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Sample records for magnetic cycles influence

  1. The number of full-sine cycles per pulse influences the efficacy of multicycle transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pechmann, Astrid; Delvendahl, Igor; Bergmann, Til O; Ritter, Christoph; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert; Mall, Volker; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to excite corticospinal neurons depends on pulse waveform. In this study, we examined whether the effectiveness of polyphasic TMS can be increased by using a pulse profile that consists of multiple sine cycles. In eight subjects, single-pulse TMS was applied to the left primary motor hand area through a round coil attached to a stimulator device that generated polyphasic pulses consisting of one to six full-sine cycles with a cycle length of 86 μs. In different blocks, we varied the number of sine cycles per pulse and recorded the motor-evoked potential (MEP) from the right first dorsal interosseus muscle. For each stimulus type, we determined resting motor threshold (RMT), stimulus-response curve (SRC), and mean MEP amplitude evoked at maximal stimulator output to assess the efficacy of stimulation. Multicycle pulses were more effective than a single full-sine cycle in exciting corticospinal neurons. TMS with multicycle pulses resulted in lower RMT, larger MEP amplitudes at maximal stimulator output and a steeper slope of the SRC relative to a TMS pulse consisting of a single-sine cycle. The increase in efficacy was already evident when two full-sine cycles were used and did not increase further by adding more cycles to the TMS pulse. Increasing the number of full-sine cycles per pulse can improve the efficacy of TMS to excite corticospinal neurons, but there is no simple linear relationship between the number of cycles and TMS efficacy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance comparison of magnetic refrigeration cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.; Chen, G.L.; Murphy, R.W.; Mei, V.C.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration has been used for cryogenic cooling at temperatures near absolute zero for many years. In these cases, a single-step adiabatic demagnetization method that does not provide continuous refrigeration is commonly used. The possibilities of providing continuous cooling through magnetic refrigeration cycles and of extending the range of applications above near-absolute-zero temperatures have been investigated only in recent years. This paper reports the results of a parametric performance study of three magnetic refrigeration cycles using four rare-earth magnetic materials operating near their respective Curie temperatures. The thermodynamic cycles employed are the magnetic-equivalent Carnot, Ericsson, and ideal regenerative cycles, and the four magnetic materials are terbium, holmium, erbium, and thulium. Our findings show that the Carnot cycle is not possible for cases of temperature lift beyond 10 K for a magnetic field variation of Tesla, that the performance and capacity of an ideal regenerative cycle are higher than that of the corresponding Ericsson cycle, and that the magnetocaloric effects of erbium and thulium seem to be too weak for practical applications. 14 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Reconciling solar and stellar magnetic cycles with nonlinear dynamo simulations.

    PubMed

    Strugarek, A; Beaudoin, P; Charbonneau, P; Brun, A S; do Nascimento, J-D

    2017-07-14

    The magnetic fields of solar-type stars are observed to cycle over decadal periods-11 years in the case of the Sun. The fields originate in the turbulent convective layers of stars and have a complex dependency upon stellar rotation rate. We have performed a set of turbulent global simulations that exhibit magnetic cycles varying systematically with stellar rotation and luminosity. We find that the magnetic cycle period is inversely proportional to the Rossby number, which quantifies the influence of rotation on turbulent convection. The trend relies on a fundamentally nonlinear dynamo process and is compatible with the Sun's cycle and those of other solar-type stars. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Magnetic network elements in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chunlan; Wang, Jingxiu

    2013-07-01

    In this report, we present our recent effort to understand the cyclic behavior of network magnetic elements based on the unique database from full-disk observations provided by Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in the interval including the entire cycle 23. The following results are unclosed. (1) The quiet regions dominate the solar magnetic flux for about 8 years in solar cycle 23, and from the solar minimum to maximum they contribute (0.94-1.44)×1023Mx flux to the solar photosphere. In the entire cycle 23, the magnetic flux of the quiet regions is 1.12 times that of active regions. The occupation ratio of quiet region flux equally characterizes the course of a solar cycle. (2) With the increasing magnetic flux per element, the variations of numbers and total flux of the network elements show three-fold scenario: no-correlation, anti-correlation, and correlation with sunspots, respectively. The anti-correlated elements covering the range of (3-32)×1018Mx occupy 77% of total element number and 37% of quiet Sun flux. (3) The time-latitude distribution of anti-correlated magnetic elements is out of phase with that of sunspots, while the correlated elements display the similar butterfly diagram of sunspots but with wider latitude distribution. These results imply that the correlated elements are the debris of decayed sunspots, and the source of anti-correlated elements is modulated by sunspot magnetic field.

  5. MAGNETIC WREATHS AND CYCLES IN CONVECTIVE DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Toomre, Juri; Brown, Benjamin P.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2013-01-10

    Solar-type stars exhibit a rich variety of magnetic activity. Seeking to explore the convective origins of this activity, we have carried out a series of global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the anelastic spherical harmonic code. Here we report on the dynamo mechanisms achieved as the effects of artificial diffusion are systematically decreased. The simulations are carried out at a nominal rotation rate of three times the solar value (3 {Omega}{sub Sun }), but similar dynamics may also apply to the Sun. Our previous simulations demonstrated that convective dynamos can build persistent toroidal flux structures (magnetic wreaths) in the midst of a turbulent convection zone and that high rotation rates promote the cyclic reversal of these wreaths. Here we demonstrate that magnetic cycles can also be achieved by reducing the diffusion, thus increasing the Reynolds and magnetic Reynolds numbers. In these more turbulent models, diffusive processes no longer play a significant role in the key dynamical balances that establish and maintain the differential rotation and magnetic wreaths. Magnetic reversals are attributed to an imbalance in the poloidal magnetic induction by convective motions that is stabilized at higher diffusion levels. Additionally, the enhanced levels of turbulence lead to greater intermittency in the toroidal magnetic wreaths, promoting the generation of buoyant magnetic loops that rise from the deep interior to the upper regions of our simulated domain. The implications of such turbulence-induced magnetic buoyancy for solar and stellar flux emergence are also discussed.

  6. Magnetic cycles at different ages of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, K.; Kővári, Zs.; Petrovay, K.; Soon, W.; Baliunas, S.; Kolláth, Z.; Vida, K.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We study the different patterns of interannual magnetic variability in stars on or near the lower main sequence, approximately solar-type (G-K dwarf) stars in time series of 36 yr from the Mount Wilson Observatory Ca ii H&K survey. Our main aim is to search for correlations between cycles, activity measures, and ages. Methods: Time-frequency analysis has been used to discern and reveal patterns and morphology of stellar activity cycles, including multiple and changing cycles, in the datasets. Both the results from short-term Fourier transform and its refinement using the Choi-Williams distribution, with better frequency resolution, are presented in this study. Rotational periods of the stars were derived using multifrequency Fourier analysis. Results: We found at least one activity cycle on 28 of the 29 stars we studied. Twelve stars, with longer rotational periods (39.7 ± 6.0 days), have simple smooth cycles, and the remaining stars, with much faster rotation (18.1 ± 12.2 days) on average, show complex and sometimes vigorously changing multiple cycles. The cycles are longer and quite uniform in the first group (9.7 ± 1.9 yr), while they are generally shorter and vary more strongly in the second group (7.6 ± 4.9). The clear age division between stars with smooth and complex cycles follows the known separation between the older and younger stars at around 2 to 3 Gyr of age.

  7. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  8. Magnetic Stirling cycles - A new application for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    There is the prospect of a fundamental new application for magnetic materials as the working substance in thermodynamic cycles. Recuperative cycles which use a rare-earth ferromagnetic material near its Curie point in the field of a superconducting magnet appear feasible for applications from below 20 K to above room temperature. The elements of the cycle, advanced in an earlier paper, are summarized. The basic advantages include high entropy density in the magnetic material, completely reversible processes, convenient control of the entropy by the applied field, the feature that heat transfer is possible during all processes, and the ability of the ideal cycle to attain Carnot efficiency. The mean field theory is used to predict the entropy of a ferromagnet in an applied field and also the isothermal entropy change and isentropic temperature change caused by applying a field. Results are presented for J = 7/2 and g = 2. The results for isentropic temperature change are compared with experimental data on Gd. Coarse mixtures of ferromagnetic materials with different Curie points are proposed to modify the path of the cycle in the T-S diagram in order to improve the efficiency or to increase the specific power.

  9. Magnetic Stirling cycles - A new application for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    There is the prospect of a fundamental new application for magnetic materials as the working substance in thermodynamic cycles. Recuperative cycles which use a rare-earth ferromagnetic material near its Curie point in the field of a superconducting magnet appear feasible for applications from below 20 K to above room temperature. The elements of the cycle, advanced in an earlier paper, are summarized. The basic advantages include high entropy density in the magnetic material, completely reversible processes, convenient control of the entropy by the applied field, the feature that heat transfer is possible during all processes, and the ability of the ideal cycle to attain Carnot efficiency. The mean field theory is used to predict the entropy of a ferromagnet in an applied field and also the isothermal entropy change and isentropic temperature change caused by applying a field. Results are presented for J = 7/2 and g = 2. The results for isentropic temperature change are compared with experimental data on Gd. Coarse mixtures of ferromagnetic materials with different Curie points are proposed to modify the path of the cycle in the T-S diagram in order to improve the efficiency or to increase the specific power.

  10. Solar cycle variation of magnetic flux emergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Golub, L.; Kreiger, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    The number of X-ray bright points (XBP) has been measured from solar X-ray images obtained during two rocket flights in 1976. When compared with the data obtained during the Skylab mission (1973), the number is found to be higher by a factor of 2. As the probability of obtaining the result by chance is less than 1 in 5 million, it is concluded that the number of XBP has increased in the three year interval. As all other indicators of activity have decreased between 1973 and 1976, the cyclical variation of the short-lifetime end of the magnetic-flux-emergence spectrum is out of phase with the solar cycle as defined by active regions or sunspots. Since XBP in 1973 contributed more to the emerging magnetic flux than did active regions, the possibility exists that the total amount of emerging magnetic flux may be maximized at a sunspot minimum.

  11. Magnetic stirling cycles: A new application for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    The elements of the cycle are summarized. The basic advantages include high entropy density in the magnetic material, completely reversible processes, convenient control of the entropy by the applied field, the feature that heat transfer is possible during all processes, and the ability of the ideal cycle to attain Carnot efficiency. The mean field theory is used to predict the entropy of a ferromagnet in an applied field and also the isothermal entropy change and isentropic temperature change caused by applying a field. The results for isentropic temperature change are compared with experimental data on Gd. Coarse mixtures of ferromagnetic materials with different Curie points are proposed to modify the path of the cycle in the T-S diagram in order to improve the efficiency or to increase the specific power.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Adipose Tissues in the Head of a Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis): Structure Identification and Influence of a Freezing-Thawing Cycle.

    PubMed

    Arribart, M; Ognard, J; Guintard, C; Domergue, F; Hassani, S; Ben Salem, D; Jung, J-L

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan the head of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) in order to visualize the different adipose tissues involved in echolocation functioning and to precisely delineate their anatomical topology. MRI scans were performed on the head taken from a freshly stranded carcass and repeated after a 2-week freezing time followed by thawing. The main fatty organs of the head, that is the melon, the mandibula bulba, the bursae cantantes, and their different connections with surrounding tissues were identified and labelled. The nasal sacs, other organs of echolocation, were also identified and labelled thanks to different MRI acquisitions. The shape, the location, the type of MRI signal of each organ and of their different connections were successfully analysed on all images, and then, the images of the head fresh or after thawing were compared. No impacts of the freezing/thawing cycle on the fatty tissues of the head were identified. Different parts were distinguished in the melon on the basis of the MRI signal emitted, corresponding most likely to the internal and external melon already identified by other analytical approaches, and linked to differences in lipid composition. MRI is shown here to be a useful tool to study the functional anatomy of the organs responsible for echolocation in odontocetes, with a particularly high level of precision. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Magnetic cycling as a method of energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, I.S.; Finkel', V.A.

    1983-05-01

    We have demonstrated that energy conversion based on magnetic cycling is feasible. In order to improve the conversion efficiency, i.e., permit the generator to operate using full-wave rectification and increase the generated emf, the magnetic cycling frequency must clearly be decreased.(AIP)

  14. The connection between stellar activity cycles and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Boro Saikia, S.; Bouvier, J.; Fares, R.; Folsom, C. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Petit, P.; Waite, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    Zeeman-Doppler imaging (ZDI) has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained from ZDI and activity cycles.

  15. Loss analysis of the thermodynamic cycle of magnetic heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Murphy, R. W.; Mei, V. C.; Chen, G. L.; Lue, J. W.; Lubell, M. S.

    1991-02-01

    The needs for developing non-ozone-depleting, no-greenhouse-effect heat pump systems and for exploring the potential of new high-temperature superconducting materials have prompted a renewed interest in the study of magnetic heat pumps. The new materials can provide the high magnetic field that an effective superconducting magnetic heat pump requires, and magnetic heat pumps do not use freon for a working fluid. Traditionally, magnetic heat pump concepts have been successfully developed and used for refrigeration applications at temperatures near absolute zero degree. In these cases, a temperature lift of a few degrees in a cryogenic environment is sufficient and can be easily achieved by a simple magnetic heat pump cycle. The working media are usually the chemical compounds of gadolinium. To extend magnetic heat pumping to other temperature ranges and other types of applications in which the temperature lift is more than just a few degrees requires more involved cycle processes dependent upon the thermomagnetic properties of the working media and the availability of a high magnetic field. This report documents our efforts to study the thermophysics of magnetic heat pumps, including a survey of literature, a study of thermodynamic cycles and cycle thermal losses, and an analysis of pulse magnets. The regenerative cycle has been identified as the most efficient, with a maximum of 42 percent loss in coefficient of performance at 260 K cooling temperature and a maximum of 15 percent loss in capacity at 232 K cooling temperature for the constant field (magnetic Ericsson) cycle, between 200 and 320 K, as compared with the ideal regenerative cycle with gadolinium as the core material.

  16. The Otto thermodynamic cycle using the magnetic molecule Ni2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Wolfgang; Dong, Chuanding; Lefkidis, Georgios

    2012-02-01

    In order to design realistic molecular heat engines, the study of quantum thermodynamics is essential since classical thermodynamics does not apply in this extreme miniaturization limit [1,2]. Realizing a thermodynamic cycle on an existing magnetic molecule embodies a novel and unique approach to understand and exploit the thermodynamic properties of spin at the molecular level.Here we propose an Otto cycle in the Ni2 dimer based on a fully ab-initio calculation of the electronic states and the perturbative inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. A laser pulse, described by the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation, is used to heat the Ni2 dimer. The pulse not only excites the electrons to higher, many-body electronic states, but also influences the spin of the system due to spin-orbit coupling. Using a low-temperature thermal bath the system is cooled back to the ground state. The adiabatic work exchange between the Ni2 and the environment is described by the quasi-static expansion or compression of the bond length of the dimer. The calculated efficiency of the cycle is up to 34%.[1] T. D. Kieu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 140403 (2004)[2] H. T. Quan, Phys. Rev. E 79 041129 (2009)[3] T. Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. A 75 062102 (2007)

  17. Topology of the magnetic field in cycle 23 and in the beginning of the cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevolenskaya, Elena; Ponyavin, Yurij

    The solar variability in irradiance is directly related to the solar magnetic field. The SOHO/ MDI data provide the uniform time series of the synoptic magnetic maps which covered the period of the cycle 23 and the beginning of the cycle 24. The axisymmetrical and non-axisymmetrical distributions of the magnetic field are associated with the EUV coronal emission. The reappearance of the activity has a tendency to reappear in clusters of the solar activity or active longitudinal zone. The weak polar magnetic field precedes the long and deep solar minimum. In this presentation we have discussed the development of the solar cycle 23. And, how the magnetic activity affects the current solar cycle

  18. Synoptic magnetic field in cycle 23 and in the beginning of the cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevolenskaya, E. E.; Ponyavin, Yu. D.

    2012-09-01

    The SOHO/MDI data provide the uniform time series of the synoptic magnetic maps which cover the period of the cycle 23 and the beginning of the cycle 24. It is very interesting period because of the long and deep solar minimum between the cycles 23 and 24. Synoptic structure of the solar magnetic field shows variability during solar cycles. It is known that the magnetic activity contributes to the solar irradiance. The axisymmetrical distribution of the magnetic flux (Fig. 3c) is closely associated with the 'butterfly' diagram in the EUV emission (Benevolenskaya et al., 2001). And, also, the magnetic field (B∥) shows the non-uniform distributions of the solar activity with longitude, so-called 'active zones', and 'coronal holes' in the mid-latitude. Polar coronal holes are forming after the solar maxima and they persist during the solar minima. SOHO/EIT data in the emission of Fe XII (195 Å) could be a proxy for the coronal holes tracking. The active longitudinal zones or active longitude exist due to the reappearance of the activity and it is clearly seen in the synoptic structure of the solar cycle. On the descending branch of the solar cycle 23 active zones are less pronounced comparing with previous cycles 20, 21 and 22. Moreover, the weak polar magnetic field precedes the long and deep solar minimum. In this paper we have discussed the development of solar cycles 23 and 24 in details.

  19. Lanthanide Al-Ni base Ericsson cycle magnetic refrigerants

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-10-31

    A magnetic refrigerant for a magnetic refrigerator using the Ericsson thermodynamic cycle comprises DyAlNi and (Gd{sub 0.54}Er{sub 0.46})AlNi alloys having a relatively constant {Delta}Tmc over a wide temperature range. 16 figs.

  20. Lanthanide Al-Ni base Ericsson cycle magnetic refrigerants

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-10-31

    A magnetic refrigerant for a magnetic refrigerator using the Ericsson thermodynamic cycle comprises DyAlNi and (Gd.sub.0.54 Er.sub.0.46)AlNi alloys having a relatively constant .DELTA.Tmc over a wide temperature range.

  1. Magnetic field aberration induced by cycle stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Yang; luming, Li; Xing, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Magneto-mechanical effect has been causing people's growing interest because of its relevance to several technology problems. One of them is the variation of surface magnetic field induced by stress concentration under the geomagnetic field. It can be used as an innovative, simple and convenient potential NDE method, called as magnetic memory method. However, whether and how this can be used as a quantitative measurement method, is still a virginal research field where nobody sets foot in. In this paper, circle tensile stress within the elastic region was applied to ferromagnetic sample under geomagnetic field. Experiment results on the relation between surface magnetic field and elastic stress were presented, and a simple model was derived. Simulation of the model was reconciled with the experimental results. This can be of great importance for it provides a brighter future for the promising Magnetic Memory NDE method—the potential possibility of quantitative measurement.

  2. Solar Cycle: Magnetized March to Equator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Bands of magnetized solar material – with alternating south and north polarity – march toward the sun's equator. Comparing the evolution of the bands with the sunspot number in each hemisphere over...

  3. Solar cycle variations in the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    ISEE 3 interplanetary magnetic field measurements have been used to extend the NSSDC hourly averaged IMF composite data set through mid-1982. Most of sunspot cycle 20 (start:1964) and the first half of cycle 21 (start:1976) are now covered. The average magnitude of the field was relatively constant over cycle 20 with approx. 5-10% decreases in 1969 and 1971, when the Sun's polar regions changed polarity, and a 20% decrease in 1975-6 around solar minimum. Since the start of the new cycle, the total field strength has risen with the mean for the first third of 1982 being about 40% greater than the cycle 20 average. As during the previous cycle, an approx. 10% drop in IMF magnitude accompanied the 1980 reversal of the solar magnetic field. While the interplanetary magnetic field is clearly stronger during the present solar cycle, another 5-7 years of observations will be needed to determine if cycle 21 exhibits the same modest variations as the last cycle. Accordingly, it appears at this time that intercycle changes in IMF magnitude may be much larger than the intracycle variations.

  4. Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Uchida, Mona; Tomioka, Michiko; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition. PMID:27580019

  5. Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Uchida, Mona; Tomioka, Michiko; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition.

  6. Background magnetic fields during last three cycles of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andryeyeva, O. A.; Stepanian, N. N.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes our studies of evolution of the solar magnetic field with different sign and field strength in the range from -100 G to 100 G. The structure and evolution of large-scale magnetic fields on the Sun during the last 3 cycles of solar activity is investigated using magnetograph data from the Kitt Peak Solar Observatory. This analysis reveals two groups of the large-scale magnetic fields evolving differently during the cycles. The first group is represented by relatively weak background fields, and is best observed in the range of 3-10 Gauss. The second group is represented by stronger fields of 75-100 Gauss. The spatial and temporal properties of these groups are described and compared with the total magnetic flux. It is shown that the anomalous behaviour of the total flux during the last cycle can be found only in the second group

  7. Performances of four magnetic heat-pump cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Murphy, R. W.; Mei, V. C.; Chen, G. L.

    Magnetic heat pumps (MHP) have been successfully used for refrigeration applications at near absolute-zero-degree temperatures. In these applications, a temperature lift of a few degrees in a cryogenic environment is sufficient and can be easily achieved by a simple magnetic heat-pump cycle. To extend magnetic heat pumping to other temperature ranges and other types of applications in which the temperature lift is more than just a few degrees requires more involved cycle processes. This paper investigates the characteristics of a few better-known thermomagnetic heat-pump cycles (Carnot, Ericsson, Stirling, and regenerative) in extended ranges of temperature lift. The regenerative cycle is the most efficient one. For gadolinium operating between 0 and 7 T (Tesla) in a heat pump cycle with a heat-rejection temperature of 320 K, our analysis predicted a 42 percent loss in coefficient of performance at 260 K cooling temperature, and a 15 percent loss in capacity at 232 K cooling temperature for the constant-field cycle as compared with the ideal regenerative cycle. Such substantial penalties indicate that the potential irreversibilities from this one source (the additional heat transfer that would be needed for the constant-field vs the ideal regenerative cycle) may adversely affect the viability of certain proposed MHP concepts if the relevant loss mechanisms are not adequately addressed.

  8. Investigation of a theoretical magnetic refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, Joshua D.

    This research paper studies the concept of developing a different type of freezer rather than vapor-compression for Dippin' Dots, a company who sells frozen goods. The freezer in question is a magnetic freezer that works by removing the compressor and bringing in magnetocaloric materials, which provide cooling by being subjected to a magnetic field. Many possibilities for improvements are available from this technology including a safer more environmentally benign fluid, a higher efficiency, and a possible cost savings. A theoretical model was designed and efficiency calculations and a cost analysis were both performed to determine if there were any improvements and if constructing a prototype freezer was feasible. The coefficient of performance of the designed freezer had the theoretical capability of being up to 5 times that of the vapor-compression freezer, but with the pumps found to complete the design this high number fell significantly short. The price to build a prototype was calculated to be around $7,050. After considering the data building a magnetic freezer prototype does not seem feasible. Although this freezer does not seem reasonable, the magnetic refrigerator technology seems applicable for other uses and is capable of developing in the future.

  9. Influence of Solar Cycles on Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, M.

    2011-12-01

    This research inspects possible influence of solar cycles on earthquakes through of statistical analyses. We also discussed the mechanism that would drive the occurrence of increasing of earthquakes during solar maxima. The study was based on worldwide earthquakes events during approximately four hundred years (1600-2010). The increase of earthquakes events followed the Maxima of Solar cycle, and also depends on the tectonic plate location. From 1600 until 1645 events increased during the Maxima in some of the tectonic plates as Pacific, Arabian and South America. The earthquakes analyzed during two grand solar minima, the Maunder (1645-1720) and the Dalton (1790-1820) showed a decrease in the number of earthquakes and the solar activity. It was observed during these minima a significant number of events at specific geological features. After the last minima (Dalton) the earthquakes pattern increased with solar maxima. The calculations showed that events increasing during solar maxima most in the Pacific, South America or Arabian until 1900. Since there were few records during these three centuries we needed additional analysis on modern data. We took the last four solar cycles events (1950-2010) and made similar calculations. The results agreed with the former calculations. It might be that the mechanism for the Sun-Earth connection relies on the solar wind speed. In both records (1600-1900) and (1950-2010) the results showed a significant increase in earthquakes events in some of the tectonic plates linked to solar maxima. The Solar wind energy striking the Earth's magnetosphere affects the entire environment because the pressure on the region increases and the magnetosphere shrinks sometimes four Earth's radii. This sudden compression causes earthquakes in specific plates. During the times of solar minima the pressure from the solar wind on the earth decreases, then the magnetosphere expands and earthquakes happen in a different pattern according to the

  10. Experimental simulation of a magnetic refrigeration cycle in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmieva, E. T.; Kamantsev, A. P.; Koledov, V. V.; Mashirov, A. V.; Shavrov, V. G.; Cwik, J.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The complete magnetic refrigeration cycle has been simulated on a sample of gadolinium in magnetic fields of a Bitter coil magnet up to 12 T. The total change of temperature of the sample during the cycle is a consequence of magnetic refrigeration, and the dependence of the magnetization of the sample on the magnetic field exhibits a hysteretic behavior. This makes it possible to determine the work done by the magnetic field on the sample during the magnetic refrigeration cycle and to calculate the coefficient of performance of the process. In a magnetic field of 2 T near the Curie temperature of gadolinium, the coefficient of performance of the magnetic refrigeration is found to be 92. With an increase in the magnetic field, the coefficient of performance of the process decreases sharply down to 15 in a magnetic field of 12 T. The reasons, for which the coefficient of performance of the magnetic refrigeration is significantly below the fundamental limitations imposed by the reversed Carnot theorem, have been discussed.

  11. Comparing the Large-Scale Magnetic Field During the Last Three Solar Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale magnetic field observations show that the current extended solar cycle minimum differs from the two previous well-observed minima in several respects. The weaker polar fields increase the relative influence of middle and low-latitude flux patterns on the configuration of the corona and heliosphere. A much larger fraction of the open flux originates in equatorial coronal holes. Even though the heliospheric field magnitude and the mean solar magnetic field are the weakest since direct measurements began, the sector structure of the interplanetary field that reflects the shape of the heliospheric current sheet continues to extend to fairly high latitude. The pattern of emergence of active regions through the cycle and the transport of flux from low to high latitudes also show quite different patterns, providing insight into the meridional flow that influences the dynamo that drives the cycle. The long records of synoptic observations that provide a rich source of information about solar activity must be maintained.

  12. Sun's Polar Magnetic Field Reversals in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishkalo, M. I.; Leiko, U. M.

    It is known that polar magnetic field of the Sun changes its sign at the maximum of solar cycle. These changes were called as polar field reversals. We investigated dynamics of high-latitude solar magnetic fields separately in northern and southern hemispheres. Solar polar field strength measurements from the Wilcox Solar Observatory and low-resolution synoptic magnetic maps from the SOLIS project and from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory were used. We analyzed total magnetic flux at near-polar zones, starting from 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and 85 degrees of latitude, and found time points when the total magnetic flux changed its sign. It was concluded that total magnetic flux changed its sign at first at lower latitudes and finally near the poles. Single polar magnetic field reversal was found in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere was characterized by three-fold magnetic field reversal. Polar magnetic field reversals finished in northern and southern hemispheres by CR 2150 and CR 2162, respectively.

  13. Towards better constrained models of the solar magnetic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres

    2010-12-01

    The best tools we have for understanding the origin of solar magnetic variability are kinematic dynamo models. During the last decade, this type of models has seen a continuous evolution and has become increasingly successful at reproducing solar cycle characteristics. The basic ingredients of these models are: the solar differential rotation -- which acts as the main source of energy for the system by shearing the magnetic field; the meridional circulation -- which plays a crucial role in magnetic field transport; the turbulent diffusivity -- which attempts to capture the effect of convective turbulence on the large scale magnetic field; and the poloidal field source -- which closes the cycle by regenerating the poloidal magnetic field. However, most of these ingredients remain poorly constrained which allows one to obtain solar-like solutions by "tuning" the input parameters, leading to controversy regarding which parameter set is more appropriate. In this thesis we revisit each of those ingredients in an attempt to constrain them better by using observational data and theoretical considerations, reducing the amount of free parameters in the model. For the meridional flow and differential rotation we use helioseismic data to constrain free parameters and find that the differential rotation is well determined, but the available data can only constrain the latitudinal dependence of the meridional flow. For the turbulent magnetic diffusivity we show that combining mixing-length theory estimates with magnetic quenching allows us to obtain viable magnetic cycles and that the commonly used diffusivity profiles can be understood as a spatiotemporal average of this process. For the poloidal source we introduce a more realistic way of modeling active region emergence and decay and find that this resolves existing discrepancies between kinematic dynamo models and surface flux transport simulations. We also study the physical mechanisms behind the unusually long minimum of

  14. MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH INCLUDING SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Tóth, G. E-mail: mopher@bu.edu E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu

    2015-04-10

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ∼100 km s{sup −1} larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  15. Sun-like Stars: magnetic fields, cycles and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, Rim

    2016-10-01

    In Sun-like stars, magnetic fields are generated in the outer convective layers. They shape the stellar environment, from the photosphere to planetary orbits. Studying the large-scale magnetic field of those stars enlightens our understanding of the field properties and gives us observational constraints for field generation dynamo models. It also sheds light on how ``normal'' the Sun is among Sun-like stars. In this contribution, I will review the field properties of Sun-like stars, focusing on solar twins and planet hosting stars. I will discuss the observed large-scale magnetic cycles, compare them to stellar activity cycles, and link that to what we know about the Sun. I will also discuss the effect of large-scale stellar fields on exoplanets, exoplanetary emissions (e.g. radio), and habitability.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of four magnetic heat-pump cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Murphy, R. W.; Mei, V. C.; Chen, G. L.

    1992-10-01

    The characteristics of four thermomagnetic heat pump cycles (Carnot, Ericsson, Stirling, and regenerative) are analyzed over extended ranges of temperature lift. The analysis is carried out for gadolinium operating between 0 and 7 Tesla, with a heat-rejection temperature of 320 K. A 42-percent reduction in the coefficient of performance at 260 K cooling temperature and a 15-percent reduction in capacity at 232 K cooling temperature is predicted for the magnetic Ericsson cycle as compared with the ideal regenerative cycle. It is suggested that the potential irreversibilities from this one source alone may adversely affect the viability of certain proposed magnetic heat pump concepts if the relevant loss mechanisms are not adequately addressed.

  17. A double magnetic solar cycle and dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, H.

    Various solar activity data have indicated that along with the well-known 22-year cycle there is a shorter periodicity of about 2 years. To simulate this phenomenon, we constructed a dynamical system, which reproduced double-periodic behaviour of the solar cycle. Such nonlinear dynamical system described the solar αω-dynamo process with variable intensities Rα and Rω of the α-effect and the differential rotation, respectively. We have plotted the time distribution and butterfly diagrams for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields with dipole and quadrupole symmetries. The dynamical system with dipole symmetry of the magnetic field reproduces a regime similar to the double cycle at -450 < RαRω < -210. In the case of quadrupole symmetry, this regime exists at -220 < RαRω < -190.

  18. DYNAMO ACTION AND MAGNETIC CYCLES IN F-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Toomre, Juri; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2013-11-10

    Magnetic activity and differential rotation are commonly observed features on main-sequence F-type stars. We seek to make contact with such observations and to provide a self-consistent picture of how differential rotation and magnetic fields arise in the interiors of these stars. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic code is employed to simulate global-scale convection and dynamo processes in a 1.2 M{sub ☉} F-type star at two rotation rates. The simulations are carried out in spherical shells that encompass most of the convection zone and a portion of the stably stratified radiative zone below it, allowing us to explore the effects a stable zone has upon the morphology of the global-scale magnetic fields. We find that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs in the star rotating more rapidly at 20 Ω{sub ☉}, with the polarity of the mean field reversing on a timescale of about 1600 days. Between reversals, the magnetic energy rises and falls with a fairly regular period, with three magnetic energy cycles required to complete a reversal. The magnetic energy cycles and polarity reversals arise due to a linking of the polar-slip instability in the stable region and dynamo action present in the convection zone. For the more slowly rotating case (10 Ω{sub ☉}), persistent wreaths of magnetism are established and maintained by dynamo action. Compared to their hydrodynamic progenitors, the dynamo states here involve a marked reduction in the exhibited latitudinal differential rotation, which also vary during the course of a cycle.

  19. Dynamo Action and Magnetic Cycles in F-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic activity and differential rotation are commonly observed features on main-sequence F-type stars. We seek to make contact with such observations and to provide a self-consistent picture of how differential rotation and magnetic fields arise in the interiors of these stars. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic code is employed to simulate global-scale convection and dynamo processes in a 1.2 M ⊙ F-type star at two rotation rates. The simulations are carried out in spherical shells that encompass most of the convection zone and a portion of the stably stratified radiative zone below it, allowing us to explore the effects a stable zone has upon the morphology of the global-scale magnetic fields. We find that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs in the star rotating more rapidly at 20 Ω⊙, with the polarity of the mean field reversing on a timescale of about 1600 days. Between reversals, the magnetic energy rises and falls with a fairly regular period, with three magnetic energy cycles required to complete a reversal. The magnetic energy cycles and polarity reversals arise due to a linking of the polar-slip instability in the stable region and dynamo action present in the convection zone. For the more slowly rotating case (10 Ω⊙), persistent wreaths of magnetism are established and maintained by dynamo action. Compared to their hydrodynamic progenitors, the dynamo states here involve a marked reduction in the exhibited latitudinal differential rotation, which also vary during the course of a cycle.

  20. Influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic field on the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Lai, Mei-Feng; Hou, Yun-Fang; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-13

    We investigated the influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of suspended magnetic nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires was obtained using steady-state Joule heating to measure the change in resistance caused by spontaneous heating. The results showed that the thermal conductivity coefficients of straight and wavy magnetic nanowires decreased with an increase in the magnetic domain wall number, implying that the scattering between magnons and domain walls hindered the heat transport process. In addition, we proved that the magnetic field considerably reduced the thermal conductivity of a magnetic nanowire. The influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline magnetic nanowires can be attributed to the scattering of long-wavelength spin waves mediated by intergrain exchange coupling.

  1. Plasma heating via adiabatic magnetic compression-expansion cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.; Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-06-15

    Heating of collisionless plasmas in closed adiabatic magnetic cycle comprising of a quasi static compression followed by a non quasi static constrained expansion against a constant external pressure is proposed. Thermodynamic constraints are derived to show that the plasma always gains heat in cycles having at least one non quasi static process. The turbulent relaxation of the plasma to the equilibrium state at the end of the non quasi static expansion is discussed and verified via 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations. Applications of this scheme to heating plasmas in open configurations (mirror machines) and closed configurations (tokamak, reverse field pinche) are discussed.

  2. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATION OF THE INTER-NETWORK MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Chunlan; Wang, Jingxiu

    2015-06-20

    The solar inter-network magnetic field is the weakest component of solar magnetism, but it contributes most of the solar surface magnetic flux. The study of its origin has been constrained by the inadequate tempospatial resolution and sensitivity of polarization observations. With dramatic advances in spatial resolution and detecting sensitivity, the solar spectropolarimetry provided by the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode in an interval from the solar minimum to maximum of cycle 24 opens an unprecedented opportunity to study the cyclic behavior of the solar inter-network magnetic field. More than 1000 Hinode magnetograms observed from 2007 January to 2014 August are selected in the study. It has been found that there is a very slight correlation between sunspot number and magnetic field at the inter-network flux spectrum. From solar minimum to maximum of cycle 24, the flux density of the solar inter-network field is invariant, at 10 ± 1 G. The observations suggest that the inter-network magnetic field does not arise from flux diffusion or flux recycling of solar active regions, thereby indicating the existence of a local small-scale dynamo. Combining the full-disk magnetograms observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager in the same period, we find that the area ratio of the inter-network region to the full disk of the Sun apparently decreases from solar minimum to maximum but always exceeds 60%, even in the phase of solar maximum.

  3. On the Influence of the Solar Bi-Cycle on Comic Ray Modulatio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifter, N. Part Xxvii: A. Defect Of The Solar Dynamo. B.; Scissors, K.; Sprucener, H.

    In this presentation we propose a new paradigm that explains the different lengths of individual solar Hale cycles. It proves beneficial to distinguish between a so-called inHale and ex-Hale cycle, which together form the solar bi-cycle. We carefully analyzed the influence of so-called complex mode excitations (CMEs) on comic ray modulation, in particular on the drifts of the comic isotope O+3 , which we found to induce characteristic anisotropies. This comic isotope anisotropy (CIA) is caused by the wellknown north-south asymmetry (NSA) and can be observed as a rare Forbush increase (FBI). The latter is linked to the solar magnetic field which appears to have a chaotic behaviour (for details see part I-XXVI). Especially during an ex-Hale cycle magnetic flux is pseudo-pneumatically escaping through a coronal hole. Consequently, the solar dynamo can no longer operate efficiently, i.e. is defect.

  4. Solar cycle-dependent helicity transport by magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-08-01

    Magnetic clouds observed with the Wind and ACE spacecraft are fit with the static, linear force-free cylinder model to obtain estimates of the chirality, fluxes, and magnetic helicity of each event. The fastest magnetic clouds (MCs) are shown to carry the most flux and helicity. We calculate the net cumulative helicity which measures the difference in right- and left-handed helicity contained in MCs over time. The net cumulative helicity does not average to zero; rather, a strong left-handed helicity bias develops over the solar cycle, dominated by the largest events of cycle 23: Bastille Day 2000 and 28 October 2003. The majority of MCs ("slow" events, < 500 km/s) have a net cumulative helicity profile that appears to be modulated by the solar activity cycle. This is far less evident for "fast" MC events ( ≥ 500 km/s), which were disproportionately left-handed over our data set. A brief discussion about the various solar sources of CME helicity and their implication for dynamo processes is included.

  5. Thermonuclear inverse magnetic pumping power cycle for stellarator reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    A novel power cycle for direct conversion of alpha-particle energy into electricity is proposed for an ignited plasma in a stellarator reactor. The plasma column is alternately compressed and expanded in minor radius by periodic variation of the toroidal magnetic field strength. As a result of the way a stellarator is expected to work, the plasma pressure during expansion is greater than the corresponding pressure during compression. Therefore, negative work is done on the plasma during a complete cycle. This work manifests itself as a back-voltage in the toroidal field coils, and direct electrical energy is obtained from this voltage. For a typical reactor, the average power obtained from this cycle (with a minor radius compression factor on the order of 50%) can be as much as 50% of the electrical power obtained from the thermonuclear neutrons without compressing the plasma. Thus, if it is feasible to vary the toroidal field strength, the power cycle provides an alternative scheme of energy conversion for a deuterium-tritium fueled reactor. The cycle may become an important method of energy conversion for advanced neutron-lean fueled reactors. By operating two or more reactors in tandem, the cycle can be made self-sustaining.

  6. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  7. Solar-cycle variations of the internetwork magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faurobert, M.; Ricort, G.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The quiet Sun exhibits a rich and complex magnetic structuring that is still not fully resolved or understood. Aims: We intend to contribute to the debate about the origin of the internetwork magnetic fields and whether or not they are related to the global solar dynamo. Methods: We analyzed center-to-limb polarization measurements obtained with the SOT/SP spectropolarimeter onboard the Hinode satellite outside active regions in 2007 and 2013, that is, at a minimum and a maximum of the solar cycle, respectively. We examined 10'' × 10'' maps of the unsigned circular and linear polarization in the FeI 630.25 nm line in regions located away from network elements. The maps were corrected for bias and focus variations between the two data sets. Then we applied a Fourier spectral analysis to examine wether the spatial structuring of the internetwork magnetic fields shows significant differences between the minimum and maximum of the cycle. Results: Neither the mean values of the unsigned circular and linear polarizations in the selected 10'' × 10'' maps nor their spatial fluctuation power spectra show significant center-to-limb variations. For the unsigned circular polarization the power of the spatial fluctuations is lower in 2013 than in 2007, but the spectral slope is unchanged. The linear polarization spectra show no significant differences in 2013 and 2007, but the spectrum of 2013 is more strongly affected by noise. Conclusions: The small-scale magnetic structuring in the internetwork is different in our 2013 and 2007 data. Surprisingly, we find a lower spatial fluctuation power at the solar maximum in the internetwork magnetic structuring. This indicates some complex interactions between the small-scale magnetic structures in the quiet Sun and the global dynamo, as predicted by recent numerical simulations. This result has to be confirmed by further statistical studies with larger data sets.

  8. Properties of Magnetic Tongues over a Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; Démoulin, Pascal; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.

    2016-08-01

    The photospheric spatial distribution of the main magnetic polarities of bipolar active regions (ARs) present during their emergence deformations are known as magnetic tongues. They are attributed to the presence of twist in the toroidal magnetic-flux tubes that form the ARs. The aim of this article is to study the twist of newly emerged ARs from the evolution of magnetic tongues observed in photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. We apply the procedure described by Poisson et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015a) to ARs observed over the full Solar Cycle 23 and the beginning of Cycle 24. Our results show that the hemispherical rule obtained using the tongues as a proxy of the twist has a weak sign dominance (53 % in the southern hemisphere and 58 % in the northern hemisphere). By defining the variation of the tongue angle, we characterize the strength of the magnetic tongues during different phases of the AR emergence. We find that there is a tendency of the tongues to be stronger during the beginning of the emergence and to become weaker as the AR reaches its maximum magnetic flux. We compare this evolution with the emergence of a toroidal flux-rope model with non-uniform twist. The variety of evolution of the tongues in the analyzed ARs can only be reproduced when using a broad range of twist profiles, in particular having a large variety of twist gradients in the direction vertical to the photosphere. Although the analytical model used is a special case, selected to minimize the complexity of the problem, the results obtained set new observational constraints to theoretical models of flux-rope emergence that form bipolar ARs.

  9. [Influence of chosen metals on the citric acid cycle].

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołebiewska, Ewa; Kucharzewski, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Industrial activity growth influenced not only technological progress, but also had negative effects on human natural environment. It results among others in increased human exposition to heavy metals. In case of detoxication mechanisms disturbance in organism, heavy metals cumulate in tissues causing mutations and disrupting metabolism, including Krebs cycle. Recent studies have revealed that iron, zinc and manganese have especially strong influence on Krebs cycle. These elements act as cofactors or inhibitors regulating activity of particular enzymes of this cycle, which has a reflection in cellular energy production disturbances.

  10. An Educational Display of the Solar Magnetic Cycle: Year 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H. P.; Gearen, M. V.; Jacoby, S. H.

    1999-05-01

    We are developing an educational module to improve student and public understanding of the Sun's magnetic cycle. The instructional package features a CDROM compatible with most personal computers available in the home or classroom with a day-by-day record of an entire magnetic cycle as recorded in magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (NSO/KPVT) near Tucson, AZ. These data have in fact been crucial to developing our present understanding of the solar cycle and its terrestrial effects. In the second year of the project, we have loaded the data to compact disks both as individual "gif" files for inspection and analysis and as QuickTime movies, have prepared the first version of the accompanying textual material, and are developing macros to aid extraction of information from the data for various laboratory exercises. We will display samples of these images and movies, and will furnish copies of the compact disks and accompanying textual material for testing and comment.

  11. Energy efficient iron based electronic field cycling magnet.

    PubMed

    Plendl, Dirk; Fujara, Marian; Privalov, Alexei F; Fujara, Franz

    2009-06-01

    A new concept for an energy efficient electromagnet for fast field cycling NMR applications as well as its construction and first test results are presented. The magnet, which provides a rectangular sample space of 17 x 25 mm, has an iron yoke and pole pieces optimised with respect to the B(0) homogeneity. The maximum field is 0.66 T at a current of 320 A; its field inhomogeneity for a cylindrical sample (length 7 mm, diameter 6mm) is about 50 ppm. The power dissipation during polarisation at 0.55 T is as low as 1.4 kW. The magnet is powered by a commercially available power supply and can be rapidly switched with a slew rate of 0.55 T/ms. The system has shown a stability of 50 ppm/h.

  12. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke; Carter, Brett A.

    2017-04-01

    It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998-2014) of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian) have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (Kp>3) have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  13. Optimization of the performance characteristics in an irreversible regeneration magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, GuoXing

    2012-02-01

    A model of the irreversible regenerative Brayton refrigeration cycle working with paramagnetic materials is established, in which the regeneration problem in two constant-magnetic field processes and the irreversibility in two adiabatic processes are considered synthetically. Expressions for the COP, cooling rate, power input, the minimum ratio of the two magnetic fields, etc., are derived. It is found that the influence of the irreversibility and the regeneration on the main performance parameters of the magnetic Brayton refrigerator is remarkable. It is important that we have obtained several optimal criteria, which may provide some theoretical basis for the optimal design and operation of the Brayton refrigerator. The results obtained in the paper can provide some new theoretical information for the optimal design and performance improvement of real Brayton refrigerators.

  14. Magnetic field influence on paramecium motility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.F.; Rosen, A.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The influence of a moderately intense static magnetic field on movement patterns of free swimming Paramecium was studied. When exposed to fields of 0.126 T, these ciliated protozoa exhibited significant reduction in velocity as well as a disorganization of movement pattern. It is suggested that these findings may be explained on the basis of alteration in function of ion specific channels within the cell membrane.

  15. Developing a Solar Magnetic Catalog Spanning Four Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werginz, Zachary; Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeLuca, Michael D.; Vargas Acosta, Juan Pablo; Vargas Dominguez, Santiago; Zhang, Jie; Longcope, Dana; Martens, Petrus C.

    2016-05-01

    Bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) are the cornerstone of solar cycle propagation, the building blocks that give structure to the solar atmosphere, and the origin of the majority of space weather events. However, in spite of their importance, there is no homogeneous BMR catalog spanning the era of systematic solar magnetic field measurements. Here we present the results of an ongoing project to address this deficiency applying the Bipolar Active Region Detection (BARD) code to magnetograms from the 512 Channel of the Kitt Peak Vaccum Telescope, SOHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI.The BARD code automatically identifies BMRs and tracks them as they are rotated by differential rotation. The output of the automatic detection is supervised by a human observer to correct possible mistakes made by the automatic algorithm (like incorrect pairings and tracking mislabels). Extra passes are made to integrate fragmented regions as well as to balance the flux between BMR polarities. At the moment, our BMR database includes 6,885 unique objects (detected and tracked) belonging to four separate solar cycles (21-24).

  16. Update on a Solar Magnetic Catalog Spanning Four Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Acosta, Juan Pablo; Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Vargas Dominguez, Santiago; Werginz, Zachary; DeLuca, Michael D.; Longcope, Dana; Harvey, J. W.; Windmueller, John; Zhang, Jie; Martens, Petrus C.

    2017-08-01

    Bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) are the cornerstone of solar cycle propagation, the building blocks that give structure to the solar atmosphere, and the origin of the majority of space weather events. However, in spite of their importance, there is no homogeneous BMR catalog spanning the era of systematic solar magnetic field measurements. Here we present the results of an ongoing project to address this deficiency applying the Bipolar Active Region Detection (BARD) code to magnetograms from the 512 Channel of the Kitt Peak Vaccum Telescope, SOHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI.The BARD code automatically identifies BMRs and tracks them as they are rotated by differential rotation. The output of the automatic detection is supervised by a human observer to correct possible mistakes made by the automatic algorithm (like incorrect pairings and tracking mislabels). Extra passes are made to integrate fragmented regions as well as to balance the flux between BMR polarities. At the moment, our BMR database includes nearly 10,000 unique objects (detected and tracked) belonging to four separate solar cycles (21-24).

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Joo Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-09

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π/2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  18. Optimization of the performance characteristics in an irreversible magnetic Ericsson refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Z. R.; Ye, X. M.; Lin, G. X.; Brück, E.

    2006-05-01

    A general model of an irreversible Ericsson refrigeration cycle employing paramagnetic materials as the working substance is presented, in which multi-irreversibilities such as finite-rate heat transfer, regenerative loss, heat leak, efficiency of regenerator and internal irreversibility resulting from magnetic working substances are taken into account. On the basis of the general thermodynamic properties of paramagnetic materials and the optimal-control theory, the optimal mathematical expressions of cooling load, coefficient of performance and power input of the irreversible Ericsson refrigeration cycle using paramagnetic materials as the working substance are derived. By means of a numerical approach, the influence of the heat leak, the internal irreversibility, the efficiency of regenerator, the ratio of the magnetic fields on the cyclic performance characteristics of the refrigeration cycle are revealed and discussed in detail. Some important performance bounds, e.g. the maximum cooling load and the corresponding coefficient of performance, the maximum coefficient of performance and the corresponding cooling load, are determined and evaluated. Furthermore, several special cases may be deduced from the primary results in this paper. The conclusions obtained in the present paper are more general and useful than those existing in literature and can provide some new important information for the optimal design and performance improvement of magnetic refrigerators.

  19. Cycle Length Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity and Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hwajin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Oh, Suyeon; Kim, Bogyeong; Kim, Hoonkyu; Yi, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Solar cycle (SC) 23 was extraordinarily long with remarkably low magnetic activity. We have investigated whether this is a common behavior of solar-type stars. From the Ca ii H and K line intensities of 111 stars observed at Mount Wilson Observatory from 1966 to 1991, we have retrieved data of all 23 G-type stars and recalculated their cycle lengths using the damped least-squares method for the chromospheric activity index S as a function of time. A regression analysis was performed to find relations between the derived cycle length, Pavg, and the index for excess chromospheric emission, RHK\\prime . As a noteworthy result, we found a segregation between young and old solar-type stars in the cycle length-activity correlation. We incorporated the relation for the solar-type stars into the previously known rule for stellar chromospheric activity and brightness to estimate the variation of solar brightness from SC 22 to SC 23 as (0.12 ± 0.06)%, much higher than the actual variation of total solar irradiance (TSI) ≤0.02%. We have then examined solar spectral irradiance (SSI) to find a good phase correlation with a sunspot number in the wavelength range of 170-260 nm, which is close to the spectral range effective in heating the Earth’s atmosphere. Therefore, it appears that SSI rather than TSI is a good indicator of the chromospheric activity, and its cycle length dependent variation would be more relevant to the possible role of the Sun in the cyclic variation of the Earth’s atmosphere.

  20. Influence of quasiparticle damping on magnetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Nolting, W.

    1996-04-01

    We propose a modified alloy analogy for the single-band Hubbard model, by which we investigate the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in narrow energy bands. It is shown that a proper definition of the fictitious alloy enables self-consistent magnetic solutions to be found. The existence of spontaneous magnetism is mainly influenced by the lattice structure, the effective Coulomb coupling, and the band occupation. In accordance with the simple Stoner criterion, ferromagnetism appears in strongly correlated electron systems for band occupations, which locate the chemical potential μ in regions of high quasiparticle density of states. Rather realistic Curie temperatures are found. The macroscopic magnetic properties explain themselves via temperature-dependent quasiparticle densities of states, quasiparticle band structures, and respective spectral densities. It is shown how quasiparticle damping may depress quite substantially the stability of magnetic states by broadening corresponding spectral density peaks. Correlation effects lead to the expected splitting into two quasiparticle subbands (``Hubbard bands''), and under certain conditions to an additional exchange splitting of each of these quasiparticle subbands, as well as to a spin-dependent band narrowing, the combination of which gives rise to an unconventional ``inverse'' exchange shift at certain positions of the Brillouin zone.

  1. Long term evolution of Earth's magnetic field strength: Supercontinent cycles and nucleation of the inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirscher, Uwe; Mitchell, Ross N.; Cox, Grant; Asimow, Paul; Zhang, Nan; Li, Zheng-Xiang

    2017-04-01

    regime that not just organized but increased core-mantle boundary heat flow, then there may be a causal link to inner core nucleation through increased core cooling. Our results thus have implications for both the age of the inner core and the long-term modulation of magnetic field strength through the influence of the supercontinent cycle on core-mantle boundary heat flow. If, in fact, inner core nucleation is related to formation of the first supercontinent, then there is an unexpected connection between these two major state changes in the history of our planet and a coupling between its innermost and outermost spheres.

  2. Intermittency of the Solar Magnetic Field and Solar Magnetic Activity Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibalova, A. S.; Obridko, V. N.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2017-03-01

    Small-scale solar magnetic fields demonstrate features of fractal intermittent behavior, which requires quantification. For this purpose we investigate how the observational estimate of the solar magnetic flux density B depends on resolution D in order to obtain the scaling ln BD = - k ln D +a in a reasonably wide range. The quantity k demonstrates cyclic variations typical of a solar activity cycle. In addition, k depends on the magnetic flux density, i.e. the ratio of the magnetic flux to the area over which the flux is calculated, at a given instant. The quantity a demonstrates some cyclic variation, but it is much weaker than in the case of k. The scaling obtained generalizes previous scalings found for the particular cycle phases. The scaling is typical of fractal structures. In our opinion, the results obtained trace small-scale action in the solar convective zone and its coexistence with the conventional large-scale solar dynamo based on differential rotation and mirror-asymmetric convection.

  3. EXor Outbursts from Disk Amplification of Stellar Magnetic Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Philip J.

    2016-12-01

    EXor outbursts—moderate-amplitude disk accretion events observed in Class I and Class II protostellar sources—have timescales and amplitudes that are consistent with the viscous accumulation and release of gas in the inner disk near the dead zone boundary. We suggest that outbursts are indirectly triggered by stellar dynamo cycles, via poloidal magnetic flux that diffuses radially outward through the disk. Interior to the dead zone the strength of the net field modulates the efficiency of angular momentum transport by the magnetorotational instability. In the dead zone changes in the polarity of the net field may lead to stronger outbursts because of the dominant role of the Hall effect in this region of the disk. At the level of simple estimates we show that changes to kG-strength stellar fields could stimulate disk outbursts on 0.1 au scales, though this optimistic conclusion depends upon the uncertain efficiency of net flux transport through the inner disk. The model predicts a close association between observational tracers of stellar magnetic activity and EXor events.

  4. Comparing Coronal and Heliospheric Magnetic Fields over Several Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, J. S.; Virtanen, I. I.; Mursula, K.

    2017-01-01

    Here we use the PFSS model and photospheric data from Wilcox Solar Observatory, SOHO/MDI, SDO/HMI, and SOLIS to compare the coronal field with heliospheric magnetic field measured at 1 au, compiled in the NASA/NSSDC OMNI 2 data set. We calculate their mutual polarity match and the power of the radial decay, p, of the radial field using different source surface distances and different number of harmonic multipoles. We find the average polarity match of 82% for the declining phase, 78%–79% for maxima, 76%–78% for the ascending phase, and 74%–76% for minima. On an average, the source surface of 3.25 RS gives the best polarity match. We also find strong evidence for solar cycle variation of the optimal source surface distance, with highest values (3.3 RS) during solar minima and lowest values (2.6 RS–2.7 RS) during the other three solar cycle phases. Raising the number of harmonic terms beyond 2 rarely improves the polarity match, showing that the structure of the HMF at 1 au is most of the time rather simple. All four data sets yield fairly similar polarity matches. Thus, polarity comparison is not affected by photospheric field scaling, unlike comparisons of the field intensity.

  5. The Influence of Eccentricity Cycles on Exoplanet Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, N. J. K.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Abbot, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    In our search for habitable exoplanets, it is important to understand how planetary habitability is influenced by orbital configurations that differ from those of the terrestrial planets in our Solar system. In particular, observational surveys have revealed the prevalence of planetary systems around binary stars. Within these systems, the gravitational influence of a companion star can induce libration in the eccentricity of the planet's orbit (referred to as Kozai Cycles) on timescales as short as thousands of years. The resulting fluctuations in stellar flux at the top of the atmosphere can potentially induce dramatic variations in surface temperatures, with direct implications for the planet's habitability prospects. We investigate this research problem using two steps. First, we utilize the MERCURY N-body integrator in order to calculate the eccentricity of a hypothetical Earth-analogue under the gravitational influence of a stellar companion. Second, we run a coupled Global Climate Model (GCM) at various stages of a cycle provided by the MERCURY runs in order to examine if the increase in insolation renders the planet uninhabitable. This work will allow us to better understand how Kozai cycles influence the boundaries of a planet's habitable zone.

  6. SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES, CORONAL POTENTIAL FIELD MODELS AND ERUPTION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2013-05-10

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  7. Solar magnetic activity cycles, coronal potential field models and eruption rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2013-07-01

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the NSO's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) vector spectro-magnetograph (VSM), the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from the U. Stanford's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus), Solar Eruptive Event Detection System (SEEDS), and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003-2012 than for those between 1997-2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  8. [Life cycle of magnetic nanoparticles in the organism].

    PubMed

    Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Lartigue, Lénaïc; Péchoux, Christine; Luciani, Nathalie; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials drastically increases and yet their behavior in living organisms remains poorly examined. At the same time a better comprehension of the interactions between nanoparticles and the biological environment would allow us to limit potential nanoparticle-based toxicity and fully exploit nanoparticles medical applications. In this perspective, it is high time we develop methods to detect, quantify and follow the evolution of nanoparticles in the complex biological environment, spanning all relevant scales from the nanometer up to the tissue level. In this work we follow the life cycle of magnetic nanoparticles in vivo, focusing on their transformations over time from administration to elimination. As opposed to traditional nano-toxicological approaches, we herein take the nanoparticle perspective and try to establish how biological environment might impact the particles properties and their fate (interaction with proteins, cell confinement, degradation...) from their initial state to a series of changes a nanoparticle might undergo on its journey throughout the organism. © Société de Biologie, 2014.

  9. Influencing Factors on Life-Cycle Cost of Mooring Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Wataru; Yokota, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Katsufumi; Furuya, Koichi; Kato, Hirotoshi

    It is required that infrastructure should satisfy performance requirement through their service life based on an appropriate life cycle management strategy. Now adays, to determine the maintenance strategy and to consider the appropriate timing and method of intervention, the life-cycle cost (LCC) has been widely used as one of the decision-making indices. However, many factors influence on the estimation of LCC and they have not been adequately investigated. In this paper, the authors have made analytical investigation to quantify the influence of important factors on the results of LCC estimation. Four kinds of mooring facilities are focused; two of them are open-type wharves and the other two are sheet pile type quay walls having different design water depths. Prediction of deterioration progress and performance degradation is made by using the Markov models. The influences of structural sizes, transition probability in the Markov model, design service life, periodic inspection and methods of intervention on LCC were investigated. The influence of those factors has been discussed based on the calculated results of LCC by creating the maintenance scenarios for model mooring facilities.

  10. Oscillating dynamo in the presence of a fossil magnetic field - The solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E. H.; Boyer, D.

    1982-01-01

    Hydromagnetic dynamo generation of oscillating magnetic fields in the presence of an external, ambient magnetic field introduces a marked polarity asymmetry between the two halves of the magnetic cycle. The principle of oscillating dynamo interaction with external fields is developed, and a tentative application to the sun is described. In the sun a dipole moment associated with the stable fluid beneath the convection zone would produce an asymmetrical solar cycle.

  11. Oscillating dynamo in the presence of a fossil magnetic field - The solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E. H.; Boyer, D.

    1982-01-01

    Hydromagnetic dynamo generation of oscillating magnetic fields in the presence of an external, ambient magnetic field introduces a marked polarity asymmetry between the two halves of the magnetic cycle. The principle of oscillating dynamo interaction with external fields is developed, and a tentative application to the sun is described. In the sun a dipole moment associated with the stable fluid beneath the convection zone would produce an asymmetrical solar cycle.

  12. Influence of Menstrual Cycle Phase on Neural and Craving Responses to Appetitive Smoking Cues in Naturally Cycling Females

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Kanchana; Wetherill, Reagan R.; Johnson, Barbara; Kelly, Shannon; Langguth, Jamison; Mumma, Joel; Childress, Anna Rose

    2015-01-01

    Introdu ction: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used extensively in an attempt to understand brain vulnerabilities that mediate maladaptive responses to drug cues. Using perfusion fMRI, we have consistently shown reward-related activation (medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum) to smoking cues (SCs). Because preclinical and clinical studies generally show that progesterone may reduce reward and craving, we hypothesized that females in the follicular phase of the cycle (FPs; when progesterone levels are low) would have greater reward-related neural responses to SCs compared with females in the luteal phase (LPs). Methods: Sated cigarette-dependent premenopausal naturally cycling females underwent pseudo-continuous arterial spin-labeled perfusion fMRI during exposure to 10-min audio visual clips of appetitive SCs and non-SCs. Brain responses to SCs relative to non-SCs were examined among females grouped according to menstrual cycle (MC) phase at the time of scanning (22 FPs, 15 LPs). Craving scores were acquired pre- and post-SC exposure. Results: FPs showed increased neural responses to SCs compared with non-SCs in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (p ≤ .05corrected), whereas LPs did not. FPs reported SC-elicited craving (p ≤ .005), whereas LPs did not. Within FPs, SC-induced craving correlated with increased neural responses in the anterior insula (r = 0.73, p < .0001). Conclusions: FPs may be more vulnerable to relapse during appetitive SC exposure than LPs. Because the influence of MC phase on drug cue neural activity has not been examined, these results contribute to our knowledge of the neurobiological underpinnings of responses to drug cues, and they highlight the importance of monitoring menstrual cycle phase in all areas of addiction research. PMID:25762748

  13. Beginning of the new solar cycle (cycle 24) in the large-scale open solar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2008-06-01

    It is proposed to determined minimums of the 11-year solar cycles based on a minimal flux of the large-scale open solar magnetic field. The minimal fluxes before the finished cycle 23 (Carrington rotation CR 1904) and the started cycle 24 (CR 2054, April 2007) were equal to 1.8 × 1022 and 1.2 × 1022 μs, respectively. The long-term tendency toward an approach to a deep minimum of solar activity is confirmed. On the assumption that magnetic flux variations from minimums to maximums are proportional to each other, the anticipated value of the maximal Wolf number during cycle 24 is estimated as W max = 80.

  14. The influence of catalysts on biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA)

    DOE PAGES

    Benavides, Pahola Thathiana; Cronauer, Donald C.; Adom, Felix K.; ...

    2017-01-21

    Catalysts play an important role in biofuel production but are rarely included in biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA). In this work, we estimate the cradle-to-gate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of Pt/γ-Al2O3, CoMo/γ-Al2O3, and ZSM-5, catalysts that could be used in processes to convert biomass to biofuels. We also consider the potential impacts of catalyst recovery and recycling. Integrating the energy and environmental impacts of CoMo/γ-Al2O3 and ZSM-5 into an LCA of renewable gasoline produced via in-situ and ex-situ fast pyrolysis of a blended woody feedstock revealed that the ZSM-5, with cradle-to-gate GHG emissions of 7.7 kg CO2e/kg,more » could influence net life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline (1.7 gCO2e/MJ for the in-situ process, 1.2 gCO2e/MJ for the ex-situ process) by up to 14% depending on the loading rate. CoMo/γ-Al2O3 had a greater GHG intensity (9.6 kg CO2e/kg) than ZSM-5, however, it contributed approximately only 1% to the life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline because of the small amount of this catalyst needed per kg of biofuel produced. As a result, given that catalysts can contribute significantly to biofuel life-cycle GHG emissions depending on the GHG intensity of their production and their consumption rates, biofuel LCAs should consider the potential influence of catalysts on LCA results.« less

  15. The influence of catalysts on biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA)

    DOE PAGES

    Benavides, Pahola Thathiana; Cronauer, Donald C.; Adom, Felix K.; ...

    2017-01-21

    Catalysts play an important role in biofuel production but are rarely included in biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA). In this work, we estimate the cradle-to-gate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of Pt/γ-Al2O3, CoMo/γ-Al2O3, and ZSM-5, catalysts that could be used in processes to convert biomass to biofuels. We also consider the potential impacts of catalyst recovery and recycling. Integrating the energy and environmental impacts of CoMo/γ-Al2O3 and ZSM-5 into an LCA of renewable gasoline produced via in-situ and ex-situ fast pyrolysis of a blended woody feedstock revealed that the ZSM-5, with cradle-to-gate GHG emissions of 7.7 kg CO2e/kg,more » could influence net life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline (1.7 gCO2e/MJ for the in-situ process, 1.2 gCO2e/MJ for the ex-situ process) by up to 14% depending on the loading rate. CoMo/γ-Al2O3 had a greater GHG intensity (9.6 kg CO2e/kg) than ZSM-5, however, it contributed approximately only 1% to the life-cycle GHG emissions of the renewable gasoline because of the small amount of this catalyst needed per kg of biofuel produced. As a result, given that catalysts can contribute significantly to biofuel life-cycle GHG emissions depending on the GHG intensity of their production and their consumption rates, biofuel LCAs should consider the potential influence of catalysts on LCA results.« less

  16. Menstrual cycle influences on voice and speech in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Elisea M; Garcez, Vera; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Capp, Edison

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize voice intensity and stability of fundamental frequency, formants and diadochokinesis, vocal modulations, rhythms, and speed of speech in adolescents during follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Twenty-three adolescent females who were nonusers of oral contraceptives participated in a cross-sectional study of menstrual cycle influences on voicing and speaking tasks. Acoustic analyses were performed during both phases of the menstrual cycle using the Kay Elemetrics Computer Speech Lab Software Package. Data were analyzed using Student's paired sample t test. Phono-articulatory parameters were similar in both phases of the menstrual cycle (fundamental frequency: 192.6+/-23.9 Hz; minimum formant 891.7+/-110.3 Hz; and maximum formant: 2471.5+/-203.6 Hz). In diadochokinesis, they had a speed of 5.6+/-0.6 seg/s and vocal intensity was 61.5+/-2.6 dB. The mean values for the variations in voice modulations were as follows: anger (21.7+/-8.7 Hz)cycle, the speed of speech was 5.2+/-0.6 seg/s in meaningful sentences and 1.9+/-0.2 seg/s in meaningless sentences. In conclusion, the adolescents showed similar voice fundamental frequency and intensity, formants, speed of speech, and suprasegmental speech parameters. The results shown in this study may be used as standard of acoustic phono-articulatory for adolescents.

  17. ISOTHERMAL PHASE TRANSFORMATION CYCLING IN STEEL BY APPLICATION OF A HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Kisner, Roger A; Wilgen, John B

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation reversal via the application and removal of a large magnetic field was investigated. Because a large magnetic field can alter the phase equilibrium between paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, volume fractions for each phase constituent can be modified at constant temperature by changing the magnetic field strength. In this research elevated temperature isothermal hold experiments were performed for 5160 steel. During the isothermal hold, the magnetic field was cycled between 0 and 30 Tesla. As companion experiments, temperature cycling and isothermal holds were performed without magnetic fields. The resulting microstructures were examined using optical and SEM metallography. These microstructures indicate that a portion of the microstructure experiences isothermal transformation cycling between austenite and ferrite due to the application and removal of the 30T (Tesla) magnetic field.

  18. Magnetometeorology: Relationships between the weather and the earth's magnetic field. [solar cycle effects on length of growing season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. W.; Willis, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison of meteorological pressures and the strength of the earth's magnetic field suggests that the magnetic field exerts, through some unknown process, a controlling influence on the average pressure in the troposphere at high latitudes. Changes in the length of the growing season are related to the solar cycle effects on the geomagnetic field. On average, the growing season is about 25 days longer near sunspot maximum than near sunspot minimum. Comparison of growing season and solar data reveals the geophysically interesting fact that the growing season tends to be the longest about a year after sunspot maximum.

  19. Thermodynamic simulation of a rotating Ericsson-cycle magnetic refrigerator without a regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakuraku, Y.

    1987-09-01

    A magnetic Ericsson cycle, which consists of two isothermal stages and two isofield stages, is generally thought to require regenerators. However, a new concept makes it possible to realize magnetic refrigerators capable of executing an Ericsson-cycle without using regenerators. The basic principle lies in directly linking the two isofield changes by transferring heat between the isofield stages through heat paths rather than through regenerators. A fundamental configuration is proposed for a rotating magnetic refrigerator that operates based on this concept. A simulation of the thermodynamic cycle in this simplified refrigerator model shows that the system is theoretically feasible.

  20. Factors Influencing Phosphorous Cycling in Biogeochemical 'Hot Spots'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saia, S. M.; Walter, M. T.; Buda, A. R.; Carrick, H. J.; Regan, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the phosphorus (P) cycle has led to subsequent soil and water quality issues. For example, P build up in soils due to historic fertilizer application may become biologically available and exacerbate eutrophication and anoxia in nearby water bodies. In the humid Northeastern United States, storm runoff transports P and also stimulates biogeochemical processes, these locations are termed biogeochemical 'hot spots'. Many studies have looked at nitrogen and carbon cycling in biogeochemical hot spots but few have focused on P. We hypothesize the periodic wetting and drying of biogeochemical hot spots promotes a combination of abiotic and biotic processes that influence the mobility of P. To test this hypothesis, we took monthly soil samples (5 cm deep) from May to October in forest, pasture, and cropped land near Ithaca, NY. In-situ measurements taken with each sample included volumetric soil moisture and soil temperature. We also analyzed samples for 'runoff generated' phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate (from 0.01 M CaCl2 extraction), Fe(II), percent organic matter, pH, as well as oxalate extractable and total P, Al, and Fe. We used linear mixed effects models to test how runoff generated phosphate concentrations vary with soil moisture and whether other environmental factors strengthen/weaken this relationship. The knowledge gained from this study will improve our understanding of P cycling in biogeochemical hot spots and can be used to improve the effectiveness of agricultural management practices in the Northeastern United States.

  1. Elevated CO2 influences microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) has been shown to have significant effects on terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about its influence on the structure, composition, and functional potential of soil microbial communities, especially carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. A high-throughput functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) was used to examine the composition, structure, and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities from a grassland field experiment after ten-year field exposure to ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations. Results Distinct microbial communities were established under eCO2. The abundance of three key C fixation genes encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) and propionyl-CoA/acetyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC/ACC), significantly increased under eCO2, and so did some C degrading genes involved in starch, cellulose, and hemicellulose. Also, nifH and nirS involved in N cycling were significantly stimulated. In addition, based on variation partitioning analysis (VPA), the soil microbial community structure was largely shaped by direct and indirect eCO2-driven factors. Conclusions These findings suggest that the soil microbial community structure and their ecosystem functioning for C and N cycling were altered dramatically at eCO2. This study provides new insights into our understanding of the feedback response of soil microbial communities to elevated CO2 and global change. PMID:23718284

  2. Influence of sulfur compounds on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Using the climate model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM), numerical experiments have been conducted in line with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), but scaling the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur compounds into the troposphere by ±25%. Two types of impacts of sulfur compounds on climate and the global carbon cycle are considered: climate impact (CI, associated with the influence of tropospheric sulfates on climate and, as a consequence, on the carbon cycle characteristics) and ecological impact (EI, associated with the influence of SO2 on the rate of photosynthesis of terrestrial plants). The climate impact was found to be generally more important than the ecological one. However, in a number of regions, the EI is comparable to CI, including in the southeast parts of North America and, especially, of Asia. The contribution of EI to the change in global characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems in the 20th century is likewise considerable. The CI is generally more sensitive to the uncertainty in anthropogenic emissions of sulfur compounds into the troposphere than the EI.

  3. Exotic Earthworm Influence on Nitrogen Cycling in FACE Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, S. M.; Filley, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Exotic earthworm invasion in northern North American forests has the potential to significantly alter nitrogen and carbon cycling in forest soils, through litter layer losses, loss of organic horizon, and changes in fine root density. Earthworm influence on nitrogen cycling is currently being investigated in the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) sites at Rhinelander, WI. Because of the 13C depleted CO2 used in the FACE experiment and a 15N addition to the soil, this system affords an ideal opportunity to determine the impact of earthworm activity on soil organic matter dynamics by tracking the relative abundance and stable isotope compositions of biopolymers (amino acids, etc.) isolated in earthworms fecal pellets and soils. The 15N and 13C isotope composition of earthworm fecal matter from epigeic (litter and organic matter horizon dwelling) and endogeic (predominantly mineral soil dwelling) species highlighted their distinct role in litter, surface soil, and deeper soil movement through the soil. Specifically, endogeic fecal matter exhibited a lower uptake of FACE-derived C and a more enriched 15N signal. Nitrogen content of soil between the control and elevated CO2 treatments is not significantly different; however, elevated CO2 treatments exhibited relative depletion in both the soil and root 15N with respect to controls. The loss of 15N in the roots and the top 5 cm of the soil under elevated CO2, suggests that there is greater cycling power with increased below ground productivity and earthworm activity under elevated CO2, as higher abundances of earthworms exist in the elevated CO2 treatments. Amino acid extractions from the soil and fecal matter are ongoing and will help clarify the details regarding molecular nitrogen cycling.

  4. Regenerative characteristics of magnetic or gas Stirling refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Yan, Z.

    A general criterion to distinguish whether a Stirling refrigeration cycle possesses the condition of perfect regeneration is given. It is proven using the criterion that a Stirling refrigeration cycle using a simple paramagnetic or ferromagnetic material as the working substance possesses the condition of perfect regeneration, as does a Stirling refrigeration cycle using an ideal or van der Waals gas as the working substance. However, a Stirling refrigeration cycle using a gas which is described by the Redlich-Kwong, Beattie-Bridgeman, Benedict-Webb-Rubin, Dieterici, Berthelot, or Martin-Hou equation as the working substance does not possess the condition of perfect regeneration and its coefficient of performance is always smaller than that of the Carnot refrigeration cycle for the same temperature range. Moreover, the effect of non-perfect regeneration on the level of refrigeration and the coefficient of performance of a Stirling refrigeration cycle is expounded using a strict equation of state.

  5. Prediction of solar activity from solar background magnetic field variations in cycles 21-23

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Simon J.; Zharkov, Sergei I.; Zharkova, Valentina V. E-mail: s.zharkov@hull.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive spectral analysis of both the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) in cycles 21-23 and the sunspot magnetic field in cycle 23 reported in our recent paper showed the presence of two principal components (PCs) of SBMF having opposite polarity, e.g., originating in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Over a duration of one solar cycle, both waves are found to travel with an increasing phase shift toward the northern hemisphere in odd cycles 21 and 23 and to the southern hemisphere in even cycle 22. These waves were linked to solar dynamo waves assumed to form in different layers of the solar interior. In this paper, for the first time, the PCs of SBMF in cycles 21-23 are analyzed with the symbolic regression technique using Hamiltonian principles, allowing us to uncover the underlying mathematical laws governing these complex waves in the SBMF presented by PCs and to extrapolate these PCs to cycles 24-26. The PCs predicted for cycle 24 very closely fit (with an accuracy better than 98%) the PCs derived from the SBMF observations in this cycle. This approach also predicts a strong reduction of the SBMF in cycles 25 and 26 and, thus, a reduction of the resulting solar activity. This decrease is accompanied by an increasing phase shift between the two predicted PCs (magnetic waves) in cycle 25 leading to their full separation into the opposite hemispheres in cycle 26. The variations of the modulus summary of the two PCs in SBMF reveals a remarkable resemblance to the average number of sunspots in cycles 21-24 and to predictions of reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26.

  6. Influences of Vegetation Phenological Shifts on Water and Energy Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensed vegetation indices and field measurements have demonstrated that climate change has influenced vegetation phenology. The phenological changes are expressed in shifts in the timing of spring vegetation activity and the length of the active growing season. According to NDVI data from NOAA and GIMMS, the length of the active growing season north of 45°N has extended by 12 days due to 8 days advancement in spring and 4 days prolongation in autumn between July 1981 and June 1991. The same NDVI dataset from July 1981 to December 1999 has shown the growing season increased by 18 days in Eurasia and 12 days in North America. Phenology regulates vegetation interactions with climate by influencing the energy, water and carbon cycles. Here, we use observations and the Community Land Model 4.5 (CLM4.5) in offline mode and coupled with CESM to evaluate influences of shifts in phenology on energy and water budget and partitioning and on interactions with the atmosphere. Satellite retrieved leaf area index (LAI) is used to prescribe shifts in vegetation phenology in CLM4.5. We find that phenological advancement of 12 days over the past few decades can result in monthly mean changes of (-5-7 Wm-2) in latent heat and (-5-9Wm-2) in sensible heat balance over wide regions. We will discuss (1) the capability of current climate models to predict the impacts of phenological shifts on climate change, (2) seasonal to annual changes in energy and water cycles in response to phenological shifts, (3) the spatial heterogeneity in phenological-induced energy and water partitioning in different plant functional types across regions and continents, and (4) phenology and plant-climate interactions in changing climate.

  7. Previous experience influences pacing during 20 km time trial cycling.

    PubMed

    Micklewright, D; Papadopoulou, E; Swart, J; Noakes, T

    2010-10-01

    To investigate how experience and feedback influence pacing and performance during time trial cycling. Twenty-nine cyclists performed three 20 km cycling time trials using a Computrainer. The first two time trials (TT1 and TT2) were performed (1) without any performance feedback (n = 10), (2) with accurate performance feedback (n = 10) or (3) with false feedback showing the speed to be 5% greater than the actual speed (n = 9). All participants received full feedback during the third time trial (TT3), and their performance and pacing data were compared against TT2. Completion time, average power and average speed did not change among the false feedback group, but their pacing strategy did change as indicated by a lower average cadence, 89.2 (SD 5.2) vs 96.4 (6.8) rpm, p<0.05, and higher power during the first 5 km (SMD = 39, 36, 36, 27 and 27 W for 1-5 km respectively). Pacing changed among the blind feedback group indicated by a faster completion time, 35.9 (3.1) vs 36.8 (4.4) min, p<0.05, and power increases during the final 5 km (SMD = 14, 13, 18, 23 and 53 W for 16-20 km respectively). No performance or pacing changes were observed among the accurate feedback group. Pacing is influenced by an interaction between feedback and previous experience. Conscious cognitive processes that lead to ratings of perceived exertion and pacing appear to be influenced by previous experience.

  8. Menstrual cycle influence on cognitive function and emotion processing—from a reproductive perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Gingnell, Malin

    2014-01-01

    The menstrual cycle has attracted research interest ever since the 1930s. For many researchers the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. Over the past years methodological improvements in menstrual cycle studies have been noted, and this review summarizes the findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies in healthy women. Whereas the predominant hypotheses of the cognitive field state that sexually dimorphic cognitive skills that favor men are improved during menstrual cycle phases with low estrogen and that cognitive skills that favor women are improved during cycle phases with increased estrogen and/or progesterone, this review has not found sufficient evidence to support any of these hypotheses. Mental rotation has gained specific interest in this aspect, but a meta-analysis yielded a standardized mean difference in error rate of 1.61 (95% CI −0.35 to 3.57), suggesting, at present, no favor of an early follicular phase improvement in mental rotation performance. Besides the sexually dimorphic cognitive skills, studies exploring menstrual cycle effects on tasks that probe prefrontal cortex function, for instance verbal or spatial working memory, have also been reviewed. While studies thus far are few, results at hand suggest improved performance at times of high estradiol levels. Menstrual cycle studies on emotional processing, on the other hand, tap into the emotional disorders of the luteal phase, and may be of relevance for women with premenstrual disorders. Although evidence at present is limited, it is suggested that emotion recognition, consolidation of emotional memories, and fear extinction is modulated by the menstrual cycle in women. With the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, several studies report changes in brain reactivity across the menstrual cycle, most notably increased amygdala reactivity in the luteal phase. Thus, to the extent that behavioral changes

  9. Influence of Plants on Chlorine Cycling in Terrestrial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelius, Malin; Thiry, Yves; Marang, Laura; Ranger, Jacques; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Svensson, Teresia; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Chlorine (Cl), one of the 20 most abundant elements on Earth, is crucial for life as a regulator of cellular ionic strength and an essential co-factor in photosynthesis. Chlorinated organic compounds (Clorg) molecules are surprisingly abundant in soils, in fact many studies during the last decades show that Clorg typically account for more than 60% of the total soil Cl pool in boreal and temperate forest soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl-) levels. The natural and primarily biotic formation of this Clorg pool has been confirmed experimentally but the detailed content of the Clorg pool and the reasons for its high abundance remains puzzling and there is a lack of Cl budgets for different ecosystems. Recently, the radioisotope 36Cl has caused concerns because of presence in radioactive waste, a long half-life (301 000 years), potential high mobility, and limited knowledge about Cl residence times, speciation and uptake by organisms in terrestrial environments. The chlorination of organic molecules may influence the pool of available Cl- to organisms and thereby the Cl cycling dynamics. This will prolong residence times of total Cl in the soil-vegetation system, which affects exposure times in radioactive 36Cl isotope risk assessments. We tested to what extent the dominating tree species influences the overall terrestrial Cl cycling and the balance between Cl- and Clorg. Total Cl and Clorg were measured in different tree compartments and soil horizons in the Breuil experimental forest, Bourgogne, established in 1976 and located at Breuil-Chenue in Eastern France. The results from this field experiment show how the dominating tree species affected Cl cycling and accumulation over a time period of 30 years. Cl uptake by trees as well as content of both total Cl and Clorg in soil humus was much higher in experimental plots with coniferous forests compared to deciduous forests. The amounts of Clorg found in plant tissue indicate significant Clorg production inside

  10. Design considerations of translmission line superconductors for fast-cycling accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    Novel design options of HTS and LTS superconductor lines for fast-cycling accelerator magnets are presented. The cryogenic power losses in using these conductors in transmission line application to energize the accelerator magnet string are discussed. A test arrangement to measure power loss of the proposed superconductor lines operating up to 2 T/s ramp rate and 0.5 Hz repetition cycle is described.

  11. Differential leaflet mortality may influence biogeochemical cycling following tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Ferreras, Ulysses

    2014-01-01

    Intensity of tropical cyclones is expected to increase in the coming century, and an improved understanding of their influence on biogeochemical cycles would benefit ecologists and conservationists. We studied the November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan damage to observe that numerous examples of partial leaf necrosis on intact leaves of trees in the Cycadaceae and Arecaceae families resulted, leaving behind a copious amount of arboreal dead leaf material attached to live leaves. The decay process of this form of arboreal litter has not been previously studied. When compared with decay of ground litter or detached litter suspended in the canopy, we predict the decay process of this form of arboreal litter will include increased photooxidation, leaching, and comminution by detritivorous insects and mites; but decreased catabolism of organic molecules by saprophytic organisms.

  12. Training effects induced by cycling of magnetic field in ferromagnetic rich phase-separated nanocomposite manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out an experimental investigation of magneto-transport and magnetic properties of charge-ordered Pr0.67Ca0.33MnO3 (PCMO) and ferromagnetic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) nanoparticles along with a nanocomposite consisting of those two types of nanoparticles. From the magneto-transport measurements, clear irreversibility is observed in the field dependence of resistance due to magnetic field cycling in the case of PCMO nanoparticles. The value of resistance increases during such a field cycling. However such an irreversibility is absent in the case of LSMO nanoparticles as well as nanocomposites. On the other hand, the magnetic measurements indicate the gradual growth of antiferromagnetic phases in all samples leading to a decrease in magnetization. These inconsistencies between magneto-transport and magnetic behaviors are attributed to the magnetic training effects.

  13. Using planetary transits to estimate magnetic cycles lengths in Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrela, Raissa; Valio, Adriana

    2017-10-01

    Observations of various solar-type stars along decades showed that they could have magnetic cycles, just like our Sun. These observations yield a relation between the rotation period P rot and the cycle length P cycle of these stars. Two distinct branches for the cycling stars were identified: active and inactive, classified according to stellar activity level and rotation rate. In this work, we determined the magnetic activity cycle for 6 active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. The method adopted here estimates the activity from the excess in the residuals of the transit light curves. This excess is obtained by subtracting a spotless model transit from the light curve, and then integrating over all the residuals during the transit. The presence of long term periodicity is estimated from the analysis of a Lomb-Scargle periodogram of the complete time series. Finally, we investigate the rotation-cycle period relation for the stars analysed here.

  14. 22 year cycle in the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernova, Elena; Baranov, Dmitrii; Tyasto, Marta

    The manifestation of the 22 year solar magnetic cycle in the imbalance of positive and negative photospheric magnetic fluxes is studied. For the analysis we use synoptic maps of the photospheric magnetic field of Kitt Peak Observatory (1976 - 2003) and John Wilcox Observatory in Stanford (1976 - 2012). We consider strong magnetic fields for the heliolatitudes in the interval from +40° to -40°. It is shown that the sign of the imbalance between positive and negative fluxes remains constant during 11 years from one inversion of the Sun’s global magnetic field to the next one and always coincides with the sign of the polar field in the Northern hemisphere. Thus, the imbalance between the magnetic fluxes of different polarities changes according to the 22 year cycle. The sign of the imbalance is determined both by the phase of the solar cycle (before or after the inversion) and by the parity of the solar cycle. The imbalance of positive and negative magnetic fluxes can be observed not only for the strong fields in the sunspot zone. The mean magnetic field of the Sun (Sun as a star), which is determined by the net flux of the background fields, changes according to the same pattern as the imbalance of the strong fields. The regular changes of the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fields are reflected also in the parameters of heliosphere. We show the connection of the imbalance with the quadrupole component of the photospheric magnetic field and with the imbalance of the interplanetary magnetic field (the difference between the numbers of the days with positive and negative polarities of the interplanetary magnetic field near Earth).

  15. The influence of stray magnetic fields on ion beam neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y.-C.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described of a comparison between the ion beam neutralization characteristics of a local neutralizer (within approximately 5 cm of the beam edge) and those associated with a distant one (approximately 1 meter away from the thruster). The influence of magnetic fields in the vicinity of the neutralizer cathode orifice which are either parallel or normal to the neutralizer axis is assessed. The plasma property profiles which reflect the influence of the magnetic fields are measured. The results suggest that magnetic fields at the region of a neutralizer cathode orifice influence its ability to couple to the ion beam. They reveal that there is a potential jump from the neutralizer cathode orifice to the plasma which exists close to the orifice. This potential drop is found to increase as the axial component of magnetic flux density increases. A magnetic field perpendicular to the neutralizer axis induces a potential rise a few centimeters downstream from the neutralizer cathode.

  16. Influence of soil moisture-carbon cycle interactions on the terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L.; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Water availability is a crucial limiting factor for terrestrial ecosystems, but relatively few studies have quantitatively assessed the influence of soil moisture variability on the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here, we investigate the role of soil moisture variability and state in the contemporary terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe. For this we use a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) based on the COSMO-CLM Regional Climate Model, coupled to the Community Land Model version 4.0 (CLM4.0) and its carbon-nitrogen module. The simulation setup consists of a control simulation over the period 1979-2010 in which soil moisture is interactive and three sensitivity simulations in which soil moisture is prescribed to a mean, a very dry or a very wet seasonal cycle without inter-annual variability. The cumulative net biome productivity varies markedly between the different experiments ranging from a strong sink of up to 6PgC in the wet experiment to a source of up to 1.2PgC in the dry experiment. Changes in the land carbon uptake are driven by a combination of two factors: the direct impact of soil moisture on plant's carbon uptake (essentially in southern Europe) and an indirect effect through changes in temperature affecting ecosystem respiration (mainly in central and northern Europe). We find that removing temporal variations in soil moisture dampens interannual variations in terrestrial carbon fluxes (Gross Primary Productivity, respiration, Net Biome Productivity) by more than 50% over most of Europe. Moreover, the analysis reveals that on annual scale about two-thirds of central Europe and about 70% of southern Europe display statistically significant effect of drying and/or wetting on the terrestrial carbon budget and its components. Our findings confirm the crucial role of soil moisture in determining the magnitude and the inter-annual variability in land CO2 uptake which is a key contributor to the year-to-year variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  17. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Erdős, G.; Balogh, A.

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  18. Deciphering solar magnetic activity. I. On the relationship between the sunspot cycle and the evolution of small magnetic features

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Markel, Robert S.; Thompson, Michael J.; Leamon, Robert J.; Malanushenko, Anna V.; Davey, Alisdair R.; Howe, Rachel; Krista, Larisza D.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Gurman, Joseph B.; Pesnell, William D.

    2014-09-01

    Sunspots are a canonical marker of the Sun's internal magnetic field which flips polarity every ∼22 yr. The principal variation of sunspots, an ∼11 yr variation, modulates the amount of the magnetic field that pierces the solar surface and drives significant variations in our star's radiative, particulate, and eruptive output over that period. This paper presents observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory indicating that the 11 yr sunspot variation is intrinsically tied to the spatio-temporal overlap of the activity bands belonging to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle. Using a systematic analysis of ubiquitous coronal brightpoints and the magnetic scale on which they appear to form, we show that the landmarks of sunspot cycle 23 can be explained by considering the evolution and interaction of the overlapping activity bands of the longer-scale variability.

  19. SOLAR CYCLE PROPAGATION, MEMORY, AND PREDICTION: INSIGHTS FROM A CENTURY OF MAGNETIC PROXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeLuca, Edward E.; Dasi-Espuig, Maria; Balmaceda, Laura A. E-mail: edeluca@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: lbalmaceda@icate-conicet.gob.ar

    2013-04-20

    The solar cycle and its associated magnetic activity are the main drivers behind changes in the interplanetary environment and Earth's upper atmosphere (commonly referred to as space weather). These changes have a direct impact on the lifetime of space-based assets and can create hazards to astronauts in space. In recent years there has been an effort to develop accurate solar cycle predictions (with aims at predicting the long-term evolution of space weather), leading to nearly a hundred widely spread predictions for the amplitude of solar cycle 24. A major contributor to the disagreement is the lack of direct long-term databases covering different components of the solar magnetic field (toroidal versus poloidal). Here, we use sunspot area and polar faculae measurements spanning a full century (as our toroidal and poloidal field proxies) to study solar cycle propagation, memory, and prediction. Our results substantiate predictions based on the polar magnetic fields, whereas we find sunspot area to be uncorrelated with cycle amplitude unless multiplied by area-weighted average tilt. This suggests that the joint assimilation of tilt and sunspot area is a better choice (with aims to cycle prediction) than sunspot area alone, and adds to the evidence in favor of active region emergence and decay as the main mechanism of poloidal field generation (i.e., the Babcock-Leighton mechanism). Finally, by looking at the correlation between our poloidal and toroidal proxies across multiple cycles, we find solar cycle memory to be limited to only one cycle.

  20. The formation of the sunspot and magnetic cycles in the GCR intensity in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, M. S.; Krainev, M. B.

    2013-02-01

    We compare the different approaches (observational and theoretical) to the definition and separation of the GCR intensity variations due to the changing number and area of sunspots (the sunspot cycle) and the changing polarity of the high-latitude solar magnetic fields (the magnetic cycle). Using the theoretical approach we can consider how both types of the GCR intensity variations change with energy in different parts of the heliosphere during the minima of the sunspot cycle and their relative weights in the calculated intensity.

  1. Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Huang, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Fast-cycling synchrotrons are key instruments for accelerator based nuclear and high-energy physics programs. We explore a possibility to construct fast-cycling synchrotrons by using super-ferric, {approx}2 Tesla B-field dipole magnets powered with a superconducting transmission line. We outline both the low temperature (LTS) and the high temperature (HTS) superconductor design options and consider dynamic power losses for an accelerator with operation cycle of 0.5 Hz. We also briefly outline possible power supply system for such accelerator, and discuss the quench protection system for the magnet string powered by a transmission line conductor.

  2. White-light corona and solar polar magnetic field strength over solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rušin, V.; Saniga, M.; Komžík, R.

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the large-scale structure of the solar corona, in particular its helmet streamers, as observed during total solar eclipses around maxima of solar cycles and make its comparison with solar polar magnetic field strength as observed by the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) since 1976. Even though the magnetic field strength at the solar poles around cycle minima decreased minimally twice in the last forty years, distributions of helmet streamers around the Sun in different cycles around cycle maxima remain nearly the same. This indicates that large-scale magnetic structures governing the shape and evolution of helmet streamers must be of a different nature than those related with solar polar fields.

  3. Environmental magnetic fields: Influences on early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, I.L.; Hardman, W.E.; Winters, W.D.; Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A 10-mG, 50 to 60-Hz magnetic field is in the intensity and frequency range that people worldwide are often exposed to in homes and in the workplace. Studies about the effects of 50- to 100-Hz electromagnetic fields on various species of animal embryos (fish, chick, fly, sea urchin, rat, and mouse) indicate that early stages of embryonic development are responsive to fluctuating magnetic fields. Chick, sea urchin, and mouse embryos are responsive to magnetic field intensities of 10-100 mG. Results from studies on sea urchin embryos indicate that exposure to conditions of rotating 60-Hz magnetic fields, e.g., similar to those in our environment, interferes with cell proliferation at the morula stage in a manner dependent on field intensity. The cleavage stages, prior to the 64-cell stage, were not delayed by this rotating 60-Hz magnetic field suggesting that the ionic surges, DNA replication, and translational events essential for early cleavage stages were not significantly altered. Studies of histone synthesis in early sea urchin embryos indicated that the rotating 60-Hz magnetic field decreased zygotic expression of early histone genes at the morula stage and suggests that this decrease in early histone production was limiting to cell proliferation. Whether these comparative observations from animal development studies will be paralleled by results from studies of human embryogenesis, as suggested by some epidemiology studies, has yet to be established. 38 refs.

  4. Solar-Cycle Variation of Subsurface-Flow Divergence: A Proxy of Magnetic Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, R.; Howe, R.; Hill, F.

    2017-09-01

    We study the solar-cycle variation of subsurface flows from the surface to a depth of 16 Mm. We have analyzed Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Dopplergrams with a ring-diagram analysis covering about 15 years and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Dopplergrams covering more than 6 years. After subtracting the average rotation rate and meridional flow, we have calculated the divergence of the horizontal residual flows from the maximum of Solar Cycle 23 through the declining phase of Cycle 24. The subsurface flows are mainly divergent at quiet regions and convergent at locations of high magnetic activity. The relationship is essentially linear between divergence and magnetic activity at all activity levels at depths shallower than about 10 Mm. At greater depths, the relationship changes sign at locations of high activity; the flows are increasingly divergent at locations with a magnetic activity index (MAI) greater than about 24 G. The flows are more convergent by about a factor of two during the rising phase of Cycle 24 than during the declining phase of Cycle 23 at locations of medium and high activity (about 10 to 40 G MAI) from the surface to at least 10 Mm. The subsurface divergence pattern of Solar Cycle 24 first appears during the declining phase of Cycle 23 and is present during the extended minimum. It appears several years before the magnetic pattern of the new cycle is noticeable in synoptic maps. Using linear regression, we estimate the amount of magnetic activity that would be required to generate the precursor pattern and find that it should be almost twice the amount of activity that is observed.

  5. Influence of fast magnetic pulses on the superconducting magnet test facility TOSKA

    SciTech Connect

    Biro, O.; Maurer, W.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is given about the influence of fast magnetic field pulses (up to 40 T/s) on components of the TOSKA magnet test facility at KfK, Karlsruhe. Such fast magnetic field changes occur during the operation of poloidal field coils and accidental plasma disruptions in a Tokamak and also during safety discharges of superconducting magnets. Induced eddy currents in surrounding conductive components can cause some detrimental damage. FEM calculations were performed in order to study the influence on critical components of TOSKA and to identify necessary modifications of the facility. The paper presents the results of these calculations.

  6. HIGH-LATITUDE SOLAR TORSIONAL OSCILLATIONS DURING PHASES OF CHANGING MAGNETIC CYCLE AMPLITUDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.

    2012-05-01

    Torsional oscillations are variations of the solar differential rotation that are strongly linked to the magnetic cycle of the Sun. Helioseismic inversions have revealed significant differences in the high-latitude branch of torsional oscillations between cycle 23 and cycle 24. Here we employ a non-kinematic flux-transport dynamo model that has been used previously to study torsional oscillations and simulate the response of the high-latitude branch to a change in the amplitude of the magnetic cycle. It is found that a reduction of the cycle amplitude leads to an increase in the amplitude of differential rotation that is mostly visible as a drop in the high-latitude rotation rate. Depending on the amplitude of this adjustment the high-latitude torsional oscillation signal can become temporarily hidden due to the unknown changing mean rotation rate that is required to properly define the torsional oscillation signal.

  7. Comparison of changes in the global magnetic field and spot activity in cycles 21 to 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    We compare changes in the solar global magnetic field (GMF) given by the distribution of magnetic fields on the source surface and spot activity characterized by Wolf numbers, the number of spots, and their area reflecting the dynamics of local magnetic fields of active regions during cycles 21 to 24 (1976-2015). The results indicate that the changes in the GMF and spot activity have certain differences, both in different cycles generally and in the phases of growth, maximum, and decline in each individual cycle. The maximum and minimum correlations between the GMF and spot activity are observed in cycles 22 and 24, respectively. The maximum correlation is reached in growth phases (cycles 21, 22, and 24) and in the phase of decline (cycle 23), which can be associated with the fact that the phase of decline in cycle 23 is anomalously extended. Almost no correlation between the GMF and spot activity can be found at the phases of the maximum and early beginning of decline in all cycles. This can be associated with structural reorganization and sign change in the GMF.

  8. The Life Cycle of Active Region Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Thompson, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a contemporary view of how solar active region magnetic fields are understood to be generated, transported and dispersed. Empirical trends of active region properties that guide model development are discussed. Physical principles considered important for active region evolution are introduced and advances in modeling are reviewed.

  9. [Influence of the ovarian cycle on the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Kuhl, H

    2002-04-01

    Estradiol, progesterone and some of their metabolites modulate the activity of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in the CNS. The distribution and concentrations of sex steroids in the various CNS regions is partly dependent on the serum levels, but also on the local synthesis of the steroids. In general, estradiol and testosterone exert a stimulatory, progesterone an inhibitory effect on neuronal activities which are mediated by excitatory (e.g. glutamate, aspartate), and inhibitory amino acids (e.g. GABA) and neuropeptides (e.g. beta-endorphin), respectively. Gonadotropin release is primarily governed by the rhythm of pulsatile secretion of GnRH in the hypothalamus which is controlled by estradiol and progesterone by means of inhibitory or stimulatory modulation of the amplitude and frequency of GnRH pulses. The discharges of GnRH neurons triggered by excitatory amino acids are modulated by estradiol, while the inhibitory effect of progesterone is mediated by GABA and beta-endorphin which cause hyperpolarization of the GnRH neurons and consequently a reduced pulse frequency. The pulse amplitudes are primarily influenced by estradiol, but neuropeptide Y, neurotensin and noradrenaline contribute to their preovulatory enhancement. The postovulatory rise in core temperature is caused by the increasing level of progesterone and its metabolite 3 alpha-pregnanolone, respectively. Despite of this, up to 20% of ovulatory cycles do not show any rise in body temperature. Although 3 alpha-pregnanolone has sedative activities, there is no change in sleep quality during the luteal phase due to their low serum levels. It could be demonstrated that performance on tests of articulatory and fine motor skills are enhanced in the late follicular phase as compared to the menstruation phase, while spatial ability was better during menses. Estrogens may influence mood and well-being in a favorable manner, while in predisposed women progesterone may cause symptoms of premenstrual

  10. Optical characterization of oligonucleotide DNA influenced by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Mohammadi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein Mousa Kazemi; Ritikos, Richard; Rahman, Saadah Abdul

    2013-09-25

    UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis of oligonucleotide DNA exposed to different magnetic fields was performed in order to investigate the relationship between DNA extinction coefficients and optical parameters according to magnetic-field strength. The results with the oligonucleotides adenine-thymine 100 mer (AT-100 DNA) and cytosine-guanine 100 mer (CG-100 DNA) indicate that the magnetic field influences DNA molar extinction coefficients and refractive indexes. The imaginary parts of the refractive index and molar extinction coefficients of the AT-100 and CG-100 DNA decreased after exposure to a magnetic field of 750 mT due to cleavage of the DNA oligonucleotides into smaller segments.

  11. Can beating between different dynamo modes explain multiple magnetic cycles in solar - type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Karoff, C.; Metcalfe, T. S.

    2015-09-01

    Stellar magnetic activity can be characterized by a chaotic, multiple or single cycle behavior. Sometimes cyclic activity can be interrupted by a flat behavior. The mechanism that produce such a diverse behavior in stellar atmosphere is a matter of debate. We decided to address this issue by investigating the properties of a sample of 40 stars with high quality cycles, selected from the original data provided by the Mount Wilson Observatory. This sample contains stars with single and secondary cycles, whose secondary periods are longer or shorter than the primary cycle.

  12. Influence of Cutting Cycle and Spacing on Coppice Sycamore Yield

    Treesearch

    H. E. Kennedy

    1975-01-01

    Cutting cycle significantly affected total aboveground dry-weight yields, which were greater with the 2-, 3-, and 4-year cycles than with the I-year. For all cutting cycles, significantly higher yields were obtained with 2- by 5-foot spacings than with 4 by 5. Dry-weight yields ranged from 3,229 pounds per acre per year for the I-year cutting cycle spaced at 4 by 5...

  13. Solar Cycle Propagation, Memory, and Prediction: Insights from a Century of Magnetic Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Dasi-Espuig, M.; Balmaceda, L. A.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2013-07-01

    In the simplest of forms, modern dynamo theory describes the solar cycle as a process that takes the solar magnetic field (back and forth) from a configuration that is predominantly poloidal (contained inside the meridional plane), to one predominantly toroidal (wrapped around the axis of rotation). However, there is still uncertainty and controversy in the detailed understanding of this process. A major contributor to this uncertainty is the lack of direct long-term databases covering different components of the solar magnetic field (an issue mainly affecting the poloidal component of the solar magnetic field). In this talk we will review the different observations that can be used as proxies for the solar magnetic field (in absence of direct magnetic observations). I will present a recently standardized database that can be used as a proxy for the evolution of the polar magnetic field. And to conclude, I will show the insights that can be gained (by taking advantage of this database) in the context of the transition between the toroidal and poloidal phases of the cycle, solar cycle memory as determined by the different mechanisms of flux transport, and the practical goal of solar cycle prediction.

  14. QBO as Potential Amplifier of Solar Cycle Influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mangel, John G.; Wolff, Charles L.; Porter, Hayden S.

    2006-01-01

    The solar cycle (SC) effect in the lower atmosphere has been linked observationally to the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal circulation. Salby and Callaghan (2000) in particular analyzed the QBO covering more than 40 years and found that it contains a large SC signature at 20 km. We discuss a 3D study in which we simulate the QBO under the influence of the SC. For a SC period of 10 years, the relative amplitude of radiative forcing is taken to vary with height: 0.2% (surface), 2% (50 km), 20% (100 km and above). This model produces in the lower stratosphere a relatively large modulation of the QBO, which appears to come from the SC and qualitatively agrees with the observations. The modulation of the QBO, with constant phase relative to the SC, is shown to persist at least for 50 years, and it is induced by a SC modulated annual oscillation that is hemispherically symmetric and confined to low latitudes.

  15. Evidence that the lunar cycle influences human sleep.

    PubMed

    Cajochen, Christian; Altanay-Ekici, Songül; Münch, Mirjam; Frey, Sylvia; Knoblauch, Vera; Wirz-Justice, Anna

    2013-08-05

    Endogenous rhythms of circalunar periodicity (∼29.5 days) and their underlying molecular and genetic basis have been demonstrated in a number of marine species [1, 2]. In contrast, there is a great deal of folklore but no consistent association of moon cycles with human physiology and behavior [3]. Here we show that subjective and objective measures of sleep vary according to lunar phase and thus may reflect circalunar rhythmicity in humans. To exclude confounders such as increased light at night or the potential bias in perception regarding a lunar influence on sleep, we retrospectively analyzed sleep structure, electroencephalographic activity during non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep, and secretion of the hormones melatonin and cortisol found under stringently controlled laboratory conditions in a cross-sectional setting. At no point during and after the study were volunteers or investigators aware of the a posteriori analysis relative to lunar phase. We found that around full moon, electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during NREM sleep, an indicator of deep sleep, decreased by 30%, time to fall asleep increased by 5 min, and EEG-assessed total sleep duration was reduced by 20 min. These changes were associated with a decrease in subjective sleep quality and diminished endogenous melatonin levels. This is the first reliable evidence that a lunar rhythm can modulate sleep structure in humans when measured under the highly controlled conditions of a circadian laboratory study protocol without time cues.

  16. Thermonuclear inverse magnetic pumping power cycle for stellarator reactor

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Darwin D.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma column in a stellarator is compressed and expanded alternatively in minor radius. First a plasma in thermal balance is compressed adiabatically. The volume of the compressed plasma is maintained until the plasma reaches a new thermal equilibrium. The plasma is then expanded to its original volume. As a result of the way a stellarator works, the plasma pressure during compression is less than the corresponding pressure during expansion. Therefore, negative work is done on the plasma over a complete cycle. This work manifests itself as a back-voltage in the toroidal field coils. Direct electrical energy is obtained from this voltage. Alternatively, after the compression step, the plasma can be expanded at constant pressure. The cycle can be made self-sustaining by operating a system of two stellarator reactors in tandem. Part of the energy derived from the expansion phase of a first stellarator reactor is used to compress the plasma in a second stellarator reactor.

  17. Magnetic Evolution and the Disappearance of Sun-Like Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.; van Saders, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    After decades of effort, the solar activity cycle is exceptionally well characterized, but it remains poorly understood. Pioneering work at the Mount Wilson Observatory demonstrated that other Sun-like stars also show regular activity cycles, and suggested two possible relationships between the rotation rate and the length of the cycle. Neither of these relationships correctly describes the properties of the Sun, a peculiarity that demands explanation. Recent discoveries have started to shed light on this issue, suggesting that the Sun's rotation rate and magnetic field are currently in a transitional phase that occurs in all middle-aged stars. Motivated by these developments, we identify the manifestation of this magnetic transition in the best available data on stellar cycles. We propose a reinterpretation of previously published observations to suggest that the solar cycle may be growing longer on stellar evolutionary timescales, and that the cycle might disappear sometime in the next 0.8 - 2.4 Gyr. Future tests of this hypothesis will come from ground-based activity monitoring of Kepler targets that span the magnetic transition, and from asteroseismology with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission to determine precise masses and ages for bright stars with known cycles.

  18. Spin-Torque Influence on the High-Frequency Magnetization Fluctuations in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, S.; Baraduc, C.; Thirion, C.; Ebels, U.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Wang, P.; Dieny, B.

    2007-02-01

    Voltage noise measurements were performed in the 3 7 GHz frequency range on magnetic tunnel junctions biased with a dc current. Magnetic noise associated with ferromagnetic resonance excitations is either amplified or reduced depending on the direction of the bias current. This effect is interpreted as the influence of spin transfer torque on the magnetization fluctuations and described using Gilbert dynamics equation including spin transfer torque and effective field terms.

  19. Magnetization changes in 2% Mn pipeline steel induced by uniaxial tensile stress cycles of increasing amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.; Atherton, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    The application of cyclic stress to a ferromagnetic normally gives irreversible magnetization shifts towards the anhysteretic magnetization. Here experimental measurements are presented that show the irreversible magnetization changes induced by cyclic uniaxial isofield stress applied after magnetization at particular points on minor hysteresis loops. Selecting the (M,H) point and magnetization history, then applying stress cycles of increasing amplitude enables irreversible changes, initially away from and later toward the anhysteretic curve, to be obtained. Examples of a second inversion (i.e., irreversible shifts initially toward, then away and subsequently, toward the anhysteretic magnetization) with increasing amplitude cyclic uniaxial stress are also given. Preisach diagrams are used to interpret these results qualitatively in terms of local, more extensive and global anhysteretic states.

  20. Influence of magnetic shear on impurity transport

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, H.; Fueloep, T.; Candy, J.; Strand, P.; Weiland, J.

    2007-05-15

    The magnetic shear dependence of impurity transport in tokamaks is studied using a quasilinear fluid model for ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron (TE) mode driven turbulence in the collisionless limit and the results are compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic results using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys 186, 545 (2003)]. It is shown that the impurity transport is sensitive to the magnetic shear, in particular for weak, negative, and large positive shear where a strong reduction of the effective impurity diffusivity is obtained. The fluid and gyrokinetic results are in qualitative agreement, with the gyrokinetic diffusivities typically a factor 2 larger than the fluid diffusivities. The steady state impurity profiles in source-free plasmas are found to be considerably less peaked than the electron density profiles for moderate shear. Comparisons between anomalous and neoclassical transport predictions are performed for ITER-like profiles [R. Aymar, P. Barabaschi, and Y. Shimomura, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 519 (2002)].

  1. Magnetic Helicity of the Global Field in Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    For the first time we reconstruct the magnetic helicity density of the global axisymmetric field of the Sun using the method proposed by Brandenburg et al. and Pipin et al. To determine the components of the vector potential, we apply a gauge which is typically employed in mean-field dynamo models. This allows for a direct comparison of the reconstructed helicity with the predictions from the mean-field dynamo models. We apply this method to two different data sets: the synoptic maps of the line-of-sight magnetic field from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and vector magnetic field measurements from the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) on the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) system. Based on the analysis of the MDI/SOHO data, we find that in solar cycle 23 the global magnetic field had positive (negative) magnetic helicity in the northern (southern) hemisphere. This hemispheric sign asymmetry is opposite to the helicity of the solar active regions, but it is in agreement with the predictions of mean-field dynamo models. The data also suggest that the hemispheric helicity rule may have reversed its sign during the early and late phases of cycle 23. Furthermore, the data indicate an imbalance in magnetic helicity between the northern and southern hemispheres. This imbalance seems to correlate with the total level of activity in each hemisphere in cycle 23. The magnetic helicity for the rising phase of cycle 24 is derived from SOLIS/VSM data, and qualitatively its latitudinal pattern is similar to the pattern derived from SOHO/MDI data for cycle 23.

  2. IS THE SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD CORRELATED WITH THE DYNAMO CYCLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The small-scale magnetic field is ubiquitous at the solar surface—even at high latitudes. From observations we know that this field is uncorrelated (or perhaps even weakly anticorrelated) with the global sunspot cycle. Our aim is to explore the origin, and particularly the cycle dependence, of such a phenomenon using three-dimensional dynamo simulations. We adopt a simple model of a turbulent dynamo in a shearing box driven by helically forced turbulence. Depending on the dynamo parameters, large-scale (global) and small-scale (local) dynamos can be excited independently in this model. Based on simulations in different parameter regimes, we find that, when only the large-scale dynamo is operating in the system, the small-scale magnetic field generated through shredding and tangling of the large-scale magnetic field is positively correlated with the global magnetic cycle. However, when both dynamos are operating, the small-scale field is produced from both the small-scale dynamo and the tangling of the large-scale field. In this situation, when the large-scale field is weaker than the equipartition value of the turbulence, the small-scale field is almost uncorrelated with the large-scale magnetic cycle. On the other hand, when the large-scale field is stronger than the equipartition value, we observe an anticorrelation between the small-scale field and the large-scale magnetic cycle. This anticorrelation can be interpreted as a suppression of the small-scale dynamo. Based on our studies we conclude that the observed small-scale magnetic field in the Sun is generated by the combined mechanisms of a small-scale dynamo and tangling of the large-scale field.

  3. Influence of ferroelectric polarization on magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardana, A.; Ducharme, S.; Adenwalla, S.

    2010-03-01

    Thin film heterostructures of transition metal ferromagnets (FM) and polymer ferroelectrics (FE) are investigated to look for changes in the magnetic anisotropy of the FM layer that occur on switching the FE polarization (with an ensuing change in the electric field direction).[1] Samples of [Glass/ Pd (50 nm)/Co wedge (0.9-2.6nm)/ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) (53 nm)/Al (30nm)] are deposited via sputtering or evaporation for the metallic layers and via Langmuir-Schaefer deposition for the polymer ferroelectric. [2] Magnetic and FE properties have been characterized using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) and the pyroelectric effect. Polar and longitudinal MOKE loops are measured across the Co wedge for both positive and negative FE polarization and the difference in the two MOKE loops is ascribed to the changes in the magnetic anisotropy of the FM layer. [3] These changes are most apparent in the region where the Co undergoes a transition from in-plane to out-of-plane anisotropy. This research is supported by the NSF MRSEC through Grant No. DMR- 0820521 1. Chun-Gang Duan et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 122905 (2008) 2. A. V. Bune, et al, Nature (London) 391, 874 (1998) 3. P. F. Carcia, J.Appl. Phys. 63, 5066 (1988)

  4. Magnetic Cloud Bz solar cycle variation and the space weather implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jian, L.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between magnetic cloud (MC) polarity and the solar magnetic field polarity cycle is extended up to the present. In spite of the weak solar polar fields, the related complications of helmet streamer belt and source surface neutral line over the recent solar cycle, the MC polarity solar cycle variation pattern continues to be true. A trend related to the long solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24are longer periods of N-S polarity MCs. The MC polarity patterns at the STEREO sites generally reflect that at L1. Combining the MC events at three observing points (L1 and STEREO A&B) provides a larger data sample, and the normalized result reenforce and clarify the MC polarity trend. We conclude with some discussions regarding source regions and space weather implications.

  5. Evolution of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field sector structure during the last 15 solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanin, Mikhail

    We have inferred for the first time Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) polarities from ground-based geomagnetic observations back to 1844. Reconstructions are reliable enough to study sector structure of the IMF in the past. The inferred daily polarities demonstrate solar-cycle changes during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We have analyzed statistics of the sector boundaries and found recurrences that reflect evolution of the solar wind sources. Additionally, seasonal variations of the ratio of positive and negative sectors provide evidence of solar magnetic field reversals during the last 15 solar cycles.

  6. Influence of soil structure on nutrient cycling using microfluidic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano Caicedo, Carlos; Aleklett, Kristin; Ohlsson, Pelle; Hammer, Edith

    2017-04-01

    The rising of atmospheric CO2 levels and its effects on global warming make it necessary to understand the elements that regulate such levels and furthermore try to slow down the CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere. The exchange of carbon between soil and atmosphere plays a significant role in the atmospheric carbon budget. Soil organisms deposit organic compounds on and in soil aggregates, either as exudates or dead remains. Much of this dead organic material is quickly recycled, but a portion, however, will stay in the soil for long term. Evidence suggests that micro-scale biogeochemical interactions could play a highly significant role in degradation or persistence of organic matter in soils, thus, soil physical structure might play a decisive role in preventing accessibility of nutrients to microorganisms. For studying effects of spatial microstructure on soil nutrient cycles, we have constructed artificial habitats for microbes that simulate soil structures. Microfluidic, so called Lab-on-a-chip technologies, are one of the tools used to achieve our purpose. Such micro-habitats consist of pillar structures of difference density and surface area, tunnels with increasing depth, and mazes of increasing complexity to simulate different stages of soil aggregation. Using microscopy and analytical chemistry, we can follow the growth of microorganisms inoculated into the "soil chip" as well as the chemical degradation of organic matter compounds provided as nutrient source. In this way, we want to be able to predict how soil structure influences soil microbial activity leading to different effects on the carbon cycle. Our first results of a chip inoculated with natural soil showed a succession of organisms colonizing channels leading to dead-end arenas, starting with a high presence of bacteria inside the chip during the first days. Fungal hyphae growth gradually inside the channels until it finally occupied the big majority of the spaces isolating bacteria which

  7. The influence of soil moisture on magnetic susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, G.; Scholger, R.; Schön, J.

    2006-06-01

    An important methodological question for magnetic susceptibility measurements is if a variation of the soil conductivity, as a result of a change in soil moisture, influences the measured susceptibility values. An answer to this question is essential because an accurate magnetic susceptibility mapping requires a grid of comparable magnetic susceptibility values, which indicate the magnetic iron-mineral contents of the soils. Therefore, in the framework of the MAGPROX project (EU-Project EVK2-CT-1999-00019), the study aims at investigating the influence of soil moisture and the possible correlation between magnetic susceptibility and electric conductivity. This approach was realised by model experiments in the laboratory and a field monitoring experiment, which was performed in an analogical manner as the model. For the laboratory experiment, a plastic tub with a water in- and outflow system and installed lines of electrodes was used. The measurements were carried out with layers of different magnetic material within the experimental sand formation under varying water saturation conditions. For the field experiment, which was carried out from July to December 2003, two test sites were selected. The magnetic susceptibility was measured by means of the recently developed vertical soil profile kappa meter SM400 and a commonly used Bartington MS2D probe. The electric resistivity was recorded using a 4-point light system (laboratory) and a ground conductivity meter EM38 (field). The knowledge of the resistivity of the sand formation enabled an estimation of porosity and water saturation in consideration of the Archie equations. The laboratory experiment results showed a very slight variation of measured magnetic susceptibility under different degrees of moisture, indicating mainly the influence from the diamagnetic contribution of the water volume. A measurement error in connection with the measurement method, for example caused by an interfering effect of soil

  8. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  9. On Polar Magnetic Field Reversal and Surface Flux Transport During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-01

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  10. Influence of driving cycles on unit emissions from passenger cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joumard, R.; André, M.; Vidon, R.; Tassel, P.; Pruvost, C.

    Small samples of petrol engine or diesel cars, equipped with or without catalysts, were tested over 36 driving cycles divided into four categories - standard cycles and three sets of cycles more representative of real-world driving conditions. The tests addressed standard gaseous pollutants and fuel consumption and also less frequently measured pollutant such as CH 4. In the first part of this paper we examine cold emissions in order to assess the duration of the cold start impact and the representativity of the cold ECE15 cycle. Then unit emissions are compared over the four driving cycle families. As compared to representative cycles, the standardised cycles underestimate hot emissions by almost 50% for petrol engine cars and 30% for diesel vehicles. Conversely, the results obtained for the three representative cycle families are in relatively close agreement with each other - within approximately 10%. However, the cinematic properties of the three families differ. Finally, we demonstrate that weighting all emission data equally, not taking into account the weight of each cycle in overall traffic, introduces significant biases, particularly when plotting emission vs. average speed curves.

  11. Influence of magnetic reluctances of magnetic elements on servo valve torque motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changhai; Jiang, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    The current research of electro-hydraulic servo valves mainly focuses on the vibration, pressure oscillating and source of noise. Unfortunately, literatures relating to the study of the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements are rarely available. This paper aims to analyze the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements on torque motor. Considering these magnetic reluctances ignored in previous literatures, a new mathematical model of servo valve torque motor is developed and proposed based on the fundamental laws of electromagnetism. By using this new mathematical model and the previous models, electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness are evaluated for a given set of torque motor parameters. A computer simulation by using AMESim software is also performed for the same set of torque motor parameters to verify the proposed model. The theoretical results of electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness evaluated by the proposed model render closer agreement with the simulation results than those evaluated by the previous models. In addition, an experimental measurement of the magnetic flux densities in the air-gaps is carried out by using SFL218 servo valve torque motor. Compared with the theoretical results of the magnetic flux densities in the air-gaps evaluated by the previous models, the theoretical results evaluated by the proposed model also show better agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model shows the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements on the servo valve torque motor, and offers modified and analytical expressions to electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness. These modified and analytical expressions could provide guidance more accurately for a linear control design approach and sensitivity analysis on electro-hydraulic servo valves than the previous expressions.

  12. Babcock Redux: An Amendment of Babcock's Schematic of the Sun's Magnetic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2017-08-01

    We amend Babcock's original scenario for the global dynamo process that sustains the Sun's 22-year magnetic cycle. The amended scenario fits post-Babcock observed features of the magnetic activity cycle and convection zone, and is based on ideas of Spruit & Roberts (1983, Nature, 304, 401) about magnetic flux tubes in the convection zone. A sequence of four schematic cartoons lays out the proposed evolution of the global configuration of the magnetic field above, in, and at the bottom of the convection zone through sunspot Cycle 23 and into Cycle 24. Three key elements of the amended scenario are: (1) as the net following-polarity magnetic field from the sunspot-region Ω-loop fields of an ongoing sunspot cycle is swept poleward to cancel and replace the opposite-polarity polar-cap field from the previous sunspot cycle, it remains connected to the ongoing sunspot cycle's toroidal source-field band at the bottom of the convection zone; (2) topological pumping by the convection zone's free convection keeps the horizontal extent of the poleward-migrating following-polarity field pushed to the bottom, forcing it to gradually cancel and replace old horizontal field below it that connects the ongoing-cycle source-field band to the previous-cycle polar-cap field; (3) in each polar hemisphere, by continually shearing the poloidal component of the settling new horizontal field, the latitudinal differential rotation low in the convection zone generates the next-cycle source-field band poleward of the ongoing-cycle band. The amended scenario is a more-plausible version of Babcock's scenario, and its viability can be explored by appropriate kinematic flux-transport solar-dynamo simulations. A paper giving a full description of our dynamo scenario is posted on arXiv (http://arxiv.org/abs/1606.05371).This work was funded by the Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate through the Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology Program and the Hinode

  13. On the influence of magnetic fields in neutral planetary wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreali D'Angelo, C.; Schneiter, M.; Esquivel, A.

    2017-10-01

    We present a 3D magnetohydrodynamic study of the effect that stellar and planetary magnetic fields have on the calculated Lyα absorption during the planetary transit, employing parameters that resemble the exoplanet HD209458b. We assume a dipolar magnetic field for both the star and the planet, and use the Parker solution to initialize the stellar wind. We also consider the radiative processes and the radiation pressure. We use the numerical MHD code Guacho to run several models varying the values of the planetary and stellar magnetic moments within the range reported in the literature. We found that the presence of magnetic fields influences the escaping neutral planetary material spreading the absorption Lyα line for large stellar magnetic fields.

  14. Principal Component Analysis of Solar Background and Sunspot Magnetic Field in cycles 21-24 and its implications for the solar activity prediction in cycles 25-27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Popova, Helen; Zharkov, Sergei; Shepherd, Simon

    Principle component analysis (PCA) of the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) measured from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) and sunspot magnetic field (SMF) measured by SOHO/MDI magnetograms reveals the two principal components (PCs) of waves travelling in time. In addition, the independent components analysis helps to uncover 8 pairs of SBMF waves in latitudes: two large symmetric magnetic waves , which are the same for all cycles 21-23, and three pairs of asymmetric magnetic waves, which are unique for each cycle. In each pair the waves travel slightly off phase with different phase shift for each cycle and have a different number of equator crossings (Zharkova et al, 2012). These SBMF variations are assumed to be those of poloidal magnetic field traveling slightly off-phase from pole to pole which are caused by a joint action of dipole and quadruple magnetic sources in the Sun. The simulations with the two layer Parker's dynamo model with meridional circulation revealed that the dominant pair of PCs can be produced by a magnetic dipole accounting for the two main dynamo waves operating between the two magnetic poles. The further three pairs of the waves are unique to each cycle and associated with the multiple magnetic sources in the solar interior: with a quadruple symmetry in both layers for cycle 21, with quadruple magnetic sources in the upper layer and dipole sources in the inner layer for cycle 22 and with the quadruple magnetic sources in the inner layer and the dipole sources in the upper layer for cycle 23 (Popova et al, 2013). The PCs derived for all three cycles from SMBF were used as a training set for the magnetic wave prediction for the cycles 24-27 by using Hamiltonian approach (Shepherd and Zharkova, 2014) and verifying by the SBMF observations in the current cycle 24. The prediction results indicate that the solar activity is defined mainly by the solar background magnetic fields while the sunspots and their magnetic fields seem to be

  15. CORRELATION BETWEEN THE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE AND THE 22-YEAR QUASICYCLE IN THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Weizheng; Zhao Jinping; Huang Fei; Deng Shenggui

    2012-07-15

    According to the variation pattern of the solar magnetic field polarity and its relation to the relative sunspot number, we established the time series of the sunspot magnetic field polarity index and analyzed the strength and polarity cycle characteristics of the solar magnetic field. The analysis showed the existence of a cycle with about a 22-year periodicity in the strength and polarity of the solar magnetic field, which proved the Hale proposition that the 11-year sunspot cycle is one-half of the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. By analyzing the atmospheric temperature field, we found that the troposphere and the stratosphere in the middle latitude of both the northern and southern hemispheres exhibited a common 22-year quasicycle in the atmospheric temperature, which is believed to be attributable to the 22-year solar magnetic cycle.

  16. Eddy current control in the AGS rapid cycling booster accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.; Spataro, C.

    1994-07-01

    The Booster requires highly variable magnet cycles. When B is large, eddy current induced sextupole, etc., in the dipole vacuum chamber (VC) is large, with a much smaller contribution from magnet ends. Simple passive coils excited automatically by transformer action cancel the B induced sextupole. A self correction coil is not required for the quadrupoles, since B induced aberrations are very small (< 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at full aperture). Iron magnetization does not produce dipole or quadrupole magnet multipole aberrations, so these magnets have been effectively made independent of unwanted multipoles for all cycles. However, variations in the transfer functions and thus the Booster tune have not been automatically eliminated. Iron magnetization contributions are almost matched, but the B induced field retardation in the dipoles VC is larger than in the quadrupoles. Results of measurements will be presented, plus a simple system to overcome the mismatch and make the tune independent of B. Properties of special lattice magnets and their corrections will also be described.

  17. Eddy current control in the AGS rapid cycling booster accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.; Spataro, C.

    1993-11-01

    The Booster requires highly variable magnet cycles. When B is large, eddy current induced sextupole, etc., in the dipole vacuum chamber (VC) is large, with a much smaller contribution from magnet ends. Simple passive coils excited automatically by transformer action cancel the B induced sextupole. A self correction coil is not required for the quadrupoles, since g induced aberrations are very small (< 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at full aperture). Iron magnetization does not produce dipole or quadrupole magnet multipole aberrations, so these magnets have been effectively made independent of unwanted multipoles for all cycles. However, variations in the transfer functions and thus the Booster tune have not been automatically eliminated. Iron magnetization contributions are almost matched, but the B induced field retardation in the dipoles VC is larger than in the quadrupoles. Results of measurements will be presented, plus a simple system to overcome the mismatch and make the tune independent of B. Properties of special lattice magnets and their corrections will also be described.

  18. Cycling on a Bike Desk Positively Influences Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torbeyns, Tine; De Pauw, Kevin; Decroix, Lieselot; Van Cutsem, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cycling desks as a means to reduce sedentary time in the office has gained interest as excessive sitting has been associated with several health risks. However, the question rises if people will still be as efficient in performing their desk-based office work when combining this with stationary cycling. Therefore, the effect of cycling at 30% Wmax on typing, cognitive performance and brain activity was investigated. Methods After two familiarisation sessions, 23 participants performed a test battery [typing test, Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT), Stroop test and Rosvold continuous performance test (RCPT)] with electroencephalography recording while cycling and sitting on a conventional chair. Results Typing performance, performance on the RAVLT and accuracy on the Stroop test and the RCPT did not differ between conditions. Reaction times on the Stroop test and the RCPT were shorter while cycling relative to sitting (p < 0.05). N200, P300, N450 and conflict SP latency and amplitude on the Stroop test and N200 and P300 on the RCPT did not differ between conditions. Conclusions This study showed that typing performance and short-term memory are not deteriorated when people cycle at 30% Wmax. Furthermore, cycling had a positive effect on response speed across tasks requiring variable amounts of attention and inhibition. PMID:27806079

  19. Anomalous magnetic field of the sun at the beginning of cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, I. V.; Kotov, S. V.; Kotov, V. A.

    2001-10-01

    Measurements of the mean magnetic field (MMF) of the Sun from 1968-1999 showed that (1) the Sun's magnetic field has a predominance of S-polarity, (2) it changes with periods 1.04, 1.60 and 23 yr, (3) the yearly-mean index of MMF energy reached the peak value in 1991, and after that (4) a significant decrease of MMF was observed. It is supposed that (a) the magnetic asymmetry of the Sun is a fundamental property of solar magnetism, (b) there are near-resonances between the MMF and orbital motions of Mercury, Venus and Earth which arose at early stages of formation of the Solar system, and (c) cycle 23 will display an anomalously low magnetic and sunspot activity.

  20. Performance predictions for a room temperature, Ericsson cycle, magnetic heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnell, J. G.

    1982-05-01

    The performance potential of a room temperature magnetic heat pump utilizing Gadolinium and operating on an Ericsson Cycle was investigated at magnetic flux densities of 2 and 7-Tesla which represent the upper limits of conventional and superconducting electromagnetics, respectively. At a coefficient of performance of 5, a 7-Tesla system would provide a cooling capacity of at best 1200 BTU per hour per pound of Gadolinium while a 2-Tesla system would operate at approximately 130 BTU per hour per pound of Gadolinium. Magnetic circuit efficiency was not determined but must be high (95-percent or better) in order for the magnetic heat pump performance to compete with conventional cooling systems. It is unlikely the magnetic heat pump investigated could approach the performance and compactness of the conventional cooling systems unless field strengths much greater than 7-Tesla are possible.

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC BIPOLES ON THE SUN OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Tlatov, Andrey G.; Vasil'eva, Valerya V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A. E-mail: apevtsov@nso.ed

    2010-07-01

    We employ synoptic full disk longitudinal magnetograms to study latitudinal distribution and orientation (tilt) of magnetic bipoles in the course of sunspot activity during cycles 21, 22, and 23. The data set includes daily observations from the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak (1975-2002) and Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (MDI/SOHO, 1996-2009). Bipole pairs were selected on the basis of proximity and flux balance of two neighboring flux elements of opposite polarity. Using the area of the bipoles, we have separated them into small quiet-Sun bipoles (QSBs), ephemeral regions (ERs), and active regions (ARs). We find that in their orientation, ERs and ARs follow Hale-Nicholson polarity rule. As expected, AR tilts follow Joy's law. ERs, however, show significantly larger tilts of opposite sign for a given hemisphere. QSBs are randomly oriented. Unlike ARs, ERs also show a preference in their orientation depending on the polarity of the large-scale magnetic field. These orientation properties may indicate that some ERs may form at or near the photosphere via the random encounter of opposite polarity elements, while others may originate in the convection zone at about the same location as ARs. The combined latitudinal distribution of ERs and ARs exhibits a clear presence of Spoerer's butterfly diagram (equatorward drift in the course of a solar cycle). ERs extend the ARs' 'wing' of the butterfly diagram to higher latitudes. This high latitude extension of ERs suggests an extended solar cycle with the first magnetic elements of the next cycle developing shortly after the maximum of the previous cycle. The polarity orientation and tilt of ERs may suggest the presence of poloidal fields of two configurations (new cycle and old cycle) in the convection zone at the declining phase of the sunspot cycle.

  2. Lack of Influence of the Menstrual Cycle on Blood Lactate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Linda S.

    1986-01-01

    Nine healthy women were tested before, during, and after exercise during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycles to determine the effect of menstruation on blood lactate levels. Findings are discussed. (Author/MT)

  3. Lack of Influence of the Menstrual Cycle on Blood Lactate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Linda S.

    1986-01-01

    Nine healthy women were tested before, during, and after exercise during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycles to determine the effect of menstruation on blood lactate levels. Findings are discussed. (Author/MT)

  4. [Influences of lunar cycle in labor: myth or scientific finding?].

    PubMed

    Bueno, Aline; Iessi, Isabela Lovizutto; Damasceno, Débora Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Superstitions are found everywhere in our lives, and medicine, a profession that is prides itself on an evidence-based approach to treatment, is not exempt. A superstition that pervades the labor and delivery floor is that it is busier during certain phases of the lunar cycle, specifically the full moon. Although some studies have demonstrated an increase in deliveries that are related to the lunar cycle, there has been disagreement about when, in the lunar cycle, the peak volume occurs. Front to the divergence of the existent results in the literature to relate the events of the lunar cycle with deliveries, the aim of this review was to accomplish the literature in the attempt of explaining this popular culture with base in the results presented by different researchers.

  5. Magnetic Cycles in a Dynamo Simulation of Fully Convective M-star Proxima Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Wolk, Scott J.; Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2016-12-01

    The recent discovery of an Earth-like exoplanet around Proxima Centauri has shined a spot light on slowly rotating fully convective M-stars. When such stars rotate rapidly (period ≲20 days), they are known to generate very high levels of activity that is powered by a magnetic field much stronger than the solar magnetic field. Recent theoretical efforts are beginning to understand the dynamo process that generates such strong magnetic fields. However, the observational and theoretical landscape remains relatively uncharted for fully convective M-stars that rotate slowly. Here, we present an anelastic dynamo simulation designed to mimic some of the physical characteristics of Proxima Centauri, a representative case for slowly rotating fully convective M-stars. The rotating convection spontaneously generates differential rotation in the convection zone that drives coherent magnetic cycles where the axisymmetric magnetic field repeatedly changes polarity at all latitudes as time progress. The typical length of the “activity” cycle in the simulation is about nine years, in good agreement with the recently proposed activity cycle length of about seven years for Proxima Centauri. Comparing our results with earlier work, we hypothesis that the dynamo mechanism undergoes a fundamental change in nature as fully convective stars spin down with age.

  6. Study and Development of an Air Conditioning System Operating on a Magnetic Heat Pump Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the design of a laboratory scale demonstration prototype of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle. Design parameters were selected through studies performed by a Kennedy Space Center (KSC) System Simulation Computer Model. The heat pump consists of a rotor turning through four magnetic fields that are created by permanent magnets. Gadolinium was selected as the working material for this demonstration prototype. The rotor was designed to be constructed of flat parallel disks of gadolinium with very little space in between. The rotor rotates in an aluminum housing. The laboratory scale demonstration prototype is designed to provide a theoretical Carnot Cycle efficiency of 62 percent and a Coefficient of Performance of 16.55.

  7. A new solar signal: Average maximum sunspot magnetic fields independent of activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, William; Watson, Fraser

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 5 years, 2010 to April 2015, we observed 4176 sunspot umbrae in the infrared (IR) to measure maximum magnetic field strengths from the Zeeman splitting of Fe 15,648.5 Å. Herein we distinguish "field strengths" from "field flux." Field strengths range from 1500 G in pores to 3500+ in large spots. We made one observation per spot per observing day, ignoring spot size. We show that in the IR no activity cycle dependence on average maximum field strength (2070 ± 20 G) has been found. A similar analysis of 17,450 spots observed in space by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager reveals a similar cycle independence (2050 ± 0.18 G). We conclude that the average maximum umbral fields are constant with time and independent of the activity cycle within our time coverage.

  8. Influence of substrate magnetism of coated conductors on critical current distribution measurement using magnetic knife method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Amemiya, N.; Onuma, T.; Kato, T.; Ueyama, M.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.; Shiohara, Y.

    2008-09-01

    A YBCO coated conductor with non-magnetic substrate and a magnetic Ni alloy tape were prepared to investigate the influence of the substrate magnetism on the Jc distribution measurement. We measured the Jc distribution of the YBCO coated conductor and that of the same YBCO coated conductor with the magnetic tape over-lied on its face (the space between the superconducting layer and the magnetic tape is 20 μm which is the thickness of protecting Ag layer), and compared the measured results with each other. The measured results agreed well with each other, and there was little influence of the tape magnetism on the Jc distribution measurement. Based on this fact, the Jc distribution in a HoBCO coated conductor with magnetic substrate was measured using the magnetic knife method. Twenty-two voltage taps were attached to the conductor with 5 mm separation along the conductor axis. The lateral Jc distributions in the sections were generally in the shape of trapezoid.

  9. Magnetic Cycles in a Wreath-Building Dynamo Simulation of a Young Solar-type Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin; Miesch, M. S.; Browning, M. K.; Brun, A. S.; Nelson, N. J.; Toomre, J.

    2011-01-01

    Stars like the Sun build global-scale magnetic fields though dynamo processes in their convection zones. There, global-scale plasma motions couple with rotation and likely drive cycles of magnetic activity, though the exact processes at work in solar and stellar dynamos remain elusive. Observations of younger suns indicate that they rotate quite rapidly, have strong magnetic fields at their surfaces, and show signs of cyclic activity. Here we explore recent 3-D MHD simulations of younger, more rapidly rotating solar-type stars conducted with the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. These simulations of global-scale convection and dynamo action produce strikingly organized magnetic structures in the bulk of their convection zones. Wreaths of magnetic field fill the convection zone and can undergo regular cycles of polarity reversal. Indeed, we find that cyclic behavior is a common feature throughout the parameter space we have explored. Though these magnetic wreaths can coexist with tachoclines of penetration and shear, they do not rely on that internal boundary layer for their formation or persistence. Tachoclines may play a less critical role in the stellar dynamos of younger Suns than has been supposed in solar dynamo theory.

  10. Rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    The rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24 is investigated through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields during Carrington rotation numbers 2076-2146 (2008 October to 2014 January). The sidereal rotation rates of positive and negative magnetic fields at some latitudes are shown, and it can be found that the positive (negative) fields generally rotate faster than the negative (positive) fields in the southern (northern) hemisphere at low latitudes. The mean rotation profiles of total, positive, and negative magnetic fields between ±60° latitudes in the time interval are also obtained. It should be noted that both of the mean rotation profiles of the positive and negative magnetic fields, as well as the mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field, exhibit a quasi-rigid rotation at latitudes above about 55°. The mean rotation rates of the positive (negative) polarity reach their maximum values at about 9°(6)° latitude in the southern (northern) hemisphere. The mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field displays an obvious north-south asymmetry, where the rotation seems to be more differential in the northern hemisphere. The latitude variation in the rotation rate differences between positive and negative magnetic fields is further studied, and it is found that magnetic fields with the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere rotate faster than those with the opposite polarity, except for the zones around 52° latitude of the southern hemisphere and around 35° latitude of the northern hemisphere. The implication of these results is discussed. It is clear that the obtained results can provide some observational constraints on the theoretical research of the mechanisms of differential rotation and solar cycle.

  11. The Sun's Meridional Flow and Its Role in Magnetic Flux Transport and the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, D. H.; Upton, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Sun's meridional flow can be measured with a variety of measurement techniques including, but not limited to: direct Doppler, magnetic feature tracking, velocity feature tracking, time-distance helioseismology, and ring-diagram analysis. Direct Doppler gives information on the flow in the photosphere while the other measurement techniques provide information about the flow at some depth or range of depths in the Sun's convection zone. These various measurement methods now provide a converging (but not yet fully converged) picture of the meridional flow as a function of latitude, depth, and time. This converging picture has a flow which is poleward from the equator all the way to pole in the near surface layers, has an equatorward return flow beginning at a depth of about 50 Mm, and has another poleward branch deeper in the convection zone. The poleward flow in the near surface layers varies systematically in strength and latitudinal structure with the phase of the sunspot cycle and from one cycle to the next. This near surface meridional flow is observed to play a significant role in the poleward transport of the magnetic flux that emerges at the surface in the form of bipolar active regions. Variations in the strength and structure of the meridional flow introduce variations in the strength of the Sun's polar fields, which in turn introduce variations in the size of subsequent sunspot cycles. The polar fields at the end of cycle 23 (2008-2009) were much weaker than the polar fields at the end of the previous cycles. This led to the production of the weakest sunspot cycle in 100 years - cycle 24. Surprisingly, we find that the variations we observed in the meridional flow during cycle 23 led to stronger polar fields than would have been produced otherwise. This suggests that variations in the meridional flow can be one mechanism for modulating the sizes of sunspot cycles - helping to keep them from getting too big or too small.

  12. Air core notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruber, S.; Farrher, G. D.; Anoardo, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript we present details on the optimization, construction and performance of a wide-bore (71 mm) α -helical-cut notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR. In addition to the usual requirements for this kind of magnets (high field-to-power ratio, good magnetic field homogeneity, low inductance and resistance values) a tunable homogeneity and a more uniform heat dissipation along the magnet body are considered. The presented magnet consists of only one machined metallic cylinder combined with two external movable pieces. The optimal configuration is calculated through an evaluation of the magnetic flux density within the entire volume of interest. The magnet has a field-to-current constant of 0.728 mT/A, allowing to switch from zero to 0.125 T in less than 3 ms without energy storage assistance. For a cylindrical sample volume of 35 cm3 the effective magnet homogeneity is lower than 130 ppm.

  13. Air core notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Kruber, S; Farrher, G D; Anoardo, E

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript we present details on the optimization, construction and performance of a wide-bore (71 mm) α-helical-cut notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR. In addition to the usual requirements for this kind of magnets (high field-to-power ratio, good magnetic field homogeneity, low inductance and resistance values) a tunable homogeneity and a more uniform heat dissipation along the magnet body are considered. The presented magnet consists of only one machined metallic cylinder combined with two external movable pieces. The optimal configuration is calculated through an evaluation of the magnetic flux density within the entire volume of interest. The magnet has a field-to-current constant of 0.728 mT/A, allowing to switch from zero to 0.125 T in less than 3 ms without energy storage assistance. For a cylindrical sample volume of 35 cm(3) the effective magnet homogeneity is lower than 130 ppm.

  14. Thermodynamic property evaluation and magnetic refrigeration cycle analysis for gadolinium gallium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.

    1994-12-01

    Based on relevant material property data and previous model formulations, a magnetothermodynamic property map for gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was adapted for refrigeration cycle analysis in the temperature range 4-40 K and the magnetic field range 0-6 T. Employing methods similar to those previously developed for other materials and temperature ranges, assessments of limitations and relative performance were made for Carnot, ideal regenerative, and pseudo-constant field regenerative cycles. It was found that although Carnot cycle limitations on available temperature lift for gadolinium gallium garnet are not as severe as the limitations for materials previously examined, considerable improvement in cooling capacity and temperature lift combinations can be achieved by using regenerative cycles if serious loss mechanisms are avoided.

  15. Real-time assessment of Krebs cycle metabolism using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Ball, Daniel R; Cole, Mark A; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2009-08-01

    The Krebs cycle plays a fundamental role in cardiac energy production and is often implicated in the energetic imbalance characteristic of heart disease. In this study, we measured Krebs cycle flux in real time in perfused rat hearts using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). [2-(13)C]Pyruvate was hyperpolarized and infused into isolated perfused hearts in both healthy and postischemic metabolic states. We followed the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate, acetylcarnitine, citrate, and glutamate with 1 s temporal resolution. The appearance of (13)C-labeled glutamate was delayed compared with that of other metabolites, indicating that Krebs cycle flux can be measured directly. The production of (13)C-labeled citrate and glutamate was decreased postischemia, as opposed to lactate, which was significantly elevated. These results showed that the control and fluxes of the Krebs cycle in heart disease can be studied using hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate.

  16. In vivo detection of brain Krebs cycle intermediate by hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mishkovsky, Mor; Comment, Arnaud; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-12-01

    The Krebs (or tricarboxylic acid (TCA)) cycle has a central role in the regulation of brain energy regulation and metabolism, yet brain TCA cycle intermediates have never been directly detected in vivo. This study reports the first direct in vivo observation of a TCA cycle intermediate in intact brain, namely, 2-oxoglutarate, a key biomolecule connecting metabolism to neuronal activity. Our observation reveals important information about in vivo biochemical processes hitherto considered undetectable. In particular, it provides direct evidence that transport across the inner mitochondria membrane is rate limiting in the brain. The hyperpolarized magnetic resonance protocol designed for this study opens the way to direct and real-time studies of TCA cycle kinetics.

  17. Magnetic instability regions in patterned structures: influence of element shape on magnetization reversal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Han, X F; Grimsditch, M; Meersschaut, J; Hoffmann, A; Ji, Y; Sort, J; Nogués, J; Divan, R; Pearson, J E; Keavney, D J

    2007-04-06

    We report a time-resolved imaging study of the influence of shape on magnetic instabilities in patterned magnetic structures. We find that in rectangular structures magnetization reversal initiates at the ends and interior simultaneously, while in structures with tapered ends the reversal begins in the middle of the structures and spreads out to the ends. The degree of tapering is important for both the switching field and the time required for full reversal. A model based on the concept of local instability regions yields good agreement with the observed location of the reversal onsets.

  18. Magnetic instability regions in patterned structures : influence of element shape on magnetization reversal dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Keavney, D. J.; Han, X. F.; Grimsditch, M.; Meersschaut, J.; Hoffmann, A.; Ji, Y.; Sort, J.; Notues, J.; Divan, R.; Pearson, J. E.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Bader, S. D.; Inst. voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica and INPAC; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona

    2007-04-06

    We report a time-resolved imaging study of the influence of shape on magnetic instabilities in patterned magnetic structures. We find that in rectangular structures magnetization reversal initiates at the ends and interior simultaneously, while in structures with tapered ends the reversal begins in the middle of the structures and spreads out to the ends. The degree of tapering is important for both the switching field and the time required for full reversal. A model based on the concept of local instability regions yields good agreement with the observed location of the reversal onsets.

  19. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  20. Polarity Reversal of the Solar Photospheric Magnetic Field During Activity Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-06-01

    The large-scale solar magnetic field reverses its polarity during the maximum phase of each activity cycle. As observed on the photosphere, active region (AR) magnetic flux migrates poleward in narrow, sheared streams resulted from large-scale flows and diffusion. A small net flux of the trailing sunspot polarity eventually aggregates at high latitudes, manifesting the poloidal field of the next cycle. We characterize this process for the ongoing cycle 24 based on four years' line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The axial dipole component reversed sign in early 2012, but the poleward flux migration was grossly out of phase in the two hemispheres. As a proxy, the northern polar field (taken as mean above 70 degrees latitude) switched from negative to positive in late 2012, whereas the southern remained positive as of March 2014. Three factors that are in line with the surface flux transport model may have contributed. First, AR emergence started and peaked earlier in the north. Second, several ARs with small or inverse tilt angles (w.r.t. the Joy's law) emerged in the south in late 2010. Third, meridional flow speed inferred from helioseismology varied greatly prior to 2013; slower streams (compared to a three-year mean at the same latitude) appeared earlier in the north. We correlate HMI with the long-running Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) dataset, and compare the current cycle with the previous three.

  1. INFLUENCE OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC DUTY CYCLE ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of duty cycle, the fraction of time the heating and cooling (HVAC) system was operating, were made in homes during the spring season of the RTP Particulate Matter Panel Study and the Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study. A temperature sensor/logger placed on an outlet...

  2. How trees influence the hydrological cycle in forest ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Barbara J. Bond; Frederick C. Meinzer; J. Renee Brooks

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, the quest of ecohydrology (or hydroecology) is to apply fundamental knowledge from hydrology, ecology, atmospheric science, and related disciplines to solve real world problems involving biological systems and hydrologic cycles. Achieving this goal requires sharing information across disciplines, and this chapter is structured toward that end. Our aim is to...

  3. INFLUENCE OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC DUTY CYCLE ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of duty cycle, the fraction of time the heating and cooling (HVAC) system was operating, were made in homes during the spring season of the RTP Particulate Matter Panel Study and the Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study. A temperature sensor/logger placed on an outlet...

  4. SUN-LIKE MAGNETIC CYCLES IN THE RAPIDLY ROTATING YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 30495

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, Ricky; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2015-10-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial (∼2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, a ∼1 Gyr old G1.5 V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at ∼1.7 years and a long cycle of ∼12 years. We measure three individual long-period cycles and find durations ranging from 9.6 to 15.5 years. We find the short-term variability to be intermittent, but present throughout the majority of the time series, though its occurrence and amplitude are uncorrelated with the longer cycle. These essentially solar-like variations occur in a Sun-like star with more rapid rotation, though surface differential rotation measurements leave open the possibility of a solar equivalence.

  5. Sun-like Magnetic Cycles in the Rapidly-rotating Young Solar Analog HD 30495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial (∼2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, a ∼1 Gyr old G1.5 V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at ∼1.7 years and a long cycle of ∼12 years. We measure three individual long-period cycles and find durations ranging from 9.6 to 15.5 years. We find the short-term variability to be intermittent, but present throughout the majority of the time series, though its occurrence and amplitude are uncorrelated with the longer cycle. These essentially solar-like variations occur in a Sun-like star with more rapid rotation, though surface differential rotation measurements leave open the possibility of a solar equivalence.

  6. POLAR NETWORK INDEX AS A MAGNETIC PROXY FOR THE SOLAR CYCLE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Priyal, Muthu; Banerjee, Dipankar; Ravindra, B.; Singh, Jagdev; Karak, Bidya Binay; Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai E-mail: dipu@iiap.res.in

    2014-09-20

    The Sun has a polar magnetic field which oscillates with the 11 yr sunspot cycle. This polar magnetic field is an important component of the dynamo process which operates in the solar convection zone and produces the sunspot cycle. We have direct systematic measurements of the Sun's polar magnetic field only from about the mid-1970s. There are, however, indirect proxies which give us information about this field at earlier times. The Ca-K spectroheliograms taken at the Kodaikanal Solar Observatory during 1904-2007 have now been digitized with 4k × 4k CCD and have higher resolution (∼0.86 arcsec) than the other available historical data sets. From these Ca-K spectroheliograms, we have developed a completely new proxy (polar network index, hereafter PNI) for the Sun's polar magnetic field. We calculate PNI from the digitized images using an automated algorithm and calibrate our measured PNI against the polar field as measured by the Wilcox Solar Observatory for the period 1976-1990. This calibration allows us to estimate the polar fields for the earlier period up to 1904. The dynamo calculations performed with this proxy as input data reproduce reasonably well the Sun's magnetic behavior for the past century.

  7. Polar Network Index as a Magnetic Proxy for the Solar Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyal, Muthu; Banerjee, Dipankar; Karak, Bidya Binay; Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Ravindra, B.; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Singh, Jagdev

    2014-09-01

    The Sun has a polar magnetic field which oscillates with the 11 yr sunspot cycle. This polar magnetic field is an important component of the dynamo process which operates in the solar convection zone and produces the sunspot cycle. We have direct systematic measurements of the Sun's polar magnetic field only from about the mid-1970s. There are, however, indirect proxies which give us information about this field at earlier times. The Ca-K spectroheliograms taken at the Kodaikanal Solar Observatory during 1904-2007 have now been digitized with 4k × 4k CCD and have higher resolution (~0.86 arcsec) than the other available historical data sets. From these Ca-K spectroheliograms, we have developed a completely new proxy (polar network index, hereafter PNI) for the Sun's polar magnetic field. We calculate PNI from the digitized images using an automated algorithm and calibrate our measured PNI against the polar field as measured by the Wilcox Solar Observatory for the period 1976-1990. This calibration allows us to estimate the polar fields for the earlier period up to 1904. The dynamo calculations performed with this proxy as input data reproduce reasonably well the Sun's magnetic behavior for the past century.

  8. Using a Magnetic Flux Transport Model to Predict the Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatskaya, S.; Hathaway, D.; Winebarger, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the use of a magnetic flux transport model to predict the amplitude of future solar cycles. Recently Dikpati, de Toma, & Gilman (2006) showed how their dynamo model could be used to accurately predict the amplitudes of the last eight solar cycles and offered a prediction for the next solar cycle - a large amplitude cycle. Cameron & Schussler (2007) found that they could reproduce this predictive skill with a simple 1-dimensional surface flux transport model - provided they used the same parameters and data as Dikpati, de Toma, & Gilman. However, when they tried incorporating the data in what they argued was a more realistic manner, they found that the predictive skill dropped dramatically. We have written our own code for examining this problem and have incorporated updated and corrected data for the source terms - the emergence of magnetic flux in active regions. We present both the model itself and our results from it - in particular our tests of its effectiveness at predicting solar cycles.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in plants under magnetic fluid influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Angela; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia

    2005-03-01

    The study was focussed on the influence of a petroleum magnetic fluid upon the cell proliferation in young plants of agricultural interest. Zea mays plants, in their early ontogenetic stages were treated with magnetic fluid in relatively low concentrations (up to 100 μl/l) and root meristem was investigated by cytogenetical methods. The cell proliferation rate was found significantly enhanced as well as the percentage of chromosomal aberrations. Micronuclei, bridges, chromosome fragments and three-polar anaphases were the main types of chromosomal aberrations.

  10. Influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Leonora, E.; Aiello, S.; Leotta, G.

    2011-07-01

    The influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers proposed for a future deep sea neutrino telescope was studied under the EU-funded KM3NeT design study. The aims were to evaluate variations in PMT performance in the Earth's magnetic field and to decide whether the use of magnetic shielding is necessary. Measurements were performed on three Hamamatsu PMTs: two 8-inch R5912 types, one of these with super-bi-alkali photocathode, and a 10-inch R7081 type with a standard bi-alkali photocathode. The various characteristics of the PMTs were measured while varying the PMT orientations with respect to the Earth's magnetic field, both with and without a mu-metal cage as magnetic shield. In the 8-inch PMTs the impact of the magnetic field was found to be smaller than that on the 10-inch PMT. The increased quantum efficiency in the 8 super-bi-alkali PMT almost compensated its smaller detection surface compared to the 10' PMT. No significant effects were measured upon transit time and the fraction of spurious pulses. (authors)

  11. Kinetics of the viral cycle influence pharmacodynamics of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Ahmad R; Wilke, Claus O

    2011-09-12

    More and more antiretroviral therapies are being developed for treatment of HIV infection. The in-vivo efficacy of these drugs is commonly predicted based on in-vitro measures of antiviral effect. One primary in-vitro measure is the IC50, the amount of drug required for 50% inhibition of viral replication. We have previously shown that HIV life-cycle kinetics impact clinically observed HIV viral dynamics. Here we present a mathematical model of how they affect the pharmacodynamics of antiretroviral drugs. We find that experimentally measured antiretroviral IC50s are determined by three factors: (i) intrinsic drug properties (e.g. drug-target binding), (ii) kinetics of the HIV life cycle, and (iii) kinetics of drug-inhibited infected cells. Our model predicts that the IC50 is a declining function of the duration of the drug-susceptible stage in the host cell. We combine our model with known viral life-cycle kinetics to derive a measure of intrinsic properties, reflecting drug action, for known antiretroviral drugs from previously measured IC50s. We show that this measure of intrinsic drug property correlates very well with in vitro-measured antiviral activity, whereas experimentally measured IC50 does not. Our results have implications for understanding pharmacodynamics of and improving activity of antiretroviral drugs. Our findings predict that drug activity can be improved through co-administration of synergistic drugs that delay the viral life cycle but are not inhibitory by themselves. Moreover, our results may easily extend to treatment of other pathogens.

  12. Influence of Cycle Temperature on the Wear Resistance of Vermicular Iron Derivatized with Bionic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-11-01

    Depending on their applications, such as in brake discs, camshafts, etc., the wear behavior of vermicular iron is influenced by the thermal cycling regime. The failure of a working part during its service life is a consequence of both thermal fatigue and wear. Previously, the wear and thermal fatigue resistance properties of vermicular iron were separately investigated by researchers, rather than a study combining these two factors. In the present work, the effect of cycle temperature on the wear resistance of specimens with bionic units processed by laser has been investigated experimentally. The wear behavior pre- and post-thermal cycling has also been investigated, and the influence of different cycle temperatures on the wear resistance is discussed. The results indicate that the thermal cycling regime brought about negative influences with varying degrees, on the material properties, such as the microstructures, micro-hardness, cracks, and oxidation resistance properties. All these factors synergistically reduced the wear resistance of vermicular iron. In particular, the negative influence apparently increased with an increase in cycle temperature. Nevertheless, the post-thermal-cycle wear resistance of the specimens with bionic units was superior to those without bionic units. Hence, the laser bionic process is an effective way to improve the performance of vermicular iron in combined thermal cycling and wear service conditions.

  13. Monte Carlo study of the influence of magnetic field on energy measurements in calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. V.

    1996-02-01

    The influence of magnetic field on energy measurements in calorimeters is studied by Monte Carlo methods. It is shown that magnetic field influence depends on type of incident particles and on material and thickness of absorber plates.

  14. F region plasma drifts over Arecibo - Solar cycle, seasonal, and magnetic activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of low-latitude F region plasma drifts are determined on the basis of Arecibo incoherent scatter measurements from 1981 to 1990. The measurements show large day-to-day variability even during magnetically quiet periods. The average poleward/perpendicular plasma drifts do not change significantly with season and solar cycle except in the midnight-morning sector. The zonal drifts show clear solar cycle and seasonal effects. The plasma drifts along the magnetic field lines exhibit large altitudinal and seasonal variations, particularly near solar minimum, and are generally anticorrelated with the perpendicular/north drifts. The drift patterns observed by the Arecibo and the middle and upper atmosphere radars have significantly different seasonal dependences. This is explained by electrodynamic effects in the corresponding local and conjugate ionospheres.

  15. Influence of magnetic field on enzymatic ONOO- production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranova, T.; Petrovskii, D.; Ershov, N.; Slepneva, I.; Stass, D.

    2017-08-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of L-arginine catalyzed by inducible nitric oxide synthase gives nitric oxide as the main product and superoxide anion as a side reaction product. Recombination of these radicals gives a very reactive species - peroxynitrite, which is involved in many biochemical processes. In the current work it was shown that such a system can be a usable model system for investigating the influence of magnetic field on enzymatic peroxynitrite formation. Using a selective fluorescent probe for peroxynitrite - coumarin boronic acid and an adopted for the experimental purpose incubation mixture, magnetic field experiments have been done at 11.7T. The averaged magnetic field effect is equal to 2.8±0.9%.

  16. The spiral interplanetary magnetic field - A polarity and sunspot cycle variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft observations near the earth of the average direction of the interplanetary magnetic field during the sunspot maximum year 1968 showed a deviation from the spiral field of Parker's classical description. The included angle between the average field direction when the field polarity was away from the sun and the average direction when the field polarity was toward the sun was 168 deg, rather than 180 deg as predicted by Parker. This effect appears to have a sunspot cycle variation.

  17. The spiral interplanetary magnetic field: A polarity and sunspot cycle variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft observations near the earth of the yearly average direction of the interplanetary magnetic field during the sunspot maximum year 1968 showed a deviation from the spiral field. The angle between the average field direction when the field polarity was away from the sun and the average direction for toward polarity was 168 deg, rather than 180 deg. This effect appears to have a sunspot cycle variation.

  18. Diurnal cycle influences peripheral and brain iron levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Unger, Erica L; Earley, Christopher J; Beard, John L

    2009-01-01

    Iron movement between organ pools involves a dynamic equilibrium of iron efflux and uptake, and homeostatic mechanisms are likely involved in providing iron to cells and organs when required. Daily iron levels in the plasma pool fluctuate with the diurnal cycle, but clear explanations regarding the objectives and regulation of the flux are lacking. The association between diurnal cycle and iron flux is relevant in the disease of restless legs syndrome (RLS), where individuals display diurnal deficits in motor control, have impaired brain iron metabolism, and perhaps altered iron uptake from the plasma pool. The goal of the present study was to examine diurnal variations in peripheral and regional brain iron to evaluate iron flux between organs in iron-sufficient and iron-deficient mice. In mice fed control diet, liver iron was elevated 30-40%, and plasma iron was reduced 20-30% in the active dark period compared with the inactive light phase. Dietary iron deficiency eliminated this variation in liver iron in male and female mice and in plasma iron in male mice. Reductions in ventral midbrain and nucleus accumbens iron and ferritin were apparent in iron-deficient mice during both diurnal phases, but only during the light phase was an approximately 25% reduction in whole brain iron observed, suggesting different brain iron requirements between phases. These data demonstrate that iron flux between organs is sensitive to diurnal regulatory biology. Importantly, variations in brain iron may have temporal implications regarding neural functioning and may contribute to the diurnal cycle-dependent symptoms of RLS.

  19. Influence of magnetic electrodes thicknesses on the transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Dieny, Bernard

    2014-08-01

    The influence of the bottom and top magnetic electrodes thicknesses on both perpendicular anisotropy and transport properties is studied in (Co/Pt)/Ta/CoFeB/MgO/FeCoB/Ta magnetic tunnel junctions. By carefully investigating the relative magnetic moment of the two electrodes as a function of their thicknesses, we identify and quantify the presence of magnetically dead layers, likely localized at the interfaces with Ta, that is, 0.33 nm for the bottom electrode and 0.60 nm for the top one. Critical thicknesses (spin-reorientation transitions) are determined as 1.60 and 1.65 nm for bottom and top electrodes, respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance ratio reaches its maximum value, as soon as both effective (corrected from dead layer) electrode thicknesses exceed 0.6 nm.

  20. The behavior of a magnetic filament in flow under the influence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüsebrink, Daniel; Cerdà, Joan J.; Sánchez, Pedro A.; Kantorovich, Sofia S.; Sintes, Tomás

    2016-12-01

    We present an extensive numerical study of the behaviour of a filament made of ferromagnetic colloidal particles subjected to the simultaneous action of a fluid flow and a stationary external magnetic field perpendicular to the flow lines. We found that in the presence of a shear flow, the tumbling motion observed at zero field is strongly inhibited when the external magnetic field is applied. The field is able to stabilise the filament with a well defined degree of alignment that depends on the balance between hydrodynamic and magnetic torques. In addition, for a Poiseuille flow, it has been found that the initial position has a long lasting influence on the behaviour of the magnetic filament when the external field is applied.

  1. Influence of magnetic electrodes thicknesses on the transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Dieny, Bernard

    2014-08-04

    The influence of the bottom and top magnetic electrodes thicknesses on both perpendicular anisotropy and transport properties is studied in (Co/Pt)/Ta/CoFeB/MgO/FeCoB/Ta magnetic tunnel junctions. By carefully investigating the relative magnetic moment of the two electrodes as a function of their thicknesses, we identify and quantify the presence of magnetically dead layers, likely localized at the interfaces with Ta, that is, 0.33 nm for the bottom electrode and 0.60 nm for the top one. Critical thicknesses (spin-reorientation transitions) are determined as 1.60 and 1.65 nm for bottom and top electrodes, respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance ratio reaches its maximum value, as soon as both effective (corrected from dead layer) electrode thicknesses exceed 0.6 nm.

  2. Magnetic-field cycling instrumentation for dynamic nuclear polarization-nuclear magnetic resonance using photoexcited triplets.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Akinori; Negoro, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    To advance static solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear spins, a system has been developed enabling dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using electron spins in the photoexcited triplet state with X-band microwave apparatus, followed by static solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments using the polarized nuclear-spin system with a goniometer. In order to perform the DNP and NMR procedures in different magnetic fields, the DNP system and the NMR system are spatially separated, between which the sample can be shuttled while its orientation is controlled in a reproducible fashion. We demonstrate that the system developed in this work is operational for solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear-spin systems in static organic materials, and also discuss the application of our system.

  3. Magnetic Cycles in a Convective Dynamo Simulation of a Young Solar-type Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Miesch, Mark S.; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2011-04-01

    Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and many are magnetically active. Some appear to undergo magnetic cycles similar to the 22 yr solar activity cycle. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore dynamo action achieved in the convective envelope of a solar-type star rotating at five times the current solar rotation rate. We find that dynamo action builds substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields in the midst of the convection zone. Striking magnetic wreaths span the convection zone and coexist with the turbulent convection. A surprising feature of this wreath-building dynamo is its rich time dependence. The dynamo exhibits cyclic activity and undergoes quasi-periodic polarity reversals where both the global-scale poloidal and toroidal fields change in sense on a roughly 1500 day timescale. These magnetic activity patterns emerge spontaneously from the turbulent flow and are more organized temporally and spatially than those realized in our previous simulations of the solar dynamo. We assess in detail the competing processes of magnetic field creation and destruction within our simulations that contribute to the global-scale reversals. We find that the mean toroidal fields are built primarily through an Ω-effect, while the mean poloidal fields are built by turbulent correlations which are not well represented by a simple α-effect. During a reversal the magnetic wreaths propagate toward the polar regions, and this appears to arise from a poleward propagating dynamo wave. As the magnetic fields wax and wane in strength and flip in polarity, the primary response in the convective flows involves the axisymmetric differential rotation which varies on similar timescales. Bands of relatively fast and slow fluid propagate toward the poles on timescales of roughly 500 days and are associated with the magnetic structures that propagate in the

  4. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN A CONVECTIVE DYNAMO SIMULATION OF A YOUNG SOLAR-TYPE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Miesch, Mark S.; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2011-04-10

    Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and many are magnetically active. Some appear to undergo magnetic cycles similar to the 22 yr solar activity cycle. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore dynamo action achieved in the convective envelope of a solar-type star rotating at five times the current solar rotation rate. We find that dynamo action builds substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields in the midst of the convection zone. Striking magnetic wreaths span the convection zone and coexist with the turbulent convection. A surprising feature of this wreath-building dynamo is its rich time dependence. The dynamo exhibits cyclic activity and undergoes quasi-periodic polarity reversals where both the global-scale poloidal and toroidal fields change in sense on a roughly 1500 day timescale. These magnetic activity patterns emerge spontaneously from the turbulent flow and are more organized temporally and spatially than those realized in our previous simulations of the solar dynamo. We assess in detail the competing processes of magnetic field creation and destruction within our simulations that contribute to the global-scale reversals. We find that the mean toroidal fields are built primarily through an {Omega}-effect, while the mean poloidal fields are built by turbulent correlations which are not well represented by a simple {alpha}-effect. During a reversal the magnetic wreaths propagate toward the polar regions, and this appears to arise from a poleward propagating dynamo wave. As the magnetic fields wax and wane in strength and flip in polarity, the primary response in the convective flows involves the axisymmetric differential rotation which varies on similar timescales. Bands of relatively fast and slow fluid propagate toward the poles on timescales of roughly 500 days and are associated with the magnetic structures that propagate

  5. Flow downstream of the heliospheric terminal shock: Magnetic field line topology and solar cycle imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Suess, S. T.; Schmahl, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The topology of the magnetic field in the heliosheath is illustrated using plots of the field lines. It is shown that the Archimedean spiral inside the terminal shock is rotated back in the heliosheath into nested spirals that are advected in the direction of the interstellar wind. The 22-year solar magnetic cycle is imprinted onto these field lines in the form of unipolar magnetic envelopes surrounded by volumes of strongly mixed polarity. Each envelope is defined by the changing tilt of the heliospheric current sheet, which is in turn defined by the boundary of unipolar high-latitude regions on the Sun that shrink to the pole at solar maximum and expand to the equator at solar minimum. The detailed shape of the envelopes is regulated by the solar wind velocity structure in the heliosheath.

  6. Magnetization, anomalous Barkhausen effect, and core loss of Supermendur under high temperature cycling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J. M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The magnetization and core loss of Supermendur were measured up to 900 C under conditions of slow temperature cycling in vacuum. As a consequence of this heating, the coercivity at 25 C increased from 21 A/m to about 110 A/m. This increase is less than previously reported. A prominent anomalous Barkhausen effect, pinched-in hysteresis loops, and a magnetic viscosity field in excess of 20 A/m were observed in the range of 600 to 700 C. At 850 C, Supermendur had a coercivity of 23 A/m, a saturation induction exceeding 1.5 T, a core loss of 26 W/kg at 400 Hz, and a maximum induction of 1.5 T. Supermendur may be useful for high temperature soft magnetic material applications where some history dependence of properties and instability of minor loops at lower temperatures is acceptable.

  7. Flow downstream of the heliospheric terminal shock: Magnetic field line topology and solar cycle imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Suess, S. T.; Schmahl, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The topology of the magnetic field in the heliosheath is illustrated using plots of the field lines. It is shown that the Archimedean spiral inside the terminal shock is rotated back in the heliosheath into nested spirals that are advected in the direction of the interstellar wind. The 22-year solar magnetic cycle is imprinted onto these field lines in the form of unipolar magnetic envelopes surrounded by volumes of strongly mixed polarity. Each envelope is defined by the changing tilt of the heliospheric current sheet, which is in turn defined by the boundary of unipolar high-latitude regions on the Sun that shrink to the pole at solar maximum and expand to the equator at solar minimum. The detailed shape of the envelopes is regulated by the solar wind velocity structure in the heliosheath.

  8. A Preisach-Based Nonequilibrium Methodology for Simulating Performance of Hysteretic Magnetic Refrigeration Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy D.; Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Chen, Jing-Han; Karaman, Ibrahim; Ross, Joseph H.; Shamberger, Patrick J.

    2015-09-01

    In giant magnetocaloric effect (GMCE) materials a large entropy change couples to a magnetostructural first-order phase transition, potentially providing a basis for magnetic refrigeration cycles. However, hysteresis loss greatly reduces the availability of refrigeration work in such cycles. Here, we present a methodology combining a Preisach model for rate-independent hysteresis with a thermodynamic analysis of nonequilibrium phase transformations which, for GMCE materials exhibiting hysteresis, allows an evaluation of refrigeration work and efficiency terms for an arbitrary cycle. Using simplified but physically meaningful descriptors for the magnetic and thermal properties of a Ni45Co5Mn36.6In13.4 at.% single-crystal alloy, we relate these work/efficiency terms to fundamental material properties, demonstrating the method's use as a materials design tool. Following a simple two-parameter model for the alloy's hysteresis properties, we compute and interpret the effect of each parameter on the cyclic refrigeration work and efficiency terms. We show that hysteresis loss is a critical concern in cycles based on GMCE systems, since the resultant lost work can reduce the refrigeration work to zero; however, we also find that the lost work may be mitigated by modifying other aspects of the transition, such as the width over which the one-way transformation occurs.

  9. Tibial acceleration variability during consecutive gait cycles is influenced by the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ross A; Bartold, Simon; Bryant, Adam L

    2010-07-01

    The relationship between the phases of the menstrual cycle and injury risk remains unclear. Neuromuscular function may be compromised during menstruation, which could result in reduced cyclicality of movement patterns. We hypothesize that mediolateral (varus/valgus) knee acceleration during running gait will possess increased variability during menstruation when compared to approximately ovulation in women who do not take the monophasic oral contraceptive pill (MOCP). Thirty-six women (18 MOCP users: MOCP group and 18 non-pill users: NP group) performed six-minute treadmill running trials at 10 km h(-1) with an accelerometer fixed to the proximal tibia. Trials were performed at menstruation and approximately equal ovulation (for the MOCP group at a similar stage of the cycle) in a randomized order. The cyclicality of gross mediolateral tibial acceleration during 15 consecutive strides was assessed using combined wavelet and autocorrelation analysis. Longitudinal and anteroposterior accelerations were also examined. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were performed to assess differences at each stage of the menstrual cycle (alpha=0.05). Gross mediolateral acceleration in the NP group had significantly (P=0.022) increased variability at the time of menstruation compared to approximately equal ovulation, and was also significantly (P=0.011) more variable than the MOCP group at the corresponding time point. No significant difference was observed for any measure in the MOCP group. Increased variability in the NP users at menstruation may be a result of compromised motor control strategies. This provides further evidence of variability in performance and motor control during menstruation, and may have implications for a female athlete's risk of injury. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of magnetic cohesion on the stability of granular slopes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K; King, P J; Swift, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    We use a molecular dynamics model to simulate the formation and evolution of a granular pile in two dimensions in order to gain a better understanding of the role of magnetic interactions in avalanche dynamics. We find that the angle of repose increases only slowly with magnetic field; the increase in angle is small even for intergrain cohesive forces many times stronger than gravity. The magnetic forces within the bulk of the pile partially cancel as a result of the anisotropic nature of the dipole-dipole interaction between grains. However, we show that this cancellation effect is not sufficiently strong to explain the discrepancy between the angle of repose in wet systems and magnetically cohesive systems. In our simulations we observe shearing deep within the pile, and we argue that it is this motion that prevents the angle of repose from increasing dramatically. We also investigate different implementations of friction with the front and back walls of the container, and conclude that the nature of the friction dramatically affects the influence of magnetic cohesion on the angle of repose.

  11. Colaba-Alibag magnetic observatory and Nanabhoy Moos: the influence of one over the other

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawali, P. B.; Doiphode, M. G.; Nimje, R. N.

    2015-09-01

    The first permanent magnetic observatories in colonial India were established by the East India Company and under the Göttingen Magnetic Union. One of the world's longest running observatories was set up at Colaba (Bombay) in 1841, which was shifted to Alibag in 1904 to avoid electric traction effects on magnetic recordings. The observatory is located at the northwestern tip of Maharashtra, India, on the Arabian Sea. The magnetic data at Colaba were collected through eye-observation instruments from 1841 to 1872 and by photographic (magnetograph) instruments from 1872 to 1905, which reveal seasonal and other periodic effects on geomagnetic elements. Seasonal influence can be deciphered on the H minimum, but not on the maximum; the disturbances in March and April were opposite to those in December and January. D was maximum in 1880 (57' E) and minimum in 1904 (10' E). The data from 1882 to 1905 revealed that H annual inequality was influenced by 5.5-year periodicity, D by 13.5 days from 1888 to 1905, and I and Z by 11-year periodicity from 1894 to 1905 and 1873 to 1905, respectively. Secular variation of Z was parallel to that of I. Z exhibited an increasing trend from 1868 (12 874 nT) to 1905 (15 083 nT). The plan and location of Colaba-Alibag as well as the instruments used are discussed. The initial Colaba magnetic data containing "magnetic disturbances" was harnessed to identify the "disturbing point" on Earth. Nanabhoy Moos, the first Indian director, presciently hinted at a solar origin for magnetic disturbances, revealed the dependence of magnetic elements on the sunspot cycle, unraveled disturbance daily variation, and tried to understand the association, if any, between geomagnetic, seismological and meteorological phenomena. The two giant volumes published in 1910 attest to Moos' seminal work and his inventiveness in organizing and analyzing long series data. He also had a major role in moving Colaba magnetic observatory to Alibag. Thus, the observatory

  12. The influence of reactive oxygen species on cell cycle progression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Verbon, Eline Hendrike; Post, Jan Andries; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-12-10

    Cell cycle regulation is performed by cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Recently, it has become clear that reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence the presence and activity of these enzymes and thereby control cell cycle progression. In this review, we first describe the discovery of enzymes specialized in ROS production: the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complexes. This discovery led to the recognition of ROS as essential players in many cellular processes, including cell cycle progression. ROS influence cell cycle progression in a context-dependent manner via phosphorylation and ubiquitination of CDKs and cell cycle regulatory molecules. We show that ROS often regulate ubiquitination via intermediate phosphorylation and that phosphorylation is thus the major regulatory mechanism influenced by ROS. In addition, ROS have recently been shown to be able to activate growth factor receptors. We will illustrate the diverse roles of ROS as mediators in cell cycle regulation by incorporating phosphorylation, ubiquitination and receptor activation in a model of cell cycle regulation involving EGF-receptor activation. We conclude that ROS can no longer be ignored when studying cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of magnetic fields in planetary dynamo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, Krista; King, Eric; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are common throughout the solar system with properties as diverse as the planets themselves. Since these fields likely result from convectively driven dynamo action, the coupling between magnetic fields, fluid flow, and heat transfer must be understood in order to determine what controls the strength, morphology, and evolution of planetary magnetic fields. Towards this end, we have carried out a suite of dynamo and non-magnetic convection simulations to investigate the effect of the presence of magnetic fields on convection, the effect of varying convective vigor, and the effect of varying the rotation rate. This survey considers models with Prandtl number Pr = 1; magnetic Prandtl numbers up to Pm = 5; Ekman numbers in the range 10-3 × E × 10-5; and Rayleigh numbers from near onset to more than 1000 times critical. We measure the strengths and structures of magnetic fields and fluid motions, as well as heat transfer efficiency and in situ force balances. These analyses illustrate that dynamo action does not necessitate a fundamental change to the overall flow field, although the impact of magnetic fields is found to increase for lower Ekman numbers. By directly calculating the forces in each of our simulations, we show that the traditionally defined Elsasser number, ?i, overestimates the role of the Lorentz force in dynamos. The Coriolis force remains greater than the Lorentz force even in cases with ?i ? 100, explaining the persistence of columnar flows in ?i > 1 dynamo simulations, a quasigeostrophic phenomena. We argue that a dynamic Elsasser number, ?d, better represents the Lorentz to Coriolis force ratio. By applying the ?d parametrization to planetary settings, we predict that the convective dynamics (excluding zonal flows) in planetary interiors are only weakly influenced by their large-scale magnetic fields. Our survey also provides new insight into the breakdown of dipolar magnetic field generation since we observe a sharp transition

  14. Using the dipolar and quadrupolar moments to improve solar-cycle predictions based on the polar magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Balmaceda, Laura A; DeLuca, Edward E

    2013-07-26

    The solar cycle and its associated magnetic activity are the main drivers behind changes in the interplanetary environment and Earth's upper atmosphere (commonly referred to as space weather and climate). In recent years there has been an effort to develop accurate solar cycle predictions, leading to nearly a hundred widely spread predictions for the amplitude of solar cycle 24. Here we show that cycle predictions can be made more accurate if performed separately for each hemisphere, taking advantage of information about both the dipolar and quadrupolar moments of the solar magnetic field during minimum.

  15. Influence Deforestation on Hydrological Cycle at Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J. C.; Beltrao, J.; Gandu, A. W.

    2007-05-01

    The last three decades, the Amazon Basin has been affected for the occupation with consequence large deforestation. The principal area deforested is located from Maranhao state to Rondonia state. This area is common called "Arc Deforestation", and representing the transition between two important Brazilian ecosystems, Amazon Forest and Savanna Region. Theses ecosystems have precious biodiversity, and it has population about 10.331.000. The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of arc deforestation on the hydrological cycle at Amazon basin, using BRAMS (Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) including a model of dynamic vegetation, called GEMTM (General Energy and Mass Transport Model). In this study, numerical simulations were performed with a high spatial resolution regional model that allows capture some mesoscale aspects associated to the land used, topography, coastlines and large rivers. In order to predict the impact of the arc deforestation over the hydrological cycle, it was run two model simulations, conducted over a one-year period. In the first simulation, designated "control", it was used the scenarios derived from Soares Filho (2002), for the year 2002, in governance situation. In the second simulation called "deforestation", it was used the scenarios for the 2050, derived from results of Soares-Filho with governance, too. The higher-resolution regional modeling revealed important features of the deforestation process, displaying some associated mesoscale effects that are not typically represented in similar Global Circulation Model simulations. Near coastal zones and along large rivers, deforestation resulted in reduced precipitation. However, it was predicted increased precipitation over mountainous areas, especially on mountain slopes facing river valleys. Then, these higher-resolution simulations showed that, in general, orography, coastline profile and large river distribution play important roles in

  16. Influence of acetaminophen on performance during time trial cycling.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Alexis R; Jones, Andrew M; Williams, Craig A

    2010-01-01

    To establish whether acetaminophen improves performance of self-paced exercise through the reduction of perceived pain, 13 trained male cyclists performed a self-paced 10-mile (16.1 km) cycle time trial (TT) following the ingestion of either acetaminophen (ACT) or a placebo (PLA), administered in randomized double-blind design. TT were completed in a significantly faster time (t(12) = 2.55, P < 0.05) under the ACT condition (26 min 15 s +/- 1 min 36 s vs. 26 min 45 s +/- 2 min 2 s). Power output (PO) was higher during the middle section of the TT in the ACT condition, resulting in a higher mean PO (P < 0.05) (265 +/- 12 vs. 255 +/- 15 W). Blood lactate concentration (B[La]) and heart rate (HR) were higher in the ACT condition (B[La] = 6.1 +/- 2.9 mmol/l; HR = 87 +/- 7%max) than in the PLA condition (B[La] = 5.1 +/- 2.6 mmol/l; HR = 84 +/- 9%max) (P < 0.05). No significant difference in rating of perceived exertion (ACT = 15.5 +/- 0.2; PLA = 15.7 +/- 0.2) or perceived pain (ACT = 5.6 +/- 0.2; PLA = 5.5 +/- 0.2) (P > 0.05) was observed. Using acetaminophen, participants cycled at a higher mean PO, with an increased HR and B[La], but without changes in perceived pain or exertion. Consequently, completion time was significantly faster. These findings support the notion that exercise is regulated by pain perception, and increased pain tolerance can improve exercise capacity.

  17. Influence of magnetic field and mechanical scratch on the recorded magnetization stability of longitudinal and perpendicular recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Katsumasa; Tobari, Kousuke; Futamoto, Masaaki

    The influences of magnetic field and mechanical scratch on the magnetization structural stability are investigated for longitudinal (LMR) and perpendicular (PMR) recording media by using a magnetic force microscope. For both media, the magnetization structure started to change at lower magnetic fields in the areas near and below mechanical scratches when compared with normal areas with no scratches. For PMR samples, the magnetization stability of recorded bits near and below mechanical scratches is enhanced with increasing the area density. The recorded magnetization stability decreases near and below mechanical scratches depending delicately on the depth and the width for both types of media.

  18. Influences on Marital Satisfaction during the Middle Stages of the Family Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Laurence; Silverberg, Susan B.

    1987-01-01

    Examined influence of adolescent development, parent-adolescent relationship, and psychological characteristics of midlife adults on marital satisfaction during transitional period of the family life cycle between childhood and adolescence. Marital satisfaction during the family's adolescent years was negatively influenced by distance in the…

  19. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  20. Solar Cycle Variations of Sunspot Magnetic Field Strengths from the Mount Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Bertello, L.; Tlatov, A.; Nagovitsyn, Y.; Kilcik, A.

    2012-05-01

    We used historical synoptic data the Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) to study long-term changes in sunspot magnetic field strengths over the period of 1920-1959. By selecting sunspots with the strongest field strength for each observing day, we find that the average field strengths in sunspots vary with solar cycle with amplitude of a few hundred Gauss. The data show no statistically significant long-term trend over the period of about 40 years covered by these observations. We also find that the fractional distribution of sunspots changes from cycle to cycle. From Cycle 15 to Cycle 19, MWO data show a steady increase in fraction of sunspots with weaker field strengths (<1000 G), while the fraction of sunspots with strongest field strengths (>3000 G) steadily decreases. The fraction of sunspots with field strengths between 1000-3000 Gauss does not change in any systematic way. In contract, the fractional distribution of sunspots by their area (i.e., small, intermediate, and large) taken from the Greenwich observatory data set does not change during the same period of time. The different behavior in these two fractional distributions might indicate some physical changes in the properties of sunspots (e.g., sunspots of about the same area show progressively smaller field strengths), or it could be the result of some systematic instrumental/observational effects. We discuss our findings in the framework of these two possible explanations.

  1. Influence of Magnetic Fields on Magneto-Aerotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Mathieu; McCarthy, Aongus; Fix, Dmitri; Edwards, Matthew R.; Repp, Felix; Vach, Peter; Dunlop, John W. C.; Sitti, Metin; Buller, Gerald S.; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The response of cells to changes in their physico-chemical micro-environment is essential to their survival. For example, bacterial magnetotaxis uses the Earth's magnetic field together with chemical sensing to help microorganisms move towards favoured habitats. The studies of such complex responses are lacking a method that permits the simultaneous mapping of the chemical environment and the response of the organisms, and the ability to generate a controlled physiological magnetic field. We have thus developed a multi-modal microscopy platform that fulfils these requirements. Using simultaneous fluorescence and high-speed imaging in conjunction with diffusion and aerotactic models, we characterized the magneto- aerotaxis of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. We assessed the influence of the magnetic field (orientation; strength) on the formation and the dynamic of a micro-aerotactic band (size, dynamic, position). As previously described by models of magnetotaxis, the application of a magnetic field pointing towards the anoxic zone of an oxygen gradient results in an enhanced aerotaxis even down to Earth's magnetic field strength. We found that neither a ten-fold increase of the field strength nor a tilt of 45° resulted in a significant change of the aerotactic efficiency. However, when the field strength is zeroed or when the field angle is tilted to 90°, the magneto-aerotaxis efficiency is drastically reduced. The classical model of magneto-aerotaxis assumes a response proportional to the cosine of the angle difference between the directions of the oxygen gradient and that of the magnetic field. Our experimental evidence however shows that this behaviour is more complex than assumed in this model, thus opening up new avenues for research. PMID:24983865

  2. Influence of magnetic fields on magneto-aerotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Mathieu; McCarthy, Aongus; Fix, Dmitri; Edwards, Matthew R; Repp, Felix; Vach, Peter; Dunlop, John W C; Sitti, Metin; Buller, Gerald S; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The response of cells to changes in their physico-chemical micro-environment is essential to their survival. For example, bacterial magnetotaxis uses the Earth's magnetic field together with chemical sensing to help microorganisms move towards favoured habitats. The studies of such complex responses are lacking a method that permits the simultaneous mapping of the chemical environment and the response of the organisms, and the ability to generate a controlled physiological magnetic field. We have thus developed a multi-modal microscopy platform that fulfils these requirements. Using simultaneous fluorescence and high-speed imaging in conjunction with diffusion and aerotactic models, we characterized the magneto-aerotaxis of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. We assessed the influence of the magnetic field (orientation; strength) on the formation and the dynamic of a micro-aerotactic band (size, dynamic, position). As previously described by models of magnetotaxis, the application of a magnetic field pointing towards the anoxic zone of an oxygen gradient results in an enhanced aerotaxis even down to Earth's magnetic field strength. We found that neither a ten-fold increase of the field strength nor a tilt of 45° resulted in a significant change of the aerotactic efficiency. However, when the field strength is zeroed or when the field angle is tilted to 90°, the magneto-aerotaxis efficiency is drastically reduced. The classical model of magneto-aerotaxis assumes a response proportional to the cosine of the angle difference between the directions of the oxygen gradient and that of the magnetic field. Our experimental evidence however shows that this behaviour is more complex than assumed in this model, thus opening up new avenues for research.

  3. Influence of uterine inflammation on the estrous cycle in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Aoki, Hajime; Furuichi, Tomohiro; Hatori, Sachiko; Tanimoto, Hanako; Kawakami, Shizuo

    2004-06-01

    To investigate how uterine inflammation affects ovarian activity in rats, endometritis was induced and changes in the length of estrous cycle and serum concentrations of estradiol-17beta (E(2)) and progesterone (P(4)) were examined. A suspension of Staphylococcus aureus (bacterial solution) or iodine solution was infused into the uterine lumen at various estrous phases. When the bacterial solution was infused at estrus, metestrus, or the first day of diestrus, the following diestrus continued for 5 to 12 days. In the case of the iodine solution, regardless of the estrous phase of the infusion, the following diestrus continued for approximately 6 days. E(2) concentration after infusion of each solution did not fluctuate largely and remained at a low concentration (around 5 pg/ml). P(4) concentration was high (35-45 ng/ml) on the day following infusion, but decreased rapidly to base line values within a few days and remained thereafter at a low level (around 5 ng/ml). It is assumed that the endometritis caused by biological or chemical stimulation raises the concentration of P(4) to depress gonadotrophic hormone secretion, and hence this high P(4) concentration might inhibit the growth of ovarian follicles.

  4. Magnetic susceptibility fabrics in slates: Structural, mineralogical and lithological influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G.; Sarvas, P.

    1990-02-01

    A single, penetrative tectonic deformation of Archean greywackes, accompanied by low grade metamorphism, generated low-field magnetic susceptibility fabrics that are coaxial with the rock's schistosity although there are multiple sources of magnetic susceptibility. Pre-metamorphic magnetite and the metamorphic minerals pyrrhotite, biotite and chlorite (variety thuringite: daphnite-aphrosiderite) are responsible for the anisotropy of susceptibility. These minerals grew with preferred crystallographic orientations influenced by the prevailing stress regime. On its own, rotation cannot be invoked to explain the alignment of the metamorphic minerals. There are varying proportions of at least two of these minerals in most specimens. For 153 specimens the degree of anisotropy increases as the mean susceptibility increases over the range from 100 to 700 (in units of 10 -6 S.I.)- Theory shows that this is to be expected either due to increasing the traces of strongly oriented ferrimagnetics or due to increasing the proportion of chlorite. In the latter case this simultaneously increased its preferred orientation by closer packing. Stress-influenced crystallization of chlorite rapidly achieves saturation alignment and a limiting magnetic anisotropy although strain may continue to increase. Samples taken through individual graded beds show that the susceptibility ellipsoid varies from oblate in slaty rocks to a neutral shape in sandier rocks. However, its orientation is always structurally controlled, with the minimum susceptibility axis perpendicular to schistosity.

  5. Spectral Irradiance Variations and Magnetic Field Changes During Solar Cycle 23.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pap, J. M.; Bertello, L.; Chapman, G.; Floyd, L. E.; Harder, J.; Jones, H.; Malanuskenko, O.; Preminger, D.; Turmon, M.

    2008-12-01

    Both total irradiance and the Mg core-to-wing ratio was high at the maximum of weak solar cycle 23. However, photometric observations from the San Fernando Observatory show that both the number and size of active regions (spots and faculae) were low at the maximum of solar cycle 23 which points to the importance of the role of weak magnetic fields in irradiance variations. The purpose of this paper is to use new SOLIS spectromagnetograph observations in conjunction with a newly developed image analysis technique to compare irradiance time series as function of wavelengths with various surface magnetic features. One major goal is to compare features derived from the SOLIS images using the new technique with well-established features from SFO. Another important goal is to determine the contribution of active regions/weak fields to irradiance variations at various wavelengths, using the SOHO/VIRGO and SORCE/SIM data. A third goal is to determine the extent of irradiance variations not explained by magnetic structures. To do this, we use a new analysis technique to evaluate SOLIS spectromagnetograph observations.

  6. SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY INJECTED INTO THE HELIOSPHERE: MAGNITUDE, BALANCE, AND PERIODICITIES OVER SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Kuzanyan, K. M.

    2009-11-01

    Relying purely on solar photospheric magnetic field measurements that cover most of solar cycle 23 (1996-2005), we calculate the total relative magnetic helicity injected into the solar atmosphere, and eventually shed into the heliosphere, over the latest cycle. Large active regions dominate the helicity injection process with approx5.7 x 10{sup 45} Mx{sup 2} of total injected helicity. The net helicity injected is approx<1% of the above output. Peculiar active-region plasma flows account for approx80% of this helicity; the remaining approx20% is due to solar differential rotation. The typical helicity per active-region CME ranges between (1.8-7) x 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2} depending on the CME velocity. Accounting for various minor underestimation factors, we estimate a maximum helicity injection of approx6.6 x 10{sup 45} Mx{sup 2} for solar cycle 23. Although no significant net helicity exists over both solar hemispheres, we recover the well-known hemispheric helicity preference, which is significantly enhanced by the solar differential rotation. We also find that helicity injection in the solar atmosphere is an inherently disorganized, impulsive, and aperiodic process.

  7. Synchronized Northern Hemisphere climate change and solar magnetic cycles during the Maunder Minimum

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Miyahara, Hiroko; Sho, Kenjiro; Nakatsuka, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The Maunder Minimum (A.D. 1645–1715) is a useful period to investigate possible sun–climate linkages as sunspots became exceedingly rare and the characteristics of solar cycles were different from those of today. Here, we report annual variations in the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of tree-ring cellulose in central Japan during the Maunder Minimum. We were able to explore possible sun–climate connections through high-temporal resolution solar activity (radiocarbon contents; Δ14C) and climate (δ18O) isotope records derived from annual tree rings. The tree-ring δ18O record in Japan shows distinct negative δ18O spikes (wetter rainy seasons) coinciding with rapid cooling in Greenland and with decreases in Northern Hemisphere mean temperature at around minima of decadal solar cycles. We have determined that the climate signals in all three records strongly correlate with changes in the polarity of solar dipole magnetic field, suggesting a causal link to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). These findings are further supported by a comparison between the interannual patterns of tree-ring δ18O record and the GCR flux reconstructed by an ice-core 10Be record. Therefore, the variation of GCR flux associated with the multidecadal cycles of solar magnetic field seem to be causally related to the significant and widespread climate changes at least during the Maunder Minimum. PMID:21076031

  8. Supersubstorms (SML < -2500 nT): Magnetic storm and solar cycle dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajra, Rajkumar; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Gjerloev, Jesper W.

    2016-08-01

    We study extremely intense substorms with SuperMAG AL (SML) peak intensities < -2500 nT ("supersubstorms"/SSSs) for the period from 1981 to 2012. The SSS events were often found to be isolated SML peaks and not statistical fluctuations of the indices. The SSSs occur during all phases of the solar cycle with the highest occurrence (3.8 year-1) in the descending phase. The SSSs exhibited an annual variation with equinoctial maximum altering between spring in solar cycle 22 and fall in solar cycle 23. The occurrence rate and strength of the SSSs did not show any strong relationship with the intensity of the associated geomagnetic storms. All SSS events were associated with strong southward interplanetary magnetic field Bs component. The Bs fields were part of interplanetary magnetic clouds in 46% and of interplanetary sheath fields in 54% of the cases. About 77% of the SSSs were associated with small regions of very high density solar wind plasma parcels or pressure pulses impinging upon the magnetosphere. Comments on how SSS events may cause power outages at Earth are discussed at the end of the paper.

  9. Synchronized Northern Hemisphere climate change and solar magnetic cycles during the Maunder Minimum.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Miyahara, Hiroko; Sho, Kenjiro; Nakatsuka, Takeshi

    2010-11-30

    The Maunder Minimum (A.D. 1645-1715) is a useful period to investigate possible sun-climate linkages as sunspots became exceedingly rare and the characteristics of solar cycles were different from those of today. Here, we report annual variations in the oxygen isotopic composition (δ(18)O) of tree-ring cellulose in central Japan during the Maunder Minimum. We were able to explore possible sun-climate connections through high-temporal resolution solar activity (radiocarbon contents; Δ(14)C) and climate (δ(18)O) isotope records derived from annual tree rings. The tree-ring δ(18)O record in Japan shows distinct negative δ(18)O spikes (wetter rainy seasons) coinciding with rapid cooling in Greenland and with decreases in Northern Hemisphere mean temperature at around minima of decadal solar cycles. We have determined that the climate signals in all three records strongly correlate with changes in the polarity of solar dipole magnetic field, suggesting a causal link to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). These findings are further supported by a comparison between the interannual patterns of tree-ring δ(18)O record and the GCR flux reconstructed by an ice-core (10)Be record. Therefore, the variation of GCR flux associated with the multidecadal cycles of solar magnetic field seem to be causally related to the significant and widespread climate changes at least during the Maunder Minimum.

  10. Theoretical studies to elucidate the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions occurring in the magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaci, M.; Cacciola, M.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the study of magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively developed not only for their fundamental theoretical interest, but also for their many technological applications, especially biomedical applications, ranging from contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to the deterioration of cancer cells via hyperthermia treatment. The theoretical and experimental research has shown until now that the magnetic dipolar interactions between nanoparticles can have a significant influence on the magnetic behaviour of the system. But, this influence is not well understood. It is clear that the magnetic dipolar interaction intensity is correlated with the nanoparticle concentration, volume fraction and magnetic moment orientations. In this paper, we try to understand the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions on the behaviour of magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications. For the model, we considered spherical nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy and lognormal distribution of the sizes. The model involves a simulation stage of the spatial distribution and orientation of the nanoparticles and their easy axes of magnetic anisotropy, and an evaluation stage of the Néel relaxation time. To assess the Néel relaxation time, we are going to discretise and adapt, to the local magnetic field, the Coffey analytical solution for the equation Fokker-Planck describing the dynamics of magnetic moments of nanoparticles in oblique external magnetic field. There are three fundamental aspects of interest in our studies on the magnetic nanoparticles: their spatial & orientational distributions, concentrations and sizes.

  11. Mesoscale Influences of Wind Farms Throughout a Diurnal Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, A. C.; Lundquist, J. K.; Olson, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Few observations are available to give insight into the interaction between large wind farms and the boundary layer. As wind farm deployment increases, questions are arising on the potential impact on meteorology within and downwind of large wind farms. While large-eddy simulation can provide insight into the detailed interaction between individual turbines and the boundary layer, to date it has been too computationally expensive to simulate wind farms with large numbers of turbines and the resulting wake far downstream. Mesoscale numerical weather prediction models provide the opportunity to investigate the flow in and around large wind farms as a whole, and the resulting impact on meteorology. To this end, we have implemented a wind farm parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which represents wind turbines by imposing a momentum sink on the mean flow; converting kinetic energy into electricity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The parameterization improves upon previous models, basing the atmospheric drag of turbines on the thrust coefficient of a modern commercial turbine. In addition, the source of TKE varies with wind speed, reflecting the amount of energy extracted from the atmosphere by the turbines that does not produce electrical energy. We simulate a wind farm covering 10x10 km over land, consisting of 100 turbines each of nominal power output of 5 MW. Results will be presented showing how the wake structure varies dramatically over a diurnal cycle characteristic of a region in the Great Plains of the US, where wind farm deployment is planned. At night, a low-level jet forms within the rotor area, which is completely eliminated by energy extraction within the wind farm. The deep stable layer and lack of higher momentum air aloft at this time maximises the wind deficit and the length of the wake. The presentation will discuss the maximum reduction of wind speed within and downwind from the farm, and the wake e

  12. Lithological and pedological influences on the magnetic susceptibility of soil: their consideration in magnetic pollution mapping.

    PubMed

    Hanesch, Monika; Rantitsch, Gerd; Hemetsberger, Sigrid; Scholger, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements are widely used to map and monitor the heavy metal pollution of soils. However, the magnetic properties of soils are influenced significantly by the bedrock lithology and soil-forming processes. Therefore, a main challenge in the data interpretation is to filter out the anthropogenic pollution signal. In this study we address this problem by analysing susceptibility values, heavy metal concentrations, as well as pedological parameters in a large soil data set from the eastern segment of Austria, covering a wide range of different lithologies and soil types. The statistic assessment demonstrates an influence of lithology and soil type on the magnetic susceptibility signal. Therefore anomalies are defined in sub sets of different soil types separately. Three different methods were applied to detect susceptibility anomalies: the median absolute deviation method, the boxplot method, and the population modelling method. These methods evaluate topsoil data only and can therefore also be applied to field measurements of magnetic susceptibility. The results were compared to the conventional method of calculating the difference of topsoil and subsoil susceptibility. All three approaches identify the main anomalies in the study area and are successful in circumventing the problem of erroneous anomaly definition due to pedological processes. However, knowledge of the lithological background is still necessary for a meaningful interpretation and can only be substituted by a large amount of data. The tested methods lead to thresholds of different height and therefore act as filters of different strength for the definition of anomalies.

  13. Influence of saddle setback on pedalling technique effectiveness in cycling.

    PubMed

    Menard, Mathieu; Domalain, Mathieu; Decatoire, Arnaud; Lacouture, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Besides its regulation by Union Cycliste Internationale, the evidence relating saddle setback to pedalling performance remains inconclusive. This study investigates the influence of saddle setback on pedalling effectiveness through two indexes: an index of pedalling force effectiveness and an index of pedalling work effectiveness. Eleven cyclists were assessed six saddle setback conditions while pedalling at a steady power output of 200 W and cadence of 90 rpm. A force sensor was integrated within the seat post to compute the centre of pressure on the saddle. From instrumented pedals, an index of force effectiveness (ratio between the force directed perpendicular to the crank arm and the total force applied to the pedal) and an index of work effectiveness (based on the minimisation of negative crank work) were calculated. In comparison with a forward position, sitting backward significantly decreased 5% cumulative total work, increased index of work effectiveness (84.2 ± 3.7 vs. 82.0 ± 4.7%), and increased index of force effectiveness (41.7 ± 2.9 vs. 39.9 ± 3.7 and 36.9 ± 0.7%). Thus, while it was previously reported that sitting more forward favours maximal power, this study demonstrates that it also leads to a decreased effectiveness in steady-state pedalling.

  14. Influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in API5L steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ortiz, P.; Pérez-Benítez, J. A.; Espina-Hernández, J. H.; Caleyo, F.; Mehboob, N.; Grössinger, R.; Hallen, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    This work studies the influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of the energy of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal in three different API5L pipeline steels. The results show that the shape of the angular dependence of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise energy changes with the increase of the amplitude of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon is a consequence of the presence of unlike magnetization processes at different magnitudes of the applied magnetic field. The outcomes reveal the importance of controlling the value of the maximum applied field as parameter for the improvement of the MBN angular dependence measurements.

  15. The influence of training status, age, and muscle fiber type on cycling efficiency and endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Hopker, James G; Coleman, Damian A; Gregson, Hannah C; Jobson, Simon A; Von der Haar, Tobias; Wiles, Jonathan; Passfield, Louis

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of age, training status, and muscle fiber-type distribution on cycling efficiency. Forty men were recruited into one of four groups: young and old trained cyclists, and young and old untrained individuals. All participants completed an incremental ramp test to measure their peak O2 uptake, maximal heart rate, and maximal minute power output; a submaximal test of cycling gross efficiency (GE) at a series of absolute and relative work rates; and, in trained participants only, a 1-h cycling time trial. Finally, all participants underwent a muscle biopsy of their right vastus lateralis muscle. At relative work rates, a general linear model found significant main effects of age and training status on GE (P < 0.01). The percentage of type I muscle fibers was higher in the trained groups (P < 0.01), with no difference between age groups. There was no relationship between fiber type and cycling efficiency at any work rate or cadence combination. Stepwise multiple regression indicated that muscle fiber type did not influence cycling performance (P > 0.05). Power output in the 1-h performance trial was predicted by average O2 uptake and GE, with standardized β-coefficients of 0.94 and 0.34, respectively, although some mathematical coupling is evident. These data demonstrate that muscle fiber type does not affect cycling efficiency and was not influenced by the aging process. Cycling efficiency and the percentage of type I muscle fibers were influenced by training status, but only GE at 120 revolutions/min was seen to predict cycling performance.

  16. Sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding influence emotional memory for gist and detail.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Shawn E; Ahmed, Imran; Cahill, Larry

    2013-11-01

    Sex influences on emotional memory have received increasing interest over the past decade. However, only a subset of this previous work explored the influence of sex on memory for central information (gist) and peripheral detail in emotional versus neutral contexts. Here we examined the influence of sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding on memory for either an emotional or neutral story, specifically with respect to the retention of gist and peripheral detail. Healthy naturally cycling women and men viewed a brief, narrated, three-phase story containing neutral or emotionally arousing elements. One week later, participants received a surprise free recall test for story elements. The results indicate that naturally cycling women in the luteal (high hormone) phase of the menstrual cycle at encoding show enhanced memory for peripheral details, but not gist, when in the emotional compared with neutral stories (p<.05). In contrast, naturally cycling women in the follicular (low hormone) phase of the menstrual cycle at encoding did not show enhanced memory for gist or peripheral details in the emotional compared with neutral stories. Men show enhanced memory for gist, but not peripheral details, in the emotional versus neutral stories (p<.05). In addition, these sex influences on memory cannot be attributed to differences in attention or arousal; luteal women, follicular women, and men performed similarly on measures of attention (fixation time percentage) and arousal (pupil diameter changes) during the most arousing phase of the emotional story. These findings suggest that sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding influence long term memory for different types of emotional information.

  17. Influence of solar magnetic sector structure on terrestrial atmosphere vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Scherrer, P. H.; Svalgaard, L.; Roberts, W. O.; Olson, R. H.; Jenne, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The solar magnetic sector structure has a sizable and reproducible influence on tropospheric and lower stratospheric vorticity. The average vorticity during winter in the Northhern Hemisphere north of 20 deg N latitude reaches a minimum approximately one day after the passing of a sector boundary, and then increases during the following two or three days. The effect is found at all heights within the troposphere, but is not prominent in the stratosphere, except at the lower levels. No single longitudinal interval appears to dominate the effect.

  18. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN GLOBAL LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizaru, Mihai; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2010-06-01

    We report on a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the solar convection zone, which succeeds in generating a large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component, antisymmetric about the equatorial plane and undergoing regular polarity reversals on decadal timescales. We focus on a specific simulation run covering 255 years, during which 8 polarity reversals are observed, with a mean period of 30 years. Time-latitude slices of the zonally averaged toroidal magnetic component at the base of the convecting envelope show a well-organized toroidal flux system building up in each solar hemisphere, peaking at mid-latitudes and migrating toward the equator in the course of each cycle, in remarkable agreement with inferences based on the sunspot butterfly diagram. The simulation also produces a large-scale dipole moment, varying in phase with the internal toroidal component, suggesting that the simulation may be operating as what is known in mean-field theory as an {alpha}{Omega} dynamo.

  19. Non-linear MHD modeling of edge localized mode cycles and mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, François; Bécoulet, M.; Morales, J.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Hoelzl, M.; Garbet, X.; Pamela, S.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Fil, A.; Cahyna, P.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of a multi-edge localized mode (ELM) cycle as well as the ELM mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are modeled in realistic tokamak X-point geometry with the non-linear reduced MHD code JOREK. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be a key parameter enabling us to reproduce the cyclical dynamics of the plasma relaxations and to model the near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates consistently with experimental measurements. Moreover, the non-linear coupling of the RMPs with unstable modes are found to modify the edge magnetic topology and induce a continuous MHD activity in place of a large ELM crash, resulting in the mitigation of the ELMs. At larger diamagnetic rotation, a bifurcation from unmitigated ELMs—at low RMP current—towards fully suppressed ELMs—at large RMP current—is obtained.

  20. Tuning of magnetic parameters in cobalt-polystyrene nanocomposites by reduction cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Swapna S.; Sunny, Vijutha; Anantharaman, M.R.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores. A porous polymer network (polystyrene) was chosen as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this technique by repeating the cycling process. Highlights: {yields} Elementary cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized inside polystyrene by a novel process. {yields} The self protection is achieved by the auto-shelling with the metal oxide. {yields} The magnetisation and coercivity could be tuned by repeating the cycles. {yields} Tuning of magnetic properties (both coercivity and magnetisation) could be achieved by the repetition of reduction cycles. {yields} Synthesized nanocomposite can act as a catalyst for carbon nanotube synthesis. -- Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores using CoSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O and NaBH{sub 4}. A porous polymer network (sulphonated polystyrene) was chosen, as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The

  1. Glass eels (Anguilla anguilla) have a magnetic compass linked to the tidal cycle.

    PubMed

    Cresci, Alessandro; Paris, Claire B; Durif, Caroline M F; Shema, Steven; Bjelland, Reidun M; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit; Browman, Howard I

    2017-06-01

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) has one of the longest migrations in the animal kingdom. It crosses the Atlantic Ocean twice during its life history, migrating between the spawning area in the Sargasso Sea and Europe, where it is widely distributed. The leptocephalus larvae drift with the Gulf Stream and other currents for more than a year and metamorphose into glass eels when they arrive on the continental shelf and move toward coastal areas. The mechanisms underlying glass eel orientation toward the coast and into freshwater systems are poorly known. However, anguillid eels, including the glass eel life stage, have a geomagnetic sense, suggesting the possibility that they use Earth's magnetic field to orient toward the coast. To test this hypothesis, we used a unique combination of laboratory tests and in situ behavioral observations conducted in a drifting circular arena. Most (98%) of the glass eels tested in the sea exhibited a preferred orientation that was related to the tidal cycle. Seventy-one percent of the same eels showed the same orientation during ebb tide when tested in the laboratory under a manipulated simulated magnetic field in the absence of any other cue. These results demonstrate that glass eels use a magnetic compass for orientation and suggest that this magnetic orientation system is linked to a circatidal rhythm.

  2. Glass eels (Anguilla anguilla) have a magnetic compass linked to the tidal cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cresci, Alessandro; Paris, Claire B.; Durif, Caroline M. F.; Shema, Steven; Bjelland, Reidun M.; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit; Browman, Howard I.

    2017-01-01

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) has one of the longest migrations in the animal kingdom. It crosses the Atlantic Ocean twice during its life history, migrating between the spawning area in the Sargasso Sea and Europe, where it is widely distributed. The leptocephalus larvae drift with the Gulf Stream and other currents for more than a year and metamorphose into glass eels when they arrive on the continental shelf and move toward coastal areas. The mechanisms underlying glass eel orientation toward the coast and into freshwater systems are poorly known. However, anguillid eels, including the glass eel life stage, have a geomagnetic sense, suggesting the possibility that they use Earth’s magnetic field to orient toward the coast. To test this hypothesis, we used a unique combination of laboratory tests and in situ behavioral observations conducted in a drifting circular arena. Most (98%) of the glass eels tested in the sea exhibited a preferred orientation that was related to the tidal cycle. Seventy-one percent of the same eels showed the same orientation during ebb tide when tested in the laboratory under a manipulated simulated magnetic field in the absence of any other cue. These results demonstrate that glass eels use a magnetic compass for orientation and suggest that this magnetic orientation system is linked to a circatidal rhythm. PMID:28630895

  3. Quasiperiodicity in cataclysmic variable stars caused by solar-type magnetic cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brian

    1988-01-01

    Cyclical variations of orbital periods, quiescent magnitudes and outburst intervals in the activity of cataclysmic variable binary stars are inter-related and are ascribed to variations in radii of the secondaries, caused by solar-type (sunspot) magnetic cycles. In the nova remnant DQ Herculis the observed variations in orbital period and quiescent magnitude are consistent with this mechanism. But accretion onto the white dwarf, from an accretion disk acquired from its companion, cannot explain the observed variation of the 71-second oscillations.

  4. Buffer influence on magnetic dead layer, critical current, and thermal stability in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Żywczak, Antoni; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Zietek, Sławomir; Kanak, Jarosław; Banasik, Monika; Powroźnik, Wiesław; Skowroński, Witold; Checiński, Jakub; Wrona, Jerzy; Głowiński, Hubert; Dubowik, Janusz; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed study of Ta/Ru-based buffers and their influence on features crucial from the point of view of applications of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs) such as critical switching current and thermal stability. We study buffer/FeCoB/MgO/Ta/Ru and buffer/MgO/FeCoB/Ta/Ru layers, investigating the crystallographic texture, the roughness of the buffers, the magnetic domain pattern, the magnetic dead layer thickness, and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy fields for each sample. Additionally, we examine the effect of the current induced magnetization switching for complete nanopillar MTJs with lateral dimensions of 270 × 180 nm. Buffer Ta 5/Ru 10/Ta 3 (thicknesses in nm), which has the thickest dead layer, exhibits a much larger thermal stability factor (63 compared to 32.5) while featuring a slightly lower critical current density value (1.25 MA/cm2 compared to 1.5 MA/cm2) than the buffer with the thinnest dead layer Ta 5/Ru 20/Ta 5. We can account for these results by considering the difference in damping which compensates for the difference in the switching barrier heights.

  5. DISCOVERY OF A 1.6 YEAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {iota} HOROLOGII

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Judge, P. G.; Knoelker, M.; Mathur, S.; Rempel, M.; Basu, S.; Henry, T. J.; Soderblom, D. R.

    2010-11-10

    The Mount Wilson Ca HK survey revealed magnetic activity variations in a large sample of solar-type stars with timescales ranging from 2.5 to 25 years. This broad range of cycle periods is thought to reflect differences in the rotational properties and the depths of the surface convection zones for stars with various masses and ages. In 2007, we initiated a long-term monitoring campaign of Ca II H and K emission for a sample of 57 southern solar-type stars to measure their magnetic activity cycles and their rotational properties when possible. We report the discovery of a 1.6 year magnetic activity cycle in the exoplanet host star {iota} Horologii and obtain an estimate of the rotation period that is consistent with Hyades membership. This is the shortest activity cycle so far measured for a solar-type star and may be related to the short-timescale magnetic variations recently identified in the Sun and HD 49933 from helioseismic and asteroseismic measurements. Future asteroseismic observations of {iota} Hor can be compared to those obtained near the magnetic minimum in 2006 to search for cycle-induced shifts in the oscillation frequencies. If such short activity cycles are common in F stars, then NASA's Kepler mission should observe their effects in many of its long-term asteroseismic targets.

  6. The influence of 3D kinematic and electromyographical parameters on cycling economy.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Hebron, Jack; Atkins, Stephen; Hurst, Howard; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Economy is considered to be a key factor for the determination of performance in endurance events such as cycling. There have been no investigations which have related cycling economy to simultaneous measurements of 3D kinematics and muscular activation. This study examined selected biomechanical and neuromuscular parameters which have the strongest association with cycling economy. Twenty-five trained cyclists (31.27 ± 3.19 years) completed steady state cycling time trials at a workload of 180 W. Simultaneous measurements of 3D kinematics and electromyographical parameters were obtained. Continuous measurements of expired gases were used to provide a measure of cycling economy. A multiple regression analysis showed that key parameters of peak knee extension velocity and mean activity of the rectus femoris muscles were significant predictors of VO2 during steady state cycling (P < 0.01). This study has documented the key biomechanical parameters pertinent to cycling economy. As economy has been shown to influence aerobic performance, future work should focus on optimising these parameters to improve cycling economy.

  7. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  8. The interplanetary magnetic field during solar cycle 21 ISEE-3/ICE observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Jungman, G.; Smith, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temporal variations in the IMF during solar cycle 21 are investigated using magnetic field observations collected by the vector helium magnetometer on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft. Analysis of the observations reveal that the IMF magnitude, which had declined to 4.7 nT in 1976, peaked in late 1982 (two years after solar maximum) at 9.0 nT and rapidly decreased during 1983-1984 to an intensity of 6.2 nT in early 1985. The IMF intensities are compared with the auroral AE index; the observed peak in strength during 1981-1983 is related to a 50 percent increase in substorm activity levels. A decrease in Parker spiral angle, revealing the existence of high-speed streams is detected in the declining phase of the solar cycle. Variations in the intensity of the IMF correlate with Mt. Wilson magnetograph measurements of full disk magnetic flux. Source regions for the evolution of solar wind and the IMF are proposed.

  9. Hale cycle effects in cosmic ray east-west anisotropy and interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    1993-07-01

    We have reanalyzed diurnal anisotropy data obtained with the shielded ion chamber (IC) at Cheltenham/Fredericksburg and the neutron monitor (NM) at Swarthmore/Newark. IC data are for the 1936-1977 period and NM data are for the 1965-1988 period. We have corrected IC data for the diurnal temperature effect. Application of this correction results in a better agreement between IC and other data sets, thereby making it possible to study the long-term changes in the diurnal anisotropy using IC data. The behavior of the annual mean east-west anisotropy is studied for 53 years of observations. The period encompasses more than two solar magnetic (Hale) cycles. Its amplitude undergoes the expected 11 and 22 year variations, with the largest changes occurring near solar activity minima. Moreover, the data indicate the presence of the subsidiary maxima for the entire 53-year period, following the solar polar field reversals, during the declining phases of activity cycles when high-speed solar wind streams are present in the heliosphere. The data suggest that the amplitude of the subsidiary maximum is large when the solar polar magnetic field points toward the sun in the Northern Hemisphere, and radial anisotropy is absent.

  10. Seasonal and solar-cycle variations of polar magnetic fields resolved via eigenanalysis and graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Robert; Freeman, Mervyn; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2017-04-01

    We apply the meteorological analysis method of Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) to ground magnetometer measurements, and subsequently use graph theory to classify the results. The EOF method is used to characterise and separate contributions to the variability of the Earth's external magnetic field (EMF) in the northern polar region. EOFs decompose the noisy EMF data into a small number of independent spatio-temporal basis functions, which collectively describe the majority of the magnetic field variance. We use these basis functions (computed monthly) to infill where data are missing, providing a self-consistent description of the EMF at 5-minute resolution spanning 1997—2009 (solar cycle 23). Each of the EOF basis functions can typically be associated with one of the Disturbance Polar (DP)-type current systems (e.g. DP2, DP1, DPY, NBZ), or with the motion of these systems. This association allows us to describe the varying behaviour of the current systems over the 144 months (i.e. 1997—2009) of our reanalysis. However, the EOF basis functions are (by definition) ranked by their contribution to the total variance, and thus a given current system may be described by a different rank of basis vector from month to month. We use graph theory to find clusters of quantifiably-similar spatial basis functions, and thereby track a given pattern throughout the span of 144 months. Via this method, we present the seasonal and solar cycle variations in the polar current systems.

  11. Influence of coupling of sorption and photosynthetic processes on trace element cycles in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical and biological processes have important roles in the transport and cycling of trace elements in natural waters, but their complex interactions are often not well understood. Trace-element concentrations may, for example, be controlled by adsorption-desorption reactions at mineral surfaces, with the equilibrium strongly influenced by pH. Variations in pH due to photosynthetic activity should result in concentration fluctuations as the adsorption-desorption equilibrium shifts with pH. To investigate these interactions, we have studied the effect of diurnal cycling of pH on dissolved arsenate in a perennial stream contaminated with arsenic. As expected, a diurnal cycle in arsenate concentration was observed, but surprisingly, the arsenate cycle lags several hours behind the pH cycle. Laboratory experiments show that the lag results from a slow approach to sorption equilibrium. Our observations demonstrate that the coupling of photosynthesis and sorption processes may have an important influence on the cycling of many trace elements and emphasize the importance of understanding sorption kinetics in modelling these processes.

  12. THE LATITUDE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ELEMENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X. E-mail: wangjx@nao.cas.cn

    2012-01-20

    With the unique data set from full-disk observations provided by Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in the interval embodying solar cycle 23, we have found that the cyclic variations of numbers and total flux of these small-scale magnetic elements covering fluxes of (2.9-32.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} Mx and (4.27-38.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx show anticorrelation and correlation with sunspots, respectively. In this study, the time-latitude distributions of these anticorrelated and correlated elements are analyzed. The following results are disclosed: (1) for the correlated elements, the cyclic variations of the total flux in low-latitude and middle-latitude regions show a longer duration of cyclic maximum phase than that of an active region (AR) in the corresponding latitude region; the total flux of these elements shows the accordant south-north asymmetry with that of AR; the time-latitude distribution of their number displays a similar butterfly diagram but with a latitude distribution that is twice as wide as that of sunspots. (2) For the anticorrelated elements, the time-latitude distribution of number shows a solar cycle variation different from the sunspot butterfly diagram; in each latitude, the distribution of anticorrelated elements always shows the anticorrelated variation with that of sunspots; during solar cycle 23, the average speed of the peak latitudinal migration for anticorrelated elements reaches 7.5 deg year{sup -1}, almost three times that for sunspots. These results seem to imply that the correlated elements are the debris of decayed sunspots, and the anticorrelated elements have a different source but are affected or modulated by sunspot magnetic field.

  13. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple multilayer random crosslinking of the trypsin molecules onto magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while the conventional immobilization of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. A single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome were digested at atmospheric pressure and 37 °C for 12 h or in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, EC-TR/NPs performed equally to or better than free trypsin in terms of both identified peptide/protein number and the digestion reproducibility. In addition, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very rapid (~1 min) and efficient digestions with more reproducible digestion results. PMID:21204257

  14. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple crosslinking of the enzyme to magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while a control sample of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. Digestions were carried out on a single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome, and also compared for digestion at atmospheric pressure and 37 ºC for 12 h, and in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, the EC-TR/NPs performed equally as well or better than free trypsin in terms of the number of peptide/protein identifications and reproducibility across technical replicates. However, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very fast (~1 min) and more reproducible digestions.

  15. Abnormal fb Es enhancements in equatorial Es layers during magnetic storms of solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, L. C. A.; Denardini, C. M.; Batista, I. S.

    2013-09-01

    We have analyzed the behavior of blanketing frequency of the Es layer (fb Es) occurring at an equatorial station covering the days before, during and subsequent to 24 intense and very intense magnetic storms (Dst≤-100 nT) that occurred during the solar cycle 23. The fb Es was measured by digital ionosonde over São Luís, Brazil (2.33° S, 44.2° W, dip: -4.5°). Our analysis shows that there are significant changes in the fb Es, mainly during the recovery phase of magnetic storms, characterized by occurrence of peaks that exceed the ambient background values. Also, these peaks are associated to other types of sporadic E layer than the Esq (a non-blanketing layer detected due the plasma irregularities in the equatorial electrojet), which in turn means competing mechanisms. The results are discussed in terms of the statistics of the abnormal enhancement taking into account the phase of the magnetic storm.

  16. Dry-cured ham tissue characterization by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry and quantitative magnetization transfer.

    PubMed

    Bajd, Franci; Gradišek, Anton; Apih, Tomaž; Serša, Igor

    2016-05-31

    Fast field cycling (FFC) and quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) NMR methods are two powerful tools in NMR analysis of biological tissues. The qMT method is well established in biomedical NMR applications, while the FFC method is often used in investigations of molecular dynamics on which longitudinal NMR relaxation times of the investigated material critically depend. Despite their proven analytical potential, these two methods were rarely used in NMR studies of food, especially when combined together. In our study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a combined FFC/qMT-NMR approach for the fast and nondestructive characterization of dry-curing ham tissues differing by protein content. The characterization is based on quantifying the pure quadrupolar peak area (area under the quadrupolar contribution of dispersion curve obtained by FFC-NMR) and the restricted magnetization pool size (obtained by qMT-NMR). Both quantities correlate well with concentration of partially immobilized, nitrogen-containing and proton magnetization exchanging muscle proteins. Therefore, these two quantities could serve as potential markers for dry-curing process monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Influences of surface coating, UV irradiation and magnetic field on the algae removal using magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shijian; Agbakpe, Michael; Wu, Zhiyi; Kuang, Liyuan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-20

    Magnetophoretic separation is a promising and sustainable technology for rapid algal separation or removal from water. This work demonstrated the application of magnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with a cationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), toward the separation of Scenedesmus dimorphus from the medium broth. The influences of surface coating, UV irradiation, and magnetic field on the magnetophoretic separation were systematically examined. After PEI coating, zeta potential of MNPs shifted from −7.9 ± 2.0 to +39.0 ± 3.1 mV at a pH of 7.0, which improved MNPs-algae interaction and helped reduce the dose demand of MNPs (e.g., from 0.2 to 0.1 g·g(–1) while the harvesting efficiency (HE) of over 80% remained unchanged). The extended Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory predicted a strong attractive force between PEI-coated MNPs and algae, which supported the improved algal harvesting. Moreover, the HE was greater under the UV365 irradiation than that under the UV254, and increased with the irradiation intensity. Continuous application of the external magnetic field at high strength remarkably improved the algal harvesting. Finally, the reuse of MNPs for multiple cycles of algal harvesting was studied, which aimed at increasing the sustainability and lowering the cost.

  18. Influence of driving cycles on exhaust emissions and fuel consumption of gasoline passenger car in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Nutramon, Tamsanya; Supachart, Chungpaibulpatana

    2009-01-01

    The influence of different driving cycles on their exhaust emissions and fuel consumption rate of gasoline passenger car was investigated in Bangkok based on the actual measurements obtained from a test vehicle driving on a standard chassis dynamometer. A newly established Bangkok driving cycle (BDC) and the European driving cycle (EDC) which is presently adopted as the legislative cycle for testing automobiles registered in Thailand were used. The newly developed BDC is constructed using the driving characteristic data obtained from the real on-road driving tests along selected traffic routes. A method for selecting appropriate road routes for real driving tests is also introduced. Variations of keyed driving parameters of BDC with different driving cycles were discussed. The results showed that the HC and CO emission factors of BDC are almost two and four times greater than those of EDC, respectively. Although the difference in the NOx emission factor is small, the value from BDC is still greater than that of EDC by 10%. Under BDC, the test vehicle consumes fuel about 25% more than it does under EDC. All these differences are mainly attributed to the greater proportion of idle periods and higher fluctuations of vehicle speed in the BDC cycle. This result indicated that the exhausted emissions and fuel consumption of vehicles obtained from tests under the legislative modal-type driving cycle (EDC) are significantly different from those actually produced under real traffic conditions especially during peak periods.

  19. Longitudinal Distribution of Solar Magnetic Fields and Activity During the Ending and Starting Periods of Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.; Garcia, A.; Klvaňa, M.

    2000-10-01

    Studying the appearance of active regions during periods of solar activity minima, we observed that the magnetic fields of active regions belonging to the old and new cycle were mutually related. This was the reason we decided to investigate the relation of the old and new cycle activity during the two last minima in more detail. We examined the distribution of both activities in heliographic longitude, because the patterns of such distribution change substantially during the time of the minimum, and we studied their relation to the distribution and development of the global (background) magnetic field. We observed that the active regions of the old and new cycles tended to concentrate in the same active longitudes. The sources of their magnetic fluxes seem to have the same heliographic longitude. The beginning of the new cycle activity, occurring at the very beginning to a very weak degree in the equatorial zone, and then proceeding to higher latitudes, occurs in the magnetic field remnants of the old cycle activity. During the transition phase, a relatively large number of small active regions is produced by both cycles.

  20. Reception pattern influence on magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Qi; Ma, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Based on the acoustic radiation theory of a dipole source, the influence of the transducer reception pattern is studied for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). Numerical studies are conducted to simulate acoustic pressures, waveforms, and reconstructed images with unidirectional, omnidirectional, and strong directional transducers. With the analyses of equivalent and projection sources, the influences of the model dimension and the layer effect are qualitatively analyzed to evaluate the performance of MAT-MI. Three-dimensional simulation studies show that the strong directional transducer with a large radius can reduce the influences of equivalent sources, projection sources, and the layer effect effectively, resulting in enhanced pressure and improved image contrast, which is beneficial for boundary pressure extraction in conductivity reconstruction. The reconstructed conductivity contrast images present the conductivity boundaries as stripes with different contrasts and polarities, representing the values and directions of the conductivity changes of the scanned layer. The favorable results provide solid evidence for transducer selection and suggest potential practical applications of MAT-MI in biomedical imaging. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB707900), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos 11274176 and 11474166), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China.

  1. Solar and interplanetary signatures of declining of solar magnetic fields: Implications to the next solar cycle 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.

    2015-08-01

    Our detailed study of solar surface magnetic fields at high-latitudes, using magnetic synoptic magnetograms of NSO/Kitt Peak observatory from 1975-2014, has shown a steady decline of the field strength since mid-1990's until mid-2014, i.e. the solar maximum of cycle 24. We also found that magnetic field strength at high-latitudes declines after each solar cycle maximum, and since cycle 24 is already past its peak implies that solar surface magnetic fields will be continuing to decline until solar minimum of cycle 24. In addition, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements of solar wind micro-turbulence levels, from Solar and Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Japan, have also shown a steady decline in sync with the declining surface fields. Even the heliospheric magnetic fields (HMF) at 1 AU have been declined much below the previously proposed floor level of HMF of ~4.6 nT. From study of a correlation between the high-latitude surface fields and the HMF at the last four solar minima we found a floor value of HMF of ~3.2 nT. Using the above correlation and the fact that the high-latitude surface fields is expected to decline until the minimum of cycle 24, we estimate the value of the HMF at the minimum of cycle 24 will be 3.8 ± 0.2 nT and the peak sunspot number for solar cycle 25 will be 56±12 suggesting a weak sunspot activity to be continued in cycle 25 too.

  2. Hemispheric progression of solar cycles in solar magnetic field data and its relation to the solar dynamo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, F.; Simoniello, R.; Knudsen, M. F.; Karoff, C.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: We aim to characterise the solar cycle progression simultaneously at different latitudes in each solar hemisphere using solar magnetic field data provided by the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO). We also investigate whether the features observed in the WSO data are best explained by the Babcock-Leighton (BL) mechanism and/or turbulent helicity as the α-effect in solar dynamos. Methods: We analysed the hemispheric solar-cycle progression of the Sun's magnetic field in different 15° latitudinal bands, which allow us to explore the extent of cycle overlap. We also investigated the Waldmeier Rule, and the relationship between decay rates and peak amplitudes of the same cycle. These aspects of the solar-cycle progression can be explained in different ways by solar dynamo models depending on the source of the α-effect. Results: The progression of the last four solar cycles in different latitudinal bands reveals that the degree of overlap between consecutive cycles is small and is more likely to be confined to low solar latitudes. We also found that the southern and northern solar hemispheres behave differently for the last four solar cycles, suggesting a slight decoupling between the hemispheres. The results also reveal a strong correlation between the decay rates and the peak amplitudes of the solar cycles.

  3. Effects of 50 Hz magnetic field on cell cycle kinetics and the colony forming ability of budding yeast exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, A; Juutilainen, J; Lang, S; Pelkonen, J; Rytömaa, T; Naarala, J

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposed budding yeast, haploid yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells of the strain SEy2101a were exposed to 50 Hz sine wave magnetic field (MF) of 120 microT with simultaneous exposure to UV radiation. Most of the UV energy was in the UVB range (280-320 nm). The biologically weighted (CIE action spectrum) dose level for the UV radiation was 175 J/m2. We examined whether 50 Hz MF affected the ability of UV irradiated yeast cells to form colonies (Colony Forming Units, CFUs). In addition, the effect of coexposure on cell cycle kinetics was investigated. Although the significant effect of MF on the cell cycle phases of UV exposed yeast cells was seen only at one time point, the overall results showed that MF exposure may influence the cell cycle kinetics at the first cycle after UV irradiation. The effect of our particular MF exposure on the colony forming ability of the UV irradiated yeast cells was statistically significant 420 min after UV irradiation. Moreover, at 240, 360, and 420 min after UV irradiation, there were fewer CFUs in every experiment in (UV+MF) exposed populations than in only UV exposed yeast populations. These results could indicate that MF exposure in conjunction with UV may have some effects on yeast cell survival or growth. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. The influence of the hydrologic cycle on the extent of sea ice with climatic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Ken; Gosink, Joan

    1991-01-01

    The role was analyzed of the hydrologic cycle on the distribution of sea ice, and its influence on forcings and fluxes between the marine environment and the atmosphere. River discharge plays a significant role in degrading the sea ice before any melting occurs elsewhere along the coast. The influence is considered of river discharge on the albedo, thermal balance, and distribution of sea ice. Quantitative atmospheric-hydrologic models are being developed to describe these processes in the coastal zone. Input for the models will come from satellite images, hydrologic data, and field observations. The resulting analysis provides a basis for the study of the significance of the hydrologic cycle throughout the Arctic Basin and its influence on the regional climate as a result of possible climatic scenarios. The area offshore from the Mackenzie River delta was selected as the study area.

  5. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Vessela T Z; Papazov, Sava P; Daskalov, Ivan K

    2003-12-23

    Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium.

  6. Influence of domain wall interactions on nanosecond switching in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J.; Kuch, W.; Hertel, R.; Camarero, J.; Fukumoto, K.; Romanens, F.; Pizzini, S.; Bonfim, M.; Petroff, F.; Fontaine, A.; Kirschner, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have obtained microscopic evidence of the influence of domain wall stray fields on the nanosecond magnetization switching in magnetic trilayer systems. The nucleation barrier initiating the magnetic switching of the soft magnetic Fe20Ni80 layer in magnetic tunnel junctionlike FeNi/Al2O3/Co trilayers is considerably lowered by stray fields generated by domain walls present in the hard magnetic Co layer. This internal bias field can significantly increase the local switching speed of the soft layer. The effect is made visible using nanosecond time- and layer-resolved magnetic domain imaging and confirmed by micromagnetic simulations.

  7. Influence of magnetization on field quality in cosine-theta and block design dipole magnets wound with coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogabe, Yusuke; Sakashita, Masaki; Nakamura, Taketsune; Ogitsu, Toru; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-04-01

    We carried out electromagnetic field analyses on the cross sections of two dipole magnets wound with coated conductors. One was a cosine-theta magnet, and the other was a block design magnet. The electric field-current density characteristics of the coated conductors were formulated using a percolation depinning model based on the measured voltage-current characteristics. We calculated the temporal evolutions of the current-density distributions in all the turns of each magnet and used these evolutions to calculate the multipole components of the magnetic field. We compared the two magnets, which differed in coated-conductor orientations, regarding the influence of coated-conductor magnetization on the field qualities.

  8. THE ACOUSTIC CUTOFF FREQUENCY OF THE SUN AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Palle, P. L.; Garcia, R. A.

    2011-12-20

    The acoustic cutoff frequency-the highest frequency for acoustic solar eigenmodes-is an important parameter of the solar atmosphere as it determines the upper boundary of the p-mode resonant cavities. At frequencies beyond this value, acoustic disturbances are no longer trapped but are traveling waves. Interference among them gives rise to higher-frequency peaks-the pseudomodes-in the solar acoustic spectrum. The pseudomodes are shifted slightly in frequency with respect to p-modes, making possible the use of pseudomodes to determine the acoustic cutoff frequency. Using data from the GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, we calculate the acoustic cutoff frequency using the coherence function between both the velocity and intensity sets of data. By using data gathered by these instruments during the entire lifetime of the mission (1996 until the present), a variation in the acoustic cutoff frequency with the solar magnetic activity cycle is found.

  9. Coronal Holes and Open Magnetic Flux over Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowder, Chris; Qiu, Jiong; Leamon, Robert

    2017-01-01

    As the observational signature of the footprints of solar magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, coronal holes provide a critical measure of the structure and evolution of these lines. Using a combination of Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT), Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (STEREO/EUVI A/B) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations spanning 1996 - 2015 (nearly two solar cycles), coronal holes are automatically detected and characterized. Coronal hole area distributions show distinct behavior in latitude, defining the domain of polar and low-latitude coronal holes. The northern and southern polar regions show a clear asymmetry, with a lag between hemispheres in the appearance and disappearance of polar coronal holes.

  10. Influence of estrous and circadian cycles on calcium intake of the rat.

    PubMed

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Tordoff, Michael G

    2013-03-15

    The food, water and sodium intake of laboratory rats fluctuates over the circadian and estrous cycles. Blood calcium and calcium-regulating hormones also wax and wane in response to these cycles, raising the possibility that the same might be true of calcium intake. To investigate this, we monitored the fluid intakes of female Long-Evans rats given a choice between water and 10mM CaCl2 solution for two consecutive estrous cycles. We found that calcium solution intake changed over the circadian cycle in a similar manner to water intake; the preference scores for CaCl2 solution remained stable. We did not detect any changes in calcium solution intake or preference scores during the estrous cycle despite a decrease in fluid intake at estrus. Thus, fluctuations in intake of calcium solution during the circadian cycle appear to be nonspecific and probably the result of changes in fluid balance. Estrous changes either do not influence calcium intake or their effects are masked by other factors, resulting in stable levels of calcium intake.

  11. Environmental and organizational influences on magnet hospital recognition.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas L; Sanders, Tom J

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on research studying the influence of environmental and organizational factors on the adoption of the magnet hospital concept. Although research has been reported on the adoption of innovations by healthcare organizations, research on factors influencing the adoption of administrative advances remains an important area to investigate. Logistic regression was used to determine both the significance and direction of the association of environmental and organizational factors with innovation adoption. In addition, the size and type of the hospitals in the sample was used as a control variable. It was found for environmental factors that environmental complexity and community resources were associated with innovation adoption and that competition and network externalities were not. For the organizational factors examined, it was found that organizational complexity and control of domain were associated with innovation adoption. Slack resources and external communications were not associated with adoption. The findings from this study contribute to healthcare management research by enhancing the understanding of the innovation adoption process. The results have important implications for both healthcare providers and policy makers.

  12. Influence of duty cycle on the power-duration relationship: observations and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Broxterman, R M; Ade, C J; Wilcox, S L; Schlup, S J; Craig, J C; Barstow, T J

    2014-02-01

    The highest sustainable rate of aerobic metabolism [critical power (CP)] and the finite amount of work that can be performed above CP (W' [curvature constant]) were determined under two muscle contraction duty cycles. Eight men completed at least three constant-power handgrip tests to exhaustion to determine CP and W' for 50% and 20% duty cycles, while brachial artery blood flow (Q̇BA) and deoxygenated-[hemoglobin + myoglobin] (deoxy-[Hb+Mb]) were measured. CP was lower for the 50% duty cycle (3.9 ± 0.9 W) than the 20% duty cycle (5.1 ± 0.8 W; p < 0.001), while W' was not significantly different (50% duty cycle: 452 ± 141 J vs. 20% duty cycle: 432 ± 130 J; p > 0.05). At the same power output, Q̇BA and deoxy-[Hb + Mb] achieved higher end-exercise values for the 20% duty cycle (9.87 ± 1.73 ml·s(-1); 51.7 ± 4.7 μM) than the 50% duty cycle (7.37 ± 1.76 ml·s(-1), p < 0.001; 44.3 ± 2.4 μM, p < 0.03). These findings indicate that blood flow influences CP, but not W'.

  13. Simulations of the sun's polar magnetic fields during sunspot cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devore, C. Richard; Sheeley, Neil R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Regarding new bipolar magnetic regions as sources of flux, the evolution of the radial component of the solar photospheric magnetic field is simulated during 1976-1984, and the corresponding evolution of the line-of-sight polar fields as seen from earth is derived. The observed timing and strength of the polar-field reversal during cycle 21 can be accounted for by supergranular diffusion alone, for a diffusion coefficient of 800 sq km/sec. For an assumed 300 sq km/sec rate of diffusion, on the other hand, a poleward meridional flow with a moderately broad profile and a peak speed of 10 m/s reached at about 5 deg latitude is required to obtain agreement between the simulated and observed fields. Such a flow accelerates the transport of following-polarity flux to the polar caps, but also inhibits the diffusion of leading-polarity flux across the equator. For flows faster than about 10 m/s, the latter effect dominates, and the simulated polar fields reverse increasingly later and more weakly than the observed fields.

  14. The use of contrast agents with fast field-cycling magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hógáin, Dara Ó.; Davies, Gareth R.; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio; Lurie, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Fast field-cycling (FFC) MRI allows switching of the magnetic field during an imaging scan. FFC-MRI takes advantage of the T1 dispersion properties of contrast agents to improve contrast, thus enabling more sensitive detection of the agent. A new contrast agent designed specifically for use with FFC was imaged using both a homebuilt FFC-MRI system and a 3 T Philips clinical MRI scanner. T1 dispersion curves were obtained using a commercial relaxometer which showed large changes in relaxation rate between fields. A model of magnetization behaviour was used to predict optimum evolution times for the maximum T1 contrast between samples at each field. Images were processed and analysed to create maps of R1 values using a set of images at each field. The R1 maps produced at two different fields were then subtracted from each other in order to create a map of ΔR1 in which pixel values depend on the change in R1 of the sample between the two fields. The dispersion properties of the agent resulted in higher contrast in a ΔR1 image compared with a standard T1-weighted image.

  15. The use of contrast agents with fast field-cycling magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hógáin, Dara O; Davies, Gareth R; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio; Lurie, David J

    2011-01-07

    Fast field-cycling (FFC) MRI allows switching of the magnetic field during an imaging scan. FFC-MRI takes advantage of the T(1) dispersion properties of contrast agents to improve contrast, thus enabling more sensitive detection of the agent. A new contrast agent designed specifically for use with FFC was imaged using both a homebuilt FFC-MRI system and a 3 T Philips clinical MRI scanner. T(1) dispersion curves were obtained using a commercial relaxometer which showed large changes in relaxation rate between fields. A model of magnetization behaviour was used to predict optimum evolution times for the maximum T(1) contrast between samples at each field. Images were processed and analysed to create maps of R(1) values using a set of images at each field. The R(1) maps produced at two different fields were then subtracted from each other in order to create a map of ΔR(1) in which pixel values depend on the change in R(1) of the sample between the two fields. The dispersion properties of the agent resulted in higher contrast in a ΔR(1) image compared with a standard T(1)-weighted image.

  16. On the latitude and solar cycle dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.-M.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty years of solar magnetograph and in-ecliptic IMF measurements are used to verify that the radial IMF component (B sub r) can be approximated by a superposition of the sun's inclined magnetic dipole moment and a current sheet normal to the dipole axis. The net field is found to be about three times stronger along the dipole axis than near the current sheet. Over the sunspot cycle, the absolute value of B sub r should undergo the least modulation near the heliographic equator and the greatest modulation above the sun's poles, where, at 1 AU, it varies systematically between about 10 nT near sunspot minimum and about 1 nT near sunspot maximum. The latitudinal gradients in the absolute value of B sub r are expected to be steepest around sunspot minimum and flattest near sunspot maximum. It is predicted that Ulysses will encounter very strong fields when it flies over the solar poles during the declining phase of sunspot cycle 22.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates with urea-cycle defects

    PubMed Central

    Gunz, Anna Catherine; Choong, Karen; Potter, Murray; Miller, Elka

    2013-01-01

    The urea-cycle functions to facilitate ammonia excretion, a disruption of which results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites. The neurological outcome of neonatal-onset urea-cycle defects (UCDs) is poor, and there are no good predictors of prognosis beyond ammonia levels at presentation. The role of neuroimaging in the prognosis of neonatal-onset UCDs is unclear. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of two patients with neonatal-onset UCDs (argininosuccinic aciduria and citrullinemia) at presentation and at 2-year follow-up, and present a review of the literature on neuroimaging in this age-group. We observed two potentially significant distinct patterns of cerebral involvement on MRI: (1) a central and focal pattern of involvement limited to the basal ganglia, perirolandic regions, and internal capsule; and (2) diffuse involvement of the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, basal ganglia, and variably thalami and brain stem. Patients with more diffuse findings tended to have higher serum glutamine peaks and worse neurological outcomes, while those with central involvement, aggressive acute management, and early liver transplantation tended to have better outcomes. We propose that MRI imaging of the brain may have prognostic value following presentation with neonatal UCDs, particularly in identifying patients at risk for poor outcome. The role and timing of follow-up neuroimaging is currently unclear. Further collaborative studies are necessary to evaluate whether patterns of MRI findings vary with specific UCD subtypes, and are predictive of clinical outcomes in neonatal UCDs. PMID:23983495

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates with urea-cycle defects.

    PubMed

    Gunz, Anna Catherine; Choong, Karen; Potter, Murray; Miller, Elka

    2013-01-01

    The urea-cycle functions to facilitate ammonia excretion, a disruption of which results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites. The neurological outcome of neonatal-onset urea-cycle defects (UCDs) is poor, and there are no good predictors of prognosis beyond ammonia levels at presentation. The role of neuroimaging in the prognosis of neonatal-onset UCDs is unclear. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of two patients with neonatal-onset UCDs (argininosuccinic aciduria and citrullinemia) at presentation and at 2-year follow-up, and present a review of the literature on neuroimaging in this age-group. We observed two potentially significant distinct patterns of cerebral involvement on MRI: (1) a central and focal pattern of involvement limited to the basal ganglia, perirolandic regions, and internal capsule; and (2) diffuse involvement of the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, basal ganglia, and variably thalami and brain stem. Patients with more diffuse findings tended to have higher serum glutamine peaks and worse neurological outcomes, while those with central involvement, aggressive acute management, and early liver transplantation tended to have better outcomes. We propose that MRI imaging of the brain may have prognostic value following presentation with neonatal UCDs, particularly in identifying patients at risk for poor outcome. The role and timing of follow-up neuroimaging is currently unclear. Further collaborative studies are necessary to evaluate whether patterns of MRI findings vary with specific UCD subtypes, and are predictive of clinical outcomes in neonatal UCDs.

  19. Evaluating the influence of residual stresses on the magnetic properties of electrical steel

    SciTech Connect

    Korzunin, G.S.; Chistyakov, V.K.

    1995-04-01

    The method described for evaluating the influence of residual stresses on the magnetic properties of coiled cold-rolled electrical steel consists in measuring the ratio of the magnetic characteristics that are and are not sensitive to the effect of residual stresses. The evaluation is made from the value of the ratio, using the correlations between its value and the magnetic characteristics studied.

  20. Impaired in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity after myocardial infarction assessed using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Michael S; Atherton, Helen J; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; West, James A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian J

    2014-11-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of heart failure. An increasing body of evidence links alterations in cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial function with the progression of heart disease. The aim of this work was to, therefore, follow the in vivo mitochondrial metabolic alterations caused by MI, thereby allowing a greater understanding of the interplay between metabolic and functional abnormalities. Using hyperpolarized carbon-13 ((13)C)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in vivo alterations in mitochondrial metabolism were assessed for 22 weeks after surgically induced MI with reperfusion in female Wister rats. One week after MI, there were no detectable alterations in in vivo cardiac mitochondrial metabolism over the range of ejection fractions observed (from 28% to 84%). At 6 weeks after MI, in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity was impaired, with decreased (13)C-label flux into citrate, glutamate, and acetylcarnitine, which correlated with the degree of cardiac dysfunction. These changes were independent of alterations in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. By 22 weeks, alterations were also seen in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, which decreased at lower ejection fractions. These results were confirmed using in vitro analysis of enzyme activities and metabolomic profiles of key intermediates. The in vivo decrease in Krebs cycle activity in the 6-week post-MI heart may represent an early maladaptive phase in the metabolic alterations after MI in which reductions in Krebs cycle activity precede a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism in heart disease are progressive and proportional to the degree of cardiac impairment. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Impaired In Vivo Mitochondrial Krebs Cycle Activity After Myocardial Infarction Assessed Using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Carolyn A.; Stuckey, Daniel J.; West, James A.; Griffin, Julian L.; Radda, George K.; Clarke, Kieran; Heather, Lisa C.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of heart failure. An increasing body of evidence links alterations in cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial function with the progression of heart disease. The aim of this work was to, therefore, follow the in vivo mitochondrial metabolic alterations caused by MI, thereby allowing a greater understanding of the interplay between metabolic and functional abnormalities. Methods and Results Using hyperpolarized carbon-13 (13C)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in vivo alterations in mitochondrial metabolism were assessed for 22 weeks after surgically induced MI with reperfusion in female Wister rats. One week after MI, there were no detectable alterations in in vivo cardiac mitochondrial metabolism over the range of ejection fractions observed (from 28% to 84%). At 6 weeks after MI, in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity was impaired, with decreased 13C-label flux into citrate, glutamate, and acetylcarnitine, which correlated with the degree of cardiac dysfunction. These changes were independent of alterations in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. By 22 weeks, alterations were also seen in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, which decreased at lower ejection fractions. These results were confirmed using in vitro analysis of enzyme activities and metabolomic profiles of key intermediates. Conclusions The in vivo decrease in Krebs cycle activity in the 6-week post-MI heart may represent an early maladaptive phase in the metabolic alterations after MI in which reductions in Krebs cycle activity precede a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism in heart disease are progressive and proportional to the degree of cardiac impairment. PMID:25201905

  2. Influence of Age, Reproductive Cycling Status, and Menstruation on the Vaginal Microbiome in Baboons (Papio anubis)

    PubMed Central

    UCHIHASHI, M.; BERGIN, I. L.; BASSIS, C. M.; HASHWAY, S. A.; CHAI, D.; BELL, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3–V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. PMID:25676781

  3. Influence of age, reproductive cycling status, and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome in baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, M; Bergin, I L; Bassis, C M; Hashway, S A; Chai, D; Bell, J D

    2015-05-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3-V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dual-tip magnetic force microscopy with suppressed influence on magnetically soft samples.

    PubMed

    Precner, Marián; Fedor, Ján; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír

    2015-02-06

    Standard magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is considered as a powerful tool used for magnetic field imaging at nanoscale. The method consists of two passes realized by the magnetic tip. Within the first one, the topography pass, the magnetic tip directly touches the magnetic sample. Such contact perturbs the magnetization of the sample explored. To avoid the sample touching the magnetic tip, we present a new approach to magnetic field scanning by segregating the topological and magnetic scans with two different tips located on a cut cantilever. The approach minimizes the disturbance of sample magnetization, which could be a major problem in conventional MFM images of soft magnetic samples. By cutting the cantilever in half using the focused ion beam technique, we create one sensor with two different tips--one tip is magnetized, and the other one is left non-magnetized. The non-magnetized tip is used for topography and the magnetized one for the magnetic field imaging. The method developed we call dual-tip magnetic force microscopy (DT-MFM). We describe in detail the dual-tip fabrication process. In the experiments, we show that the DT-MFM method reduces significantly the perturbations of the magnetic tip as compared to the standard MFM method. The present technique can be used to investigate microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic samples and is relevant in a wide range of applications, e.g., data storage and biomedicine.

  5. Regarding the influence of heating and the Soret effect on a magnetic fluid seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakov, M. S.; Nikiforov, I. V.

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a temperature gradient and the Soret effect on the distribution of particles in a magnetic fluid seal (MFS) is studied. The heating of the MFS is found to be an effective method of homogenizing the magnetic fluid in the seal; in addition, the influence of the Soret effect on this process is found to be essential.

  6. A solar-like magnetic cycle on the mature K-dwarf 61 Cygni A (HD 201091)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boro Saikia, S.; Jeffers, S. V.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.; Folsom, C. P.; Marsden, S. C.; Donati, J.-F.; Cameron, R.; Hall, J. C.; Perdelwitz, V.; Reiners, A.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The long-term monitoring of magnetic cycles in cool stars is a key diagnostic in understanding how dynamo generation and amplification of magnetic fields occur in stars similar in structure to the Sun. Aims: We investigated the temporal evolution of a possible magnetic cycle of 61 Cyg A. The magnetic cycle is determined from 61 Cyg A's large-scale field over its activity cycle using spectropolarimetric observations and compared to the solar large-scale magnetic field. Methods: We used the tomographic technique of Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) to reconstruct the large-scale magnetic geometry of 61 Cyg A over multiple observational epochs spread over a time span of nine years. We investigated the time evolution of the different components of the large-scale field and compared it with the evolution of the star's chromospheric activity by measuring the flux in three different chromospheric indicators: Ca II H&K, Hα and Ca II infrared triplet lines. We also compared our results with the star's coronal activity using XMM-Newton observations. Results: The large-scale magnetic geometry of 61 Cyg A exhibits polarity reversals in both poloidal and toroidal field components, in phase with its chromospheric activity cycle. We also detect weak solar-like differential rotation with a shear level similar to that of the Sun. During our observational time span of nine years, 61 Cyg A exhibits solar- like variations in its large-scale field geometry as it evolves from minimum activity to maximum activity and vice versa. During its activity minimum in epoch 2007.59, ZDI reconstructs a simple dipolar geometry which becomes more complex when it approaches activity maximum in epoch 2010.55. The radial field flips polarity and reverts back to a simple geometry in epoch 2013.61. The field is strongly dipolar and the evolution of the dipole component of the field is reminiscent of solar behaviour. The polarity reversal of the large-scale field indicates a magnetic cycle that is in

  7. Variation in electromagnetic parameters of the solar magnetic cycle as cause of the 22-year oscillation in global temperature and rotation rate of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Tamara; Laptukhov, Alexej

    Solar radiation is not the only heat source of the upper atmosphere. Solar energy is captured by magnetosphere and atmosphere via electromagnetic interaction of the solar wind with terrestrial field. Aim of the paper is to explain correlated 22-year variations of sunspot numbers W, global temperature Tgl and angular velocity w of the Earth derived by us on basis of observational data. First of all we analyze data of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the solar wind velocity measured at the Earth's orbit for the period of 1964-2005. Based on the data we show that heliomagnetic moment during 11-year solar activity cycle changes its direction, rotating from north pole through equators to south pole, and back. Manifestation of this magnetic solar cycle is annual variation of the electromagnetic parameters. The annual variations of values of electric field E, vector of Poyting P, IMF were obtained for different phases of the 22-yr solar cycle. We show that all the parameters are higher for odd 11-yr cycles than ones for even 11-yr cycles (11-yr cycle is determined between maxima of W). Moreover, the contrast between two cycles displays strength in summer months, when heat machine in atmosphere raised by the temperature difference between sunlit north polar cap and dark south polar cap works actively. The difference of the parameters of W1 and W2 cycles leads in the end to difference of their influence to polar magnetosphere and ionosphere. Processes in magnetosphere controlled by the solar wind causes two main phenomena in the upper polar atmosphere: particle precipitation and convection of ionospheric plasma caused by E. The particle precipitation influences on conductivities and currents. As result the Poyting flux P=[ExB] coming to polar cap leads to heating of polar ionosphere and atmosphere, temperature contrast between two caps, intensification of the inter-hemisphere heat machine in the upper atmosphere, change of angular moment of atmospheric zonal

  8. Quantifying the Amplitude, Structure and Influence of Model Error During Ocean Analysis and Forecast Cycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Pinardi and L.M. Berliner, 2011: Ocean ensemble forecasting, Part I: Mediterranean winds from a Bayesian hierarchical model . Q. J. Roy. Meteorol...Quantifying the Amplitude, Structure and Influence of Model Error during Ocean Analysis and Forecast Cycles Andrew M. Moore...Department of Ocean Sciences , 1156 High St. University of California Santa Cruz CA 95064 Phone: (831) 459-4632 fax: (831) 459-4882 email: ammoore

  9. Influence of the 11-Year Solar Cycle on Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. H.; Han, Y. B.; Yin, Z. Q.

    2009-03-01

    The monthly cosmic ray intensity (CRI) time series from Climax, Huancayo, Moscow, Kiel, and Calgary are used to investigate the presence of the 11-year periodic component with special attention paid to the solar influence on these variations. The results show obvious 11-year temporal characteristics in CRI variations. We also find a close anticorrelation between the 11-year solar cycle and CRI variations and time delays of the CRI relative to solar activity.

  10. Long periods (1 -10 mHz) geomagnetic pulsations variation with solar cycle in South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon Silva, Willian; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Guimarães Dutra, Severino Luiz; Babulal Trivedi, Nalin; Claudir da Silva, Andirlei; Souza Savian, Fernando; Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli; de Siqueira, Josemar; Espindola Antunes, Cassio

    The occurrence and intensity of the geomagnetic pulsations Pc-5 (2-7 mHz) and its relationship with the solar cycle in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly -SAMA is presented. The study of geomagnetic pulsations is important to help the understanding of the physical processes that occurs in the magnetosphere region and help to predict geomagnetic storms. The fluxgate mag-netometers H, D and Z, three axis geomagnetic field data from the Southern Space Observatory -SSO/CRS/INPE -MCT, São Martinho da Serra (29.42° S, 53.87° W, 480m a.s.l.), RS, Brasil, a were analyzed and correlated with the solar wind parameters (speed, density and temperature) from the ACE and SOHO satellites. A digital filtering to enhance the 2-7 mHz geomagnetic pulsations was used. Five quiet days and five perturbed days in the solar minimum and in the solar maximum were selected for this analysis. The days were chosen based on the IAGA definition and on the Bartels Musical Diagrams (Kp index) for 2001 (solar maximum) and 2008 (solar minimum). The biggest Pc-5 amplitude averages differences between the H-component is 78,35 nT for the perturbed days and 1,60nT for the quiet days during the solar maximum. For perturbed days the average amplitude during the solar minimum is 8,32 nT, confirming a direct solar cycle influence in the geomagnetic pulsations intensity for long periods.

  11. Influence of creep damage on the low cycle thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of two tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Doble, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests have been performed on the tantalum base alloys T-111 and ASTAR 811C with synchronized, independently programmed temperature and strain cycling. The thermal-mechanical cycles applied fell into three basic categories: these were isothermal cycling, in-phase thermal cycling, and out-of-phase thermal cycling. In-phase cycling was defined as tensile deformation associated with high temperature and compressive deformation with low temperature, while out-of-phase thermal cycling was defined as the reverse case. The in-phase thermal cycling had a pronounced detrimental influence on the fatigue life of both alloys, with the life reduction being greater in the solid solution strengthened T-111 alloy than in the carbide strengthened ASTAR 811C alloy. The out-of-phase tests also showed pronounced effects on the fatigue life of both alloys, although not as dramatic.

  12. HIV infection is influenced by dynamin at 3 independent points in the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anupriya; Hitchen, Tina L; Ootes, Lars; McAllery, Samantha; Wong, Andrew; Nguyen, Khanh; McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J; Turville, Stuart G

    2017-06-01

    CD4 T cells are important cellular targets for HIV-1, yet the primary site of HIV fusion remains unresolved. Candidate fusion sites are either the plasma membrane or from within endosomes. One area of investigation compounding the controversy of this field, is the role of the protein dynamin in the HIV life cycle. To understand the role of dynamin in primary CD4 T cells we combined dynamin inhibition with a series of complementary assays based on single particle tracking, HIV fusion, detection of HIV DNA products and active viral transcription. We identify 3 levels of dynamin influence on the HIV life cycle. Firstly, dynamin influences productive infection by preventing cell cycle progression. Secondly, dynamin influences endocytosis rates and increases the probability of endosomal fusion. Finally, we provide evidence in resting CD4 T cells that dynamin directly regulates the HIV fusion reaction at the plasma membrane. We confirm this latter observation using 2 divergent dynamin modulating compounds, one that enhances dynamin conformations associated with dynamin ring formation (ryngo-1-23) and the other that preferentially targets dynamin conformations that appear in helices (dyngo-4a). This in-depth understanding of dynamin's roles in HIV infection clarifies recent controversies and furthermore provides evidence for dynamin regulation specifically in the HIV fusion reaction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Influence of Freeze-Thaw Cycles on RNA Integrity of Gastrointestinal Cancer and Matched Adjacent Tissues.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Han, Haibo; Wang, Yixue; Song, Lijie; Cheng, Xiaojing; Xing, Xiaofang; Dong, Bin; Wang, Xiaohong; Chen, Meng; Zhang, Lianhai; Ji, Jiafu

    2017-06-01

    Comparative analysis of RNA expression profiles between cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues is an important part of cancer research. High-quality RNA is essential for consistent, reliable results, especially for identification of cancer biomarkers. However, the impact of freeze-thaw cycles on the quality of RNA both in gastrointestinal cancer and paired adjacent tissues is still unclear. To investigate the influence of freeze-thaw cycles on RNA integrity and overall histomorphology of gastrointestinal cancer and paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. Gastrointestinal cancer and matched adjacent noncancerous tissues were frozen and thawed twice before extracting RNA. Total RNA in each sample was extracted with TRIzol reagents and the RNA integrity was assessed by RNA integrity number (RIN) on an Agilent Bioanalyzer. Light microscopy was then used to assess tissue composition and morphology. RIN values for all samples tended to decrease in correlation with the frequency of freeze-thawing. With an RIN cutoff value of 6, RNA extracted from pancreatic cancer tissues was not qualified after the first freeze-thaw cycle. Moreover, all RNA extracted from adjacent noncancerous tissues had nonqualifying RIN scores after the first freeze-thaw cycle, except for liver tissues. Microscopically, all samples displayed qualified tissue morphology regardless of freeze-thaw cycle frequency. Freeze-thawing affects the RNA integrity, but not the tissue morphology of gastrointestinal cancer and paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. Furthermore, the RNA extracted from adjacent noncancerous tissues is more easily degraded than that in cancer tissues.

  14. Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Tuuli A; Leppämäki, Sami; Ojanen, Sanna-Maria; Haukka, Jari; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Partonen, Timo

    2006-01-19

    Daylight saving time is widely adopted. Little is known about its influence on the daily rest-activity cycles. We decided to explore the effects of transition into daylight saving time on the circadian rhythm of activity. We monitored the rest-activity cycles with the use of wrist-worn accelerometer on a sample of ten healthy adults for ten days around the transition into summer time. Identical protocols were carried out on the same individuals in two consecutive years, yielding data on 200 person-days for analysis in this study. There was no significant effect on the rest-activity cycle in the sample as a whole. Fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle was enhanced in a subgroup of persons having sleep for eight hours or less (P = 0.04) but reduced in those who preferred to sleep for more than eight hours per night (P = 0.05). The average level of motor activity was increased in persons having the morning preference for daily activity patterns (P = 0.01). Transition into daylight saving time may have a disruptive effect on the rest-activity cycle in those healthy adults who are short-sleepers or more of the evening type.

  15. Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Tuuli A; Leppämäki, Sami; Ojanen, Sanna-Maria; Haukka, Jari; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Partonen, Timo

    2006-01-01

    Background Daylight saving time is widely adopted. Little is known about its influence on the daily rest-activity cycles. We decided to explore the effects of transition into daylight saving time on the circadian rhythm of activity. Methods We monitored the rest-activity cycles with the use of wrist-worn accelerometer on a sample of ten healthy adults for ten days around the transition into summer time. Identical protocols were carried out on the same individuals in two consecutive years, yielding data on 200 person-days for analysis in this study. Results There was no significant effect on the rest-activity cycle in the sample as a whole. Fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle was enhanced in a subgroup of persons having sleep for eight hours or less (P = 0.04) but reduced in those who preferred to sleep for more than eight hours per night (P = 0.05). The average level of motor activity was increased in persons having the morning preference for daily activity patterns (P = 0.01). Conclusion Transition into daylight saving time may have a disruptive effect on the rest-activity cycle in those healthy adults who are short-sleepers or more of the evening type. PMID:16423282

  16. Stride cycle influences on goal-directed head movements made during walking.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian T; van Emmerik, Richard E A; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2006-08-01

    Horizontal head movements were studied in six subjects as they made rapid horizontal gaze adjustments while walking. The aim of the present research was to determine if gait cycle events alter the head movement response to a visual target acquisition task. Gaze shifts of approximately 40 degrees were elicited by a step change in the position of a visual target from a central location to a second location in the left or right horizontal periphery. The timing of the target position change was constrained to occur at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of the stride cycle. The trials were randomly presented as the subjects walked on a treadmill at their preferred speed (range: 1.25-1.48 m/s, mean: 1.39+/-0.09 m/s). Analyses focused on the movement onset latencies of the head and eyes and on the peak velocity and saccade amplitude of the head movement response. The head and eye movement onset latencies were not affected by either the direction of the target change or the point in the gait cycle during which the target relocation occurred. However, the presence of an interaction between the gait cycle events and the direction of the visual target shift for both the amplitude and peak velocity of the head movement response indicates that the head movement responses to visual target changes can be influenced by the phase of the gait cycle during which the target relocation takes place.

  17. Duty Cycling Influences Current Generation in Multi-Anode Environmental Microbial Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gardel, EJ; Nielsen, ME; Grisdela, PT; Girguis, PR

    2012-05-01

    Improving microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance continues to be the subject of research, yet the role of operating conditions, specifically duty cycling, on MFC performance has been modestly addressed. We present a series of studies in which we use a 15-anode environmental MFC to explore how duty cycling (variations in the time an anode is connected) influences cumulative charge, current, and microbial composition. The data reveal particular switching intervals that result in the greatest time-normalized current. When disconnection times are sufficiently short, there is a striking decrease in current due to an increase in the overall electrode reaction resistance. This was observed over a number of whole cell potentials. Based on these results, we posit that replenishment of depleted electron donors within the biofilm and surrounding diffusion layer is necessary for maximum charge transfer, and that proton flux may be not limiting in the highly buffered aqueous phases that are common among environmental MFCs. Surprisingly, microbial diversity analyses found no discernible difference in gross community composition among duty cycling treatments, suggesting that duty cycling itself has little or no effect. Such duty cycling experiments are valuable in determining which factors govern performance of bioelectrochemical systems and might also be used to optimize field-deployed systems.

  18. From START to FINISH: the influence of osmotic stress on the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Kaloriti, Despoina; Gustin, Michael C; Gow, Neil A R; Brown, Alistair J P; Grebogi, Celso; Romano, M Carmen; Thiel, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The cell cycle is a sequence of biochemical events that are controlled by complex but robust molecular machinery. This enables cells to achieve accurate self-reproduction under a broad range of different conditions. Environmental changes are transmitted by molecular signalling networks, which coordinate their action with the cell cycle. The cell cycle process and its responses to environmental stresses arise from intertwined nonlinear interactions among large numbers of simpler components. Yet, understanding of how these pieces fit together into a coherent whole requires a systems biology approach. Here, we present a novel mathematical model that describes the influence of osmotic stress on the entire cell cycle of S. cerevisiae for the first time. Our model incorporates all recently known and several proposed interactions between the osmotic stress response pathway and the cell cycle. This model unveils the mechanisms that emerge as a consequence of the interaction between the cell cycle and stress response networks. Furthermore, it characterises the role of individual components. Moreover, it predicts different phenotypical responses for cells depending on the phase of cells at the onset of the stress. The key predictions of the model are: (i) exposure of cells to osmotic stress during the late S and the early G2/M phase can induce DNA re-replication before cell division occurs, (ii) cells stressed at the late G2/M phase display accelerated exit from mitosis and arrest in the next cell cycle, (iii) osmotic stress delays the G1-to-S and G2-to-M transitions in a dose dependent manner, whereas it accelerates the M-to-G1 transition independently of the stress dose and (iv) the Hog MAPK network compensates the role of the MEN network during cell division of MEN mutant cells. These model predictions are supported by independent experiments in S. cerevisiae and, moreover, have recently been observed in other eukaryotes.

  19. An evaluation of magnetic refrigeration cycles based on how effectively the thermal properties of the refrigerant are utilized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, Duane Paul

    In an effort to show that the magnetothermal properties of a material can be varied in a manner useful for magnetic refrigeration, Gd doped EuS has been synthesized using an arc melting technique and its magnetic heat capacity measured. The heat capacity data shows little change from pure EuS, probably due to compensation of the donor electrons caused by inhomogeneous doping. Analysis of the data in terms of its refrigerant capacity and comparison to mean field calculations indicate that EuS is a more effective refrigerant in the 4-35 K region than Gd3Ga5O12 and that for applied fields below 1 Tesla the effects of domains and irreversibilities may be relatively more significant than at higher fields. Also a figure of merit has been developed to evaluate the effort required, due to the intrinsic properties of the materials, to implement a given refrigeration cycle. On the basis of this figure of merit a simple scaling argument indicates that a refrigeration cycle using active magnetic regeneration would be better than a single stage, passively regenerated cycle when the temperature span is greater than the heat source temperature. In addition, an analysis of an idealized Ericsson cycle using active magnetic regeneration is made and a technique to match the fixed temperature ends to the regenerator temperature variation is developed that shows qualitative new features not previously recognized.

  20. The influence of cycling temperature and cycling rate on the phase specific degradation of a positive electrode in lithium ion batteries: A post mortem analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darma, Mariyam Susana Dewi; Lang, Michael; Kleiner, Karin; Mereacre, Liuda; Liebau, Verena; Fauth, Francois; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The influence of cycling temperatures and cycling rates on the cycling stability of the positive electrode (cathode) of commercial batteries are investigated. The cathode is a mixture of LiMn2O4 (LMO), LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM) and LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA). It is found that increasing the cycling temperature from 25 °C to 40 °C is detrimental to the long term cycling stability of the cathode. Contrastingly, the improved cycling stability is observed for the cathodes cycled at higher charge/discharge rate (2C/3C instead of 1C/2C). The microstructure analysis by X-ray powder diffraction reveals that a significant capacity fading and an increased overvoltage is observed for NCM and NCA in all the fatigued cathodes. After high number of cycling (above 1500 cycles), NCM becomes partially inactive. In contrast to NCM and NCA, LMO shows a good cycling stability at 25 °C. A pronounced degradation of LMO is only observed for the fatigued cathodes cycled at 40 °C. The huge capacity losses of NCM and NCA are most likely because the blended cathodes were cycled up to 4.12 V vs. the graphite anode during the cycle-life test (corresponds to 4.16 V vs. Li+/Li); which is beyond the stability limit of the layered oxides below 4.05 V vs. Li+/Li.

  1. Influence of segmentation of ring-shaped NdFeB magnets with parallel magnetization on cylindrical actuators.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Goltz, Evandro Claiton; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira

    2014-07-21

    This work analyses the effects of segmentation followed by parallel magnetization of ring-shaped NdFeB permanent magnets used in slotless cylindrical linear actuators. The main purpose of the work is to evaluate the effects of that segmentation on the performance of the actuator and to present a general overview of the influence of parallel magnetization by varying the number of segments and comparing the results with ideal radially magnetized rings. The analysis is first performed by modelling mathematically the radial and circumferential components of magnetization for both radial and parallel magnetizations, followed by an analysis carried out by means of the 3D finite element method. Results obtained from the models are validated by measuring radial and tangential components of magnetic flux distribution in the air gap on a prototype which employs magnet rings with eight segments each with parallel magnetization. The axial force produced by the actuator was also measured and compared with the results obtained from numerical models. Although this analysis focused on a specific topology of cylindrical actuator, the observed effects on the topology could be extended to others in which surface-mounted permanent magnets are employed, including rotating electrical machines.

  2. Influence of Segmentation of Ring-Shaped NdFeB Magnets with Parallel Magnetization on Cylindrical Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Goltz, Evandro Claiton; Filho, Aly Ferreira Flores

    2014-01-01

    This work analyses the effects of segmentation followed by parallel magnetization of ring-shaped NdFeB permanent magnets used in slotless cylindrical linear actuators. The main purpose of the work is to evaluate the effects of that segmentation on the performance of the actuator and to present a general overview of the influence of parallel magnetization by varying the number of segments and comparing the results with ideal radially magnetized rings. The analysis is first performed by modelling mathematically the radial and circumferential components of magnetization for both radial and parallel magnetizations, followed by an analysis carried out by means of the 3D finite element method. Results obtained from the models are validated by measuring radial and tangential components of magnetic flux distribution in the air gap on a prototype which employs magnet rings with eight segments each with parallel magnetization. The axial force produced by the actuator was also measured and compared with the results obtained from numerical models. Although this analysis focused on a specific topology of cylindrical actuator, the observed effects on the topology could be extended to others in which surface-mounted permanent magnets are employed, including rotating electrical machines. PMID:25051032

  3. Influence of the menstrual cycle on flight simulator performance after alcohol ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mumenthaler, M S; O'Hara, R; Taylor, J L; Friedman, L; Yesavage, J A

    2001-07-01

    Previous studies investigating the influence of the menstrual cycle on cognitive functioning of women after alcohol ingestion have obtained inconsistent results. The present study tested the hypothesis that flight simulator performance during acute alcohol intoxication and 8 hours after drinking differs between the menstrual and the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. White female pilots (N = 24) were tested during the menstrual and the luteal phases of their menstrual cycles. On each test day they performed a baseline simulator flight, consumed 0.67 g/kg ethanol, and performed an acute-intoxication and an 8-hour-carryover simulator flight. Subjects reached highly significant increases in estradiol (E2) as well as progesterone (P) levels during the luteal test day. Yet, there were no significant differences in overall flight performance after alcohol ingestion between the menstrual and luteal phases during acute intoxication or at 8-hour carryover. We found no correlations between E, or P levels and overall flight performance. However, there was a statistically significant Phase x Order interaction: Pilots who started the experiment with their menstrual day were less susceptible to the effects of alcohol during the second test day than were pilots who started with their luteal day. The tested menstrual cycle phases and varying E2 and P levels did not significantly influence postdrink flight performance. Because the present study included a comparatively large sample size and because it involved complex "real world" tasks (piloting an aircraft), we believe that the present findings are important. We hope that our failure to detect menstrual cycle effects will encourage researchers to include women in their investigations of alcohol effects and human performance.

  4. The Fraction of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections That Are Magnetic Clouds: Evidence for a Solar Cycle Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    "Magnetic clouds" (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized by enhanced magnetic fields with an organized rotation in direction, and low plasma beta. Though intensely studied, MCs only constitute a fraction of all the ICMEs that are detected in the solar wind. A comprehensive survey of ICMEs in the near- Earth solar wind during the ascending, maximum and early declining phases of solar cycle 23 in 1996 - 2003 shows that the MC fraction varies with the phase of the solar cycle, from approximately 100% (though with low statistics) at solar minimum to approximately 15% at solar maximum. A similar trend is evident in near-Earth observations during solar cycles 20 - 21, while Helios 1/2 spacecraft observations at 0.3 - 1.0 AU show a weaker trend and larger MC fraction.

  5. Influence of the type of working fluid in the lower cycle and superheated steam parameters in the upper cycle on effectiveness of operation of binary power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, Aleksander A.; Wiśniewski, Sławomir

    2015-03-01

    In the paper presented have been the results of the analysis of effectiveness of operation of binary power plant consisting of combined two Clausius-Rankine cycles, namely the binary cycle with water as a working fluid in the upper cycle and organic substance as a working fluid in the lower cycle, as well as a single fluid component power plant operating also in line with the C-R cycle for superheated steam, with water as a working fluid. The influence of the parameters of superheated steam in the upper cycle has been assessed as well as the type of working fluid in the lower cycle. The results of calculations have been referred to the single-cycle classical steam power plant operating at the same parameters of superheated steam and the same mass flow rate of water circulating in both cycles. On the basis of accomplished analysis it has been shown that the binary power plant shows a greater power with respect to the reference power plant.

  6. Detection of Polonium-210 on Spirit Dust Magnets and Implications for the Global Martian Dust Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, R.; Meslin, P.; Sabroux, J.; Madsen, M. B.; Pineau, J.; Richon, P.

    2013-12-01

    The radioactivity of airborne aerosols, which originates from the attachment of radionuclides produced by radon disintegration, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) or anthropogenic activities, especially fallouts from nuclear weapons testing, can be used to measure the residence time of these aerosols in the atmosphere and their deposition rate. It is also used to characterize soils erosion rates (Matissof et al., 2002) or to investigate the origin of desert rock varnish (Hodge et al., 2005), to name only a few terrestrial applications. A translation of these nuclear methods to the Martian atmosphere, which is characterized by a very active dust cycle, is tempting, and has the potential to offer a unique insight into the present-day recycling of the Martian surface. This approach is made possible by two facts: 1) the presence of radon in the Martian atmosphere, which produces long-lived radioactive decay products, in particular polonium-210, and whose abundance can be indirectly inferred by gamma ray spectrometry from orbit using Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) (Meslin et al., 2012); 2) the presence at the surface of Mars of two Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometers (APXS), onboard Opportunity and Spirit Mars Exploration Rovers, whose energy range (in the alpha mode) very fortuitously happens to include the energy of alpha particles emitted by the decay of polonium-210. The long half-life of this radionuclide is such that it is almost entirely attached to the particles that have been in suspension in the atmosphere, especially those characterized by a large specific surface area or by a long atmospheric residence time. It can therefore be used as a tracer of the dust cycle. An analysis of the alpha spectra acquired on the dust Capture and Filter magnets of the Spirit rover confirms results obtained by Meslin et al. (2006) that the Martian dust is radioactive w/r to polonium-210, thereby extending Opportunity's result to a global scale. This result enables us to

  7. The Influence of Free Space Environment in the Mission Life Cycle: Material Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; de Groh, Kim K.

    2014-01-01

    The natural space environment has a great influence on the ability of space systems to perform according to mission design specification. Understanding the natural space environment and its influence on space system performance is critical to the concept formulation, design, development, and operation of space systems. Compatibility with the natural space environment is a primary factor in determining the functional lifetime of the space system. Space systems being designed and developed today are growing in complexity. In many instances, the increased complexity also increases its sensitivity to space environmental effects. Sensitivities to the natural space environment can be tempered through appropriate design measures, material selection, ground processing, mitigation strategies, and/or the acceptance of known risks. The design engineer must understand the effects of the natural space environment on the space system and its components. This paper will discuss the influence of the natural space environment in the mission life cycle with a specific focus on the role of material selection.

  8. Solving the influence maximization problem reveals regulatory organization of the yeast cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, David L; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-06-01

    The Influence Maximization Problem (IMP) aims to discover the set of nodes with the greatest influence on network dynamics. The problem has previously been applied in epidemiology and social network analysis. Here, we demonstrate the application to cell cycle regulatory network analysis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fundamentally, gene regulation is linked to the flow of information. Therefore, our implementation of the IMP was framed as an information theoretic problem using network diffusion. Utilizing more than 26,000 regulatory edges from YeastMine, gene expression dynamics were encoded as edge weights using time lagged transfer entropy, a method for quantifying information transfer between variables. By picking a set of source nodes, a diffusion process covers a portion of the network. The size of the network cover relates to the influence of the source nodes. The set of nodes that maximizes influence is the solution to the IMP. By solving the IMP over different numbers of source nodes, an influence ranking on genes was produced. The influence ranking was compared to other metrics of network centrality. Although the top genes from each centrality ranking contained well-known cell cycle regulators, there was little agreement and no clear winner. However, it was found that influential genes tend to directly regulate or sit upstream of genes ranked by other centrality measures. The influential nodes act as critical sources of information flow, potentially having a large impact on the state of the network. Biological events that affect influential nodes and thereby affect information flow could have a strong effect on network dynamics, potentially leading to disease. Code and data can be found at: https://github.com/gibbsdavidl/miergolf.

  9. Solving the influence maximization problem reveals regulatory organization of the yeast cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    The Influence Maximization Problem (IMP) aims to discover the set of nodes with the greatest influence on network dynamics. The problem has previously been applied in epidemiology and social network analysis. Here, we demonstrate the application to cell cycle regulatory network analysis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fundamentally, gene regulation is linked to the flow of information. Therefore, our implementation of the IMP was framed as an information theoretic problem using network diffusion. Utilizing more than 26,000 regulatory edges from YeastMine, gene expression dynamics were encoded as edge weights using time lagged transfer entropy, a method for quantifying information transfer between variables. By picking a set of source nodes, a diffusion process covers a portion of the network. The size of the network cover relates to the influence of the source nodes. The set of nodes that maximizes influence is the solution to the IMP. By solving the IMP over different numbers of source nodes, an influence ranking on genes was produced. The influence ranking was compared to other metrics of network centrality. Although the top genes from each centrality ranking contained well-known cell cycle regulators, there was little agreement and no clear winner. However, it was found that influential genes tend to directly regulate or sit upstream of genes ranked by other centrality measures. The influential nodes act as critical sources of information flow, potentially having a large impact on the state of the network. Biological events that affect influential nodes and thereby affect information flow could have a strong effect on network dynamics, potentially leading to disease. Code and data can be found at: https://github.com/gibbsdavidl/miergolf. PMID:28628618

  10. Influence of process parameters on the weld lines formation in rapid heat cycle molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorotto, Marco; Lucchetta, Giovanni

    2011-05-01

    The insufficient entanglement of the molecular chains at the v-notch of a weld line impairs the mechanical strength and the surface quality of a plastic product. The rapid heat cycle molding technology (RHCM) has been recently used to enhance surface appearance of the parts, by thermally cycling the mold surface temperature. The mold temperature is the key of RHCM technology because it significantly affects productivity, energy efficiency and the quality of the final polymer part. In this work the influence of mold temperature on the weld lines depth and roughness were studied. Three different materials were tested. To investigate the influence of process parameters, a special mold insert was designed and manufactured. Weld lines geometry and roughness were quantitatively characterized by means of a profilometer. Experimental results show that is possible to increase the temperature to 10° C lower than the glass transition to obtain a high-gloss parts without weld lines with a significant reduction of cycle time and energy consumption.

  11. The influence of carbon and oxygen on the magnetic characteristics of press-less sintered NdFeB magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, M.; Abrahamsen, A. B.; Bahl, C. R. H.; Veluri, B.; Søegaard, A. I.; Bøjsøe, P.; Millot, S.

    2017-01-01

    The Pressless Process (PLP) was adopted to manufacture NdFeB sintered magnets, where the investigations on carbon and oxygen residues from heptane milling liquid media and graphite crucibles used for sintering were quantified to evaluate the influence on the magnetic characteristics. The carbon and oxygen content in the magnets produced from wet ball milling of strip cast flakes was found to be of the order 104 ppm and 4·104 ppm respectively, which resulted in soft magnetic behavior. However using jet milling the carbon and oxygen concentration were decreased by an order of magnitude resulting in coercivity of up to 829 kA/m. Thus the influence of the carbon from the graphite crucibles is small.

  12. Bottom-up processes influence the demography and life-cycle phenology of Hawaiian bird communities.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jared D; Ralph, C John; Wiegardt, Andrew

    2017-08-05

    Changes in climate can indirectly regulate populations at higher trophic levels by influencing the availability of food resources in the lower reaches of the food web. As such, species that rely on fruit and nectar food resources may be particularly sensitive to these bottom-up perturbations due to the strength of their trophic linkages with climatically-influenced plants. To measure the influence of climatically-mediated, bottom-up processes, we used climate, bird capture, bird count, and plant phenology data from the Big Island of Hawaii to construct a series of structural equation and abundance models. Our results suggest that fruit and nectar-eating birds arrange life cycle events around climatically-influenced food resources, while some of these same food resources also influence seasonal patterns of abundance. This trend was particularly strong for two native nectarivores, 'I'iwi and 'Apapane, where we found that the dissimilar timing of molting and breeding activity was associated with peak abundance of the two most common flowers at our study site which, in turn, were each driven by dissimilar climatic cues. Given the rapidly changing Hawaiian climate, we suggest that determining behavioral plasticity, or evolutionary capacity of birds to mitigate changes in climatically-influenced food resources, should be recognized as a future research priority. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Mammal diversity influences the carbon cycle through trophic interactions in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Mar; Silvius, Kirsten M; Overman, Han; Oliveira, Luiz F B; Rabb, Ted K; Fragoso, José M V

    2017-10-09

    Biodiversity affects many ecosystem functions and services, including carbon cycling and retention. While it is known that the efficiency of carbon capture and biomass production by ecological communities increases with species diversity, the role of vertebrate animals in the carbon cycle remains undocumented. Here, we use an extensive dataset collected in a high-diversity Amazonian system to parse out the relationship between animal and plant species richness, feeding interactions, tree biomass and carbon concentrations in soil. Mammal and tree species richness is positively related to tree biomass and carbon concentration in soil-and the relationship is mediated by organic remains produced by vertebrate feeding events. Our research advances knowledge of the links between biodiversity and carbon cycling and storage, supporting the view that whole community complexity-including vertebrate richness and trophic interactions-drives ecosystem function in tropical systems. Securing animal and plant diversity while protecting landscape integrity will contribute to soil nutrient content and carbon retention in the biosphere.A high-diversity Amazonian system reveals the influence of mammalian diversity on the carbon cycle, mediated through vertebrate feeding events.

  14. Influence of magnetic field on Cr(VI) adsorption capability of given anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y B; Duan, X J; Yan, J N; Sun, S Y

    2010-02-01

    To provide beneficial guide for the application of the magnetic field in the bio-treatment of the Cr(VI)-contained wastewater, sludge samples from the control bio-system A (absent of magnetic field) and the contrast bio-system B (present of magnetic field) were used to adsorb the synthetic wastewater with 100 mg l(-1) Cr(VI). Influences of two adsorption modes, single adsorption and once continuous adsorption, on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacities of both sludge samples were compared. And the influence of regeneration on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacities were also studied. The results of adsorption experiments showed that the Cr(VI) adsorption capacities of the first single adsorption for sludge sample A and B were pretty nearly, which were 9.79 and 9.93 mg, respectively. And after 5 single adsorption periods, the total Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and efficiency of the sample B were 25.88 and 55.66 mg Cr(VI) g(-1)VSS, while those of the control were 14.95 and 33.98 mg Cr(VI) g(-1)VSS, respectively. For the sludge sample A and B after a single adsorption, both functions of regeneration were remarkable. But after 13 cycles of the single adsorption-regeneration, the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and efficiency of the sample B were 110.15 and 189.91 mg Cr(VI) g(-1)VSS, while those of the control were 70.89 and 140.38 mg Cr(VI) g(-1)VSS, respectively. Though the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of a once continuous adsorption period was more than that of a single adsorption period obviously, the Cr(VI) removal rates of the sludge sample A and B in the third period of once continuous adsorption-regeneration were only 8.12 and 33.51%, respectively. It was concluded that the weak magnetic field did improve the Cr(VI) bio-removal efficiency and the sludge stability, the batch treatment was an ideal operation mode for the bio-treatment of the Cr(VI)-contained wastewater, as compared with the continuous operation mode, but regeneration and enough sludge content were two necessary

  15. Observation of the limit cycle in asymmetric plasma divided by a magnetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, Kazuo; Naitou, Hiroshi; Tauchi, Yasushi; Fukumasa, Osamu

    2001-01-01

    An asymmetric plasma divided by a magnetic filter is numerically simulated by the one-dimensional particle-in-cell code VSIM1D [Koga et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 68, 1578 (1999)]. Depending on the asymmetry, the system behavior is static or dynamic. In the static state, the potentials of the main plasma and the subplasma are given by the sheath potentials, φM˜3TMe/e and φS˜3TSe/e, respectively, with e being an electron charge and TMe and TSe being electron temperatures (TMe>TSe). In the dynamic state, while φM˜3TMe/e, φS oscillates periodically between φS,min˜3TSe/e and φS,max˜3TMe/e. The ions accelerated by the time varying potential gap get into the subplasma and excite the laminar shock waves. The period of the limit cycle is determined by the transit time of the shock wave structure.

  16. CORONAL RAIN IN MAGNETIC ARCADES: REBOUND SHOCKS, LIMIT CYCLES, AND SHEAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Doorsselaere, T. Van

    2015-07-10

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer (>6 hr) time span. We quantify how blob-like condensations forming in situ grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence–corona transition-region-like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy, and temperature while blobs descend, impact, and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a result, there are plenty of shear flows generated with relative velocity difference around 80 km s{sup −1} in our simulations. These shear flows are siphon flows set up by multiple blob dynamics and they in turn affect the deformation of the falling blobs. In particular, we show how shear flows can break apart blobs into smaller fragments, within minutes.

  17. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on apoptosis and cell cycle induced by wogonin in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Baoan; Xia, Guohua; Wang, Shuai; Cheng, Jian; Shao, Zeye; Gao, Chong; Bao, Wen; Tian, Liang; Ren, Yanyan; Xu, Peipei; Cai, Xiaohui; Liu, Ran; Wang, Xuemei

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine is gradually becoming a new source of anticancer drugs. One such example is wogonin, which is cytotoxic to various cancer cell lines in vitro. However, due to its low water solubility, wogonin is restricted to clinical administration. Recently, the application of drug-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to increase water solubility of the drug and to enhance its chemotherapeutic efficiency has attracted much attention. In this study, wogonin was conjugated with the drug delivery system of MNPs by mechanical absorption polymerization to fabricate wogonin-loaded MNPs. It was demonstrated that MNPs could strengthen wogonin-induced cell inhibition, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in Raji cells by methylthiazol tetrazolium assay, flow cytometer assay, and nuclear 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of these phenomena were explored by western blot, in which the protein levels of caspase 8 and caspase 3 were increased significantly while those of survivin and cyclin E were decreased significantly in wogonin-MNPs group. These findings suggest that the combination of wogonin and MNPs provides a promising strategy for lymphoma therapy.

  18. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Meier, R; Rachocki, A; Korpała, A; Singh, R K; Rössler, E A

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by (19)F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the (1)H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the (19)F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  19. Environmental cycling of cellulosic thermal insulation and its influence on fire performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, J. R.

    1984-08-01

    A study was conducted on climatological data for eleven cities located throughout the United States. Findings from this environmental study were used to develop conditioning cycles for a research project on the influence of environments on the fire performance of loose-fill cellulosic thermal insulation. Six cellulosic insulation materials with different compositions of fire retardant chemicals at an add-on level of 25% by weight were specially manufactured for this study. These materials were tested for fire performance using the smoldering combustion test and the attic flooring radiant panel test to establish a baseline. After the materials were exposed to the various environmental cycles, they were tested for fire performance. Results from these tests show that environmental exposure can have a significant effect on the fire performance of cellulosic insulation materials and indicates that long term fire protection provided by fire retardant compounds may be limited.

  20. Environmental cycling of cellulosic thermal insulation and its influence on fire performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.R.

    1984-08-01

    A study was conducted on climatological data for eleven cities located throughout the United States. Findings from this environmental study were used to develop conditioning cycles for a research project on the influence of environments on the fire performance of loose-fill cellulosic thermal insulation. Six cellulosic insulation materials with different compositions of fire retardant chemicals at an add-on level of 25% by weight were specially manufactured for this study. These materials were tested for fire performance using the smoldering combustion test and the attic flooring radiant panel test to establish a baseline. After the materials were exposed to the various environmental cycles, they were tested for fire performance. Results from these tests show that environmental exposure can have a significant effect on the fire performance of cellulosic insulation materials and indicates that long term fire protection provided by fire retardant compounds may be limited.

  1. Influences of menstrual cycle position and sex hormone levels on spontaneous intrusive recollections following emotional stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Nikole K.; Kamat, Rujvi; Cahill, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous intrusive recollections (SIRs) are known to follow emotional events in clinical and nonclinical populations. Previous work in our lab has found that women report more SIRs than men after exposure to emotional films, and that this effect is driven entirely by women in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. To replicate and extend this finding, participants viewed emotional films, provided saliva samples for sex hormone concentration analysis, and estimated SIR frequency following film viewing. Women in the luteal phase reported significantly more SIRs than did women in the follicular phase, and SIR frequency significantly correlated with salivary progesterone levels. The results are consistent with an emerging pattern in the literature suggesting that menstrual cycle position of female participants can potently influence findings in numerous cognitive domains. The potential implications of these results for disorders characterized by intrusions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, are also discussed. PMID:21353599

  2. Influence of Strongly Magnetized Plasma on Photon Splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Rumyantsev, D.A.; Chistyakov, M.V.

    2005-10-01

    The photon splitting {gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in a strongly magnetized medium of arbitrary temperature and chemical potential is considered. In comparison with the case of a pure magnetic field, a new photon splitting channel is shown to be possible below the electron-positron pair production threshold. The partial splitting amplitudes and probabilities are calculated by taking into account the photon dispersion in a strong magnetic field and a charge-symmetric plasma. An enhancement of the photon splitting probability compared to the case of a magnetic field without plasma has been found to be possible under certain conditions.

  3. Crossing and anti-crossing effects of polaritons in a magnetic-semiconductor superlattice influenced by an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuz, Vladimir R.; Fesenko, Volodymyr I.; Fedorin, Illia V.; Sun, Hong-Bo; Shulga, Valeriy M.

    2017-03-01

    Crossing and anti-crossing effects in dispersion characteristics of both bulk and surface polaritons in a magnetic-semiconductor superlattice influenced by an external static magnetic field being in the Faraday geometry are discussed. The bulk polaritons are classified as eigenwaves with right-handed and left-handed elliptically polarized states, whereas the surface polaritons are considered as hybrid modes having a predominant effect of either magnetic or semiconductor subsystem, and distinctions in dispersion characteristics of such polaritons are revealed involving the concept of critical points.

  4. Influence of sex, estrous cycle and estrogen on intracranial dural mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Tanner; Levy, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Background The frequency of migraine headaches is higher in women than in men and in susceptible women attacks are related to changes in ovarian hormone levels. Intracranial mast cells (MCs) are likely to play a role in migraine headache genesis, and changes in the dural MC population might influence headache susceptibility. The present study thus tested the hypothesis that sex and ovarian hormones influence the density and phenotypic makeup of dural MCs. Methods Histochemistry combined with quantitative analyses was employed to investigate sex differences, estrous cycle and ovarian hormone influences on dural MCs density, phenotype and degranulation level in males and females rats. Results Our data show that in female rats, dural MC density fluctuates during the estrous cycle and is overall higher than in males. In ovariectomized rats, estradiol, but not progesterone, promoted an increase in dural MCs density. This effect was abolished by a splenectomy, suggesting estrogen-related recruitment of MCs from the spleen. Finally, our data suggest that the phenotypic make up of dural MCs, which represents the level of cellular maturity, is also governed by changes in estrogen levels. Conclusions Given the potential role of dural MCs in triggering headache, our data suggest that estrogen-related modulation of dural MC density and phenotypic makeup could play a role in mediating the higher frequency and severity of headaches, such as migraine, in women. PMID:22833613

  5. The influence of sea ice albedo on the global hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, A. C.; Eisenman, I.; Bordoni, S.

    2013-12-01

    The idea that Arctic sea ice retreat might influence precipitation outside the polar region has garnered considerable interest in recent years. As sea ice recedes, it alters the climate system due to factors including a change in surface albedo, which has been suggested to affect the hydrological cycle in the midlatitudes and tropics. Here we examine how sea ice influences the response of the global hydrological cycle to climate change in the broader context of climates ranging from an ice-covered earth to an ice-free earth. We use an idealized general circulation model (GCM) with and without an ice-albedo feedback, i.e., with either a constant surface albedo or a temperature-dependent surface albedo indicating sea ice or ice-free ocean. This work builds on the results of O'Gorman & Schneider (2008), who simulated the hydrological cycle in a wide range of climates using an idealized GCM without an ice-albedo feedback and found that the amount of absorbed shortwave radiation plays a key role in regulating how much global-mean precipitation is possible. Intriguingly, we find that the inclusion of the ice-albedo feedback causes an increase in global-mean precipitation despite a decrease in absorbed shortwave radiation. The atmospheric circulation is also more vigorous in the presence of the ice-albedo feedback, with a higher eddy kinetic energy and a stronger Hadley circulation. Both results are consistent with an increased meridional temperature gradient due to less absorbed solar radiation in the high latitudes. Large-scale condensation, rather than convection, is the main contributor to the changes in the hydrological cycle caused by the ice-albedo feedback, especially in the midlatitude storm tracks, where eddies tend to be more energetic in the presence of a steeper meridional temperature gradient. The results are interpreted using energy and angular momentum budget constraints and additional simulations with varied parameter values.

  6. Influence of an electric field on the ferromagnetic resonance in a plane-layered magnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karashtin, E. A.; Fraerman, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of an electric field on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in a multilayer magnetic system consisting of two magnetic layers separated by a thin nonmagnetic interlayer has been investigated. It has been shown that, upon the excitation of magnetization oscillations by a microwave magnetic field, the eigenfrequencies of the ferromagnetic resonance depend on the stationary electric field applied in the plane of the layers. It has also been demonstrated that, in this system, high-frequency magnetization oscillations can be excited by an electric microwave field. The results of the investigation of the polarization properties of the excitation mechanism indicate that this effect can be observed experimentally.

  7. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Miedzik, Jan; Daniłko, Dariusz; Barral, Serge

    2015-04-15

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. IV. SOLAR CYCLE MODEL BASED ON ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Suess, S. T.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-07-20

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90 Degree-Sign , separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)-the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.

  9. Microstructural Influences on Very High Cycle Fatigue Crack Initiation in Ti-6246 (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    surface (in degrees). Facet # 1 2 3 4 5a 5b 6 7 8 9 Angle 46 45 39 19 26 35 33 31 32 21 Table II. Orientation of facets (in degrees). Facet # 1* 2 3 4 ...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) April 2008 Journal Article Preprint 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE MICROSTRUCTURAL INFLUENCES ON VERY HIGH CYCLE...FATIGUE CRACK INITIATION IN Ti-6246 (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6 . AUTHOR(S

  10. [Influence of pulsating magnetic field used in magnet therapy and magnet stimulation on cortisol secretion in human].

    PubMed

    Woldańska-Okońska, Maria; Czernicki, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The aim of our study was to test the influence of magnetic fields during magnetotherapy and magnetostimulation over a longer period of time (like in physiotherapy) on cortisol secretion in humans. The study population was divided into two groups: magnetotherapy group (16 men) and magnetostimulation group (10 men). Magnetotherapy in the form of magnetic field induction (2.9 microT; frequency--40 Hz; square wave; bipolar; Magnetronic MF--10 apparatus) was applied for 20 min to the lumbar area in patients with chronic low back pain. Magnetostimulation (Viofor JPS system; M2P2 program; induction--25-80 microT; frequency--200 Hz, complex saw-like shape with a plateau halfway the height of the wave; bipolar) was applied every day for 12 min in patients with the same health problem. In both groups, the procedures were repeated 15 times (about 10:00 a.m.) with weekend breaks. Serum samples were collected at 6:00, 12:00, 16:00 and 24:00 and estimated by the micromethod of chemiluminescence (DPC Poland; Cat. No. LKC01). The circadian profile of cortisol was determined prior to the application, a day and a month after application. The data were analyzed statistically, using paired and unpaired Student's test. Magnetotherapy affects the cortisol secretion in the circadian profile by decreasing its level at 16:00 a day after 15 applications, whereas magnetostimulation by increasing its level at 12:00 a month after 15 applications, which may suggest its long-term effect on hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The comparison of the results indicated that a day after magnetotherapy and magnetostimulation, the circadian curves of cortisol secretion differed significantly by about 100%. All hormone oscillations did not exceed the physiological norms of the circadian cortisol level, not reaching the level so high as in an intense stress. This suggests rather their controlling effect on the cortisol level than their significant stressogenic nature.

  11. Seasonal variation in assisted conception cycles and the influence of photoperiodism on outcome in in vitro fertilization cycles.

    PubMed

    Wood, Simon; Quinn, Alison; Troupe, Stephen; Kingsland, Charles; Lewis-Jones, Iwan

    2006-12-01

    The effect of seasonality and daylight length on mammalian reproduction leading to spring births has been well established, and is known as photoperiodism. In assisted reproduction there is much greater uncertainty as to the effect of seasonality. This was a 4-year retrospective analysis of 2709 standardised cycles of IVF/ICSI. Data was analysed with regard to the 1642 cycles occurring during the months of extended daylight (Apr-Sept) and those 1067 cycles during winter months of restricted light length (Oct-Mar). The results showed that there was significant improvement in assisted conception outcomes in cycles performed in summer (lighter) months with more efficient ovarian stimulation 766iu v880iu/per oocyte retrieved (p=0.006). There was similarly a significantly improved implantation rate per embryo transferred 11.42% vs 9.35% (p=0.011) and greater clinical pregnancy rate 20% vs 15% (p=0.0033) during summer cycles. This study appears to demonstrate a significant benefit of increased daylight length on outcomes of IVF/ICSI cycles. Whilst the exact mechanism of this is unclear, it would seem probable that melatonin may have actions at multiple sites and on multiple levels of the reproductive tract, and may exert a more profound effect on outcomes of assisted conception cycles than has been previously considered.

  12. BLOOD PRESSURE, HEART RATE AND MELATONIN CYCLES SYNCHRONIZATION WITH THE SEASON, EARTH MAGNETISM AND SOLAR FLARES

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.; Sothern, R.B.; Hillman, D.C.; Siegelová, J.

    2010-01-01

    the other aspect of RBS′ physical environment, namely the seasons (at ~1.0 year), earth magnetism (at ~0.5 year) and/or solar flares (at ~0.42 year). Cosmic-biotic transfer of information, albeit hardly of energy (the biospheric amplitudes are very small) may be mediated in this set of frequency windows. As found earlier, RBS′ circulation is also frequency-trapped environmentally in multidecadal windows, HR being locked into the transtridecadal Brückner, or rather Brückner-Egeson-Lockyer, BEL sunspot and terrestrial weather cycle, while his BP follows Hale’s didecadal cycle in the changing polarity of sunspots. The ~0.41-year HR cycle may be associated with changes in solar flares, the cis-half-year amplitude of HR showing a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.79 with the total solar flare index (from both solar hemispheres) at a lag of ~3.2 years. The superposed time courses of these two variables indicate the presence of a shared Horrebow-Arago-Schwabe sunspot cycle of ~11 years, the cis-half-year in HR being more prominent after the total solar flare index reaches its ~11-year peak. Differences in the time-varying behavior of BP vs. HR are also described. PMID:21566725

  13. BLOOD PRESSURE, HEART RATE AND MELATONIN CYCLES SYNCHRONIZATION WITH THE SEASON, EARTH MAGNETISM AND SOLAR FLARES.

    PubMed

    Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F; Sothern, R B; Hillman, D C; Siegelová, J

    2010-01-01

    other aspect of RBS' physical environment, namely the seasons (at ~1.0 year), earth magnetism (at ~0.5 year) and/or solar flares (at ~0.42 year). Cosmic-biotic transfer of information, albeit hardly of energy (the biospheric amplitudes are very small) may be mediated in this set of frequency windows. As found earlier, RBS' circulation is also frequency-trapped environmentally in multidecadal windows, HR being locked into the transtridecadal Brückner, or rather Brückner-Egeson-Lockyer, BEL sunspot and terrestrial weather cycle, while his BP follows Hale's didecadal cycle in the changing polarity of sunspots.The ~0.41-year HR cycle may be associated with changes in solar flares, the cis-half-year amplitude of HR showing a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.79 with the total solar flare index (from both solar hemispheres) at a lag of ~3.2 years. The superposed time courses of these two variables indicate the presence of a shared Horrebow-Arago-Schwabe sunspot cycle of ~11 years, the cis-half-year in HR being more prominent after the total solar flare index reaches its ~11-year peak. Differences in the time-varying behavior of BP vs. HR are also described.

  14. Change of magnetic properties of nanocrystalline alloys under influence of external factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, Jozef; Holková, Dominika; Dekan, Julius; Novák, Patrik

    2016-10-01

    Nanocrystalline (Fe3Ni1)81Nb7B12 alloys were irradiated using different types of radiation and subsequently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. External magnetic field of 0.5 T, electron-beam irradiation up to 4 MGy, neutron irradiation up to 1017 neutrons/cm2 and irradiation with Cu ions were applied on the samples. All types of external factors had an influence on the magnetic microstructure manifested as a change in the direction of the net magnetic moment, intensity of the internal magnetic field and volumetric fraction of the constituent phases. The direction of the net magnetic moment was the most sensitive parameter. Changes of the microscopic magnetic parameters were compared after different external influence and results of nanocrystalline samples were compared with their amorphous precursors.

  15. Low Reynolds number flow's heat transfer influenced by strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleskacz, L.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.

    2016-09-01

    For the last 20 years research concerning the strong magnetic field influence on the weakly magnetic substances has been dynamically developing. The published papers refer mainly to natural convection problems connected with the impact of strong magnetic field. This paper follows previous Authors’ approach to forced convection modification by the additional magnetic force. Presently, attention was paid to the heat transfer processes and their quality assessment done in the basis of Nusselt number for low Reynolds number flow. The analysis was done for the geometry from Graetz-Brinkman problem with the magnetic coil located at the position of adiabatic-thermal boundary condition change. The numerical analysis was performed with Ansys software and application of the user-defined functions. Presented results revealed the influence of magnetic field on the flow structure and heat transfer.

  16. Influence of time dependent longitudinal magnetic fields on the cooling process, exchange bias and magnetization reversal mechanism in FM core/AFM shell nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel, Yusuf; Akıncı, Ümit

    2016-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the dynamic phase transition properties of magnetic nanoparticles with ferromagnetic core coated by an antiferromagnetic shell structure. Effects of field amplitude and frequency on the thermal dependence of magnetizations, magnetization reversal mechanisms during hysteresis cycles, as well as on the exchange bias and coercive fields have been examined, and the feasibility of applying dynamic magnetic fields on the particle have been discussed for technological and biomedical purposes.

  17. Influence of time dependent longitudinal magnetic fields on the cooling process, exchange bias and magnetization reversal mechanism in FM core/AFM shell nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Yusuf; Akıncı, Ümit

    2016-12-07

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the dynamic phase transition properties of magnetic nanoparticles with ferromagnetic core coated by an antiferromagnetic shell structure. Effects of field amplitude and frequency on the thermal dependence of magnetizations, magnetization reversal mechanisms during hysteresis cycles, as well as on the exchange bias and coercive fields have been examined, and the feasibility of applying dynamic magnetic fields on the particle have been discussed for technological and biomedical purposes.

  18. Influence of external magnetic field on dynamics of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2007-03-15

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the non-Markovian dynamics of an open two-dimensional quantum system is investigated. The fluctuations of collective coordinate and momentum and transport coefficients are studied for a charged harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a neutral bosonic heat bath. It is shown that the dissipation of collective energy slows down with increasing strength of the external magnetic field. The role of magnetic field in the diffusion processes is illustrated by several examples.

  19. Influence of external magnetic field on dynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Kalandarov, Sh A; Kanokov, Z; Adamian, G G; Antonenko, N V

    2007-03-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the non-Markovian dynamics of an open two-dimensional quantum system is investigated. The fluctuations of collective coordinate and momentum and transport coefficients are studied for a charged harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a neutral bosonic heat bath. It is shown that the dissipation of collective energy slows down with increasing strength of the external magnetic field. The role of magnetic field in the diffusion processes is illustrated by several examples.

  20. Diode magnetic-field influence on radiographic spot size

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr.

    2012-09-04

    Flash radiography of hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories. The Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos was developed for flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) produce the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each experiment ('hydrotest'). The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. For time resolution of the hydrotest dynamics, the 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by slicing them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{micro}s flattop. Both axes now routinely produce radiographic source spot sizes having full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) less than 1 mm. To further improve on the radiographic resolution, one must consider the major factors influencing the spot size: (1) Beam convergence at the final focus; (2) Beam emittance; (3) Beam canonical angular momentum; (4) Beam-motion blur; and (5) Beam-target interactions. Beam emittance growth and motion in the accelerators have been addressed by careful tuning. Defocusing by beam-target interactions has been minimized through tuning of the final focus solenoid for optimum convergence and other means. Finally, the beam canonical angular momentum is minimized by using a 'shielded source' of electrons. An ideal shielded source creates the beam in a region where the axial magnetic field is zero, thus the canonical momentum zero, since the beam is born with no mechanical angular momentum. It then follows from Busch's conservation theorem that the canonical angular momentum is minimized at the target, at least in principal. In the DARHT accelerators, the axial magnetic field at the cathode is minmized by using a 'bucking coil' solenoid with reverse polarity to cancel out whatever solenoidal beam transport field exists there. This is imperfect in practice, because of

  1. Magnetic field influence on the transient photoresistivity of defect-induced magnetic ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, C.; Khalid, M.; Simonelli, G.; Villafuerte, M.; Heluani, S. P.; Esquinazi, P.

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic field dependent photoresistivity was measured at 280 K in ZnO ferromagnetic films grown on r-plane Al2O3 under a N2 atmosphere. A correlation between the negative magneto photoresistivity and the existence of defect-induced magnetic order was found. The effect of magnetic field on the transient photoresistivity is to slow down the recombination process enhancing the photocarriers density. The experimental results demonstrate the possibility of tuning photocarriers life time using magnetic field in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  2. Influence of magnetic fields on structural martensitic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, J C; Cooley, J C; Smith, J L; Fisher, R A; Modic, K A; Yang, X- D; Riseborough, P S; Opeil, C P; Finlayson, T R; Goddard, P A; Silhanek, A V

    2009-01-01

    We show evidence that a structural martensitic transition is related to significant changes in the electronic structure, as revealed in thermodynamic measurements made in high-magnetic fields. The magnetic field dependence is considered unusual as many influential investigations of martensitic transitions have emphasized that the structural transitions are primarily lattice dynamical and are driven by the entropy due to the phonons. We provide a theoretical framework which can be used to describe the effect of magnetic field on the lattice dynamics in which the field dependence originates from the dielectric constant.

  3. Influence of noncircular chainring on male physiological parameters in hand cycling.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Sebastian; Abel, Thomas; Smith, Paul M; Strueder, Heiko K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a noncircular chainring (NCC) compared with a conventional circular chainring (CC) on hand cycling performance. Eleven nondisabled male participants with no hand cycling experience initially completed an incremental exercise test. Afterward, the participants completed two 20 s sprint tests, followed by a 20 min endurance test and then another two 20 s sprint tests. An NCC and a CC were used in random order on two separate occasions. To compare the effects of the NCC and CC on power data of the sprint tests and metabolic response during the endurance test, a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures was used. Average power values of the sprint tests showed no significant difference between NCC and CC, but over time, values of the first and third sprint tests were higher than those of the second and fourth sprint tests for both chainrings. Values of energy expenditure (kilojoules), gross efficiency (percentage), and net efficiency (percentage) after 10 and 20 min during the endurance test using NCC and CC showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) either between tests or over time. Under the current test conditions and focusing on physiological parameters, a performance optimization using an NCC in hand cycling could not be proven.

  4. Does the reproductive cycle influence sleep patterns in women with sleep complaints?

    PubMed

    Hachul, H; Andersen, M L; Bittencourt, L R A; Santos-Silva, R; Conway, S G; Tufik, S

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how prominent gynecological factors (regular/irregular menstrual cycle, premenstrual complaints, or menopause) can influence both subjective and objective sleep data. A total of 931 women who sought clinical assistance because of a sleep complaint were included in the investigation. All subjects filled out a sleep and gynecological questionnaire prior to undergoing a polysomnography (PSG) recording. Premenopausal women with an irregular menstrual cycle were more likely to report sleep difficulties (related to falling sleep and insomnia symptoms) than those with a regular cycle (odds ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.5). These women showed increased light sleep stages and awakenings. Premenstrual complaints were reported by a higher percentage of women with periodic leg movement, lower time in saturation under 90%, and higher sleep efficiency. A lower percentage of women who took hormonal contraceptives reported snoring, had fewer arousals and longer REM latency compared to those not taking hormonal contraceptives. Menopausal women with hot flushes had more restless leg complaints. Awake time was shorter in hormone therapy users compared with non-users. Women with menopause are more likely to have an apnea-hypoapnea index greater than 5/h. The present findings suggest that gynecological status is associated with subjective sleep quality and objective sleep parameters in women with sleep complaints.

  5. Influence of temperature difference calculation method on the evaluation of Rankine cycle performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisaki, Takafumi.; Ikegami, Yasuyuki.

    2014-02-01

    In the new century, energy and environmental problems are becoming more critical, and the development of natural energy is desired. Low-grade Thermal Energy Conversion (LTEC) is refocused as one of the renewable energy methods. The usefulness of LTEC is expected using hot springs and waste heat. In the case of the Rankine cycle using ammonia as the working fluid, the thermal properties of the working fluid changes in the evaporator. The traditional evaluation method of heat exchanger performance is the LMTD (Logarithmic Mean Temperature Difference) method. On the other hand, the GMTD (Generalized Mean Temperature Difference) method allows the variation of thermal properties in the heat exchanger. The aim of this study is to compare the two methods for the calculation of temperature differences and the corresponding influence on the total performance of the Rankine cycle that is operated using ammonia as a working fluid. As a result, the thermal efficiency of the Rankine cycle is greater than that of the LMTD method. Moreover, the computable range of the GMTD calculation method is less than that of the LMTD calculation method.

  6. Temperature and Cyanobacterial Bloom Biomass Influence Phosphorous Cycling in Eutrophic Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Ye, Tian-Ran; Krumholz, Lee R.; Jiang, He-Long

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms frequently occur in freshwater lakes, subsequently, substantial amounts of decaying cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) settles onto the lake sediments where anaerobic mineralization reactions prevail. Coupled Fe/S cycling processes can influence the mobilization of phosphorus (P) in sediments, with high releases often resulting in eutrophication. To better understand eutrophication in Lake Taihu (PRC), we investigated the effects of CBB and temperature on phosphorus cycling in lake sediments. Results indicated that added CBB not only enhanced sedimentary iron reduction, but also resulted in a change from net sulfur oxidation to sulfate reduction, which jointly resulted in a spike of soluble Fe(II) and the formation of FeS/FeS2. Phosphate release was also enhanced with CBB amendment along with increases in reduced sulfur. Further release of phosphate was associated with increases in incubation temperature. In addition, CBB amendment resulted in a shift in P from the Fe-adsorbed P and the relatively unreactive Residual-P pools to the more reactive Al-adsorbed P, Ca-bound P and organic-P pools. Phosphorus cycling rates increased on addition of CBB and were higher at elevated temperatures, resulting in increased phosphorus release from sediments. These findings suggest that settling of CBB into sediments will likely increase the extent of eutrophication in aquatic environments and these processes will be magnified at higher temperatures. PMID:24682039

  7. Influence of increased body mass and body composition on cycling anaerobic power.

    PubMed

    Maciejczyk, Marcin; Wiecek, Magdalena; Szymura, Jadwiga; Szygula, Zbigniew; Brown, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that not only body fat (BF) but high lean body mass (HLBM) adversely affects aerobic performance and may reduce aerobic endurance performance as well. However, the influence of body composition on anaerobic performance remains controversial. This study aimed to examine the effects of increased body mass (BM) and body composition on cycling anaerobic power. Peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) measurements were conducted in 2 groups of men with similar total BM but different body compositions resulting from (a) high level of BF [HBF group] or (b) high level of lean body mass [HLBM group] and in a control group. Peak power and MP were calculated in absolute values, relative to BM and lean body mass (LBM), and using allometric scaling. Absolute PP and MP were significantly higher in the HLBM group compared with the control and HBF groups. However, PP and MP relative to BM and using allometric scaling were similar in the HLBM and control groups, yet significantly higher than in the HBF group. There were no significant differences between groups in PP and MP when presented relative to LBM. Therefore, it seems that it is not BM but rather body composition that affects PP. Increased BM, resulting from increased LBM, does not adversely affect cycling anaerobic power, but a BM increase resulting from an increase in BF may adversely affect PP. Therefore, coaches and athletes should avoid excess BF to maximize cycling anaerobic power.

  8. The influence of elliptical chainrings on 10 km cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R

    2010-12-01

    The use of elliptical chainrings (also called chainwheels or sprockets) has gained considerable interest in the amateur and professional cycling community. Nevertheless, we are unaware of any scientific studies that have examined the performance benefits of using elliptical chainrings during an actual performance trial. Therefore, this study examined the influence of elliptical chainring use on physiological and performance parameters during a 10 km cycling time trial. Nine male cyclists completed, in a counterbalanced order, three 10 km cycling time trials using either a standard chainring or an elliptical chainring at two distinct settings. An attempt was made to blind the cyclists to the type of chainring used until the completion of the study. During the 10 km time trial, power output and heart rate were recorded at a frequency of 1 Hz and RPE was measured at 3, 6, and 8.5 km. Total power output was not different (P = .40) between the circular (340 ± 30 W) or either elliptical chainring condition (342 ± 29 W and 341 ± 31 W). Similarly, no differences (P = .73) in 2 km mean power output were observed between conditions. Further, no differences in RPE were observed between conditions measured at 3, 6, and 8.5 km. Heart rate was significantly greater (P = .02) using the less aggressive elliptical setting (174 ± 10 bpm) compared with the circular setting (171 ± 9 bpm). Elliptical chainrings do not appear to provide a performance benefit over traditional circular chainrings during a mid-distance time trial.

  9. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors and Poisons, and the Influence of Cell Cycle Checkpoints.

    PubMed

    D Arcy, Nicholas; Gabrielli, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between the decatenation checkpoint and Topoisomerase II (TopoII) are vital for maintaining integrity of the genome. Agents that target this enzyme have been in clinical use in cancer therapy for over 30 years with great success. The types of compounds that have been developed to target TopoII are broadly divided into poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The TopoII poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapies, although in common to most chemotherapeutic agents, they display considerable normal tissue toxicity. Inhibition of the TopoIIb isoform has been implicated in this cytotoxicity. Response to TopoII active agents is determined by several factors, but cell cycle checkpoints play a large role in sensitivity and resistance. The G2/M phase checkpoints are of particular importance in considering the effectiveness of these drugs and are reviewed in this article. Functionality of the ATM dependent decatenation checkpoint may represent a new avenue for selective cancer therapy. Here we review the function of TopoII, the anti-cancer mechanisms and limitations of current catalytic inhibitors and poisons, and their influence on cell cycle checkpoints. We will also assess potential new mechanisms for targeting this enzyme to limit normal tissue toxicity, and how the cell cycle checkpoint triggered by these drugs may provide an alternative and possibly better target for novel therapies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  12. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Enríquez, C. D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Restrepo, J.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others.

  13. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Rachocki, A.; Korpała, A.; Singh, R. K.

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220–258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF{sub 4}, 243–318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF{sub 6}, 258–323 K). The dispersion of {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate R{sub 1}(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by {sup 19}F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF{sub 6} in the corresponding frequency range. From the {sup 1}H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF{sub 4}, and BMIM-PF{sub 6} are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R{sub 1} on square root of frequency. From the {sup 19}F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF{sub 6}. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  14. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  15. Solar Cycle Influence on Ionospheric Outflows and Implications for Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotko, W.; Brambles, O. J.; Zhang, B.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Global simulations have shown that the presence of ionospheric ions in the magnetosphere has a major influence on geospace dynamics including, among other effects, modifications of the ionospheric potential and currents, inflation of the magnetosphere, intensification of the ring current and development of sawtooth oscillations. The hemispheric fluence of ionospheric outflows changes during the solar cycle in two fundamental ways. First and most importantly for superthermal outflows, the fluence increases with geomagnetic activity, which itself exhibits complex solar cycle dependence. Thus enhanced geomagnetic activity induced by the stronger solar wind driving prevalent around solar maximum increases ion outflow and mass loading of the magnetosphere. Second and perhaps more importantly for thermal outflows, an increase in solar EUV flux at solar maximum causes the underlying thermosphere and ionosphere to expand. The result is an increase, on average, in both the dayside flux and the hemispheric fluence of ionospheric outflows, especially O+, at solar maximum. Aspects of these influences are demonstrated in global simulations. When outflows driven by Alfvénic Poynting fluxes flowing toward the ionosphere are included in the simulations, weak to moderate solar wind driving typical of solar minimum (e.g., as measured by the Vasyliunas et al. (1982) SW-M coupling parameter) tends to produce steady magnetospheric convection states and isolated substorms. Moderate to strong solar driving more typical of solar maximum tends to promote more intense substorms and sawtooth oscillations. It is difficult based on the current state-of-the-art global simulations that include the effects of ionospheric outflows to fully systematize the solar cycle dependence of the impacts of ionospheric outflows on magnetospheric dynamics because the effects of the outflow depend on its flux and bulk properties, e.g., composition, field-aligned velocity and thermal energy, and the

  16. Male influence on oestrous cycles in female woolly opossum (Caluromys philander).

    PubMed

    Perret, M; Ben M'Barek, S

    1991-03-01

    Plasma progesterone concentrations and the occurrence of oestrous cycles were studied in isolated woolly opossums subsequently subjected to male influences during a 40-day period. Pairing (N = 48) or exposure to male urine (N = 15) resulted in all females exhibiting oestrous during the stimulation phase, providing evidence that the activation of ovarian activity in the woolly opossum involves pheromonal cues from males. The latency of occurrence of oestrous in stimulated females depended upon their sexual state before male stimulation. In anoestrous females, the mean latency was 20.7 +/- 0.9 days (N = 35), a value which agrees with the duration of the follicular phase. In females which first entered oestrous before male stimulation, the latency of induced oestrous was inversely correlated to the date of occurrence of the previous oestrous. The inter-oestrous interval was normal (38.1 +/- 1 days, N = 5) when females were in oestrous at the beginning of male stimulation. In contrast, the inter-oestrous interval was significantly shortened (28.7 +/- 2 days, N = 7) or lengthened (51.1 +/- 1.7 days, N = 16) depending on whether females were in the luteal or follicular phases at the beginning of male stimulation. During pairing several females became pregnant and gave birth 24 +/- 0.9 days (N = 13) after copulation. In the woolly opossum, the response to male influences involves mechanisms similar to those observed in eutherians and results in enhancement and synchronization of oestrous cycles in females. Pheromonal interactions could play an important role in synchronizing oestrous cycles in wild females during the dry season, a period when animals regroup to feed on spatially localized food resources.

  17. Influence of lunar cycles on growth of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera [L.] Dunal)

    PubMed Central

    Tavhare, Swagata D.; Nishteswar, K.; Shukla, Vinay J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ayurvedic classics have advocated to collect the medicinal plants according to part used and seasons in order to get desired pharmacological action and therapeutic benefits. The logic behind this principle is being validated by recent researches. Aim: To analyze the influence of lunar cycles on growth of Ashwagandha in Shishira and Greeshma Ritu (winter and summer season). Materials and Methods: Fourteen small crops of Ashwagandha of average size 10 cm were collected on October 7, 2013, from institute campus and then replantation was done at Charaka Herbal Garden, Gujarat Ayurved University, Jamnagar in an area of 60 cm × 60 cm (l × b). No fertilizers or pesticides were used. The plants were watered daily and plants were uprooted as per lunar cycles for analysis. Eight samples were collected and observed during Shishira and Greeshma season on Pournima (full moon) and Amavasya (new moon) days. The measurements were taken thrice and average values were taken into consideration for study purpose. The variations in morphological characteristics such as length, breadth, weight, and number of roots and twigs were studied through statistical procedure of principle component analysis, which makes interpretation of all possible related variables. Results: Root weight (RW), pith diameter (PD) and internodal distance (ID) were found to be increased on full moon days as compared to new moon days. The maximum RW was observed during Greeshma Aashadha Pournima. Conclusion: The study has shown a definite influence of lunar cycles on the growth of the plant parts assessed by RW, PD, and ID that have found to be increased on full moon days as compared to new moon days. PMID:27313411

  18. Influence of lunar cycles on growth of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera [L.] Dunal).

    PubMed

    Tavhare, Swagata D; Nishteswar, K; Shukla, Vinay J

    2015-01-01

    Ayurvedic classics have advocated to collect the medicinal plants according to part used and seasons in order to get desired pharmacological action and therapeutic benefits. The logic behind this principle is being validated by recent researches. To analyze the influence of lunar cycles on growth of Ashwagandha in Shishira and Greeshma Ritu (winter and summer season). Fourteen small crops of Ashwagandha of average size 10 cm were collected on October 7, 2013, from institute campus and then replantation was done at Charaka Herbal Garden, Gujarat Ayurved University, Jamnagar in an area of 60 cm × 60 cm (l × b). No fertilizers or pesticides were used. The plants were watered daily and plants were uprooted as per lunar cycles for analysis. Eight samples were collected and observed during Shishira and Greeshma season on Pournima (full moon) and Amavasya (new moon) days. The measurements were taken thrice and average values were taken into consideration for study purpose. The variations in morphological characteristics such as length, breadth, weight, and number of roots and twigs were studied through statistical procedure of principle component analysis, which makes interpretation of all possible related variables. Root weight (RW), pith diameter (PD) and internodal distance (ID) were found to be increased on full moon days as compared to new moon days. The maximum RW was observed during Greeshma Aashadha Pournima. The study has shown a definite influence of lunar cycles on the growth of the plant parts assessed by RW, PD, and ID that have found to be increased on full moon days as compared to new moon days.

  19. Muskie lunacy: does the lunar cycle influence angler catch of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vinson, Mark R.; Angradi, Ted R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ≈5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge.

  20. Blood Removal Influences Pacing During a 4-Minute Cycling Time Trial.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Nathan G; Abbiss, Chris R; Raman, Aaron; Fairchild, Timothy J; Maker, Garth L; Trengove, Robert D; Peiffer, Jeremiah J

    2017-01-17

    To examine the influence of manipulating aerobic contribution following whole blood removal on pacing patterns, performance and energy contribution during self-paced middle distance cycling. Seven male cyclists (33 ± 8 y) completed an incremental cycling test followed 20 min later by a 4-min self-paced cycling time trial (4MMP) on six separate occasions over 42 d. The initial two sessions acted as a familiarisation and baseline testing after which 470 mL of blood was removed with the remaining sessions performed 24 h, 7 d, 21 d and 42 d following blood removal. During all 4MMP trials, power output, V̇O2, and aerobic and anaerobic contribution to power were determined. 4MMP average power output significantly decreased by 7 ± 6%, 6 ± 8% and 4 ± 6% at 24 h, 7 d and 21 d following blood removal, respectively. Compared with baseline, aerobic contribution during the 4MMP was significantly reduced by 5 ± 4%, 4 ± 5% and 4 ± 10% at 24 h, 7 d and 21 d, respectively. The rate of decline in power output upon commencement of the 4MMP was significantly attenuated and was 76 ± 20%, 72 ± 24% and 75 ± 35% lower than baseline at 24 h, 21 d and 42 d, respectively. The results indicate that the removal of 470 mL of blood reduces aerobic energy contribution, alters pacing patterns and decreases performance during self-paced cycling. These findings indicate the importance of aerobic energy distribution during self-paced middle distance events.

  1. Muskie Lunacy: Does the Lunar Cycle Influence Angler Catch of Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Mark R.; Angradi, Ted R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ≈5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge. PMID:24871329

  2. Muskie Lunacy: does the lunar cycle influence angler catch of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?

    PubMed

    Vinson, Mark R; Angradi, Ted R

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ≈5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge.

  3. Variations of solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic parameters with solar magnetic multipole fields during Solar Cycles 21-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bogyeong; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study we compare the temporal variations of the solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic (SIG) parameters with that of open solar magnetic flux from 1976 to 2012 (from Solar Cycle 21 to the early phase of Cycle 24) for a purpose of identifying their possible relationships. By the open flux, we mean the average magnetic field over the source surface (2.5 solar radii) times the source area as defined by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model of the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO). In our result, most SIG parameters except the solar wind dynamic pressure show rather poor correlations with the open solar magnetic field. Good correlations are recovered when the contributions from individual multipole components are counted separately. As expected, solar activity indices such as sunspot number, total solar irradiance, 10.7 cm radio flux, and solar flare occurrence are highly correlated with the flux of magnetic quadrupole component. The dynamic pressure of solar wind is strongly correlated with the dipole flux, which is in anti-phase with Solar Cycle (SC). The geomagnetic activity represented by the Ap index is correlated with higher order multipole components, which show relatively a slow time variation with SC. We also found that the unusually low geomagnetic activity during SC 23 is accompanied by the weak open solar fields compared with those in other SCs. It is argued that such dependences of the SIG parameters on the individual multipole components of the open solar magnetic flux may clarify why some SIG parameters vary in phase with SC and others show seemingly delayed responses to SC variation.

  4. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, M.; Wu, H.; Zhang, S.; Li, H.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In urban areas,fine particle matter with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 um and 10 um (PM2.5-10), and 2.5 um (PM2.5), as an important source of urban particulate matter (PM) pollutants, have significant negative effects on health, atmospheric visibility and climate. PM has increasingly become a significant index of indicating the atmospheric pollution of city. In recent years, Beijing, China has been listed as one of the most serious air pollution city in the world. In order to investigate the sources of air pollutants, a total of 283 pairs of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples were collected daily from July, 2010 to June, 2011 in Beijing. Mineral magnetic properties and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were measured to verify the magnetic materials. Magnetic measures for PM indicated that the major magnetic phase was coarse-grained magnetite-like material. The χlf, χarm, SIRM and χarm/SIRM series of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show seasonal dependences: high values in winter and low values in summer. In additional the parameters analyzed by Time-series methods show a strong cycle about 7 days above 95% confidence level. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show different pattern: the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5-10 show high values in mid-week, and particle sizes is steady, while the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5 show reverse a weekly cycle pattern, and particle sizes is smaller in the mid-week.Microscopy analyses reveal basically three morphologies of magnetic grains: aggregate, spherules and angular particles. The ultrafine carbonaceous particles which tend to form complex clusters and chain-like structures, most likely come from coal burning and motor vehicle exhaust. Spherical particles in PM2.5 are dominantly composed of Fe, O and C, grain-diameters of particles range from 0.3 to 2 um. Angular particles of Fe

  5. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  6. Cross-spectrally coherent ~10.5- and 21-year biological and physical cycles, magnetic storms and myocardial infarctions*

    PubMed

    Halberg, Franz; Cornélissen, Germaine; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Katinas, George S.; Burioka, Naoto; Delyukov, Anatoly; Gorgo, Yuri; Zhao, Ziyan; Weydahl, Andi; Sothern, Robert B.; Siegelova, Jarmila; Fiser, Bohumil; Dusek, Jiri; Syutkina, Elena V.; Perfetto, Federico; Tarquini, Roberto; Singh, R.B.; Rhees, Brad; Lofstrom, Dennis; Lofstrom, Paula; Johnson, Paul William Cort; Schwartzkopff, Othild; the International BIOCOS Study Group

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic storms trigger myocardial infarctions with mechanisms relating to heart rate variability. Solar cycle-to-solar cycle differences and solar cycle stage dependence shown herein may resolve prior controversy and serve to advocate coordinated worldwide systematically aligned biological and physical monitoring. * This paper was originally invited by the historian-geophysicist Wilfried SCHRöDER of Bremen, Germany, for his biographical "Encounters," and is to serve as an update on the project on the BIOsphere and the Cosmos (BIOCOS) and its offspring ICEHRV (Dr. Kuniaki Otsuka's International Chronome Ecologic Study of Heart Rate Variability). It is intended for distribution at a NATO conference on space weather hazards, organized by Dr. Ioannis Daglis, June 18-29, 2000.

  7. High-cycle fatigue of 10M Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy in reversed mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltio, I.; Soroka, A.; Ge, Y.; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2010-07-01

    Application of Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloys in magnetic-field-induced actuation relies on their performance in long-term high-cycle fatigue. In this paper the performance and changes in the microstructure of a Ni-Mn-Ga 10M martensite single crystal material are reported in a long-term mechanically induced shape change cycling. The longest test was run for 2 × 109 cycles at a frequency of 250 Hz and a strain amplitude of ± 1%. After the test a clear increase of the dynamic stiffness of the material was detected. Three specimens out of ten were cycled until fracture occurred and their fracture mechanism was studied. It was observed that the macroscopic crack growth took place roughly at a 45° angle with respect to the loading direction that was along the lang100rang crystallographic direction of the sample. The macroscopic fracture plane seemed to correspond roughly to the {111} crystal planes. On a microscopic scale the fracture propagated in a step-like manner at least partly along crystallographic planes. The steps at the fracture plane correspond to the {101} twin planes, with the height of steps along the lang101rang direction. The final fracture of the samples occurred in a brittle manner after the critical stress was exceeded.

  8. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-07-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal stresses are built up and frozen, as residual stresses occur. In the present work, a glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate with an unidirectional architecture based on non-crimp fabrics with backing fibers is investigated. Three different curing cycles (time-temperature cycles) are used, leading to different levels of internal stresses. The mechanical properties, static strength and fatigue life time, are measured in three different directions of the material, i.e. the fiber direction, 0°, the 30° off axis direction, and the 90° direction transverse to the fiber direction. It is experimentally demonstrated that the resulting residual stresses barely influences the quasi-static mechanical properties of reinforced glass-fiber composites. It is found that the fatigue performance in the 0° direction is significantly influenced by the internal stresses, whereas the fatigue performance in the off axes directions so is not significantly influenced of these stresses. This is related to the observations that the damage mechanisms in the off axes directions are mainly related to shear failure in the matrix and in the interface between fiber and matrix and different from the damage mechanisms in the fiber direction, where the damage initiates in the transverse backing fibers and is directly related to fiber fractures in the load-carrying axial fiber bundles.

  9. Influence of mold surface temperature on polymer part warpage in rapid heat cycle molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, G. R.; Pacher, G. A.; Pichler, A.; Friesenbichler, W.; Gruber, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic mold surface temperature control was examined for its influence on the warpage. A test mold, featuring two different rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) technologies was used to manufacture complex plate-shaped parts having different ribs, varying thin-wall regions, and both, circular and rectangular cut-outs. The mold's nozzle side is equipped with the areal heating and cooling technology BFMOLD®, where the heating/cooling channels are replaced by a ball-filled slot near the cavity surface flooded through with hot and cold water sequentially. Two local electrical ceramic heating elements are installed into the mold's ejection side. Based on a 23 full-factorial design of experiments (DoE) plan, varying nozzle temperature (Tnozzle), rapid heat cycle molding temperature (TRHCM) and holding pressure (pn), specimens of POM were manufactured systematically. Five specimens were examined per DoE run. The resulting warpage was measured at 6 surface line scans per part using the non-contact confocal topography system FRT MicroProf®. Two warpage parameters were calculated, the curvature of a 2nd order approximation a, and the vertical deflection at the profile center d. Both, the influence strength and the acting direction of the process parameters and their interactions on a and d were calculated by statistical analysis. Linear mathematical process models were determined for a and d to predict the warpage as a function of the process parameter settings. Finally, an optimum process setting was predicted, based on the process models and Microsoft Excel GRG solver. Clear and significant influences of TRHCM, pn, Tnozzle, and the interaction of TRHCM and pn were determined. While TRHCM was dominant close to the gate, pn became more effective as the flow length increased.

  10. Influence of seasonal cycles in Martian atmosphere on entry, descent and landing sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčeta, Dušan; Šegan, Stevo; Rašuo, Boško

    2014-05-01

    The phenomena like high eccentricity of Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion, separately or together can significantly alter not only the level of some Martian atmospheric parameters but also the characteristics of its diurnal and seasonal cycle. Considering that entry, descent and landing (EDL) sequence is mainly driven by the density profile of the atmosphere and aerodynamic characteristic of the entry vehicle. We have performed the analysis of the influence of the seasonal cycles of the atmospheric parameters on EDL profiles by using Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM). Since the height of the deployment of the parachute and the time passed from the deployment to propulsion firing (descent time) are of crucial importance for safe landing and the achievable landing site elevation we paid special attention to the influence of the areocentric longitude of the Sun (Ls) on these variables. We have found that these variables have periodic variability with respect to Ls and can be very well approximated with a sine wave function whose mean value depends only on the landing site elevation while the amplitudes and phases depend only on the landing site latitude. The amplitudes exhibit behavior which is symmetric with respect to the latitude but the symmetry is shifted from the equator to the northern mid-tropics. We have also noticed that the strong temperature inversions which are usual for middle and higher northern latitudes while Mars is around its orbital perihelion significantly alter the descent time without influencing the height of the parachute deployment. At last, we applied our model to determine the dependence of the accessible landing region on Ls and found that this region reaches maximum when Mars is around the orbital perihelion and can vary 50° in latitude throughout the Martian year.

  11. Influence of thermal debinding on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys for metal injection molding (MIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez-Pavón, A.; Jiménez-Morales, A.; Santos, T. G.; Quintino, L.; Torralba, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) may be used to produce soft magnetic materials with optimal mechanical and magnetic properties. Unlike other techniques, MIM enables the production of complex and small Fe-Si alloy parts with silicon contents greater than 3% by weight. In MIM process development, it is critical to design a proper debinding cycle not only to ensure complete removal of the binder system but also to obtain improved properties in the final part. This work is a preliminary study on the production of Fe-3.8Si soft magnetic parts by MIM using pre-alloyed powders and a non-industrialized binder. Two different heating rates during thermal debinding were used to study their effect on the final properties of the part. The final properties of the sintered parts are related to thermal debinding. It has been demonstrated that the heating rate during thermal debinding has a strong influence on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys.

  12. Influence of a Ta spacer on the magnetic and transport properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Ducruet, Clarisse; Dieny, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    Ultrathin Ta layers were inserted in the bottom hard (Co/Pt)/Ta/CoFeB/MgO magnetic electrode of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetization of the top part of this electrode abruptly falls in-plane when the Ta thickness exceeds 0.45 nm. This results from the balance between the various energy terms acting on this layer (exchange-like coupling through Ta, demagnetizing energy, and perpendicular anisotropy at the CoFeB/MgO interface). For small Ta thicknesses, this insertion leads to a strong improvement of the tunnel magnetoresistance, as long as the magnetization of all layers remains perpendicular-to-plane.

  13. The influence of quarantine on reproductive cycling in wild-caught Baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Liechty, Emma R; Wang, Diane Y; Chen, Emily; Chai, Daniel; Bell, Jason D; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2015-12-01

    Stress impacts nonhuman primate menstrual cycle length but the impact of quarantine is unknown. A retrospective analysis was performed on cycle data from 31 wild-caught baboons during and following quarantine. Cycling initiated in 94 days (19-181) and length normalized within 4-6 cycles. Quarantine significantly impacts menstrual cycle length.

  14. Investigating influence of the magnetic arc blow in multi-break vacuum circuit breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Minfu; Ge, Guowei; Duan, Xiongying; Huang, Zhihui; Zou, Jiyan

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the interactive magnetic field in multi-break vacuum circuit breakers (VCBs) on the arc plasma and the post-arc characteristics. The magnetic field of multi-break VCBs is asymmetric and off-center because of the interactive magnetic field, which is also called bias magnetic field (BMF). The BMF distribution of double-break VCBs is gained by electromagnetic analysis. The test circuit of the magnetic arc blow in multi-break VCBs is established by simplifying as the interaction between the vacuum arc and the BMF. The influence of the magnetic arc blow on the arc plasma is studied by the high-speed CMOS camera and the post-arc current measure. While the vacuum arc is in the direction of the Ampere force with the BMF at 200 mT, it is in the retrograde direction when the BMF is below 100 mT, which results in the post-arc charge obviously varying from 9 μC to 50 μC. The relationship between the BMF and the post arc charge is gained. The mechanism of the magnetic arc blow in multi-break VCBs is discussed. Therefore, this paper can provide the base of construct and configuration to avoid the influence of the magnetic arc blow.

  15. Experimental investigation on heat transfer characteristics of magnetic fluid flow around a fine wire under the influence of an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2009-04-15

    Experimental investigation is conducted to get insight into convective heat transfer features of the aqueous magnetic fluid flow over a fine wire under the influence of an external magnetic field. The convective heat transfer coefficient of the aqueous magnetic fluid flow around the heated wire is measured in both the uniform magnetic field and the magnetic field gradient. The effects of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation on the thermal behaviors of the magnetic fluids are analyzed. The experimental results show that the external magnetic field is a vital factor that affects the convective heat transfer performances of the magnetic fluids and the control of heat transfer processes of a magnetic fluid flow can be possible by applying an external magnetic field. (author)

  16. Influence of Barium Hexaferrite on Magnetic Properties of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Jarupoom, P; Jaita, P

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) powders was derived from natural bovine bone by sequence of thermal processes. The barium hexaferrite (BF) find magnetic powders were added into HA powders in ratio of 1-3 vol.%. The HA-BF ceramics were prepared by a solid state reaction method and sintered at 1250 degrees C for 2 h. Effects of BF additive on structural, physical and magnetic properties of HA ceramics were investigated. X-ray diffraction revealed that all HA-BF samples showed a main phase of high purity hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] with calcium and phosphate molar ratio of 1.67. The addition of BF into HA inhibited grain growth and caused an improvement of mechanical properties. The M-H hysteresis loops also showed an improvement in magnetic behavior for higher content of BF. Moreover, in vitro bioactivity test indicated that the 2-3 vol.% sample may be suitable for biological applications.

  17. Magnetic influence on the unidentified luminous phenomena in Hessdalen, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitle Hauge, Bjørn; Kjøniksen, Anna-Lena; Petter Strand, Erling; Zlotnicki, Jaques; Vargemezis, George

    2016-04-01

    Unidentified luminous phenomena have been observed in the low atmosphere over the Hessdalen valley for decades. First scientific investigation was done by E.Strand in 1984, where spiral movements of lights was recorded. The Science Camp program has conducted yearly field investigations since 2002 and has confirmed the existence of this spiral-behavior. (http://sciencecamp.no) Such behavior has also been documented in Alabama, USA. In September 2015 spiral like movement of lights was observed together with the more common spherical lights. This spiral movement indicates the presence of low atmospheric charged matter, moving in a magnetic field. A geological survey in 2014 reviled the presence of strong magnetic anomalies. The valley contains several abandoned copper mines containing Chalcopyrite and Magnetite. The Magnetite was not useful in the copper production, and left in heaps around the valley unused. This may contribute to the magnetic anomalies in the valley.

  18. Study on Torque Calculation for Hybrid Magnetic Coupling and Influencing Factor Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; Guo, Yong-cun; Wang, Peng-yu; Li, De-yong

    2017-03-01

    Specific to a problem that the present transmission of magnetic coupling torque was subjected to restrictions of its own structure, a hybrid magnetic coupling was proposed. Then, finite element method was adopted to carry out numerical calculations for its three-dimensional magnetic field to obtain three-dimensional magnetic field distribution of radial and axial configurations. Major influencing factors of its torque, such as lengths of axial and radial air gaps, thicknesses of axial and radial permanent magnets, the number of slots in axial copper rotor, thickness of axial and radial copper rotor, etc., were analyzed. The relevant results indicated that in certain conditions of shapes, ten magnetic poles of the axial permanent magnet rotor, nine of the radial permanent magnet rotor and nine slots from the axial copper rotor were used. Correspondingly, the axial copper rotor had a thickness of 20 mm and it was 5 mm for the radial copper rotor. Moreover, the maximum torque could reach 190 N.m approximately. If lengths of axial and radial air gaps increased, the torque may go down otherwise. Within a certain scope, the torque rose in the first place and then fell with increases in the permanent magnet thickness of axial permanent magnetic rotor, the number of axial and radial magnetic poles, the number of slots in axial copper rotor, and the thickness of axial copper rotor. Additionally, the number of slots in the axial copper rotor could not be equivalent to that of magnetic poles in axial permanent magnetic rotor. However, as the permanent magnet thickness of radial permanent magnetic rotor rose, the torque went up as well.

  19. Influence of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Ventilatory Efficiency and Cycling Performance in Normoxia and Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Naranjo Orellana, José; Santalla, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilatory efficiency, in normoxia and hypoxia, and to investigate the relationship between ventilatory efficiency and cycling performance. Sixteen sport students (23.05 ± 4.7 years; 175.11 ± 7.1 cm; 67.0 ± 19.4 kg; 46.4 ± 8.7 ml·kg−1·min−1) were randomly assigned to an inspiratory muscle training group (IMTG) and a control group (CG). The IMTG performed two training sessions/day [30 inspiratory breaths, 50% peak inspiratory pressure (Pimax), 5 days/week, 6-weeks]. Before and after the training period subjects carried out an incremental exercise test to exhaustion with gas analysis, lung function testing, and a cycling time trial test in hypoxia and normoxia. Simulated hypoxia (FiO2 = 16.45%), significantly altered the ventilatory efficiency response in all subjects (p < 0.05). Pimax increased significantly in the IMTG whereas no changes occurred in the CG (time × group, p < 0.05). Within group analyses showed that the IMTG improved ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope; EqCO2VT2) in hypoxia (p < 0.05) and cycling time trial performance [WTTmax (W); WTTmean (W); PTF(W)] (p < 0.05) in hypoxia and normoxia. Significant correlations were not found in hypoxia nor normoxia found between ventilatory efficiency parameters (VE/VCO2 slope; LEqCO2; EqCO2VT2) and time trial performance. On the contrary the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) was highly correlated with cycling time trial performance (r = 0.89; r = 0.82; p < 0.001) under both conditions. Even though no interaction effect was found, the within group analysis may suggest that IMT reduces the negative effects of hypoxia on ventilatory efficiency. In addition, the data suggest that OUES plays an important role in submaximal cycling performance. PMID:28337149

  20. Influence of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Ventilatory Efficiency and Cycling Performance in Normoxia and Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Naranjo Orellana, José; Santalla, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilatory efficiency, in normoxia and hypoxia, and to investigate the relationship between ventilatory efficiency and cycling performance. Sixteen sport students (23.05 ± 4.7 years; 175.11 ± 7.1 cm; 67.0 ± 19.4 kg; 46.4 ± 8.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were randomly assigned to an inspiratory muscle training group (IMTG) and a control group (CG). The IMTG performed two training sessions/day [30 inspiratory breaths, 50% peak inspiratory pressure (Pimax), 5 days/week, 6-weeks]. Before and after the training period subjects carried out an incremental exercise test to exhaustion with gas analysis, lung function testing, and a cycling time trial test in hypoxia and normoxia. Simulated hypoxia (FiO2 = 16.45%), significantly altered the ventilatory efficiency response in all subjects (p < 0.05). Pimax increased significantly in the IMTG whereas no changes occurred in the CG (time × group, p < 0.05). Within group analyses showed that the IMTG improved ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope; EqCO2VT2) in hypoxia (p < 0.05) and cycling time trial performance [WTTmax (W); WTTmean (W); PTF(W)] (p < 0.05) in hypoxia and normoxia. Significant correlations were not found in hypoxia nor normoxia found between ventilatory efficiency parameters (VE/VCO2 slope; LEqCO2; EqCO2VT2) and time trial performance. On the contrary the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) was highly correlated with cycling time trial performance (r = 0.89; r = 0.82; p < 0.001) under both conditions. Even though no interaction effect was found, the within group analysis may suggest that IMT reduces the negative effects of hypoxia on ventilatory efficiency. In addition, the data suggest that OUES plays an important role in submaximal cycling performance.

  1. Influence of the magnetic tip in ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbois, V.; Naletov, V. V.; Youssef, J. Ben; Klein, O.

    2002-06-01

    We compare mechanically detected ferromagnetic resonance spectra for different separations h between the magnetic tip and sample surface. When the bias field generated by the tip is smaller than a few hundred gauss, the prominent changes are shifts of the entire spectrum (without line shape distortions) to higher frequency as h decreases. These results are in agreement with the Damon and Eshbach model for spin waves propagating in a potential perturbed by the additional field of the probe magnet. It is used to predict the spatial resolution limit for magnetostatic modes bounded by the stray field of the tip. The answer is approx4 mum for yttrium iron garnet.

  2. Influence of a constant magnetic field on human lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Ardito, G; Lamberti, L; Bigatti, P; Prono, G

    1984-07-31

    The growing exposure to magnetic fields of a certain intensity could represent a serious hazard for our health. In the present note we analyze the effect of a 740 Gauss magnetic field on human lymphocyte cell cultures. From the analysis of our data it is possible to point out that this field produces an inhibition of the cell growth, while does not affect at all the sister chromatid exchange frequency of the chromosomes. Conversely we found a significant increase of chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells. The chromosome aberrations found were mostly gaps and breaks.

  3. The influence of crystallised Fe3O4 on the magnetic properties of coprecipitation-derived ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Bretcanu, O; Spriano, S; Verné, E; Cöisson, M; Tiberto, P; Allia, P

    2005-07-01

    Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics are potential candidates for magnetic induction hyperthermia, which is one form of inducing deep-regional hyperthermia, by using a magnetic field. The aim of this work was to analyse the influence of the amount of crystallised magnetite on the magnetic properties of glass-ceramic samples. Thus, two different ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics with the composition of the system Na(2)O-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-FeO-Fe(2)O(3) were prepared by melting at 1500 degrees C for 30 min of the coprecipitation-derived starting products. The X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of nanometric magnetite crystals in a glassy matrix after cooling from melting temperature. The estimated amount of crystallised magnetite varies between 20 and 45 wt.%, as a function of the chemical composition. The morphology of the crystals was studied by scanning electron micrography and transmission electron micrography. Glass transition temperature and thermal stability were investigated by differential thermal analysis. Magnetic hysteresis cycles were analysed using a vibrating sample magnetometer with a maximum applied field of 17 kOe, at room temperature, in quasi-static conditions. Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a magnetic induction furnace. The power losses estimated from calorimetric measurements under a magnetic field of 40 kA/m and 440 kHz are 65 W/g for the glass-ceramic with lower iron oxides content and 25 W/g for the glass-ceramic with higher iron oxide content.

  4. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Andrew W; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Polman, Remco C J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low-voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, [Formula: see text] = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, [Formula: see text] = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, [Formula: see text] = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.10) and 750-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.16), 500-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.15), and 750-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to

  5. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Andrew W.; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C.; Polman, Remco C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low–voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, ηp2 = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, ηp2 = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, ηp2 = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m (ηp2 = 0.10) and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m (ηp2 = 0.16), 500-m (ηp2 = 0.15), and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to improve 5-km TT performance. PMID:28223939

  6. Influence of noise on a magnetically sensitive atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desavage, Sara A.; Srinivasan, Arvind; Davis, Jon P.; Zimmermann, Matthias; Efremov, Maxim; Rasel, Ernst; Schleich, Wolfgang; Welch, George R.; Mimih, Jihane; Narducci, Frank A.

    2016-05-01

    The inherent sensitivity of atom interferometer sensors has been well established and much progress has been made in the development of atom interferometer gravimeters, gravity gradiometers and gyroscopes e.g.. These interferometers use the ``clock'' transition which is magnetically insensitive. When considering interferometers with magnetically sensitive transitions operating in unshielded environments additional noise sources must be considered. The frequency content of the noise from these sources can vary dramatically, depending on the environment. In this talk, we will discuss these various noise sources and their impact on the performance of magnetically sensitive interferometers. Specifically, we identify three ways by which noise can be introduced into the system and their effect: fluctuating detuning, leading to a randomness of the interference pattern; fluctuating Rabi frequency, leading to pulse errors; non-uniformity of the magnetic field across the atom cloud, which can, under certain circumstances lead to a complete washing out of the interference pattern. Implications for our current experiments will be discussed. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  7. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  8. Factors influencing serum progesterone level on triggering day in stimulated in vitro fertilization cycles.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Hee; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Elevated serum progesterone (P) levels on triggering day have been known to affect the pregnancy rate of in vitro fertilization (IVF). This study aimed to identify the possible factors influencing serum P levels on triggering day in stimulated IVF cycles. Three hundred and thirty consecutive fresh IVF cycles were included in the study. All cycles were first attempts and were performed in a single infertility center. The indications for IVF were male factor infertility (n=114), ovulatory infertility (n=84), endometriosis (n=61), tubal infertility (n=59), unexplained infertility (n=41), and uterine factor infertility (n=39). A luteal long protocol of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (n=184) or a GnRH antagonist protocol (n=146) was used for pituitary suppression. Ovarian sensitivity was defined as the serum estradiol level on triggering day per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[a]) or the retrieved oocyte number per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[b]). Univariate analysis revealed that the serum P level on triggering day was associated with the serum estradiol level on triggering day (r=0.379, p<0.001), the number of follicles ≥14 mm (r=0.247, p<0.001), the number of retrieved oocytes (r=0.384, p<0.001), and ovarian sensitivity (OS[a]: r=0.245, p<0.001; OS[b]: r=0.170, p=0.002). The woman's age, body mass index, antral follicle count, and basal serum follicle stimulating hormone and estradiol levels were not associated with serum P level on triggering day. The serum P level on triggering day did not show significant variation depending on the type or cause of infertility, pituitary suppression protocol, or the type of gonadotropins used. The serum P level on triggering day was closely related to the response to ovarian stimulation.

  9. Factors influencing serum progesterone level on triggering day in stimulated in vitro fertilization cycles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hee; Jee, Byung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated serum progesterone (P) levels on triggering day have been known to affect the pregnancy rate of in vitro fertilization (IVF). This study aimed to identify the possible factors influencing serum P levels on triggering day in stimulated IVF cycles. Methods Three hundred and thirty consecutive fresh IVF cycles were included in the study. All cycles were first attempts and were performed in a single infertility center. The indications for IVF were male factor infertility (n=114), ovulatory infertility (n=84), endometriosis (n=61), tubal infertility (n=59), unexplained infertility (n=41), and uterine factor infertility (n=39). A luteal long protocol of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (n=184) or a GnRH antagonist protocol (n=146) was used for pituitary suppression. Ovarian sensitivity was defined as the serum estradiol level on triggering day per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[a]) or the retrieved oocyte number per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[b]). Results Univariate analysis revealed that the serum P level on triggering day was associated with the serum estradiol level on triggering day (r=0.379, p<0.001), the number of follicles ≥14 mm (r=0.247, p<0.001), the number of retrieved oocytes (r=0.384, p<0.001), and ovarian sensitivity (OS[a]: r=0.245, p<0.001; OS[b]: r=0.170, p=0.002). The woman's age, body mass index, antral follicle count, and basal serum follicle stimulating hormone and estradiol levels were not associated with serum P level on triggering day. The serum P level on triggering day did not show significant variation depending on the type or cause of infertility, pituitary suppression protocol, or the type of gonadotropins used. Conclusion The serum P level on triggering day was closely related to the response to ovarian stimulation. PMID:26161336

  10. A model of the ocean iron cycle and its influence on biological production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Parekh, P.; Follows, M.

    2003-04-01

    Biological productivity in large regions of the ocean, specifically high nutrient, low chlorophyll regions, is limited by the deficit in iron relative to other nutrients. We have developed a parameterization of the iron cycle of the world's oceans which attempts to explicitly represent the processes by which this deficit in iron occurs. We have implemented this parameterization in the context of the MIT three dimensional global ocean model and examined the consequences for nutrient distributions, new production and primary production. The iron model parameterizes the mechanisms of scavenging of iron onto sinking particles and complexation with an organic ligand and is driven by specified aeolian flux patterns. First, using an idealized representation of export production, limited by light, phosphate and iron, the model reproduces the broad features of the observed ocean phosphate and iron distributions. We replace the simplified export parameterization with an explicit, but highly idealized, ecosystem model. The model represents a simplified food web with two phytoplankton size classes and a single grazer. The base currency for this model is phosphorus, but the larger phytoplankton class (i.e. diatoms) is also limited by silica. Both classes are limited by the availability of iron. The results of this model are also generally consistent with the observed patterns of phosphate and iron. In addition, the model captures the broad features of the distributions and cycles of silica, chlorophyll and primary production. We will also explore the sensitivities of this model to the forcing fields (e.g. aeolian iron flux) and parameter choices of the ecosystem model. This model represents a step towards the explicit representation of the ocean iron cycle, and its biogeochemical influences, in global biogeochemical models.

  11. Motor modules of human locomotion: influence of EMG averaging, concatenation, and number of step cycles

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Anderson S.; Gizzi, Leonardo; Farina, Dario; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion can be investigated by factorization of electromyographic (EMG) signals, e.g., with non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). This approach is a convenient concise representation of muscle activities as distributed in motor modules, activated in specific gait phases. For applying NMF, the EMG signals are analyzed either as single trials, or as averaged EMG, or as concatenated EMG (data structure). The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the data structure on the extracted motor modules. Twelve healthy men walked at their preferred speed on a treadmill while surface EMG signals were recorded for 60s from 10 lower limb muscles. Motor modules representing relative weightings of synergistic muscle activations were extracted by NMF from 40 step cycles separately (EMGSNG), from averaging 2, 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 consecutive cycles (EMGAVR), and from the concatenation of the same sets of consecutive cycles (EMGCNC). Five motor modules were sufficient to reconstruct the original EMG datasets (reconstruction quality >90%), regardless of the type of data structure used. However, EMGCNC was associated with a slightly reduced reconstruction quality with respect to EMGAVR. Most motor modules were similar when extracted from different data structures (similarity >0.85). However, the quality of the reconstructed 40-step EMGCNC datasets when using the muscle weightings from EMGAVR was low (reconstruction quality ~40%). On the other hand, the use of weightings from EMGCNC for reconstructing this long period of locomotion provided higher quality, especially using 20 concatenated steps (reconstruction quality ~80%). Although EMGSNG and EMGAVR showed a higher reconstruction quality for short signal intervals, these data structures did not account for step-to-step variability. The results of this study provide practical guidelines on the methodological aspects of synergistic muscle activation extraction from EMG during locomotion. PMID:24904375

  12. Influence of the estrous cycle on the behavior of rats in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Amauri; dos Santos, Ubirajara D; Felisbino, Fabrício E; de Afonseca, Taciana L; Antunes, Gabriela; Morato, Silvio

    2004-09-30

    The elevated T-maze is an animal anxiety model which can discriminate between anxiety-like and fear-like behaviors. The estrous cycle is an important variable of the response in animal anxiety tests and is known to affect other models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the estrous cycle on behavior displayed in the elevated T-maze test. Seventeen male and 60 female rats were submitted to one session in this test, with the females being screened for the estrous cycle and divided into groups according to the various phases. The elevated T-maze had three arms of equal dimensions ( 50 cm x 10 cm), one enclosed by 40-cm high walls and perpendicular to the others, the apparatus being elevated 50 cm above the floor. Each rat was placed in the end of the enclosed arm and the latency for it to leave this arm was recorded. These measurements were repeated three times separated by 30-s intervals (passive avoidance). After trial 3, each rat was placed at the distal end of the right open arm and the latency to exit this arm was recorded. Whenever latencies were greater than 300 s the trial was finished. The results demonstrated females in diestrus exhibited anxiety-like behaviors while females in metaestrus behaved in a similar way as the males. There were no differences between groups in fear-like behaviors. The results also indicate the elevated T-maze to be a sensitive test to measure anxiety.

  13. Influence of the solar cycle on the Polar-night Jet Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yuhji

    2017-04-01

    The Polar-night Jet Oscillation (PJO) is the dominant mode of stratospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), and persists from mid-winter to spring. The influence of the 11-year solar cycle on modulation of the PJO from late winter to spring is examined using observations and three 42-year simulations from a chemistry-climate model. The only variation applied to model boundary conditions was the strength of ultraviolet radiation (UV). This is set at two times larger than observations to enhance the strength of the solar signal. Simulations show a downward propagation of the stratospheric signal into the troposphere from late winter to spring, which tends to be enhanced as UV strength increases. This result is similar to observations, but with a 1-2 month lag. The behavior of the PJO with respect to wave-mean flow interactions is examined using a newly developed momentum budget analysis as well as wave-energy analysis. We suggest that UV modulation of the interactions between planetary waves and zonal-mean flow in the stratosphere, rather than direct diabatic processes as suggested in a previous study, is the source of solar cycle modulation of the PJO.

  14. Duty Cycle of Deformational Loading Influences the Growth of Engineered Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth W; Mauck, Robert L; Wang, Christopher C-B; Kelly, Terri-Ann N; Ho, Mandy M-Y; Chen, Faye Hui; Ateshian, Gerard A; Hung, Clark T

    2009-09-01

    This study examines how variations in the duty cycle (the duration of applied loading) of deformational loading can influence the mechanical properties of tissue engineered cartilage constructs over one month in bioreactor culture. Dynamic loading was carried out with three different duty cycles: 1 h on/1 h off for a total of 3 h loading/day, 3 h continuous loading, or 6 h of continuous loading per day, with all loading performed 5 days/week. All loaded groups showed significant increases in Young's modulus after one month (vs. free swelling controls), but only loading for a continuous 3 and 6 h showed significant increases in dynamic modulus by this time point. Histological analysis showed that dynamic loading can increase cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and collagen types II and IX, as well as prevent the formation of a fibrous capsule around the construct. Type II and IX collagen deposition increased with increased with duration of applied loading. These results point to the efficacy of dynamic deformational loading in the mechanical preconditioning of engineered articular cartilage constructs. Furthermore, these results highlight the ability to dictate mechanical properties with variations in mechanical input parameters, and the possible importance of other cartilage matrix molecules, such as COMP, in establishing the functional material properties of engineered constructs.

  15. Factors influencing the life cycle burdens of the recovery of energy from residual municipal waste.

    PubMed

    Burnley, Stephen; Coleman, Terry; Peirce, Adam

    2015-05-01

    A life cycle assessment was carried out to assess a selection of the factors influencing the environmental impacts and benefits of incinerating the fraction of municipal waste remaining after source-separation for reuse, recycling, composting or anaerobic digestion. The factors investigated were the extent of any metal and aggregate recovery from the bottom ash, the thermal efficiency of the process, and the conventional fuel for electricity generation displaced by the power generated. The results demonstrate that incineration has significant advantages over landfill with lower impacts from climate change, resource depletion, acidification, eutrophication human toxicity and aquatic ecotoxicity. To maximise the benefits of energy recovery, metals, particularly aluminium, should be reclaimed from the residual bottom ash and the energy recovery stage of the process should be as efficient as possible. The overall environmental benefits/burdens of energy from waste also strongly depend on the source of the power displaced by the energy from waste, with coal giving the greatest benefits and combined cycle turbines fuelled by natural gas the lowest of those considered. Regardless of the conventional power displaced incineration presents a lower environmental burden than landfill.

  16. Influence of cycle exercise on acetone in expired air and skin gas.

    PubMed

    Yamai, Kazuaki; Ohkuwa, Tetsuo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Tsuda, Takao

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cycle exercise on acetone concentration in expired air and skin gas. The subjects for this experiment were eight healthy males. Subjects performed a continuous graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer. The workloads were 360 (1.0 kg), 720 (2.0 kg), 990 (2.75 kg) kgm/min, and each stage was 5 min in duration. A pedaling frequency of 60 rpm was maintained. Acetone concentration was analyzed by gas chromatography. The acetone concentration in expired air and skin gas during exercise at 990 kgm/min intensity was significantly increased compared with the basal level. The skin-gas acetone concentration at 990 kgm/min significantly increased compared with the 360 kgm/min (P < 0.05). The acetone excretion of expired air at 720 kgm/min and 990 kgm/min significantly increased compared with the basal level (P < 0.05). Acetone concentration in expired air was 4-fold greater than skin gas at rest and 3-fold greater during exercise (P < 0.01). Skin gas acetone concentration significantly related with expired air (r = 0.752; P < 0.01). This study confirmed that the skin-gas acetone concentration reflected that of expired air.

  17. Intertidal Concentrations of Microplastics and Their Influence on Ammonium Cycling as Related to the Shellfish Industry.

    PubMed

    Cluzard, Melanie; Kazmiruk, Tamara N; Kazmiruk, Vasily D; Bendell, L I

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are ubiquitous within the marine environment. The last 10 years have seen research directed at understanding the fate and effect of microplastics within the marine environment; however, no studies have yet addressed how concentrations of these particles could affect sedimentary processes such as nutrient cycling. Herein we first determine the concentration and spatial distribution of microplastics within Baynes Sound, a key shellfish-growing area within coastal British Columbia (BC). We also determined sediment grain size and % organic matter (OM) such that we could relate spatial patterns in sediment microplastic concentrations to sedimentary processes that determine zones of accretion and erosion. Using field-determined concentrations of microplastics, we applied laboratory microcosms studies, which manipulated sediment concentrations of microplastics, OM, and bivalves to determine the influence of sediment microplastics on ammonium cycling within intertidal sediments. Concentrations of microplastics determined within the intertidal sediment varied spatially and were similar to those found in other coastal regions of high urban use. Concentrations were independent of grain size and OM suggesting that physical processes other than those that govern natural sediment components determine the fate of microplastics within sediments. Under laboratory conditions, concentrations of ammonium were significantly greater in the overlying water of treatments with microplastics, clams, and OM compared with treatments without microplastics. These preliminary studies suggest that high concentrations of microplastics have the potential to alter key sedimentary processes such as ammonium flux. This could have serious implications, for example, contributing to eutrophication events in regions of the coast that are highly urbanized.

  18. Influence of the solar cycle on the Polar-night Jet Oscillation in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yuhji; Deushi, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    The Polar-night Jet Oscillation (PJO) is the dominant mode of stratospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere and persists from midwinter to spring. The influence of the 11 year solar cycle on modulation of the PJO from late winter to spring is examined using observations and three 42 year simulations from a chemistry-climate model. The only variation applied to model boundary conditions was the strength of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This is set at 2 times larger than observations to enhance the strength of the solar signal. Simulations show a downward propagation of the stratospheric signal into the troposphere from late winter to spring, which tends to be enhanced as UV strength increases. This result is similar to observations but with a 1-2 month lag. The behavior of the PJO with respect to wave-mean flow interactions is examined using a newly developed momentum budget analysis as well as wave energy analysis. We suggest that UV modulation of the interactions between planetary waves and zonal-mean flow in the stratosphere, rather than direct diabatic processes as suggested in a previous study, is the source of solar cycle modulation of the PJO.

  19. The QBO as Potential Amplifier and Conduit to Lower Altitudes of Solar Cycle Influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, John G.; Chan, Kwing L.; Porter, Hayden S.

    2005-01-01

    The solar cycle (SC) effect in the lower atmosphere has been linked observationally to the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO), which is generated primarily by small-scale gravity waves. Salby and Callaghan analyzed the QBO observations covering more than 40 years and found that it contains a relatively large SC signature at 20 km. Following up on a 2D study with our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), we discuss here a 3D study in which we simulated the QBO under the influence of the SC. For a SC period of 10 years, the amplitude of the relative variations of radiative forcing is taken to vary from 0.2% at the surface to 2% at 50 km to 20% at 100 km and above. This model produces in the lower stratosphere a relatively large modulation of the QBO, which appears to be related to the SC and is in qualitative agreement with the observations. Further studies are needed, (1) to determine whether the effect is real and the results are robust and (2) to explore the mechanism(s) that may amplify the SC effect. Quasi-decadal oscillations, generated internally by the QBO interacting with the seasonal cycles, may interfere with or aid the SC effect.

  20. The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L.; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2013-01-01

    Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances. PMID:24954981

  1. The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2013-04-01

    Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances.

  2. Selection of organic process and source indicator substances for the anthropogenically influenced water cycle.

    PubMed

    Jekel, Martin; Dott, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Axel; Dünnbier, Uwe; Gnirß, Regina; Haist-Gulde, Brigitte; Hamscher, Gerd; Letzel, Marion; Licha, Tobias; Lyko, Sven; Miehe, Ulf; Sacher, Frank; Scheurer, Marco; Schmidt, Carsten K; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    An increasing number of organic micropollutants (OMP) is detected in anthropogenically influenced water cycles. Source control and effective natural and technical barriers are essential to maintain a high quality of drinking water resources under these circumstances. Based on the literature and our own research this study proposes a limited number of OMP that can serve as indicator substances for the major sources of OMP, such as wastewater treatment plants, agriculture and surface runoff. Furthermore functional indicators are proposed that allow assessment of the proper function of natural and technical barriers in the aquatic environment, namely conventional municipal wastewater treatment, advanced treatment (ozonation, activated carbon), bank filtration and soil aquifer treatment as well as self-purification in surface water. These indicator substances include the artificial sweetener acesulfame, the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen, the anticonvulsant carbamazepine, the corrosion inhibitor benzotriazole and the herbicide mecoprop among others. The chemical indicator substances are intended to support comparisons between watersheds and technical and natural processes independent of specific water cycles and to reduce efforts and costs of chemical analyses without losing essential information.

  3. Lunar cycles at mating do not influence sex ratio at birth in horses.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, J J; Cuervo-Arango, J; Santa Juliana, L

    2015-02-01

    It is scientifically demonstrated that lunar cycles have important effects on several biological events. Controversy exists about the lunar influence on human and animal parturition. In addition, in the horse industry, especially in Polo Horse breeders of Argentina and around the world there is a higher demand for female offspring than for males. The objective of this study was to determine whether there is a significant association between the lunar phase at the time of mating and the sex ratio at birth in horses. The Argentinean Stud Book provided information related to all matings registered for Thoroughbred and Arab horses between 2003 and 2011. Statistical associations were tested between dates of matings at different lunar phases or days and sex ratio at birth. A total of 65.535 gestations were studied. Overall, sex ratio at birth resulted in 33.396 fillies (50.96%) and 32.139 colts (49.04%). The percentages of males and females at birth were not statistically different amongst the different lunar phases or days. We can strongly conclude that managing the breeding dates in relation to lunar cycles in order to manipulate the sex ratio of the offspring is not a viable option in horses.

  4. The QBO as Potential Amplifier and Conduit to Lower Altitudes of Solar Cycle Influence?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, John G.; Porter, Hayden S.

    2005-01-01

    The solar cycle (SC) effect in the lower atmosphere has been linked observationally to the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO), which is generated primarily by small-scale gravity waves (GW). Following up on a 2D study with our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), we discuss here a 3D study in which we simulated the QBO under the influence of the SC. For a SC period of 10 years, the relative amplitude of radiative forcing is taken to vary exponentially with height, i.e., 0.2% at the surface, 2% at 50 km, 20% at 100 km and above. Applying spectral analysis to filter out and identify the SC signature, this model produces a relatively large modulation in the QBO of the lower stratospheric circulation, which is in qualitative agreement with the results obtained by Salby and Callaghan (2000) who analyzed zonal wind observations covering more than 40 years. The modeled SC modulation of the QBO extends to high latitudes where it produces temperature variations of about 1 K in the troposphere below 10 km. We report that the SC also generates in the model a hemispherically symmetric Equatorial Annual Oscillation (EAO, with 12-month period) that is largely confined to low latitudes. Under the influence of the GWs, the SC modulated EA0 propagates down into the lower stratosphere like the QBO. As is the case for the QBO, the energy of this EA0 is partially redistributed by the meridional circulation and planetary waves, presumably, to generate measurable SC signatures in the tropospheric temperature of the polar regions, which may be related to the so called Arctic Oscillation (Thompson and Wallace, 1998). The larger SC influence at higher altitudes is apparently transferred to the lower and denser regions of the atmosphere by tapping the momentum from the upward propagating GWs that drive the oscillations. The SC modulation of the QBO period could prove to be very effective in this process, as our earlier 2D study indicated. Further studies are needed, (1) to make sure that the SC

  5. The QBO as Potential Amplifier and Conduit to Lower Altitudes of Solar Cycle Influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, John G.; Porter, Hayden S.

    2005-01-01

    In several papers, the solar cycle (SC) effect in the lower atmosphere has been linked to the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO), which is generated primarily by small-scale gravity waves. Salby and Callaghan (2000) analyzed the observed zonal winds of the QBO over more than 40 years and found that it contains a relatively large SC signature at 20 km. Following up on an earlier 2D study with our global-scale Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), we discuss here a 3D study with the QBO under the influence of the SC. For a SC period of 10 years, the amplitude of the relative variations of radiative forcing is taken to vary for simplicity from 0.2% at the surface to 2% at 50 km to 20% at 100 km and above. Covering a limited time span of 40 years, this model produces in the lower stratosphere a relatively large modulation of the QBO, which appears to be related to the SC and is in qualitative agreement with the observations. Some of the energy in the QBO, confined to low latitudes primarily, is redistributed globally by the meridional circulation and planetary waves presumably, so that a measurable SC modulation is generated in the tropospheric temperatures of the polar regions. Further studies are needed, (1) to determine whether the effect is real and prevails in more extensive simulations and whether the results are robust when shorter integration steps are employed, and (2) to explore the mechanism(s) that may ample the apparent SC influence of the UV radiation extending into the lower atmosphere. Quasi-decadal oscillations, generated internally by the QBO interacting with the seasonal cycles, may interfere with or aid the SC effect.

  6. [Modeling the Influencing Factors of Karstification and Karst Carbon Cycle in Laboratory].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui-yi; Lü, Xian-fu; Duan, Yi-fan

    2015-08-01

    To analyze the influencing factors of karstification and karst carbon cycle, a simulation experiment was carried out and 6 soil columns were designed. The results showed that the content of H2O4, hydrodynamic condition and thickness of the soil had important influence on karstification and karst carbon cycle. For the soil columns which were covered by the same thickness of soil, the concentrations of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and SO4(2-) followed the order of B20-2 > B20-1 > B20-3, B50-2 > B50-1 > B50-3. This meant that input of H2SO4 enhanced the karstification and increasing infiltration water had significant dilution effect on the chemical properties. For the soil columns with different thickness of soil but with the same slag pile and hydrodynamic conditions, the concentrations of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and SO4(2-) followed the order of B50-1 > B20-1, B50-2 > B20-2, B50-3 > B20-3. It was demonstrated that more carbonate rock was dissolved under the thick soil columns. In addition, the net consumption of CO2 mainly depended on the content of H2SO4 in this experiment due to slight contribution of H2CO3 to carbonate rock dissolution. More content of H2SO4 brought about less net consumption of C02, but B50-2 was an exception. Organic matter and other nutrients might be input into deep soil with the slag pile, and they promoted the production of soil C)2. Therefore, more CO2 was consumed due to the increased contribution of H2CO to karstification.

  7. Gender and estrous cycle influences on behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adult rats neonatally administered ketamine.

    PubMed

    Célia Moreira Borella, Vládia; Seeman, Mary V; Carneiro Cordeiro, Rafaela; Vieira dos Santos, Júnia; Romário Matos de Souza, Marcos; Nunes de Sousa Fernandes, Ethel; Santos Monte, Aline; Maria Mendes Vasconcelos, Silvânia; Quinn, John P; de Lucena, David F; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade in rodents triggers schizophrenia (SCZ)-like alterations during adult life. SCZ is influenced by gender in age of onset, premorbid functioning, and course. Estrogen, the hormone potentially driving the gender differences in SCZ, is known to present neuroprotective effects such as regulate oxidative pathways and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, the aim of this study was to verify if differences in gender and/or estrous cycle phase during adulthood would influence the development of behavioral and neurochemical alterations in animals neonatally administered ketamine. The results showed that ketamine-treated male (KT-male) and female-in-diestrus (KTF-diestrus, the low estrogen phase) presented significant deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and spatial working memory, two behavioral SCZ endophenotypes. On the contrary, female ketamine-treated rats during proestrus (KTF-proestrus, the high estradiol phase) had no behavioral alterations. This correlated with an oxidative imbalance in the hippocampus (HC) of both male and KTF-diestrus female rats, that is, decreased levels of GSH and increased levels of lipid peroxidation and nitrite. Similarly, BDNF was decreased in the KTF-diestrus rats while no alterations were observed in KTF-proestrus and male animals. The changes in the HC were in contrast to those in the prefrontal cortex in which only increased levels of nitrite in all groups studied were observed. Thus, there is a gender difference in the adult rat HC in response to ketamine neonatal administration, which is based on the estrous cycle. This is discussed in relation to neuropsychiatric conditions and in particular SCZ. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Radial and solar cycle variations of the magnetic fields in the heliosheath: Voyager 1 observations from 2005 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2009-12-01

    We discuss the magnetic field strength B(t) and polarity observed by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath at the heliographic latitude ≈34° as it moved away from the sun from 2005 through 2008.82. The pattern of the polarity of the magnetic field changed from alternating positive and negative polarities to predominantly negative polarities (magnetic fields pointing along the Archimedean spiral field angle toward the sun) at ≈ 2006.23). This transition indicates that the latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind, as expected for the declining phase of the solar cycle, and as predicted by extrapolation of the magnetic neutral line near the photosphere to the position of V1. However, the polarity was not uniformly negative in during 2008, in contrast to the predicted polarity. This difference suggests that the maximum latitudinal extent of the HCS was tending to increase in the northern hemisphere in the heliosheath, while it was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind. The large-scale magnetic field strength B(t) HCS was observed by V1 from 2005 through 2008.820. During this interval of decreasing solar activity toward solar minimum, B(t) at 1 AU was decreasing and the solar wind speed V at the latitude of V1 was increasing. Adjusting the temporal profile of B(t) observed by V1 for the solar cycle variations of B and V in the supersonic solar wind, we find that the radial gradient of B(R) in heliosheath from the radial distance R = 94.2 AU to 107.9 AU between 2005.0 and 2008.82 was 0.0017 nT/AU ≤ grad B ≤ 0.0055 nT/AU, or grad B = (0.0036 ± 0.0019) nT/AU

  9. Radial and solar cycle variations of the magnetic fields in the heliosheath: Voyager 1 observations from 2005 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Acuña, M. H.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R.

    2009-06-01

    We discuss the magnetic field strength B(t) and polarity observed by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath at the heliographic latitude ≈34° as it moved away from the Sun from 2005 through 2008.82 (where 2008.0 is the beginning of 1 January 2008). The pattern of the polarity of the magnetic field changed from alternating positive and negative polarities to predominantly negative polarities (magnetic fields pointing along the Archimedean spiral field angle toward the Sun) at ≈2006.23). This transition indicates that the latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind, as expected for the declining phase of the solar cycle, and as predicted by extrapolation of the magnetic neutral line near the photosphere to the position of V1. However, the polarity was not uniformly negative in during 2008, in contrast to the predicted polarity. This difference suggests that the maximum latitudinal extent of the HCS was tending to increase in the northern hemisphere in the heliosheath, while it was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind. The large-scale magnetic field strength B(t) was observed by V1 from 2005 through 2008.82. During this interval of decreasing solar activity toward solar minimum, B(t) at 1 AU was decreasing, and the solar wind speed V at the latitude of V1 was increasing. Adjusting the temporal profile of B(t) observed by V1 for the solar cycle variations of B and V in the supersonic solar wind, we find that the radial gradient of B(R) in heliosheath from the radial distance R = 94.2 AU to 107.9 AU between 2005.0 and 2008.82 was 0.0017 nT/AU ≤ grad B ≤ 0.0055 nT/AU, or grad B = (0.0036 ± 0.0019) nT/AU.

  10. Radial and Solar Cycle Variations of the Magnetic Fields in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations from 2005 to 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, Leonard; Ness, N.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the magnetic field strength B(t) and polarity observed by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath at the heliographic latitude approximately equal 34 deg as it moved away from the sun from 2005 through 2008.82. The pattern of the polarity of the magnetic field changed from alternating positive and negative polarities to predominantly negative polarities (magnetic fields pointing along the Archimedean spiral field angle toward the sun) at approximately equal 2006.23). This transition indicates that the latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind, as expected for the declining phase of the solar cycle, and as predicted by extrapolation of the magnetic neutral line near the photosphere to the position of V1. However, the polarity was not uniformly negative in during 2008, in contrast to the predicted polarity. This difference suggests that the maximum latitudinal extent of the HCS was tending to increase in the northern hemisphere in the heliosheath, while it was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind. The large-scale magnetic field strength B(t) HCS was observed by V1 from 2005 through 2008.820. During this interval of decreasing solar activity toward solar minimum, B(t) at 1 AU was decreasing and the solar wind speed V at the latitude of V1 was increasing. Adjusting the temporal profile of B(t) observed by V1 for the solar cycle variations of B and V in the supersonic solar wind, we find that the radial gradient of B(R) in heliosheath from the radial distance R = 94.2 AU to 107.9 AU between 2005.0 and 2008.82 was 0.0017 nT/AU <= grad B <= 0.0055 nT/AU or grad B = (0.0036 +/- 0.0019) nT/AU

  11. Radial and Solar Cycle Variations of the Magnetic Fields in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations from 2005 to 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, Leonard; Ness, N.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the magnetic field strength B(t) and polarity observed by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath at the heliographic latitude approximately equal 34 deg as it moved away from the sun from 2005 through 2008.82. The pattern of the polarity of the magnetic field changed from alternating positive and negative polarities to predominantly negative polarities (magnetic fields pointing along the Archimedean spiral field angle toward the sun) at approximately equal 2006.23). This transition indicates that the latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind, as expected for the declining phase of the solar cycle, and as predicted by extrapolation of the magnetic neutral line near the photosphere to the position of V1. However, the polarity was not uniformly negative in during 2008, in contrast to the predicted polarity. This difference suggests that the maximum latitudinal extent of the HCS was tending to increase in the northern hemisphere in the heliosheath, while it was decreasing in the supersonic solar wind. The large-scale magnetic field strength B(t) HCS was observed by V1 from 2005 through 2008.820. During this interval of decreasing solar activity toward solar minimum, B(t) at 1 AU was decreasing and the solar wind speed V at the latitude of V1 was increasing. Adjusting the temporal profile of B(t) observed by V1 for the solar cycle variations of B and V in the supersonic solar wind, we find that the radial gradient of B(R) in heliosheath from the radial distance R = 94.2 AU to 107.9 AU between 2005.0 and 2008.82 was 0.0017 nT/AU <= grad B <= 0.0055 nT/AU or grad B = (0.0036 +/- 0.0019) nT/AU

  12. Comparing the solar magnetic field in the corona and in the inner heliosphere during solar cycles 21-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, I. I.; Mursula, K.

    2009-04-01

    We compare the open solar magnetic field estimated by the PFSS model based on the WSO photospheric field observations, with the inner heliospheric magnetic field. We trace the observed radial HMF into the coronal PFSS boundary at 2.5 solar radii using the observed solar wind velocity, and determine the PFSS model field at the line-of-sight footpoint. Comparing the two field values, we calculate the power n of the apparent decrease of the radial field. According to expectations based on Maxwell's equations, also reproduced by Parker's HMF model, the radial HMF field should decrease with n=2. However, comparison gives considerably lower values of n, indicating the effect of HCS in the PFSS model and the possible superexpansion. The n values vary with solar cycle, being roughly 1.3-1.4 at minima and about 1.7 at maxima. Interestingly, the n values for the two HMF sectors show systematic differences in the late declining to minimum phase, with smaller n values for the HMF sector dominant in the northern hemisphere. This is in agreement with the smaller field value in the northern hemisphere and the southward shifted HCS, summarized by the concept of the bashful ballerina. We also find that the values of n during the recent years, in the late declining phase of solar cycle 23, are significantly larger than during the same phase of the previous cycles. This agrees with the exceptionally large tilt of the solar dipole at the end of cycle 23. We also find that the bashful ballerina appears even during SC 23 but the related hemispheric differences are smaller than during the previous cycles.

  13. Influence of the magnetic field on microorganisms in the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    BRKOVIC, Snezana; POSTIC, Srdjan; ILIC, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of their lives, all living organisms are exposed to the influence of geomagnetic fields. Objectives : With respect to the positive effects that magnetic fields have on human tissues, especially the bactericidal effect, this investigation aimed to assess their influence on the reduction of oral microorganisms. Material and Methods : In order to obtain adequate specimens of dental plaque deposit, microbes such as Streptococcus parasanguinis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Rhodococcus equi and Candida albicans were isolated from the human mouth. To establish the intensity of microbial growth on the basis of the modified optical density (OD) of agar turbidimetry assay, microbial count and spectrophotometry were applied. The study was carried out with two microbial concentrations (1 and 10 CFU/ml) after periods of incubation of 24 and 48 h and using micromagnets. Results : A positive effect of the magnetic field, resulting in the reduction of dental plaque microbes in vitro, was found. In the first 24 hours of exposure to the magnetic field, the number of all isolated microbes was significantly reduced. The most potent influence of magnets and the most intensified reduction after 24 hours were evident in Candida albicans colonies. The decrease in the influence of magnets on microbes in vitro was also detected. Conclusions : Magnets reduce the number of microbes and might be recommended as a supplement in therapy for reduced periodontal tissues. This is important because periodontal tissues that are in good conditions provide prolonged support to the oral tissues under partial and supradental denture. PMID:26018310

  14. Familiarization Protocol Influences Reproducibility of 20-km Cycling Time-Trial Performance in Novice Participants.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Andrew W; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Polman, Remco C J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Exercise performance is reproducible in experienced athletes; however, less trained participants exhibit greater variability in performance and pacing. To reduce variability, it is common practice to complete a familiarization prior to experimental testing. However, there are no clear guidelines for familiarizing novice participants to a cycling time-trial (TT), and research findings from novice populations may still be influenced by learning effects. Accordingly, the aims of this study were to establish the variability between TTs after administering differing familiarization protocols (duration or type) and to establish the number of familiarization trials required to limit variability over multiple trials. Methods: Thirty recreationally active participants, with no prior experience of a TT, performed a 20-km cycling TT on five separate occasions, after completing either a full (FF, 20-km TT, n = 10), a half (HF, 10-km TT, n = 10) or an equipment familiarization (EF, 5-min cycling, n = 10). Results: Variability of TT duration across five TTs was the lowest after completing FF (P = 0.69, η p(2) = 0.05) compared to HF (P = 0.08, η p(2) = 0.26) and EF (P = 0.07, η p(2) = 0.21). In the FF group after TT2, the effect size for changes in TT duration was small (d < 0.49). There were large differences between later TTs in HF (d = 1.02, TT3-TT4) and EF (d = 1.12, TT4-TT5). The variability in mean power output profiles between trials was lowest within FF, with a similar pacing profile reproduced between TT3-TT5. Discussion: Familiarization of the exercise protocol influenced reproducibility of pacing and performance over multiple, maximal TTs, with best results obtained after a full experience of the exercise compared to HF and EF. The difference of TT1 to later TTs indicates that one familiarization is not adequate in reducing the variability of performance for novice participants. After the FF and an additional TT, performance changes between TTs were

  15. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  16. The Influence of Serial Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing on Power Output during a Cycle Sprint

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Shaun M.; Findlay, Scott; Kavaliauskas, Mykolas; Grant, Marie Clare

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of serial administration of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on performance, metabolic and perceptual responses during a cycle sprint. Twelve physically active males (mean (± SD) age: 23.1 (3.0) years, height: 1.83 (0.07) m, body mass (BM): 86.3 (13.5) kg) completed the following mouth rinse trials in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind fashion; 1. 8 x 5 second rinses with a 25 ml CHO (6% w/v maltodextrin) solution, 2. 8 x 5 second rinses with a 25 ml placebo (PLA) solution. Following mouth rinse administration, participants completed a 30 second sprint on a cycle ergometer against a 0.075 g·kg-1 BM resistance. Eight participants achieved a greater peak power output (PPO) in the CHO trial, resulting in a significantly greater PPO compared with PLA (13.51 ± 2.19 vs. 13.20 ± 2.14 W·kg-1, p < 0.05). Magnitude inference analysis reported a likely benefit (81% likelihood) of the CHO mouth rinse on PPO. In the CHO trial, mean power output (MPO) showed a trend for being greater in the first 5 seconds of the sprint and lower for the remainder of the sprint compared with the PLA trial (p > 0.05). No significant between-trials difference was reported for fatigue index, perceived exertion, arousal and nausea levels, or blood lactate and glucose concentrations. Serial administration of a CHO mouth rinse may significantly improve PPO during a cycle sprint. This improvement appears confined to the first 5 seconds of the sprint, and may come at a greater relative cost for the remainder of the sprint. Key points The paper demonstrates that repeated administration of a carbohydrate mouth rinse can significantly improve peak power output during a single 30 second cycle sprint. The ergogenic effect of the carbohydrate mouth rinse may relate to the duration of exposure of the oral cavity to the mouth rinse, and associated greater stimulation of oral carbohydrate receptors. The significant increase in peak power

  17. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy influence on voltage-driven spin-diode effect in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Chȩciński, Jakub; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2017-05-01

    We study the influence of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on the voltage-induced ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). An MTJ response to the applied radio-frequency voltage excitation is investigated using micromagnetic calculations with the free layer oriented both in-plane and out-of-plane. Our model allows for a quantitative description of the magnetic system parameters such as resonance frequency, sensitivity or quality factor and for a distinction between material-dependent internal damping and disorder-dependent effective damping. We find that the sensitivity abruptly increases up to three orders of magnitude near the anisotropy transition regime, while the quality factor declines due to effective damping increase. We attribute the origin of this behaviour to the changes of the exchange energy in the system, which is calculated using micromagnetic approach.

  18. Plastic Deformation Influence on Intrinsic Magnetic Field of Austenitic Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetana, Milan; Čápová, Klára; Chudáčik, Vladimír; Palček, Peter; Oravcová, Monika

    2016-12-01

    This article deals with non-destructive evaluation of austenitic stainless steels, which are used as the biomaterials in medical practice. Intrinsic magnetic field is investigated using the fluxgate sensor, after the applied plastic deformation. The three austenitic steel types are studied under the same conditions, while several values of the deformation are applied, respectively. The obtained results are presented and discussed in the paper.

  19. Influence of technology on magnetic tape storage device characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gniewek, John J.; Vogel, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    There are available today many data storage devices that serve the diverse application requirements of the consumer, professional entertainment, and computer data processing industries. Storage technologies include semiconductors, several varieties of optical disk, optical tape, magnetic disk, and many varieties of magnetic tape. In some cases, devices are developed with specific characteristics to meet specification requirements. In other cases, an existing storage device is modified and adapted to a different application. For magnetic tape storage devices, examples of the former case are 3480/3490 and QIC device types developed for the high end and low end segments of the data processing industry respectively, VHS, Beta, and 8 mm formats developed for consumer video applications, and D-1, D-2, D-3 formats developed for professional video applications. Examples of modified and adapted devices include 4 mm, 8 mm, 12.7 mm and 19 mm computer data storage devices derived from consumer and professional audio and video applications. With the conversion of the consumer and professional entertainment industries from analog to digital storage and signal processing, there have been increasing references to the 'convergence' of the computer data processing and entertainment industry technologies. There has yet to be seen, however, any evidence of convergence of data storage device types. There are several reasons for this. The diversity of application requirements results in varying degrees of importance for each of the tape storage characteristics.

  20. Static magnetic field influence on rat brain function detected by heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Veliks, Viktors; Ceihnere, Edīte; Svikis, Igors; Aivars, Juris

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) on rat brain structures that control autonomic functions, specifically heart rate and heart rhythmicity. The experiments were carried out on 44 male Wistar rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. SMF was induced using samarium-cobalt fused magnets (20 x 20 x 10 mm in size) placed bitemporally. Magnetic induction intensity was 100 mT on the surface of the head. Duration of magnetic field application was 15 min. An electrocardiogram was recorded from limb lead II, and both heart rate (average duration of cardiac cycles) and heart rhythmicity were analyzed before and after SMF application. SMF evoked changes in both heart rate and rhythm in 80% of the animals; the predominant effects were bradycardia and disappearance of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, the effectiveness of SMF in large measure depends on both functional peculiarities and functional activities of brain autonomic centers.

  1. Influence of Nb addition on vacancy defects and magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaja, Małgorzata; Gębara, Piotr; Filipecki, Jacek; Pawlik, Katarzyna; Przybył, Anna; Pawlik, Piotr; Wysłocki, Jerzy J.; Filipecka, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    In present work, influence of Nb addition on vacancy defects and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, was investigated. Samples with composition (Nd,Fe,B)100-xNbx (where x=6,7,8) were studied in as-cast state and after annealing. Samples were prepared by arc-melting with high purity of constituent elements under Ar atmosphere. Ribbons were obtained by melt-spinning technique under low pressure of Ar. Ribbon samples in as-cast state had amorphous structure and soft magnetic properties. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy PALS has been applied to detection of positron - trapping voids (vacancy defects). With increase of Nb in alloy increasing of vacancy defects concentration was observed. Heat treatment of the samples was carried out at various temperatures (from 923 K to 1023 K) for 5 min, in order to obtain nanocrystalline structure. The aim of present work was to determine the influence of Nb addition and annealing conditions on the vacancy defects and magnetic properties of the Nd-Fe-B- type alloys in as-cast state and after heat treatment.

  2. The influence of temperature on the cycle life performance of rechargeable Li-TiS2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Huang, C.-K.; Deligiannis, F.; Halpert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report studies on the influence of low temperature on the properties and cycling performance of six selected electrolytes. The electrolytes investigated were 2-MeTHF, EC/2-MeTHF, THF, THF/2-MeTHF, EC/THF, and EC/THF/2-MeTHF. All the electrolytes contained 1.5M LiAsF6. Open circuit stand tests indicated that organic electrolytes exhibited improved stability towards lithium at 10 C. However, cycling of the cells at 10 C did not result in improved cycle life performance.

  3. The rock magnetic characteristics of last glacial cycle loess from the island of Susak (Adriatic Sea, Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, Ulrich; Duchoslav, Maguerita; Rolf, Christian; Wacha, Lara; Frechen, Manfred; Galovic, Lidija

    2010-05-01

    palaeosols occur at 3 and 5.5 metre depth and two macroscopically visible volcanic tephra layers are intercalated in the upper part of the section. At present, we assume that the sequence represents the entire last glacial cycle (11-130 kyr). The concentration dependent magnetic parameters (e.g. magnetic low field susceptibility, SIRM) do not at all resemble the lithology. Volume susceptibility in unaltered loess exceeds even 1*10-3 SI which is at least 3 times higher compared to loess from the middle Danube basin only a few hundreds of kilometres to the East (Markovic et al. 2009). Grain size dependent magnetic parameters (e.g. frequency dependent magnetic susceptibility, S-ratio, etc.) reveal the relative enhancement of superparamagnetic particles and the formation of high-coercivity minerals in the pedogenetically altered horizons. However, in general the magnetic signal seems to be controlled by the primarily detrital minerals and climatically governed relatively weak alterations occur only in the macroscopically visible pedohorizons. During the last glacial cycle, the sea level of the Adriatic Sea was lowered by several decametres at least. As a consequence, the alluvial plain of the Po River extended far to the Southeast and provided the sand and silt which were blown to the shallow mountain ranges forming today the islands of the Dalmatian archipelago (Cremaschi 1990). Pleistocene and recent floodplain deposits of the Po River in North Italy contain large amounts of heavy minerals from the metamorphic series of the Central Alps. This detritus may control the magnetic properties of the aeolian deposits on the island of Susak. Further petrographical and mineral magnetic studies are necessary to prove our hypothesis.

  4. Microstructure and magnetic properties of magnetic fluids consisting of shifted dipole particles under the influence of an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Weeber, Rudolf; Klinkigt, Marco; Kantorovich, Sofia; Holm, Christian

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the structure of a recently proposed magnetic fluid consisting of shifted dipolar (SD) particles in an externally applied magnetic field via computer simulations. For standard dipolar fluids the applied magnetic field usually enhances the dipole-dipole correlations and facilitates chain formation whereas in the present system the effect of an external field can result in a break-up of clusters. We thoroughly investigate the origin of this phenomenon through analyzing first the ground states of the SD-particle systems as a function of an applied field. In a second step we quantify the microstructure of these systems as functions of the shift parameter, the effective interaction parameter, and the applied magnetic field strength. We conclude the paper by showing that with the proper choice of parameters, it is possible to create a system of SD-particles with highly interacting magnetic particles, whose initial susceptibility is below the Langevin susceptibility, and which remains spatially isotropic even in a very strong external magnetic field.

  5. Sedimentary iron cycling and the origin and preservation of magnetization in platform carbonate muds, Andros Island, Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloof, Adam C.; Kopp, Robert E.; Grotzinger, John P.; Fike, David A.; Bosak, Tanja; Vali, Hojotollah; Poussart, Pascale M.; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    2007-07-01

    Carbonate muds deposited on continental shelves are abundant and well-preserved throughout the geologic record because shelf strata are difficult to subduct and peritidal carbonate units often form thick, rheologically strong units that resist penetrative deformation. Much of what we know about pre-Mesozoic ocean chemistry, carbon cycling, and global change is derived from isotope and trace element geochemistry of platform carbonates. Paleomagnetic data from the same sediments would be invaluable, placing records of paleolatitude, paleogeography, and perturbations to the geomagnetic field in the context and relative chronology of chemostratigraphy. To investigate the depositional and early diagenetic processes that contribute to magneitzation in carbonates, we surveyed over 500 core and surface samples of peritidal, often microbially bound carbonate muds spanning the last ˜ 1000 yr and deposited on top of Pleistocene aeolianites in the Triple Goose Creek region of northwest Andros Island, Bahamas. Sedimentological, geochemical, magnetic and ferromagnetic resonance properties divide the sediment columns into three biogeochemical zones. In the upper sediments, the dominant magnetic mineral is magnetite, produced by magnetotactic bacteria and dissimiliatory microbial iron metabolism. At lower depths, above or near mean tide level, microbial iron reduction dissolves most of the magnetic particles in the sediment. In some cores, magnetic iron sulfides precipitate in a bottom zone of sulfate reduction, likely coupled to the oxidation of decaying mangrove roots. The remanent magnetization preserved in all oriented samples appears indistinguishable from the modern local geomagnetic field, which reflects the post-depositional origin of magnetic particles in the lower zone of the parasequence. While we cannot comment on the effects of late-stage diagenesis or metamorphism on remanence in carbonates, we postulate that early-cemented, thin-laminated parasequence tops in

  6. New isolated gate bipolar transistor two-quadrant chopper power supply for a fast field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, D. M.; Marques, G. D.; Sebastião, P. J.; Ribeiro, A. C.

    2003-10-01

    This work, presents, for the first time, an Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) two-quadrant chopper power supply for a fast field cycling (FFC) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. This power supply was designed to achieve a maximum current of 200 A with good efficiency, low semiconductor losses, low cost, and easy maintenance. Both energy storage circuits and dumping circuits are used to obtain switching times less than 2 ms between field levels in agreement with the FFC technique specifications. The current ripple at high currents is better than 1×10-4 and presents a specific shape which can be used for additional compensation using auxiliary circuits. The implemented power supply was tested and been continuously operating with a home-built FFC solenoidal magnet, associated cooling system, and rf units for fields between 0 and 0.2 T.

  7. Reproducing the Photospheric Magnetic Field Evolution During the Rise of Cycle 24 with Flux Transport by Supergranules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun s photosphere by an evolving pattern of cellular horizontal flows (supergranules). Characteristics of the simulated flow pattern match observed characteristics including the velocity power spectrum, cell lifetimes, and cell pattern motion in longitude and latitude. Simulations using an average, and north-south symmetric, meridional motion of the cellular pattern produce polar magnetic fields that are too weak in the North and too strong in the South. Simulations using cellular patterns with meridional motions that evolve with the observed changes in strength and north-south asymmetry will be analyzed to see if they reproduce the polar field evolution observed during the rise of Cycle 24.

  8. Reproducing the Photospheric Magnetic Field Evolution during the Rise of Cycle 24 with Flux Transport by Supergranules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David; Upton, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun s photosphere by an evolving pattern of cellular horizontal flows (supergranules). Characteristics of the simulated flow pattern can match observed characteristics including the velocity power spectrum, cell lifetimes, and cell motions in longitude and latitude. Simulations using an average, and north-south symmetric, meridional motion of the cellular pattern produce polar magnetic fields that are too weak in the North and too strong in the South. Simulations using cellular patterns with meridional motions that evolve with the observed changes in strength and north-south asymmetry will be analyzed to see if they reproduce the polar field evolution observed during the rise of Cycle 24.

  9. Comparison of the pedalling performance induced by magnetic and electrical stimulation cycle ergometry in able-bodied subjects.

    PubMed

    Szecsi, J; Straube, A; Fornusek, C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the mechanical power and work generated by able-bodied subjects during functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) vs. functional electrical stimulation (FES) induced ergometer training conditions. Both stimulation methods were applied at a 30 Hz frequency to the quadriceps muscles of 22 healthy able-bodied subjects to induce cycling for 4× four minutes or until exhaustion. FMS was performed via large surface, cooled coils, while FES was applied with a typical stimulation setup used for cycling. Significantly more (p<10(-3)) muscular power was generated by FMS (23.8 ± 9.1W [mean ± SD]) than by FES (11.3 ± 11.3 W). Additionally, significantly more (p<10(-6)) work was produced by FMS than by FES (4.413 ± 2.209 kJ vs. 0.974 ± 1.269 kJ). The increase in the work was paralleled by a significant prolongation of time to cycling failure (181.8 ± 33.4s vs. 87.0 ± 54.0 s, respectively, p<10(-5)). Compared to FES, FMS can produce more intense and longer cycling exercise in able-bodied subjects. The differing dynamic behaviour of FMS and FES in the presented measurement setup might be related to stimulation induced pain and fatigue mechanisms of the neuromuscular system.

  10. Influence of quantum degeneracy on the performance of a gas Stirling engine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ji-Zhou; Mao, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2006-09-01

    Based on the state equation of an ideal quantum gas, the regenerative loss of a Stirling engine cycle working with an ideal quantum gas is calculated. Thermal efficiency of the cycle is derived. Furthermore, under the condition of quantum degeneracy, several special thermal efficiencies are discussed. Ratios of thermal efficiencies versus the temperature ratio and volume ratio of the cycle are made. It is found that the thermal efficiency of the cycle not only depends on high and low temperatures but also on maximum and minimum volumes. In a classical gas state the thermal efficiency of the cycle is equal to that of the Carnot cycle. In an ideal quantum gas state the thermal efficiency of the cycle is smaller than that of the Carnot cycle. This will be significant for deeper understanding of the gas Stirling engine cycle.

  11. Magnetic properties of bcc Iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment: electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Guntram; Gerber, Iann C

    2015-01-14

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of low-indexed iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment on these properties. We have considered the (1 0 0), (1 1 0), (1 1 1), (2 1 1) and (3 1 0) surfaces, both, bare and with the presence of adsorbates. These were chosen to mimic realistic chemical synthesis environments, being H, Cl, HCl, NH3, NH4Cl, or CH3COOH. We have found an increased magnetization at all bare surfaces. Upon H adsorption the magnetization is generally reduced, but still above the bulk value. All other ligands and their dissociated parts alter the magnetic properties of the surfaces only weakly. Our calculations do not indicate that ligands are responsible for experimental observations of Fe nanoparticles with average magnetizations below the bulk value.

  12. Magnetic properties of bcc Iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment: electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Guntram; Gerber, Iann C.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of low-indexed iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment on these properties. We have considered the (1 0 0), (1 1 0), (1 1 1), (2 1 1) and (3 1 0) surfaces, both, bare and with the presence of adsorbates. These were chosen to mimic realistic chemical synthesis environments, being H, Cl, HCl, NH3, NH4Cl, or CH3COOH. We have found an increased magnetization at all bare surfaces. Upon H adsorption the magnetization is generally reduced, but still above the bulk value. All other ligands and their dissociated parts alter the magnetic properties of the surfaces only weakly. Our calculations do not indicate that ligands are responsible for experimental observations of Fe nanoparticles with average magnetizations below the bulk value.

  13. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF CORONAL NULL POINTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MAGNETIC BREAKOUT MODEL OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G. R.; Mackay, D. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu E-mail: duncan@mcs.st-and.ac.u

    2009-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate the solar cycle variation of coronal null points and magnetic breakout configurations in spherical geometry, using a combination of magnetic flux transport and potential field source surface models. Within the simulations, a total of 2843 coronal null points and breakout configurations are found over two solar cycles. It is found that the number of coronal nulls present at any time varies cyclically throughout the solar cycle, in phase with the flux emergence rate. At cycle maximum, peak values of 15-17 coronal nulls per day are found. No significant variation in the number of nulls is found from the rising to the declining phase. This indicates that the magnetic breakout model is applicable throughout both phases of the solar cycle. In addition, it is shown that when the simulations are used to construct synoptic data sets, such as those produced by Kitt Peak, the number of coronal nulls drops by a factor of 1/6. The vast majority of the coronal nulls are found to lie above the active latitudes and are the result of the complex nature of the underlying active region fields. Only 8% of the coronal nulls are found to be connected to the global dipole. Another interesting feature is that 18% of coronal nulls are found to lie above the equator due to cross-equatorial interactions between bipoles lying in the northern and southern hemispheres. As the majority of coronal nulls form above active latitudes, their average radial extent is found to be in the low corona below 1.25 R {sub sun} (175, 000 km above the photosphere). Through considering the underlying photospheric flux, it is found that 71% of coronal nulls are produced though quadrupolar flux distributions resulting from bipoles in the same hemisphere interacting. When the number of coronal nulls present in each rotation is compared to the number of bipoles emerging, a wide scatter is found. The ratio of coronal nulls to emerging bipoles is found to be approximately 1/3. Overall

  14. 1H relaxation enhancement induced by nanoparticles in solutions: Influence of magnetic properties and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Taheri, S. Mehdizadeh; Kozłowski, A.; Förster, S.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles that induce nuclear relaxation are the most promising materials to enhance the sensitivity in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation enhancement in solutions, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 1H spin-lattice relaxation for decalin and toluene solutions of various Fe2O3 nanoparticles was investigated. The relaxation experiments were performed in a frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz by applying Field Cycling method, and in the temperature range of 257-298 K, using nanoparticles differing in size and shape: spherical - 5 nm diameter, cubic - 6.5 nm diameter, and cubic - 9 nm diameter. The relaxation dispersion data were interpreted in terms of a theory of nuclear relaxation induced by magnetic crystals in solution. The approach was tested with respect to its applicability depending on the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystals and the time-scale of translational diffusion of the solvent. The role of Curie relaxation and the contributions to the overall 1H spin-lattice relaxation associated with the electronic spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation was thoroughly discussed. It was demonstrated that the approach leads to consistent results providing information on the magnetic (electronic) properties of the nanocrystals, i.e., effective electron spin and relaxation times. In addition, features of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation resulting from the electronic properties of the crystals and the solvent diffusion were explained.

  15. The Influence of Solar Proton Events in Solar Cycle 23 on the Neutral Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; vonKonig, Miriam; Anderson, John; Roble, Raymond G.; McPeters, Richard D.; Fleming, Eric L.; Russell, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth's middle atmosphere. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HO(x) (H, OH, HO2) and NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The HO(x) increases lead to short-lived ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere due to the short lifetimes of the HO, constituents. The NO(x) increases lead to long-lived stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NO(y) constituents in this region. Solar cycle 23 was quite active with SPEs and very large fluxes of high energy protons occurred in July and November 2000, November 200 1, and April 2002. Smaller, but still substantial, proton fluxes impacted the Earth during other months in the 1997-2003 time period. The impact of the very large SPEs on the neutral middle atmosphere during solar cycle 23 will be discussed, including the HO(x), NO(y), ozone variations and induced atmospheric transport changes. Two multi-dimensional models, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Two-dimensional (2D) Model and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM), were used in computing the influence of the SPEs. The results of the GSFC 2D Model and the TIME-GCM will be shown along with comparisons to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments.

  16. Mosses influence phosphorus cycling in rich fens by driving redox conditions in shallow soils.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Katherine F; Bedford, Barbara L

    2011-09-01

    Mosses play an integral role in the hydrologic regimes of ecosystems where they cover the soil surface, and thus affect biogeochemical cycling of elements influenced by soil oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, including the plant growth-limiting nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus (P). In rich fens where P often limits plant growth, we hypothesized that feedbacks between mosses and redox conditions would determine P availability to shallow-rooted forb species that constitute much of these wetlands' unusually high plant species diversity. In a moss removal experiment in three fens, forb tissue P and microbial P were greater while anion exchange membrane (AEM) resin P was lower where mosses occurred than where they were removed, suggesting both higher availability and greater demand for P in moss-covered soils. Coupled physicochemical and biological mechanisms drove moss effects on P cycling, ultimately through effects on soil oxygenation or reduction: higher redox potential underlying mosses corresponded to greater microbial activity, phosphatase enzyme activity, and colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), all of which can promote greater P availability to plants. These more oxidized soils stimulated: (1) greater microbial activity and root vigor; (2) correspondingly greater P demand via microbial uptake, forb uptake, and iron (Fe)-P reactions; and (3) greater P supply through soil and root phosphatase activity and AMF colonization. This work demonstrates that mosses improve vascular plant P acquisition by alleviating stresses caused by reducing conditions that would otherwise prevail in shallow underlying soils, thus providing a mechanism by which mosses facilitate plant species diversity in rich fens.

  17. [The influence of general magnetic therapy on the psychological status of the patients presenting with osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Degtiarev, V K; Aleksandrov, A V; Nenasheva, N V; Cherkashina, I V; Nikitin, M V

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to estimate the influence of general magnetic therapy on the psychical conditions of 151 patients presenting with degenerative joint diseases including osteoarthritis (OA). It was shown that the application of general magnetic therapy for the rehabilitative treatment of osteoarthrosis promotes the improvement of the psycho-emotional state of the patients. It is concluded that prescription of general magnetic therapy to the patients with OA suffering from serious psycho-emotional disorders brings about beneficial changes in their anxiety- and depression-related personality traits.

  18. External magnetic field influence on H{sub {alpha}} line in abnormal glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Obradovic, B.M.; Dojcinovic, I.P.; Kuraica, M.M.; Puric, J.

    2006-04-03

    Influence of the external axial magnetic field on the hydrogen H{sub {alpha}} line profiles in an abnormal glow discharge has been studied. It has been found that the applied magnetic field predominantly increases the intensity of central component of the characteristic excessively broadened H{sub {alpha}} profile. Magnetic filed causes helical motion of electrons along the electric field lines and prolongs their trajectories increasing the number of collisions with matrix gas. This explains the increase of the central component of H{sub {alpha}} profile and can be regarded as an experimental proof for the main contribution of electron excitation to that part of the profile.

  19. Gravitational Influences on Magnetic Field Structure in Accretion Disks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneck, K.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The structure of the magnetic fields associated with plasma disks surrounding black holes is identified when the effects of gravitational and Lorentz forces on the dynamics of the disk are comparable. The effects of corrections to the radial gravitational force% ρGM*R(R^2+z^2)^3/2 are explored within the geometry of a thin disk. A significant external magnetic field component is considered, along with an internal component due to the azimuthal current configuration. The relation of the resulting configuration to the field structure when the gravitational force can be neglectedfootnotetextB. Coppi, Phys. Plasmas 12, 057302 (2005)^,footnotetextCoppi, B. and Rousseau, F. Astrophysical Journal, 641: 458-470 (2006) is discussed. The relevant equations for the pseudo-Newtonian potentialfootnotetextPaczy'nski, B. and Wiita, P. J. Astron. Astrophys. 88: 23 (1980) describing the physics near the event horizon of the black hole are also derived and the physical consequences are explored. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the MIT Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

  20. Influence of all-out and fast start on 5-min cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Aisbett, Brad; Lerossignol, Peter; McConell, Glenn Kevin; Abbiss, Chris Richard; Snow, Rod

    2009-10-01

    To examine the influence of two different fast-start pacing strategies on performance and oxygen consumption (VO2) during cycle ergometer time trials lasting ∼5 min. Eight trained male cyclists performed four cycle ergometer time trials whereby the total work completed (113 ± 11.5 kJ; mean ± SD) was identical to the better of two 5-min self-paced familiarization trials. During the performance trials, initial power output was manipulated to induce either an all-out or a fast start. Power output during the first 60 s of the fast-start trial was maintained at 471.0 ± 48.0 W, whereas the all-out start approximated a maximal starting effort for the first 15 s (mean power: 753.6 ± 76.5 W) followed by 45 s at a constant power output (376.8 ± 38.5 W). Irrespective of starting strategy, power output was controlled so that participants would complete the first quarter of the trial (28.3 ± 2.9 kJ) in 60 s. Participants performed two trials using each condition, with their fastest time trial compared. Performance time was significantly faster when cyclists adopted the all-out start (4 min 48 s ± 8 s) compared with the fast start (4 min 51 s ± 8 s; P < 0.05). The first-quarter VO2 during the all-out start trial (3.4 ± 0.4 L·min(-1)) was significantly higher than during the fast-start trial (3.1 ± 0.4 L·min(-1); P < 0.05). After removal of an outlier, the percentage increase in first-quarter VO2 was significantly correlated (r = -0.86, P < 0.05) with the relative difference in finishing time. An all-out start produces superior middle distance cycling performance when compared with a fast start. The improvement in performance may be due to a faster VO2 response rather than time saved due to a rapid acceleration.

  1. [Effect of the external nasal dilator breathe right and nasal cycle influence].

    PubMed

    Yoshinami, Hiroyoshi; Takegoshi, Hideki; Kikuchi, Shigeru; Iinuma, Toshitaka

    2005-11-01

    The external nasal dilator Breathe Right is a nonprescription disposable mechanical device worn over the bridge of the nose that supports the outer walls of the nasal vestibule to increase cross-sectional nasal valve area and enhance air flow through the nose. When worn, the device applies a gentle outward pull to the outside walls of the nasal vestibule that helps prevent collapse of the lateral walls of the nasal vestibule. The device appears similar to an adhesive bandage with two polyester springs attached lengthwise to the nonadhesive side of the backing material. The form of the external nose varies significantly between racial groups and some comment is possible about the form of the nasal valve, i.e., Caucasian noses are leptorrhine, Negroid noses platyrrhine, and Oriental noses intermediate. A question exists about whether Breathe Right is as effective in Japanese as in Caucasians against nasal obstruction. We measured the effect by acoustic rhinometry in 35 healthy subjects. We measured 2 cross-sectional areas-the I-notch and C-notch-and 3 nasal volumes-V(0-1), from 0 to 1 cm corresponding to the I-notch, V(1-3), from 1 to 3cm corresponding to the C notch, and V (3-6), from 3 to 6cm. We studied the influence of the nasal cycle on the effect of Breathe Right in the nasal cavity. We evaluated subjects in a stable sitting position before applying Breathe Right, after using 5 minutes, and in a free interval of 25 minutes following. The experiment was repeated 10 times. We found that Breathe Right increases the nasal volume especially in V(1-3) and the cross-sectional area especially in the C-notch. Interestingly, the change in the C-notch decreased gradually with time. One possible mechanism may be the change in compliance between the skin under the Breathe Right and the nasal mucous membrane. The nasal cycle did not significantly influence the effect of Breathe Right.

  2. Influence of magnetic field structure on the conduction cooling of flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model facilitates calculation of the influence of magnetic-field configuration on the conduction cooling rate of a hot post-flare coronal plasma. The magnetic field is taken to be that produced by a line dipole or point dipole at an arbitrary depth below the chromosphere. For the high temperatures (at least 10 million K) produced by flares, the plasma may remain static and isobaric. The influence of the field is such as to increase the heat flux (per unit area) into the chromosphere, but to decrease the total conduction cooling of the flare plasma. This leads to a significant enhancement of the total energy radiated by the flare plasma.

  3. Probing latitudinal variations of the solar magnetic field in cycles 21-23 by Parker's Two-Layer Dynamo Model with meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E.; Zharkova, V.; Zharkov, S.

    2013-11-01

    Principle component analysis (PCA) of the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) measured from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) magnetograms revealed the following principal components (PCs) in latitudes: two main symmetric components, which are the same for all cycles 21-23, and three pairs of asymmetric components, which are unique for each cycle. These SBMF variations are assumed to be those of poloidal magnetic field travelling slightly off-phase from pole to pole while crossing the equator. They are assumed to be caused by a joint action of dipole and quadruple magnetic sources in the Sun. In the current paper, we make the first attempt to interpret these latitudinal variations in the surface magnetic field with Parker's two-layer dynamo model. The latitudinal distributions of such waves are simulated for cycles 21-23 by the modified Parker's dynamo model taking into account both α and ω effects operating simultaneously in the two (upper and lower) layers of the solar convective zone (SCZ) and having opposite directions of meridional circulation. The simulations are carried out for both dipole and quadruple magnetic sources with the dynamo parameters specifically selected to provide the curves fitting closely the PCs derived from SBMF variations in cycles 21-23. The simulations are optimised for matching the positions of maximums in latitude, the number of equator crossings and the phase difference between the two dynamo waves operating in the two layers. The dominant pair of PCs present in each cycle is found to be fully asymmetric with respect to the magnetic poles and produced by a magnetic dipole. This pair is found to account for the two main dynamo waves operating between the two magnetic poles. There are also three further pairs of waves unique to each cycle and associated with multiple magnetic sources in the Sun. For the odd cycle 21 the simulated poloidal field fits the observed PCs, only if they are produced by magnetic sources with a quadruple

  4. THE MORPHOLOGIC PROPERTIES OF MAGNETIC NETWORKS OVER THE SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Chong; Yan Yihua; Zhang Yin; Tan Baolin; Li Gang E-mail: yyh@nao.cas.cn

    2012-11-10

    The morphologic properties of the magnetic networks during Carrington Rotations (CRs) 1955-2091 (from 1999 to 2010) have been analyzed by applying the watershed algorithm to magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Interferometer on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft. We find that the average area of magnetic cells on the solar surface at lower latitudes (within {+-}50 Degree-Sign ) is smaller than that at higher latitudes (beyond {+-}50 Degree-Sign ). Statistical analysis of these data indicates that the magnetic networks are fractal in nature and the average fractal dimension is D{sub f} = 1.253 {+-} 0.011. We also find that both the fractal dimension and the size of the magnetic networks are anti-correlated with the sunspot area. This is perhaps because a strong magnetic field can suppress spatially modulated oscillation and compress the boundaries of network cells, leading to smoother cell boundaries. The fractal dimension of the cell deviates from that predicted from an isobar of Kolmogorov k {sup -5/3} homogeneous turbulence.

  5. North-south asymmetries in the polar thermosphere-ionosphere system: Solar cycle and seasonal influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cnossen, Ingrid; Förster, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that ion drift and neutral wind speeds at ~400 km in the polar cap (>80° magnetic latitude) are on average larger in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) than in the Southern Hemisphere, which is at least partly due to asymmetry in the geomagnetic field. Here we investigate for the first time how these asymmetries depend on season and on solar/geomagnetic activity levels. Ion drift measurements from the Cluster mission show little seasonal dependence in their north-south asymmetry when all data (February 2001-December 2013) are used, but the asymmetry disappears around June solstice for high solar activity and around December solstice for low solar activity. Neutral wind speeds in the polar cap obtained from the Challenging Minisatellite Payload spacecraft (January 2002-December 2008) are always larger in the summer hemisphere, regardless of solar activity, but the high-latitude neutral wind vortices at dawn and dusk tend to be stronger in the NH, except around December solstice, in particular, when solar activity is low. Simulations with the Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere (CMIT) more or less capture the behavior of the ion drift speeds, which can be explained as a superposition of seasonal and geomagnetic field effects, with the former being stronger for higher solar activity. The behavior of the neutral wind speed and vorticity is not accurately captured by the model. This is probably due to an incorrect seasonal cycle in plasma density around ~400 km in CMIT, which affects the ion drag force. This must be addressed in future work.

  6. Influence of rotating resonant magnetic perturbations on particle confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiming; Yu, Q.; Wang, Nengchao; Shi, Peng; Yi, Bin; Ding, Yonghua; Rao, Bo; Chen, Zhipeng; Gao, Li; Hu, Xiwei; Jin, Hai; Li, Mao; Li, Jianchao; Yu, Kexun; Zhuang, Ge; the J-TEXT Team

    2014-12-01

    The effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on particle confinement is studied in J-TEXT tokamak by using externally applied rotating RMPs. It is found that RMPs cause improved (degraded) particle confinement when its frequency is higher (lower) than the natural m/n = 2/1 tearing mode frequency, and the amount of change in electron density is proportional to the difference between these two frequencies, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode number, respectively. These results reveal the important role of the relative rotation between RMPs and the electron fluid in affecting the particle confinement. The experimental results are compared to numerical ones based on nonlinear two-fluid equations, and quantitative agreement is found.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility and cyclostratigraphy of upper Jurassic marly formations (ANDRA, underground research laboratory, Bure, Eastern Paris Basin): Record of Milankovitch cycles, sedimentary gaps, and implications for regional correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilia, H.; Bruno, G.; Pierre-Yves, C.; Slah, B.; Pascal, E.; Linda, H.; Christian, R.

    2006-05-01

    This study integrates research conducted by ANDRA at the Underground Research Laboratory of Bure (Meuse, France) to investigate the feasibility of a deep geological waste repository in clay for high-level and long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste. The aim of this study is to detect possible sedimentary gaps in the upper Callovian-lower Oxfordian homogeneous marly formation where the laboratory is located, and to estimate the duration of stages and biostratigraphic zonation by comparison with a basin sequence from the southeast of France that is presumed to have accumulated continuously. The search for hiatuses was made using a high resolution cyclostratigraphic approach based on the study of magnetic susceptibility (MS) fluctuations. Four ANDRA boreholes (EST 342, EST 322, EST 103 and EST 312) oriented on a SW-NE transect (40 kilometers) were analyzed. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were made on core samples with a Bartington Instruments MS2E1 sensor every 4 centimeters. Sedimentological data suggest that variations of the clay content influence the long term evolution of MS. The high frequency variations in MS were subjected to spectral analysis. Composite cycles of 0.5, 1 and 2.5 m thickness were recognized on the basis of frequency ratio and correspond to the frequency ratio of orbital Milankovitch cycles. The duration of the Mariae ammonite zone in the Paris Basin was estimated by counting the cycles, to be between 2.4 and 2.6 My ± 0.3 ky (borehole EST 322 & EST 103). The amplitude spectrum shows (1) sedimentation rate variations in particular in the lower Oxfordian and (2) interruptions in cycle evolution correlated to sequential limits. We interpret these zones as short condensed levels. The same methods were applied to sections from the southeast of France (Aspres-sur-Buëch, Thuoux), and the Mariae ammonite zone estimated to be between 2.3 and 2.8 My of age. By comparison of this biostratigraphic zone between the two studied regions

  8. The influence of a neotropical herbivore (Lamponius portoricensis) on nutrient cycling and soil processes.

    PubMed

    Fonte, S J; Schowalter, T D

    2005-12-01

    The role of phytophagous insects in ecosystem nutrient cycling remains poorly understood. By altering the flow of litterfall nutrients from the canopy to the forest floor, herbivores may influence key ecosystem processes. We manipulated levels of herbivory in a lower montane tropical rainforest of Puerto Rico using the common herbivore, Lamponius portoricensis (Phasmatidea), on a prevalent understory plant, Piper glabrescens (Piperaceae), and measured the effects on nutrient input to the forest floor and on rates of litter decomposition. Four treatment levels of herbivory generated a full range of leaf area removal, from plants experiencing no herbivory to plants that were completely defoliated (>4,000 cm(2) leaf area removed during the 76-day study duration). A significant (P<0.05) positive regression was found between all measures of herbivory (total leaf area removed, greenfall production, and frass-related inputs) and the concentration of NO (3) (-) in ion exchange resin bags located in the litter layer. No significant relationship was found between any of the herbivory components and resin bag concentrations of NH (4) (+) or PO (4) (-) . Rates of litter decay were significantly affected by frass-related herbivore inputs. A marginally significant negative relationship was also found between the litter mass remaining at 47 days and total leaf area removed. This study demonstrated a modest, but direct relationship between herbivory and both litter decomposition and NO (3) (-) transfer to the forest floor. These results suggest that insect herbivores can influence forest floor nutrient dynamics and thus merit further consideration in discussions on ecosystem nutrient dynamics.

  9. Hyperbilirubinemia Influences Sleep-Wake Cycles of Term Newborns in a Non-Linear Manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian; Zhou, Yanxia; Li, Xufang; Cheng, Tingting

    2017-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common cause for irreversible neuronal influence in the brain of term newborns, while the feature of neurological symptoms associated with hyperbilirubinemia has not been well characterized yet. In the present study, we examined a total of 203 neonates suffering from hyperbilirubinemia with a bedside amplitude-integrated Electroencephalography (aEEG) device, in order to determine whether there is any special change in sleep-wake cycles (SWCs). Among these patients, 14 cases showed no recognizable SWCs with the total serum bilirubin (TSB) level at 483.9-996.2 μmol/L; 75 cases exhibited reduced SWCs with the TSB level at 311.2-688.5 μmol/L; and the rest cases had the normal SWCs. The number of the normal SWCs occurrence had a significant negative correlation with the increased TSB level in a non-linear manner (r = -0.689, p <0.001). In addition, the increased TSB reshaped the structure of SWC by narrowing down the broadband and broadening the narrowband. Spearman's correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between the TSB level and the ratio of broadband (r = -0.618, p < 0.001), a significant positive correlation between the TSB level and the narrowband ratio (r = 0.618, p < 0.001), respectively. Furthermore, the change of SWC seemed like a continuous phenomenon, and the hyperbilirubinemia caused SWC changes was fit into a loess model in this paper. In summary, the hyperbilirubinemia influenced SWC of term newborns significantly at a non-linear manner, and these results revealed the feature of the neurological sequela that is associated with TSB.

  10. Hyperbilirubinemia Influences Sleep-Wake Cycles of Term Newborns in a Non-Linear Manner

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lian; Zhou, Yanxia; Li, Xufang; Cheng, Tingting

    2017-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common cause for irreversible neuronal influence in the brain of term newborns, while the feature of neurological symptoms associated with hyperbilirubinemia has not been well characterized yet. In the present study, we examined a total of 203 neonates suffering from hyperbilirubinemia with a bedside amplitude-integrated Electroencephalography (aEEG) device, in order to determine whether there is any special change in sleep-wake cycles (SWCs). Among these patients, 14 cases showed no recognizable SWCs with the total serum bilirubin (TSB) level at 483.9–996.2 μmol/L; 75 cases exhibited reduced SWCs with the TSB level at 311.2–688.5 μmol/L; and the rest cases had the normal SWCs. The number of the normal SWCs occurrence had a significant negative correlation with the increased TSB level in a non-linear manner (r = -0.689, p <0.001). In addition, the increased TSB reshaped the structure of SWC by narrowing down the broadband and broadening the narrowband. Spearman’s correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between the TSB level and the ratio of broadband (r = -0.618, p < 0.001), a significant positive correlation between the TSB level and the narrowband ratio (r = 0.618, p < 0.001), respectively. Furthermore, the change of SWC seemed like a continuous phenomenon, and the hyperbilirubinemia caused SWC changes was fit into a loess model in this paper. In summary, the hyperbilirubinemia influenced SWC of term newborns significantly at a non-linear manner, and these results revealed the feature of the neurological sequela that is associated with TSB. PMID:28072860

  11. How do changes in dissolved oxygen concentration influence microbially-controlled phosphorus cycling in stream biofilms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saia, S. M.; Locke, N. A.; Regan, J. M.; Carrick, H. J.; Buda, A. R.; Walter, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Advances in molecular microbiology techniques (e.g. epi-fluorescent microscopy and PCR) are making it easier to study the influence of specific microorganisms on nutrient transport. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly used in wastewater treatment plants to remove excess phosphorus (P) from effluent water. PAOs have also been identified in natural settings but their ecological function is not well known. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PAOs in natural environments would release and accumulate P during anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. We placed stream biofilms in sealed, covered tubs and subjected them to alternating air (aerobic conditions) and N2 gas (anaerobic condition) bubbling for 12 hours each. Four treatments investigated the influence of changing dissolved oxygen on micribially-controlled P cycling: (1) biofilms bubbled continuously with air, (2) biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2, (3) biocide treated biofilms bubbled continuously with air, and (4) biocide treated biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2. Treatments 3 and 4 serve as abiotic controls to treatments 1 and 2. We analyzed samples every 12 hours for soluble reactive P (SRP), temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH. We also used fluorescent microscopy (i.e. DAPI staining) and PCR to verify the presence of PAOs in the stream biofilms. SRP results over the course of the experiment support our hypothesis that anaerobic and aerobic stream conditions may impact PAO mediated P release and uptake, respectively in natural environments. The results of these experiments draw attention to the importance of microbiological controls on P mobility in freshwater ecosystems.

  12. [The influence of a magnetic field on chromosome sets and cell division].

    PubMed

    Tsoneva, M T; Penchev, P R; Karev, G B; Gishin, S S

    1975-01-01

    An effect of stable magnetic field on karyotype and cell division of human lymphocytes from peripheral blood was studied in tissue culture. Comparative investigations were carried out with lymphocytes, whoch were treated with magnetic field of different tension (0,179; 0,391 and 0,600 Ts) and continuance (30 sec, 30 and 60 min). Lymphocytes, treated with stable magnetic field, were suspended in donor plasma and immediately cultivated after the treatment. The stable magnetic field was found to have a distinct mutagenic effect on cultivated lymphocytes of human peripheral blood. The increase in structural impairements of chromosomes correlated with tension of magnetic field and continuance of its effect. In structural impairements of chromosomes the chromatid gaps and breaks were more often observed but chromosome ruptures and pericentric clearances occurred more rarely. The effect of stable magnetic field on lymphocytes proliferation was studie. Under weak and transient using of magnetic field the proliferation was stimulated, but in rigid conditions--mitosis and blastic transformation were decreased. Continuous effect of magnetic field with weak tension did not inhibite the blastic transformation but influenced on the survival rate of cells in tissue culture, enhancing their lethality.

  13. Magnetic activity of red secondaries: clues from the outburst cycle variations of dwarf novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinarova, L. L.

    Photometric variations of 6 dwarf novae stars are studied based on the photographic observations from the Odessa, Moscow and Sonneberg plate collections and published visual monitoring data from the AFOEV database (Schweitzer E.: 1993, Bull. AFOEV, 64, 14). The moments of maxima are determined by using the "running parabola" fit (Andronov I.L., 1990, Kinematika Fizika Nebesn. Tel., v.6,,N 6, 87) with automatically determined filter half-width (Andronov I.L., 1997, As.Ap. Suppl., in press). All investigated stars exhibit significant changes not only from cycle-to-cycle, but from season-to-season as well. Secondary decade-scale cycles of smooth variations (Bianchini A., 1990, AJ 99, 1941) and abrupt switchings (Andronov I.L., Shakun L.I., 1990, ASS 169, 237) were interpreted by a solar-type activity of the red dwarf secondary in a binary system and may argue for existence of two different subgroups of the dwarf novae.

  14. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for predicting pathological response after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Abramson, Richard G; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Kang, Hakmook; Chakravarthy, Anuradha Bapsi; Abramson, Vandana G; Farley, Jaime; Mayer, Ingrid A; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Means-Powell, Julie; Grau, Ana M; Sanders, Melinda; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), obtained before and after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), is superior to single-parameter measurements for predicting pathologic complete response (pCR) in patients with breast cancer. Patients with stage II/III breast cancer were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved study in which 3-T DCE-MRI and DWI data were acquired before (n = 42) and after 1 cycle (n = 36) of NAC. Estimates of the volume transfer rate (K), extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve), blood plasma volume fraction (vp), and the efflux rate constant (kep = K/ve) were generated from the DCE-MRI data using the Extended Tofts-Kety model. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was estimated from the DWI data. The derived parameter kep/ADC was compared with single-parameter measurements for its ability to predict pCR after the first cycle of NAC. The kep/ADC after the first cycle of NAC discriminated patients who went on to achieve a pCR (P < 0.001) and achieved a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) of 0.92, 0.78, 0.69, and 0.88, respectively. These values were superior to the single parameters kep (AUC, 0.76) and ADC (AUC, 0.82). The AUCs between kep/ADC and kep were significantly different on the basis of the bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals (0.018-0.23), whereas the AUCs between kep/ADC and ADC trended toward significance (-0.11 to 0.24). The multiparametric analysis of DCE-MRI and DWI was superior to the single-parameter measurements for predicting pCR after the first cycle of NAC.

  15. A study of north-south asymmetry of interplanetary magnetic field plasma and some solar indices throughout four solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Borie, M. A.; Abdel-halim, A. A.; El-Monier, S. Y.; Bishara, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    We provide a long epoch study of a set of solar and plasma parameters (sunspot number Rz, total solar irradiance TSI, solar radio flux SF, solar wind speed V, ion density n, dynamic pressure nV 2, and ion temperature T) covering a temporal range of several decades corresponding to almost four solar cycles. Such data have been organized accordingly with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) polarity, i.e. away (A) if the azimuthal component of the IMF points away from the Sun and T if it points towards, to examine the N-S asymmetries between the northern and southern hemispheres. Our results displayed the sign of the N-S asymmetry in solar activity depends on the solar magnetic polarity state (qA>0 or qA<0). The solar flux component of toward field vector was larger in magnitude than those of away field vector during the negative polarity epochs (1986-88 and 2001-08). In addition, the solar wind speeds (SWS) are faster by about 22.11±4.5 km/s for away polarity days than for toward polarity days during the qA<0 epoch (2001-08), where the IMF points away from the Sun. Moreover, during solar cycles 21st and 24th the solar plasma is more dense, hotter, and faster south of the HCS.

  16. Earth's Magnetic Field Dynamics: Space Weather and Solar Cycle Effect Exhibiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, A. L.; Sobitnyak, L. I.; Ryabov, M. I.; Orlyuk, M. I.; Orliuk, I. M.; Romenets, A. A.

    According to the 'Odessa' and 'Kiev' observatories total vector magnetic field variations data for 2008-2010 period, dynamics of the space weather manifestations were considered. Wavelet analysis application made the determination of structure changing in circadian period possible. The features of displaying 12, 8 and 6 hour periods are shown. The nature of their correlation and modulation in solar and geomagnetic activity changing is seen. Two stations changes differences that can result from the latitudinal dependence are examined. The existence of 'Odessa' magnetic anomaly located on land and at sea is reviewed.

  17. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site...

  18. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site...

  19. Evidence for Solar Cycle Influence on the Infrared Energy Budget and Radiative Cooling of the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Williams, Joshua; Turpin, TImothy; Kratz, D. P.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Tom; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for solar cycle influence on the infrared energy budget and radiative cooling of the thermosphere. By analyzing nearly five years of data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, we show that the annual mean infrared power radiated by the nitric oxide (NO) molecule at 5.3 m has decreased by a factor of 2.9. This decrease is correlated (r = 0.96) with the decrease in the annual mean F10.7 solar index. Despite the sharp decrease in radiated power (which is equivalent to a decrease in the vertical integrated radiative cooling rate), the variability of the power as given in the standard deviation of the annual means remains approximately constant. A simple relationship is shown to exist between the infrared power radiated by NO and the F10.7 index, thus providing a fundamental relationship between solar activity and the thermospheric cooling rate for use in thermospheric models. The change in NO radiated power is also consistent with changes in absorbed ultraviolet radiation over the same time period.

  20. The Influence of Zirconium on the Low-Cycle Fatigue Response of Ultrafine-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, P.; Canadinc, D.; Maier, H. J.; Hellmig, R. J.; Zuberova, Z.; Estrin, J.

    2007-09-01

    This article reports on the influence of zirconium (Zr) addition (0.17 wt pct) on the cyclic stability of ultrafine-grained (UFG) oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper (Cu) of originally high (99.995 wt pct) purity processed via equal-channel angular extrusion (ECAE). Systematic low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests accompanied by microstructural investigation revealed that a Zr addition substantially affects the cyclic stability of UFG Cu, such that longer fatigue lives, notable cyclic hardening, and higher stress ranges were attained in the LCF regime. This significant improvement of the fatigue properties of OFHC Cu by the addition of Zr is attributed to the Cu-Zr precipitates and impurities, effectively limiting the mobility of the grain boundaries and additional work hardening imposed by the precipitates. In addition, the strain-amplitude and strain-rate dependencies of the cyclic stability of Zr-added UFG Cu were investigated in detail, where the UFG Cu-Zr alloy exhibits an expressively lesser dependency as compared with the pure UFG Cu. The current results offer new insight into the improvement of the cyclic stability of UFG Cu and other UFG materials, and provides a venue for their utility in a broader range of applications demanding enhanced cyclic deformation response and stability.

  1. Performance analysis of the MHD-steam combined cycle, including the influence of cost

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G. F.; Dennis, C. B.

    1980-08-01

    The MHD Systems group of the ANL Engineering Division is conducting overall system studies, utilizing the computer simulation code that has been developed at ANL. This analytical investigation is exploring a range of possible performance variables, in order to determine the sensitivity of a specific plant design to variation in key system parameters and, ultimately, to establish probable system performance limits. The comprehensive computer code that has been developed for this task will analyze and simulate an MHD power plant for any number of different configurations, and will hold constraints automatically while conducting either sensitivity studies or optimization. A summary of a sensitivity analysis conducted for a combined cycle, MHD-steam power plant is presented. The influence of several of the more important systems parameters were investigated in a systematic fashion, and the results are presented in graphical form. The report is divided into four sections. Following the introduction, the second section describes in detail the results of a validation study conducted to insure that the code is functioning correctly. The third section includes a description of the ANL cost algorithm and a detailed comparison between the ANL cost results and published OCMHD cost information. it is further demonstrated in this section that good agreement is obtained for the calculated cost of electricity. The fourth section is a sensitivity study and optimization for a specific OCMHD configuration over several key plant parameters.

  2. Induction of mammary tumors in rat by intraperitoneal injection of NMU: histopathology and estral cycle influence.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E S; Andrade, N; Martin, G; Melito, G; Cricco, G; Mohamad, N; Davio, C; Caro, R; Bergoc, R M

    1994-11-11

    In order to obtain an experimental model we induced mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley rats. The carcinogen N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 50 mg/kg body weight when animals were 50, 80 and 110 days old. Tumor sizes were measured with a caliper and their growth parameters and histopathological properties were tested. For 100 rats, 88.4% of developed lesions were ductal carcinomas, histologically classified as 52.8% cribiform variety, 30.6% solid carcinoma. Metastases in liver, spleen and lung were present. Other primary tumors were detected with low incidence. The influence of the rat estrous cycle during the first exposure to intraperitoneal NMU injection was studied. The latency period in estrus, proestrus and diestrus was 82 +/- 15, 77 +/- 18 and 79 +/- 18 days, respectively. Tumor incidence was significantly higher in estrus (95.2%) than proestrus (71.4%) or diestrus (77.4), (P < 0.01). Mean number or tumors per animal was similar among the three groups (4.4 +/- 3.2, 3.8 +/- 3.6, 3.2 +/- 1.8). The procedure described appears to be the simplest method for inducing experimental mammary tumors in rats.

  3. Performance Predictions for a Room Temperature, Ericsson Cycle, Magnetic Heat Pump.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Performance CPM Cycles Per Minute GD Gadolinium KJ Kilojoules Conversion Constants (Work was done in English units and the following provides...PAS-82-11 1AINE THERMIAL HEAT PUMP PERFORMANCE RT 7. 0 TESI 00109 04IG, *I.- 2. W PLATE W ~I 6IIII. - 0.040 TEMP. NOT Em), r - s. MIXING TDU,7. 0.0 oa

  4. Histological evaluation of the influence of magnetic field application in autogenous bone grafts in rats

    PubMed Central

    Puricelli, Edela; Dutra, Nardier B; Ponzoni, Deise

    2009-01-01

    Background Bone grafts are widely used in oral and maxillofacial reconstruction. The influence of electromagnetic fields and magnets on the endogenous stimulation of target tissues has been investigated. This work aimed to assess the quality of bone healing in surgical cavities filled with autogenous bone grafts, under the influence of a permanent magnetic field produced by in vivo buried devices. Methods Metal devices consisting of commercially pure martensitic stainless steel washers and titanium screws were employed. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into 3 experimental and 3 control groups. A surgical bone cavity was produced on the right femur, and a bone graft was collected and placed in each hole. Two metallic washers, magnetized in the experimental group but not in the control group, were attached on the borders of the cavity. Results The animals were sacrificed on postoperative days 15, 45 and 60. The histological analysis of control and experimental samples showed adequate integration of the bone grafts, with intense bone neoformation. On days 45 and 60, a continued influence of the magnetic field on the surgical cavity and on the bone graft was observed in samples from the experimental group. Conclusion The results showed intense bone neoformation in the experimental group as compared to control animals. The intense extra-cortical bone neoformation observed suggests that the osteoconductor condition of the graft may be more susceptible to stimulation, when submitted to a magnetic field. PMID:19134221

  5. Influence of axial self-magnetic field component on arcing behavior of spiral-shaped contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Dingyu; Xiu, Shixin Wang, Yi; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yali; Bi, Dongli

    2015-10-15

    The transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact design is commonly used in vacuum interrupters. When arcing occurs between the TMF contacts, the contact structure can create a self-induced magnetic field that drives the arc to move and rotate on the contact, and thus local overheating and severe erosion can be avoided. However, TMF contacts could also create an axial self-magnetic component, and the influence of this component on the arc behavior has not been considered to date. In this paper, five different types of Cu-Cr spiral-shaped TMF contacts with three different structures are investigated in a demountable vacuum chamber that contains a high-speed charge-coupled device video camera. It was found that the contact structure greatly influenced the arc behavior, especially in terms of arc rotation and the effective contact area, while contacts with the same slot structure but different diameters showed similar arc behavior and arc motion. The magnetic field distribution and the Lorentz force of each of the three different contact structures are simulated, and the axial self-magnetic field was first taken into consideration for investigation of the TMF contact design. It was found that contact designs that have higher axial self-magnetic field components tend to have arc columns with larger diameters and show poorer arc motion and rotation performance in the experiments.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Concurrent Urodynamic Testing Identifies Brain Structures Involved in Micturition Cycle in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khavari, Rose; Karmonik, Christof; Shy, Michael; Fletcher, Sophie; Boone, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, which is common in patients with multiple sclerosis, has a significant impact on quality of life. In this study we sought to determine brain activity processes during the micturition cycle in female patients with multiple sclerosis and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. We report brain activity on functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneous urodynamic testing in 23 ambulatory female patients with multiple sclerosis. Individual functional magnetic resonance imaging activation maps at strong desire to void and at initiation of voiding were calculated and averaged at Montreal Neuroimaging Institute. Areas of significant activation were identified in these average maps. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with elicitable neurogenic detrusor overactivity or detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Group analysis of all patients at strong desire to void yielded areas of activation in regions associated with executive function (frontal gyrus), emotional regulation (cingulate gyrus) and motor control (putamen, cerebellum and precuneus). Comparison of the average change in activation between previously reported healthy controls and patients with multiple sclerosis showed predominantly stronger, more focal activation in the former and lower, more diffused activation in the latter. Patients with multiple sclerosis who had demonstrable neurogenic detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia showed a trend toward distinct brain activation at full urge and at initiation of voiding respectively. We successfully studied brain activation during the entire micturition cycle in female patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and multiple sclerosis using a concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging/urodynamic testing platform. Understanding the central neural processes involved in specific parts of micturition in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction may identify areas

  7. Influence of Spontaneously Generated Turbulence on Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughton, William; Roytershteyn, Vadim; Karimabadi, Homa

    2012-10-01

    The 3D dynamics of reconnection is examined for electron-positron plasmas within Harris sheet geometry with a guide field. This configuration is unstable to tearing modes at resonant surfaces across the layer, corresponding to oblique angles relative to 2D models. Vlasov theory predicts a spectrum of oblique modes which can destroy the flux surfaces and produce interacting flux ropes. These structures coalesce to larger scales leading to the continual formation and break-up of new current sheets and the generation of turbulence. The fluctuation spectrum is highly anisotropic and is characterized by two power-laws with a break at k di˜1, where di is the inertial length. In the large 3D simulations, the dissipation rate is reduced by ˜40% relative to small 2D cases which are steady and laminar. In both limits, the reconnection remains fast (i.e. Alfv'enic), is insensitive to the system size and ultimately occurs within inertial-scale current sheets. These results imply that the physics responsible for setting the time scale is not radically altered by the turbulence. However, the results indicate that a larger fraction of the magnetic energy is accessible in 3D and that many more particles are accelerated into the high energy tails due to the turbulence.

  8. Flexible magnetic filaments under the influence of external magnetic fields in the limit of infinite dilution.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, Joan J; Sánchez, Pedro A; Lüsebrink, Daniel; Kantorovich, Sofia; Sintes, Tomàs

    2016-05-14

    In the present work we use Langevin dynamics computer simulations to understand how the presence of a constant external magnetic field modifies the conformational phase diagram of magnetic filaments in the limit of infinite dilution. We have considered the filaments immersed in either a good (non-sticky filaments) or a poor (Stockmayer polymers) solvent. It has been found that in the presence of an applied field, filaments turn out to be much more susceptible to parameters such as temperature and solvent conditions. Filaments owe this increased susceptibility to the fact that the external magnetic field tends to level the free energy landscape as compared to the zero-field case. The field induces equalization in the free energy of competing conformational states that were separated by large energy differences in the zero-field limit. In this new scenario multistability arises, and manifests itself in the existence of broad regions in the phase diagram where two or more equilibrium configurations coexist. The existence of multistability greatly enhances the possibility of tuning the properties of the filament.

  9. Magnetic field dependent electric conductivity of the magnetorheological fluids: the influence of oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Xiaohui; Wang, Yu; Xuan, Shouhu; Gong, Xinglong

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the influence of oscillatory shear on the magnetic field dependent electric conductivity of the magnetorheological fluid (MRF) was reported. Upon applying a 0.96 T magnetic field, the electric conductivity could increase about 1500 times larger than the one without magnetic field. By increasing the volume fraction of carbonyl iron particles in the MRF from 5% to 30%, the electric conductivity increased about 565 times. Under applying an oscillatory shear, the resistance of the MRF decreased and it oscillated synchronously with the oscillatory shear. Interestingly, the larger shear strain led to larger oscillatory amplitude of the resistance. A particle-particle resistance model and a semi-empirical formula were proposed to investigate the influence of the oscillatory shear on the electric conductivity. The fitting results matched the experimental results very well. At last, a possible mechanism was proposed to explain the changes of resistance.

  10. Influence of the pulsating electric field on the ECR heating in a nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Balmashnov, A. A. Umnov, A. M.

    2011-12-15

    According to a computer simulation, the randomized pulsating electric field can strongly influence the ECR plasma heating in a nonuniform magnetic field. It has been found out that the electron energy spectrum is shifted to the high energy region. The obtained effect is intended to be used in the ECR sources for effective X-ray generation.

  11. The Influence of Categories on Perception: Explaining the Perceptual Magnet Effect as Optimal Statistical Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Naomi H.; Griffiths, Thomas L.; Morgan, James L.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of studies have demonstrated that organizing stimuli into categories can affect the way the stimuli are perceived. We explore the influence of categories on perception through one such phenomenon, the perceptual magnet effect, in which discriminability between vowels is reduced near prototypical vowel sounds. We present a Bayesian model…

  12. Influence of fault heterogeneity on the frequency-magnitude statistics of earthquake cycle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbeck, Jack; Horne, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Numerical models are useful tools for investigating natural geologic conditions can affect seismicity, but it can often be difficult to generate realistic earthquake sequences using physics-based earthquake rupture models. Rate-and-state earthquake cycle simulations on planar faults with homogeneous frictional properties and stress conditions typically yield single event sequences with a single earthquake magnitude characteristic of the size of the fault. In reality, earthquake sequences have been observed to follow a Gutenberg-Richter-type frequency-magnitude distribution that can be characterized by a power law scaling relationship. The purpose of this study was to determine how fault heterogeneity can affect the frequency-magnitude distribution of simulated earthquake events. We considered the effects fault heterogeneity at two different length-scales by performing numerical earthquake rupture simulations within a rate-and-state friction framework. In our first study, we investigated how heterogeneous, fractal distributions of shear and normal stress resolved along a two-dimensional fault surface influenced the earthquake nucleation, rupture, and arrest processes. We generated a catalog of earthquake events by performing earthquake cycle simulations for 90 random realizations of fractal stress distributions. Typical realizations produced between 4 to 6 individual earthquakes ranging in event magnitudes between those characteristic of the minimum patch size for nucleation and the size of the model fault. The resulting aggregate frequency-magnitude distributions were characterized well by a power-law scaling behavior. In our second study, we performed simulations of injection-induced seismicity using a coupled fluid flow and rate-and-state earthquake model. Fluid flow in a two-dimensional reservoir was modeled, and the fault mechanics was modeled under a plane strain assumption (i.e., one-dimensional faults). We generated a set of faults with an average strike of

  13. The influence of the menstrual cycle on energy balance and taste preference in Asian Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Sarah A; Ng, Janet; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing; Henry, Christiani J K

    2015-12-01

    In Caucasian women, research has shown that energy balance and taste preference change throughout the menstrual cycle. However, the contributory role of the menstrual cycle to obesity and insulin resistance among Asian women remains unclear. We investigate the impact of the menstrual cycle on energy balance and taste preference in Singaporean Chinese females. Thirty-one healthy young Chinese female subjects with regular menstrual cycles were recruited. Anthropometrics, body composition, energy intake, resting metabolic rate, premenstrual syndrome (PMS) severity and taste preference to sucrose were assessed during three phases (menses, follicular and luteal), over one (N = 18) to two (N = 13) menstrual cycles. For all subjects (N = 31), we found significant reductions in energy, fat intake (p < 0.05) and taste preference for sucrose (p < 0.05) in the luteal phase compared to early follicular phase as far as Cycle 1 is concerned. No significant differences were observed for carbohydrate and protein intake as well as PMS score. In those evaluated for two full cycles (N = 13), we found that taste preference for sucrose and PMS score were significantly higher in the menstrual phase in Cycle 2 (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in energy and macronutrient intake throughout Cycle 2. RMR was similar across the three phases. However, non-significant cyclic variations were noted within and between the cycles. Cyclic variations in energy intake and expenditure contributed by sensory and behavioural changes occur during the menstrual cycle. Whether this contributes to cyclic weight gain is speculative and remains to be proven. Further research in non-Caucasians spanning more than one menstrual cycle is needed to establish the impact of the menstrual cycle on taste preference and energy balance.

  14. TOWARD A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC THEORY OF THE STATIONARY ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY: TOY MODEL OF THE ADVECTIVE-ACOUSTIC CYCLE IN A MAGNETIZED FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Guilet, Jerome; Foglizzo, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on the linear phase of the advective-acoustic instability is investigated as a first step toward a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory of the stationary accretion shock instability taking place during stellar core collapse. We study a toy model where the flow behind a planar stationary accretion shock is adiabatically decelerated by an external potential. Two magnetic field geometries are considered: parallel or perpendicular to the shock. The entropy-vorticity wave, which is simply advected in the unmagnetized limit, separates into five different waves: the entropy perturbations are advected, while the vorticity can propagate along the field lines through two Alfven waves and two slow magnetosonic waves. The two cycles existing in the unmagnetized limit, advective-acoustic and purely acoustic, are replaced by up to six distinct MHD cycles. The phase differences among the cycles play an important role in determining the total cycle efficiency and hence the growth rate. Oscillations in the growth rate as a function of the magnetic field strength are due to this varying phase shift. A vertical magnetic field hardly affects the cycle efficiency in the regime of super-Alfvenic accretion that is considered. In contrast, we find that a horizontal magnetic field strongly increases the efficiencies of the vorticity cycles that bend the field lines, resulting in a significant increase of the growth rate if the different cycles are in phase. These magnetic effects are significant for large-scale modes if the Alfven velocity is a sizable fraction of the flow velocity.

  15. Influence of various surfactants on magnetic property of cobalt ferrite prepared by Co-precipitation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Neha; Khatri, Hemal; Jotania, R. B.

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe2O4) particles were synthesised using a Co-precipitation method. Influence of three different surfactants i.e. (1) Cationic - CTAB (Cetyl Tri-Methyl Ammonium Bromide), (2) Anionic - SDBS (Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulphonate) and (3) Nonionic - Triton X-100, on magnetic property of Cobalt Ferrite were investigated. Magnetic property of Cobalt ferrite powder was studied at room temperature using Vibrating Sample Measurements (VSM) technique under an applied magnetic field of 15kOe. The results show maximum value of saturation magnetization - Ms (81.87 emu/g) for the sample synthesised without surfactant and Coercivity value found maximum (2086 kOe) for the sample synthesized in presence of surfactant SDBS.

  16. Probing the Influence of Thermal Spin Torque on Magnetic Tunnel Junction Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phung, Timothy; Pushp, Aakash; Rettner, Charles; Hughes, Brian; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    It has been established in the past few years that heat flow within a ferromagnet can induce a spin current and an associated voltage. This so called Spin Seebeck effect, initially reported in ferromagnetic metals, has also been observed in magnetic semiconductors, magnetic insulators as well as in strongly spin orbit coupled systems. An open question has been whether heat induced spin currents can be used in switching a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) via thermal spin torque (TST). In order to answer this question, we investigate the MTJ switching with TST induced by sharp temperature gradients on the order of 1-10 K/nm. We will describe our experimental setup and present data that show the various roles that temperature plays on the saturation magnetization of the material and on the induced spin currents that influence MTJ switching.

  17. Graphene under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, E. A.; Zhukovsky, V. Ch.

    2016-09-01

    Investigation of real two-dimensional systems with Dirac-like electronic behavior under the influence of magnetic field is challenging and leads to many interesting physical results. In this paper we study a 2D graphene model with a particular form of magnetic field as a superposition of a homogeneous field and an Aharonov-Bohm vortex. For this configuration, electronic wave functions and the energy spectrum are obtained and it is shown that the magnetic Aharonov-Bohm vortex plays the role of a charge impurity. As a demonstration of vacuum properties of the system, vacuum current, as well as an electric current, is calculated and their representation for particular limiting cases of a magnetic field is obtained.

  18. [The influence of variable and constant magnetic fields on biota and biological activity of ordinary chernozem soils].

    PubMed

    Denisova, T V; Kazeev, K Sh

    2007-01-01

    In model experiments on influence variable magnetic fields of industrial frequency (50 Hz) an induction of 1500 and of 6000 mkTl and the constant magnetic field an induction of 6000 mkTl and of 15000 mkTl during 5 days of exposure on biological properties of chernozem ordinary is shown, that the soil microflora is more sensitive to magnetic fields, than enzymes activity. Bacteria are more sensitive, than microscopic mushrooms. Dehydrogenase it is steady against influence of all variants. Constant magnetic field by the induction of 15000 mkTl rendered practically identical authentic overwhelming influence on catalase and saccharase activity - on 51 and 47% accordingly.

  19. Periodic inversion of the vertical component of the earth's magnetic field influences fluctuations of visual sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Thoss, F; Bartsch, B; Tellschaft, D; Thoss, M

    1999-10-01

    According to theoretical considerations, the magnetic field of the earth could influence the first steps of light-induced changes in ocular photopigment, an effect that is thought to underlie the magnetic orientation of some animals. To find out whether man could be influenced in this way, we have tested the effect of an artificial fluctuation in the direction of the earth's magnetic field on oscillations of the visual sensitivity in 27 healthy subjects. The resultant spectra show a significant influence of the field fluctuations, indicating that man is sensitive to changes in the direction of the earth's magnetic field.

  20. Interior Dynamics of Giant Planets: The Competing Influences of Rotation, Magnetic Fields, and Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Soderlund, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive across the solar system. Despite this commonality, each planet has unique characteristics. Among the dipole-dominated gas giant planets, Jupiter has the strongest planetary magnetic field in the solar system, while Saturn's magnetic field has the smallest measured dipole tilt. In contrast, the poorly constrained magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune have surface amplitudes comparable to the Earth's although their morphologies are multipolar with large dipole tilts away from the rotation axis. Planetary magnetic fields are driven by dynamo action, the conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic energy. Convection in the electrically conducting regions of planetary interiors is powered by thermo-compositional buoyancy and modulated by rotation and magnetic fields. The Coriolis force tends to organize the flow into axial columns, while the Lorentz force tends to inhibit the relative movement of the magnetic field and the fluid. Similarly, strong buoyancy and inertia associated with vigorous convection can destroy the columnar alignment of flows imposed by rotation. The relative importance of these competing effects are paramount for the planform of core convection and magnetic field characteristics: dynamos with dominant Coriolis forces are expected to be driven by fundamentally different fluid motions than those with co-dominant Lorentz forces and/or strong buoyancy effects. In this study, we use a suite of numerical simulations in combination with rotating convection and dynamo theory to predict the influence of rotation, magnetic fields, and buoyancy on the interior dynamics of giant planets. Our results suggest that Jupiter is strongly constrained by rotation, although the Lorentz force may be significant, i.e. within an order of magnitude of the Coriolis force. Magnetic fields become increasingly sub-dominant for the other planets, where the Coriolis force is predicted to exceed the Lorentz force by at least two orders of magnitude

  1. Influence of number of dental autoclave treatment cycles on rotational performance of commercially available air-turbine handpieces.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masahiro; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2006-06-01

    The influence of number of autoclave treatment cycles (N) on rotational speed and total indicated run-out of commercially available air-turbine handpieces from five manufacturers was investigated at N=0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 cycles, and the significance in the test results was assessed by Dunnett's multiple comparison test. Some air-turbine handpieces showed the significant differences in rotational speed at N=300 cycles, however, the decreases of the rotational speeds were only 1 to 3.5 percent. Some air-turbine handpieces showed the significant differences in total indicated run-out, however, the respective values were smaller than that at N=0 cycle. Accordingly, it can be considered that the ball bearing in the air-turbine handpieces is not affected significantly by autoclave. To further evaluate rotational performance, this study focused on the rotational vibration of the ball bearing components of the air-turbine, as measured by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis; the power spectra of frequency of the ball's revolution, frequency of the cage's rotation and frequency of the ball's rotation were comparatively investigated at N=0, 150 and 300 cycles, and the influence of autoclave was evaluated qualitatively. No abnormalities in the ball bearings were recognized.

  2. The influence of female age on the cumulative live-birth rate of fresh cycles and subsequent frozen cycles using vitrified blastocysts in hyper-responders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Lee, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Hsiu-Hui; Chen, Chung-I; Huang, Chun-Chia; Lee, Maw-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this research was to study the influence of female age on the cumulative live-birth rate of fresh and subsequent frozen cycles using vitrified blastocysts of the same cohort in hyper-responders. This was a retrospective study of 1137 infertile women undergoing their first in vitro fertilization treatment between 2006 and 2013. The main outcome measure was cumulative live births among the fresh and all vitrified blastocyst transfers combined after the same stimulation cycle. The results were also analyzed according to age (i.e., <35 years, 35-39 years, and ≥ 40 years). The mean number of retrieved oocytes was 19.9 ± 8.5 oocytes. The cumulative pregnancy rate was 89.2% and the cumulative live-birth rate was 73.3%. The cumulative live-birth rate declined from 73.9% for women younger than 35 years old to 67.3% for women 35-39 years old to 57.9% for women 40 years or older. Combined fresh and vitrified blastocyst transfer cycles can result in a high cumulative live-birth rate. The cumulative live-birth rates among older women are lower than the rates among younger women when autologous oocytes are used. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. On the stability of carbon glass thermometers cycled at low temperatures under high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couach, M.; Monnier, F.; De Combarieu, A.; Bedin, E.

    We report on the reliability of three carbon glass thermometers used in the temperature range 4.2 K - 50 K under high magnetic field conditions. In two of the three sensors we observed a serious lack of reproducibility (1.5 K at 25 K). These results indicate that in experiments requiring precise temperature measurements in the range 20 - 30 K, it is necessary to perform regular calibrations of carbon glass thermometers versus secondary standards such as platinum or germanium resistors.

  4. Spatial Structures of Polar Magnetic Field During the Last Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Sun's polar field is closely related to the large scale coronal structure. It is important for coronal modeling and greatly affects the result. However, the polar field is not well observed because the ecliptic lies near the Sun's equator. In this study, we make use of the data from various observatories (MDI/WSO/MWO/Hinode) to study its spatial structures during the last solar cycle. The result is useful to improve the polar field extrapolation schemes.

  5. Influence of pulse sequence, polarity and amplitude on magnetic stimulation of human and porcine peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Maccabee, P J; Nagarajan, S S; Amassian, V E; Durand, D M; Szabo, A Z; Ahad, A B; Cracco, R Q; Lai, K S; Eberle, L P

    1998-01-01

    Mammalian phrenic nerve, in a trough filled with saline, was excited by magnetic coil (MC)-induced stimuli at defined stimulation sites, including the negative-going first spatial derivative of the induced electric field along a straight nerve, at a bend in the nerve, and at a cut nerve ending. At all such sites, the largest amplitude response for a given stimulator output setting was elicited by an induced damped polyphasic pulse consisting of an initial quarter-cycle hyperpolarization followed by a half-cycle depolarization compared with a predominantly ‘monophasic’ quarter-cycle depolarization.Simulation studies demonstrated that the increased efficacy of the induced quarter-cycle hyperpolarizing-half-cycle depolarizing polyphasic pulse was mainly attributed to the greater duration of the outward membrane current phase, resulting in a greater outward charge transfer afforded by the half-cycle (i.e. quarter-cycles 2 and 3). The advantage of a fast rising initial quarter-cycle depolarization was more than offset by the slower rising, but longer duration depolarizing half-cycle.Simulation further revealed that the quarter-cycle hyperpolarization-half-cycle depolarization showed only a 2.6 % lowering of peak outward current and a 3.5 % lowering of outward charge transfer at threshold, compared with a half-cycle depolarization alone. Presumably, this slight increase in efficacy reflects modest reversal of Na+ inactivation by the very brief initial hyperpolarization.In vitro, at low bath temperature, the nerve response to an initial quarter-cycle depolarization declined in amplitude as the second hyperpolarizing phase progressively increased in amplitude and duration. This ‘pull-down’ phenomenon nearly disappeared as the bath temperature approached 37 °C. Possibly, at the reduced temperature, delay in generation of the action potential permitted the hyperpolarization phase to reduce excitation.Pull-down was not observed in the thenar muscle responses to

  6. Strong evidence for the influence of solar cycles on a Late Miocene lake system revealed by biotic and abiotic proxies

    PubMed Central

    Kern, A.K.; Harzhauser, M.; Piller, W.E.; Mandic, O.; Soliman, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Late Miocene paleogeography of central Europe and its climatic history are well studied with a resolution of c. 106 years. Small-scale climatic variations are yet unresolved. Observing past climatic change of short periods, however, would encourage the understanding of the modern climatic system. Therefore, past climate archives require a resolution on a decadal to millennial scale. To detect such a short-term evolution, a continuous 6-m-core of the Paleo-Lake Pannon was analyzed in 1-cm-sample distance to provide information as precise and regular as possible. Measurements of the natural gamma radiation and magnetic susceptibility combined with the total abundance of ostracod shells were used as proxies to estimate millennial- to centennial scale environmental changes during the mid-Tortonian warm period. Patterns emerged, but no indisputable age model can be provided for the core, due to the lack of paleomagnetic reversals and the lack of minerals suitable for absolute dating. Therefore, herein we propose another method to determine a hypothetic time frame for these deposits. Based on statistical processes, including Lomb–Scargle and REDFIT periodograms along with Wavelet spectra, several distinct cyclicities could be detected. Calculations considering established off-shore sedimentation rates of the Tortonian Vienna Basin revealed patterns resembling Holocene solar-cycle-records well. The comparison of filtered data of Miocene and Holocene records displays highly similar patterns and comparable modulations. A best-fit adjustment of sedimentation rate results in signals which fit to the lower and upper Gleissberg cycle, the de Vries cycle, the unnamed 500-year- and 1000-year-cycles, as well as the Hallstatt cycle. Each of these cycles has a distinct and unique expression in the investigated environmental proxies, reflecting a complex forcing-system. Hence, a single-proxy-analysis, as often performed on Holocene records, should be considered cautiously as

  7. Influence of Temperature and Mechanical Scratch on the Recorded Magnetization Stability of Longitudinal and Perpendicular Recording Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Katsumasa; Tobari, Kousuke; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2011-07-01

    Stability of recorded magnetization of hard disk drive (HDD) is influenced by external environments, such as temperature and magnetic field. Small scratches are frequently formed on HDD medium surface upon contacts with the magnetic head. The influences of temperature and mechanical scratch on the magnetization structure stability are investigated for longitudinal and perpendicular recording media by using a magnetic force microscope. PMR media remained almost unchanged up to about 300 °C for the area with no scratches, whereas the areas near and under mechanical scratches started to change around 250 °C. The magnetization structure of LMR media started to change at about 100 degrees lower temperature under mechanical scratches when compared with no scratch areas. A quantitative analysis of magnetization structure variation is carried out by measuring the recorded magnetization strength difference estimated from the MFM images observed for a same sample area before and after exposing the sample to different temperatures.

  8. Comparison of the influence of age on cycling efficiency and the energy cost of running in well-trained triathletes.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Jeremiah; Abbiss, Chris R; Sultana, Frederic; Bernard, Thierry; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2016-01-01

    Locomotive efficiency is cited as an important component to endurance performance; however, inconsistent observations of age-related changes in efficiency question its influence in the performance of masters athletes. This study examined locomotive efficiency in young and masters triathletes during both a run and cycle test. Twenty young (28.5 ± 2.6 years) and 20 masters (59.8 ± 1.3 years) triathletes completed an incremental cycling and running test to determine maximal aerobic consumption (VO2max) and the first ventilatory threshold (VT1). Participants then completed 10-min submaximal running and cycling tests at VT1 during which locomotive efficiency was calculated from expired ventilation. Additionally, body fat percentage was determined using skin-fold assessment. During the cycle and run, VO2max was lower in the masters (48.3 ± 5.4 and 49.6 ± 4.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1), respectively) compared with young (61.6 ± 5.7 and 62.4 ± 5.2 ml kg(-1) min(-1), respectively) cohort. Maximal running speed and the cycling power output corresponding to VO2max were also lower in the masters (15.1 ± 0.8 km h(-1) and 318.6 ± 26.0 W) compared with the young (19.5 ± 1.3 km h(-1) and 383.6 ± 35.0 W) cohort. Cycling efficiency was lower (-11.2%) in the masters compared with young cohort. Similar results were observed for the energy cost of running (+10.8%); however, when scaled to lean body mass, changes were more pronounced during the run (+22.1%). Within trained triathletes, ageing can influence efficiency in both the run and cycle discipline. While disregarded in the past, efficiency should be considered in research examining performance in ageing athletes.

  9. Social interaction and sex differences influence rat temperature circadian rhythm under LD cycles and constant light.

    PubMed

    Cambras, T; Castejón, L; Díez-Noguera, A

    2011-06-01

    Circadian rhythms produce an efficient organization of animal behaviour over the 24h day. In some species, social cues have been found to have a role as synchronizers of these rhythms. Here, the influence of social interaction on rat circadian behaviour was investigated, addressing the question of whether cohabitation would produce a delay in the appearance of arrhythmicity under constant light conditions. To this end, the circadian rhythms of male and female rat body temperature were studied for 10days under light-dark conditions, followed by 33days under constant bright light. Half of the animals were maintained in individual cages, whilst the others were maintained in larger cages in groups of three rats of the same sex. Results showed that individual circadian rhythms under 24hour light-dark (LD) cycles were more stable and with higher amplitude in grouped than in isolated animals, and higher in males than in females. During the first days under constant light (LL), the stability of the rhythm was also higher in males than in females, but there were no differences according to the group. Moreover, we did not find significant differences in the time of circadian rhythm loss under LL, since high individual variability was found for this variable. On the other hand, female rats living in isolation showed a delayed acrophase in the circadian rhythm under LD conditions compared with those living in groups. These results suggest that cohabitation increases the internal coherence of circadian behaviour, and could be interpreted as indicating that living in isolation may induce a level of stress that disturbs manifestation of the circadian rhythm, especially in females, which are also more reactive than males to external signals.

  10. Nitrification and its influence on biogeochemical cycles from the equatorial Pacific to the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Ijichi, Minoru; Isobe, Kazuo; Hashihama, Fuminori; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Ehama, Makoto; Hayashizaki, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hamasaki, Koji; Furuya, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We examined nitrification in the euphotic zone, its impact on the nitrogen cycles, and the controlling factors along a 7500 km transect from the equatorial Pacific Ocean to the Arctic Ocean. Ammonia oxidation occurred in the euphotic zone at most of the stations. The gene and transcript abundances for ammonia oxidation indicated that the shallow clade archaea were the major ammonia oxidizers throughout the study regions. Ammonia oxidation accounted for up to 87.4% (average 55.6%) of the rate of nitrate assimilation in the subtropical oligotrophic region. However, in the shallow Bering and Chukchi sea shelves (bottom ⩽67 m), the percentage was small (0–4.74%) because ammonia oxidation and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers were low, the light environment being one possible explanation for the low activity. With the exception of the shallow bottom stations, depth-integrated ammonia oxidation was positively correlated with depth-integrated primary production. Ammonia oxidation was low in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll subarctic region and high in the Bering Sea Green Belt, and primary production in both was influenced by micronutrient supply. An ammonium kinetics experiment demonstrated that ammonia oxidation did not increase significantly with the addition of 31–1560 nm ammonium at most stations except in the Bering Sea Green Belt. Thus, the relationship between ammonia oxidation and primary production does not simply indicate that ammonia oxidation increased with ammonium supply through decomposition of organic matter produced by primary production but that ammonia oxidation might also be controlled by micronutrient availability as with primary production. PMID:26918664

  11. Sex and estrous cycle influence diazepam effects on anxiety and memory: Possible role of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anatildes Feitosa; Sousa, Diego Silveira; Medeiros, André Macêdo; Macêdo, Priscila Tavares; Leão, Anderson Henrique; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Izídio, Geison Souza; Silva, Regina Helena

    2016-10-03

    Studies with rodents and humans show the relationship between female sex hormones and cognitive/emotional tasks. However, despite the greater incidence of anxiety disorders in women, the data are still inconclusive regarding the mechanisms related to this phenomenon. We evaluated the effects of a classical anxiolytic/amnestic drug (diazepam; DZP) on female (at different estrous cycle phases) and male rats tested in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT), that allows the concomitant evaluation of memory and anxiety-like behavior. Further, in order to investigate the role of progesterone and its metabolites in the effects of DZP in the PMDAT, female rats were pre-treated with the progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone or the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. The main findings were: (1) DZP caused memory impairment and anxiolysis in both sexes, but only the highest dose induced the anxiolytic effect in females; (2) females in proestrus did not present the amnestic and anxiolytic effects of DZP (at 2.0 and 4.0mg/kg, respectively) and (3) the co-administration of mifepristone reestablished both amnestic and anxiolytic effects of DZP, while finasteride reinstated the amnestic effect in proestrus female rats. These results suggest that changes in the endogenous levels of progesterone and its metabolites are important in the modulation of emotional/cognitive behavior in female rats. Based on the influence on different aspects of DZP action, the mechanisms related to this modulation are probably linked to GABAergic transmission, but this point remains to be investigated. Further, the variation in therapeutic and adverse effects of DZP depending on sex and hormonal state is of great relevance considering the higher prevalence of anxiety disorders in women.

  12. When product diversification influences life cycle impact assessment: A case study of canned anchovy.

    PubMed

    Laso, Jara; Margallo, María; Fullana, Pére; Bala, Alba; Gazulla, Cristina; Irabien, Ángel; Aldaco, Rubén

    2017-03-01

    The anchovy canning industry is one of the most important economic resources of the Cantabria region in Spain. However, environmental, economic and social problems over the past years have forced companies to apply marketing strategies, develop product diversification, create new products and introduce them in new "green markets". Launching Cantabrian canned anchovies into more sustainable markets requires measuring the environmental performance using Product Category Rules (PCRs) and Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs). EPDs and PCRS include the environmental profile of a range of similar products, such as all of the available canned anchovy products. The great variety of anchovy canned products depends on three process variables: the origin of the anchovy (Cantabria, Argentina and Chile or Peru), the type of oil (refined olive oil, extra virgin olive oil and sunflower oil) and the packaging (aluminum, tinplate, glass and plastic). This work aims to assess the environmental impact from cradle to grave of canned anchovies in oil using the life cycle assessment methodology (LCA). Moreover, the paper evaluates the influence of the above-mentioned three product variables in the LCA results. The results show that out of all of the alternatives, Chilean and Peruvian anchovies have the highest environmental burdens due to the transportation by ship. The production of anchovies in sunflower oil is a less environmentally friendly oil process due to the low yield per hectare of sunflower cultivation. Finally, the use of aluminum as the packaging material has the largest environmental impact out of almost all of the impact categories. Moreover, because the LCA results can be significantly affected by the allocation procedure, a sensitivity analysis comparing system expansion, mass and economic allocation is performed. In this case, the system expansion approach presents the highest environmental impacts followed by the mass allocation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors

  13. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G.; Johnson, Jay R.; Miller, Federick W.; Matteson, Eric L.; Crowson, C. S.; Gabriel, S. E.

    2015-05-15

    Our objective was to examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We used data from patients with GCA (1950-2004) and RA (1955-2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. Results: The correlation of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0-1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5-7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4-5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8-11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. Conclusions: AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4-5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. Lastly, the link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases.

  14. Nitrification and its influence on biogeochemical cycles from the equatorial Pacific to the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Ijichi, Minoru; Isobe, Kazuo; Hashihama, Fuminori; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Ehama, Makoto; Hayashizaki, Ken-Ichi; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hamasaki, Koji; Furuya, Ken

    2016-09-01

    We examined nitrification in the euphotic zone, its impact on the nitrogen cycles, and the controlling factors along a 7500 km transect from the equatorial Pacific Ocean to the Arctic Ocean. Ammonia oxidation occurred in the euphotic zone at most of the stations. The gene and transcript abundances for ammonia oxidation indicated that the shallow clade archaea were the major ammonia oxidizers throughout the study regions. Ammonia oxidation accounted for up to 87.4% (average 55.6%) of the rate of nitrate assimilation in the subtropical oligotrophic region. However, in the shallow Bering and Chukchi sea shelves (bottom ⩽67 m), the percentage was small (0-4.74%) because ammonia oxidation and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers were low, the light environment being one possible explanation for the low activity. With the exception of the shallow bottom stations, depth-integrated ammonia oxidation was positively correlated with depth-integrated primary production. Ammonia oxidation was low in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll subarctic region and high in the Bering Sea Green Belt, and primary production in both was influenced by micronutrient supply. An ammonium kinetics experiment demonstrated that ammonia oxidation did not increase significantly with the addition of 31-1560 nm ammonium at most stations except in the Bering Sea Green Belt. Thus, the relationship between ammonia oxidation and primary production does not simply indicate that ammonia oxidation increased with ammonium supply through decomposition of organic matter produced by primary production but that ammonia oxidation might also be controlled by micronutrient availability as with primary production.

  15. Microbial Influences on Trace Metal Cycling in a Meromictic Lake, Fayetteville Green Lake, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, A. L.; House, C.; Kump, L.

    2002-12-01

    dominant microorganisms to influence trace metal cycling and bioavailability in the FGL water column.

  16. Dynamics of liquid metal droplets and jets influenced by a strong axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D.; Karcher, Ch

    2017-07-01

    Non-contact electromagnetic control and shaping of liquid metal free surfaces is crucial in a number of high-temperature metallurgical processes like levitation melting and electromagnetic sealing, among others. Other examples are the electromagnetic bending or stabilization of liquid metal jets that frequently occur in casting or fusion applications. Within this context, we experimentally study the influence of strong axial magnetic fields on the dynamics of falling metal droplets and liquid metal jets. GaInSn in eutectic composition is used as test melt being liquid at room temperature. In the experiments, we use a cryogen-free superconducting magnet (CFM) providing steady homogeneous fields of up to 5 T and allowing a tilt angle between the falling melt and the magnet axis. We vary the magnetic flux density, the tilt angle, the liquid metal flow rate, and the diameter and material of the nozzle (electrically conducting/insulating). Hence, the experiments cover a parameter range of Hartmann numbers Ha, Reynolds numbers Re, and Weber numbers We within 0 < Ha < 440, 340 < Re < 4500, and 0.09 < We < 12.1. As major results we find that under the influence of the strong magnetic field, droplet rotation ceases and the droplets are stretched in the field direction. Moreover, we observe that the jet breakup into droplets (spheroidization) is suppressed, and in the case of electrically conducting nozzles and tilt, the jets are bent towards the field axis.

  17. Influence of a magnetic field during directional solidification of MAR-M 246 + Hf superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Alter, Wendy; Schmidt, Dianne

    1991-01-01

    An area that has been almost totally overlooked in the optimization of properties in directionally solidified superalloys is the control of microstructural features through the application of a magnetic field during solidification. The influence of a magnetic field on the microstructural features of a nickel-base superalloys is investigated. Studies were performed on the dendritic MAR-M 246+Hf alloy, which was solidified under both a 5 K gauss magnetic field and under no-applied-field conditions. The possible influences of the magnetic field on the solidification process were observed by studying variations in microstructural features including volume fraction, surface area, number, and shape of the carbide particles. Stereological factors analyzed also included primary and secondary dendrite arm spacing and the volume fraction of the interdendritic eutectic constituent. Microprobe analysis was performed to determine the chemistry of the carbides, dendrites, and interdendritic constituents, and how it varied between field and no-field solidification samples. Experiments involving periodic application and removal of the magnetic field were also performed in order to permit a comparison with structural variations observed in a MAR-M 246+Hf alloy solidified during KC-135 high-g, low-g maneuvers.

  18. IBEX views the global structure of the heliosphere influenced by the Interstellar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan

    The IBEX ribbon has been separated from the surrounding globally distributed flux (GDF), revealing ENA emission largely from the inner heliosheath. The line-of-sight (LOS) integrated pressure in the GDF is quite large, requiring that the interstellar magnetic field be sufficiently strong (e.g. 3 microG) to balance the pressure of the inner heliosheath. The LOS emissions from the GDF have revealed signatures of the nose of the heliosphere, and the heliotail, which has been examined carefully. The strong interstellar magnetic field has broad implications for the structure of the heliosphere and the existence or lack of a bow shock. These global heliospheric structures also filter primary interstellar neutral atoms and lead to creation of secondary atoms through charge-exchange in the outer he