognize trace of the biocide components both in environmental samples and in the formulated commercial products.

  18. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  19. Saturation transfer difference NMR for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Begley, Darren W; Moen, Spencer O; Pierce, Phillip G; Zartler, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening by saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) is a robust method for identifying small molecule binders and is well suited to a broad set of biological targets. STD-NMR is exquisitely sensitive for detecting weakly binding compounds (a common characteristic of fragments), which is a crucial step in finding promising compounds for a fragment-based drug discovery campaign. This protocol describes the development of a library suitable for STD-NMR fragment screening, as well as preparation of protein samples, optimization of experimental conditions, and procedures for data collection and analysis. PMID:24391096

  20. Acupressure magnets: a possible MRI hazard.

    PubMed

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Mallon, Kara; Brown, Julie C

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets as a component of complementary and alternative medicine is increasingly common. Magnet therapy is used to treat a variety of conditions and often involves tiny magnets adhered to the skin. In auriculotherapy, magnets are placed in specific locations of the ear pinnae which represent particular parts of the body. While generally considered safe, these magnets have the potential to cause imaging problems and serious injury during MRI. We report a case of auriculotherapy magnets which escaped detection despite the use of screening forms and a walk-through metal detector. The magnets caused image artifact but no other patient harm. We recommend updating patient screening practices and educating providers placing therapeutic magnets and performing MRIs of this new potential MRI hazard.

  1. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  2. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  3. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  4. Screening in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Paolo Del; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  5. Screening in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Poggio, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  6. Screening of lake sediments for emerging contaminants by liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Krauss, Martin; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-01-15

    We developed a multiresidue method for the target and suspect screening of more than 180 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, biocides, additives, corrosion inhibitors, musk fragrances, UV light stabilizers, and industrial chemicals in sediments. Sediment samples were freeze-dried, extracted by pressurized liquid extraction, and cleaned up by liquid-liquid partitioning. The quantification and identification of target compounds with a broad range of physicochemical properties (log K(ow) 0-12) was carried out by liquid chromatography followed by electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) coupled to high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS). The overall method average recoveries and precision are 103% and 9% (RSD), respectively. The method detection limits range from 0.010 to 4 ng/g(dw), while limits of quantification range from 0.030 to 14 ng/g(dw). The use of APPI as an alternative ionization source helped to distinguish two isomeric musk fragrances by means of different ionization behavior. The method was demonstrated on sediment cores from Lake Greifensee located in northeastern Switzerland. The results show that biocides, musk fragrances, and other personal care products were the most frequently detected compounds with concentrations ranging from pg/g(dw) to ng/g(dw), whereas none of the targeted pharmaceuticals were found. The concentrations of many urban contaminants originating from wastewater correlate with the highest phosphorus input into the lake as a proxy for treatment efficiency. HRMS enabled a retrospective analysis of the full-scan data acquisition allowing the detection of suspected compounds like quaternary ammonium surfactants, the biocide triclocarban, and the tentative identification of further compounds without reference standards, among others transformation products of triclosan and triclocarban. PMID:23215447

  7. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  8. Screening in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Biringer, Anne

    1988-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, traditional elements of antenatal care have been supplemented by complex biochemical and biophysical investigations. With his/her knowledge of the patient and awareness of the principles of screening, the family physician is ideally placed to assess potential problems in pregnancy. This article reviews the rationale for screening for certain disorders in pregnancy. Genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and other specific conditions are considered. Some of the more recent controversies in prenatal screening are highlighted. PMID:21253226

  9. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  10. [Overdiagnosis in cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Cervera Deval, J; Sentís Crivillé, M; Zulueta, J J

    2015-01-01

    In screening programs, overdiagnosis is defined as the detection of a disease that would have gone undetected without screening when that disease would not have resulted in morbimortality and was treated unnecessarily. Overdiagnosis is a bias inherent in screening and an undesired effect of secondary prevention and improved sensitivity of diagnostic techniques. It is difficult to discriminate a priori between clinically relevant diagnoses and those in which treatment is unnecessary. To minimize the effects of overdiagnosis, screening should be done in patients at risk. PMID:25174786

  11. [Overdiagnosis in cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Cervera Deval, J; Sentís Crivillé, M; Zulueta, J J

    2015-01-01

    In screening programs, overdiagnosis is defined as the detection of a disease that would have gone undetected without screening when that disease would not have resulted in morbimortality and was treated unnecessarily. Overdiagnosis is a bias inherent in screening and an undesired effect of secondary prevention and improved sensitivity of diagnostic techniques. It is difficult to discriminate a priori between clinically relevant diagnoses and those in which treatment is unnecessary. To minimize the effects of overdiagnosis, screening should be done in patients at risk.

  12. Screening on binary Zr-1X (X = Ti, Nb, Mo, Cu, Au, Pd, Ag, Ru, Hf and Bi) alloys with good in vitro cytocompatibility and magnetic resonance imaging compatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, F Y; Qiu, K J; Li, H F; Huang, T; Wang, B L; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the microstructures, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, in vitro cytocompatibility and magnetic susceptibility of Zr-1X alloys with various alloying elements, including Ti, Nb, Mo, Cu, Au, Pd, Ag, Ru, Hf and Bi, were systematically investigated to explore their potential use in biomedical applications. The experimental results indicated that annealed Zr-1X alloys consisted entirely or primarily of α phase. The alloying elements significantly increased the strength and hardness of pure Zr and had a relatively slight influence on elastic modulus. Ru was the most effective enhancing element and Zr-1Ru alloy had the largest elongation. The results of electrochemical corrosion indicated that adding various elements to Zr improved its corrosion resistance, as indicated by the reduced corrosion current density. The extracts of the studied Zr-1X alloys produced no significant deleterious effects on osteoblast-like cells (MG 63), indicating good in vitro cytocompatibility. All except for Zr-1Ag alloy showed decreased magnetic susceptibility compared to pure Zr, and Zr-1Ru alloy had the lowest magnetic susceptibility value, being comparable to that of α' phase Zr-Mo alloy and Zr-Nb alloy and far lower than that of Co-Cr alloy and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Among the experimental Zr-1X alloys, Zr-1Ru alloy possessing high strength coupled with good ductility, good in vitro cytocompatibility and low magnetic susceptibility may be a good candidate alloy for medical devices within a magnetic resonance imaging environment.

  13. Aneuploidy Screening in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dashe, Jodi S

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal aneuploidy screening has changed dramatically in recent years with increases in the types of chromosomal abnormalities reliably identified and in the proportion of aneuploid fetuses detected. Initially, screening was available only for trisomies 21 and 18 and was offered only to low-risk pregnancies. Improved detection with the quadruple- and first-trimester multiple marker screens led to the option of aneuploidy screening for women 35 years of age and older. Cell-free DNA tests now screen for common autosomal trisomies and sex chromosome aneuploidies. Cell-free DNA screening is particularly effective in older women because of higher positive predictive values and lower false-positive rates. Integrated first- and second-trimester multiple marker tests provide specific risks for trisomies 21, 18, and possibly 13, and may detect an even wider range of aneuploidies. Given current precision in risk assessment, based on maternal age and preferences for screening or diagnostic tests, counseling has become more complex. This review addresses the benefits and limitations of available aneuploidy screening methods along with counseling considerations when offering them. PMID:27275786

  14. Radiographic intensifying screen

    SciTech Connect

    Ochiai, T.

    1985-02-26

    A radiographic intensifying screen comprising a substrate and a fluorescent layer provided thereon and consisting essentially of a binder and a radioluminescent phosphor dispersed therein. The binder comprises linear polyester resin or linear polyester resin crosslinked with a crosslinking agent. The screen exhibits improved physical properties.

  15. Preconception Carrier Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can the results of a carrier screening test tell me? A genetic counselor or your health care provider will use the results to calculate the ... the publisher. Related FAQs Genetic Disorders (FAQ094) Screening Tests for Birth Defects ... Education & Events Annual Meeting CME Overview CREOG ...

  16. Scoliosis Screening in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Pupil Personnel Services.

    The booklet outlines New York state school policy and procedures for screening students for scoliosis, lateral curvature of the spine. It is explained that screening is designed to discover spinal deformities early enough to prevent surgery. Planning aspects, including organizing a planning team for the school district, are discussed. Among…

  17. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An ocular screening system designed for safe, convenient screening of large groups was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, leading to the formation of Medical Sciences Corporation. The system identifies visual defects accurately and inexpensively, and includes a photorefractor telephoto lens and an electronic flash. Medical Sciences Corporation is using the device to test at schools, industrial plants, etc.

  18. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  19. Screening for Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Chan, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Wang, Kenneth K

    2015-05-01

    The large increase in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West during the past 30 years has stimulated interest in screening for Barrett's esophagus (BE), a precursor to esophageal cancer. Effective endoscopic treatments for dysplasia and intramucosal cancer, coupled with screening programs to detect BE, could help reverse the increase in the incidence of esophageal cancer. However, there are no accurate, cost-effective, minimally invasive techniques available to screen for BE, reducing the enthusiasm of gastroenterologists. Over the past 5 years, there has been significant progress in the development of screening technologies. We review existing and developing technologies, new minimally invasive imaging techniques, nonendoscopic devices for cell collection, and biomarkers that can be measured in blood or stool samples. We discuss the status of these approaches, data from clinical studies of their effects, and their anticipated strengths and weaknesses in screening. The area is rapidly evolving, and new tools will soon be ready for prime time. PMID:25701083

  20. Psychological screening program overview.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathleen M; Huffman, Ann H; Adler, Amy B; Castro, Carl A

    2002-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on health surveillance conducted during military deployments, focusing on models for assessing the impact of operational deployments on peacekeepers. A discussion of the stressors and potential mental health consequences of peacekeeping operations follows with relevant examples of findings from U.S. and international military forces. Psychological screening in different peacekeeping operations conducted in U.S. Army-Europe is reviewed. The review begins with the redeployment screening of military personnel deployed to Bosnia mandated under the Joint Medical Surveillance Program, and continues through the present screening of units deployed to Kosovo. The detailed description of the screening program includes a discussion of procedures and measures and demonstrates the evolution of the program. A summary of key findings from the screening program and a discussion of future research directions are provided. PMID:12392255

  1. Diabetes Screening Among Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Creatore, Maria I.; Booth, Gillian L.; Manuel, Douglas G.; Moineddin, Rahim; Glazier, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine diabetes screening, predictors of screening, and the burden of undiagnosed diabetes in the immigrant population and whether these estimates differ by ethnicity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A population-based retrospective cohort linking administrative health data to immigration files was used to follow the entire diabetes-free population aged 40 years and up in Ontario, Canada (N = 3,484,222) for 3 years (2004–2007) to determine whether individuals were screened for diabetes. Multivariate regression was used to determine predictors of having a diabetes test. RESULTS Screening rates were slightly higher in the immigrant versus the general population (76.0 and 74.4%, respectively; P < 0.001), with the highest rates in people born in South Asia, Mexico, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Immigrant seniors (age ≥65 years) were screened less than nonimmigrant seniors. Percent yield of new diabetes subjects among those screened was high for certain countries of birth (South Asia, 13.0%; Mexico and Latin America, 12.1%; Caribbean, 9.5%) and low among others (Europe, Central Asia, U.S., 5.1–5.2%). The number of physician visits was the single most important predictor of screening, and many high-risk ethnic groups required numerous visits before a test was administered. The proportion of diabetes that remained undiagnosed was estimated to be 9.7% in the general population and 9.0% in immigrants. CONCLUSIONS Overall diabetes-screening rates are high in Canada’s universal health care setting, including among high-risk ethnic groups. Despite this finding, disparities in screening rates between immigrant subgroups persist and multiple physician visits are often required to achieve recommended screening levels. PMID:22357181

  2. Design and development of a new generation of UV-visible-light-driven nanosized codoped titanium dioxide photocatalysts and biocides/sporocides, and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamal, Dambar B.

    For solar environmental remediation, a new generation of nanosized (< 10 nm) titanium dioxide photocatalysts codoped with metals and nonmetals, or metals only were prepared by the xero-gel and aero-gel methods. For silver or cobalt-based xero-gel titanium dioxide photocatalysts, photoactivities tests revealed that codoping of titanium dioxide with a metal (1% Ag or 2% Co) and nonmetals (carbon and sulfur) is necessary to achieve high-activities for acetaldehyde degradation under visible light (wavelength > 420 nm). It was concluded that high visible-light-activities for acetaldehyde degradation over codoped titanium dioxide were attributed to an interplay of anatase crystallinity, high-surface area, reduced band-gap (< 3.0 eV), uniform dispersion of doped metal ions, and suppressed recombination rate of photogenerated electronhole pairs. Moreover, the nature and amount of codoped metals play a significant role in visible-light-induced photocatalysis. Metals (Al, Ga, and In) doped/codoped titanium dioxide photocatalysts were prepared by the aero-gel method. The photocatalytic studies showed that activities of metal doped/codoped photocatalysts under UV light (wavelength < 400 nm) were found to be dependent on pollutants. Indium demonstrated beneficial effects in both textural and photocatalytic properties. Gallium and indium codoped titanium dioxide photocatalysts displayed even better performance in the CO oxidation reaction under UV light. Notably, titanium dioxide codoped with Ga, In, and Pt, exhibited unique photoactivities for the CO oxidation under both UV and visible light irradiation, indicating that this system could have promise for the water-gas shift reaction for hydrogen production. Silver-based nanostructured titanium dioxide samples were developed for killing human pathogens (Escherichia coli cells and Bacillus subtilis spores). Biocidal tests revealed that silver, carbon, and sulfur codoped titanium dioxide nanoparticles (< 10 nm) possess very strong

  3. REXPO: A catchment model designed to understand and simulate the loss dynamics of plant protection products and biocides from agricultural and urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, I. K.; Bader, H.-P.; Scheidegger, R.; Stamm, C.

    2016-02-01

    During rain events, biocides and plant protection products are transported from agricultural fields but also from urban sources to surface waters. Originally designed to be biologically active, these compounds may harm organisms in aquatic ecosystems. Although several models allow either urban or agricultural storm events to be predicted, only few combine these two sources, and none of them include biocide losses from building envelopes. This study therefore aims to develop a model designed to predict water and substance flows from urban and agricultural sources to surface waters. We developed a model based on physical principles for water percolation and substance flow including micro- (also called matrix-) and macropore-flows for the agricultural areas together with a model representing sources, sewer systems and a wastewater treatment plant for urban areas. In a second step, the combined model was applied to a catchment where an extensive field study had been conducted. The modelled and measured discharge and compound results corresponded reasonably well in terms of quantity and dynamics. The total cumulative discharge was only slightly lower than the total measured discharge (factor 0.94). The total modelled losses of the agriculturally used herbicide atrazine were slightly lower (∼25%) than the measured losses when the soil pore water distribution coefficient (describing the partition between soil particles and pore water) (Kd) was kept constant and slightly higher if it was increased with time. The modelled urban losses of diuron from facades were within a factor of three with respect to the measured values. The results highlighted the change in importance of the flow components during a rain event from urban sources during the most intensive rain period towards agricultural ones over a prolonged time period. Applications to two other catchments, one neighbouring and one on another continent showed that the model can be applied using site specific data for

  4. Leuconostoc bacteriophages from blue cheese manufacture: long-term survival, resistance to thermal treatments, high pressure homogenization and chemical biocides of industrial application.

    PubMed

    Pujato, Silvina A; Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Ackermann, Hans-W; Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Reinheimer, Jorge A; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Nine Leuconostoc mesenteroides phages were isolated during blue cheese manufacture yielding faulty products with reduced eye formation. Their morphologies, restriction profiles, host ranges and long-term survival rates (25°C, 8°C, -20°C and -80°C) were analysed. Based on restriction analysis, six of them were further examined regarding resistance to physical (heat and high pressure homogenization, HPH) and chemical treatments (ethanol, sodium hypochlorite, peracetic acid, biocides A, C, E and F). According to their morphology, L. mesenteroides phages studied in the present work belonged to the Caudovirales order and Siphoviridae family. Six distinct restriction patterns were obtained with EcoRV, HindIII, ClaI and XhoI enzymes, revealing interesting phage diversity in the dairy environment. No significant reductions in phage counts were observed after ten months of storage at -20°C and -80°C, while slightly and moderate decrease in phage numbers were noticed at 8°C and 25°C, respectively. The phages subjected to heat treatments generally showed high resistance at 63°C and moderate resistance at 72°C. However, 80°C for 30 min and 90°C for 2 min led to complete inactivation of viral particles. In general, the best ethanol concentration tested was 75%, as complete inactivation for most Leuconostoc phages within 30 min of incubation was achieved. Peracetic acid, and biocides A, C, E and F were highly effective when used at the same or at a moderately lower concentration as recommended by the producer. Usually, moderate or high concentrations (600-1,600 ppm) of sodium hypochlorite were necessary to completely inactivate phage particles. Leuconostoc phages were partially inactivated by HPH treatments as remaining viral particles were found even after 8 passes at 100 MPa. This is the first report of L. mesenteroides phages isolated from an Argentinean dairy cheese plant. The results of this work could be useful for establishing the most effective physical and

  5. Leuconostoc bacteriophages from blue cheese manufacture: long-term survival, resistance to thermal treatments, high pressure homogenization and chemical biocides of industrial application.

    PubMed

    Pujato, Silvina A; Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Ackermann, Hans-W; Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Reinheimer, Jorge A; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Nine Leuconostoc mesenteroides phages were isolated during blue cheese manufacture yielding faulty products with reduced eye formation. Their morphologies, restriction profiles, host ranges and long-term survival rates (25°C, 8°C, -20°C and -80°C) were analysed. Based on restriction analysis, six of them were further examined regarding resistance to physical (heat and high pressure homogenization, HPH) and chemical treatments (ethanol, sodium hypochlorite, peracetic acid, biocides A, C, E and F). According to their morphology, L. mesenteroides phages studied in the present work belonged to the Caudovirales order and Siphoviridae family. Six distinct restriction patterns were obtained with EcoRV, HindIII, ClaI and XhoI enzymes, revealing interesting phage diversity in the dairy environment. No significant reductions in phage counts were observed after ten months of storage at -20°C and -80°C, while slightly and moderate decrease in phage numbers were noticed at 8°C and 25°C, respectively. The phages subjected to heat treatments generally showed high resistance at 63°C and moderate resistance at 72°C. However, 80°C for 30 min and 90°C for 2 min led to complete inactivation of viral particles. In general, the best ethanol concentration tested was 75%, as complete inactivation for most Leuconostoc phages within 30 min of incubation was achieved. Peracetic acid, and biocides A, C, E and F were highly effective when used at the same or at a moderately lower concentration as recommended by the producer. Usually, moderate or high concentrations (600-1,600 ppm) of sodium hypochlorite were necessary to completely inactivate phage particles. Leuconostoc phages were partially inactivated by HPH treatments as remaining viral particles were found even after 8 passes at 100 MPa. This is the first report of L. mesenteroides phages isolated from an Argentinean dairy cheese plant. The results of this work could be useful for establishing the most effective physical and

  6. Electric current and magnetic field effects on bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, Elizabeth Louise

    The ability of bacteria to form and grow as biofilm presents a major challenge in clinical medicine. Through this work, two alternative electromagnetic treatment strategies were investigated to combat bacterial biofilms like those that cause chronic infections on indwelling medical devices. Direct electric current (DC) was applied at current densities of 0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm2 alone and in conjunction with antibiotic. Unlike most previous studies, chloride ions were included in the treatment solution at a physiologically-relevant concentration. Using this approach, low levels of DC alone were demonstrated to have a dose-responsive, biocidal effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms with no synergistic enhancement of antibiotic activity. Through a series of experiments using chemical measures, cell viability, and global gene expression, electrolytic generation of chlorine, a potent disinfectant, was identified as the predominant mechanism by which DC kills bacteria in biofilm. The second treatment strategy investigated weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) as a noninvasive approach, involving an extension of concepts from well-studied ELF-MF effects observed in eukaryotic systems to bacterial biofilm. S. epidermidis biofilms grown in weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) at Ca2+ and K+ ion resonance frequencies were assessed using global gene expression to determine if S. epidermidis in biofilm detect and respond to ELF-MFs. Frequency-dependent changes in gene expression were observed with upregulation of genes involved in transposase activity, signal transduction systems, and membrane transport processes indicating possible effects consistent with theories of ELF-MF induced changes in ion transport reported in eukaryotic cells. This is the first transcriptome study to indentify ELF-MF effects in bacteria. While no direct biocidal effect was observed with ELF-MF treatment, alteration of membrane

  7. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries. PMID:27535387

  8. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries.

  9. High performance magnetically controllable microturbines.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Ku, Jin-Feng; He, Yan; Xu, Bin-Bin; Chen, Qi-Dai; Xia, Hong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Reported in this paper is two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) fabrication of magnetic microturbines with high surface smoothness towards microfluids mixing. As the key component of the magnetic photoresist, Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were carefully screened for homogeneous doping. In this work, oleic acid stabilized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles synthesized via high-temperature induced organic phase decomposition of an iron precursor show evident advantages in particle morphology. After modification with propoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (PO(3)-TMPTA, a kind of cross-linker), the magnetic nanoparticles were homogeneously doped in acrylate-based photoresist for TPP fabrication of microstructures. Finally, a magnetic microturbine was successfully fabricated as an active mixing device for remote control of microfluids blending. The development of high quality magnetic photoresists would lead to high performance magnetically controllable microdevices for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications. PMID:20721411

  10. Screening and diagnosis for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    HIV testing; HIV screening; HIV screening test; HIV confirmatory test ... Task Force. Final Update Summary: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Screening. July 2015. www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/ ...

  11. Medicare Preventive and Screening Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... covered? Search Medicare.gov for covered items Preventive & screening services How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers: Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening Alcohol misuse screenings & counseling Bone mass measurements (bone ...

  12. A History of Vision Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelboom, Tina M.

    1985-01-01

    The vision screening program has a long and interesting history involving educators, pediatricians, optometrists, and ophthamologists. This historical review of vision screening in the schools includes a discussion of amblyopia and screening of preschool students. (Author/CB)

  13. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain types ...

  14. Chemical Screening in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Brady, Colleen A; Rennekamp, Andrew J; Peterson, Randall T

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic small molecule screens in zebrafish have gained popularity as an unbiased approach to probe biological processes. In this chapter we outline basic methods for performing chemical screens with larval zebrafish including breeding large numbers of embryos, plating larval fish into multi-well dishes, and adding small molecules to these wells. We also highlight important considerations when designing and interpreting the results of a phenotypic screen and possible follow-up approaches, including popular methods used to identify the mechanism of action of a chemical compound. PMID:27464797

  15. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  16. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wada, Keita; Takaori, Kyoichi; Traverso, L William

    2015-10-01

    Neither extended surgery nor extended indication for surgery has improved survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. According to autopsy studies, presumably 90% are metastatic. The only cure is complete removal of the tumor at an early stage before it becomes a systemic disease or becomes invasive. Early detection and screening of individuals at risk is currently under way. This article reviews the evidence and methods for screening, either familial or sporadic. Indication for early-stage surgery and precursors are discussed. Surgeons should be familiar with screening because it may provide patients with a chance for cure by surgical resection.

  17. Electron screening in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajević, J.; Lipoglavšek, M.; Likar, A.; Petrovič, T.; Pelicon, P.; Sánchez Ortiz, A.; Cvetinović, A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to further investigate electron screening effect we studied proton induced nuclear reactions over an energy range from 0.8 to 2.6 MeV for different environments: Mn and Cd metals and MnO and CdO insulators. Shifts in resonance energy for metallic relative to insulator targets were not observed. No large electron screening could be deduced for (p,γ) and (p,n) reactions in Mn. Moreover, no large electron screening can be deduced with certainty for the (p,n) reaction in Cd.

  18. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Deffebach, Mark E; Humphrey, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Screening for lung cancer in high-risk individuals with annual low-dose computed tomography has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% and is recommended by multiple health care organizations. Lung cancer screening is not a specific test; it is a process that involves appropriate selection of high-risk individuals, careful interpretation and follow-up of imaging, and annual testing. Screening should be performed in the context of a multidisciplinary program experienced in the diagnosis and management of lung nodules and early-stage lung cancer.

  19. Neonatal hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Margaret A

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal hearing screening can be performed using reliable and reproducible methods. Intervention before the age of 6 months with hearing aids and appropriate educational support services will give the infant the best possible opportunity to develop language. Potential barriers to efficient implementation of a neonatal hearing screening program include access to appropriate and timely diagnostic and support services and insurance to cover the services. Without universal neonatal hearing screening, many children with hearing loss will be missed, which will have a direct negative impact on their speech, language, educational, and social development. PMID:12809324

  20. Magnetic Spinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays above two triangular magnets fixed to the base. The magnetic repulsive force experienced by the circular magnets is independent of their orientation; therefore, the holder of these magnets can be rotated without affecting its stability. The holder with the circular magnets can be oscillated up and down as a horizontally suspended physical pendulum.

  1. Facile synthesis of BiOI in hierarchical nanostructure preparation and its photocatalytic application to organic dye removal and biocidal effect of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Long, Yang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Ju, Peng; Sun, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Novel BiOI hierarchical nanostructures with porous architecture was prepared at room temperature by an economical, facile and rapid route. The coupling adsorption and degradation efficiency of rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue (MB), and methyl orange (MO) could achieve 98.7%, 43.2%, 76.9% within 180min in the presence of BiOI, respectively. BiOI hierarchical nanostructures also exhibit excellent effective biocidal performances, and the disinfection rate of the typical biofouling bacteria Bacillus sp. and Pseudoalteromonas sp. could reach 99.9% and 99.8% in 60min, respectively. The circulate photocatalytic degradation of RhB experiment verified the good stability and reusability of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures. Based on active specie trapping experiments, the superoxide radicals (O2(-)) and holes (h(+)) were proved to be the main reactive species in the BiOI-based system. The obviously enhanced coupling adsorption and photocatalytic degradation performance of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures could be mainly attributed to the large surface area (64.5m(2)/g), negatively charged surface and the intrinsic electron structure. This study provides a new strategy to develop novel photocatalysts for water treatment and marine antifouling. PMID:27451034

  2. Transcriptome analysis of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to biocide stress reveals a multi-system response involving cell wall synthesis, sugar uptake, and motility.

    PubMed

    Casey, Aidan; Fox, Edward M; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Coffey, Aidan; McAuliffe, Olivia; Jordan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a virulent food-borne pathogen most often associated with the consumption of "ready-to-eat" foods. The organism is a common contaminant of food processing plants where it may persist for extended periods of time. A commonly used approach for the control of Listeria monocytogenes in the processing environment is the application of biocides such as quaternary ammonium compounds. In this study, the transcriptomic response of a persistent strain of L. monocytogenes (strain 6179) on exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of the quaternary ammonium compound benzethonium chloride (BZT) was assessed. Using RNA-Seq, gene expression levels were quantified by sequencing the transcriptome of L. monocytogenes 6179 in the presence (4 ppm) and absence of BZT, and mapping each data set to the sequenced genome of strain 6179. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes were identified, and subsequent analysis suggested that many biological processes such as peptidoglycan biosynthesis, bacterial chemotaxis and motility, and carbohydrate uptake, were involved in the response of L. monocyotogenes to the presence of BZT. The information generated in this study further contributes to our understanding of the response of bacteria to environmental stress. In addition, this study demonstrates the importance of using the bacterium's own genome as a reference when analysing RNA-Seq data.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to biocide stress reveals a multi-system response involving cell wall synthesis, sugar uptake, and motility

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Aidan; Fox, Edward M.; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Coffey, Aidan; McAuliffe, Olivia; Jordan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a virulent food-borne pathogen most often associated with the consumption of “ready-to-eat” foods. The organism is a common contaminant of food processing plants where it may persist for extended periods of time. A commonly used approach for the control of Listeria monocytogenes in the processing environment is the application of biocides such as quaternary ammonium compounds. In this study, the transcriptomic response of a persistent strain of L. monocytogenes (strain 6179) on exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of the quaternary ammonium compound benzethonium chloride (BZT) was assessed. Using RNA-Seq, gene expression levels were quantified by sequencing the transcriptome of L. monocytogenes 6179 in the presence (4 ppm) and absence of BZT, and mapping each data set to the sequenced genome of strain 6179. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes were identified, and subsequent analysis suggested that many biological processes such as peptidoglycan biosynthesis, bacterial chemotaxis and motility, and carbohydrate uptake, were involved in the response of L. monocyotogenes to the presence of BZT. The information generated in this study further contributes to our understanding of the response of bacteria to environmental stress. In addition, this study demonstrates the importance of using the bacterium's own genome as a reference when analysing RNA-Seq data. PMID:24616718

  4. Cationic Oligo(thiophene ethynylene) with Broad-Spectrum and High Antibacterial Efficiency under White Light and Specific Biocidal Activity against S. aureus in Dark.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Li, Junting; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Zhengping; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-13

    We designed and synthesized a novel oligo(thiophene ethynylene) (OTE) to investigate the antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Ralstonia solanacearum and Escherichia coli) bacteria in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Notably, OTE presents broad-spectrum and greatly high antibacterial activities after white light irradiation at nanogram per milliliter concentrations. The half inhibitory concentrations (IC50) values obtained for S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli, and R. solanacearum are 8, 13, 24, and 52 ng/mL after illumination for 30 min, respectively, which are lower than that of other PDT agents. Interestingly, OTE shows the specific and very strong dark killing capability against S. aureus at the concentration of 180 ng/mL for 30 min, which is the highest efficiency biocide against S. aureus without the need of irradiation to date. The antibacterial mechanism investigated demonstrated that reactive oxygen species or singlet-oxygen generated by OTE kills bacteria irreversibly upon white light irradiation, and OTE as a v-type oligomer exerts its toxicity directly on destroying bacterial cytoplasmic membrane in the dark. Importantly, the OTE shows no cell cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. The results indicate that it is potential to provide versatile applications in the efficient control of pathogenic organisms and specific application for killing S. aureus. PMID:26671682

  5. A solid device based on doped hybrid composites for controlling the dosage of the biocide N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine in industrial formulations.

    PubMed

    Argente-García, A; Muñoz-Ortuño, M; Molins-Legua, C; Moliner-Martínez, Y; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2016-01-15

    A colorimetric composite device is proposed to determine the widely used biocide N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (ADP).This sensing device is based on a film of 1,2-Naphthoquinone-4-sulfonate (NQS) embedded into polydimethylsiloxane-tetraethylortosilicate-SiO2 nanoparticles composite (PDMS-TEOS-SiO2NPs). Semiquantitative analysis can be performed by visual inspection. Digitalized image or diffuse reflectance (DR) measurements can be carried out for quantitative analysis. Satisfactory detection limit (0.018%, w/v) and relative standard deviations <12% were achieved. The proposed device has been applied for the determination of ADP in detergent industrial formulations with recovery values between 80% and 112%. The method has been successfully validated, showing its high potential to control and monitor this compound because the device is easy to prepare and use, robust, portable, stable over time and cost effective. This device allows a green, simple and rapid approach for the analysis of samples without pretreatment and does not require highly trained personnel. These advantages give the proposed kit good prospects for implementation in several industries. PMID:26592589

  6. Facile synthesis of BiOI in hierarchical nanostructure preparation and its photocatalytic application to organic dye removal and biocidal effect of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Long, Yang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Ju, Peng; Sun, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Novel BiOI hierarchical nanostructures with porous architecture was prepared at room temperature by an economical, facile and rapid route. The coupling adsorption and degradation efficiency of rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue (MB), and methyl orange (MO) could achieve 98.7%, 43.2%, 76.9% within 180min in the presence of BiOI, respectively. BiOI hierarchical nanostructures also exhibit excellent effective biocidal performances, and the disinfection rate of the typical biofouling bacteria Bacillus sp. and Pseudoalteromonas sp. could reach 99.9% and 99.8% in 60min, respectively. The circulate photocatalytic degradation of RhB experiment verified the good stability and reusability of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures. Based on active specie trapping experiments, the superoxide radicals (O2(-)) and holes (h(+)) were proved to be the main reactive species in the BiOI-based system. The obviously enhanced coupling adsorption and photocatalytic degradation performance of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures could be mainly attributed to the large surface area (64.5m(2)/g), negatively charged surface and the intrinsic electron structure. This study provides a new strategy to develop novel photocatalysts for water treatment and marine antifouling.

  7. Telechelic Poly(2-oxazoline)s with a biocidal and a polymerizable terminal as collagenase inhibiting additive for long-term active antimicrobial dental materials

    PubMed Central

    Fik, Christoph P.; Konieczny, Stefan; Pashley, David H.; Waschinski, Christian J.; Ladisch, Reinhild S.; Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten; Tiller, Joerg C.

    2015-01-01

    Although modern dental repair materials show excellent mechanical and adhesion properties, they still face two major problems: First, any microbes that remain alive below the composite fillings actively decompose dentin and thus, subsequently cause secondary caries. Second, even if those microbes are killed, the extracellular proteases such as MMP, remain active and can still degrade collagenousdental tissue. In order to address both problems, a poly(2-methyloxazoline) with a biocidal quaternary ammonium and a polymerizable methacrylate terminal was explored as additive for a commercial dental adhesive. It could be demonstrated that the adhesive rendered the adhesive contact-active antimicrobial against S. mutans at a concentration of only 2.5 wt% and even constant washing with water for 101 days did not diminish this effect. Increasing the amount of the additive to 5 wt% allowed killing S. mutans cells in the tubuli of bovinedentin upon application of the adhesive. Further, the additive fully inhibited bacterial collagenase at a concentration of 0.5 wt% and reduced human recombinant collagenase MMP-9 to 13% of its original activity at that concentration. Human MMPs naturally bound to dentin were inhibited by more than 96% in a medium containing 5 wt% of the additive. Moreover, no adverse effect on the enamel/dentine shear bond strength was detected in combination with a dental composite. PMID:25130877

  8. Biocide immobilized OMMT-carbon dot reduced Cu2O nanohybrid/hyperbranched epoxy nanocomposites: Mechanical, thermal, antimicrobial and optical properties.

    PubMed

    De, Bibekananda; Gupta, Kuldeep; Mandal, Manabendra; Karak, Niranjan

    2015-11-01

    The present work demonstrated a transparent thermosetting nanocomposite with antimicrobial and photoluminescence attributes. The nanocomposites are fabricated by incorporation of different wt.% (1, 2 and 3) of a biocide immobilized OMMT-carbon dot reduced Cu2O nanohybrid (MITH-NH) in the hyperbranched epoxy matrix. MITH-NH is obtained by immobilization of 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one hydrochloride (MITH) at room temperature using sonication on OMMT-carbon dot reduced Cu2O nanohybid. The nanohybrid is prepared by reduction of cupric acetate using carbon dot as the reducing agent in the presence of OMMT at 70°C. The significant improvements in tensile strength (~2 fold), elongation at break (3 fold), toughness (4 fold) and initial thermal degradation temperature (30°C) of the pristine hyperbranched epoxy system are achieved by incorporation of 3wt.% of MITH-NH in it. The nanocomposites exhibit strong antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria and Candida albicans, a fungus. The nanocomposite also shows significant activity against biofilm formation compared to the pristine thermoset. Further, the nanocomposite films emit different colors on exposure of different wavelengths of UV light. The properties of these nanocomposites are also compared with the same nanohybrid without OMMT.

  9. Comparative analysis of the susceptibility to triclosan and three other biocides of avian Salmonella enterica isolates collected 1979 through 1994 and 2004 through 2010.

    PubMed

    Rensch, U; Klein, G; Schwarz, S; Kaspar, H; de Jong, A; Kehrenberg, C

    2013-04-01

    Few studies have been conducted on changes in the susceptibility of bacteria due to long-term use of biocides. A total of 375 avian Salmonella isolates collected in Germany from healthy or diseased animals during two time periods, 1979 through 1994 and 2004 through 2010, were included in the present study. The isolates were tested for their MICs of triclosan, acriflavine, benzalkonium chloride, and chlorhexidine by broth macrodilution. MIC50, MIC90, and the distribution of MICs were compared. The MIC ranges were 0.0625 to 0.5 μg/ml for triclosan, 16 to 256 μg/ml for acriflavine, 8 to 128 μg/ml for benzalkonium chloride, and 0.5 to 32 μg/ml for chlorhexidine. MIC50s and MIC90s were equal or differed by not more than one dilution step. For isolates from healthy poultry collected during the two time periods, statistical analysis revealed a significant increase only in MICs for chlorhexidine. Salmonellae from diseased birds were more susceptible to triclosan and benzalkonium chloride but less susceptible to acriflavine and chlorhexidine. Overall, only 25 strains had the highest detected MIC of 0.5 μg/ml triclosan, but an association with multidrug resistance could not be confirmed.

  10. Prostate cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... not do an accurate job of screening for prostate cancer. ... and anxiety, even if you do not have prostate cancer. Side effects from further testing. If your PSA test is higher than normal, you may need to ...

  11. Screening Tests for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... or colonoscopy) Diabetes screening Gonorrhea test HIV test Syphilis test Get tested for chlamydia yearly through age ... to be tested for HIV. Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk or pregnant. ...

  12. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... difficult to assess the effect of lead-time bias on the reported rates. Men with screen-detected ... and Treatment Two poor-quality (high risk of bias) randomized, con- trolled trials initiated in the 1980s ...

  13. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... screening tests are being studied in clinical trials. Virtual colonoscopy Virtual colonoscopy is a procedure that uses ... complications may occur more often in older patients. Virtual colonoscopy Virtual colonoscopy often finds problems with organs ...

  14. RAS - Screens & Assays

    Cancer.gov

    A primary goal of the RAS Initiative is to develop assays for RAS activity, localization, and signaling and adapt those assays so they can be used for finding new drug candidates. Explore the work leading to highly validated screening protocols.

  15. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is no cancer. This is called a false-positive result. For women who have had cancer in ... easier to treat. Risks of screenings can include: False-positive results . This occurs when a test shows cancer ...

  16. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  17. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these tests as well as the possible harms, both of which are explained below. This fact ... after receiving abnormal test results. Benefits and Possible Harms The main benefit of screening is that it ...

  18. Screening for Glaucoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough evidence to determine the potential benefits and harms of glaucoma screening for adults who do not ... Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can harm the eye’s optic nerve. The optic nerve carries ...

  19. Difficult Decisions: Genetic Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.; Parakh, Jal S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the issue of mandatory genetic screening. Poses the question of the benefits, drawbacks, and motives involved. Provides a discussion activity to be used in high school biology classes consisting of a hypothetical situation and several questions. (CW)

  20. Screening for Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... events Visit the podcast archive Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/Disorders Related ... for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies ...

  1. Environmental Stress Screening 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The following identifies the authors of this report and the organizations that sponsored the effort conducted under the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) Environmental Stress Screening (ESS) 2000 Project.

  2. Use of biosensors to screen urine samples for potentially toxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Horswell, Jacqui; Dickson, Stuart

    2003-09-01

    Forensic toxicology laboratories are often required to implicate or exclude poisoning as a factor in a death or unexplained illness. An analytical tool which enables toxicologists to screen a wide variety of common poisons would be extremely useful. In this paper, we describe the use of a bacterial biosensor for detecting the presence of commonly encountered potentially toxic chemicals in urine. The biosensor responds to any chemical that causes metabolic stress to the bacterial cell and the response is in direct proportion to the concentration of the stressor. This allows a measure of the concentration of a toxicant in urine, without knowing exactly what the toxic compound(s) may be. This affords a distinct advantage over conventional analytical techniques, which require an extensive screening program before it is even known that a toxic compound is present. This preliminary investigation has shown that this biosensor can indicate the presence, in urine, of herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid; the biocide pentachlorophenol; or inorganic poisons such as arsenic, mercury, and cyanide. The biosensor was also shown to be sensitive to a concentration range of these toxicants likely to be found in samples submitted for toxicological analysis.

  3. Screen-printed nanoparticles as anti-counterfeiting tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Cuerva, Carlos; Zieba, Maciej; Sebastian, Victor; Martínez, Gema; Sese, Javier; Irusta, Silvia; Contamina, Vicente; Arruebo, Manuel; Santamaria, Jesus

    2016-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles with different physical properties have been screen printed as authentication tags on different types of paper. Gold and silver nanoparticles show unique optical signatures, including sharp emission bandwidths and long lifetimes of the printed label, even under accelerated weathering conditions. Magnetic nanoparticles show distinct physical signals that depend on the size of the nanoparticle itself. They were also screen printed on different substrates and their magnetic signals read out using a magnetic pattern recognition sensor and a vibrating sample magnetometer. The novelty of our work lies in the demonstration that the combination of nanomaterials with optical and magnetic properties on the same printed support is possible, and the resulting combined signals can be used to obtain a user-configurable label, providing a high degree of security in anti-counterfeiting applications using simple commercially-available sensors.

  4. Screening of solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  5. Screening of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  6. A magnetic protein biocompass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Siying; Yin, Hang; Yang, Celi; Dou, Yunfeng; Liu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Peng; Yu, He; Huang, Yulong; Feng, Jing; Hao, Junfeng; Hao, Jia; Deng, Lizong; Yan, Xiyun; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhao, Zhongxian; Jiang, Taijiao; Wang, Hong-Wei; Luo, Shu-Jin; Xie, Can

    2016-02-01

    The notion that animals can detect the Earth’s magnetic field was once ridiculed, but is now well established. Yet the biological nature of such magnetosensing phenomenon remains unknown. Here, we report a putative magnetic receptor (Drosophila CG8198, here named MagR) and a multimeric magnetosensing rod-like protein complex, identified by theoretical postulation and genome-wide screening, and validated with cellular, biochemical, structural and biophysical methods. The magnetosensing complex consists of the identified putative magnetoreceptor and known magnetoreception-related photoreceptor cryptochromes (Cry), has the attributes of both Cry- and iron-based systems, and exhibits spontaneous alignment in magnetic fields, including that of the Earth. Such a protein complex may form the basis of magnetoreception in animals, and may lead to applications across multiple fields.

  7. 8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN TRACKS RESIDUAL CHLORINE; INDICATES AMOUNT OF SUNLIGHT WHICH ENABLES OPERATOR TO ESTIMATE NEEDED CHLORINE; CENTER SCREEN SHOWS TURNOUT STRUCTURES; RIGHT SCREEN SHOWS INDICATORS OF ALUMINUM SULFATE TANK FARM. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Neodymium Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wida, Sam

    1992-01-01

    Uses extremely strong neodymium magnets to demonstrate several principles of physics including electromagnetic induction, Lenz's Law, domain theory, demagnetization, the Curie point, and magnetic flux lines. (MDH)

  9. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, O S

    2000-05-01

    Screening for lung cancer serves to prevent deaths from this disease insofar as earlier resections are associated with higher rates of cure. There is good reason to believe that this is the case: in stage I, the 5-year survival rate with resection is 70%, whereas without resection the corresponding rate is only 10%. Before this evidence emerged, various authoritative organizations and agencies in North America advised against screening for lung cancer on the grounds of the results of several RCTs. As for CXR, I argue that the study results are consistent with up to 40% reduction in the fatality rate. Moreover, modern helical CT screening provides for detecting much smaller tumors than were detected in those studies. It is time to revoke the conclusion that screening for lung cancer does not serve to prevent deaths from this disease, and to quantify the usefulness of CT screening in particular. As for the requisite research, the prevailing orthodoxy has it that RCTs are to be used, but I argue that more meaningful results are obtainable, more rapidly and much less expensively, by the use of noncomparative (and hence unrandomized) studies. PMID:10855255

  10. Screening sealed bottles for liquid explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sankaran; McMichael, W. Casey; Kim, Y.-W.; Sheldon, Alan G.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Ficke, L.; Chhoa, T. K.; Moeller, C. R.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Burnett, Lowell J.; Czipott, Peter V.; Pence, J. S.; Skvoretz, David C.

    1997-01-01

    A particularly disturbing development affecting transportation safety and security is the increasing use of terrorist devices which avoid detection by conventional means through the use of liquid explosives and flammables. The hazardous materials are generally hidden in wine or liquor bottles that cannot be opened routinely for inspection. This problem was highlighted by the liquid explosives threat which disrupted air traffic between the US an the Far East for an extended period in 1995. Quantum Magnetics has developed a Liquid Explosives Screening systems capable of scanning unopened bottles for liquid explosives. The system can be operated to detect specific explosives directly or to verify the labeled or bar-coded contents of the container. In this system, magnetic resonance (MR) is used to interrogate the liquid. MR produces an extremely rich data set and many characteristics of the MR response can be determined simultaneously. As a result, multiple MR signatures can be defined for any given set of liquids, and the signature complexity then selected according to the level of threat. The Quantum Magnetics Liquid Explosives Screening System is currently operational. Following extensive laboratory testing, a field trial of the system was carried out at the Los Angeles International Airport.

  11. Liquid chromatography "on-flow" 1H nuclear magnetic resonance on native glycosphingolipid mixtures together with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry on the released oligosaccharides for screening and characterisation of carbohydrate-based antigens from pig lungs.

    PubMed

    Bäcker, A E; Thorbert, S; Rakotonirainy, O; Hallberg, E C; Olling, A; Gustavsson, M; Samuelsson, B E; Soussi, B

    1999-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids were prepared from pig lung and pooled into two fractions with (i) < or = 3 sugar residues, and (ii) > or = 3 sugar residues. Oligosaccharides were prepared and used for gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The glycolipid fractions i and ii were further characterised and purified using a novel method based on high performance liquid chromatography "on-flow" proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The LC "on-flow" NMR technique showed good chromatographic separation and gave NMR spectral information which could be used as guidance for pooling of the separated mixture glycolipids. Conventional 1H NMR, thin layer immunostaining, gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry were used to characterise the glycolipids and to validate LC-NMR spectral data.

  12. Magnetic power piston fluid compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compressor with no moving parts in the traditional sense having a housing having an inlet end allowing a low pressure fluid to enter and an outlet end allowing a high pressure fluid to exit is described. Within the compressor housing is at least one compression stage to increase the pressure of the fluid within the housing. The compression stage has a quantity of magnetic powder within the housing, is supported by a screen that allows passage of the fluid, and a coil for selectively providing a magnetic field across the magnetic powder such that when the magnetic field is not present the individual particles of the powder are separated allowing the fluid to flow through the powder and when the magnetic field is present the individual particles of the powder pack together causing the powder mass to expand preventing the fluid from flowing through the powder and causing a pressure pulse to compress the fluid.

  13. [Neonatal hearing screening].

    PubMed

    Oudesluys-Murphy, A M; van Straaten, H L; Ens-Dokkum, M H; Kauffman-de Boer, M A

    2000-03-25

    Approximately 1 to 2 per thousand live-born infants suffer from a serious perceptive hearing loss. Normal hearing from birth is essential for optimal human development (language and speech, social and emotional development, communicative skills and learning). The earlier the hearing loss is diagnosed the better the prognosis for the infant with a hearing impairment. Suitable methods are now available for neonatal hearing screening: automated measurement of auditory brain stem response and measurement of oto-acoustic emissions. Screening must be viewed as only the first step in a program of diagnosis, treatment and habilitation of these children. The ultimate goal of the implementation of neonatal hearing screening is: identification of bilateral hearing losses before the age of 3 months and start of therapy and counselling before the age of 6 months.

  14. Magnetic Spinner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…

  15. Magnetic Levitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets…

  16. Biocidal and Sporicidal Efficacy of Pathoster® 0.35% and Pathoster® 0.50% Against Bacterial Agents in Potential Bioterrorism Use

    PubMed Central

    Candeliere, Antonio; Donatiello, Adelia; Pagano, Stefania; Iatarola, Michela; Tolve, Francesco; Antonino, Leonardo; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The use of products that can neutralize or significantly reduce the microbial load and that are not harmful to human health and the environment represents a milestone in the fight against the spread of infectious diseases. Peracetic acid, besides being an excellent sterilizing and sporicidal agent, is harmless to humans and the environment when it is used in a common dosage. However, the high costs and loss of efficacy of the product very quickly after its reconstitution limit its use. We evaluated the efficacy and stability of 2 commercial products, based on stabilized peracetic acid (Pathoster® 0.35% and Pathoster® 0.50%) used against spores of Bacillus anthracis and spores of Bacillus cereus and vegetative forms of Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis. The efficacy tests were based on the direct contact of the products with a standard suspension of the bacteria. The stability of the products was defined as the period of time during which the biocidal and sporicidal properties remained unchanged. The limit of effectiveness was the period after which the product was unable to exert a complete sterilization after a contact of 5 minutes with at least 1 of the 8 bacteria used in this work. Both formulations showed good efficacy against the microorganisms used in the study, confirming the utility of peracetic acid as a sterilizing product. After the reconstitution, Pathoster® 0.35% was stable until 16±1 days, while Pathoster® 0.50% was stable until 24±1 days. The formulations used in this study showed good performance and a significant stability of peracetic acid. PMID:27482880

  17. Biocidal and Sporicidal Efficacy of Pathoster(®) 0.35% and Pathoster(®) 0.50% Against Bacterial Agents in Potential Bioterrorism Use.

    PubMed

    Candeliere, Antonio; Campese, Emanuele; Donatiello, Adelia; Pagano, Stefania; Iatarola, Michela; Tolve, Francesco; Antonino, Leonardo; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The use of products that can neutralize or significantly reduce the microbial load and that are not harmful to human health and the environment represents a milestone in the fight against the spread of infectious diseases. Peracetic acid, besides being an excellent sterilizing and sporicidal agent, is harmless to humans and the environment when it is used in a common dosage. However, the high costs and loss of efficacy of the product very quickly after its reconstitution limit its use. We evaluated the efficacy and stability of 2 commercial products, based on stabilized peracetic acid (Pathoster(®) 0.35% and Pathoster(®) 0.50%) used against spores of Bacillus anthracis and spores of Bacillus cereus and vegetative forms of Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis. The efficacy tests were based on the direct contact of the products with a standard suspension of the bacteria. The stability of the products was defined as the period of time during which the biocidal and sporicidal properties remained unchanged. The limit of effectiveness was the period after which the product was unable to exert a complete sterilization after a contact of 5 minutes with at least 1 of the 8 bacteria used in this work. Both formulations showed good efficacy against the microorganisms used in the study, confirming the utility of peracetic acid as a sterilizing product. After the reconstitution, Pathoster(®) 0.35% was stable until 16±1 days, while Pathoster(®) 0.50% was stable until 24±1 days. The formulations used in this study showed good performance and a significant stability of peracetic acid. PMID:27482880

  18. Cost-Utility Analysis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Eric; Wartelle-Bladou, Claire; Lepanto, Luigi; Lachaine, Jean; Cloutier, Guy; Tang, An

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in Western countries. No studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of screening for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), its advanced form. METHODS We performed a cost-utility analysis of annual non-invasive screening strategies using third-party payer perspective in a general population and compared it to screening in a high-risk obese or diabetic population. Screening algorithms involved well-studied techniques including NAFLD fibrosis score, transient elastography (TE), and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for detecting advanced fibrosis (≥ F3); and plasma cytokeratin (CK)-18 for NASH detection. Liver biopsy and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) were compared as confirmation methods. Canadian dollar costs were adjusted for inflation and discounted at 5%. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of ≤$C50,000 was considered cost-effective. RESULTS Compared with no screening, screening with NAFLD fibrosis score/TE/CK-18 algorithm with MRE as confirmation for advanced fibrosis had an ICER of $C26,143 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Screening in high-risk obese or diabetic populations was more cost-effective, with an ICER of $C9,051 and $C7,991 per QALY gained respectively. Liver biopsy confirmation was not found to be cost-effective. CONCLUSIONS Our model suggests that annual NASH screening in high-risk obese or diabetic populations can be cost-effective. PMID:25994191

  19. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  20. Methane Screening in JET Reverse Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; B. Alper; G. Corrigan; S.K. Erents; C. Giroud; A. Korotkov; H. Leggate; G.F. Mathews; R.A. Pitts; M. Stamp; J. Spence

    2004-05-17

    JET plasmas with reverse magnetic field feature a different SOL flow than those with normal field. The observed carbon fueling efficiency from injecting methane gas was similar in reverse and normal field. EDGE2D modeling used an externally applied force to create the SOL flows, without specifying the origin of the force. The resulting flow agreed reasonably with the experimental values between the separatrix and 4 cm mid-plane depth in the SOL. The effect of the flow on the calculated carbon screening was 5 to 15% higher carbon fueling efficiency for the low flow velocity with reverse field.

  1. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  2. Disparities in Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Monica E; Han, Jini H

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This paper describes trends in screening mammography utilization over the past decade and assesses the remaining disparities in mammography use among medically underserved women. We also describe the barriers to mammography and report effective interventions to enhance utilization. DESIGN We reviewed medline and other databases as well as relevant bibliographies. MAIN RESULTS The United States has dramatically improved its use of screening mammography over the past decade, with increased rates observed in every demographic group. Disparities in screening mammography are decreasing among medically underserved populations but still persist among racial/ethnic minorities and low-income women. Additionally, uninsured women and those with no usual care have the lowest rates of reported mammogram use. However, despite apparent increases in mammogram utilization, there is growing evidence that limitations in the national survey databases lead to overestimations of mammogram use, particularly among low-income racial and ethnic minorities. CONCLUSIONS The United States may be farther from its national goals of screening mammography, particularly among underserved women, than current data suggests. We should continue to support those interventions that increase mammography use among the medically underserved by addressing the barriers such as cost, language and acculturation limitations, deficits in knowledge and cultural beliefs, literacy and health system barriers such as insurance and having a source regular of medical care. Addressing disparities in the diagnostic and cancer treatment process should also be a priority in order to affect significant change in health outcomes among the underserved. PMID:15009798

  3. Visual Screening: A Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert T.

    Vision is a complex process involving three phases: physical (acuity), physiological (integrative), and psychological (perceptual). Although these phases cannot be considered discrete, they provide the basis for the visual screening procedure used by the Reading Services of Colorado State University and described in this document. Ten tests are…

  4. Brassica greens herbicide screening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to screen herbicides for potential use in brassica greens. Plots were in a RBD with 4 replications. The study was direct seeded on May 19, 2009 with a seeding rate of 272,000 seeds/acre (‘Savanna’ mustard). Treatments included trifluralin PPI + DCPA pre-emergence ap...

  5. Early Dementia Screening

    PubMed Central

    Panegyres, Peter K.; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1–42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history—hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia. PMID:26838803

  6. Early Screening Inventory (ESI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welge-Crow, Patricia; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Early Screening Inventory is designed to identify English- or Spanish-speaking children, ages 4-6, who may need special education services. The instrument measures the ability to acquire new skills in the areas of visual-motor/adaptive, language/cognition, and gross-motor/body-awareness. This paper describes administration, summation of data,…

  7. Pediatric Eye Screening Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Ling; Lewis, J. W. L.

    2001-11-01

    Computational evaluations are presented for binocular eye screening using the off-axis digital retinascope. The retinascope, such as the iScreen digital screening system, has been employed to perform pediatric binocular screening using a flash lamp and single-shot camera recording. The digital images are transferred electronically to a reading center for analysis. The method has been shown to detect refractive error, amblyopia, anisocoria, and ptosis. This computational work improves the performance of the system and forms the basis for automated data analysis. For this purpose, variouis published eye models are evaluated with simulated retinascope images. Two to ten million rays are traced in each image calculation. The poster will present the simulation results for a range of eye conditions of refractive error of -20 to +20 diopters with 0.5- to-1 diopter resolution, pupil size of 3 to 8 mm diameter (1-mm increment), and staring angle of 2 to 12 degree (2-degree increment). The variation of the results with the system conditions such as the off-axis distance of light source and the shutter size of camera are also evaluated. The quantitative analysis for each eye’s and system’s condition is then performed to obtain parameters for automatic reading. The summary of the system performance is given and performance-enhancement design modifications are presented.

  8. A Complete Analytical Screening Identifies the Real Pesticide Contamination of Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschet, Christoph; Wittmer, Irene; Simovic, Jelena; Junghans, Marion; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian; Leu, Christian; Hollender, Juliane

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive assessment of pesticides in surface waters is challenging due to the large number of potential contaminants. In Switzerland for example, roughly 500 active ingredients are registered as either plant protection agent (PPA) or as biocide. In addition, an unlimited number of transformations products (TPs) can enter or be formed in surfaced waters. Most scientific publications or regulatory monitoring authorities have implemented 15-40 pesticides in their analytics. Only a few TPs are normally included. Interpretations of the surface water quality based on these subsets remains error prone. In the presented study, we carried out a nearly complete analytical screening covering 86% of all polar organic pesticides (from agricultural and urban sources) in Switzerland (300 substances) and 134 TPs with limits of quantification in the low ng/L range. The comprehensive pesticide screening was conducted by liquid-chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Five medium-sized rivers (Strahler stream order 3-4, catchment size 35-105 km2), containing high percentiles of diverse crops, orchards and urban settlements in their catchments, were sampled from March till July 2012. Nine subsequent time-proportional bi-weekly composite samples were taken in order to quantify average concentrations. In total, 104 different active ingredients could be detected in at least one of the five rivers. Thereby, 82 substances were only registered as PPA, 20 were registered as PPA and as biocide and 2 were only registered as biocide. Within the PPAs, herbicides had the most frequent detections and the highest concentrations, followed by fungicides and insecticides. Most concentrations were found between 1 and 50 ng/L; however 31 substances (mainly herbicides) had concentrations above 100 ng/L and 3 herbicides above 1000 ng/L. It has to be noted that the measured concentrations are average concentrations over two weeks in medium sized streams and that maximum

  9. Screening for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Merican, I

    1996-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the commonest cancers in Asian males. In Malaysia, it is one of the ten most common cancers amongst the male population. Most of our patients with HCC present to us rather late and almost all die within 4 months of diagnosis. HCC occurs more commonly in patients with cirrhosis associated with hepatitis B and C infections. Screening for HCC can lead to early detection of small tumours (< 5 cm) that are more amenable to surgical resection, resulting in improved survival rates. The average 5-year survival rate for those who have undergone surgical resection is 68% (range, 22-73%). Better results are obtained with the smaller tumours (< 2 cm in diameter). Patients with chronic hepatitis B and C infection especially those who are > 45 years of age, who have concomitant cirrhosis or have a family history of HCC should be examined every 3-6 months with periodic serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurements and abdominal ultrasound examinations. Abdominal ultrasound is useful in the detection of small tumours. While mass screening for HCC is not cost-effective in countries of low incidence of HCC, screening of high risk groups may be justified in countries with a high endemicity of HBV infection. Screening for HCC in Japan, Taiwan and China appears to yield better results than those in the West. Nonetheless, primary prevention with mass hepatitis B vaccination and blood donor screening for anti-HCV is expected to make a much greater impact in the control of HCC in the years to come.

  10. PERFORMANCE DEMONSTRATIONS OF ALTERNATIVE SCREEN RECLAMATION PRODUCTS FOR SCREEN PRINTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated environmentally-preferable products for the screen reclamation process In screen printing during month-long demonstrations at 23 printing facilities nationwide. hrough the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Design for the Environment Printing Project, pr...

  11. Competition between Kondo Screening and Quantum Hall Edge Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Heine, A W; Tutuc, D; Zwicknagl, G; Haug, R J

    2016-03-01

    We report on a Kondo correlated quantum dot connected to two-dimensional leads where we demonstrate the renormalization of the g factor in the pure Zeeman case. i.e., for magnetic fields parallel to the plane of the quantum dot. For the same system, we study the influence of orbital effects by investigating the quantum Hall regime; i.e., a perpendicular magnetic field is applied. In this case an unusual behavior of the suppression of the Kondo effect and of the split zero-bias anomaly is observed. The splitting decreases with magnetic field and shows discontinuous changes that are attributed to the intricate interplay between Kondo screening and the quantum Hall edge structure originating from electrostatic screening. This edge structure, made up of compressible and incompressible stripes, strongly affects the Kondo temperature of the quantum dot and thereby influences the renormalized g factor. PMID:26991192

  12. Competition between Kondo Screening and Quantum Hall Edge Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Zwicknagl, G.; Haug, R. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a Kondo correlated quantum dot connected to two-dimensional leads where we demonstrate the renormalization of the g factor in the pure Zeeman case. i.e., for magnetic fields parallel to the plane of the quantum dot. For the same system, we study the influence of orbital effects by investigating the quantum Hall regime; i.e., a perpendicular magnetic field is applied. In this case an unusual behavior of the suppression of the Kondo effect and of the split zero-bias anomaly is observed. The splitting decreases with magnetic field and shows discontinuous changes that are attributed to the intricate interplay between Kondo screening and the quantum Hall edge structure originating from electrostatic screening. This edge structure, made up of compressible and incompressible stripes, strongly affects the Kondo temperature of the quantum dot and thereby influences the renormalized g factor.

  13. Cancer screening in the USA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Once screening for cancer has been shown to be effective, reducing cancer morbidity and mortality in the population depends on the successful delivery of mass screening. Today, screening for cancer may be achieved through the organized delivery of services, or unsystematically, by individual referral for screening at intervals which are not necessarily optimal or regularly spaced. Organized screening is distinguished from unsystematic screening primarily on the basis of how the offer of screening occurs--whether by invitation, issued from centralized population registers or coincidently, depending on individuals seeking screening on their own, or having providers initiate screening during visits for care for other reasons. This manuscript describes cancer screening in the USA, which for most Americans is unsystematic. While this model can achieve many of the goals of screening, these goals are achieved at a greater cost, less efficiently, and without the assurance of full participation of the entire, eligible population. In order to achieve the fullest potential of cancer screening in the most cost-effective manner, screening should be organized, with attention to monitoring the fullest performance of the programme from recruitment to follow-up. PMID:17227643

  14. An Alternative to Impedance Screening: Unoccluded Frontal Bone Conduction Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Square, Regina; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A bone conduction hearing screening test using frontal bone oscillator placement was compared with pure-tone air-conduction screening and impedance audiometry with 114 preschoolers. Unoccluded frontal bone conduction testing produced screening results not significantly different from results obtained by impedance audiometry. (CL)!

  15. Second Trimester Maternal Serum Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screen Related tests: hCG Pregnancy ; Estrogens ; First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen ; Amniotic Fluid Analysis ; Chromosome Analysis Were you ... that a fetus has certain chromosomal abnormalities, including Down syndrome (trisomy 21) or Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) , or ...

  16. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  17. Recommended Screenings for Men 50+

    MedlinePlus

    ... and continue reading about other screenings. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm If you are between the ages of 65 ... care team about being screened for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). AAA is a bulging in your abdominal ...

  18. Genetic Screening for Employment Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olian, Judy D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses genetic screening in the employment context, which involves identification of individuals hypersusceptible to toxins in the work environment. Examines the status of genetic screening devices against standard testing and legal criteria. (LLL)

  19. Glucose screening tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening ... first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change ...

  20. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  1. National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)

    Cancer.gov

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a research study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute that used low-dose helical CT scans or chest X-ray to screen men and women at risk for lung cancer.

  2. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  3. [Chemical databases and virtual screening].

    PubMed

    Rognan, Didier; Bonnet, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    A prerequisite to any virtual screening is the definition of compound libraries to be screened. As we describe here, various sources are available. The selection of the proper library is usually project-dependent but at least as important as the screening method itself. This review details the main compound libraries that are available for virtual screening and guide the reader to the best possible selection according to its needs. PMID:25537046

  4. Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chitty, L S

    1995-12-01

    Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities is increasingly becoming part of routine antenatal care in Europe and the UK. However, there has been very little formal evaluation of this practice. In this article reports of routine ultrasound screening are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages discussed. The majority of routine anomaly scanning is done in the second trimester but there may be a case for screening at other times in pregnancy and alternative anomaly screening policies are discussed. PMID:8710765

  5. The role of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Koduru, Pramoda; Joshi, Virendra; Saxena, Payal; Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal cancer. Despite a significant advancement in cancer treatment, the mortality rate of PC is nearly identical to the incidence rates. Early detection of tumor or its precursor lesions with dysplasia may be the most effective approach to improve survival. Screening strategies should include identification of the population at high risk of developing PC, and an intense application of screening tools with adequate sensitivity to detect PC at an early curable stage. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem to be the most promising modalities for PC screening based on the data so far. EUS had an additional advantage over MRI by being able to obtain tissue sample during the same examination. Several questions remain unanswered at this time regarding the age to begin screening, frequency of screening, management of asymptomatic pancreatic lesions detected on screening, timing of resection, and extent of surgery and impact of screening on survival. Novel techniques such as needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE), along with biomarkers, may be helpful to identify pancreatic lesions with more aggressive malignant potential. Further studies will hopefully lead to the development of strategies combining EUS with other technological/biological advancements that will be cost-effective and have an impact on survival.

  6. Drug Screening in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2016-01-01

    Gestational substance exposure continues to be a significant problem. Neonates may be exposed to various substances including illicit drugs, prescription drugs, and other legal substances that are best not used during pregnancy because of their potential deleterious effects as possible teratogens or their potential to create dependence and thus withdrawal in the neonate. Screening the newborn for gestational substance exposure is important for both acute care and early intervention to promote the best possible long-term outcomes. This column provides insight into what is known about the extent of substance use by pregnant women, an overview of neonatal biologic matrices for drug testing, and a discussion of the legal implications of neonatal substance screening. PMID:27636697

  7. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  8. Rapid, Optimized Interactomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Domanski, Michal; Hough, Loren; Oroskar, Asha A.; Oroskar, Anil R.; Keegan, Sarah; Dilworth, David J.; Molloy, Kelly R.; Sherman, Vadim; Aitchison, John D.; Fenyö, David; Chait, Brian T.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Rout, Michael P.; LaCava, John

    2015-01-01

    We must reliably map the interactomes of cellular macromolecular complexes in order to fully explore and understand biological systems. However, there are no methods to accurately predict how to capture a given macromolecular complex with its physiological binding partners. Here, we present a screen that comprehensively explores the parameters affecting the stability of interactions in affinity-captured complexes, enabling the discovery of physiological binding partners and the elucidation of their functional interactions in unparalleled detail. We have implemented this screen on several macromolecular complexes from a variety of organisms, revealing novel profiles even for well-studied proteins. Our approach is robust, economical and automatable, providing an inroad to the rigorous, systematic dissection of cellular interactomes. PMID:25938370

  9. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis.

  10. A gene expression screen.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Brown, D D

    1991-01-01

    A gene expression screen identifies mRNAs that differ in abundance between two mRNA mixtures by a subtractive hybridization method. The two mRNA populations are converted to double-stranded cDNAs, fragmented, and ligated to linkers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The multiple cDNA fragments isolated from any given gene can be treated as alleles in a genetic screen. Probability analysis of the frequency with which multiple alleles are found provides an estimation of the total number of up- and down-regulated genes. We have applied this method to genes that are differentially expressed in amphibian tadpole tail tissue in the first 24 hr after thyroid hormone treatment, which ultimately induces tail resorption. We estimate that there are about 30 up-regulated genes; 16 have been isolated. Images PMID:1722336

  11. [Screening for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Koch, Klaus; Büchter, Roland; Lange, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer screening has been a controversial for decades. The recently published findings of large trials have further intensified the debate. The prospect of reducing mortality from prostate cancer is measured against the risk of over-diagnosing the disease. In individual cases, the trade-off between possible benefits and harms is possible to ascertain, so general recommendations in favor of or against PSA tests for individuals cannot be made. The majority of men, however, are not well-informed on the possible advantages and drawbacks of screening. This situation urgently needs to be corrected. The PSA test is promoted to healthy men, who need to be provided with especially detailed information. If not provided with clear and unbiased information on the risks associated with the test (above all over-diagnosis and over-treatment), these men cannot be considered to be fully informed. PMID:23535548

  12. Universal newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Declau, F; Doyen, A; Robillard, T; de Varebeke, S Janssens

    2005-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common congenital anomalies, occurring in approximately 1-2 infants per 1000. Left undetected, hearing impairments in infants can negatively impact speech and language acquisition, academic achievement, social and emotional development. These negative impacts can be diminished and even eliminated through early intervention at or before 6 months of age. Reliable screening tests that minimize referral rates and maximize sensitivity and specificity are available. The goal of universal neonatal hearing screening is to maximize linguistic and communicative competence and literacy development for children who are hard of hearing or deaf. Audiologic and medical evaluations should be in progress before 3 months of age. Infants with confirmed hearing loss should receive intervention before 6 months of age from health care and education professionals with expertise in hearing loss and deafness in infants and young children. PMID:16363265

  13. Technological advances in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bailing; Li, Songjun; Hu, Jie

    2004-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is the process of testing a large number of diverse chemical structures against disease targets to identify 'hits'. Compared to traditional drug screening methods, HTS is characterized by its simplicity, rapidness, low cost, and high efficiency, taking the ligand-target interactions as the principle, as well as leading to a higher information harvest. As a multidisciplinary field, HTS involves an automated operation-platform, highly sensitive testing system, specific screening model (in vitro), an abundant components library, and a data acquisition and processing system. Various technologies, especially the novel technologies such as fluorescence, nuclear-magnetic resonance, affinity chromatography, surface plasmon resonance, and DNA microarray, are now available, and the screening of more than 100,000 samples per day is already possible. Fluorescence-based assays include the scintillation proximity assay, time-resolved energy transfer, fluorescence anisotropy, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy. Fluorescence-based techniques are likely to be among the most important detection approaches used for HTS due to their high sensitivity and amenability to automation, giving the industry-wide drive to simplify, miniaturize, and speed up assays. The application of NMR technology to HTS is another recent trend in drug research. One advantage afforded by NMR technology is that it can provide direct information on the affinity of the screening compounds and the binding location of protein. The structure-activity relationship acquired from NMR analysis can sharpen the library design, which will be very important in furnishing HTS with well-defined drug candidates. Affinity chromatography used for library screening will provide the information on the fundamental processes of drug action, such as absorption, distribution, excretion, and receptor activation; also the eluting curve can give directly the

  14. Extracellular polymeric substances buffer against the biocidal effect of H2O2 on the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Pan, Xiangliang; Zhang, Daoyong; Mu, Shuyong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Halik, Umut

    2015-02-01

    H2O2 is an emerging biocide for bloom-forming cyanobacteria. It is important to investigate the H2O2 scavenging ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of cyanobacteria because EPS with strong antioxidant activity may "waste" considerable amounts of H2O2 before it kills the cells. In this study, the buffering capacity against H2O2 of EPS from the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated. IC50 values for the ability of EPS and vitamin C (VC) to scavenge 50% of the initial H2O2 concentration were 0.097 and 0.28 mg mL(-1), respectively, indicating the higher H2O2 scavenging activity of EPS than VC. Both proteins and polysaccharides are significantly decomposed by H2O2 and the polysaccharides were more readily decomposed than proteins. H2O2 consumed by the EPS accounted for 50% of the total amount of H2O2 consumed by the cells. Cell growth and photosynthesis were reduced more for EPS-free cells than EPS coated cells when the cells were treated with 0.1 or 0.2 mg mL(-1) H2O2, and the maximum photochemical efficiency Fv/Fm of EPS coated cells recovered to higher values than EPS-free cells. Concentrations of H2O2 above 0.3 mg mL(-1) completely inhibited photosynthesis and no recovery was observed for both EPS-free and EPS coated cells. This shows that EPS has some buffering capacity against the killing effect of H2O2 on cyanobacterial cells. Such a strong H2O2 scavenging ability of EPS is not favorable for killing bloom-forming cyanobacteria. The high H2O2 scavenging capacity means considerable amounts of H2O2 have to be used to break through the EPS barrier before H2O2 exerts any killing effects on the cells. It is therefore necessary to determine the H2O2 scavenging capacity of the EPS of various bloom-forming cyanobacteria so that the cost-effective amount of H2O2 needed to be used for killing the cyanobacteria can be estimated.

  15. What's New with Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Newborn screening is the process of testing and screening newborns shortly after birth for certain, potentially dangerous, conditions and/or impairments--conditions that include everything from inborn errors of metabolism and other genetic disorders to hearing impairment. Early detection through newborn screening is paramount, often allowing the…

  16. What Screening Tests Are There?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Related Links Stay Informed Cancer Home What Screening Tests Are There? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... packs a day for 15 years. Risks of Screening Lung cancer screening has at least three risks— ...

  17. High throughput screening informatics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xuefeng Bruce

    2008-03-01

    High throughput screening (HTS), an industrial effort to leverage developments in the areas of modern robotics, data analysis and control software, liquid handling devices, and sensitive detectors, has played a pivotal role in the drug discovery process, allowing researchers to efficiently screen millions of compounds to identify tractable small molecule modulators of a given biological process or disease state and advance them into high quality leads. As HTS throughput has significantly increased the volume, complexity, and information content of datasets, lead discovery research demands a clear corporate strategy for scientific computing and subsequent establishment of robust enterprise-wide (usually global) informatics platforms, which enable complicated HTS work flows, facilitate HTS data mining, and drive effective decision-making. The purpose of this review is, from the data analysis and handling perspective, to examine key elements in HTS operations and some essential data-related activities supporting or interfacing the screening process, and outline properties that various enabling software should have. Additionally, some general advice for corporate managers with system procurement responsibilities is offered.

  18. Weak bond screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  19. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  20. Screening for antibiofilm and antioxidant potential of turmeric (Curcuma longa) extracts.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Sumreen; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2016-07-01

    The antibiofilm and antioxidant activities associated with turmeric were the main focus of the study. Antibacterial activity was explored against bacteria isolated from dental plaques and dental unit water lines exhibiting resistance against antibiotics and biocides respectively. This study provides a comparison of the natural plant extract against synthetic mouthwash, chemicals and commonly prescribed antibiotics. Methanol extract was more effective as compared to other extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranged from 2.5-10mg/ml. Time based killing kinetic assay showed a significant reduction of bacterial load with increasing concentration of turmeric. Micro titer plate assay indicated significant inhibition of biofilm formation in cells treated with turmeric extract. Phytochemical screening of plant extracts showed the presence of vital secondary metabolites. Flavonoid content and total phenolic content varied among extracts, phenolic content for methanolic extract was 61.669 mg GAE/ gm dry extract and flavonoid content was 3.119mg quercitin/gm dry extract. The values of ferric reducing power were in the range of 5.55- 15.55 mmol of FeSO4 equivalent/ liter of the extract. Antioxidant activities and total phenolic content of the turmeric extracts had significant positive correlation. On the basis of these results turmeric may confidently be recommended as natural antibiofilm and antioxidant agent.