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Sample records for magnetic diffraction experiments

  1. Neutron diffraction experiments with 40T pulsed magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohoyama, K.; Katoh, N.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Hiraka, H.; Ikeda, K.; Shimizu, H. M.

    2006-11-01

    Aiming at realising neutron scattering experiments under B = 40T magnetic fields, we are developing diffusive techniques for neutron diffraction with a long pulse magnet. For the present experiments, we succeeded in observing the spin-flop transition of the antiferromagnet MnF2 around B = 10T using a 20T pulsed magnet on a neutron spectrometer installed at a reactor. 35T pulsed magnetic fields were also successfully generated.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility and neutron diffraction experiments on nuclear ordering in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyrkkio, Teppo

    Experimental curves of entropy and susceptibility versus temperature for copper nuclear spins down to the ordered state were obtained. Impurities and anomalous spin-lattice relaxation in copper at submilli-Kelvin temperatures were observed. Phase diagrams for spontaneous nuclear ordering in copper were derived. Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering in copper was investigated. The feasibility of neutron diffraction experiments on ordered copper nuclei at nano-Kelvin temperature was studied. Neutron scattering experiments on nuclear magnets were carried out. Calibration and applications of polarized neutron thermometry at milli- and micro-Kelvin temperatures is described.Observation of nuclear antiferromagnetic order in copper by neutron diffraction at nano-Kelvin temparatures is reported.

  3. Neutron powder diffraction experiments on AMnF 4 (A=K, Rb): nuclear and magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morón, M. C.; Palacio, F.; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.

    1992-06-01

    Neutron powder diffraction experiments show that KMnF 4 is monoclinic, space group P2 1/a, and RbMnF 4 orthorhombic, space group Pmab, between room temperature and 1.5K. The magnetic structure of both compounds is antiferromagnetic with Tc =6.6K for KMnF 4 and T = 3.9K for RbMnF 4.

  4. Multidataset Refinement Resonant Diffraction, and Magnetic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Attfield, J. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scope of Rietveld and other powder diffraction refinements continues to expand, driven by improvements in instrumentation, methodology and software. This will be illustrated by examples from our research in recent years. Multidataset refinement is now commonplace; the datasets may be from different detectors, e.g., in a time-of-flight experiment, or from separate experiments, such as at several x-ray energies giving resonant information. The complementary use of x rays and neutrons is exemplified by a recent combined refinement of the monoclinic superstructure of magnetite, Fe3O4, below the 122 K Verwey transition, which reveals evidence for Fe2+/Fe3+ charge ordering. Powder neutron diffraction data continue to be used for the solution and Rietveld refinement of magnetic structures. Time-of-flight instruments on cold neutron sources can produce data that have a high intensity and good resolution at high d-spacings. Such profiles have been used to study incommensurate magnetic structures such as FeAsO4 and β–CrPO4. A multiphase, multidataset refinement of the phase-separated perovskite (Pr0.35Y0.07Th0.04Ca0.04Sr0.5)MnO3 has been used to fit three components with different crystal and magnetic structures at low temperatures. PMID:27366599

  5. dxtbx: the diffraction experiment toolbox.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Waterman, David G; Hattne, Johan; Ashton, Alun W; Echols, Nathaniel; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sauter, Nicholas K; Winter, Graeme

    2014-08-01

    Data formats for recording X-ray diffraction data continue to evolve rapidly to accommodate new detector technologies developed in response to more intense light sources. Processing the data from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments therefore requires the ability to read, and correctly interpret, image data and metadata from a variety of instruments employing different experimental representations. Tools that have previously been developed to address this problem have been limited either by a lack of extensibility or by inconsistent treatment of image metadata. The dxtbx software package provides a consistent interface to both image data and experimental models, while supporting a completely generic user-extensible approach to reading the data files. The library is written in a mixture of C++ and Python and is distributed as part of the cctbx under an open-source licence at http://cctbx.sourceforge.net.

  6. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  7. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  8. High resolution neutron Larmor diffraction using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fankang; Feng, Hao; Thaler, Alexander N; Parnell, Steven R; Hamilton, William A; Crow, Lowell; Yang, Wencao; Jones, Amy B; Bai, Hongyu; Matsuda, Masaaki; Baxter, David V; Keller, Thomas; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Pynn, Roger

    2017-04-13

    The neutron Larmor diffraction technique has been implemented using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms in both single-arm and double-arm configurations. Successful measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a single-crystal copper sample demonstrates that the method works as expected. The experiment involves a new method of tuning by varying the magnetic field configurations in the device and the tuning results agree well with previous measurements. The difference between single-arm and double-arm configurations has been investigated experimentally. We conclude that this measurement benchmarks the applications of magnetic Wollaston prisms in Larmor diffraction and shows in principle that the setup can be used for inelastic phonon line-width measurements. The achievable resolution for Larmor diffraction is comparable to that using Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) coils. The use of superconducting materials in the prisms allows high neutron polarization and transmission efficiency to be achieved.

  9. High resolution neutron Larmor diffraction using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Fankang; Feng, Hao; Thaler, Alexander N.; ...

    2017-04-13

    The neutron Larmor diffraction technique has been implemented using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms in both single-arm and double-arm configurations. Successful measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a single-crystal copper sample demonstrates that the method works as expected. Our experiment involves a new method of tuning by varying the magnetic field configurations in the device and the tuning results agree well with previous measurements. The difference between single-arm and double-arm configurations has been investigated experimentally. Here, we conclude that this measurement benchmarks the applications of magnetic Wollaston prisms in Larmor diffraction and shows in principle that the setup canmore » be used for inelastic phonon line-width measurements. The achievable resolution for Larmor diffraction is comparable to that using Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) coils. Furthermore, the use of superconducting materials in the prisms allows high neutron polarization and transmission efficiency to be achieved.« less

  10. Diffraction experiments with infrared remote controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we describe an experiment in which radiation emitted by an infrared remote control is passed through a diffraction grating. An image of the diffraction pattern is captured using a cell phone camera and then used to determine the wavelength of the radiation.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction for pyrolytic magnetic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamishima, K.; Noda, T.; Kadonome, F.; Kakizaki, K.; Hiratsuka, N.

    We have prepared pyrolytic carbon samples from triethylamine and investigated their magnetic and crystallographic properties. The magnetic property depends on pyrolysis temperatures. A ferromagnetic sample with M=5×10-1 emu/g was obtained from the pyrolysis products even at room temperature. The synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed for the pyrolytic carbon samples in order to see the crystal structure of ferromagnetic samples. Diffraction peaks of iron or iron oxides were not observed for the ferromagnetic samples, whereas the major diffraction peak of the intermediate graphite-diamond (IGD) structure was clearly observed for ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic samples. Therefore, the IGD structure is not the direct cause of ferromagnetism. The ferromagnetism may be related to the graphite-like structure.

  12. A Simple Experiment on Fresnel Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the Fresnel diffraction pattern of a single slit can be displayed directly on an oscilloscope. The experiment requires a minimum amount of equipment and space. Results of the experiment are presented and compared with theoretical calculations carried out by a digital computer. (LC)

  13. Exploring the magnetic phase diagram of dysprosium with neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; LeClair, P. R.; Mankey, G. J.; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, M. L.; Tian, W.

    2015-01-01

    With one of the highest intrinsic magnetic moments (10.6 μB/atom ) among the heavy rare-earth elements, dysprosium exhibits a rich magnetic phase diagram, including several modulated magnetic phases. Aided by the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction, the magnetic modulations propagate coherently over a long range. Neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the microscopic magnetic origin of the field induced phases in bulk Dy as a function of temperature, covering regions of the well-known ferromagnetic, helical antiferromagnetic, fan phases, and several possible new phases suggested by previous studies. A short-range ordered fan phase was identified as the intermediate state between ferromagnetism and long-range ordered fan. In a field of 1 T applied along the a axis, the temperature range of a coexisting helix/fan phase was determined. The magnetic phase diagram of Dy was thus refined to include the detailed magnetic origin and the associated phase boundaries. Based on the period of the magnetic modulation and the average magnetization, the evolution of the spin arrangement upon heating was derived quantitatively for the modulated magnetic phases.

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  15. Effect of recording condition on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram with magnetic garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yuichi Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-09-14

    A holographic memory has been attracting attention as recording media with high recording density and high data transfer rate. We have studied the magnetic garnets as a rewritable and long life media for magnetic holography. However, since the signal intensity of reconstructed image was relatively low, the effects of recording conditions on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram were investigated with experiments and the numerical simulation using COMSOL multi-physics. The diffraction efficiency tends to decrease as increasing the spatial frequency, and the use of short pulse laser with the pulse width of 50 ps was found to be effective to achieve high diffraction efficiency. This suggests that the formation of clear magnetic fringe similar to interference pattern can be obtained by the use of short pulse laser since undesirable heat diffusion during radiation does not occur. On the other hand, the diffraction efficiency increased as increasing the film thickness up to 3.1 μm but was saturated in the garnet film thicker than 3.1 μm in the case of spatial frequency of 1500 line pair/mm. The numerical simulation showed that the effective depth of magnetic fringe was limited about 1.8 μm irrespective of the garnet film thickness because the fringes were connected by thermal diffusion near the surface of the film, and the effective depth is limited due to this connection of the magnetic fringe. Avoiding this fringe connection, much higher diffraction efficiency will be achieved.

  16. Effect of recording condition on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram with magnetic garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-09-01

    A holographic memory has been attracting attention as recording media with high recording density and high data transfer rate. We have studied the magnetic garnets as a rewritable and long life media for magnetic holography. However, since the signal intensity of reconstructed image was relatively low, the effects of recording conditions on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram were investigated with experiments and the numerical simulation using COMSOL multi-physics. The diffraction efficiency tends to decrease as increasing the spatial frequency, and the use of short pulse laser with the pulse width of 50 ps was found to be effective to achieve high diffraction efficiency. This suggests that the formation of clear magnetic fringe similar to interference pattern can be obtained by the use of short pulse laser since undesirable heat diffusion during radiation does not occur. On the other hand, the diffraction efficiency increased as increasing the film thickness up to 3.1 μm but was saturated in the garnet film thicker than 3.1 μm in the case of spatial frequency of 1500 line pair/mm. The numerical simulation showed that the effective depth of magnetic fringe was limited about 1.8 μm irrespective of the garnet film thickness because the fringes were connected by thermal diffusion near the surface of the film, and the effective depth is limited due to this connection of the magnetic fringe. Avoiding this fringe connection, much higher diffraction efficiency will be achieved.

  17. Data Exploration Toolkit for serial diffraction experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Zeldin, Oliver B.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; ...

    2015-01-23

    Ultrafast diffraction at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has the potential to yield new insights into important biological systems that produce radiation-sensitive crystals. An unavoidable feature of the 'diffraction before destruction' nature of these experiments is that images are obtained from many distinct crystals and/or different regions of the same crystal. Combined with other sources of XFEL shot-to-shot variation, this introduces significant heterogeneity into the diffraction data, complicating processing and interpretation. To enable researchers to get the most from their collected data, a toolkit is presented that provides insights into the quality of, and the variation present in, serial crystallography datamore » sets. These tools operate on the unmerged, partial intensity integration results from many individual crystals, and can be used on two levels: firstly to guide the experimental strategy during data collection, and secondly to help users make informed choices during data processing.« less

  18. A public database of macromolecular diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Marek; Langner, Karol M; Cymborowski, Marcin; Porebski, Przemyslaw J; Sroka, Piotr; Zheng, Heping; Cooper, David R; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Elsliger, Marc André; Burley, Stephen K; Minor, Wladek

    2016-11-01

    The low reproducibility of published experimental results in many scientific disciplines has recently garnered negative attention in scientific journals and the general media. Public transparency, including the availability of `raw' experimental data, will help to address growing concerns regarding scientific integrity. Macromolecular X-ray crystallography has led the way in requiring the public dissemination of atomic coordinates and a wealth of experimental data, making the field one of the most reproducible in the biological sciences. However, there remains no mandate for public disclosure of the original diffraction data. The Integrated Resource for Reproducibility in Macromolecular Crystallography (IRRMC) has been developed to archive raw data from diffraction experiments and, equally importantly, to provide related metadata. Currently, the database of our resource contains data from 2920 macromolecular diffraction experiments (5767 data sets), accounting for around 3% of all depositions in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), with their corresponding partially curated metadata. IRRMC utilizes distributed storage implemented using a federated architecture of many independent storage servers, which provides both scalability and sustainability. The resource, which is accessible via the web portal at http://www.proteindiffraction.org, can be searched using various criteria. All data are available for unrestricted access and download. The resource serves as a proof of concept and demonstrates the feasibility of archiving raw diffraction data and associated metadata from X-ray crystallographic studies of biological macromolecules. The goal is to expand this resource and include data sets that failed to yield X-ray structures in order to facilitate collaborative efforts that will improve protein structure-determination methods and to ensure the availability of `orphan' data left behind for various reasons by individual investigators and/or extinct structural genomics

  19. The susceptibility of pure tubulin to high magnetic fields: a magnetic birefringence and x-ray fiber diffraction study.

    PubMed Central

    Bras, W; Diakun, G P; Díaz, J F; Maret, G; Kramer, H; Bordas, J; Medrano, F J

    1998-01-01

    The orientational behavior of microtubules assembled in strong magnetic fields has been studied. It is shown that when microtubules are assembled in a magnetic field, they align with their long axis parallel to the magnetic field. The effect of several parameters known to affect the microtubule assembly are investigated with respect to their effect on the final degree of alignment. Aligned samples of hydrated microtubules suitable for low-resolution x-ray fiber diffraction experiments have been produced, and the results obtained from the fiber diffraction experiments have been compared with the magnetic birefringence experiments. Comparisons with earlier fiber diffraction work and small-angle x-ray solution scattering experiments have been made. PMID:9512047

  20. Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction Studies in Pulsed Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detlefs, C.; Frings, P.; Vanacken, J.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Bras, W.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beamline (BM26B) at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110kJ to the magnet coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8K and 300K.

  1. Synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction studies in pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, P.; Vanacken, J.; Detlefs, C.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Bras, W.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2006-06-01

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beamline (BM26B) at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110kJ to the magnet coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8 and 300K. Powder diffraction patterns of several samples were recorded using 21keV monochromatic x-rays and an on-line image plate detector. Here we present the first results on the suppression of the Jahn-Teller structural distortion in TbVO4 by magnetic field. These data clearly demonstrate the feasibility of x-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields with relatively inexpensive instrumentation.

  2. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongsheng; Rusz, Jan; Cai, Jianwang; Zhu, Jing

    2016-10-01

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y3Fe5O12, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique.

  3. Magnetic structures of actinide materials by pulsed neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Goldstone, J.A.; Huber, J.G.; Giorgi, A.L.; Conant, J.W.; Severing, A.; Cort, B.; Robinson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We describe some attempts to observe magnetic structure in various actinide (5f-electron) materials. Our experimental technique is neutron powder diffraction as practiced at a spallation (pulsed) neutron source. We will discuss our investigations of {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, {alpha}-UD{sub 3} and {beta}-UD{sub 3}. {beta}-UD{sub 3} is a simple ferromagnet: surprisingly, the moments on the two non-equivalent uranium atoms are the same within experimental error. {alpha}-UD{sub 3}, {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu are non-magnetic, within the limits of our observations. Our work with pulsed neutron diffraction shows that it is a useful technique for research on magnetic materials.

  4. IBEX magnetic coupling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Kiekel, P.D.; Miller, R.B.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Wagner, J.; Ramirez, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic coupling of one pulse to another is a key issue for some modes of high-current beam propagation. Experiments are in progress on Sandia's IBEX accelerator to address issues relevant to magnetic coupling. The IBEX experiments differ from previous experiments in that the B/sub theta/ field acting on the second pulse is the result of residual plasma current from the first pulse rather than current applied by an external means. This new feature makes the propagation sensitive to beam and plasma current profiles that are key to the physics of the magnetic coupling problem. These experiments do not attempt to study the air chemistry issues, as this would require much higher current densities than are available from IBEX. We are using the IBEX accelerator with a mismatched magnetized diode to produce two high-current pulses separated by approx.130 nsec. A pulse pair has been propagated over a 1.5-m path in low pressure air. Extraction of two pulses, each having different parameters, complicates the experiment but also provides new insight into the magnetic coupling proplem. 7 figs.

  5. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  6. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  7. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  8. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  9. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Saldin, D K; Poon, H-C; Schwander, P; Uddin, M; Schmidt, M

    2011-08-29

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called "diffract-and-destroy" experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  10. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, D. K.; Poon, H.-C.; Schwander, P.; Uddin, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-08-01

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called ``diffract-and-destroy'' experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  11. Neutron diffraction optics of films with noncollinear magnetic depth structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, Daniel A.; Chernenko, L. P.

    1992-11-01

    A model of a thin film with depth inhomogeneous or noncollinear magnetization is used to describe its neutron-optical, diffraction, and polarization properties. A quantum mechanical method of calculation is developed based on a numerical solution of the Pauli equation for a neutron in inhomogeneous matter with boundary conditions. This solution permits the uniform calculation of intensities and the polarization vector of the scattered beam over a wide range of conditions from specular reflection to neutron diffraction. The method is applied to certain model structures. Examples of its application to model structures (ferromagnetic spirals, long- period soliton) are given and the calculation can be programmed for a personal computer, taking a few seconds for each value of the incident neutron wave vector.

  12. MOKE Diffraction Study of Magnetic Dot and Antidot Arrays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsditch, Marcos

    2003-03-01

    A beam of visible light, incident on a particle array with a submicron period, is diffracted. Extending conventional Magneto Optic Kerr Effect (MOKE) techniques to include the diffracted beams leads to a variety of 'hysteresis' loops. From these loops we show that it is possible to obtain information on the magnetic structure within a unit cell of the array. A brief review of the experimental technique, the theoretical interpretation of the results, and a brief summary of our earlier results on vortices in circular disks [1] and coherent domain formation in antidot arrays [2] will be given. The D-MOKE results from square Permalloy rings will then be presented and compared with micromagnetic simulations. Our results show that magnetization reversal in these ring structures, which is expected to be a jump between two onion states, actually occurs via intermediate, metastable states. For different directions of the applied field these intermediate states are a vortex state or a horseshoe state. A suitable field history allows these states to be quenched and observed using Magnetic Force Microscopy. Work at ANL supported by the US DOE BES Mater. Sci. under contract # W-31-109-ENG-38. [1] M. Grimsditch et al, Phys. Rev. B 65, 172419 (2002) [2] I. Guedes et al, Phys, Rev. B 66, 014434 (2002)

  13. Optical Tweezers for Sample Fixing in Micro-Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amenitsch, H.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Laggner, P.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.; Garbin, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, Ch.

    2007-01-19

    In order to manipulate, characterize and measure the micro-diffraction of individual structural elements down to single phospholipid liposomes we have been using optical tweezers (OT) combined with an imaging microscope. We were able to install the OT system at the microfocus beamline ID13 at the ESRF and trap clusters of about 50 multi-lamellar liposomes (< 10 {mu}m large cluster). Further we have performed a scanning diffraction experiment with a 1 micrometer beam to demonstrate the fixing capabilities and to confirm the size of the liposome cluster by X-ray diffraction.

  14. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  15. Double Slit Diffraction Experiments with Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Kamrul; Grave-de-Peralta, Luis

    2012-10-01

    Young's double slit experiment is the most famous interference experiment. Two parallel waveguides were used for producing interference patterns with Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPP), which are equivalent to a double slit diffraction experiment. SPP interference was studied using SPP tomography. A series of experiments were done changing the separation and width of the waveguides. There was a good correspondence between observed and simulated interference patterns.

  16. Spin-polarized photoelectron diffraction from magnetically-ordered solids and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinković, B.; Hermsmeier, B.; Fadley, C. S.

    1986-02-01

    We report the first experimental observation of Spin-Polarized Photoelectron Diffraction (SPPD), an effect which shows considerable promise for studying short-range order in magnetic solids and surfaces. The detection of photoelectron spin polarization in this experiment is provided by 3s-level multiplet splittings in 3d metals and their compounds; thus no external spin detector is required. Measurements on antiferromagnetic KMnF 3 show spin asymmetries of as high as 17% due to short-range order.

  17. The magnetic nozzle experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Samuel; Berlinger, B.; Corso, V.; Fahmy, F.; Gorman, J.; Levinton, F.; Lemunyan, G.; Fredriksen, A.

    1999-11-01

    A facility to study the flow of magnetized plasmas expanding through a constriction formed by increased magnetic field intensity has been constructed and operated. The experiments are to study plasma recombination promoted by expansion cooling. This has applications to the fields of fusion physics, space propulsion, materials processing, and lasing systems. Through the helicon-wave method, 2 cm diameter Ar plasmas with densities up to 10^14 cm-3 and temperatures near 5 eV have been produced in a region of nearly uniform magnetic field (B < 0.5 T), formed by a 25 cm ID Helmholtz coil pair. Inside the Helmholtz coil remote from the helicon antenna, the field is compressed to more than 1 T by a coaxial coil with 2 cm ID. Spectroscopic and electric probe techniques have been used to study plasmas in both the uniform and expanding field regions. We present numerical results from a model of 2-species plasma expansion, including 3-body effects and electron-ion coupling. More than 50% helium recombination is predicted for initial plasma densities above 10^14 cm-3. Cool ions aid recombination.

  18. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  19. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  20. Photoelectron diffraction of magnetic ultrathin films: Fe/Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G. ); Wagner, M.K. . Dept. of Chemistry); Guo, X.Q.; Tong, S.Y. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-03

    The preliminary results of an ongoing investigation of Fe/Cu(001) are presented here. Energy dependent photoelectron diffraction, including the spin-dependent variant using the multiplet split Fe3s state, is being used to investigate the nanoscale structures formed by near-monolayer deposits of Fe onto Cu(001). Core-level photoemission from the Fe3p and Fe3s states has been generated using synchrotron radiation as the tunable excitation source. Tentatively, a comparison of the experimental Fe3p cross section measurements with multiple scattering calculations indicates that the Fe is in a fourfold hollow site with a spacing of 3.6{Angstrom} between it and the atom directly beneath it, in the third layer. This is consistent with an FCC structure. The possibility of utilizing spin-dependent photoelectron diffraction to investigate magnetic ultrathin films will be demonstrated, using our preliminary spectra of the multiplet-split Fe3s os near-monolayer Fe/Cu(001). 18 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Acoustic diffraction by a finite barrier; theories and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebsen, G. M.

    1981-03-01

    The Biot-Tolstoy (B-T) exact impulse solution of diffraction by an infinite half-plane is compared to the usual Helmholtz-Kirchhoff (H-K) integral formulation and to the exact continuous wave (CW) solution of Macdonald. For backscatter the B-T and H-K solutions are found to differ significantly, especially near the surface of the half-plane, where the B-T solution gives close agreement with experiment. For forward scatter the two exact solutions and experimental data are in agreement. B-T is found to agree well with measurements of diffraction by a barrier perpendicular to a rigid base. By considering source and source image in the base separately the concept of 'image of the source in the barrier' is found to be unnecessary. Use of the time domain form of B-T solution in calculating the forward diffraction near a corner and behind a thin strip is shown to give results which agree well with measured data. Secondary diffraction effects are observed in the measurements of diffraction by a thin strip, a non-vertical barrier and a thick edge.

  2. Experiments on Magnetic Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, C. S.; Ertel, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of a simple apparatus to measure the magnetization density and magnetic susceptibility of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and the diamagnetic solids and liquids. (Author/GA)

  3. Experiments on Magnetic Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, C. S.; Ertel, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of a simple apparatus to measure the magnetization density and magnetic susceptibility of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and the diamagnetic solids and liquids. (Author/GA)

  4. Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction and Absorption Spectroscopy in Pulsed Magnetic Fields with Milliseconds Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacken, J.; Detlefs, C.; Mathon, O.; Frings, P.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Dominguez, M.-C.; Herczeg, J.; Bras, W.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Rikken, G.

    2007-03-01

    X-ray Powder Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy experiments (WAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments were carried out at the ESRF DUBBLE beam line (BM26) and at the energy dispersive beam line (ID24), respectively. A mobile pulse generator, developed at the LNCMP, delivered 110kJ to the load coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30T with a rise time of about 5 ms. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 4.2K and 300K. Powder diffraction patterns of TbVO4 were recorded in a broad temperature range using 21 keV monochromatic X-rays and using an on-line image plate detector. We observed the suppression of the Jahn-Teller structural distortion in TbVO4 due to the high magnetic pulsed field. XAS spectra could be measured and finite XMCD signals, directly proportional to the magnetic moment on the Gd absorber atom, were measured in thin Gd foils. Thanks to its element and orbital selectivity, XMCD proofs to be very useful in probing the magnetic properties and due to the strong brilliance of the synchrotron beam, the signals can be measured even in the ms range.

  5. New synchrotron powder diffraction facility for long-duration experiments

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Claire A.; Potter, Jonathan; Day, Sarah J.; Baker, Annabelle R.; Thompson, Stephen P.; Kelly, Jon; Morris, Christopher G.; Tang, Chiu C.

    2017-01-01

    A new synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction instrument has been built and commissioned for long-duration experiments on beamline I11 at Diamond Light Source. The concept is unique, with design features to house multiple experiments running in parallel, in particular with specific stages for sample environments to study slow kinetic systems or processes. The instrument benefits from a high-brightness X-ray beam and a large area detector. Diffraction data from the commissioning work have shown that the objectives and criteria are met. Supported by two case studies, the results from months of measurements have demonstrated the viability of this large-scale instrument, which is the world’s first dedicated facility for long-term studies (weeks to years) using synchrotron radiation. PMID:28190992

  6. New synchrotron powder diffraction facility for long-duration experiments.

    PubMed

    Murray, Claire A; Potter, Jonathan; Day, Sarah J; Baker, Annabelle R; Thompson, Stephen P; Kelly, Jon; Morris, Christopher G; Yang, Sihai; Tang, Chiu C

    2017-02-01

    A new synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction instrument has been built and commissioned for long-duration experiments on beamline I11 at Diamond Light Source. The concept is unique, with design features to house multiple experiments running in parallel, in particular with specific stages for sample environments to study slow kinetic systems or processes. The instrument benefits from a high-brightness X-ray beam and a large area detector. Diffraction data from the commissioning work have shown that the objectives and criteria are met. Supported by two case studies, the results from months of measurements have demonstrated the viability of this large-scale instrument, which is the world's first dedicated facility for long-term studies (weeks to years) using synchrotron radiation.

  7. The Cleveland Clinic's magnet experience.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Peggy A; Lewicki, Linda J; Modic, Mary Beth; Schaab, Debbie; Rump, Colleen; Bixler, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    The awarding of Magnet Status by the Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program of the American Nursing Credentialing Center is acknowledged as the achievement of Excellence in Nursing. In this article, The Cleveland Clinic shares insights from its experience in becoming the 72nd Magnet hospital. Questions to ponder when conducting a readiness assessment before embarking on the Magnet journey, techniques to engage the staff in the application process, and writing and organizing tips are shared.

  8. Neutron Diffraction Investigations of Magnetism in BiFeO3 Epitaxial Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    ordering temperatures are far too low for device applications. Perovskite-structured BiFeO 3 (BFO) with a rhom- bohedral distortion along the [111...where the magnetic moment lies in the HHL plane. Neutron Diffraction Investigations of Magnetism in BiFeO 3 Epitaxial Films The recovery of a...modulated magnetic structure in epitaxial BiFeO 3 thin fi lms as revealed by neutron diffraction is reported. The magnetic structure in thin fi lms is

  9. Estimates of signals in LCLS diffraction imaging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N

    2004-12-17

    In the coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments, samples will be injected or placed in the beam and a two-dimensional diffraction pattern will be collected for a single pulse. This is repeated for a large number of pulses, with the data being read out of the detector each pulse, and stored if the data meets a requirement of enough total recorded counts. There must be sufficient pixels in the detector to over-sample the diffraction pattern, which depends on the sample size and desired resolution, as described below. The scattering from the sample covers a large dynamic range: it is strong very close to the central core and at high angles there will be much less than one photon per pixel. Since the technique relies upon classifying and averaging a large number of patterns, the read noise must be considerably less than the photon count per pixel averaged over these patterns. Estimates of the noise level and dynamic range are given below, after first listing the requirements of pixel count and sampling.

  10. Pixel Detectors For Diffraction Experiments At The Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Huelsen, G.; Eikenberry, E.F.; Schmitt, B.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Tomizaki, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Willmott, P.; Patterson, B.; Broennimann, Ch.; Horisberger, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Borchert, G. L.

    2004-05-12

    The PILATUS detector (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a large, quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography which is currently under construction. Its basic units are modules with 16 CMOS chips bump-bonded to a large, continuously sensitive silicon sensor with 157x366 pixels of 217x217 {mu}m2, leading to an active area of 34x80 mm2. With a counting circuit in each pixel, X-rays are detected in single photon counting mode, leading to excellent, noise-free data. The main properties of the detector are an energy range of 6 to 30 keV, no back-ground due to leakage current or readout-noise, fast read-out time of 6.7 ms, a rate/pixel >104/s and a PSF of one pixel. PILATUS detectors are installed at the SLS X06SA protein crystallography beamline, and at both the surface diffraction (SD) station and the radiography and tomography (XTM) station of beamline X04SA. The detectors are operated at room temperature and thus are very easy to use. Experiments benefit from the ability to detect very weak diffraction spots with high precision. At the SD station and at the XTM station, which is equipped with a Bragg magnifier, diffraction, radiography and tomography experiments showed promising results. At beamline X06SA, a three-module array (1120x157 pixels) with a readout time of 6.7 ms was tested. This system was used to collect fine phi-sliced protein crystal data in continuous sample rotation mode in which the crystal was continuously rotated with a slow angular velocity of 0.04 deg./s without any shutter operation. Exposure time per frame ranged from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the crystal. These initial experiments show the potential of this method.

  11. Pixel Detectors For Diffraction Experiments At The Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hülsen, G.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Horisberger, R.; Schmitt, B.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Tomizaki, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Stampanoni, M.; Borchert, G. L.; Willmott, P.; Patterson, B.; Brönnimann, Ch.

    2004-05-01

    The PILATUS detector (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a large, quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography which is currently under construction. Its basic units are modules with 16 CMOS chips bump-bonded to a large, continuously sensitive silicon sensor with 157×366 pixels of 217×217 μm2, leading to an active area of 34×80 mm2. With a counting circuit in each pixel, X-rays are detected in single photon counting mode, leading to excellent, noise-free data. The main properties of the detector are an energy range of 6 to 30 keV, no back-ground due to leakage current or readout-noise, fast read-out time of 6.7 ms, a rate/pixel >104/s and a PSF of one pixel. PILATUS detectors are installed at the SLS X06SA protein crystallography beamline, and at both the surface diffraction (SD) station and the radiography and tomography (XTM) station of beamline X04SA. The detectors are operated at room temperature and thus are very easy to use. Experiments benefit from the ability to detect very weak diffraction spots with high precision. At the SD station and at the XTM station, which is equipped with a Bragg magnifier, diffraction, radiography and tomography experiments showed promising results. At beamline X06SA, a three-module array (1120×157 pixels) with a readout time of 6.7 ms was tested. This system was used to collect fine phi-sliced protein crystal data in continuous sample rotation mode in which the crystal was continuously rotated with a slow angular velocity of 0.04 °/s without any shutter operation. Exposure time per frame ranged from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the crystal. These initial experiments show the potential of this method.

  12. Sacrificial tamper slows down sample explosion in FLASH diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Boutet, Sébastien; Barty, Anton; Bajt, Sasa; Bogan, Michael J; Frank, Matthias; Andreasson, Jakob; Iwan, Bianca; Seibert, M Marvin; Hajdu, Janos; Sakdinawat, Anne; Schulz, Joachim; Treusch, Rolf; Chapman, Henry N

    2010-02-12

    Intense and ultrashort x-ray pulses from free-electron lasers open up the possibility for near-atomic resolution imaging without the need for crystallization. Such experiments require high photon fluences and pulses shorter than the time to destroy the sample. We describe results with a new femtosecond pump-probe diffraction technique employing coherent 0.1 keV x rays from the FLASH soft x-ray free-electron laser. We show that the lifetime of a nanostructured sample can be extended to several picoseconds by a tamper layer to dampen and quench the sample explosion, making <1 nm resolution imaging feasible.

  13. Magnetic Repulsion: An Introductory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romer, Alfred

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of a balance assembled from standard laboratory components to conduct an experiment on the repulsion between two bar magnets. Includes an analysis of data on the two-pole and four-pole models. (CC)

  14. Magnetic space shuttle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; F. Doyle, John; Carter, Paul; Wachtel, Howard; Deuser, Mark S.; Vellinger, John C.; Cassanto, John M.; Alvarado, Ulises; Sygusch, Jurgen; Kent, Thomas B.

    1999-04-01

    Applications of magnetic fields in separation science, biotechnology and gravitational biology as studied in the low-gravity environment of space flight are reviewed. Ferromagnetism, ferrimagnetism, paramagnetism and diamagnetism have been applied in studies of collagen gel formation, bacterial growth and mixing in the free-fall condition of orbital space flight.

  15. Uranium Hydridoborates: Synthesis, Magnetism, and X-ray/Neutron Diffraction Structures.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, H; Gackstatter, A; Kupfer, T; Radacki, K; Franke, S; Meyer, K; Fucke, K; Lemée-Cailleau, M-H

    2015-08-17

    While uranium hydridoborate complexes containing the [BH4](-) moiety have been well-known in the literature for many years, species with functionalized borate centers remained considerably rare. We were now able to prepare several uranium hydridoborates (1-4) with amino-substituted borate moieties with high selectivity by smooth reaction of [Cp*2UMe2] (Cp* = C5Me5) and [Cp'2UMe2] (Cp' = 1,2,4-tBu3C5H2) with the aminoborane H2BN(SiMe3)2. A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, deuteration experiments, magnetic SQUID measurements, and X-ray/neutron diffraction studies was used to verify the anticipated molecular structures and oxidation states of 1-4 and helped to establish a linear tridentate coordination mode of the borate anions.

  16. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  17. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise and Neutron Diffraction Techniques for the Study of Intergranular Residual Strains in Mild Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hutanu, Roxana; Clapham, Lynann; Rogge, Ronald

    2004-02-26

    Intergranular residual stresses (IS) are microscopic residual stresses which have been found to accumulate along the <100> direction in steels. The <100> direction is also the magnetic easy axis direction in steel. This work involved Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) studies on steel samples, deformed uniaxially to increasing levels of strain. The MBN results indicated that a bulk magnetic easy axis was produced by the deformation process, and neutron diffraction experiments showed that this easy axis was correlated with the tensile strain in grains oriented in the <100> direction.

  18. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth.

  19. Crystal cavity resonance for hard x rays: A diffraction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Stetsko, Yu. P.; Tang, M.-T.; Shew, B.-Y.; Lee, Y.-R.; Sun, W.-H.; Wu, H.-H.; Kuo, T.-T.; Chen, S.-Y.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Shy, J.-T.; Yabashi, M.; Tamasaku, K.; Miwa, D.

    2006-10-01

    We report the details of the recent x-ray back diffraction experiments, in which interference fringes due to x-ray cavity resonance are unambiguously observed. The Fabry-Perot type cavities, the tested crystal devices of reflectivity R{approx_equal}0.5 and finesse F{approx_equal}2.3, consist of monolithic two-plate and eight-plate silicon crystals. They were prepared by using x-ray lithographic techniques. The thicknesses of the crystal plates and the gaps between the two adjacent plates are a few tens to hundreds {mu}m. The (12 4 0) back reflection and synchrotron x-radiation of energy resolution {delta}E=0.36 meV at 14.4388 keV are employed. Interference fringes in angle- and photon-energy scans for two-plate and eight-plate cavities are shown. Considerations on the temporal and spatial coherence for observable resonance interference fringes using synchrotron x-rays are presented. The details about the accompanied simultaneous 24-beam diffraction in relation to x-ray photon energy are also described.

  20. Locating and Visualizing Crystals for X-Ray Diffraction Experiments.

    PubMed

    Becker, Michael; Kissick, David J; Ogata, Craig M

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography has advanced from using macroscopic crystals, which might be >1 mm on a side, to crystals that are essentially invisible to the naked eye, or even under a standard laboratory microscope. As crystallography requires recognizing crystals when they are produced, and then placing them in an X-ray, electron, or neutron beam, this provides challenges, particularly in the case of advanced X-ray sources, where beams have very small cross sections and crystals may be vanishingly small. Methods for visualizing crystals are reviewed here, and examples of different types of cases are presented, including: standard crystals, crystals grown in mesophase, in situ crystallography, and crystals grown for X-ray Free Electron Laser or Micro Electron Diffraction experiments. As most techniques have limitations, it is desirable to have a range of complementary techniques available to identify and locate crystals. Ideally, a given technique should not cause sample damage, but sometimes it is necessary to use techniques where damage can only be minimized. For extreme circumstances, the act of probing location may be coincident with collecting X-ray diffraction data. Future challenges and directions are also discussed.

  1. Tetragonal magnetic phase in Ba1-xKxFe2As2 from x-ray and neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Allred, J. M.; Avci, S.; Chung, D. Y.; ...

    2015-09-28

    In this paper, combined neutron and x-ray diffraction experiments demonstrate the formation of a low-temperature minority magnetic tetragonal phase in Ba0.76K0.24Fe2As2 in addition to the majority magnetic, orthorhombic phase. The coincident enhancement in the magnetic (1/2 1/2 1) peaks shows that this minority phase is of the same type that was observed in Ba1-xNaxFe2As2 (0.24 ≤ x ≤ 0.28), in which the magnetic moments reorient along the c axis. This is evidence that the tetragonal magnetic phase is a universal feature of the hole-doped iron-based superconductors. Finally, the observations suggest that in this regime the energy levels of the C2more » and C4 symmetric magnetic phases are very close.« less

  2. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3, in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields.

  3. Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction characterization methods for iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbasov, Raul; Polikarpov, Michael; Cherepanov, Valery; Chuev, Michael; Mischenko, Iliya; Lomov, Andrey; Wang, Andrew; Panchenko, Vladislav

    2015-04-01

    Water soluble magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with oleic polymer coating and average diameters in the range of 5-25 nm, previously determined by TEM, were characterized using Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction measurements. Comparative analysis of the results demonstrated a large diversity of magnetic relaxation regimes. Analysis showed the presence of an additional impurity component in the 25 nm nanoparticles, with principally different magnetic nature at the magnetite core. In some cases, X-ray diffraction measurements were unable to estimate the size of the magnetic core and Mössbauer data were necessary for the correct interpretation of the experimental results.

  4. A Simple Diffraction Experiment Using Banana Stem as a Natural Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aji, Mahardika Prasetya; Karunawan, Jotti; Chasanah, Widyastuti Rochimatun; Nursuhud, Puji Iman; Wiguna, Pradita Ajeng; Sulhadi

    2017-01-01

    A simple diffraction experiment was designed using banana stem as natural grating. Coherent beams of lasers with wavelengths of 632.8 nm and 532 nm that pass through banana stem produce periodic diffraction patterns on a screen. The diffraction experiments were able to measure the distances between the slit of the banana stem, i.e. d = (28.76 ±…

  5. X-ray diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Koyama, Keiichi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    A system was developed measuring x-ray powder diffraction in high magnetic fields up to 5 T and at temperatures from 283 to 473 K. The stability of the temperature is within 1 K over 6 h. In order to examine the ability of the system, the high-field x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for Si and a Ni-based ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy. The results show that the x-ray powder diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures are useful for materials research. PMID:27877263

  6. Circularly polarized soft x-ray diffraction study of helical magnetism in hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, A. M.; Lawrence, S. M.; Princep, A. J.; Staub, U.; Bodenthin, Y.; García-Fernández, M.; Garganourakis, M.; Hester, J.; Macquart, R.; Ling, C. D.

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic spiral structures can exhibit ferroelectric moments as recently demonstrated in various multiferroic materials. In such cases the helicity of the magnetic spiral is directly correlated with the direction of the ferroelectric moment and measurement of the helicity of magnetic structures is of current interest. Soft x-ray resonant diffraction is particularly advantageous because it combines element selectivity with a large magnetic cross-section. We calculate the polarization dependence of the resonant magnetic x-ray cross-section (electric dipole transition) for the basal plane magnetic spiral in hexaferrite Ba0.8Sr1.2Zn2Fe12O22 and deduce its domain population using circular polarized incident radiation. We demonstrate there is a direct correlation between the diffracted radiation and the helicity of the magnetic spiral.

  7. Laboratory Experiments on Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a topological rearrangement of magnetic field lines, is one of the key self-organization processes in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. This talk presents the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection reviewing the recent significant progress in laboratory experiments. Sawtooth relaxation in a tokamak plasma, which represents a repetitive change of the electron temperature profile, provides a good example of magnetic reconnection. During the relaxation phase of the sawtooth, a rapid flattening of the electron temperature profile occurs and the pitch of field lines changes suddenly as the field lines break and rearrange themselves to form a new topological profile. In the reversed field pinch (RFP) and spheromak plasmas, a sudden re-arrangement of field lines in an inner flux surface can trigger another rearrangement in the outer flux surfaces, leading to a global magnetic relaxation event. Magnetic reconnection physics has been investigated in a variety of laboratory experiments dedicated for reconnection research. These laboratory experiments have made important contributions to recent advances in our understanding of magnetic reconnection. Significant findings are as follows: 1) The reconnection dynamics are determined both by local and global conditions, 2) The profiles of the reconnection layer and reconnection rate change drastically as the plasma's collisionality is reduced, 3) Two-fluid dynamics have been verified through experimental identification of both the ion and electron diffusion layers, 4) Electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations and their spatial profiles were measured in the reconnection layer of both laboratory and space plasmas with notable similarities, and 5) The reconnection rate increases significantly when the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length approaches unity. A new scaling of reconnection resistivity with respect to this ratio has been obtained from the laboratory results. The

  8. Correlating Sampling and Intensity Statistics in Nanoparticle Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-08-01

    In this article, [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014). J. Appl. Cryst. 47, 1016-1025] it was shown that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye-Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys. (1948), 19, 742-753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. Three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos [theta], to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos [theta]B/cos [theta], corrects this problem.

  9. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; ...

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) themore » one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.« less

  10. Induced magnetic anisotropy in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials: A transmission x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, R. Suzuki, K.; Yanai, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A.; Ohnuma, M.

    2015-05-07

    In order to better understand the origin of field-induced anisotropy (K{sub u}) in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys, the lattice spacing of the bcc-Fe phase in nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} (x = 10, 12, 14) alloys annealed under an applied magnetic field has been investigated by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry (t-XRD) with the diffraction vector parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. The saturation magnetostriction (λ{sub s}) of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} was found to increase linearly with the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase and is well described by taking into account the volume-weighted average of two local λ{sub s} values for the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites (−5 ± 2 ppm) and the residual amorphous matrix (+8 ± 2 ppm). The lattice distortion required to produce the measured K{sub u} values (∼100 J/m{sup 3}) was estimated via the inverse magnetostrictive effect using the measured λ{sub s} values and was compared to the lattice spacing estimations made by t-XRD. The lattice strain required to produce K{sub u} under the magnetoelastic model was not observed by the t-XRD experiments and so the findings of this study suggest that the origin of magnetic field induced K{sub u} cannot be explained through the magnetoelastic effect.

  11. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.

  12. Measurement of diffractive dijet production at the H1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Raičević, Nataša

    2016-03-25

    The new results on measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering, ep → eXY, obtained with the H1 detector are presented. The system X contains at least two jets. Measurements are performed using two approaches. One approach is based on detection of the diffractive processes with Y being a proton or its low mass excitation. Diffractive events are selected by demanding a large empty rapidity gap interval separating the final state hadronic systems X and Y. In another approach, the leading final state proton from the process ep → eXp is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurements are compared with predictions from NLO QCD calculations based on diffractive parton densities.

  13. High-precision neutron spectrometry, using diffraction focusing. Test experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Berdnikov, A. Ya.; Borisov, Yu. V.; Braginetz, Yu. P.; Fedorov, V. V.; Lasitsa, M. V.; Semenikhin, S. Yu.; Khorina, M. L.; Voronin, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of double-crystal neutron focusing, using Laue diffraction in large perfect crystals was studied. The observed effect allows reach the angular resolution better than 0.03", that is ~ 10-2 of the Bragg reflection width. This fact makes it possible to create a new ultraprecise method for neutron spectrometry combining the spin-echo small angle neutron scattering with Laue diffraction.

  14. Acousto-Optic Beam Sampler, Part III: Diffraction Experiments at 10.6 micrometers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report deals with the results of acousto - optic diffraction experiments in air at 10.6 micron. The laser used for the experiments was operated...fields. Detailed experiments were performed to investigate the dependence of the acousto - optic diffraction on incident laser power, acoustic drive voltage and angle of incidence.

  15. Pulsed magnetic field synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction of the Jahn-Teller distortion in TbVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacken, J.; Frings, P.; Detlefs, C.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Bras, W.; Rikken, G.

    2006-11-01

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beam line at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110 kJ to the load coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30 T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8 K and 300 K. Powder diffraction patterns of TbVO4 were recorded in a broad temperature range using 21 keV monochromatic X-rays and an on-line image plate detector. We present results on the suppression of the Jahn-Teller structural distortion in TbVO4by to the magnetic field.

  16. Magnetic and electronic orderings in orthorhombic RMnO3 (R=Tm, Lu) studied by resonant soft x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garganourakis, M.; Bodenthin, Y.; de Souza, R. A.; Scagnoli, V.; Dönni, A.; Tachibana, M.; Kitazawa, H.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.; Staub, U.

    2012-08-01

    Resonant soft x-ray powder diffraction experiments on orthorhombic TmMnO3 and LuMnO3 are presented. Experiments were performed in the vicinity of the Tm M5 and the Mn L2,3 edges to study the Tm and Mn magnetic moments, respectively. These experiments show that for the heavy rare-earth perovskite with an E-type ordered ground state, the Tm magnetic moments order already in the nonferroelectric incommensurate magnetic phase. Additionally, deviations from the collinear E-type Mn magnetic structure at low temperatures are found for both compounds. These experiments show the power of resonant soft x-ray diffraction, extended to polycrystalline 4f materials.

  17. Diffraction of a Bose-Einstein Condensate from a Magnetic Lattice on a Microchip

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, A.; Kraft, S.; Kemmler, M.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.; Zimmermann, C.; Fortagh, J.

    2005-10-21

    We experimentally study the diffraction of a Bose-Einstein condensate from a magnetic lattice, realized by a set of 372 parallel gold conductors which are microfabricated on a silicon substrate. The conductors generate a periodic potential for the atoms with a lattice constant of 4 {mu}m. After exposing the condensate to the lattice for several milliseconds we observe diffraction up to fifth order by standard time of flight imaging techniques. The experimental data can be quantitatively interpreted with a simple phase imprinting model. The demonstrated diffraction grating offers promising perspectives for the construction of an integrated atom interferometer.

  18. Improved Magnetic Reconnection Experiment at FRC Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Zhou, Ruijie; Vasquez, Daniel; Huang, Tian-Sen; Prairie View Solar Observatory Team

    2014-10-01

    With experimental facility's improvement, magnetic reconnection has been further studied at Prairie View rotamak device. By adding one toroidal current in the central part of the rotamak device, the cutting of one magnetic field reverse configuration (FRC) as two FRCs in the experiment process becomes more obvious. Differing from the magnetic reconnection experiments conducted at other labs, where magnetic reconnection is formed with two ware-coiled currents buried in a chamber with large scale magnetic field, in our magnetic reconnection experiment the main source of the magnetic field is plasma current. Thus, the magnetic reconnection experiments conducted at rotamak device are closer to the one occurring in the space and on the sun. At the present stage, our experiments focus on the study of the change in electron temperature during the magnetic reconnection process. Furthermore, the ion temperature and plasma flow can be easily achieved from fast ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) diagnostic system, which makes the magnetic reconnection process more clearly.

  19. Dynamic effects in alignment of biological macromolecules for diffraction experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, D.; Weierstall, U.; Schmidt, K.; Doak, R. B.; Fromme, P.; Spence, J. C. H.

    2006-03-01

    Molecular alignment by means of anisotropic polarizability interaction with a laser electric field is the crucial step in the recently proposed serial diffraction of non-crystallizable proteins, where protein damage is prevented by recording the x-ray diffraction pattern from an array of identically oriented proteins passing through the intersection of x-ray and laser beams. The proteins can be delivered using a periodically triggered Rayleigh beam of doped water droplets. The behavior of a small globular protein (lysozyme), a large protein complex (ribosome) and a rodlike virus (TMV) in a water droplet and a gas damping cell at various pressures is considered. Optimum conditions for alignment in terms of laser power, pressure in a damping cell and adiabatic field switch-on are discussed. The degree of molecular alignment depends on these conditions and has to be sufficient to obtain sub-nanometer resolution in the charge density maps recovered from diffraction patterns.

  20. The magnetic structure of Co(NCNH)₂ as determined by (spin-polarized) neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Müller, Paul; Dronskowski, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The magnetic structure of Co(NCNH)₂ has been studied by neutron diffraction data below 10 K using the SPODI and DNS instruments at FRM II, Munich. There is an intensity change in the (1 1 0) and (0 2 0) reflections around 4 K, to be attributed to the onset of a magnetic ordering of the Co²⁺ spins. Four different spin orientations have been evaluated on the basis of Rietveld refinements, comprising antiferromagnetic as well as ferromagnetic ordering along all three crystallographic axes. Both residual values and supplementary susceptibility measurements evidence that only a ferromagnetic ordering with all Co²⁺ spins parallel to the c axis is a suitable description of the low-temperature magnetic ground state of Co(NCNH)₂. The deviation of the magnetic moment derived by the Rietveld refinement from the expectancy value may be explained either by an incomplete saturation of the moment at temperatures slightly below the Curie temperature or by a small Jahn–Teller distortion. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic ground state of Co(NCNH)₂ has been clarified by (spin-polarized) neutron diffraction data at low temperatures. Intensity changes below 4 K arise due to the onset of ferromagnetic ordering of the Co²⁺ spins parallel to the c axis, corroborated by various (magnetic) Rietveld refinements. Highlights: • Powderous Co(NCNH)₂ has been subjected to (spin-polarized) neutron diffraction. • Magnetic susceptibility data of Co(NCNH)₂ have been collected. • Below 4 K, the magnetic moments align ferromagnetically with all Co²⁺ spins parallel to the c axis. • The magnetic susceptibility data yield an effective magnetic moment of 4.68 and a Weiss constant of -13(2) K. • The ferromagnetic Rietveld refinement leads to a magnetic moment of 2.6 which is close to the expectancy value of 3.

  1. Single-Slit Electron Diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm Phase: Feynman's Thought Experiment with Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics.

  2. Single-slit electron diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm phase: Feynman's thought experiment with quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-10

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics.

  3. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  4. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  5. Magnetic structures of R(Cu, Ni)2 compounds (R = heavy rare earth) studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetana, Z.; Šíma, V.

    1985-11-01

    Magnetics structures of powdered orthorhombic R(Cu, Ni)2 compounds (R = heavy rare earth) determined by neutron diffraction are described. The influence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and exchange interactions on the type of magnetic ordering is discussed.

  6. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

  7. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

  8. Neutron diffraction studies of magnetic-shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Prokes, Karel; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2007-09-01

    Neutron diffraction of single crystal of the typical example of magnetic-shape memory (MSM) alloy Ni 49.7Mn 29.3Ga 21 was carried out with a 2D position sensitive detector. The quality and inhomogeneity of the single crystal and martensite variant distribution was studied using ω-scan of selected nuclear Bragg reflections. The neutron diffraction reveals split of the (2 0 0) reflection of major martensite variant and large structural inhomogeneities in martensite phase. Using measurement in reciprocal space, we recorded a set of reflections that appear due to structural modulation (5 M) of the martensite, however, the set seems to be incomplete with missing or very weak reflections of second order compared with X-ray diffraction. The line of the magnetic reflection arising from the supposed antiferromagnetic ordering of the excess Mn atoms was very weak and it is difficult to discern from the background.

  9. Neutron diffraction studies on magnetic properties of Ca5Ni4V6O24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shivani; Singh, Kiran; Lalla, N. P.; Suard, E.; Simon, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    The temperature dependent neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and magnetization measurements of vanadium based garnet Ca5Ni4V6O24 (CNVO) have been performed to explore its crystal and magnetic structures. The magnetization results illustrate two magnetic anomalies at 7 and 4 K. The Rietveld analysis of room temperature x-ray diffraction and NPD data confirms its Ia-3d crystal structure. The temperature dependent NPD shows the emergence of magnetic reflections below 7 K whose intensity keeps on increasing with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K. The crystal structure remains cubic down to 1.5 K. Rietveld analysis reveals that below 7 K, the Ni moments in CNVO undergo a commensurate collinear A-type antiferromagnetic ordering with propagation vector k=(0,0,0) and the per site ordered moment of Ni2+ is 1.69±0.05 μB. Absence of any additional magnetic or nuclear reflections below 4 K confirms that the nuclear and magnetic structures remain invariant across the 4 K magnetic anomaly.

  10. Strategy for realizing magnetic field enhancement based on diffraction coupling of magnetic plasmon resonances in embedded metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mao, Peng; Xu, Rongqing; Tang, Chaojun; Liu, Yuanjian; Wang, Qiugu; Zhang, Labao

    2015-06-15

    We have demonstrated a straightforward strategy to realize magnetic field enhancement through diffraction coupling of magnetic plasmon (MP) resonances by embedding the metamaterials consisting of a planar rectangular array of U-shaped metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) into the substrate. Our method provides a more homogeneous dielectric background allowing stronger diffraction coupling of MP resonances among SRRs leading to strong suppression of the radiative damping. We observe that compared to the on-substrate metamaterials, the embedded ones lead to a narrow-band hybridized MP mode, which results from the interference between MP resonances in individual SRRs and an in-plane propagating collective surface mode arising from light diffraction. Associated with the excitation of this hybridized MP mode, a twenty-seven times enhancement of magnetic fields within the inner area of the SRRs is achieved as compared with the pure MP resonance. Moreover, we also found that besides the above requirement of homogeneous dielectric background, only a collective surface mode with its magnetic field of the same direction as the induced magnetic moment in the SRRs could mediate the excitation of such a hybridized MP mode.

  11. Magnetic Structure of Goethite α-FeOOH: A Neutron Diffraction Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Nakotte, H.; Vogel, S. C.; Wenk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) is found in diverse natural ecosystems, it is by far the most common oxyhydroxide in terrestrial soils, sediments and clays and an important mineral in the biogeochemical cycle of iron at the Earth's surface. Neutron diffraction studies have found that the iron magnetic moments are collinear in a two sublattice antiferromagnetic structure, aligned parallel to the c axis in space group Pbnm (Forsyth et. al. 1968). However, goethite shows superparamagnetic behavior and also a weak ferromagnetic component that has been attributed to the presence of lattice distortions. It is thought that these changes in magnetic ordering could be due to a 13° canting of the magnetic moment with respect to the c-axis, which enables the flipping of the spins due to small perturbations in the lattice (Coey et. al. 1995). In this study we used neutron diffraction at HIPPO and NPDF beamlines at LANSCE of Los Alamos National Laboratory on a powder of natural goethite provided by A. Gualtieri. The nuclear and magnetic structures were determined by means of a Rietveld refinement with GSAS and it was found that the spins of the iron atoms are aligned parallel to the c-axis, with no evidence of spin canting. The net magnetic moment is lower than what has previously been found. These results provide further insight into the magnetic ordering of this mineral and can be important in understanding the physical processes responsible for goethite's intriguing magnetic behavior.

  12. Magnetic symmetries in neutron and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction patterns of four iridium oxides.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Khalyavin, D D; Manuel, P; Chapon, L C; Cao, G; Qi, T F

    2012-12-12

    The magnetic properties of Sr(2)IrO(4), Na(2)IrO(3), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3) are discussed, principally in the light of experimental data in recent literature for Bragg intensities measured in x-ray diffraction with enhancement at iridium L-absorption edges. The electronic structure factors we report, which incorporate parity-even and acentric entities, serve the immediate purpose of making full use of crystal and magnetic symmetry to refine our knowledge of the magnetic properties of the four iridates from resonant x-ray diffraction data. They also offer a platform on which to interpret future investigations, using dichroic signals, resonant x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, for example, as well as ab initio calculations of electronic structure. Unit-cell structure factors, suitable for x-ray Bragg diffraction enhanced by an electric dipole-electric dipole (E1-E1) event, reveal exactly which iridium multipoles are visible, e.g., a magnetic dipole parallel to the crystal c-axis (z-axis) and an electric quadrupole with yz-like symmetry in the specific case of CaIrO(3). Magnetic space-groups are assigned to Sr(2)IrO(4), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3), namely, P(I)cca, P(A)ban and Cm'cm', respectively, in the Belov-Neronova-Smirnova notation. The assignment for Sr(2)IrO(4) is possible because of our new high-resolution neutron diffraction data, gathered on a powder sample. In addition, the new data are used to show that the ordered magnetic moment of an Ir(4+) ion in Sr(2)IrO(4) does not exceed 0.29(4) μ(B). Na(2)IrO(3) has two candidate magnetic space-groups that are not resolved with currently available resonant x-ray data.

  13. Crystalline, mixed-valence manganese analogue of prussian blue: magnetic, spectroscopic, X-ray and neutron diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Franz, Patrick; Ambrus, Christina; Hauser, Andreas; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Hostettler, Marc; Hauser, Jürg; Keller, Lukas; Krämer, Karl; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen; Pattison, Philip; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Decurtins, Silvio

    2004-12-22

    The compound of stoichiometry Mn(II)3[Mn(III)(CN)6]2.zH2O (z = 12-16) (1) forms air-stable, transparent red crystals. Low-temperature single crystal optical spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction provide compelling evidence for N-bonded high-spin manganese(II), and C-bonded low-spin manganese(III) ions arranged in a disordered, face-centered cubic lattice analogous to that of Prussian Blue. X-ray and neutron diffraction show structured diffuse scattering indicative of partially correlated (rather than random) substitutions of [Mn(III)(CN)6] ions by (H2O)6 clusters. Magnetic susceptibility measurements and elastic neutron scattering experiments indicate a ferrimagnetic structure below the critical temperature Tc = 35.5 K.

  14. Instrumentation For Diffraction Enhanced Imaging Experiments At HASYLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, M.; Dix, W.-R.; Metge, J.; Reime, B.

    2004-05-12

    The new X-ray radiography imaging technique, named diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), enables almost scatter free absorption imaging, the production of the so-called refraction images of a sample. The images show improved contrast compared to standard imaging applications. At the HASYLAB wiggler beamline W2 at the 2nd-generation storage ring DORIS a 5cm wide beam with an adjustable energy between 10 and 70keV is available. A Si [111] pre-monochromator is used followed by the main monochromator using the (111) or the (333)-reflection. Visualization of fossils, detecting internal pearl structures, monitoring of bone and cartilage and documentation of implant healing in bone are application examples at HASYLAB.

  15. Electron backscattered diffraction texture analysis of SmCo5 magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, Marcos F.; Yonamine, Taeko; Fukuhara, Marcos; Machado, Rogerio; Romero, Sergio A.; Landgraf, Fernando J. G.; Rodrigues, Daniel; Missell, Frank P.

    2007-05-01

    The remanence of sintered SmCo5 magnets is a direct function of their crystallographic texture. The Jr/Js ratio was determined by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) for SmCo5 magnets which had been oriented in a pulsed field of 6T, compressed isostatically, and then sintered at 1150-1170°C for 1h. The experimentally determined EBSD distribution does not follow a Gaussian or a function of the form f(θ =cosnθ). EBSD measurements provided the same Jr/Js value (0.91) as a microstructural model plus remanence measurements. X-ray diffraction Schulz pole figures resulted in a slightly higher Jr/Js value (0.92), probably due to neglecting misaligned grains.

  16. Modified magnetic field distribution in relativistic magnetron with diffraction output for compact operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Yong-gui

    2011-02-01

    A modified magnetic field distribution in relativistic magnetron with diffraction output (MDO) for compact operation is proposed in this paper. The principle of how the modified magnetic field confines electrons drifting out of the interaction space is analyzed. The results of the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the MDO with the modified magnetic field distribution show that the output power of the MDO is improved, and the long cylindrical waveguide used for collecting the drifting electrons can be omitted. The latter measure allows the horn antenna of the MDO to produce more focused energy with better directivity in the far field than it does with the long cylindrical waveguide. The MDO with the modified magnetic field distribution promises to be the real most compact narrow band high power microwave source.

  17. A 30 T pulsed magnet with conical bore for synchrotron powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Billette, J; Duc, F; Frings, P; Nardone, M; Zitouni, A; Detlefs, C; Roth, T; Crichton, W; Lorenzo, J E; Rikken, G L J A

    2012-04-01

    We report on the design, construction, and operation of a horizontal field, 30 T magnet system with a conical bore optimized for synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction. The magnet offers ±31° optical access downstream of the sample, which allows to measure a sufficiently large number of Debye rings for an accurate crystal structure analysis. Combined with a 290 kJ generator, magnetic field pulses of 60 ms length were generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 4.1 ms and a repetition rate of 6 pulses/h at 30 T. The coil is mounted inside a liquid nitrogen bath. A liquid helium flow cryostat reaches into the coil and allows sample temperature between 5 and 250 K. The setup was used on the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beamlines ID20 and ID06.

  18. A 30 T pulsed magnet with conical bore for synchrotron powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billette, J.; Duc, F.; Frings, P.; Nardone, M.; Zitouni, A.; Detlefs, C.; Roth, T.; Crichton, W.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2012-04-01

    We report on the design, construction, and operation of a horizontal field, 30 T magnet system with a conical bore optimized for synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction. The magnet offers ±31° optical access downstream of the sample, which allows to measure a sufficiently large number of Debye rings for an accurate crystal structure analysis. Combined with a 290 kJ generator, magnetic field pulses of 60 ms length were generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 4.1 ms and a repetition rate of 6 pulses/h at 30 T. The coil is mounted inside a liquid nitrogen bath. A liquid helium flow cryostat reaches into the coil and allows sample temperature between 5 and 250 K. The setup was used on the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beamlines ID20 and ID06.

  19. Grain size quantification by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hansheng; Yao, Yin; Warner, Jacob A; Qu, Jiangtao; Yun, Fan; Ye, Zhixiao; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2017-06-13

    Quantification of microstructure, especially grain size, in polycrystalline materials is a vital aspect to understand the structure-property relationships in these materials. In this paper, representative characterization techniques for determining the grain size, including optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy/magnetic force microscopy (AFM/MFM), are thoroughly evaluated in comparison, illustrated by rare-earth sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. Potential applications and additional information achieved by using aforementioned characterization techniques have been discussed and summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interrupted Magnetic First Order Transitions and Kinetic Arrest probed with In-field Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siruguri, V.; Kaushik, S. D.; Rayaprol, S.; Babu, P. D.; Chaddah, P.; Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Hoser, A.; Ritter, C.

    2016-09-01

    In-field neutron diffraction studies were carried out on two compounds that exhibit magnetic first order phase transitions (FOPT). It is shown that the FOPT can be interrupted by an external magnetic field, resulting in a coexistence of kinetically arrested metastable states and equilibrium phases. Use of a novel protocol CHUF (Cooling and Heating under Unequal Fields) helps to determine the coexisting phase fractions and also to observe the devitrification of the kinetically arrested phase into the equilibrium phase, in a manner similar to that found in structural glassy systems.

  1. Magnetic levitation experiments in Sendai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, I.; Takahashi, K.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.; Motokawa, M.

    2006-11-01

    A levitating apple in a hybrid magnet implies the presence of microgravity conditions under gradient magnetic fields. However, several unique behaviors were found, the orientation of levitating rice grains, the alignment of levitating bismuth particles, and the thermal convection in water under the levitation conditions. These are unlikely under the microgravity conditions in the space and are characteristic of the magnetic levitation. On the basis of the understanding of such behaviors, the magnetic levitation was applied to containerless materials processing, and such an attempt resulted in the development of a magnetic levitation furnace.

  2. Pressure dependence of the magnetic order in CrAs: a neutron diffraction investigation

    DOE PAGES

    Keller, L.; White, J. S.; Babkevich, P.; ...

    2015-01-29

    The suppression of magnetic order with pressure concomitant with the appearance of pressure-induced superconductivity was recently discovered in CrAs. Here we present a neutron diffraction study of the pressure evolution of the helimagnetic ground-state towards and in the vicinity of the superconducting phase. Neutron diffraction on polycrystalline CrAs was employed from zero pressure to 0.65 GPa and at various temperatures. The helimagnetic long-range order is sustained under pressure and the magnetic propagation vector does not show any considerable change. The average ordered magnetic moment is reduced from 1.73(2) μB at ambient pressure to 0.4(1) μB close to the critical pressuremore » Pc ≈ 0.7 GPa, at which magnetic order is completely suppressed. The width of the magnetic Bragg peaks strongly depends on temperature and pressure, showing a maximum in the region of the onset of superconductivity. In conclusion, we interpret this as associated with competing ground-states in the vicinity of the superconducting phase.« less

  3. Development of an x-ray diffraction camera used in magnetic fields up to 10 T.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Koyama, Keiichi; Takahashi, Kohki; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    A high-field x-ray diffraction (HF-XRD) camera was developed to observe structural changes of magnetic materials in magnetic fields up to 10 T. The instrument mainly consists of a Debye-Scherrer-type camera with a diameter of 80.1 mm, a 10-T cryocooled superconducting magnet with a 100-mm room-temperature bore, an x-ray source, a power supply, and a chiller for the x-ray source. An x-ray detector (image plate) in the HF-XRD camera can be taken out and inserted into the magnet without changing the sample position. The performance of the instrument was tested by measuring the HF-XRD for silicon and ferromagnetic MnBi powders. A change of x-ray diffraction pattern was observed due to the magnetic orientation of MnBi, showing that the instrument is useful for studying field-induced orientation processes and structural properties of field-controlled materials.

  4. Pressure dependence of the magnetic order in CrAs: a neutron diffraction investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, L.; White, J. S.; Babkevich, P.; Susner, Michael A.; Sims, Zachary C; Safa-Sefat, Athena; Ronnow, H. M.; Ruegg, Ch.

    2015-01-29

    The suppression of magnetic order with pressure concomitant with the appearance of pressure-induced superconductivity was recently discovered in CrAs. Here we present a neutron diffraction study of the pressure evolution of the helimagnetic ground-state towards and in the vicinity of the superconducting phase. Neutron diffraction on polycrystalline CrAs was employed from zero pressure to 0.65 GPa and at various temperatures. The helimagnetic long-range order is sustained under pressure and the magnetic propagation vector does not show any considerable change. The average ordered magnetic moment is reduced from 1.73(2) μB at ambient pressure to 0.4(1) μB close to the critical pressure Pc ≈ 0.7 GPa, at which magnetic order is completely suppressed. The width of the magnetic Bragg peaks strongly depends on temperature and pressure, showing a maximum in the region of the onset of superconductivity. In conclusion, we interpret this as associated with competing ground-states in the vicinity of the superconducting phase.

  5. Development of an x-ray diffraction camera used in magnetic fields up to 10 T

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Takahashi, Kohki; Watanabe, Kazuo; Koyama, Keiichi

    2011-12-15

    A high-field x-ray diffraction (HF-XRD) camera was developed to observe structural changes of magnetic materials in magnetic fields up to 10 T. The instrument mainly consists of a Debye-Scherrer-type camera with a diameter of 80.1 mm, a 10-T cryocooled superconducting magnet with a 100-mm room-temperature bore, an x-ray source, a power supply, and a chiller for the x-ray source. An x-ray detector (image plate) in the HF-XRD camera can be taken out and inserted into the magnet without changing the sample position. The performance of the instrument was tested by measuring the HF-XRD for silicon and ferromagnetic MnBi powders. A change of x-ray diffraction pattern was observed due to the magnetic orientation of MnBi, showing that the instrument is useful for studying field-induced orientation processes and structural properties of field-controlled materials.

  6. Microstructure Characterization of Magnetic-Pulse-Welded AA 6061-T6 by Electron Backscattered Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuan; Babu, Suresh; Zhang, P; Kenik, Edward A; Daehn, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    The grain boundary crystallographic misorientations of magnetic-pulse-welded (MPW) aluminum alloy (AA) 6061-T6 in linear and tubular configurations were examined using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. A refined structure of heavily deformed grains with higher grain boundary angles was observed in linear welds. Significant spalling was observed away from the joints, in the interior of tubular welds. The results show the complex interaction of shock waves with the materials during this impact welding process.

  7. In situ X-ray powder diffraction, synthesis, and magnetic properties of InVO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Rylan J.; Cranswick, Lachlan M.D.; Bieringer, Mario . E-mail: Mario_Bieringer@umanitoba.ca

    2006-12-15

    We report the first synthesis and high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction study of InVO{sub 3}. Polycrystalline InVO{sub 3} has been prepared via reduction of InVO{sub 4} using a carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide buffer gas. InVO{sub 3} crystallizes in the bixbyite structure in space group Ia-3 (206) with a=9.80636(31) A with In{sup 3+}/V{sup 3+} disorder on the (8b) and (24d) cation sites. In situ powder X-ray diffraction experiments and thermal gravimetric analysis in a CO/CO{sub 2} buffer gas revealed the existence of the metastable phase InVO{sub 3}. Bulk samples with 98.5(2)% purity were prepared using low-temperature reduction methods. The preparative methods limited the crystallinity of this new phase to approximately 225(50) A. Magnetic susceptibility and neutron diffraction experiments suggest a spin-glass ground state for InVO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: In situ powder X-ray diffractograms for the reduction of InVO{sub 4} in CO/CO{sub 2}. The three temperature regions show the conversion of InVO{sub 4} to InVO{sub 3} and final decomposition into In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and V{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  8. Temperature-Dependent Cycloidal Magnetic Structure in GdRu2Al10 Studied by Resonant X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi

    2017-09-01

    We have performed resonant X-ray diffraction experiments on the antiferromagnet GdRu2Al10 and have clarified that the magnetic structure in the ordered state is cycloidal with the moments lying in the bc-plane and propagating along the b-axis. The propagation vector shows a similar temperature dependence to the magnetic order parameter, which can be interpreted as being associated with the gap opening in the conduction band and the resultant change in the magnetic exchange interaction. Although the S = 7/2 state of Gd is almost isotropic, the moments show slight preferential ordering along the b-axis. The c-axis component in the cycloid develops with decreasing temperature through a tiny transition in the ordered phase. We also show that the scattering involves the σ-σ' process, which is forbidden in normal E1-E1 resonance of magnetic dipole origin. We discuss the possibility of the E1-E2 resonance originating from a toroidal moment due to the lack of inversion symmetry at the Gd site. The spin-flop transition in a magnetic field is also described in detail.

  9. (X-ray diffraction experiments with condenser matter)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: high-{Tc} superconductors; The response of crystal to an applied electric field; quasicrystals; surface structure and kinetics of surface layer formation; EXAFS studies of superconductors and heterostructures; effect of iron on the crystal structure of perovskite; x-ray detector development; and SAXS experiments. (LSP)

  10. A simple diffraction experiment using banana stem as a natural grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetya Aji, Mahardika; Karunawan, Jotti; Rochimatun Chasanah, Widyastuti; Iman Nursuhud, Puji; Ajeng Wiguna, Pradita; Sulhadi

    2017-03-01

    A simple diffraction experiment was designed using banana stem as natural grating. Coherent beams of lasers with wavelengths of 632.8 nm and 532 nm that pass through banana stem produce periodic diffraction patterns on a screen. The diffraction experiments were able to measure the distances between the slit of the banana stem, i.e. d=≤ft(28.76+/- 0.295\\right)× {{10}-6} \\text{m} for a laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm and d=≤ft(26.62+/- 0.002\\right)× {{10}-6} \\text{m} for a wavelength of 532 nm. Therefore, banana stem could be used as an easily obtained and low cost grating for diffraction experiments.

  11. Investigation of the commensurate magnetic structure in the heavy-fermion compound CePt2In7 using magnetic resonant x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Nicolas; Wermeille, Didier; Casati, Nicola; Sakai, Hironori; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Bauer, Eric D.; White, Jonathan S.

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the magnetic structure of the heavy-fermion compound CePt2In7 below TN=5.34 (2 ) K using magnetic resonant x-ray diffraction at ambient pressure. The magnetic order is characterized by a commensurate propagation vector k1 /2=(1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) with spins lying in the basal plane. Our measurements did not reveal the presence of an incommensurate order propagating along the high-symmetry directions in reciprocal space but cannot exclude other incommensurate modulations or weak scattering intensities. The observed commensurate order can be described equivalently by either a single-k structure or by a multi-k structure. Furthermore we explain how a commensurate-only ordering may explain the broad distribution of internal fields observed in nuclear quadrupolar resonance experiments [Sakai et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 140408 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevB.83.140408] that was previously attributed to an incommensurate order. We also report powder x-ray diffraction showing that the crystallographic structure of CePt2In7 changes monotonically with pressure up to P =7.3 GPa at room temperature. The determined bulk modulus B0=81.1 (3 ) GPa is similar to those of the Ce-115 family. Broad diffraction peaks confirm the presence of pronounced strain in polycrystalline samples of CePt2In7 . We discuss how strain effects can lead to different electronic and magnetic properties between polycrystalline and single crystal samples.

  12. Structural, magnetic, and transport properties of Permalloy for spintronic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nahrwold, Gesche; Scholtyssek, Jan M.; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Albrecht, Ole; Merkt, Ulrich; Meier, Guido

    2010-07-15

    Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) is broadly used to prepare magnetic nanostructures for high-frequency experiments where the magnetization is either excited by electrical currents or magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the material properties is mandatory for thorough understanding its magnetization dynamics. In this work, thin Permalloy films are grown by dc-magnetron sputtering on heated substrates and by thermal evaporation with subsequent annealing. The specific resistance is determined by van der Pauw methods. Point-contact Andreev reflection is employed to determine the spin polarization of the films. The topography is imaged by atomic-force microscopy, and the magnetic microstructure by magnetic-force microscopy. Transmission-electron microscopy and transmission-electron diffraction are performed to determine atomic composition, crystal structure, and morphology. From ferromagnetic resonance absorption spectra the saturation magnetization, the anisotropy, and the Gilbert damping parameter are determined. Coercive fields and anisotropy are measured by magneto-optical Kerr magnetometry. The sum of the findings enables optimization of Permalloy for spintronic experiments.

  13. Magnetic octupole order in Ce0.7La0.3B6: A polarized neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, K.; Iwasa, K.; Kohgi, M.; Aso, N.; Sera, M.; Iga, F.; Matsuura, M.; Hirota, K.

    2009-09-01

    Recently, in phase IV of CexLa1-xB6, weak but distinct superlattice reflections from the order parameter of phase IV have been detected by our unpolarized neutron scattering experiment [K. Kuwahara, K. Iwasa, M. Kohgi, N. Aso, M. Sera, F. Iga, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 76 (2007) 093702]. The scattering vector dependence of the intensity of superlattice reflections is quite unusual; the intensity is stronger for high scattering vectors. This result strongly indicates that the order parameter of phase IV is the magnetic octupole. However, the possibility that the observed superlattice reflections are due to lattice distortions could not be completely ruled out only on the basis of the unpolarized neutron scattering experiment. To confirm that the superlattice reflections are magnetic, therefore, we have performed a single crystal polarized neutron diffraction experiment on Ce0.7La0.3B6. The obtained result has clearly shown that the time reversal symmetry is broken by the order parameter of phase IV. This is further evidence for the magnetic octupole order in CexLa1-xB6.

  14. X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction Studies of Structural and Magnetic Disordering Transitions Near Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thuy Thu

    This thesis deals with order/disorder transitions near solid surfaces as studied by x-ray photoelectron diffraction and photoelectron holography. Transitions involving both atomic positional order and magnetic order have been studied. Further evidence for a reversible high-temperature surface-disordering phase transition on Ge(111) has been found using Ge 3p x-ray photoelectron diffraction (a short -range-order probe of surface structure) and photoelectron holography. Azimuthal diffraction data at takeoff angles with respect to the surface of theta = 19^circ and theta = 55^circ show abrupt drops in intensity of ~30%-40% over the temperature interval of 900-1200 K. Photoelectron holographic near-neighbor images at temperatures below and above the transition region furthermore indicate an identical near-neighbor structure for all atoms present in ordered sites. These combined diffraction and holography data show that by 1200 K, the Ge(111) surface is covered by a completely disordered overlayer of about 2 Ge monolayers in thickness. The rate of growth of this overlayer with increasing temperature is in excellent agreement with recent medium-energy ion scattering results, although the thickness we find for the overlayer is 1.5-2.0x larger than that derived from ion scattering. Based on these data, a disordering model for the Ge(111) surface phase transition occurring at 1050 K is discussed. Spin-polarized photoelectron diffraction is a recently developed and promising application of photoelectron diffraction to the study of the magnetic structure near surfaces. This technique is based on an internal source of spin-polarized electrons as produced in core-level multiplet splittings and it is thus sensitive to the short-range magnetic order around a given type of emitter in the crystal. In prior studies, it has been applied to two antiferromagnets, KMnF_3 and MnO, and the effects seen at temperatures well above the Neel (or long-range -order) temperature have been

  15. Plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Hassan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Optical localized heating in the nanoscale has recently attracted great attention due to its unique small hot spot size with high energy. However, the hot spot size is conventionally constrained by the diffraction limit. Plasmonic localized heating can provide solutions to this limitation in nanoscale patterning, cancer treatment, and data storage. Plasmonic approaches to overcome the diffraction limit in hot spot size have mainly utilized the excitation of surface plasmon or localized surface plasmon resonance. However, achieving plasmonic localized heating by the excitation of magnetic polariton has not been researched extensively yet. In this work, we numerically investigated the optical response of a nanoscale metamaterial composed of a gold nanowire array and a gold film separated by an ultrathin polymer spacer using ANSYS High Frequency Structural Simulator. A strong absorption peak at the wavelength of 760 nm was exhibited, and the underlying physical mechanism for the strong absorption was verified via the local electromagnetic field distribution to be magnetic resonance excitation. An inductor-capacitor circuit model was used to predict the magnetic resonance wavelength and compare with the numerical results for varied geometrical parameters. Volume loss density due to the strong local optical energy confinement was transferred as heat generation to an ANSYS thermal solver to obtain the local temperature profile. The steady state temperature profile shows an average temperature of 145 °C confined in a local area as small as 33 nm within the spacer, with a full-width at half-maximum of 50 nm along the x-direction. Moreover, the temperature rise from ambient drops to half its maximum value at a distance of 5 nm from the top of the spacer along the z-direction. This clearly demonstrates plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation. Furthermore, the transient temperature profile shows that the system reached

  16. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-11-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such experiments. It would, however, be possible for students to analyze data from scientific experiments by analogy to experiments they themselves had performed. Based on this rationale, this paper describes two pairs of experiments that may be of interest to teachers aiming to teach the wave nature of light and of particles to upper secondary school (or to college) students. Specifically, students are asked to (i) carry out a double-slit experiment by using monochromatic light, thus repeating in a way the historical experiment of Young,1 and then analyze real data from Jönsson's2-3 scientific double-slit experiment with electrons, and (ii) perform an experiment involving diffraction of monochromatic light using a compact disc (CD) as a reflection grating, and then by analogy analyze data from the experiment of Davisson and Germer.4 The proposed real experiments are not original, and different versions of them have been wi dely described in the literature.5,6 The educational value of the present work lies in the use of the analogy between experiments carried out in the school lab and experiments performed in the scientific lab.

  17. Expected values and variances of Bragg peak intensities measured in a nanocrystalline powder diffraction experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Öztürk, Hande; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2017-08-24

    A rigorous study of sampling and intensity statistics applicable for a powder diffraction experiment as a function of crystallite size is presented. Our analysis yields approximate equations for the expected value, variance and standard deviations for both the number of diffracting grains and the corresponding diffracted intensity for a given Bragg peak. The classical formalism published in 1948 by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] appears as a special case, limited to large crystallite sizes, here. It is observed that both the Lorentz probability expression and the statistics equations used in the classical formalism are inapplicable for nanocrystallinemore » powder samples.« less

  18. Magnetic bubble for CR experiments in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillantini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed to equip with an intense magnetic field the innovative isotropic, high granularity, homogeneous, deep cubic calorimeter, nicknamed 'calocube', in development for CR experiments in space. A number of identical coils are arranged for constituting three mutually orthogonal magnetic torus's forming a 'magnetic bubble' wrapping the calocube. Number and shape of the coils are discussed. Magnetic field intensity, and encumbrance and mass of the coils are evaluated for a model of the system wrapping a 1 m side calocube. A reduced version, with only one magnetic torus (4 coils) wrapping a 0.8 m side calocube is evaluated and discussed.

  19. Spin density in YTiO3: I. Joint refinement of polarized neutron diffraction and magnetic x-ray diffraction data leading to insights into orbital ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibalin, I. A.; Yan, Z.; Voufack, A. B.; Gueddida, S.; Gillon, B.; Gukasov, A.; Porcher, F.; Bataille, A. M.; Morini, F.; Claiser, N.; Souhassou, M.; Lecomte, C.; Gillet, J.-M.; Ito, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakurai, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Hoffmann, C. M.; Wang, X. P.

    2017-08-01

    Orbital ordering below 30 K was previously observed in the ferromagnetic YTiO3 compound both by polarized neutron diffraction (PND) and x-ray magnetic diffraction (XMD). In this paper we report a procedure for the joint refinement of a unique spin-density model based on both PND and XMD data. The distribution of the unpaired 3 d electron of titanium is clearly seen on the magnetization density reconstructed by the maximum entropy method from the PND data collection at 5 K. The Ti3+ 3 d orbital populations obtained by joint model refinement are discussed in terms of the orbital ordering scheme. Small but significant magnetic moments on apical oxygen O1 and yttrium atoms are found. The agreement between experimental and theoretical spin densities obtained using density functional theory is discussed.

  20. Magnetic Levitation Experiments with the Electrodynamic Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordrey, Vincent; Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Gaul, Nathan; Majewski, Walerian

    Our experiments explored inductive magnetic levitation using circular Halbach arrays with the strong variable magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such a system is usually called an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We constructed two Electrodynamic Wheels with different diameters and demonstrated that the magnetic interactions produce both lift and drag forces on the EDW which can be used for levitation and propulsion of the EDW. The focus of our experiments is the direct measurement of lift and drag forces to compare with theoretical models using wheels of two different radii. Supported by Grants from the Virginia Academy of Science, Society of Physics Students, Virginia Community College System, and the NVCC Educational Foundation.

  1. Mikhailov's experiments on detection of magnetic charge

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.

    1988-08-01

    In a reanalysis of Mikhailov's experiments, it is argued that observations of magnetic charge g = (1/2)(1/137)(1/3)e on ferromagnetic aerosols are incorrect. Future experiments of the type conducted by Mikhailov must take into an account the component of particle velocity orthogonal to E and H. It is shown that Mikhailov's data are consistent with the existence of a Dirac unit of magnetic charge g = (137/2)e found in meson spectroscopy.

  2. Development of MnBi permanent magnet: Neutron diffraction of MnBi powder

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J.; Choi, J. P.; Li, G.; Polikarpov, E.; Darsell, J.; Kramer, M. J.; Zarkevich, N. A.; Wang, L. L.; Johnson, D. D.; Marinescu, M.; Huang, Q. Z.; Wu, H.; Vuong, N. V.; Liu, J. P.

    2014-05-07

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain because of the rather drastic peritectic reaction between Mn and Bi. In this paper, we report our effort on synthesizing high purity MnBi compound using conventional powder metallurgical approaches. Neutron diffraction was carried out to investigate the crystal and nuclear structure of the obtained powder. The result shows that the purity of the obtained powder is about 91 wt. % at 300 K, and the magnetic moment of the Mn atom in MnBi lattice is 4.424 and 4.013 μB at 50 K and 300 K, respectively.

  3. Development of MnBi permanent magnet: neutron diffraction of MnBi powder

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Li, Guosheng; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Darsell, Jens T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Zarkevich, Nikolai; Wang, L. L.; Johnson, D. D.; Marinescu, Melania; Huang, Qingzhen; Wu, Hui; Vuong, Nguyen V.; Liu, J.Ping

    2014-03-05

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain because of the rather drastic peritectic reaction between Mn and Bi. In this paper, we report our effort on synthesizing high purity MnBi compound using conventional powder metallurgical approaches. Neutron diffraction was carried out to investigate the crystal and nuclear structure of the obtained power. The result shows that the purity of the obtained powder is about 91wt.% at 300K, and the magnetic moment of the Mn atom in MnBi lattice is 4.424 and 4.013 μB at 50 K and 300 K respectively.

  4. Neutron diffraction study of the magnetic structure of HoCu 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetana, Z.; Šíma, V.; Lebech, B.

    1986-05-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements show that in the temperature range from 7.4 to TN=10.4 K the magnetic structure of HoCu 2 is a commensurably modulated a-axis collinear structure with a wave vector q1=1/3 a∗. Below 7.4 K an additional structure component develops and the low temperature magnetic structure of HoCu 2 is found to be an incommensurably modulated non-collinear structure characterized by wave vectors q 1=/13; a∗, q2= qcc∗ and 2 q2, where a∗ and c∗ are reciprocal lattice vectors of the orthorhombic structure and qc=0.300±0.005. The corresponding moment components μ- q1, μq2 and μ2q2 lie along the a, b and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal lattice, respectively.

  5. Viking magnetic properties experiment - Extended mission results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.; Collinson, D. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Cates, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The backhoe magnets on Viking Lander (VL) 2 were successfully cleaned, followed by a test involving successive insertions of the cleaned backhoe into the surface. Rapid saturation of the magnets confirmed evidence from primary mission results that the magnetic mineral in the Martian surface is widely distributed, most probably in the form of composite particles of magnetic and nonmagnetic minerals. An image of the VL 2 backhoe taken via the X4 magnifying mirror demonstrates the fine-grained nature of the attracted magnetic material. The presence of maghemite and its occurrence as a pigment in, or a thin coating on, all mineral particles or as discrete, finely divided and widely distributed crystallites, are consistent with data from the inorganic analysis experiments and with laboratory simulations of results of the biology experiments on Mars.

  6. Spatiotemporal Imaging of Magnetization Dynamics at the Nanoscale: Breaking the Diffraction Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-09

    engineering high performance spintronic memory and logic devices that are simultaneously high-speed, high-density, low-power, and radiation hard. Although...magnetic devices on fundamental scales to magnetism is of particular importance to engineering high performance spintronic memory and logic devices that...quantitatively extract relevant thermal parameters from our experiment including the temperature change and the magnto-thermoelectric coefficient. Response

  7. How Rosalind Franklin Discovered the Helical Structure of DNA: Experiments in diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitzer, Heidrun; Tierney, Dennis; Braun, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Rosalind Franklin, a chemical physicist (1920-1958), used X-Ray diffraction to determine the structure of DNA. In 1953 she described the DNA has a helical structure with a period of 34 A and a radius of 10 A. We suggest experiments of varying equipment and difficulty which enable students to follow in the footsteps of Rosalind Franklin's discovery. To do this we increase the scale; instead of a tiny DNA molecule we examine the diffraction pattern of a helical spring from a ballpoint pen, and instead of X-Rays we use light rays. Students can then apply their experiences with diffraction on a helical spring to R. Franklin's X-Ray diffraction photo, which should be made available to them in original size. They can determine the angle, pitch, and radius of the DNA molecule, just like Rosalind Franklin. Our experiments can be used as demonstration experiments in interdisciplinary history and science lectures, or as lab experiments for undergraduate non science and science majors.

  8. Spin-polarized photoelectron diffraction: A new probe of short-range magnetic order (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadley, C. S.; Sinkovic, B.; Hermsmeier, B. D.; Osterwalder, J.

    1988-04-01

    It has recently been pointed out theoretically and subsequently observed experimentally that core-level multiplet splittings can be used to yield a spin-polarized form of photoelectron diffraction (SPPD). This internally referenced source of electrons that are highly polarized with both orientations of spin thus eliminates the need for an external spin detector, permits studying both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic specimens, and can, in principle, detect short-range magnetic or for temperatures above the Curie or Néel temperature. In the first measurements of this type on the antiferromagnet KMnF3, an abrupt loss of short-range order at a transition temperature considerably above the bulk Néel temperature of the material was observed. More recent theoretical diffraction calculations have pointed out several ways in which SPPD should permit deriving unique information on short-range spin-order structures at and near the surfaces of magnetic materials. New experimental results have also been obtained for the antiferromagnet MnO. This paper will discuss these new developments, will review the advantages and disadvantages of SPPD, and also will consider some interesting future directions of investigation.

  9. Development of low temperature and high magnetic field X-ray diffraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shahee, Aga; Sharma, Shivani; Singh, K.; Lalla, N. P. Chaddah, P.

    2015-06-24

    The current progress of materials science regarding multifunctional materials (MFM) has put forward the challenges to understand the microscopic origin of their properties. Most of such MFMs have magneto-elastic correlations. To investigate the underlying mechanism it is therefore essential to investigate the structural properties in the presence of magnetic field. Keeping this in view low temperature and high magnetic field (LTHM) powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), a unique state-of-art facility in the country has been developed at CSR Indore. This setup works on symmetric Bragg Brentano geometry using a parallel incident x-ray beam from a rotating anode source working at 17 kW. Using this one can do structural studies at non-ambient conditions i.e. at low- temperatures (2-300 K) and high magnetic field (+8 to −8 T). The available scattering angle ranges from 5° to 115° 2θ with a resolution better than 0.1°. The proper functioning of the setup has been checked using Si sample. The effect of magnetic field on the structural properties has been demonstrated on Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample. Clear effect of field induced phase transition has been observed. Moreover, the effect of zero field cooled and field cooled conditions is also observed.

  10. Neutron Powder Diffraction Study on the Magnetic Structure of NdPd 5 Al 2

    DOE PAGES

    Metoki, Naoto; Yamauchi, Hiroki; Kitazawa, Hideaki; ...

    2017-02-24

    The magnetic structure of NdPd5Al2 has been studied by neutron powder diffraction. Here, we observed the magnetic reflections with the modulation vector q=(1/2,0,0)q=(1/2,0,0) below the ordering temperature TN. We also found a collinear magnetic structure with a Nd moment of 2.7(3) μB at 0.5 K parallel to the c-axis, where the ferromagnetically ordered a-planes stack with a four-Nd-layer period having a ++-- sequence along the a-direction with the distance between adjacent Nd layers equal to a/2 (magnetic space group Panma). This “stripe”-like modulation is very similar to that in CePd5Al2 with q=(0.235,0.235,0)q=(0.235,0.235,0) with the Ce moment parallel to the c-axis.more » These structures with in-plane modulation are a consequence of the two-dimensional nature of the Fermi surface topology in this family, originating from the unique crystal structure with a very long tetragonal unit cell and a large distance of >7 Å between the rare-earth layers separated by two Pd and one Al layers.« less

  11. Development of low temperature and high magnetic field X-ray diffraction facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahee, Aga; Sharma, Shivani; Singh, K.; Lalla, N. P.; Chaddah, P.

    2015-06-01

    The current progress of materials science regarding multifunctional materials (MFM) has put forward the challenges to understand the microscopic origin of their properties. Most of such MFMs have magneto-elastic correlations. To investigate the underlying mechanism it is therefore essential to investigate the structural properties in the presence of magnetic field. Keeping this in view low temperature and high magnetic field (LTHM) powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), a unique state-of-art facility in the country has been developed at CSR Indore. This setup works on symmetric Bragg Brentano geometry using a parallel incident x-ray beam from a rotating anode source working at 17 kW. Using this one can do structural studies at non-ambient conditions i.e. at low- temperatures (2-300 K) and high magnetic field (+8 to -8 T). The available scattering angle ranges from 5° to 115° 2θ with a resolution better than 0.1°. The proper functioning of the setup has been checked using Si sample. The effect of magnetic field on the structural properties has been demonstrated on Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 sample. Clear effect of field induced phase transition has been observed. Moreover, the effect of zero field cooled and field cooled conditions is also observed.

  12. Neutron Powder Diffraction Study on the Magnetic Structure of NdPd5Al2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metoki, Naoto; Yamauchi, Hiroki; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Suzuki, Hiroyuki S.; Hagihala, Masato; Frontzek, Matthias D.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.

    2017-03-01

    The magnetic structure of NdPd5Al2 has been studied by neutron powder diffraction. We observed the magnetic reflections with the modulation vector q = (1/2,0,0) below the ordering temperature TN. We found a collinear magnetic structure with a Nd moment of 2.7(3) μB at 0.5 K parallel to the c-axis, where the ferromagnetically ordered a-planes stack with a four-Nd-layer period having a ++- sequence along the a-direction with the distance between adjacent Nd layers equal to a/2 (magnetic space group Panma). This "stripe"-like modulation is very similar to that in CePd5Al2 with q = (0.235,0.235,0) with the Ce moment parallel to the c-axis. These structures with in-plane modulation are a consequence of the two-dimensional nature of the Fermi surface topology in this family, originating from the unique crystal structure with a very long tetragonal unit cell and a large distance of >7 Å between the rare-earth layers separated by two Pd and one Al layers.

  13. Thermal neutron diffraction determination of the magnetic structure of EuCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan-Weetaluktuk, W. N.; Ryan, D. H.; Lemoine, P.; Cadogan, J. M.

    2014-05-07

    The magnetic structure of EuCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} has been determined by flat-plate neutron powder diffraction. Two magnetic phases are present in the neutron diffraction pattern at 3.5 K. They have the same moment, within error, and a common transition temperature. Both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy show that the two magnetic phases belong to the same crystallographic phase. Both phases can be modelled by planar helimagnetic structures: one with a propagation vector of [0.654(1), 0, 0], the other with a propagation vector of [0.410(1), 0.225(1), 0].

  14. Verification of the weak equivalence principle with Laue diffracting neutrons: Test experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezhlev, E. O.; Voronin, V. V.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Semenikhin, S. Yu.; Fedorov, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a novel experiment to test the weak equivalence principle (WEP) for the Laue diffracting neutron. Our experiment is based on an essential magnification of an external affect on neutron diffracting by Laue for the Bragg angles close to the right one in couple with additional enhancement factor which exists due to the delay of the Laue diffracting neutron at such Bragg angles. This enhancement phenomena is proposed to be utilized for measuring the force which deviates from zero if WEP is violated. The accuracy of measuring inertial to gravitational neutron masses ratio for the introduced setup can reach ˜10-5, which is more than one order superior to the best present-day result.

  15. Experiments with Coler magnetic current apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, T.

    Experiments with a replica of the famous Coler "Magnetstromapparat" (magnetic current apparatus) were conducted. The replica was built at the same institute at the Technical University of Berlin where the original was tested by Prof. Kloss in 1925. The details of the setup will be presented in this paper. The investigation of the Coler device was done with modern methods. The output was measured with a digital multi meter (DMM) and a digital storage oscilloscope (DSO). The results of the measurements will be presented. Did Coler convert vacuum fluctuations via magnetic, electric and acoustic resonance into electricity? There is a strong connection between magnetism and quantum field radiation energy. The magnetic moment of the electron is in part an energy exchange with the radiation field. The energy output of the Coler apparatus is measured. Furthermore the dynamics of the ferromagnetic magnets that Coler reported as the working principle of his device was investigated with magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and the spectroscopy mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The magnetic and acoustic resonance was investigated with magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The connection between ZPE and magnetism will be discussed as well as the perspective of using magnetic systems as a means to convert vacuum fluctuations into usable electricity.

  16. Magnetic phase transitions of MnWO4 studied by the use of neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautenschläger, G.; Weitzel, H.; Vogt, T.; Hock, R.; Böhm, A.; Bonnet, M.; Fuess, H.

    1993-09-01

    Neutron-powder-diffraction data, collected with the D1B diffractometer, and single-crystal data, collected with the D10 four-circle diffractometer, both at the Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, Grenoble, and single-crystal data, collected with the DN4 four-circle diffractometer at the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Grenoble, show that MnWO4 (space group P2/c) undergoes three magnetic phase transitions below 14 K. The transition temperatures are 13.5 K (paramagnet-AF3), 12.3 K (AF3-AF2), and 8.0 K (AF2-AF1). Phases AF3 and AF2 are incommensurate with the crystallographic lattice. The propagation vector is k=(-0.214,1/2,0.457) in each case. In AF3 the magnetic moments order in the ac plane, whereas in AF2 an additional component in the [010] direction exists. The corresponding magnetic structures were found to be a sine wave in the case of AF3 and an elliptical spiral in the case of AF2. Other possibilities, like a simple spiral, a sine wave, and commensurate collinear spin arrangements, are also discussed for AF2. The magnetic structure in AF1 was refined based on a previously reported model. It is commensurate with a propagation vector k=(+/-1/4,1/2,1/2). The magnetic moments are again collinear in the ac plane as in AF3, forming an angle of 37° with the a axis.

  17. Magnetic levitation experiments in Tohoku University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motokawa, M.; Mogi, I.; Tagami, M.; Hamai, M.; Watanabe, K.; Awaji, S.

    1998-12-01

    Magnetic levitation experiments of some diamagnetic materials in high magnetic fields have been done by using a hybrid magnet of Tohoku University. Water located near the edge of the water-cooled magnet, for example, becomes a globe and levitates when a field at the center of the magnet is above 20.5 T. As the first application of water levitation, we tried to make an ice crystal at the levitating condition and it turned out that the crystallization process shows complicated and strange behavior at supercooled -10°C. Synthesis of a dendrite ice crystal was also tried and it was first found that the directions of growing branches are different. But this effect seems to be not due to the levitation effect but due to the orientation effect.

  18. Electron back scattered diffraction characterization of Sm(CoFeCuZr){sub z} magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yonamine, T.; Fukuhara, M.; Archanjo, B. S.; Missell, F. P.

    2011-04-01

    In permanent magnets based on the Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} phase, the high coercivity depends on the presence of a complex microstructure, consisting of a Sm{sub 2}(Co,Fe){sub 17} cell phase, a cell boundary phase Sm(Co,Cu){sub 5}, and a Zr-rich platelet or lamellae phase. The aim of this work is to use electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) in order to identify the different phases present in the isotropic magnets produced from cast alloys with the composition of Sm(Co{sub bal}Fe{sub 0.2}Cu{sub 0.1}Zr{sub x}){sub 8}, where x = 0, 0.02, or 0.06, and correlate them with the different phases observed in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Due to the combination of careful surface preparation and high resolution microscopy, it was possible to observe the cellular structure characteristic of the 2:17 magnets in the SEM images. Until now, only transmission electron microscopy (TEM) had been used. Composition maps, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and EBSD measurements were used for doing the phase identification.

  19. Electron back scattered diffraction characterization of Sm(CoFeCuZr)z magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, T.; Fukuhara, M.; Archanjo, B. S.; Missell, F. P.

    2011-04-01

    In permanent magnets based on the Sm2Co17 phase, the high coercivity depends on the presence of a complex microstructure, consisting of a Sm2(Co,Fe)17 cell phase, a cell boundary phase Sm(Co,Cu)5, and a Zr-rich platelet or lamellae phase. The aim of this work is to use electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) in order to identify the different phases present in the isotropic magnets produced from cast alloys with the composition of Sm(CobalFe0.2Cu0.1Zrx)8, where x = 0, 0.02, or 0.06, and correlate them with the different phases observed in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Due to the combination of careful surface preparation and high resolution microscopy, it was possible to observe the cellular structure characteristic of the 2:17 magnets in the SEM images. Until now, only transmission electron microscopy (TEM) had been used. Composition maps, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and EBSD measurements were used for doing the phase identification.

  20. Experimental investigation of Popper’s proposed ghost-diffraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolduc, Eliot; Karimi, Ebrahim; Piché, Kevin; Leach, Jonathan; Boyd, Robert W.

    2017-10-01

    In an effort to challenge the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, Karl Popper proposed an experiment involving spatially separated entangled particles. In this experiment, one of the particles passes through a very narrow slit, and thereby its position becomes well-defined. This particle therefore diffracts into a large divergence angle; this effect can be understood as a consequence of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Popper further argued that its entangled partner would become comparably localized in position, and that, according to his understanding of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, the ‘mere knowledge’ of the position of this particle would cause it also to diffract into a large divergence angle. Popper recognized that such behavior could violate the principle of causality in that the slit could be removed and the partner particle would be expected to respond instantaneously. Popper thus concluded that it was most likely the case that, in an actual experiment, the partner photon would not undergo increased diffractive spreading and thus that the Copenhagen interpretation is incorrect. Here, we report and analyze the results of an implementation of Popper’s proposal. We find that the partner beam does not undergo increased diffractive spreading. Our work helps to clarify the issues raised in Popper’s proposal, and it provides further insight into the nature of entanglement and its relation to the uncertainty principle as applied to correlated particles.

  1. Neutron and X-ray single-crystal diffraction from protein microcrystals via magnetically oriented microcrystal arrays in gels.

    PubMed

    Tsukui, Shu; Kimura, Fumiko; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Baba, Seiki; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Kimura, Tsunehisa

    2016-07-01

    Protein microcrystals magnetically aligned in D2O hydrogels were subjected to neutron diffraction measurements, and reflections were observed for the first time to a resolution of 3.4 Å from lysozyme microcrystals (∼10 × 10 × 50 µm). This result demonstrated the possibility that magnetically oriented microcrystals consolidated in D2O gels may provide a promising means to obtain single-crystal neutron diffraction from proteins that do not crystallize at the sizes required for neutron diffraction structure determination. In addition, lysozyme microcrystals aligned in H2O hydrogels allowed structure determination at a resolution of 1.76 Å at room temperature by X-ray diffraction. The use of gels has advantages since the microcrystals are measured under hydrated conditions.

  2. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and measurement of the spatial variation of magnetic field components along a line near magnets. We describe the experimental tasks, various difficulties students have throughout, and ways this lab makes even their incorrect predictions better. We suggest that developing lab activities of this nature brings a new dimension to the ways students learn and interact with field concepts.

  3. Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Martin, Adam; Bengtson, Roger D.; Briezman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Cassibry, Jason; Shuttpelz, Branwen; Deline, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer (such as the ISS), lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue of the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment was performed to test the theory regarding the Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) detachment scenario. Data from this experiment will be presented. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) being developed by the Ad Astra Rocket Company uses a magnetic nozzle as described above. The VASIMR is also a leading candidate for exploiting an electric propulsion test platform being considered for the ISS.

  4. Sample positioning in neutron diffraction experiments using a multi-material fiducial marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, D.; Venter, A. M.; Markgraaff, J.; James, J.

    2017-01-01

    An alternative sample positioning method is reported for use in conjunction with sample positioning and experiment planning software systems deployed on some neutron diffraction strain scanners. In this approach, the spherical fiducial markers and location trackers used with optical metrology hardware are replaced with a specifically designed multi-material fiducial marker that requires one diffraction measurement. In a blind setting, the marker position can be determined within an accuracy of ±164 μm with respect to the instrument gauge volume. The scheme is based on a pre-determined relationship that links the diffracted peak intensity to the absolute positioning of the fiducial marker with respect to the instrument gauge volume. Two methods for establishing the linking relationship are presented, respectively based on fitting multi-dimensional quadratic functions and a cross-correlation artificial neural network.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-01

    Nattokinase is a single polypeptide chain composed of 275 amino acids (molecular weight 27,724) which displays strong fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, it can activate other fibrinolytic enzymes such as pro-urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. In the present study, native nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified using gel-filtration chromatography and crystallized to give needle-like crystals which could be used for X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=74.3, b=49.9, c=56.3 Å, β=95.2°. Diffraction images were processed to a resolution of 1.74 Å with an Rmerge of 5.2% (15.3% in the highest resolution shell) and a completeness of 69.8% (30.0% in the highest resolution shell). This study reports the first X-ray diffraction analysis of nattokinase.

  6. Data Exploration Toolkit for serial diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zeldin, Oliver B.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Zhou, Qiangjun; Zhao, Minglei; Weis, William I.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2015-01-23

    Ultrafast diffraction at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has the potential to yield new insights into important biological systems that produce radiation-sensitive crystals. An unavoidable feature of the 'diffraction before destruction' nature of these experiments is that images are obtained from many distinct crystals and/or different regions of the same crystal. Combined with other sources of XFEL shot-to-shot variation, this introduces significant heterogeneity into the diffraction data, complicating processing and interpretation. To enable researchers to get the most from their collected data, a toolkit is presented that provides insights into the quality of, and the variation present in, serial crystallography data sets. These tools operate on the unmerged, partial intensity integration results from many individual crystals, and can be used on two levels: firstly to guide the experimental strategy during data collection, and secondly to help users make informed choices during data processing.

  7. A 31 T split-pair pulsed magnet for single crystal x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duc, F.; Frings, P.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Delescluse, P.; Béard, J.; Nicolin, J. P.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.; Fabrèges, X.; Roth, T.; Detlefs, C.; Lesourd, M.; Zhang, L.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a pulsed magnet system with panoramic access for synchrotron x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 31 T and at low temperature down to 1.5 K. The apparatus consists of a split-pair magnet, a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the pulsed coil, and a helium cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 1.5 up to 250 K. Using a 1.15 MJ mobile generator, magnetic field pulses of 60 ms length were generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 16.5 ms and a repetition rate of 2 pulses/h at 31 T. The setup was validated for single crystal diffraction on the ESRF beamline ID06.

  8. A 31 T split-pair pulsed magnet for single crystal x-ray diffraction at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Duc, F; Fabrèges, X; Roth, T; Detlefs, C; Frings, P; Nardone, M; Billette, J; Lesourd, M; Zhang, L; Zitouni, A; Delescluse, P; Béard, J; Nicolin, J P; Rikken, G L J A

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a pulsed magnet system with panoramic access for synchrotron x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 31 T and at low temperature down to 1.5 K. The apparatus consists of a split-pair magnet, a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the pulsed coil, and a helium cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 1.5 up to 250 K. Using a 1.15 MJ mobile generator, magnetic field pulses of 60 ms length were generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 16.5 ms and a repetition rate of 2 pulses/h at 31 T. The setup was validated for single crystal diffraction on the ESRF beamline ID06.

  9. A 31 T split-pair pulsed magnet for single crystal x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, F.; Fabrèges, X.; Roth, T.; Detlefs, C.; Frings, P.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Lesourd, M.; Zhang, L.; Zitouni, A.; Delescluse, P.; Béard, J.; Nicolin, J. P.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a pulsed magnet system with panoramic access for synchrotron x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 31 T and at low temperature down to 1.5 K. The apparatus consists of a split-pair magnet, a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the pulsed coil, and a helium cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 1.5 up to 250 K. Using a 1.15 MJ mobile generator, magnetic field pulses of 60 ms length were generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 16.5 ms and a repetition rate of 2 pulses/h at 31 T. The setup was validated for single crystal diffraction on the ESRF beamline ID06.

  10. Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni Mn Ga single crystal studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, P.; Sittner, P.; Lukas, P.; Hannula, S.-P.; Heczko, O.

    2008-06-01

    Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal was studied in situ by the neutron diffraction technique. Principles of determination of individual tetragonal martensitic variants in shape memory alloys are explained. Using neutron diffraction we show that the macroscopic strain originates solely from the martensite structure reorientation or variant redistribution. Neutron diffraction also reveals that the reorientation of martensite is not fully completed even at a stress value of 25 MPa, which is about 20 times larger than the mean stress needed for reorientation. Only one twinning system is active during the reorientation process.

  11. Coherent Atom Optics With Fast Metastable Beams: Metastable Helium Diffraction By 1D and 2D Magnetized Reflection Gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M.; Bocvarski, V.

    2007-04-23

    1D and 2D reflection gratings (Permalloy stripes or dots deposited on silicon), immersed in an external homogeneous static magnetic field, are used to study 1D and 2D diffraction of fast metastable helium atoms He* (23S1). Both the grazing incidence used here and the repulsive potential (for sub-level m = -1) generated by the magnetisation reduce the quenching effect. This periodically structured potential is responsible for the diffraction in the incidence plane as well as for the diffraction in the perpendicular plane.

  12. Neutron diffraction, specific heat and magnetization studies on Nd{sub 2}CuTiO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Rayaprol, S. Kaushik, S. D.; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, K.; Guillou, F.; Simon, C.

    2016-05-23

    Structural and physical properties of a double-perovskite compound, Nd{sub 2}CuTiO{sub 6} have been studied using neutron diffraction, magnetization and specific heat measurements. The compound crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure in space group Pnma. The interesting observation we make here is that, though no long range magnetic order is observed between 2 and 300 K, the low temperature specific heat and magnetic susceptibility behavior exhibits non-Fermi liquid like behavior in this insulating compound. The magnetization and specific heat data are presented and discussed in light of these observations.

  13. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  14. Forces between permanent magnets: experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Manuel I.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes a very simple, low-cost experimental setup designed for measuring the force between permanent magnets. The experiment consists of placing one of the magnets on a balance, attaching the other magnet to a vertical height gauge, aligning carefully both magnets and measuring the load on the balance as a function of the gauge reading. A theoretical model is proposed to compute the force, assuming uniform magnetisation and based on laws and techniques accessible to undergraduate students. A comparison between the model and the experimental results is made, and good agreement is found at all distances investigated. In particular, it is also found that the force behaves as r -4 at large distances, as expected.

  15. A magnetic study of the ThCr2Si2-type RPd2Ge2 (R=Pr, Nd) compounds. Magnetic structure of PrPd2Ge2 from powder neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, Richard; Halich, Khalid

    2006-04-01

    The magnetic properties of the PrPd2Ge2 and NdPd2Ge2 compounds have been investigated by magnetic measurements, specific heat measurements and neutron diffraction experiments. The PrPd2Ge2 compound orders antiferromagnetically below TN=5.0(2) with an original modulated magnetic structure characterized by a magnetic cell three times larger than the chemical one by tripling of the c parameter. The palladium atom is non magnetic and the Pr moments are parallel to the c-axis with a value of ≈2.0 μB at 2 K. The specific heat measurements clearly detect a low temperature transition for the NdPd2Ge2 compound, interpreted as a Nd sublattice antiferromagnetic ordering below 1.3(2) K.

  16. Spin and diffractive physics with a fixed-target experiment at the LHC (AFTER-LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lorce, C.; Chambert, V.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J. P.; Rosier, P.; Brodsky, S. J.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.

    2013-04-15

    We report on the spin and diffractive physics at a future multi-purpose f xed-target experiment with proton and lead LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic f xed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The f xed-target mode has the advantage to allow for measurements of single-spin asymmetries with polarized target as well as of single-diffractive processes in the target region.

  17. Neutron diffraction study of MnNiGa{sub 2}—Structural and magnetic behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. L.; Ma, L.; Wu, G. H.; Hofmann, M.; Avdeev, M.; Kennedy, S. J.; Campbell, S. J.; Md Din, M. F.; Dou, S. X.; Hoelzel, M.

    2014-05-07

    MnNiGa{sub 2} crystallizes in the L21 (Heusler) structure and has a ferromagnetic ordering temperature T{sub C} ∼ 192 K. Rietveld refinement of the neutron diffraction patterns indicates that the Ga atoms occupy the equivalent 8c position, while Mn and Ni share the 4a (0, 0, 0) and 4b (0.5, 0.5, 0.5) sites with a mixed occupancy of Mn and Ni atoms. It is found that that ∼83% of Mn and ∼17% Ni are located at the 4a site while ∼83% of Ni and ∼17% Mn occupy the 4b site. There is no evidence of a magneto-volume effect around T{sub C}. In agreement with this finding, our detailed critical exponent analyses of isothermal magnetization curves and the related Arrott plots confirm that the magnetic phase transition at T{sub C} is second order.

  18. Plasmonic local heating beyond diffraction limit by the excitation of magnetic polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Hassan; Wang, Hao; Ma, Yanchao; Wang, Liping

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, optical local heating in the nanoscale has attracted great attention due to its unique features of small hot spot size and high energy density. Plasmonic local heating can provide solutions to several challenges in data storage and cancer treatment. Research conducted in this field to achieve plasmonic local heating has mainly utilized the excitation of localized surface plasmon (LSP) or surface plasmon resonance (SPR). However, achieving plasmonic local heating by the excitation of magnetic polariton (MP) has not been researched extensively yet. We numerically investigate the optical response of a nanostructure composed of a gold nanowire on a gold surface separated by a polymer spacer using the ANSYS High Frequency Structural Simulator (HFSS). The structure exhibits a strong absorption peak at the wavelength of 750 nm, and the underlying physical mechanism is verified by the local electromagnetic field distribution to be the magnetic resonance excitation. By incorporating the volume loss density due to the strong local optical energy confinement as the heat generation, nanoscale temperature distribution within the structure is numerically obtained with a thermal solver after assigning proper boundary conditions. The results show a maximum temperature of 158.5°C confined in a local area on the order of 35 nm within the ultrathin polymer layer, which clearly demonstrates the plasmonic local heating effect beyond diffraction limit by excitation of MP.

  19. Experiment problems for electricity and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Heuvelen, Alan; Allen, Leith; Mihas, Pavlos

    1999-11-01

    We describe problems for electricity and magnetism that are presented in the form of experiments—called experiment problems. The problems can be used in lectures or in laboratories in introductory high school and college physics courses that emphasize quantitative problem solving.

  20. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  1. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  2. The MYTHEN detector for X-ray powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Cervellino, Antonio; Dinapoli, Roberto; Gozzo, Fabia; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Kraft, Philipp; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian

    2010-01-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting silicon microstrip detector has been developed at the Swiss Light Source for time-resolved powder diffraction experiments. An upgraded version of the detector has been installed at the SLS powder diffraction station allowing the acquisition of diffraction patterns over 120° in 2θ in fractions of seconds. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the detector and to the calibration procedures developed, the quality of the data obtained is now comparable with that of traditional high-resolution point detectors in terms of FWHM resolution and peak profile shape, with the additional advantage of fast and simultaneous acquisition of the full diffraction pattern. MYTHEN is therefore optimal for time-resolved or dose-critical measurements. The characteristics of the MYTHEN detector together with the calibration procedures implemented for the optimization of the data are described in detail. The refinements of two known standard powders are discussed together with a remarkable application of MYTHEN to organic compounds in relation to the problem of radiation damage. PMID:20724787

  3. Quantification of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization in a supermartensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sicupira, Felipe Lucas; Sandim, Maria José R.; Sandim, Hugo R.Z.; Santos, Dagoberto Brandão; Renzetti, Reny Angela

    2016-05-15

    The good performance of supermartensitic stainless steels is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of retained austenite at room temperature. The present work investigates the effect of secondary tempering temperatures on this phase transformation and quantifies the amount of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization. The steel samples were tempered for 1 h within a temperature range of 600–800 °C. The microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Results show that the amount of retained austenite decreased with increasing secondary tempering temperature in both quantification methods. - Highlights: • The phase transformation during secondary tempering temperatures was observed. • Phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction and DC-saturation magnetization. • More retained austenite forms with increasing secondary tempering temperature. • The retained austenite is mainly located at the grain and lath boundaries.

  4. A novel setup for time-resolved X-ray diffraction on gas gun experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Frédéric; Chauvin, Camille; Loyen, Arnaud; Combes, Philippe; Petit, Jacques; Bland, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions in metals have been investigated for a long time under dynamic loadings through usual dynamic compression diagnostics such as velocity and temperature measurements. Such measurements were valuable for revealing the key role of kinetic effects in most phase transition mechanisms. However, the information extracted was mostly macroscopic. Obtaining direct insight about the crystallographic structure under dynamic loadings is critical for understanding mechanisms governing shock-induced structural changes. For example, in order to evidence a mixture phase or to determine the time scale of a transition, structural information may be extremely valuable. Over the last 20 years a significant number of X-ray diffraction experiments were carried under dynamic loading, either using laboratory X-ray sources or synchrotron radiation. We are developing a novel experimental setup based on a compact High Pulsed Power generator capable of producing intense X radiation through an X-pinch X-ray source. This source is specifically designed for time-resolved X-ray diffraction in Bragg geometry on gas gun experiments. Promising preliminary diffraction data obtained under static conditions are presented.

  5. A facility for X-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 25 T and temperatures between 15 and 295 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Kovalev, A. E. Suslov, A. V.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-12-15

    A facility for X-ray diffraction has been developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. It brings diffraction capability to the 25 T Florida split coil magnet and implements temperature control in a range of 15–295 K using a cold finger helium cryostat. This instrument represents an alternative to pulsed magnetic field systems, and it exceeds the static magnetic fields currently available at synchrotron facilities. Magnetic field compatibility of an X-ray source and detectors with the sizable magnetic fringe fields emanating from the magnet constrained the design of the diffractometer.

  6. Measurements of Magnetic Fluctuations in Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Terry, S.; Kulsrud, R.; Ren, Y.; Kuritsyn, A.

    2004-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays an important role in determining the evolution of magnetic topology in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. A central question concerns why the observed reconnection rates are much faster than predictions made by classical theories, such as the Sweet-Parker model based on MHD with classical Spitzer resistivity. Often, the local resistivity is conjectured to be enhanced by micro-instabilities to accelerate reconnection rates either in the context of the Sweet-Parker model or by facilitating setup of the Pestchek model. Although it is commonly believed that there is plenty of free energy available at the reconnection region to destabilize some sort of micro-instability, a clear identification of this instability and its exact role in reconnection has never been established experimentally. We report the first such experimental evidence of a clear and positive correlation between magnetic fluctuations in the lower-hybrid frequency range and resistivity enhancement during fast reconnection in the low-collisionality regimes in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The waves have been identified as right-hand polarized whistler waves, propagating obliquely to the reconnecting field, with a phase velocity comparable to the relative drift velocity. These waves are consistent with the modified two-stream instability driven by large drift speeds compared to the Alfven speed in high-beta plasmas. The short coherence length and large variation along the propagation direction indicate their strongly nonlinear nature.

  7. Magnetic Flux Compression Experiments Using Plasma Armatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic flux compression reaction chambers offer considerable promise for controlling the plasma flow associated with various micronuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power schemes, primarily because they avoid thermalization with wall structures and permit multicycle operation modes. The major physical effects of concern are the diffusion of magnetic flux into the rapidly expanding plasma cloud and the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the plasma surface, both of which can severely degrade reactor efficiency and lead to plasma-wall impact. A physical parameter of critical importance to these underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes is the magnetic Reynolds number (R(sub m), the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Efficient flux compression requires R(sub m) less than 1, and a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is essential to the reliable design and operation of practical reactors. As a means of improving this understanding, a simplified laboratory experiment has been constructed in which the plasma jet ejected from an ablative pulse plasma gun is used to investigate plasma armature interaction with magnetic fields. As a prelude to intensive study, exploratory experiments were carried out to quantify the magnetic Reynolds number characteristics of the plasma jet source. Jet velocity was deduced from time-of-flight measurements using optical probes, and electrical conductivity was measured using an inductive probing technique. Using air at 27-inHg vacuum, measured velocities approached 4.5 km/s and measured conductivities were in the range of 30 to 40 kS/m.

  8. Simplest magnetic propulsion experiment with liquid gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, L. E.; Hoffman, D.; Taylor, J.

    2001-10-01

    Magnetic propulsion of liquid metal represents a new MHD effect (discovered in Dec. 1998) which allows to drive fast liquid metal (essentially, lithium) flow in the strong toroidal magnetic field. For the fusion research, it suggests a unique way of the power extraction from the tokamak-reactor chamber. Fast flowing liquid lithium can extract at least an order of magnitude more power than typically considered in the conventional concepts, (all oriented toward the divertor configurations). Importance of the problem of the power extraction recently became even more evident when the conventional reactor approach (after 25 years of existence and spending) spent almost 15 years on the ITER next step tokamak project and resulted in a 1 MW/m^2 of the power load on the first wall, too small for the any reasonable fusion reactor. In contrast to this, the power extraction capabilities of magnetic propulsion are fully consistent with the fusion reactor requirements or even exceeding them. The first experiment, which demonstrates the effect of magnetic propulsion has been developed in PPPL based on small coaxial propulsion cell with the magnetic field generated by the current through the cell. The device can work in both propulsion and the current limiting regime.

  9. VINETA II: A linear magnetic reconnection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, H. Von Stechow, A.; Rahbarnia, K.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.

    2014-02-15

    A linear experiment dedicated to the study of driven magnetic reconnection is presented. The new device (VINETA II) is suitable for investigating both collisional and near collisionless reconnection. Reconnection is achieved by externally driving magnetic field lines towards an X-point, inducing a current in the background plasma which consequently modifies the magnetic field topology. Owing to the open field line configuration of the experiment, the current is limited by the axial sheath boundary conditions. A plasma gun is used as an additional electron source in order to counterbalance the charge separation effects and supply the required current. Two drive methods are used in the device. First, an oscillating current through two parallel conductors drive the reconnection. Second, a stationary X-point topology is formed by the parallel conductors, and the drive is achieved by an oscillating current through a third conductor. In the first setup, the magnetic field of the axial plasma current dominates the field topology near the X-point throughout most of the drive. The second setup allows for the amplitude of the plasma current as well as the motion of the flux to be set independently of the X-point topology of the parallel conductors.

  10. Lattice thermal expansion and anisotropic displacements in -sulfur from diffraction experiments and first-principles theory.

    PubMed

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L; Wang, Ai; Müller, Paul; Englert, Ulli; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-12-21

    Thermal properties of solid-state materials are a fundamental topic of study with important practical implications. For example, anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are routinely used in physics, chemistry, and crystallography to quantify the thermal motion of atoms in crystals. ADPs are commonly derived from diffraction experiments, but recent developments have also enabled their first-principles prediction using periodic density-functional theory (DFT). Here, we combine experiments and dispersion-corrected DFT to quantify lattice thermal expansion and ADPs in crystalline α-sulfur (S8), a prototypical elemental solid that is controlled by the interplay of covalent and van der Waals interactions. We begin by reporting on single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction measurements that provide new and improved reference data from 10 K up to room temperature. We then use several popular dispersion-corrected DFT methods to predict vibrational and thermal properties of α-sulfur, including the anisotropic lattice thermal expansion. Hereafter, ADPs are derived in the commonly used harmonic approximation (in the computed zero-Kelvin structure) and also in the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) which takes the predicted lattice thermal expansion into account. At the PPBE+D3(BJ) level, the QHA leads to excellent agreement with experiments. Finally, more general implications of this study for theory and experiment are discussed.

  11. Diffraction-Biased Shear Wave Fields Generated with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Elastography Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Meng; Rouvière, Olivier; Glaser, Kevin J.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a technique for quantifying the acoustic response of biological tissues to propagating waves applied at low frequencies in order to evaluate mechanical properties. Application-specific MRE drivers are typically required to effectively deliver shear waves within the tissue of interest. Surface MRE drivers with transversely oriented vibrations have often been used to directly generate shear waves. These drivers may have disadvantages in certain applications, such as poor penetration depth and inflexible orientation. Therefore, surface MRE drivers with longitudinally oriented vibrations are used in some situations. The purpose of this work was to investigate and optimize a longitudinal driver system for MR elastography applications. It is shown that a cone-like hemispherical distribution of shear waves are generated by these drivers and the wave propagation is governed by diffraction in the near field. Using MRE visualization of the vector displacement field, the properties of the shear wave field created by longitudinal MRE drivers of various sizes were studied to identify optimum shear wave imaging planes. The results offer insights and improvements in both experimental design and imaging plane selection for 2-D MRE data acquisition. PMID:18467059

  12. Single crystal polarized neutron diffraction study of the magnetic structure of HoFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterji, T.; Stunault, A.; Brown, P. J.

    2017-09-01

    Polarised neutron diffraction measurements have been made on HoFeO3 single crystals magnetised in both the [0 0 1] and [1 0 0] directions (Pbnm setting). The polarisation dependencies of Bragg reflection intensities were measured both with a high field of H = 9 T parallel to [0 0 1] at T = 70 K and with the lower field H = 0.5 T parallel to [1 0 0] at T = 5, 15, 25 K. A Fourier projection of magnetization induced parallel to [0 0 1], made using the hk0 reflections measured in 9 T, indicates that almost all of it is due to alignment of Ho moments. Further analysis of the asymmetries of general reflections in these data showed that although, at 70 K, 9 T applied parallel to [0 0 1] hardly perturbs the antiferromagnetic order of the Fe sublattices, it induces significant antiferromagnetic order of the Ho sublattices in the x-y plane, with the antiferromagnetic components of moment having the same order of magnitude as the induced ferromagnetic ones. Strong intensity asymmetries measured in the low temperature Γ2 structure with a lower field, 0.5 T \\Vert [1 0 0] allowed the variation of the ordered components of the Ho and Fe moments to be followed. Their absolute orientations, in the \

  13. The structure of phosphate glass biomaterials from neutron diffraction and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Pickup, D M; Ahmed, I; Guerry, P; Knowles, J C; Smith, M E; Newport, R J

    2007-10-17

    Neutron diffraction and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to probe the structure of phosphate glass biomaterials of general composition (CaO)0.5-x(Na2O)x(P2O5)0.5 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.5). The results suggest that all three glasses have structures based on chains of Q(2) phosphate groups. Clear structural differences are observed between the glasses containing Na2O and CaO. The P-O bonds to bridging and non-bridging oxygens are less well resolved in the neutron data from the samples containing CaO, suggesting a change in the nature of the bonding as the field strength of the cation increases [Formula: see text]. In the (CaO)0.5(P2O5)0.5 glass most of the Ca(2+) ions are present in isolated CaOx polyhedra whereas in the (Na2O)0.5(P2O5)0.5 glass the NaOx polyhedra share edges leading to a Na-Na correlation. The results of the structural study are related to the properties of the (CaO)0.4(Na2O)0.1(P2O5)0.5 biomaterial.

  14. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  15. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Nattokinase is a single polypeptide chain composed of 275 amino acids (molecular weight 27 724) which displays strong fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, it can activate other fibrinolytic enzymes such as pro-urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. In the present study, native nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified using gel-filtration chromatography and crystallized to give needle-like crystals which could be used for X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 49.9, c = 56.3 Å, β = 95.2°. Diffraction images were processed to a resolution of 1.74 Å with an R merge of 5.2% (15.3% in the highest resolution shell) and a completeness of 69.8% (30.0% in the highest resolution shell). This study reports the first X-ray diffraction analysis of nattokinase. PMID:21139221

  17. The use of a mini-κ goniometer head in macromolecular crystallography diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brockhauser, Sandor; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; McCarthy, Andrew A.

    2013-07-01

    Hardware and software solutions for MX data-collection strategies using the EMBL/ESRF miniaturized multi-axis goniometer head are presented. Most macromolecular crystallography (MX) diffraction experiments at synchrotrons use a single-axis goniometer. This markedly contrasts with small-molecule crystallography, in which the majority of the diffraction data are collected using multi-axis goniometers. A novel miniaturized κ-goniometer head, the MK3, has been developed to allow macromolecular crystals to be aligned. It is available on the majority of the structural biology beamlines at the ESRF, as well as elsewhere. In addition, the Strategy for the Alignment of Crystals (STAC) software package has been developed to facilitate the use of the MK3 and other similar devices. Use of the MK3 and STAC is streamlined by their incorporation into online analysis tools such as EDNA. The current use of STAC and MK3 on the MX beamlines at the ESRF is discussed. It is shown that the alignment of macromolecular crystals can result in improved diffraction data quality compared with data obtained from randomly aligned crystals.

  18. Magnetic properties of PrX 2 compounds (X = Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir) studied by hyperfine specific heat, magnetization and neutron-diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; de Jongh, L. J.; Huiskamp, W. J.; Fischer, P.; Furrer, A.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1983-04-01

    Magnetic ordering phenomena in rare-earth intermetallic compounds can be unravelled most advantageously in the case of simple crystallographic structure and when a combination of microscopic techniques is applied. Here we shall present the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the magnetic moment of the cubic PrX 2 compounds (X = Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir), as inferred from hyperfine specific-heat, magnetization and neutron-diffraction measurements. The results are compared with a mean-field calculation, taking crystalline electric field and bilinear (dipolar) exchange interactions into account. Adopting experimental values of the Lea, Leask and Wolf parameters x and W from inelastic neutron scattering results, we find satisfactory agreement between our magnetic data and the mean-field theory. An observed discrepancy of about 15% between the calculated and measured saturation values of the spontaneous magnetization can be explained by the presence of quadrupolar interactions.

  19. Anti-site mixing and magnetic properties of Fe3Co3Nb2 studied via neutron powder diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Yin, Yuewei; ...

    2016-11-02

    Here, we studied the crystal structure and magnetic properties of the rare-earth-free intermetallic compound Fe3Co3Nb2, which has recently been demonstrated to have potentially high magnetic anisotropy, using temperature-dependent neutron powder diffraction. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the diffraction spectra reveals a magnetic transition between 300 and 400 K, in agreement with the magnetometry measurements. According to the structural refinement of the paramagnetic state and the substantial magnetic contribution to the diffuse scattering in the ferromagnetic state, the Fe/Co anti-site mixing is so strong that the site occupation for Fe and Co is almost random. The projection of the magnetic momentsmore » turned out to be non-zero along the c axis and in the a–b plane of Fe3Co3Nb2, most likely because of the exchange interactions between the randomly orientated nanograins in the samples. These findings suggest that future studies on the magnetism of Fe3Co3Nb2 need to take the Fe/Co anti-site mixing into account, and the exchange interactions need to be suppressed to obtain large remanence and coercivity.« less

  20. Magnetic phases in the Kagomé staircase compound Co3V2O8 studied using powder neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, N. R.; Petrenko, O. A.; Chapon, L. C.

    2007-03-01

    The low temperature properties of the Kagomé-type system Co3V2O8 have been studied by powder neutron diffraction both in zero field and in applied magnetic fields of up to 8T . Below 6K , the zero-field ground state is ferromagnetic with the magnetic moments aligned along the a axis. The size of the moment on one of the two Co sites, the so-called cross-tie site, is considerably reduced compared to the fully polarized state. The application of a magnetic field in this phase is found to rapidly enhance the cross-tie site magnetic moment, which reaches the expected value of ˜3μB by the maximum applied field of 8T . Different reorientation behaviors are found for the Co cross-tie and spine sites, suggesting a more pronounced easy-axis anisotropy for moments on the spine sites. Rietveld refinements reveal that a simple model, where the spins on both cross-tie and spine sites rotate in the ac plane in a magnetic field, reproduces the experimental diffraction patterns well. In addition, it is found that at higher temperatures and moderate magnetic fields, the incommensurate antiferromagnetic order, corresponding to a transverse sinusoidal modulation above 8K , is suppressed to be replaced by ferromagnetic order.

  1. Single crystal polarized neutron diffraction study of the magnetic structure of HoFeO3.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, T; Stunault, A; Brown, P J

    2017-09-27

    Polarised neutron diffraction measurements have been made on HoFeO3 single crystals magnetised in both the [0 0 1] and [1 0 0] directions (Pbnm setting). The polarisation dependencies of Bragg reflection intensities were measured both with a high field of [Formula: see text] T parallel to [0 0 1] at [Formula: see text] K and with the lower field [Formula: see text] T parallel to [1 0 0] at [Formula: see text] K. A Fourier projection of magnetization induced parallel to [0 0 1], made using the hk0 reflections measured in 9 T, indicates that almost all of it is due to alignment of Ho moments. Further analysis of the asymmetries of general reflections in these data showed that although, at 70 K, 9 T applied parallel to [0 0 1] hardly perturbs the antiferromagnetic order of the Fe sublattices, it induces significant antiferromagnetic order of the Ho sublattices in the [Formula: see text] plane, with the antiferromagnetic components of moment having the same order of magnitude as the induced ferromagnetic ones. Strong intensity asymmetries measured in the low temperature [Formula: see text] structure with a lower field, 0.5 T [Formula: see text] [1 0 0] allowed the variation of the ordered components of the Ho and Fe moments to be followed. Their absolute orientations, in the [Formula: see text] domain stabilised by the field were determined relative to the distorted perovskite structure. This relationship fixes the sign of the Dzyalshinski-Moriya (D-M) interaction which leads to the weak ferromagnetism. Our results indicate that the combination of strong y-axis anisotropy of the Ho moments and Ho-Fe exchange interactions breaks the centrosymmetry of the structure and could lead to ferroelectric polarization.

  2. Estimation of residual stress in cold rolled iron-disks using magnetic and ultrasonic methods and neutron diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.; Taran, Yu.V.; Bokuchava, G.D.; Schreiber, J.

    1995-12-31

    Variation of internal stress states in cold rolled sheet metal can essentially influence the result of forming processes. Therefore it is important to control the forming process by a practicable in line testing method. For this purpose magnetic and ultrasonic nondestructive methods are available. However, it is necessary to calibrate these techniques. This paper describes a first step of such a calibration procedure making use of the neutron diffraction method. On the basis of the diffraction results an assessment of the magnetic and ultrasonic methods for the estimation of residual stress in the cold rolled iron-disks was made. Reasonable measuring concepts for practical applications to forming processes with cold rolled sheet metal are discussed.

  3. Magnetic Compression Experiment at General Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, Carl; Howard, Stephen; Epp, Kelly; Zawalski, Wade; Kim, Charlson; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic compression experiment at General Fusion was designed as a repetitive non-destructive test to study plasma physics applicable to Magnetic Target Fusion compression. A spheromak compact torus (CT) is formed with a co-axial gun into a containment region with an hour-glass shaped inner flux conserver, and an insulating outer wall. The experiment has external coils to keep the CT off the outer wall (levitation) and then rapidly compress it inwards. Experiments used a variety of levitation/compression field profiles. The optimal configuration was seen to improve levitated CT lifetime by around 50% over that with the original design field. Suppression of impurity influx to the plasma is thought to be a significant factor in the improvement, as supported by spectrometer data. Improved levitation field may reduce the amount of edge plasma and current that intersects the insulating outer wall during the formation process. Higher formation current and stuffing field, and correspondingly higher CT flux, was possible with the improved configuration. Significant field and density compression factors were routinely observed. The level of MHD activity was reduced, and lifetime was increased further by matching the decay rate of the levitation field to that of the CT fields. Details of experimental results and comparisons to equilibrium models and MHD simulations will be presented.

  4. Neutron diffraction study of the magnetic-field-induced transition in Mn{sub 3}GaC

    SciTech Connect

    Çakir, Ö.; Acet, M.; Farle, M.; Senyshyn, A.

    2014-01-28

    The antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}GaC undergoes an isostructural cubic–cubic first order transition from a low-temperature, large-cell-volume antiferromagnetic state to a high-temperature, small-cell-volume ferromagnetic state at around 160 K. The transition can also be induced by applying a magnetic field. We study here the isothermal magnetic-field-evolution of the transition as ferromagnetism is stabilized at the expense of antiferromagnetism. We make use of the presence of the two distinct cell volumes of the two magnetic states as a probe to observe by neutron diffraction the evolution of the transition, as the external magnetic field carries the system from the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic state. We show that the large-volume antiferromagnetic and the small-volume ferromagnetic states coexist in the temperature range of the transition. The ferromagnetic state is progressively stabilized as the field increases.

  5. Determination of the magnetic structure of CePt2In7 by means of neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raba, M.; Ressouche, E.; Qureshi, N.; Colin, C. V.; Nassif, V.; Ota, S.; Hirose, Y.; Settai, R.; Rodière, P.; Sheikin, I.

    2017-04-01

    The magnetic structure of the heavy fermion antiferromagnet CePt2In7 is determined using neutron diffraction. We find a magnetic wave vector qM=(1 /2 ,1 /2 ,1 /2 ) , which is temperature independent up to TN=5.5 K. A staggered moment of 0.45 (1 ) μB at 2 K resides on the Ce ion. The nearest-neighbor moments in the tetragonal basal plane are aligned antiferromagnetically. The moments rotate by 90∘ from one CeIn3 plane to another along the c axis. A much weaker satellite peak with an incommensurate magnetic wave vector qM=(1 /2 ,1 /2 ,0.47 ) seems to develop at low temperature. However, the experimental data available so far are not sufficient to draw a definitive conclusion about the possible coexistence of commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures in this material.

  6. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 MA, 100 ns current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μm Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ∼1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μs current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  7. A powder neutron diffraction study of the magnetic structure of FeV{sub 2}S{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.V.; Vaqueiro, P.; Ritter, C.

    1999-05-01

    Variable-temperature powder neutron diffraction data demonstrate that FeV{sub 2}S{sub 4} undergoes a transition to a long-range magnetically ordered state at 135(7) K, in agreement with magnetic susceptibility data. High-resolution neutron diffraction data collected at 1.9 K reveal that magnetic ordering results in a doubling of the crystallographic unit-cell dimensions (I2/m a = 5.8303(2), b = 3.2761(1), c = 11.2398(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 92.046(2){degree}) in the a and c directions and that the magnetic structure is described by a propagation vector of ({1/2}, 0, {1/2}). Cations in an ordered defect layer, 76% of which are Fe(II), possess an average ordered moment of 1.86(5) {mu}{sub B}, which is directed at an angle of 75{degree} to the layer. Cation-cation interactions reduce the average moment of cations in the MS{sub 2} unit to 0.17(4) {mu}{sub B}. The complex magnetic structure involves essentially collinear antiferromagnetic ordering between nearest-neighbor cations.

  8. Energy-dispersive neutron imaging and diffraction of magnetically driven twins in a Ni2MnGa single crystal magnetic shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabra, Saurabh; Kelleher, Joe; Kockelmann, Winfried; Gutmann, Matthias; Tremsin, Anton

    2016-09-01

    Single crystals of a partially twinned magnetic shape memory alloy, Ni2MnGa, were imaged using neutron diffraction and energy-resolved imaging techniques at the ISIS spallation neutron source. Single crystal neutron diffraction showed that the crystal produces two twin variants with a specific crystallographic relationship. Transmission images were captured using a time of flight MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector. The twinned and untwinned regions were clearly distinguishable in images corresponding to narrow-energy transmission images. Further, the spatially-resolved transmission spectra were used to elucidate the orientations of the crystallites in the different volumes of the crystal.

  9. Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Zanetti, L. J.; Suther, L. L.; Potemra, T. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System (MFEDAS) has been developed to process and analyze satellite magnetic field experiment data from the TRIAD, MAGSAT, AMPTE/CCE, Viking, Polar BEAR, DMSP, HILAT, UARS, and Freja satellites. The MFEDAS provides extensive data management and analysis capabilities. The system is based on standard data structures and a standard user interface. The MFEDAS has two major elements: (1) a set of satellite unique telemetry processing programs for uniform and rapid conversion of the raw data to a standard format and (2) the program Magplot which has file handling, data analysis, and data display sections. This system is an example of software reuse, allowing new data sets and software extensions to be added in a cost effective and timely manner. Future additions to the system will include the addition of standard format file import routines, modification of the display routines to use a commercial graphics package based on X-Window protocols, and a generic utility for telemetry data access and conversion.

  10. Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Zanetti, L. J.; Suther, L. L.; Potemra, T. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System (MFEDAS) has been developed to process and analyze satellite magnetic field experiment data from the TRIAD, MAGSAT, AMPTE/CCE, Viking, Polar BEAR, DMSP, HILAT, UARS, and Freja satellites. The MFEDAS provides extensive data management and analysis capabilities. The system is based on standard data structures and a standard user interface. The MFEDAS has two major elements: (1) a set of satellite unique telemetry processing programs for uniform and rapid conversion of the raw data to a standard format and (2) the program Magplot which has file handling, data analysis, and data display sections. This system is an example of software reuse, allowing new data sets and software extensions to be added in a cost effective and timely manner. Future additions to the system will include the addition of standard format file import routines, modification of the display routines to use a commercial graphics package based on X-Window protocols, and a generic utility for telemetry data access and conversion.

  11. Magnetic diagnostics for the lithium tokamak experiment.

    PubMed

    Berzak, L; Kaita, R; Kozub, T; Majeski, R; Zakharov, L

    2008-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R(0)=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, B(TF) approximately 3.4 kG, I(P) approximately 400 kA, and pulse length approximately 0.25 s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions.

  12. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  13. Magnetic structure of La2O3FeMnSe2: neutron diffraction and physical property measurements.

    PubMed

    Landsgesell, S; Blumenröther, E; Prokeš, K

    2013-02-27

    We report on the characterization of the mixed layered lanthanum iron manganese oxyselenide La(2)O(3)FeMnSe(2), where Fe and Mn share the same crystallographic position. The susceptibility data show a magnetic transition temperature of 76 K and a strong difference between field cooled and zero field cooled (ZFC) data at low fields. While the ZFC magnetization curve exhibits negative values below about 45 K, hysteresis measurement reveals, after an initial negative magnetic moment, a hysteresis loop typical for ferromagnetic material, pointing to competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions. Resistivity and dielectric permittivity measurements indicate that La(2)O(3)FeMnSe(2) is a semiconductor. We performed x-ray diffraction at 295 K and neutron diffraction at 90 and 1.7 K. The nuclear and magnetic structure was refined in the space group I4/mmm with a = 4.11031 (3) Å and c = 18.7613 (2) Å at 295 K. We did not detect a structural distortion and the Fe and Mn atoms were randomly distributed. The magnetic order was found to be antiferromagnetic, with a propagation vector q = (0,0,0) and magnetic moments of 3.44 (5) μ(B) per Fe/Mn atom aligned within the a-b plane. This magnetic order is different with respect to the pure Fe or Mn compositions reported in other studies.

  14. Characterization of CCD-based imaging x-ray detectors for diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Naday, I.; Ross, S.; Kanyo, M.; Westbrook, E.; Westbrook, M.

    1993-09-01

    High resolution CCD-based imaging detectors are successfully used in X-ray diffraction experiments. Some of the detectors are commercially available, others have been developed by research groups around the world. Reliable comparison of the performance must be based on through testing of all relevant characteristics of these detectors. We describe methods of measurements of detector parameters such as conversion gain, linearity, uniformity, point spread function, geometrical uniformity, dark current, and detective quantum efficiency. As an example for the characterization, test results of a single module fiberoptic taper/CCD X-ray detector will be presented. The projected performance of a large area, array detector consisting of 9 CCD`s and fiberoptic taper modules, will be given. This new detector (the ``Gold`` detector) will be installed on Beamline X8C at the Brookhaven National Laboratory at the NSLS Synchrotron.

  15. Parallel readout multiwire proportional chambers for time resolved X-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Bond, C. C.

    1980-10-01

    Linear position sensitive detectors have been used for a number of years in X-ray diffraction studies from various types of muscle under different physiological conditions. Such detectors are mainly based on either an internal (RC) delay line or an external (LC) delay line for decoding positional information; the counting speed of the detectors is optimally matched to the available photon flux from laboratory based X-ray cameras. However, X-ray cameras based on synchrotron radiation provide photon fluxes which are greater by about three orders of magnitude. We describe in this paper an X-ray detection system based on parallel readout from a multiwire proportional chamber which offers high counting speeds and is designed to perform time slicing experiments with time resolutions down to 1 ms.

  16. Structural and magnetic behavior of the cubic oxyfluoride SrFeO{sub 2}F studied by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Corey M.; Blakely, Colin K.; Flacau, Roxana; Greedan, John E.; Poltavets, Viktor V.

    2014-11-15

    The oxyfluoride SrFeO{sub 2}F has been prepared via a low temperature route involving the infinite-layer SrFeO{sub 2} and XeF{sub 2}. SrFeO{sub 2}F crystallizes in the cubic space group Pm-3m with disordered oxygen and fluorine atoms on the anion site. Recent reports demonstrated that SrFeO{sub 2}F is antiferromagnetic at room temperature and the zero field cooled and field cooled curves diverge at ∼150 K and ∼60 K, suggesting that the material has a spin glassy magnetic state at low temperatures. In this article, variable-temperature neutron diffraction (4–723 K) was performed to clarify the magnetic behavior observed in this material. Neutron powder diffraction measurements confirmed the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering of the system at room temperature. Below 710(1) K, the magnetic structure is a G-type AFM structure characterized by a propagation vector k=(1/2 , 1/2 , 1/2 ). The ordered moments on Fe{sup 3+} are 4.35(6)µ{sub B} at 4 K and 4.04(5)µ{sub B} at 290 K. Our results indicate that the cubic structure is retained all the way to base temperature (4 K) in contrast to PbFeO{sub 2}F. These results are compared with those of Pb and Ba analogs which exhibit very similar magnetic behavior. Furthermore, the observation of magnetic reflections at 4 K in the diffraction pattern shows the absence of the previously proposed spin glassy behavior at low temperatures. Previous proposals to explain the ZFC/FC divergences are examined. - Graphical abstract: Variable temperature powder neutron diffraction was employed to follow the evolution of the long range antiferromagnetic state in SrFeO{sub 2}F. - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2}F prepared via low temperature route involving SrFeO{sub 2} and XeF{sub 2}. • The cubic structure, Pm-3m, is retained at low temperatures, 4 K. • The magnetic structure is G-type AFM with T{sub N}=710 K and Fe{sup 3+} moment of 4.35µ{sub B}. • A small volume, bulk decoupled, spin glassy domain/cluster mechanism is proposed.

  17. Comparison between magnetic force microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction for ferrite quantification in type 321 stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Warren, A D; Harniman, R L; Collins, A M; Davis, S A; Younes, C M; Flewitt, P E J; Scott, T B

    2015-01-01

    Several analytical techniques that are currently available can be used to determine the spatial distribution and amount of austenite, ferrite and precipitate phases in steels. The application of magnetic force microscopy, in particular, to study the local microstructure of stainless steels is beneficial due to the selectivity of this technique for detection of ferromagnetic phases. In the comparison of Magnetic Force Microscopy and Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction for the morphological mapping and quantification of ferrite, the degree of sub-surface measurement has been found to be critical. Through the use of surface shielding, it has been possible to show that Magnetic Force Microscopy has a measurement depth of 105-140 nm. A comparison of the two techniques together with the depth of measurement capabilities are discussed.

  18. Laboratory experiments on magnetic reconnection and current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Gekelman, W.; Pfister, H.

    After a brief review of laboratory experiments involving magnetic reconnection a series of basic physics experiments on reconnection phenomena is described. These include magnetic annihilation, transport of magnetic energy by waves, stable and unstable current sheets, energy conversion mechanisms, and the role of global current systems vs. local reconnection processes. Current systems driven by electric fields resulting in particle flows are examined. Also, the role of a magnetic field component B(y) along the separator has been investigated.

  19. Recent Results from Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Hsu, S.; Morrison, K.

    1997-11-01

    Many fundamental issues of magnetic reconnection are being investigated in the MRX device, which creates an environment satisfying the criteria for MHD plasmas with well controlled boundary conditions in a nearly two-dimensional geometry. The diagnostics include internal magnetic probe arrays, Langmuir probes, Mach probes, a retarding field energy analyzer, an interferometer, and a spectrometer. Major findings of recent MRX experiments are: as the merging angle decreases from ~180^circ to ~ 60^circ, the shape of the diffusion region changes from double-Y to O-shape, the current-sheet thickness increases, and the reconnection speed decreases(M. Yamada, H. Ji, S. Hsu et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3117(1997).; (2) transition from collisional regime where the measured resistivity is consistent with the two-fluid theory(R. Kulsrud, invited talk in this meeting.) to collisionless regime where resistivity is greatly enhanced; (3) proportionality of current-sheet thickness to ion gyro-radius or equivalently to ion skin-depth (i.e., δ ≈ ρi ∝ c/ω_pi) in the anti-parallel reconnection case; (4) consistency of observed reconnection speed with a modified Sweet-Parker model, in which the compressibility increases the reconnection and finite down-stream pressure decreases the reconnection. Detailed analysis and physics interpretation will be presented.

  20. New neutron diffraction results on magnetic properties of the cubic rare earth compounds HoP and PrX2 (X=Ru, Rh, Ir, Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Hälg, W.; Kaldis, E.; Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1982-09-01

    Neutron diffraction studies performed on polycrystalline, NaCl type HoP in external magnetic fields yield <100> as easy directions of magnetization in the ferromagnetic state. The magnetic ordering of the MgCu2 type Laves phase systems PrX2 (X=Ru, Rh, Ir, Pt) was investigated on powdered samples by means of neutron diffraction. Simple ferromagnetic structures were observed. The determined Curie temperatures confirm bulk measurements, and the values of the ordered magnetic moments indicate crystal field effects.

  1. ALICE Diffractive Detector Control System for RUN-II in the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanillas, J. C.; Martínez, M. I.; León, I.

    2016-10-01

    The ALICE Diffractive (AD0) detector has been installed and commissioned for the second phase of operation (RUN-II). With this new detector it is possible to achieve better measurements by expanding the range of pseudo-rapidity in which the production of particles can be detected. Specifically the selection of diffractive events in the ALICE experiment which was limited by the range over which rapidity gaps occur. Any new detector should be able to take data synchronously with all other detectors and to be operated through the ALICE central systems. One of the key elements developed for the AD0 detector is the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS is designed to operate safely and correctly this detector. Furthermore, the DCS must also provide optimum operating conditions for the acquisition and storage of physics data and ensure these are of the highest quality. The operation of AD0 implies the configuration of about 200 parameters, as electronics settings and power supply levels and the generation of safety alerts. It also includes the automation of procedures to get the AD0 detector ready for taking data in the appropriate conditions for the different run types in ALICE. The performance of AD0 detector depends on a certain number of parameters such as the nominal voltages for each photomultiplier tube (PMT), the threshold levels to accept or reject the incoming pulses, the definition of triggers, etc. All these parameters affect the efficiency of AD0 and they have to be monitored and controlled by the AD0 DCS.

  2. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah A; Uhoya, Walter O; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh K; Chesnut, Gary N; Weir, Samuel T; Tulk, Christopher A; dos Santos, Antonio M

    2012-05-30

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  3. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Uhoya, Walter; Tsoi, Georgiy; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Neel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  4. From ferromagnetism to incommensurate magnetic structures: A neutron diffraction study of the chemical substitution effects in TbPt1-xCux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Señas, A.; Rodríguez Fernández, J.; Gómez Sal, J. C.; Campo, J.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.

    2004-11-01

    We report the magnetic structures of the TbPt1-xCux system obtained by means of neutron diffraction experiments. Symmetry analyses have been carried out for the R3+ magnetic site. The compounds with copper concentrations x<0.3 present the same magnetic structure than the extreme TbPt, which is of noncollinear ferromagnetic type, -CxFz ; on the contrary, for copper concentrations 0.30.5 , the propagation vector lies in the ac -plane being the structure also amplitude-modulated. For the intermediate compound, TbPt0.7Cu0.3 , we observe an evolution from an amplitude-modulated incommensurate structure to a noncollinear commensurate one, -CxFz , that remains stable down to very low temperatures. The different kinds of magnetic ordering in the TbPt1-xCux series, along which the volume remains constant, are discussed in terms of the competition between RKKY interactions and magneto-crystalline anisotropy, and they are compared to those observed in TbNi1-xCux .

  5. Effects of dynamic diffraction conditions on magnetic parameter determination in a double perovskite Sr2FeMoO6 using electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z C; Zhong, X Y; Jin, L; Chen, X F; Moritomo, Y; Mayer, J

    2017-05-01

    Electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) spectroscopy, which is similar to the well-established X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), can determine the quantitative magnetic parameters of materials with high spatial resolution. One of the major obstacles in quantitative analysis using the EMCD technique is the relatively poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), compared to XMCD. Here, in the example of a double perovskite Sr2FeMoO6, we predicted the optimal dynamical diffraction conditions such as sample thickness, crystallographic orientation and detection aperture position by theoretical simulations. By using the optimized conditions, we showed that the SNR of experimental EMCD spectra can be significantly improved and the error of quantitative magnetic parameter determined by EMCD technique can be remarkably lowered. Our results demonstrate that, with enhanced SNR, the EMCD technique can be a unique tool to understand the structure-property relationship of magnetic materials particularly in the high-density magnetic recording and spintronic devices by quantitatively determining magnetic structure and properties at the nanometer scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal and magnetic structures of Cr{sub 1∕3}NbSe{sub 2} from neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gubkin, A. F. Baranov, N. V.; Proskurina, E. P.; Sherokalova, E. M.; Selezneva, N. V.; Kousaka, Y.; Akimitsu, J.; Miao, P.; Lee, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Torii, S.; Zhang, J.; Kamiyama, T.; Campo, J.

    2016-01-07

    Neutron diffraction measurements of the Cr intercalated niobium diselenide Cr{sub 1∕3}NbSe{sub 2} together with magnetization measurements have revealed that this compound exhibits ferromagnetic ordering below T{sub C} = 96 K unlike a chiral helimagnetic order observed in the sulfide compound Cr{sub 1∕3}NbS{sub 2}. As derived from neutron diffraction data, the Cr magnetic moments μ{sub Cr} = 2.83 ± 0.03 μ{sub B} in Cr{sub 1∕3}NbSe{sub 2} are aligned within basal plane. The discrepancy in the magnetic states of Cr{sub 1∕3}NbS{sub 2} and Cr{sub 1∕3}NbSe{sub 2} is ascribed to the difference in the preferential site occupation of Cr ions in crystal lattices. In Cr{sub 1∕3}NbSe{sub 2}, the Cr ions are predominantly distributed over 2b Wyckoff site, which determines a centrosymmetric character of the crystal structure unlike Cr{sub 1∕3}NbS{sub 2}, where the Cr ions are mainly located in 2c position and the crystal structure is non-centrosymmetric.

  7. Neutron diffraction evidence for kinetic arrest of first order magneto-structural phase transitions in some functional magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Siruguri, V; Babu, P D; Kaushik, S D; Biswas, Aniruddha; Sarkar, S K; Krishnan, Madangopal; Chaddah, P

    2013-12-11

    Neutron diffraction measurements, performed in the presence of an external magnetic field, have been used to show structural evidence for the kinetic arrest of the first order phase transition from (i) the high temperature austenite phase to the low temperature martensite phase in the magnetic shape memory alloy Ni37Co11Mn42.5Sn9.5, (ii) the higher temperature ferromagnetic phase to the lower temperature antiferromagnetic phase in the half-doped charge ordered compound La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 and (iii) the formation of glass-like arrested states in both compounds. The cooling and heating under unequal fields protocol has been used to establish phase coexistence of metastable and equilibrium states, and also to demonstrate the devitrification of the arrested metastable states in the neutron diffraction patterns. We also explore the field–temperature dependent kinetic arrest line TK(H), through the transformation of the arrested phase to the equilibrium phase. This transformation has been observed isothermally in reducing H, as also on warming in constant H. TK is seen to increase as H increases in both cases, consistent with the low-T equilibrium phase having lower magnetization.

  8. Consistent first-principles pressure scales for diffraction experiments under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero-de-La-Roza, Alberto; Cabal, Victor Lua Na

    2012-02-01

    Diamond anvil cell (DAC) diffraction experiments are fundamental in geophysics and materials science to explore the behavior of solids under very high pressures and temperatures. A factor limiting the accuracy of DAC experiments is the lack of an accurate pressure scale for the calibration materials that extends to the ever-increasing pressure and temperature limits of the technique. In this communication, we address this problem by applying a newly developed technique that allows the calculation of accurate thermodynamic properties from first-principles calculations [Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011) 024109, 84 (2011) 184103]. Three elements are key in this method: i) the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) and the static energies and phonon frequencies obtained from an electronic structure calculation ii) the appropriate representation of the equation of state by using averages of strain polynomials and iii) the correction of the systematic errors caused by the exchange-correlation functional approximation. As a result, we propose accurate equations of scale for typical pressure calibrants that can be used in the whole experimental range of pressures and temperatures. The internal consistency and the agreement with the ruby scale based on experimental data is examined.

  9. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S. Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-21

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  10. Magnetic field experiment on the Freja Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freja Magnetic Field Experiment Team

    1994-11-01

    Freja is a Swedish scientific satellite mission to study fine scale auroral processes. Launch was October 6, 1992, piggyback on a Chinese Long March 2C, to the present 600×1750 km, 63° inclination orbit. The JHU/APL provided the Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE), which includes a custom APL-designed Forth, language microprocessor. This approach has led to a truly generic and flexible design with adaptability to differing mission requirements and has resulted in the transfer of significant ground analysis to on-board processing. Special attention has been paid to the analog electronic and digital processing design in an effort to lower system noise levels, verified by inflight data showing unprecedented system noise levels for near-Earth magnetic field measurements, approaching the fluxgate sensor levels. The full dynamic range measurements are of the 3-axis Earth's magnetic field taken at 128 vector samples s-1 and digitized to 16 bit, resolution, primarily used to evaluate currents and the main magnetic field of the Earth. Additional 3-axis ‘AC’ channels are bandpass filtered from 1.5 to 128 Hz to remove the main field spin signal, the range is±650 nT. These vector measurements cover Pc waves to ion gyrofrequency magnetic wave signals up to the oxygen gyrofrequency (˜40 Hz). A separate, seventh channel samples the spin axis sensor with a bandpass filter of 1.5 to 256 Hz, the signal of which is fed to a software FFT. This on-board FFT processing covers the local helium gyrofrequencies (˜160 Hz) and is plotted in the Freja Summary Plots (FSPs) along with disturbance fields. First data were received in the U.S. October 16 from Kiruna, Sweden via the Internet and SPAN e-mail networks, and were from an orbit a few hours earlier over Greenland and Sweden. Data files and data products, e.g., FSPs generated at the Kiruna ground station, are communicated in a similar manner through an automatic mail distribution system in Stockholm to PIs and various users

  11. Neutron-Diffraction Evidence for the Ferrimagnetic Ground State of a Molecule-Based Magnet with Weakly Coupled Sublattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, Randy Scott; Campo, Javier; Vos, Thomas E.; Miller, Joel S.

    2012-01-01

    The diruthenium compound [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6] contains two weakly coupled, ferrimag- netically ordered sublattices occupying the same volume. The magnetic field Hc 800 Oe required to align the two sublattice moments is proportional to the antiferromagnetic dipolar interaction Kc B Hc 5 10 3 meV between sublattices. Powder neutron-diffraction measurements on a deuterated sample reveal that the sublattice moments are restricted by the anisotropy of the diruthenium paddle-wheel complexes to the cubic diagonals. Those measurements also suggest that the quantum corrections to the ground state are significant.

  12. Density Limits in Toroidal Magnetic Confinement Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2001-10-01

    The density limit represents one of the fundamental operating boundaries for magnetic confinement devices - one with practical importance to the goal of fusion power. With fusion reactivity maximized at a plasma temperature on the order of 10 keV and a reaction rate scaling as n^2, an optimum density can be calculated which is not guaranteed to be achievable in any given device. Unlike operational limits for plasma current or pressure, the density limit cannot be explained by magneto-hydrodynamics alone. There is general agreement that the proximate cause for the disruptive limit in the tokamak is cooling of the plasma edge and subsequent current profile shrinkage. The edge cooling may be dominated by atomic physics processes or as suggested in recent experiments, by anomalous transport. A similar picture is emerging for the reversed field pinch (RFP), while the limit in stellarators is apparently due to loss of thermal equilibrium from radiation. Empirical scaling laws in which the maximum plasma density is proportional to the average current density have been fairly successful in predicting the limit for subsequent experiments. Surprisingly, the density limits found in tokamaks and RFPs are virtually identical. Currentless stellarators reach similar density limits, though the expression needs to be recast in terms of the rotational transform. While scaling laws have done a reasonable job in describing data from many recent experiments, they can only give hints at the underlying physics. Understanding the mechanism for the density limit is crucial for extrapolating machine performance into untested regimes and so far, a completely satisfactory theory has not emerged. It seems likely that robust, reliable predictions will only come from the development of a first-principles theory backed up by detailed experimental observations. The extensive work already accomplished and reviewed here should provide a solid basis for such development.

  13. Theoretical analysis of driven magnetic reconnection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Kulsrud, Russell M.; Yamada, Masaaki

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical framework for the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) [M. Yamada et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 40, 1877 (1995)] in order to understand the basic physics of the experiment, including the effect of the external driving force, and the difference between co- and counterhelicity cases of the experiment. The problem is reduced to a one-dimensional (1-D) resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. A special class of holonomic boundary conditions is defined, under which a unique sequence of global equilibria can be obtained, independent of the rate of reconnection. This enables one to break the whole problem into two parts: a global problem for the ideal region, and a local problem for the resistive reconnection layer. The calculations are then carried out and the global solution for the ideal region is obtained in one particular case of holonomic constraints, the so called ``constant force'' regime, for both the co- and counterhelicity cases. After the sequence of equilibria in the ideal region is found, the problem of the rate of reconnection in the resistive reconnection region is considered. This rate tells how fast the plasma proceeds through the sequence of global equilibria but does not affect the sequence itself. Based on a modified Sweet-Parker model for the reconnection layer, the reconnection rate is calculated, and the difference between the co- and counterhelicity cases, as well as the role of the external forces is demonstrated. The results from the present analysis are qualitatively consistent with the experimental data, predicting faster reconnection rate for the counterhelicity merging and yielding a positive correlation with external forcing.

  14. Suppression of magnetic order in CaCo1.86As2 with Fe substitution: Magnetization, neutron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction studies of Ca(Co1–xFex)yAs2

    DOE PAGES

    Jayasekara, W. T.; Pandey, Abhishek; Kreyssig, A.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Magnetization, neutron diffraction, and high-energy x-ray diffraction results for Sn-flux grown single-crystal samples of Ca(Co1–xFex)yAs2, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1, 1.86 ≤ y ≤ 2, are presented and reveal that A-type antiferromagnetic order, with ordered moments lying along the c axis, persists for x ≲ 0.12(1). The antiferromagnetic order is smoothly suppressed with increasing x, with both the ordered moment and Néel temperature linearly decreasing. Stripe-type antiferromagnetic order does not occur for x ≤ 0.25, nor does ferromagnetic order for x up to at least x = 0.104, and a smooth crossover from the collapsed-tetragonal (cT) phase of CaCo1.86As2 tomore » the tetragonal (T) phase of CaFe2As2 occurs. Furthermore, these results suggest that hole doping CaCo1.86As2 has a less dramatic effect on the magnetism and structure than steric effects due to substituting Sr for Ca.« less

  15. Characterization of thin-film multilayers using magnetization curves and modeling of low-angle X-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.; Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1994-12-01

    We have characterized thin-film multilayers grown by ion-beam sputtering using magnetization curves and modeling of low-angle x-ray diffraction data. In our films, we use ferromagnetic layer = Co, Fe, and NiFe and spacer layer = Si, Ge, FeSi{sub 2}, and CoSi{sub 2}. We have studied the effects of (1) deposition conditions; (2) thickness of layers; (3) different layer materials; and (4) annealing. We find higher magnetization in films grown at 1000V rather than 500V and in films with spacer layers of 50{angstrom} rather than 100{angstrom}. We find higher coercivity in films with cobalt grown on germanium rather than silicon, metal grown on gold underlayers rather than on glass substrates, and when using thinner spacer layers. Finally, modeling reveals that films grown with disilicide layers are more thermally stable than films grown with silicon spacer layers.

  16. Electronically- and crystal-structure-driven magnetic structures and physical properties of RScSb (R = rare earth) compounds. A neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity study

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, C; Dhar, S K; Kulkarni, R; Provino, A; Paudyal, Durga; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Gschneidner, Karl A

    2014-08-14

    The synthesis of the new equiatomic RScSb ( R = La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) compounds has been recently reported. These rare earth compounds crystallize in two different crystal structures, adopting the CeScSi-type ( I 4/ mmm) for the lighter R (La-Nd, Sm) and the CeFeSi-type (P4 /nmm) structure for the heavier R ( R = Gd-Tm, Lu, Y). Here we report the results of neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity measurements on some of these compounds ( R = Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb). Band structure calculations have also been performed on CeScSb and GdScGe (CeScSi-type), and on GdScSb and TbScSb (CeFeSi-type) to compare and understand the exchange interactions in CeScSi and CeFeSi structure types. The neutron diffraction investigation shows that all five compounds order magnetically, with the highest transition temperature of 66 K in TbScSb and the lowest of about 9 K in CeScSb. The magnetic ground state is simple ferromagnetic (τ = [0 0 0]) in CeScSb, as well in NdScSb for 32 >T > 22 K. Below 22 K a second magnetic transition, with propagation vector τ = [¼ ¼ 0], appears in NdScSb. PrScSb has a magnetic structure within, determined by mostly ferromagnetic interactions and antiferromagnetic alignment of the Pr-sites connected through the I-centering ( τ = [1 0 0]). A cycloidal spiral structure with a temperature dependent propagation vector τ = [δ δ ½] is found in TbScSb. The results of magnetization and heat capacity lend support to the main conclusions derived from neutron diffraction. As inferred from a sharp peak in magnetization, GdScSb orders antiferromagnetically at 56 K. First principles calculations show lateral shift of spin split bands towards lower energy from the Fermi level as the CeScSi-type structure changes to the CeFeSi-type structure. This rigid shift may force the system to transform from exchange split ferromagnetic state to the antiferromagnetic state in RScSb compounds (as seen for example in GdScSb and TbScSb) and is proposed to

  17. Calculation and mathematical model computer experiments with optical mountings for recording and using holographic diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Elena A.; Reyes Cortes, Santiago D.

    1997-02-01

    The latest advances in the field of holographic gratings and spectral devices is in calculation, manufacture and use of these gratings for spectral devices. The general theory of diffraction grating was developed in 1974. Although this theory is in wide use, not all the problems associated with the theory have been resolved. Theoretical calculations show that this is possible using a more complicated mounting of recording the grating. For recording of the grating with the compensation of the four aberrations it is necessary to use beams from opposite sides of the blanks. To examine this method special mathematical model was found. It is based on the ray tracing calculation, but includes two steps recording and the refraction in the glass blank. In this work we represent a system of nonhomocentric recording, which doesn't include aspheric or refractive optics, mathematical model of this system, spectral devices, which can be produced with the gratings, recorded in our system and the results of the mathematical model experiments with concrete examples of those devices.

  18. Gamma-ray and neutron diffraction studies of CoF2: magnetostriction, electron density and magnetic moments.

    PubMed

    Jauch, W; Reehuis, M; Schultz, A J

    2004-01-01

    Accurate structure factors up to sin theta/lambda = 1.6 A(-1) have been measured with 316.5 keV gamma-rays from CoF(2), both at room temperature and in the antiferromagnetic state at 10 K. The same crystal was used to collect extended time-of-flight neutron diffraction data in the two magnetic states, which allowed an accurate determination of the fluorine positional parameter. For room temperature, the standard structural parameters are reported. At 10 K, a complete charge-density study has been carried out. The total number of 3d electrons on Co is found to be 6.95 (3). The experimental populations of the d orbitals agree with expectation from crystal field theory. The fluorine valence region exhibits a strong dipolar deformation. Electronic properties at the bond critical points and integrated atomic properties are derived from the static model electron density, revealing the Co-F interactions as purely ionic. On magnetic ordering, a shift of the fluorine ions of 1.5 (4) x 10(-3) A is found which confirms a prediction from theory of optical birefringence. The effect of magnetostriction on the distortion of the ligand coordination octahedra is compared for the late members of the 3d transition-metal difluorides. From neutron powder diffraction, an ordered magnetic moment of 2.60 (4) mu(B) per cobalt ion is found. Despite the strong deviation from the ideal spin value of 3 mu(B), there is still an appreciable orbital contribution to the local magnetic moment.

  19. Electron tomography and nano-diffraction enabling the investigation of individual magnetic nanoparticles inside fibers of MR visible implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slabu, I.; Wirch, N.; Caumanns, T.; Theissmann, R.; Krüger, M.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Weirich, T. E.

    2017-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONPs) incorporated into the base material of implants are used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging for the delineation of the implants from the surrounding tissue. However, the delineation quality is strongly related to the structural characteristics of the incorporated SPIONPs and their interparticle interaction as well as their interaction with the polymer matrix of the implant. Consequently, a profound knowledge of the formation of aggregates inside the polymer matrix, which are responsible for strong interparticle interactions, and of their structural characteristics, is required for controlling the magnetic resonance image quality of the implants. In this work, transmission electron microscopy methods such as electron tomography and nano-electron diffraction were used to depict SPIONP aggregates inside the melt-spin polyvinylidene fluoride fibers used for the assembly of implants and to determine the crystal structure of individual nanocrystals inside these aggregates, respectively. Using these techniques it was possible for the first time to characterize the aggregates inside the fibers of implants and to validate the magnetization measurements that have been previously used to assess the interaction phenomena inside the fibers of implants. With electron tomography, inhomogeneously sized distributed aggregates were delineated and 3D models of these aggregates were constructed. Furthermore, the distribution of the aggregates inside the fibers was verified by means of magnetic force microscopy. With nano-diffraction measurements, the SPIONP crystal structure inside the fibers of the implant could not be clearly assigned to that of magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). Therefore, additional electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements were performed, which revealed the presence of both phases of Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3, probably caused by oxidation processes during the manufacture of the fibers by

  20. Improvements toward highly accurate diffraction experiments at the macromolecular micro-crystallography beamline BL-17A

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yusuke; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Hiraki, Masahiko; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Matsugaki, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    BL-17A is a macromolecular crystallography beamline dedicated to diffraction experiments conducted using micro-crystals and structure determination studies using a lower energy X-ray beam. In these experiments, highly accurate diffraction intensity measurements are definitively important. Since this beamline was constructed, the beamline apparatus has been improved in several ways to enable the collection of accurate diffraction data. The stability of the beam intensities at the sample position was recently improved by modifying the monochromator. The diffractometer has also been improved. A new detector table was installed to prevent distortions in the diffractometer’s base during the repositioning of the diffractometer detector. A new pinhole system and an on-axis viewing system were installed to improve the X-ray beam profile at the sample position and the centering of tiny crystal samples. PMID:24121344

  1. Structural and magnetic properties of LaFe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} studied by neutron diffraction, electron diffraction and magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, A.K. . E-mail: azad@studsvik.uu.se; Mellergard, A.; Eriksson, S.-G.; Ivanov, S.A.; Yunus, S.M.; Lindberg, F.; Svensson, G.; Mathieu, R.

    2005-10-06

    The structural and magnetic properties of the perovskite type compound LaFe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} have been studied by temperature dependent neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. Rietveld refinement of the neutron diffraction data shows that the compound crystallizes in an orthorhombic perovskite structure with a random positioning of the Fe and Cr cations at the B sublattice. The magnetic structure at 10 K is a collinear antiferromagnetic one with the magnetic moment per site being equal to 2.79(4) {mu}{sub B}. Magnetisation measurements confirm the overall antiferromagnetic behaviour. Moreover, it indicates a weak uncompensated magnetic moment close to the transition temperature T {sub N} {approx} 265 K. This moment can be described by a magnetic cluster state, which remains up to 550 K. Electron diffraction patterns along with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images reveal that the crystallites are composed by domains of different orientation, which share the same cubic perovskite sub-cell reflections.

  2. Structure of Antibodies by X-Ray Diffraction of Monomolecular Layers and by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    radical) antibody can be determined from the NMR spectrum of this protein. This opens the way to the study of structural changes in the combining site...to this problem ( NMR rather than X-ray diffraction). This change was brought about by two factors: (1) In addition to a number of difficult technical...too short to permit significant progress. (2) We found that the NMR spectra of a monoclonal anti-spin label antibody provide a remarkably powerful and

  3. The use of X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and magnetic measurements for analysing microstructural features of a duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro Miranda, M.A.; Neto, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    X-ray diffraction, light optical microscopy, and magnetization saturation measurements were employed to analyse the microstructural features of a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel modified by high-temperature treatments. The samples were heated to 1300 deg. C and cooled by different ways to produce five different microstructures. Solution treatments at 1000 deg. C were also employed to produce another five conditions. Three methods were employed to determine the austenite/ferrite proportions. X-ray diffraction gave higher austenite values than the other methods, due to the influence of texture, but can be successfully used to determine the microstrain level in each phase. Magnetic saturation measurement is a very simple and precise method for quantification of austenite and ferrite volume fractions in samples that were fast-cooled and slow-cooled. Light microscopy can give a fast and precise measurement of the phase proportions and reveals important features related to the morphology of the phases, but in the samples where the austenite content is low, quantification becomes difficult and imprecise.

  4. Neutron diffraction study of magnetic ordering of the manganese bismuth chloro-sulfide: MnBiS{sub 2}Cl

    SciTech Connect

    Doussier-Brochard, C.; Leone, P. Andre, G.; Moelo, Y.

    2009-04-02

    In quaternary compounds of Mn{sup 2+}PnQ{sub 2}X (Pn = Sb, Bi; Q = S, Se; X = Cl, Br, I), Mn atoms in octahedral coordination (4 Q and 2 X) form waved layers separated by Pn atoms. The magnetic structure of the manganese bismuth chloro-sulfide MnBiS{sub 2}Cl has been determined by neutron powder diffraction, revealing a magnetic ordering with an incommensurate wave-vector along b-axis (k = [0, 0.3978, 0]) at 1.6 K. Two modulation models, sinusoidal and helicoidal, give quite equivalent magnetic reliability factors (R{sub mag} = 0.0450 and 0.0481, respectively). The magnetic moment decreases with increasing temperature, to zero at T{sub N} = 32 K. The evolution of the propagation wave-vector shows an irregularity at about 28 K. It could evidence two-phase transitions in agreement with the specific heat measurements. These results are compared to those of manganese antimony chloro-sulfide MnSbS{sub 2}Cl, isotypic with MnBiS{sub 2}Cl.

  5. Remote Teaching Experiments on Magnetic Domains in Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskii, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our experience in building a remote laboratory for teaching magnetic domains. Fulfilling the proposed on-line experiments, students can observe and study magnetization processes that are often difficult to explain with written material. It is proposed that networks of remotely accessible laboratories could be integrated in the Global…

  6. Remote Teaching Experiments on Magnetic Domains in Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskii, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our experience in building a remote laboratory for teaching magnetic domains. Fulfilling the proposed on-line experiments, students can observe and study magnetization processes that are often difficult to explain with written material. It is proposed that networks of remotely accessible laboratories could be integrated in the Global…

  7. X-Ray Diffraction From Shocked Crystals: Experiments and Predications of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rosolankova, K; Kalantar, D H; Belak, J F; Bringa, E M; Caturla, M J; Hawreliak, J; Holian, B L; Kadau, K; Lomdahl, P S; Germann, T C; Ravelo, R; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S

    2003-09-24

    When a crystal is subjected to shock compression beyond its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), the deformation it undergoes is composed of elastic and plastic strain components. In situ time-dependent X-ray diffraction, which allows direct measurement of lattice spacings, can be used to investigate such phenomena. This paper presents recent experimental results of X-ray diffraction from shocked fcc crystals. Comparison is made between experimental data and simulated X-ray diffraction using a post-processor to Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of shocked fcc crystals.

  8. Nanosecond x-ray Laue diffraction apparatus suitable for laser shock compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Suggit, Matthew; Kimminau, Giles; Hawreliak, James; Remington, Bruce; Park, Nigel; Wark, Justin

    2010-08-01

    We have used nanosecond bursts of x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma, comprised of a mixture of mid-Z elements, to produce a quasiwhite-light spectrum suitable for performing Laue diffraction from single crystals. The laser-produced plasma emits x-rays ranging in energy from 3 to in excess of 10 keV, and is sufficiently bright for single shot nanosecond diffraction patterns to be recorded. The geometry is suitable for the study of laser-shocked crystals, and single-shot diffraction patterns from both unshocked and shocked silicon crystals are presented.

  9. Neutron diffraction study of the magnetic ordering in the series R 2 BaNiO 5 (R = Rare Earth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Matres, E.; Martínez, J. L.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.

    2001-11-01

    A neutron diffraction study, as a function of temperature, of the title compounds is presented. The whole family (space group Immm, a 3.8Å, b 5.8Å, c 11.3Å) is structurally characterised by the presence of flattened NiO6 octahedra that form chains along the a-axis, giving rise to a strong Ni-O-Ni antiferromagnetic interaction. Whereas for Y-compound only strong 1D correlations exist above 1.5 K, presenting the Haldane gap characteristic of 1D AF chain with integer spin, 3D AF ordering is established simultaneously for both R and Ni sublattices at temperatures depending on the rare earth size and magnetic moment. The magnetic structures of R2BaNiO5 ( R=Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Tm) have been determined and refined as a function of temperature. The whole family orders with a magnetic structure characterised by the temperature-independent propagation vector = (1/2, 0, 1/2). At 1.5 K the directions of the magnetic moments differ because of the different anisotropy of the rare earth ions. Except for Tm and Yb (which does not order above 1.5 K), the magnetic moment of the R3+ cations are close to the free-ion value. The magnetic moment of Ni2+ is around 1.4 , the strong reduction with respect to the free-ion value is probably due to a combination of low-dimensional quantum effects and covalency. The thermal evolution of the magnetic structures from TN down to 1.5 K is studied in detail. A smooth re-orientation, governed by the magnetic anisotropy of R3+, seems to occur below and very close to TN in some of these compounds: the Ni moment rotates from nearly parallel to the a-axis toward the c-axis following the R moments. We demonstrate that for setting up the 3D magnetic ordering the R-R exchange interactions cannot be neglected.

  10. Novel cases of diffraction of light from a grating: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetty, Ninad R.; Suman, Akash; Khaparde, Rajesh B.

    2012-11-01

    A popular pedagogical approach for introducing diffraction is to assume normal incidence of light on a single slit or a plane transmission grating. Interesting cases of diffraction from a grating at orientations other than normal incidence remain largely unexplored. In this article, we report our study of these unexplored cases, which was taken up as an undergraduate student project. We define various cases of orientation of the grating and use the Fresnel-Kirchhoff formula to arrive at the diffracted intensity distribution. An experimental arrangement consisting of a laser, a grating mount, a digital camera, and a calibrated plane screen is employed to record our observations. We discuss for each case the theoretical and experimental results and establish the conformity between the two. Finally, we analyze the details of various cases and conclude that for an arbitrary orientation of the grating, the diffraction maxima fall along a second degree curve.

  11. Plants and Magnetism: Experiments with Biomagnetism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Phenomenon of effect of magnetic field on plant growth provides wide opportunities for research in classrooms. Using moderately powerful magnets, seed growth patterns can be observed in pre-germination treatment, germination period exposure and under many other conditions. Such research may enable understanding magnetotropism more clearly. (PS)

  12. Plants and Magnetism: Experiments with Biomagnetism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Phenomenon of effect of magnetic field on plant growth provides wide opportunities for research in classrooms. Using moderately powerful magnets, seed growth patterns can be observed in pre-germination treatment, germination period exposure and under many other conditions. Such research may enable understanding magnetotropism more clearly. (PS)

  13. Magnetic ordering in NdMn2O5 studied by the neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobkalo, I. A.; Gavrilov, S. V.; Nyi, N. Z. Saw; Barilo, S. N.; Shiryaev, S. V.

    2014-03-01

    The magnetic ordering in NdMn2O5 single crystal has been studied by the neutron scattering, including XYZ-polarization analysis. At TN≈30 K the onset of the long-range magnetic order with incommensurate wave vector k=(0.5 0 ~0.36) is observed. Below 30 K two magnetic phases are observed with propagation vectors close to each other: k1=(0.5 0 kz1), k2=(0.5 0 kz2). kz1, kz2 components increase monotonously with temperature decrease down to 25 K, then remain to be constant with values kz1=0.384(2), kz2=0.395(2). Two reorientation transitions were observed at ~20 K and at ~5 K.

  14. Magnetic fan structures in Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22 hexaferrite revealed by resonant soft x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearmon, Alexander J.; Johnson, R. D.; Beale, T. A. W.; Dhesi, S. S.; Luo, X.; Cheong, S.-W.; Steadman, P.; Radaelli, Paolo G.

    2013-11-01

    The hexaferrites are known to exhibit a wide range of magnetic structures, some of which are connected to important technological applications and display magnetoelectric properties. We present data on the low magnetic field structures stabilized in a Y-type hexaferrite as observed by resonant soft x-ray diffraction. The helical spin block arrangement that is present in zero applied magnetic field becomes fanlike as a field is applied in plane. The propagation vectors associated with each fan structure are studied as a function of magnetic field, and a new magnetic phase is reported. Mean field calculations indicate this phase should stabilize close to the boundary of the previously reported phases.

  15. Neutron powder diffraction study of the crystal and magnetic structures of BiNiO{sub 3} at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Sandra J.E.; Azuma, Masaki; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Takano, Mikio; Hewat, Alan; Attfield, J. Paul

    2008-03-15

    The crystal and magnetic structures of the charge ordered perovskite BiNiO{sub 3} have been studied at temperatures from 5 to 300 K using neutron diffraction. Rietveld analysis of the data shows that the structure remains triclinic (space group P1-bar) throughout the whole temperature range. Bond-valence sum calculations based on the Bi-O and Ni-O bond distances confirm that the charge distribution is Bi{sup 3+}{sub 0.5}Bi{sup 5+}{sub 0.5}Ni{sup 2+}O{sub 3} down to 5 K. The magnetic cell is identical to that of the triclinic superstructure and a G-type antiferromagnetic model gives a good fit to the magnetic intensities, with an ordered Ni{sup 2+} moment of 1.76(3) {mu}{sub B} at 5 K. However, BiNiO{sub 3} is ferrimagnetic due to the inexact cancellation of opposing, inequivalent moments in the low symmetry cell. - Graphical abstract: A neutron diffraction study shows that the perovskite BiNiO{sub 3} retains the unusual charge distribution Bi{sup 3+}{sub 0.5}Bi{sup 5+}{sub 0.5}Ni{sup 2+}O{sub 3} down to 5 K. The Ni{sup 2+} moments are ordered in the G-type antiferromagnetic arrangement shown; however, BiNiO{sub 3} is ferrimagnetic due to the inexact cancellation of the four inequivalent moments in the triclinic unit cell.

  16. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    PubMed

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.).

  17. Turbulence reduces magnetic diffusivity in DTS liquid sodium experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, S.; Schaeffer, N.; Nataf, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Earth, Sun and many other astrophysical bodies produce their own magnetic field by dynamo action, where induction of magnetic field by fluid motion overcomes the Joule dissipation when the magnetic Reynolds number Rm = UL/η is large enough (U and L are characteristic velocity and length-scale and η the magnetic diffusivity). Large scale motion of a conducting medium shearing pre-existing magnetic field lines is a well known process to produce large scale magnetic field by omega-effect. However, such a process cannot sustain a self-excited dynamo and small-scale turbulent motions are usually invoked as the appropriate mechanism to dynamo action. The contribution of turbulent fluctuations to the induction of mean magnetic field is investigated in our liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment, with an imposed magnetic field. Many measurements are used through an inversion technique to obtain a radial profile of alpha and beta effects together with the mean flow at magnetic Reynolds number Rm = 100. It appears that the small scale turbulent fluctuations can be modeled as a strong contribution to the magnetic diffusivity which is negative in the interior region and positive close to the outer shell.Direct numerical simulations of our experiment support these results. The lowering of the effective magnetic diffusivity by small scale fluctuations implies that turbulence can actually help to achieve self-generation of large scale magnetic fields.

  18. Long-range magnetic order in Mn[N(CN)2]2(pyz) {pyz = pyrazine}. susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat and neutron diffraction measurements and electronic structure calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Huang, Q.-Z.; Lynn, J. W.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Bateman, R.; Wada, N.; Awaga, K.; Argyriou, D. N.; Miller, J. S.; Univ. of Maryland; National Inst. of Standards & Technology; North Carolina State Univ.; Oxford Research Instruments; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Utah

    2001-01-10

    Using dc magnetization, ac susceptibility, specific heat, and neutron diffraction, we have studied the magnetic properties of Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}(pyz) (pyz = pyrazine) in detail. The material crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n with a = 7.3248(2), b = 16.7369(4), and c = 8.7905(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 89.596(2){sup o}, V = 1077.65(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4, as determined by Rietveld refinement of neutron powder diffraction data at 1.35 K. The 5 K neutron powder diffraction data reflect very little variation in the crystal structure. Interpenetrating ReO{sub 3}-like networks are formed from axially elongated Mn{sup 2+} octahedra and edges made up of {mu}-bonded [N(CN){sub 2}]{sup -} anions and neutral pyz ligands. A three-dimensional antiferromagnetic ordering occurs below T{sub N} = 2.53(2) k. The magnetic unit cell is double the nuclear one along the a- and c-axes, giving the (1/2, 0, 1/2) superstructure. The crystallographic and antiferromagnetic structures are commensurate and consist of collinear Mn{sup 2+} moments, each with a magnitude of 4.15(6) {mu}{sub B} aligned parallel to the a-direction (Mn-pyz-Mn chains). Electronic structure calculations indicate that the exchange interaction is much stronger along the Mn-pyz-Mn chain axis than along the Mn-NCNCN-Mn axes by a factor of approximately 40, giving rise to a predominantly one-dimensional magnetic system. Thus, the variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data are well described by a Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain model, giving g = 2.01(1) and J/k{sub B} = -0.27(1) K. Owing to single-ion anisotropy of the Mn{sup 2+} ion, field-induced phenomena ascribed to spin-flop and paramagnetic transitions are observed at 0.43 and 2.83 T, respectively.

  19. Diffractive stacks of metamaterial lattices with a complex unit cell: Self-consistent long-range bianisotropic interactions in experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwadrin, Andrej; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces and metamaterials promise arbitrary rerouting of light using two-dimensional (2D) planar arrangements of electric and magnetic scatterers, respectively, 3D stacks built out of such 2D planes. An important problem is how to self-consistently model the response of these systems in a manner that retains dipole intuition yet does full justice to the self-consistent multiple scattering via near-field and far-field retarded interactions. We set up such a general model for metamaterial lattices of complex 2D unit cells of poly-atomic basis as well as allowing for stacking in a third dimension. In particular, each scatterer is quantified by a magnetoelectric polarizability tensor and Ewald lattice summation deals with all near-field and long-range retarded electric, magnetic, and magnetoelectric couplings self-consistently. We show in theory and experiment that grating diffraction orders of dilute split ring lattices with complex unit cells show a background-free signature of magnetic dipole response. For denser lattices experiment and theory show that complex unit cells can reduce the apparent effect of bianisotropy, i.e., the strong oblique-incidence handed response that was reported for simple split ring lattices. Finally, the method is applied to calculate transmission of finite stacks of lattices. Thereby our simple methodology allows us to trace the emergence of effective material constants when building a 3D metamaterial layer by layer, as well as facilitating the design of metasurfaces.

  20. Magnetic Compensation of Gravity: Experiments with Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichavant, G.; Cariteau, B.; Chatain, D.; Nikolayev, V.; Beysens, D.

    2009-01-01

    The CEA Grenoble, through the ESEME/SBT team, has developed a new ground based facility providing magnetic compensation of gravity in oxygen. A 2T superconducting magnetic coil has been used to create the magnetic field. The installation is described. Well adapted to the heat and mass transfer studies, for example of the various boiling regimes, it permits to enhance the understanding of these phenomena in reduced gravity and gives a convenient way to reproduce space conditions on the ground. The first experimental results are presented.

  1. Miniature Magnet for Electron Spin Resonance Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, L. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes commercially available permanent magnets that have been incorporated in a compact and inexpensive structure providing both field sweep and modulation suitable for electron spin resonance at microwave frequencies. (MLH)

  2. Experience with the SLC permanent magnet multipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, G.; Spencer, J.

    1994-06-01

    Permanent magnets have been used in the SLC Damping Rings and their injection and extraction lines since 1985. Recent upgrades of the DR vacuum chambers provided an opportunity to check DR magnets prior to higher beam current operation. Several PM sextupoles downstream of the injection kickers in the electron ring had exceeded their thermal stabilization values of 80{degrees}C and some showed serious mechanical deformations and radiation >1 R at contact. We discuss our observations, measurements and a few inexpensive modifications that should improve these magnets under such conditions. A new, block matching algorithm allowed us to use magnet blocks that had been considered unusable because of very different remament field strengths and easy axis errors.

  3. Experiences with making diffraction image data available: what metadata do we need to archive?

    SciTech Connect

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-10-01

    A local raw ‘diffraction data images’ archive was made available and some data sets were retrieved and reprocessed, which led to analysis of the anomalous difference densities of two partially occupied Cl atoms in cisplatin as well as a re-evaluation of the resolution cutoff in these diffraction data. General questions on storing raw data are discussed. It is also demonstrated that often one needs unambiguous prior knowledge to read the (binary) detector format and the setup of goniometer geometries. Recently, the IUCr (International Union of Crystallography) initiated the formation of a Diffraction Data Deposition Working Group with the aim of developing standards for the representation of raw diffraction data associated with the publication of structural papers. Archiving of raw data serves several goals: to improve the record of science, to verify the reproducibility and to allow detailed checks of scientific data, safeguarding against fraud and to allow reanalysis with future improved techniques. A means of studying this issue is to submit exemplar publications with associated raw data and metadata. In a recent study of the binding of cisplatin and carboplatin to histidine in lysozyme crystals under several conditions, the possible effects of the equipment and X-ray diffraction data-processing software on the occupancies and B factors of the bound Pt compounds were compared. Initially, 35.3 GB of data were transferred from Manchester to Utrecht to be processed with EVAL. A detailed description and discussion of the availability of metadata was published in a paper that was linked to a local raw data archive at Utrecht University and also mirrored at the TARDIS raw diffraction data archive in Australia. By making these raw diffraction data sets available with the article, it is possible for the diffraction community to make their own evaluation. This led to one of the authors of XDS (K. Diederichs) to re-integrate the data from crystals that supposedly

  4. Prospective of ultradispersic magnetic particles in biological experiments in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kuznetsov, Anatoli; Malashin, S.

    All organisms on Earth use gravity for their lifecycles. Microgravity disturbs the lifecycles significantly: orientation ability is damaged, thermo and mass exchange processes are changed, adaptation mechanisms are destroyed. A recovering the normal life cycle of organism in future long-term mission requires an artificial gravity which is complicate and not realistic with present technologies. We propose to use a magnetic properties of the biological objects for recovering of the gravity-dependent biological processes in organism during space flight. Based on result of magnetic properties investigation in gravity-sensitive plant cells, we have prepared and carried out the experiments on space station MIR. For the experiments, Magnitogravistat device was designed and installed on the station. The aim of the experiment was to replace a gravity factor of plant with a magnetic factor. The magnetic effect is based on the fact, that a magnetic particle of V volume is under the force F=ΔæVHgradH in the magnetic gradient gradH, where Δæ is the difference between the magnetic susceptibility of particle and media. When the particles are placed into the cell, the cell can be managed by the magnetic field. In laboratory experiment the iron-carbon particles of 1-2 um with nanostructurised surface and high adsorption properties have been used. The particles can be suspended in water and adsorbed chemicals including cell metabolites. In strong magnetic field, the particles can be agglomerated and the liquid substrate can be replaced. The local magnetic field near the particles can influence on cell processes. The magnetic field causes a cell differentiation and can influence on cell proliferation. A new space experiment with magnetic particles is planned to get a knowledge on cell influence and to improve a cell metabolism.

  5. Acoustic diffraction by deformed edges of finite length: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Timothy K; Chu, Dezhang; Norton, Guy V

    2007-12-01

    The acoustic diffraction by deformed edges of finite length is described analytically and in the frequency domain through use of an approximate line-integral formulation. The formulation is based on the diffraction per unit length of an infinitely long straight edge, which inherently limits the accuracy of the approach. The line integral is written in terms of the diffraction by a generalized edge, in that the "edge" can be a single edge or multiple closely spaced edges. Predictions based on an exact solution to the impenetrable infinite knife edge are used to estimate diffraction by the edge of a thin disk and compared with calculations based on the T-matrix approach. Predictions are then made for the more complex geometry involving an impenetrable thick disk. These latter predictions are based on an approximate formula for double-edge diffraction [Chu et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3177 (2007)] and are compared with laboratory data involving individual elastic (aluminum) disks spanning a range of diameters and submerged in water. The results of this study show this approximate line-integral approach to be versatile and applicable over a range of conditions.

  6. Results from the RAT Magnet Experiment on Spirit and Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Walter; Hviid, S. F.; Madsen, M. B.; Kinch, K. M.; Leer, K.; Gunnlauggson, H. P.

    2006-09-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) is one of the four payload elements that are mounted to the end of the robotic arm onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER). The RAT is a mechanism that can grind circular depressions several millimeters into the Martian rocks. The RAT magnet experiment is composed of four permanent magnets of different strengths built into the revolve housing cap plate of the RAT. Magnetic material liberated by the grinding process will be attracted by these magnets. At Gusev crater 14 different grindings were performed over 416 sols. During grinding into rocks in the plains (Adirondack, Humphrey, Mazatzal) a substantial amount of homogeneous, dark-gray material accumulated on the magnets. Based on data from the Mössbauer (MB) spectrometer the rocks are known to contain the magnetic material (Ti) magnetite. During grindings into the Eagle crater outcrop at Meridiani Planum strongly magnetic material was captured by the RAT magnets. The material is reddish and appears to be largely homogeneous. The total amount of collected material is slightly smaller as compared to the RAT magnet experiment on Spirit. Also no strongly magnetic, iron containing mineral phase has been identified by MB spectroscopy. Based on Pancam observations of the RAT magnets as well as other data we suggest that the Meridiani outcrops contains < 0.5 wt.% of a ferrimagnetic phase, possibly partly oxidized magnetite.

  7. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H.; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O.

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible within situsample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  8. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; ...

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable,more » for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.« less

  9. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifying in situ chamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  10. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H.; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O.

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  11. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  12. Six-axis multi-anvil press for high-pressure, high-temperature neutron diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Sano-Furukawa, A; Hattori, T; Arima, H; Yamada, A; Tabata, S; Kondo, M; Nakamura, A; Kagi, H; Yagi, T

    2014-11-01

    We developed a six-axis multi-anvil press, ATSUHIME, for high-pressure and high-temperature in situ time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction experiments. The press has six orthogonally oriented hydraulic rams that operate individually to compress a cubic sample assembly. Experiments indicate that the press can generate pressures up to 9.3 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K using a 6-6-type cell assembly, with available sample volume of about 50 mm(3). Using a 6-8-type cell assembly, the available conditions expand to 16 GPa and 1273 K. Because the six-axis press has no guide blocks, there is sufficient space around the sample to use the aperture for diffraction and place an incident slit, radial collimators, and a neutron imaging camera close to the sample. Combination of the six-axis press and the collimation devices realized high-quality diffraction pattern with no contamination from the heater or the sample container surrounding the sample. This press constitutes a new tool for using neutron diffraction to study the structures of crystals and liquids under high pressures and temperatures.

  13. EM induction experiment to determine the moment of a magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najiya Maryam, K. M.

    2014-05-01

    If we drop a magnet through a coil, an emf is induced in the coil according to Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction. Here, such an experiment is done using expEYES kit. The plot of emf versus time has a specific shape with two peaks. A theoretical analysis of this graph is discussed here for both short and long cylindrical magnets. Mathematical expressions are derived for both. Knowing this equation, experiments to calculate the moment of a magnet can be devised. If we use a long conducting tube instead of a simple coil in this experiment, it can even help in measuring the eddy current damping coefficient k.

  14. On the uniqueness of structure extracted from diffraction experiments on liquids and glasses.

    PubMed

    Soper, A K

    2007-10-17

    There is continued interest in the problem of extracting structures from x-ray and neutron diffraction data on liquids and glasses. Traditional Fourier transform techniques, with their inherent weakness of possible systematic and truncation artefacts being introduced into the estimated distribution functions, are increasingly being complemented by computer simulation methods. These allow three-dimensional models of the scattering system to be built, at the correct atomic number density, which are consistent with both the diffraction data themselves and with other known or estimated constraints such minimum particle separations. Here the empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR) method is used to explore structure in supercooled liquid Ni, amorphous Ge and amorphous GeSe2, and to evaluate alternative versions of the radial distribution functions which are consistent with the diffraction data. In the case of liquid Ni, it is found that there is, based on the diffraction data, some uncertainty on the hardness and shape of the repulsive core of the interatomic pair potential, and this may influence the current debate about the existence of icosahedral order in this liquid. For amorphous Ge two distinct radial distribution functions are generated, both consistent with the diffraction data, one of which has strong tetrahedral local order with the other having a predominantly triangular local coordination. For amorphous GeSe2 it is found the SeSe and GeSe radial distribution functions can be determined well from the data, but the GeGe distribution is more uncertain, with the best fits implying both GeGe and SeSe homopolar bonds as originally proposed. The results are used to discuss the ambiguities inherent in the structural interpretation of diffraction data, even for one- and two-component systems.

  15. Status of Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chavers, D. Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Gregory, Judith; Cecil, Jim; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; McCaskill, Greg; Cassibry, Jason; Li Zhongmin

    2006-01-20

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer, lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue if the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment is being performed to test the theory regarding the MHD detachment scenario. The status of that experiment will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Low temperature magnetic ground state in bulk Co0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 spinel ferrite system: Neutron diffraction, magnetization and ac-susceptibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Harshida; Acharya, Prashant; Upadhyay, R. V.; Siruguri, V.; Rayaprol, Sudhindra

    2013-01-01

    The system under study is a bulk Co0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 ferrite, synthesized by wet chemical route technique and having magnetic in-homogeneity at the microscopic scale, due to the concentration of magnetic ion at a tetrahedral site below the site percolation threshold for the ferrimagnetic ordering. To unravel the magnetic ground state of this system, low temperature neutron diffraction, magnetization and ac-susceptibility measurements were carried out. In the temperature-dependent neutron diffraction analysis, a diffused scattering signal appears at the low Q region below (1 1 1) magnetic Bragg peak at all temperature, indicating the presence of a finite magnetic cluster with infinite magnetic network. The diffused scattering signal intensity decreases with increases in magnetic field at T=10 K. The ac-susceptibility measurement exhibits three peak behavior in χ' and χ″ indicating the presence of finite magnetic clusters and cluster-cluster interaction in the system. The absence of magnetic (2 0 0) peak in neutron diffraction at 2 K and bifurcation of zero field and field cooled magnetization indicate the phase transition from uniaxial random ferromagnetic (URF) phase to semi spin glass or canted random ferromagnetic (CRF) phase in the system with temperature.

  17. How Rosalind Franklin Discovered the Helical Structure of DNA: Experiments in Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Gregory; Tierney, Dennis; Schmitzer, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Rosalind Franklin, a chemical physicist (1920-1958), used x-ray diffraction to determine the structure of DNA. What exactly could she read out from her x-ray pattern, shown in Fig. 1? In lecture notes dated November 1951, R. Franklin wrote the following: "The results suggest a helical structure (which must be very closely packed) containing 2, 3…

  18. How Rosalind Franklin Discovered the Helical Structure of DNA: Experiments in Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Gregory; Tierney, Dennis; Schmitzer, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Rosalind Franklin, a chemical physicist (1920-1958), used x-ray diffraction to determine the structure of DNA. What exactly could she read out from her x-ray pattern, shown in Fig. 1? In lecture notes dated November 1951, R. Franklin wrote the following: "The results suggest a helical structure (which must be very closely packed) containing 2, 3…

  19. Crystallization of porcine pancreatic elastase and a preliminary neutron diffraction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Tamada, Taro; Imai, Keisuke; Kurihara, Kazuo; Ohhara, Takashi; Tada, Toshiji; Kuroki, Ryota

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the structural characteristics of a covalent inhibitor bound to porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), including H atoms and hydration by water, a crystal of porcine pancreatic elastase with its inhibitor was grown to a size of 1.6 mm{sup 3} for neutron diffraction study. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination owing to the similar atomic scattering properties of deuterium and carbon. Porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) resembles the attractive drug target leukocyte elastase, which has been implicated in a number of inflammatory disorders. In order to investigate the structural characteristics of a covalent inhibitor bound to PPE, including H atoms and the hydration by water, a single crystal of PPE for neutron diffraction study was grown in D{sub 2}O containing 0.2 M sodium sulfate (pD 5.0) using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal was grown to a size of 1.6 mm{sup 3} by repeated macroseeding. Neutron diffraction data were collected at room temperature using a BIX-3 diffractometer at the JRR-3 research reactor of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The data set was integrated and scaled to 2.3 Å resolution in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.2, b = 57.8, c = 75.6 Å.

  20. Planning and Developing Magnet Schools: Experiences and Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Rolf K., Ed.; Messier, Paul R., Ed.

    This document consists of nine papers which discuss the planning and design, implementation and maintenance, and evaluation of magnet schools. They are based on practical experience with magnet schools, which first appeared in the early 1970s. By 1982, the movement had grown to include more than 1,200 schools in 140 urban school districts, and the…

  1. Simple Experiments on Magnetism and Electricity...from Edison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Robert F.

    Background information, lists of materials needed and procedures used are provided for 16 simple experiments on electricity and magnetism. These experiments are organized into sections dealing with: (1) Edison's carbon experiments (building a galvanometer, investigating the variable conductivity of carbon, and examining the carbon transmitter…

  2. Simple Experiments on Magnetism and Electricity...from Edison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Robert F.

    Background information, lists of materials needed and procedures used are provided for 16 simple experiments on electricity and magnetism. These experiments are organized into sections dealing with: (1) Edison's carbon experiments (building a galvanometer, investigating the variable conductivity of carbon, and examining the carbon transmitter…

  3. Experiences with making diffraction image data available: what metadata do we need to archive?

    PubMed Central

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the IUCr (International Union of Crystallography) initiated the formation of a Diffraction Data Deposition Working Group with the aim of developing standards for the representation of raw diffraction data associated with the publication of structural papers. Archiving of raw data serves several goals: to improve the record of science, to verify the reproducibility and to allow detailed checks of scientific data, safeguarding against fraud and to allow reanalysis with future improved techniques. A means of studying this issue is to submit exemplar publications with associated raw data and metadata. In a recent study of the binding of cisplatin and carboplatin to histidine in lysozyme crystals under several conditions, the possible effects of the equipment and X-ray diffraction data-processing software on the occupancies and B factors of the bound Pt compounds were compared. Initially, 35.3 GB of data were transferred from Manchester to Utrecht to be processed with EVAL. A detailed description and discussion of the availability of metadata was published in a paper that was linked to a local raw data archive at Utrecht University and also mirrored at the TARDIS raw diffraction data archive in Australia. By making these raw diffraction data sets available with the article, it is possible for the diffraction community to make their own evaluation. This led to one of the authors of XDS (K. Diederichs) to re-integrate the data from crystals that supposedly solely contained bound carboplatin, resulting in the analysis of partially occupied chlorine anomalous electron densities near the Pt-binding sites and the use of several criteria to more carefully assess the diffraction resolution limit. General arguments for archiving raw data, the possibilities of doing so and the requirement of resources are discussed. The problems associated with a partially unknown experimental setup, which preferably should be available as metadata, is discussed. Current thoughts on

  4. Experiences with making diffraction image data available: what metadata do we need to archive?

    PubMed

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Helliwell, John R

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the IUCr (International Union of Crystallography) initiated the formation of a Diffraction Data Deposition Working Group with the aim of developing standards for the representation of raw diffraction data associated with the publication of structural papers. Archiving of raw data serves several goals: to improve the record of science, to verify the reproducibility and to allow detailed checks of scientific data, safeguarding against fraud and to allow reanalysis with future improved techniques. A means of studying this issue is to submit exemplar publications with associated raw data and metadata. In a recent study of the binding of cisplatin and carboplatin to histidine in lysozyme crystals under several conditions, the possible effects of the equipment and X-ray diffraction data-processing software on the occupancies and B factors of the bound Pt compounds were compared. Initially, 35.3 GB of data were transferred from Manchester to Utrecht to be processed with EVAL. A detailed description and discussion of the availability of metadata was published in a paper that was linked to a local raw data archive at Utrecht University and also mirrored at the TARDIS raw diffraction data archive in Australia. By making these raw diffraction data sets available with the article, it is possible for the diffraction community to make their own evaluation. This led to one of the authors of XDS (K. Diederichs) to re-integrate the data from crystals that supposedly solely contained bound carboplatin, resulting in the analysis of partially occupied chlorine anomalous electron densities near the Pt-binding sites and the use of several criteria to more carefully assess the diffraction resolution limit. General arguments for archiving raw data, the possibilities of doing so and the requirement of resources are discussed. The problems associated with a partially unknown experimental setup, which preferably should be available as metadata, is discussed. Current thoughts on

  5. Dichroic Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish

    Understanding electronic structure at nanometer resolution is crucial to understanding physics such as phase separation and emergent behavior in correlated electron materials. Nondestructive probes which have the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and sub-picosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will impact development of future technologies, such as magnetic storage. Polarized x-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional x-ray microscopy is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate x-ray optics. In this thesis, a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure is presented. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic "maze" domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. A series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns, ptychographically recorded, are numerically inverted using non-convex and non-linear optimization theory, and we follow the magnetic domain configuration evolution through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop by applying an external magnetic field. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics, and so is a far simpler experiment. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent x-ray flux and wavelength. It can readily be extended to other non-magnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant x-ray sources.

  6. Change in the magnetic structure of (Bi,Sm)FeO{sub 3} thin films at the morphotropic phase boundary probed by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Shingo; Anbusathaiah, Varatharajan; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Fennell, Amy; Enderle, Mechthild; Ratcliff, William D.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the evolution of the magnetic structure of BiFeO{sub 3} thin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates as a function of Sm doping. We determined the magnetic structure using neutron diffraction. We found that as Sm increases, the magnetic structure evolves from a cycloid to a G-type antiferromagnet at the morphotropic phase boundary, where there is a large piezoelectric response due to an electric-field induced structural transition. The occurrence of the magnetic structural transition at the morphotropic phase boundary offers another route towards room temperature multiferroic devices.

  7. Influence of Cr doping on the magnetic structure of the FeAs-strips compound CaFe4As3: A single-crystal neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, P.; Chapon, L. C.; Trimarchi, G.; Todorov, I. S.; Chung, D. Y.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Gutmann, M. J.; Freeman, A. J.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2013-09-01

    We have studied the magnetic structure of a Cr-doped iron-arsenide compound CaFe4As3 by means of single crystal neutron diffraction. The neutron data reveal that below 90 K, an antiferromagnetic structure with propagation vector k=0 is adopted. Refinement of the magnetic structure using one of the modes allowed by symmetry analysis indicates that two of the four Fe sites, including the one where the selective substitution Fe/Cr happens, bear reduced magnetic moments. Density functional theory calculations confirm the stability of such a magnetic arrangement.

  8. Structural and magnetic phase transitions of the orthovanadates RVO3 (R= Dy, Ho, Er) as seen via neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reehuis, M.; Ulrich, C.; Prokeš, K.; Mat'aš, S.; Fujioka, J.; Miyasaka, S.; Tokura, Y.; Keimer, B.

    2011-02-01

    The structural and magnetic phase behavior of RVO3 with R=v Dy, Ho, and Er was studied by single-crystal neutron diffraction. Upon cooling, all three compounds show structural transitions from orthorhombic (space group Pbnm) to monoclinic (p21/b) symmetry due to the onset of orbital order at T= 188-200 K, followed by Néel transitions at T= 110-113 K due to the onset of antiferromagnetic (C-type) order of the vanadium moments. Upon further cooling, additional structural phase transitions occur for DyVO3 and ErVO3 at 60 and 56 K, respectively, where the monoclinic structure changes to an orthorhombic structure with the space group Pbnm, and the magnetic order of the V sublattice changes to a G-type structure. These transition temperatures are reduced compared to the ones previously observed for nonmagnetic R3+ ions due to exchange interactions between the V3+ and R3+ ions. For ErVO3, R-R exchange interactions drive a transition to collinear magnetic order at T= 2.5 K. For HoVO3, the onset of noncollinear, weakly ferromagnetic order of the Ho moments nearly coincides with the structural phase transition from the monoclinic to the low-temperature orthorhombic structure. This transition is characterized by an extended hysteresis between 24 and 36 K. The Dy moments in DyVO3 also exhibit noncollinear, weakly ferromagnetic order upon cooling below 13 K. With increasing temperature, the monoclinic structure of DyVO3 reappears in the temperature range between 13 and 23 K. This reentrant structural transition is associated with a rearrangement of the Dy moments. A group theoretical analysis showed that the observed magnetic states of the R3+ ions are compatible with the lattice structure. The results are discussed in the light of recent data on the magnetic field dependence of the lattice structure and magnetization of DyVO3 and HoVO3.

  9. Experiments with a Magnetically Controlled Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A magnetically controlled pendulum is used for observing free and forced oscillations, including nonlinear oscillations and chaotic motion. A data-acquisition system stores the data and displays time series of the oscillations and related phase plane plots, Poincare maps, Fourier spectra and histograms. The decay constant of the pendulum can be…

  10. The STEREO/IMPACT Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, M. H.; Curtis, D.; Scheifele, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Schroeder, P.; Szabo, A.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2008-04-01

    The magnetometer on the STEREO mission is one of the sensors in the IMPACT instrument suite. A single, triaxial, wide-range, low-power and noise fluxgate magnetometer of traditional design—and reduced volume configuration—has been implemented in each spacecraft. The sensors are mounted on the IMPACT telescoping booms at a distance of ˜3 m from the spacecraft body to reduce magnetic contamination. The electronics have been designed as an integral part of the IMPACT Data Processing Unit, sharing a common power converter and data/command interfaces. The instruments cover the range ±65,536 nT in two intervals controlled by the IDPU (±512 nT; ±65,536 nT). This very wide range allows operation of the instruments during all phases of the mission, including Earth flybys as well as during spacecraft test and integration in the geomagnetic field. The primary STEREO/IMPACT science objectives addressed by the magnetometer are the study of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), its response to solar activity, and its relationship to solar wind structure. The instruments were powered on and the booms deployed on November 1, 2006, seven days after the spacecraft were launched, and are operating nominally. A magnetic cleanliness program was implemented to minimize variable spacecraft fields and to ensure that the static spacecraft-generated magnetic field does not interfere with the measurements.

  11. Experiments with a Magnetically Controlled Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A magnetically controlled pendulum is used for observing free and forced oscillations, including nonlinear oscillations and chaotic motion. A data-acquisition system stores the data and displays time series of the oscillations and related phase plane plots, Poincare maps, Fourier spectra and histograms. The decay constant of the pendulum can be…

  12. ADVANCED CONCEPTS: Design of an MeV ultra-fast electron diffraction experiment at Tsinghua university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ren-Kai; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Huang, Wen-Hui; Du, Ying-Chao; Shi, Jia-Ru; Yan, Li-Xin

    2009-06-01

    Time-resolved MeV ultra-fast electron diffraction (UED) is a powerful tool for structure dynamics studies. In this paper, we present a design of a MeV UED facility based on a photocathode RF gun at Tsinghua University. Electron beam qualities are optimized with numerical simulations, indicating that resolutions of 250 fs and 0.01 A, and bunch charge exceeding 105 electrons are expected with technically achievable machine parameters. Status of experiment preparation is also presented.

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-07

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  14. An ultrahigh-vacuum apparatus for resonant diffraction experiments using soft x rays (hnu=300-2000 eV).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Chainani, A; Takata, Y; Tanaka, Y; Oura, M; Tsubota, M; Senba, Y; Ohashi, H; Mochiku, T; Hirata, K; Shin, S

    2009-02-01

    We have developed an ultrahigh-vacuum instrument for resonant diffraction experiments using polarized soft x rays in the energy range of hnu=300-2000 eV at beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. The diffractometer consists of modified differentially pumped rotary feedthroughs for theta-2theta stages, a sample manipulator with motor-controlled x-y-z-, tilt (chi)-, and azimuth (phi)-axes, and a liquid helium flow-type cryostat for temperature dependent measurements between 30 and 300 K. Test results indicate that the diffractometer exhibits high reproducibility (better than 0.001 degrees ) for a Bragg reflection of alpha-quartz 100 at a photon energy of hnu=1950 eV. Typical off- and on-resonance Bragg reflections in the energy range of 530-1950 eV could be measured using the apparatus. The results show that x-ray diffraction experiments with energy-, azimuth-, and incident photon polarization-dependence can be reliably measured using soft x rays in the energy range of approximately 300-2000 eV. The facility can be used for resonant diffraction experiments across the L-edge of transition metals, M-edge of lanthanides, and up to the Si K-edge of materials.

  15. Computer programs for unit-cell determination in electron diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, X Z

    2005-03-01

    A set of computer programs for unit-cell determination from an electron diffraction tilt series and pattern indexing has been developed on the basis of several well-established algorithms. In this approach, a reduced direct primitive cell is first determined from experimental data, in the means time, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. The derived primitive cell is then checked for possible higher lattice symmetry and transformed into a proper conventional cell. Finally a least-squares refinement procedure is adopted to generate optimum lattice parameters on the basis of the lengths of basic reflections in each diffraction pattern and the indices of these reflections. Examples are given to show the usage of the programs.

  16. Model experiment of in vivo synchrotron X-ray diffraction of human kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancharov, A. I.; Potapov, S. S.; Moiseenko, T. N.; Feofilov, I. V.; Nizovskii, A. I.

    2007-05-01

    The diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) was used to explore the phase composition of kidney stones placed into a specific object phantom, which imitated the human body. As an imitation of the patient breath, the kidney stone was moved vertically and rotated to an angle of 15° during the recording of the X-ray pattern. It was shown that rotation and displacement did not distort the X-ray pattern.

  17. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro Sánchez, Juan; Sáenz, Jacobo; de la Torre, Luis; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Heradio, Rubén; Dormido, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    This work describes two experiments: "study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation" and "the photoelectric effect". Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  18. Superconducting dipole magnet for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilkin, P.; Akishin, P.; Bychkov, A.; Floch, E.; Gusakov, Yu.; Ladygin, V.; Malakhov, A.; Moritz, G.; Ramakers, H.; Senger, P.; Shabunov, A.; Szwangruber, P.; Toral, F.

    2017-03-01

    The scientific goal of the CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) experiment at FAIR (Darmstadt) is to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest baryon densities. The physics program of the CBM experiment is complimentary to the programs to be realized at MPD and BMN facilities at NICA and will start with beam derived by the SIS100 synchrotron. The 5.15 MJ superconducting dipole magnet will be used in the silicon tracking system of the CBM detector. The magnet will provide a magnetic field integral of 1 Tm which is required to obtain a momentum resolution of 1% for the track reconstruction. The results of the development of dipole magnet of the CBM experiment are presented.

  19. Modeling HEDLA magnetic field generation experiments on laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, M.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Lamb, D.; Lee, D.; Marques, J. R.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Park, H.-S.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B.; Reville, B.; Scopatz, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Woolsey, N.; Young, R.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Flash Center is engaged in a collaboration to simulate laser driven experiments aimed at understanding the generation and amplification of cosmological magnetic fields using the FLASH code. In these experiments a laser illuminates a solid plastic or graphite target launching an asymmetric blast wave into a chamber which contains either Helium or Argon at millibar pressures. Induction coils placed several centimeters away from the target detect large scale magnetic fields on the order of tens to hundreds of Gauss. The time dependence of the magnetic field is consistent with generation via the Biermann battery mechanism near the blast wave. Attempts to perform simulations of these experiments using the FLASH code have uncovered previously unreported numerical difficulties in modeling the Biermann battery mechanism near shock waves which can lead to the production of large non-physical magnetic fields. We report on these difficulties and offer a potential solution.

  20. Magnetic Structure of Divalent Europium Compound EuGa4 Studied by Single-Crystal Time-of-Flight Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Takuro; Kaneko, Koji; Nakamura, Ai; Aso, Naofumi; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Oikawa, Kenichi; Tamura, Itaru; Nakao, Akiko; Munakata, Koji; Hanashima, Takayasu; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic structure of the intermetallic compound EuGa4 was investigated using single-crystal neutron diffraction with the time-of-flight (TOF) Laue technique on the new diffractometer SENJU at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Despite of the high neutron absorption of Eu, a vast number of diffraction spots were observed without isotope enrichment. The magnetic reflections appeared at positions with diffraction indices of h + k + l ≠ 2n below 16 K, indicating that the ordering vector is q = (0,0,0). The continuous evolution of the magnetic reflection intensity below TN follows a squared Brillouin function for S = 7/2. By adopting a wavelength-dependent absorption collection, the magnetic structure of EuGa4 was revealed that a nearly full magnetic moment of 6.4 μB of Eu lies within the basal plane of the lattice. In this study, we reveal a well-localized divalent Eu magnetism in EuGa4 and demonstrate a high ability of SENJU to investigate materials with high neutron absorption.

  1. Magnetic force microscopy reveals meta-stable magnetic domain states that prevent reliable absolute palaeointensity experiments.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Lennart V; Fabian, Karl; Bakelaar, Iman A; Dekkers, Mark J

    2014-08-22

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the absolute palaeointensity of the Earth's magnetic field is notoriously difficult. The heating of samples in most methods induces magnetic alteration--a process that is still poorly understood, but prevents obtaining correct field values. Here we show induced changes in magnetic domain state directly by imaging the domain configurations of titanomagnetite particles in samples that systematically fail to produce truthful estimates. Magnetic force microscope images were taken before and after a heating step typically used in absolute palaeointensity experiments. For a critical temperature (250 °C), we observe major changes: distinct, blocky domains before heating change into curvier, wavy domains thereafter. These structures appeared unstable over time: after 1-year of storage in a magnetic-field-free environment, the domain states evolved into a viscous remanent magnetization state. Our observations qualitatively explain reported underestimates from otherwise (technically) successful experiments and therefore have major implications for all palaeointensity methods involving heating.

  2. Experimental magnetic form factors in Co3V2O8 : A combined study of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, N.; Zbiri, M.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.; Stunault, A.; Ressouche, E.; Hansen, T. C.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Johnson, M. R.; Fuess, H.; Ehrenberg, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Itou, M.; Gillon, B.; Wolf, Th.; Rodríguez-Velamazan, J. A.; Sánchez-Montero, J.

    2009-03-01

    We present a combination of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron experiments, which elucidate the density distribution of unpaired electrons in the kagome staircase system Co3V2O8 . Ab initio wave functions were used to calculate the spin densities in real and momentum spaces, which show good agreement with the respective experiments. It has been found that the spin polarized orbitals are equally distributed between the t2g and the eg levels for the spine (s) Co ions while the eg orbitals of the cross-tie (c) Co ions only represent 30% of the atomic spin density. Furthermore, the results reveal that the magnetic moments of the cross-tie Co ions, which are significantly smaller than those of the spine Co ions in the zero-field ferromagnetic structure, do not saturate by applying an external magnetic field of 2 T along the easy axis a . In turn, the increasing bulk magnetization, which can be observed by field dependent macroscopic measurements, originates from induced magnetic moments on the O and V sites. The refined individual magnetic moments are μ(Coc)=1.54(4)μB , μ(Cos)=2.87(3)μB , μ(V)=0.41(4)μB , μ(O1)=0.05(5)μB , μ(O2)=0.35(5)μB , and μ(O3)=0.36(5)μB combining to the same macroscopic magnetization value, which was previously only attributed to the Co ions.

  3. The MaGIXS Sub-Grating Diffraction Experiment and its Implications for Instrument Integration and Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGall, J. G., III; Champey, P. R.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A. R.; Savage, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-Ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) is a NASA sounding rocket instrument designed to observe Soft X-Ray (SXR) emission lines in the solar atmosphere with high spatial and spectral resolution. This experiment will provide the quantitative data needed to cross-reference current models with theory regarding the widely debated topic of solar coronal heating. The unique optical layout of MaGIXS utilizes a nanoprinted-silicon grating with varied line spacing placed in a converging cone of rays. Highly chirped line spacing makes it possible to achieve high imaging quality (spatial and spectral) with a planar grating at shallow graze angles. The line spacing of the diffraction grating is defined by a third order polynomial and every 372nd line is removed from the line profile, effectively producing a sub-grating optimized for diffraction of the HeNe central wavelength (632.8 nm). This novel design permits the grating to be aligned on an optical bench without the need for X-ray facilities. The sub-grating's performance is assessed by measuring the far-field diffraction pattern resulting from the illumination of the grating with a collimated HeNe incident beam. We will present the results of this diagnostic experiment, which determine if the grating is suitable for alignment using the current integration and alignment plan for MaGIXS.

  4. Magnetoelastics of a spin liquid : x-ray diffraction studies of Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} in pulsed magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, J. P. C.; Islam, Z.; Clancy, J. P.; Ross, K. A.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Dabkowski, A. D.; Gaulin, B. D.; X-Ray Science Division; McMaster Univ.; Tohoku Univ.; Univ. of Tokyo; Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research; Brockhouse Inst. for Materials Research

    2010-08-13

    We report high resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction measurements of the frustrated pyrochlore magnet Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, collected using a novel low temperature pulsed magnet system. This instrument allows characterization of structural degrees of freedom to temperatures as low as 4.4 K, and in applied magnetic fields as large as 30 T. We show that Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} manifests intriguing structural effects under the application of magnetic fields, including strongly anisotropic giant magnetostriction, a restoration of perfect pyrochlore symmetry in low magnetic fields, and ultimately a structural phase transition in high magnetic fields. It is suggested that the magnetoelastic coupling thus revealed plays a significant role in the spin liquid physics of Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} at low temperatures.

  5. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

  6. Diffraction and forward physics results of the ATLAS experiment from the Run I

    SciTech Connect

    Taševský, Marek

    2015-04-10

    Various aspects of forward physics have been studied by the ATLAS collaboration using data from Run I at the LHC. In this text, main results of four published analyses are summarized, all based on data from proton-proton collisions at √(s)=7 TeV collected in 2010 or 2011. Two analyses deal with the diffractive signature, one based on single-sided events, the other on large rapidity gaps in soft events. In addition, a recent measurement of the total pp cross section using the ALFA subdetector and a recent study of higher-order QCD effects using a jet veto are discussed.

  7. Lattice thermal expansion and anisotropic displacements in 𝜶-sulfur from diffraction experiments and first-principles theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L.; Wang, Ai; Müller, Paul; Englert, Ulli; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Thermal properties of solid-state materials are a fundamental topic of study with important practical implications. For example, anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are routinely used in physics, chemistry, and crystallography to quantify the thermal motion of atoms in crystals. ADPs are commonly derived from diffraction experiments, but recent developments have also enabled their first-principles prediction using periodic density-functional theory (DFT). Here, we combine experiments and dispersion-corrected DFT to quantify lattice thermal expansion and ADPs in crystalline α-sulfur (S8), a prototypical elemental solid that is controlled by the interplay of covalent and van der Waals interactions. We begin by reporting on single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction measurements that provide new and improved reference data from 10 K up to room temperature. We then use several popular dispersion-corrected DFT methods to predict vibrational and thermal properties of α-sulfur, including the anisotropic lattice thermal expansion. Hereafter, ADPs are derived in the commonly used harmonic approximation (in the computed zero-Kelvin structure) and also in the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) which takes the predicted lattice thermal expansion into account. At the PPBE+D3(BJ) level, the QHA leads to excellent agreement with experiments. Finally, more general implications of this study for theory and experiment are discussed.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction experiment of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase complexed with risedronate

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Takeshi; Ostermann, Andreas; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Niimura, Nobuo; Schrader, Tobias E.; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), such as risedronate and zoledronate, are currently used as a clinical drug for bone-resorption diseases and are potent inhibitors of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS). X-ray crystallographic analyses of FPPS with N-BPs have revealed that N-BPs bind to FPPS with three magnesium ions and several water molecules. To understand the structural characteristics of N-BPs bound to FPPS, including H atoms and hydration by water, neutron diffraction studies were initiated using BIODIFF at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ). FPPS–risedronate complex crystals of approximate dimensions 2.8 × 2.5 × 1.5 mm (∼3.5 mm3) were obtained by repeated macro-seeding. Monochromatic neutron diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution with 98.4% overall completeness. Here, the first successful neutron data collection from FPPS in complex with N-BPs is reported. PMID:24699741

  9. Crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction experiment of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase complexed with risedronate.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takeshi; Ostermann, Andreas; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Niimura, Nobuo; Schrader, Tobias E; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), such as risedronate and zoledronate, are currently used as a clinical drug for bone-resorption diseases and are potent inhibitors of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS). X-ray crystallographic analyses of FPPS with N-BPs have revealed that N-BPs bind to FPPS with three magnesium ions and several water molecules. To understand the structural characteristics of N-BPs bound to FPPS, including H atoms and hydration by water, neutron diffraction studies were initiated using BIODIFF at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ). FPPS-risedronate complex crystals of approximate dimensions 2.8 × 2.5 × 1.5 mm (∼3.5 mm(3)) were obtained by repeated macro-seeding. Monochromatic neutron diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution with 98.4% overall completeness. Here, the first successful neutron data collection from FPPS in complex with N-BPs is reported.

  10. Magnetic Shielding Studies for Electric Dipole Moment Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, B.

    2014-09-01

    Electric dipole moment experiments are necessarily sensitive to magnetic fields and hence require effective magnetic shielding. In testing the shielding factor of single-layer Permalloy (Carpenter HyMu ``80'' ®) cylinders, we find time-dependent effects lasting tens of minutes to thousands of minutes when a static magnetic field is applied to a Permalloy cylinder that has been demagnetized in a region of near-zero field. A decrease in the magnetic field, measured at the center of the cylinder, of about 20 percent is observed for applied fields ranging from 0.5 A/m to 16 A/m. The latter applied field is comparable to the Earth's magnetic field. Effects that resemble these have been seen in other ferromagnetic materials.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations as a complement to nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Feller, Scott E

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of atomic-level membrane simulations are being driven by continued growth in computing power, improvements in the available potential energy functions for lipids, and new algorithms that implement advanced sampling techniques. These developments are allowing simulations to assess time- and length scales wherein meaningful comparisons with experimental measurements on macroscopic systems can be made. Such comparisons provide stringent tests of the simulation methodologies and force fields, and thus, advance the simulation field by pointing out shortcomings of the models. Extensive testing against available experimental data suggests that for many properties modern simulations have achieved a level of accuracy that provides substantial predictive power and can aid in the interpretation of experimental data. This combination of closely coupled laboratory experiments and molecular dynamics simulations holds great promise for the understanding of membrane systems. In the following, the molecular dynamics method is described with particular attention to those aspects critical for simulating membrane systems and to the calculation of experimental observables from the simulation trajectory.

  12. Pump-probe measurement of short and long-range exchange interactions in a rare-earth magnet using resonant x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, Matthew; Roy, Sujoy; Chuang, Yi-De; Versteeg, Rolf; Zhu, Yi; Hertlein, Marcus; Glover, Thornton; Dumesnil, Karine; Schoenlein, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The combined effects of spin-orbit interactions, magnetostriction, and long-range exchange coupling lead to a wide variety of magnetic phases in the rare earth magnets. In dysprosium, core level spins develop a spiral phase as a result of competition between short and long-range RKKY exchange interactions mediated by the conducting electrons. We use time-resolved resonant x-ray diffraction to directly probe the spiral order parameter of the core level magnetism in response to optical pumping of the conduction electrons that mediate the exchange interaction. The dynamics of the diffraction intensity and spiral turn angle occur on different time scales, and through free-energy analysis, we associate these dynamics with changes in the short and long-range exchange coupling.

  13. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2008-04-01

    The interaction of shock waves with inhomogeneous media is important in many astrophysical problems, e.g. the role of shock compression in star formation. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory, to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. Experiments with flyer-generated shock waves have been performed on the Z machine in Sandia. The Zebra accelerator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) allows for complementary experiments with high repetition rate. First experiments on Zebra demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (around 2 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  14. EM Induction Experiment to Determine the Moment of a Magnet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najiya Maryam, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    If we drop a magnet through a coil, an emf is induced in the coil according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. Here, such an experiment is done using expEYES kit. The plot of emf versus time has a specific shape with two peaks. A theoretical analysis of this graph is discussed here for both short and long cylindrical magnets.…

  15. EM Induction Experiment to Determine the Moment of a Magnet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najiya Maryam, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    If we drop a magnet through a coil, an emf is induced in the coil according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. Here, such an experiment is done using expEYES kit. The plot of emf versus time has a specific shape with two peaks. A theoretical analysis of this graph is discussed here for both short and long cylindrical magnets.…

  16. Rayleigh-taylor instability with magnetic fluids: experiment and theory

    PubMed

    Pacitto; Flament; Bacri; Widom

    2000-12-01

    We present experiments showing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between a dense magnetic liquid and an immiscible less dense liquid. The liquids are confined in a Hele-Shaw cell and a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cell. We measure the wavelength and the growth rate at the onset of the instability as a function of the external magnetic field. The wavelength decreases as the field increases. The amplitude of the interface deformation grows exponentially with time in the early stage, and the growth rate is an increasing function of the field. These results are compared to theoretical predictions given in the framework of linear stability analysis.

  17. Numerical Investigation of Plasma Detachment in Magnetic Nozzle Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Kamesh; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2008-01-01

    At present there exists no generally accepted theoretical model that provides a consistent physical explanation of plasma detachment from an externally-imposed magnetic nozzle. To make progress towards that end, simulation of plasma flow in the magnetic nozzle of an arcjet experiment is performed using a multidimensional numerical simulation tool that includes theoretical models of the various dispersive and dissipative processes present in the plasma. This is an extension of the simulation tool employed in previous work by Sankaran et al. The aim is to compare the computational results with various proposed magnetic nozzle detachment theories to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms that cause detachment. An applied magnetic field topology is obtained using a magnetostatic field solver (see Fig. I), and this field is superimposed on the time-dependent magnetic field induced in the plasma to provide a self-consistent field description. The applied magnetic field and model geometry match those found in experiments by Kuriki and Okada. This geometry is modeled because there is a substantial amount of experimental data that can be compared to the computational results, allowing for validation of the model. In addition, comparison of the simulation results with the experimentally obtained plasma parameters will provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to plasma detachment, revealing how they scale with different input parameters. Further studies will focus on modeling literature experiments both for the purpose of additional code validation and to extract physical insight regarding the mechanisms driving detachment.

  18. How Rosalind Franklin Discovered the Helical Structure of DNA: Experiments in Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Gregory; Tierney, Dennis; Schmitzer, Heidrun

    2011-03-01

    Rosalind Franklin, a chemical physicist (1920-1958), used x-ray diffraction to determine the structure of DNA. What exactly could she read out from her x-ray pattern, shown in Fig. 1? In lecture notes dated November 1951, R. Franklin wrote the following: "The results suggest a helical structure (which must be very closely packed) containing 2, 3 or 4 co-axial nucleic acid chains per helical unit, and having the phosphate groups near the outside."2 This was 16 months before J. D. Watson and F. Crick published their description of DNA, which was based on R. Franklin's x-ray photos. How they gained access to her x-ray photos is a fascinating tale of clashing personalities and male chauvinism.2,3

  19. An Electromagnetic Drift Instability in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) and its Importance for Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Russell Kulsrud; Hantao Ji; Will Fox; Masaaki Yamada

    2005-06-07

    The role which resistivity plays in breaking magnetic field lines, heating the plasma, and plasma field slippage during magnetic reconnection is discussed. Magnetic fluctuations are observed in the MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment) that are believed to provide resistive friction or wave resistivity. A localized linear theory has been proposed for their origin as an obliquely propagating Lower Hybrid Drift Instability. In this paper, the linear theory of the instability is summarized, and the resulting heating and slippage are calculated from quasi-linear theory. Making use of measured amplitudes of the magnetic fluctuations in the MRX the amount of these effects is estimated. Within the experimental uncertainties they are shown to be quite important for the magnetic reconnection process.

  20. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, S.; Ford, J.; Wright, S.; Martinez, D.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.

    2009-08-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena involve the interaction of a shock wave with an inhomogeneous background medium. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. First experiments on Zebra at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) have demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (up to 5 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  1. Scale Model Experiments on the Diffraction and Scattering of Sound by Geometrical Step Discontinuities and Curved Rough Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, James Patrick

    Two canonical problems of outdoor sound propagation have been studied in detail: (1) the propagation of sound over a rigid surface with a step discontinuity in height with the step height comparable to an acoustic wavelength and (2) the propagation of sound over a curved rough surface with a radius of curvature much greater than the acoustic wavelength and with a roughness scale smaller than the acoustic wavelength. For the first problem, it is shown that the Biot -Tolstoy-Medwin model for a rigid 90^circ wedge (H. Medwin, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69(4) 1060-1064 (1981)) can be used to predict the acoustic field around the step discontinuity directly in the time domain. Experiments carried out with a transient acoustic spark source confirm that: (1) in the region where there are no reflected waves, diffracted waves combine with the diffracted-reflected waves to produce a smooth transition; (2) the acoustic field around the step discontinuity can be highly directional due to the interference of the direct, the reflected, the diffracted, and the diffracted-reflected waves; and (3) the acoustic field is essentially unchanged if the step discontinuity is replaced with a smooth edged step discontinuity whose radius of curvature is less than the characteristic wavelength of the incident sound. For the second problem, experiments show that the Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin model for flat rough surfaces (H. Medwin, G.L. D'Spain, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79(3) 657-665 (1986)), which is valid for densely packed, steep-sloped elements and at grazing sound incidence, describes qualitatively the two major effects associated with the diffraction and scattering of sound by a curved rough surface. The first effect is that surface roughness leads to the formation of a "boundary wave" in the fluid in a layer above the surface that channels more sound into the shadow zone behind the curved surface in the form of a "creeping boundary wave". The second important effect is that surface roughness also

  2. Coseismic magnetization of fault pseudotachylytes: 1. Thermal demagnetization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, E. C.; Geissman, J. W.; Demory, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Zechmeister, M. S.; Hill, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Fault pseudotachylytes form by quenching of silicate liquids produced through coseismic frictional melting. Here we show that in natural pseudotachylytes the main carrier of magnetic remanence blocked in during cooling of the frictional melt is fine-grained magnetite. This confirms previous studies on friction melt experiments. Stoichiometric magnetite, produced during earthquakes by the breakdown of ferromagnesian silicates, records the ambient magnetic field during seismic slip. We find that most fault pseudotachylytes exposed in the Santa Rosa Mountains, southern California, a classic pseudotachylyte locality, acquired their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) upon cooling of the frictional melt through the range of magnetization blocking temperatures of the magnetite grains and this primarily constitutes a thermal remanent magnetization. NRM intensities typical of most pseudotachylyte veins range from 1 to 60·10-4 Am2/kg. A few specimens, however, contain magnetizations significantly higher than that caused by the Earth's field as well as magnetization directions that are highly variable over short distances. Other magnetization processes, possibly related to coseismic electric currents, may be involved during the seismogenic process to control NRM acquisition.

  3. HiSPoD: a program for high-speed polychromatic X-ray diffraction experiments and data analysis on polycrystalline samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2016-06-17

    Here, a high-speed X-ray diffraction technique was recently developed at the 32-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for studying highly dynamic, yet non-repeatable and irreversible, materials processes. In experiments, the microstructure evolution in a single material event is probed by recording a series of diffraction patterns with extremely short exposure time and high frame rate. Owing to the limited flux in a short pulse and the polychromatic nature of the incident X-rays, analysis of the diffraction data is challenging. Here, HiSPoD, a stand-alone Matlab-based software for analyzing the polychromatic X-ray diffraction data from polycrystalline samples, is described. With HiSPoD, researchers are able to perform diffraction peak indexing, extraction of one-dimensional intensity profiles by integrating a two-dimensional diffraction pattern, and, more importantly, quantitative numerical simulations to obtain precise sample structure information.

  4. HiSPoD: a program for high-speed polychromatic X-ray diffraction experiments and data analysis on polycrystalline samples

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    A high-speed X-ray diffraction technique was recently developed at the 32-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for studying highly dynamic, yet non-repeatable and irreversible, materials processes. In experiments, the microstructure evolution in a single material event is probed by recording a series of diffraction patterns with extremely short exposure time and high frame rate. Owing to the limited flux in a short pulse and the polychromatic nature of the incident X-rays, analysis of the diffraction data is challenging. Here, HiSPoD, a stand-alone Matlab-based software for analyzing the polychromatic X-ray diffraction data from polycrystalline samples, is described. With HiSPoD, researchers are able to perform diffraction peak indexing, extraction of one-dimensional intensity profiles by integrating a two-dimensional diffraction pattern, and, more importantly, quantitative numerical simulations to obtain precise sample structure information. PMID:27359155

  5. HiSPoD: a program for high-speed polychromatic X-ray diffraction experiments and data analysis on polycrystalline samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2016-07-01

    A high-speed X-ray diffraction technique was recently developed at the 32-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for studying highly dynamic, yet non-repeatable and irreversible, materials processes. In experiments, the microstructure evolution in a single material event is probed by recording a series of diffraction patterns with extremely short exposure time and high frame rate. Owing to the limited flux in a short pulse and the polychromatic nature of the incident X-rays, analysis of the diffraction data is challenging. Here, HiSPoD, a stand-alone Matlab-based software for analyzing the polychromatic X-ray diffraction data from polycrystalline samples, is described. With HiSPoD, researchers are able to perform diffraction peak indexing, extraction of one-dimensional intensity profiles by integrating a two-dimensional diffraction pattern, and, more importantly, quantitative numerical simulations to obtain precise sample structure information.

  6. Aperture-ratio dependence of the efficiency of magneto-optical first-order diffraction in GdFe stripe arrays with alternating perpendicular magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kakeru; Antos, Roman; Aoshima, Ken-ichi; Machida, Kenji; Kuga, Kiyoshi; Ono, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Ishibashi, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of magneto-optical (MO) diffraction in GdFe stripe arrays with alternating directions of perpendicular magnetization is investigated. The diffraction efficiency depends on the aperture ratio, as theoretically analyzed for an array composed of magnetic and nonmagnetic materials, with the magnetization directions parallel or antiparallel. The stripe patterns are composed of two ferromagnetic alloys of different compositions, Gd19.7Fe80.3 and Gd23.4Fe76.6 (denoted GF1 and GF2), having different coercivities in the parallel and antiparallel configurations. The stripe patterns are separated by nonmagnetic SiO2 stripes of different widths to obtain aperture ratios of 100, 75, 50 and 25%. The magnetization distributions in the samples is confirmed by MO microscopy. The diffraction efficiencies at a wavelength of 532 nm are measured to be 1.27×10-6, 1.04×10-6, 6.2×10-7 and 2.0×10-7 for aperture ratios of 100, 75, 50, and 25%, respectively. Those values are in accord with calculations using the measured MO and optical parameters of the GF1 layer, including the Kerr rotation angle of 0.12°, the Kerr ellipticity of -0.1° and the reflectance of 0.37.

  7. Precise Magnetic Structures of Hard Ferromagnets of ND2FE14B Type as Determined at Low Temperature from Single Crystal Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfers, P.; Bacmann, M.; Fruchart, D.

    2000-09-01

    The main constituent of the hard magnet materials Nd-Fe-B is the prototype of a new ferromagnet series, the Nd2Fe14B type (Space Group P42/nmm). Such compounds are characterised by high magnetocrystalline anisotropy parameters, those of rare earth origin being several times higher than the contribution of the iron subblattices. In many cases, these two contributions exhibit markedly different thermal behaviours, resulting in spin rotation phenomena or (and) lowering of the crystalline and the magnetic symmetry from the tetragonal high temperature state. Low temperature very precise studies on selected compounds of the series R2Fe14B with R = Nd, Ho, Er and Y, were undertaken by using neutron four circle diffractometry on single crystals. When temperature is lowered, the two first compounds exhibit a continuous spin reorientation within the [110] plane from the c-axis at high temperature towards an intermediate direction. The Er compound presents a first order transition around 350K where the resulting magnetisation first order rotates from the c-axis a high temperature to the a basal plane direction at low temperature. The last one compound remains c-easy axis in the whole temperature range. From our neutron diffraction experiments, lowering of the crystal symmetry to monoclinic (orthorhombic) space groups was precisely measured for the two first (third) samples. Besides marked deviations to collinearity affect the different sublattice magnetisations. Yet, these well marked phenomena have not been accounted for in the hundert experimental and theoretical analysis dedicated to the series. However, our results are in good agreement with a detailed 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis of the Ho ternary hydrides.

  8. Anti-site mixing and magnetic properties of Fe3Co3Nb2 studied via neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Yin, Yuewei; Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Das, Bhaskar; Liu, Yaohua; Huq, Ashfia; Sellmyer, David

    2016-11-02

    Here, we studied the crystal structure and magnetic properties of the rare-earth-free intermetallic compound Fe3Co3Nb2, which has recently been demonstrated to have potentially high magnetic anisotropy, using temperature-dependent neutron powder diffraction. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the diffraction spectra reveals a magnetic transition between 300 and 400 K, in agreement with the magnetometry measurements. According to the structural refinement of the paramagnetic state and the substantial magnetic contribution to the diffuse scattering in the ferromagnetic state, the Fe/Co anti-site mixing is so strong that the site occupation for Fe and Co is almost random. The projection of the magnetic moments turned out to be non-zero along the c axis and in the a–b plane of Fe3Co3Nb2, most likely because of the exchange interactions between the randomly orientated nanograins in the samples. These findings suggest that future studies on the magnetism of Fe3Co3Nb2 need to take the Fe/Co anti-site mixing into account, and the exchange interactions need to be suppressed to obtain large remanence and coercivity.

  9. Determination of the easy axes of small ferromagnetic precipitates in a bulk material by combined magnetic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Batista, L; Rabe, U; Hirsekorn, S

    2014-11-01

    A method to determine the magnetic easy axes of micro- and nanoscopic ferromagnetic precipitates embedded in a bulk material is proposed and applied to globular cementite (Fe₃C) embedded in a ferrite matrix. The method combines magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Magnetic domain structures in globular and in lamellar cementite precipitates in unalloyed pearlitic steels were imaged using MFM. The domain structure of the precipitates was analyzed in dependency of their size, shape and crystallographic orientation. It was found that the magnetic moments of the cementite precipitates are highly geared to their crystalline axes. The combined MFM and EBSD studies allow the conclusion that the cementite easy direction of magnetization is the long [010] axis. For fine lamellae cementite the determination of their crystallographic orientations using electron diffraction techniques is very difficult. With the previous knowledge of the behavior of the domain structure in globular cementite, the crystalline orientations of the fine lamellae cementite can be estimated by simply observing the magnetic microstructures and the topographic profiles.

  10. High-phasing-power lanthanide derivatives: taking advantage of ytterbium and lutetium for optimized anomalous diffraction experiments using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Girard, E; Anelli, P L; Vicat, J; Kahn, R

    2003-10-01

    Ytterbium and lutetium are well suited for optimized anomalous diffraction experiments using synchrotron radiation. Therefore, two lanthanide complexes Yb-HPDO3A and Lu-HPDO3A have been produced that are similar to the Gd-HPDO3A complex already known to give good derivative crystals. Derivative crystals of hen egg-white lysozyme were obtained by co-crystallization using 100 mM solutions of each lanthanide complex. De novo phasing has been carried out using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction on data sets collected on each derivative crystal at the L(III) absorption edge of the corresponding lanthanide (ff" = 28 e(-)). A third data set was collected on a Lu-HPDO3A derivative crystal at the Se K absorption edge with f"(Lu) = 10 e(-). The structures were refined and compared with the known structure of the Gd-HPDO3A lysozyme derivative. The quality of the experimental electron-density maps allows easy model building. With L(III) absorption edges at shorter wavelengths than the gadolinium absorption edge, lutetium and ytterbium, when chelated by a ligand such as HPDO3A, form lanthanide complexes that are especially interesting for synchrotron-radiation experiments in structural biology.

  11. Precision magnetic field mapping for CERN experiment NA62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, John R.; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Bergsma, Felix

    2016-12-01

    In the CERN experiment NA62, low-mass straw-tube tracking-chambers have been designed to operate in vacuum and, in conjunction with precisely mapped magnetic fields, enable the determination of the trajectories of the charged decay products of a 75 GeV/c K+ with high accuracy. This is particularly important for the crucial measurement of the branching fraction for the decay K+ → π + ν ν, which has the potential to reveal BSM physics. The charged particles passing through the magnetic field of a dipole magnet receive a transverse-momentum kick, ΔP T = 270 MeV/c, which the physics requires to be determined to better than one part in a thousand. This puts stringent constraints on the required accuracy and precision of the magnetic field components at all points through which charged particles pass. Before reaching the dipole magnet the particles travel through an evacuated steel tank of length 90 m, where residual magnetic fields of typical size 50 μT modify the trajectories of the charged particles and require measurement with a precision of better than 10 μT. In this paper we describe in detail the different approaches to the measurement and analysis of the magnetic field for the two regions, the corrections to the raw data necessary to produce the final field map, and the physics validation procedures showing that the required accuracy and precision of the field maps have been achieved.

  12. [Development of RF coil of permanent magnet mini-magnetic resonance imager and mouse imaging experiments].

    PubMed

    Hou, Shulian; Xie, Huantong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Shiyu

    2014-10-01

    In the development of radio frequency (RF) coils for better quality of the mini-type permanent magnetic resonance imager for using in the small animal imaging, the solenoid RF coil has a special advantage for permanent magnetic system based on analyses of various types.of RF coils. However, it is not satisfied for imaging if the RF coils are directly used. By theoretical analyses of the magnetic field properties produced from the solenoid coil, the research direction was determined by careful studies to raise further the uniformity of the magnetic field coil, receiving coil sensitivity for signals and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The method had certain advantages and avoided some shortcomings of the other different coil types, such as, birdcage coil, saddle shaped coil and phased array coil by using the alloy materials (from our own patent). The RF coils were designed, developed and made for keeled applicable to permanent magnet-type magnetic resonance imager, multi-coil combination-type, single-channel overall RF receiving coil, and applied for a patent. Mounted on three instruments (25 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.5 T or 1.5 T, and 50 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.48 T), we performed experiments with mice, rats, and nude mice bearing tumors. The experimental results indicated that the RF receiving coil was fully applicable to the permanent magnet-type imaging system.

  13. Radial correlation length across magnetic islands: Simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Marina, F.; Estrada, T.; Blanco, E.; García, L.

    2017-07-01

    The turbulence radial correlation length Lr of density fluctuations is studied across magnetic islands both numerically and experimentally. The numerical study has been carried out by a resistive MHD code (called FAR). It shows asymmetric Lr profiles when measured across magnetic islands. Subsequent simulations using a synthetic Doppler reflectometer suggest that this diagnostic has the capability to capture the effect observed in the results provided by FAR. Finally, experimental studies performed using the Doppler reflectometer installed at the TJ-II stellarator show asymmetries in the coherence profiles matching the radial position of magnetic islands. The similarities found between simulations and experiments indicate that radial correlation length measurements could be used to detect magnetic islands in fusion plasmas.

  14. Initial Experiments of a New Permanent Magnet Helicon Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Longmier, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    A new design for a permanent magnet helicon thruster is presented. Its small plasma volume (~10 cm-3) and low power requirements (<100 W) make it ideal for propelling nanosatellites (<10 kg). The magnetic field reached a maximum of 500 G in the throat of a converging-diverging nozzle and decreased to 0.5 G, the strength of earth's magnetic field, within 50 cm allowing the entire exhaust plume to develop in the vacuum chamber without being affected by the chamber walls. Low gas flow rates (~4 sccm) and high pumping speeds (~10,000 l/s) were used to more closely approximate the conditions of space. A parametric study of the thruster operational parameters was performed to determine its capabilities as both a thruster and as a plasma source for magnetic nozzle experiments. The plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential were measured in the plume to characterize the ion acceleration mechanism.

  15. A computer controlled system for studying gas-solid state reactions in X-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponov, Yu. A.; Yevdokov, O. V.; Sukhorukov, A. V.

    1995-02-01

    An automated system for temperature and pressure control in a reaction chamber for studying gas-solid state reactions in X-ray diffraction experiments with the use of synchrotron radiation (SR) is designed at the Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (Budker INP, Novosibirsk). A computer algorithm for controlling the temperature in the reaction chamber was developed. An analysis of the thermal characteristics of the reaction chamber was carried out in the 293-800 K temperature range and in the 0-0.2 MPa range of pressures with an accuracy of 1-3 K and 0.01 MPa respectively. Test experiments on studying the thermal decomposition of some organo-metallic compounds were carried out with the use of the designed system.

  16. Development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber for serial optical and diffraction experiments with free electron laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Rajkovic, I; Hallmann, J; Grübel, S; More, R; Quevedo, W; Petri, M; Techert, S

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present a development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber which primal function is to be used in pump/probe experiments with free electron laser (FEL) radiation. The chamber is constructed for serial diffraction and serial spectroscopy allowing a fast exchange of samples during the measurement process. For the fast exchange of samples, liquid jet systems are used. Both applications, utilizing soft x-ray FEL pulses as pump and optical laser pulses as probe and vice versa are documented. Experiments with solid samples as well as the liquid jet samples are presented. When working with liquid jets, a system of automatically refilled liquid traps for capturing liquids has been developed in order to ensure stable vacuum conditions. Differential pumping stages are placed in between the FEL beamline and the experimental chamber so that working pressure in the chamber can be up to four orders of magnitude higher than the pressure in the FEL beamline.

  17. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  18. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  19. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  20. Design of a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun for Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    DESIGN OF A COMPACT COAXIAL MAGNETIZED PLASMA GUN FOR MAGNETIC BUBBLE EXPANSION EXPERIMENTS Y. Zhang1, A. G. Lynn1, S. C. Hsu2, M. Gilmore1, C...coaxial magnetized plasma gun and its associated hardware systems are discussed in detail. The plasma gun is used for experimental studies of...medium. The gun is powered by a 120µF, 10kV ignitron- switched capacitor bank. High-pressure gas is puffed into an annular gap between inner and outer

  1. X-Ray Diffraction of Intermetallic Compounds: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Skakuj, Kacper

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe an experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory in which students synthesize the intermetallic compounds AlNi and AlNi3 and study them by X-ray diffractometry. The compounds are synthesized in a simple one-step reaction occurring in the solid state. Powder X-ray diffractograms are recorded for the two compounds…

  2. X-Ray Diffraction of Intermetallic Compounds: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Skakuj, Kacper

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe an experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory in which students synthesize the intermetallic compounds AlNi and AlNi3 and study them by X-ray diffractometry. The compounds are synthesized in a simple one-step reaction occurring in the solid state. Powder X-ray diffractograms are recorded for the two compounds…

  3. Development and operational experience of magnetic horn system for T2K experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, T.; Bessho, K.; Fujii, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hayashi, K.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Koike, S.; Koseki, K.; Maruyama, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Shibata, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamanoi, Y.; Yamaoka, H.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Kubo, H.; Butcher, Z.; Coleman, S.; Missert, A.; Spitz, J.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Tzanov, M.; Bartoszek, L.

    2015-07-01

    A magnetic horn system to be operated at a pulsed current of 320 kA and to survive high-power proton beam operation at 750 kW was developed for the T2K experiment. The first set of T2K magnetic horns was operated for over 12 million pulses during the four years of operation from 2010 to 2013, under a maximum beam power of 230 kW, and 6.63×1020 protons were exposed to the production target. No significant damage was observed throughout this period. This successful operation of the T2K magnetic horns led to the discovery of the νμ →νe oscillation phenomenon in 2013 by the T2K experiment. In this paper, details of the design, construction, and operation experience of the T2K magnetic horns are described.

  4. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the implosion requirements to achieve inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept were recently conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z coils. Despite the relatively slow implosion velocity (70 km/s) in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were approximately 3 keV, and thermonuclear DD neutron yields up to 2e12 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had a width ranging from 60-120 microns over a roughly 6 mm height and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray spectra from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.4 g/cm3 . In these experiments 1-5e10 secondary DT neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized. This is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the DT neutron time of flight spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and DD yields greater than 1e10. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to radiate away the laser energy deposited in the fuel also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; ...

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as highmore » as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.« less

  6. Unsteady magnetic reconnection in laboratory experiments with current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Anna

    2009-11-01

    According to present notion, unsteady magnetic reconnection in current sheets (CS) is basic to dramatic natural phenomena: solar and stellar flares, substorms in the Earth and other planetary magnetospheres, as well as to disruptive instabilities in tokamak plasmas. We present a review of laboratory experiments studying evolution of CS formed in 3D and 2D magnetic configurations with an X line, in the CS-3D device. Usually CS exists during an extended period in a metastable stage, without essential changes of its structure and parameters. Under certain conditions this stage may be suddenly interrupted by unsteady phase of magnetic reconnection, which manifests itself in a rapid change of the magnetic field topology, current redistribution, excitation of pulsed electric fields, and other dynamic effects. The unsteady phase results in effective conversion of magnetic energy into the energy of plasma and accelerated particles, and may finally bring about the CS disruption. In the context of the solar flares, a metastable CS is associated with a pre-flare situation, while CS disruption -- with the flare itself. The physical mechanisms triggering the unsteady magnetic reconnection in the laboratory produced current sheets are discussed. Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project # 09-02-00971).

  7. Measurements of Long-range Electronic Correlations During Femtosecond Diffraction Experiments Performed on Nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Rebecca A; Williams, Sophie; Martin, Andrew V; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Putkunz, Corey T; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor A; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sebastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Curwood, Evan K; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M; Abbey, Brian

    2017-08-22

    The precise details of the interaction of intense X-ray pulses with matter are a topic of intense interest to researchers attempting to interpret the results of femtosecond X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) experiments. An increasing number of experimental observations have shown that although nuclear motion can be negligible, given a short enough incident pulse duration, electronic motion cannot be ignored. The current and widely accepted models assume that although electrons undergo dynamics driven by interaction with the pulse, their motion could largely be considered 'random'. This would then allow the supposedly incoherent contribution from the electronic motion to be treated as a continuous background signal and thus ignored. The original aim of our experiment was to precisely measure the change in intensity of individual Bragg peaks, due to X-ray induced electronic damage in a model system, crystalline C60. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that at the highest X-ray intensities, the electron dynamics in C60 were in fact highly correlated, and over sufficiently long distances that the positions of the Bragg reflections are significantly altered. This paper describes in detail the methods and protocols used for these experiments, which were conducted both at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Australian Synchrotron (AS) as well as the crystallographic approaches used to analyse the data.

  8. Suppressing magnetization exchange effects in stimulated-echo diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Guilhem; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Furó, István

    2013-09-01

    Exchange of nuclear magnetization between spin pools, either by chemical exchange or by cross-relaxation or both, has a significant influence on the signal attenuation in stimulated-echo-type pulsed field gradient experiments. Hence, in such cases the obtained molecular self-diffusion coefficients can carry a large systematic error. We propose a modified stimulated echo pulse sequence that contains T2-filters during the z-magnetization store period. We demonstrate, using a common theoretical description for chemical exchange and cross-relaxation, that these filters suppress the effects of exchange on the diffusional decay in that frequent case where one of the participating spin pools is immobile and exhibits a short T2. We demonstrate the performance of this experiment in an agarose/water gel. We posit that this new experiment has advantages over other approaches hitherto used, such as that consisting of measuring separately the magnetization exchange rate, if suitable by Goldman-Shen type experiments, and then correcting for exchange effects within the framework of a two-site exchange model. We also propose experiments based on selective decoupling and applicable in systems with no large T2 difference between the different spin pools.

  9. Superconductivity in CaFe2As2 under uniaxial pressure: new insights from neutron diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokeš, K.; Kreyssig, A.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Pratt, D. K.; Ni, N.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; McQueeney, R. J.; Argyriou, D. N.; Goldman, A. I.

    2010-03-01

    CaFe2As2, a member of the 122 iron arsenide family, is not superconducting at ambient pressure. It undergoes structural and antiferromagnetic transitions at TTO = 172 K that are strongly coupled [1]. In clamped cell pressure measurements using a liquid medium, superconductivity has been observed with TC as high as 12 K [2]. However, measurements using a He-gas pressure cell, where non-hydrostatic pressure components are minimized show no evidence of superconductivity [3]. We report on neutron diffraction experiments using CaFe2As2 single crystals under uniaxial pressure applied along the c axis. We find that, above 0.05 GPa, several structural phases coexist at low temperature. Simultaneous diffraction/resistivity measurements strongly suggest that a pressure-stabilized tetragonal phase is responsible for the superconductivity in CaFe2As2. -- The work at Ames Laboratory was supported by US DOE (DE-AC02-07CH11358). [1] A.I. Goldman, et al., PRB 78 (2008) 100506. [2] M.S. Torikachvili, et al., PRL 101 (2008) 057006. [3] W.Yu, et al., PRB 79 (2009) 020511.

  10. Photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadley, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    The use of core-level photoelectron diffraction for structural studies of surfaces and epitaxial overlayers is discussed. Photoelectron diffraction is found to provide several direct and rather unique types of structural information, including the sites and positions of adsorbed atoms; the orientations of small molecules or fragments bound to surfaces; the orientations, layer thicknesses, vertical lattice constants, and degrees of short-range order of epitaxial or partially-epitaxial overlayers; and the presence of short-range spin order in magnetic materials. Specific systems considered are the reaction of oxygen with Ni(001), the growth of epitaxial Cu on Ni(001), the well-defined test case S on Ni(001), and short-range spin order in the antiferromagnet KMnF3. A rather straightforward single scattering cluster (SSC) model also proves capable of quantitatively describing such data, particularly for near-surface species and with corrections for spherical-wave scattering effects and correlated vibrational motion. Promising new directions in such studies also include measurements with high angular resolution and the expanded use of synchrotron radiation.

  11. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; ...

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoidmore » at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.« less

  12. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Brandt, J.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lopes, M.; Miller, J.; Nicol, T.; Ostojic, R.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Popp, J.; Pronskikh, V.; Tang, Z.; Tartaglia, M.; Wake, M.; Wands, R.; Yamada, R.

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoid at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.

  13. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Hahn, Kelly; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Schmit, Paul; Awe, Thomas James; McBride, Ryan D.; Jennings, Christopher; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Peterson, K. J.; Rovang, Dean C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Herrmann, Mark C.; Mark Harry Hess; Johns, Owen; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.; Blue, B. E.; Ryutov, D.; Schroen, Diana; Tomlinson, K.

    2015-05-14

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (~1012 DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmasinertially confined by slow (~10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Moreover, effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 1010. Further analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopicx-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ~3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm3 densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  14. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S. B. Gomez, M. R.; Sefkow, A. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Awe, T. J.; McBride, R. D.; Jennings, C. A.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Rovang, D. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hess, M. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (∼10{sup 12} DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmas inertially confined by slow (∼10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 10{sup 10}. Analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopic x-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ∼3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  15. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    DOE PAGES

    Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Sefkow, Adam B.; ...

    2015-05-14

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (~1012 DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmasinertially confined by slow (~10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Moreover, effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 1010. Further analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopicx-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ~3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm3 densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  16. Partial spin ordering and complex magnetic structure in BaYFeO4: a neutron diffraction and high temperature susceptibility study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corey M; Greedan, John E; Garlea, V Ovidiu; Flacau, Roxana; Tan, Malinda; Nguyen, Phuong-Hieu T; Wrobel, Friederike; Derakhshan, Shahab

    2014-01-21

    The novel iron-based compound, BaYFeO4, crystallizes in the Pnma space group with two distinct Fe(3+) sites, that are alternately corner-shared [FeO5](7-) square pyramids and [FeO6](9-) octahedra, forming into [Fe4O18](24-) rings, which propagate as columns along the b-axis. A recent report shows two discernible antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at 36 and 48 K in the susceptibility, yet heat capacity measurements reveal no magnetic phase transitions at these temperatures. An upturn in the magnetic susceptibility measurements up to 400 K suggests the presence of short-range magnetic behavior at higher temperatures. In this Article, variable-temperature neutron powder diffraction and high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed to clarify the magnetic behavior. Neutron powder diffraction confirmed that the two magnetic transitions observed at 36 and 48 K are due to long-range magnetic order. Below 48 K, the magnetic structure was determined as a spin-density wave (SDW) with a propagation vector, k = (0, 0, (1)/3), and the moments along the b-axis, whereas the structure becomes an incommensurate cycloid [k = (0, 0, ∼0.35)] below 36 K with the moments within the bc-plane. However, for both cases the ordered moments on Fe(3+) are only of the order ∼3.0 μB, smaller than the expected values near 4.5 μB, indicating that significant components of the Fe moments remain paramagnetic to the lowest temperature studied, 6 K. Moreover, new high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed a peak maximum at ∼550 K indicative of short-range spin correlations. It is postulated that most of the magnetic entropy is thus removed at high temperatures which could explain the absence of heat capacity anomalies at the long-range ordering temperatures. Published spin dimer calculations, which appear to suggest a k = (0, 0, 0) magnetic structure, and allow for neither low dimensionality nor geometric frustration, are inadequate to explain the

  17. Partial Spin Ordering and Complex Magnetic Structure in BaYFeO4: A Neutron Diffraction and High Temperature Susceptibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Corey; Greedan, John; Garlea, Vasile O; Flacau, Roxana; Tan, Malinda; Derakhshan, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    The novel iron-based compound, BaYFeO4, crystallizes in the Pnma space group with two distinct Fe3+ sites, that are alternately corner-shared [FeO5]7 square pyramids and [FeO6]9 octahedra, forming into [Fe4O18]24 rings, which propagate as columns along the b-axis. A recent report shows two discernible antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at 36 and 48 K in the susceptibility, yet heat capacity measurements reveal no magnetic phase transitions at these temperatures. An upturn in the magnetic susceptibility measurements up to 400 K suggests the presence of shortrange magnetic behavior at higher temperatures. In this Article, variable-temperature neutron powder diffraction and hightemperature magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed to clarify the magnetic behavior. Neutron powder diffraction confirmed that the two magnetic transitions observed at 36 and 48 K are due to long-range magnetic order. Below 48 K, the magnetic structure was determined as a spin-density wave (SDW) with a propagation vector, k = (0, 0, 1/3), and the moments along the b-axis, whereas the structure becomes an incommensurate cycloid [k = (0, 0, 0.35)] below 36 K with the moments within the bc-plane. However, for both cases the ordered moments on Fe3+ are only of the order 3.0 B, smaller than the expected values near 4.5 B, indicating that significant components of the Fe moments remain paramagnetic to the lowest temperature studied, 6 K. Moreover, new high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed a peak maximum at 550 K indicative of short-range spin correlations. It is postulated that most of the magnetic entropy is thus removed at high temperatures which could explain the absence of heat capacity anomalies at the long-range ordering temperatures. Published spin dimer calculations, which appear to suggest a k = (0, 0, 0) magnetic structure, and allow for neither low dimensionality nor geometric frustration, are inadequate to explain the observed complex magnetic

  18. Experiences with archived raw diffraction images data: capturing cisplatin after chemical conversion of carboplatin in high salt conditions for a protein crystal.

    PubMed

    Tanley, Simon W M; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Schreurs, Antoine M M; Helliwell, John R

    2013-11-01

    The archiving of raw diffraction images data is the focus of an IUCr Diffraction Data Deposition Working Group (see http://forums.iucr.org/). Experience in archiving and sharing of raw diffraction images data in collaboration between Manchester and Utrecht Universities, studying the binding of the important anti-cancer agents, cisplatin and carboplatin to histidine in a protein, has recently been published. Subsequently, these studies have been expanded due to further analyses of each data set of raw diffraction images using the diffraction data processing program XDS. The raw diffraction images, measured at Manchester University, are available for download at Utrecht University and now also mirrored at the Tardis Raw Diffraction Data Archive in Australia. Thus a direct comparison of processed diffraction and derived protein model data from XDS with the published results has been made. The issue of conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin under a high chloride salt concentration has been taken up and a detailed crystallographic assessment is provided. Overall, these new structural chemistry research results are presented followed by a short summary of developing raw data archiving policy and practicalities as well as documenting the challenge of making appropriate and detailed recording of the metadata for crystallography.

  19. Experiences with archived raw diffraction images data: capturing cisplatin after chemical conversion of carboplatin in high salt conditions for a protein crystal

    PubMed Central

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The archiving of raw diffraction images data is the focus of an IUCr Diffraction Data Deposition Working Group (see http://forums.iucr.org/). Experience in archiving and sharing of raw diffraction images data in collaboration between Manchester and Utrecht Universities, studying the binding of the important anti-cancer agents, cisplatin and carboplatin to histidine in a protein, has recently been published. Subsequently, these studies have been expanded due to further analyses of each data set of raw diffraction images using the diffraction data processing program XDS. The raw diffraction images, measured at Manchester University, are available for download at Utrecht University and now also mirrored at the Tardis Raw Diffraction Data Archive in Australia. Thus a direct comparison of processed diffraction and derived protein model data from XDS with the published results has been made. The issue of conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin under a high chloride salt concentration has been taken up and a detailed crystallographic assessment is provided. Overall, these new structural chemistry research results are presented followed by a short summary of developing raw data archiving policy and practicalities as well as documenting the challenge of making appropriate and detailed recording of the metadata for crystallography. PMID:24121332

  20. A novel and simple x-ray slit for diamond anvil cell based x-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, K. A.; Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Shekar, N. V. Chandra

    2017-04-01

    We report here a novel internal x-ray slit assembly to carry out laboratory based high pressure x-ray diffraction (HPXRD) experiments in a Mao Bell type diamond anvil cell. In this assembly a tiny sheet of lead with a 100 micron hole immediately below the diamond table acts as an x-ray slit. Data resolution and statistics were compared with the older slit. This novel slit assembly has two major advantages (i) eliminates cumbersome and lengthy procedure usually adopted for alignment of x-ray slit (ii) provides high flux and improved resolution due to the comparatively low beam divergence and effective utilization of the maxima of the beam profile.

  1. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  2. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection. PMID:23999307

  3. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  4. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  5. A novel experiment using rotating magnetic fields to study the pumping spin states in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Minguez, Alberto; Macia, Ferran; Hernandez, Joan Manel; Carbonell, Carla; Amigó, Roger; Tejada, Javier

    2008-03-01

    We report here a new experimental technique to monitor spin population dynamics in molecular magnets. This deals with a huge rotating magnetic field initially applied along the easy magnetization direction, z--axis, that rotates with components parallel and perpendicular to the z axis. This technique allows us to probe spin relaxation on reasonably fast time scales detecting the inversion of the whole spin states. The population of spin levels depends on the frequency of the rotating magnetic field. This very new technique could help to carry out new experiments in a number of different fields, broadening substantially the scope of their use until now. A Hern'andez-M'inguez et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 202502 (2007)

  6. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in theTheory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    ScienceCinema

    Wolf, Emil [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States

    2016-07-12

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  7. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in the Theory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Emil

    2010-06-02

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  8. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in theTheory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Emil

    2010-06-02

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  9. Plasma Rotation Control Experiment in a Strongly Diverging Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaka, Kenichiro; Furuta, Kanshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2016-10-01

    It has been recognized that the plasma rotation affects the plasma flow structure along the magnetic field line. However, the effect of plasma rotation on structure formation in a strongly diverging magnetic field with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions has not been fully understood, so far. Understanding the flow structure formation in an ion-unmagnetized plasma is essential to control ion streamline detachment from the magnetic field line and also necessary to study the astrophysical phenomena in laboratory. In order to clarify the effect of plasma rotation in a diverging magnetic field, we have performed the plasma rotation control experiment in the HYPER-II device at Kyushu Univ., Japan. A set of cylindrical electrode was utilized to control the radial electric field, and the profile of azimuthal E × B rotation has been changed. We present the experimental results on the electron density pileup and the flow reversal appeared in the rotating plasma. This study was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K05633.

  10. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  11. Diffractive and reactive scattering of (v=0, j=0) HD from Pt(111): Six-dimensional quantum dynamics compared with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingma, Sikke M.; Somers, Mark F.; Pijper, Ernst; Kroes, Geert-Jan; Olsen, Roar A.; Baerends, Evert-Jan

    2003-03-01

    We present results of (v=0, j=0) HD reacting on and scattering from Pt(111) at off-normal angles of incidence, treating all six molecular degrees of freedom quantum mechanically. The six-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) used was obtained from density functional theory, using the generalized gradient approximation and a slab representation of the metal surface. Diffraction and rotational excitation probabilities are compared with experiment for two incidence directions, at normal incidence energies between 0.05-0.16 eV and at a parallel translational energy of 55.5 meV. The computed ratio of specular reflection to nonspecular in-plane diffraction for HD+Pt(111) is lower than found experimentally, and lower for HD+Pt(111) than for H2+Pt(111) for both incidence directions studied. The calculations also show that out-of-plane diffraction is much more efficient than in-plane diffraction, underlining that results from experiments that solely attempt to measure in-plane diffraction are not sufficient to show the absence of surface corrugation. Discrepancies in rotational excitation and diffraction probabilities between theory and experiment are discussed, as well as possible future improvements in the dynamical model and in the calculation of the PES.

  12. IDATEN and G-SITENNO: GUI-assisted software for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments and data analyses at SACLA.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-11-01

    Using our custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors, cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments have been undertaken at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) facility. To efficiently perform experiments and data processing, two software suites with user-friendly graphical user interfaces have been developed. The first is a program suite named IDATEN, which was developed to easily conduct four procedures during experiments: aligning KOTOBUKI-1, loading a flash-cooled sample into the cryogenic goniometer stage inside the vacuum chamber of KOTOBUKI-1, adjusting the sample position with respect to the X-ray beam using a pair of telescopes, and collecting diffraction data by raster scanning the sample with X-ray pulses. Named G-SITENNO, the other suite is an automated version of the original SITENNO suite, which was designed for processing diffraction data. These user-friendly software suites are now indispensable for collecting a large number of diffraction patterns and for processing the diffraction patterns immediately after collecting data within a limited beam time.

  13. Crystallographic parameters of magnetic Pr2Fe14-xCoxB-type alloys determined using anomalous x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galego, E.; Serna, M. M.; Ramanathan, L. V.; Faria, R. N.

    2017-02-01

    Anomalous x-ray synchrotron diffraction was used to determine the crystallographic parameters of PrFeCoB-based magnetic alloys. The effect of cobalt concentration on the crystallographic parameters of the magnetically hard Pr2Fe14-xCoxB phase was studied. The results indicate that addition of cobalt has a marked effect on crystal structure. Variation of the c parameter decreased twice as much as the a parameter with increase in Co content. The positions of inequivalent atoms of the magnetically hard matrix phase ϕ in the Pr-based alloys were determined using Rietveld refinement. This permitted determination of the relative distance of each inequivalent atom from its nearest neighbors. Cobalt occupied the 16k2 site and Fe had a tendency to occupy the 8j2 sites located between the Kagomé layers.

  14. Magnetic interactions in HoCr1-xFexO3 (x = 0, 0.2) investigated by neutron powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinzhi; Hao, Lijie; Ma, Xiaobai; Wang, Chin-Wei; Klose, Frank; Liu, Yuntao; Sun, Kai; Li, Yuqing; Chen, Dongfeng

    2017-07-01

    The temperature dependent magnetism of Fe-doped rare earth orthochromite HoCr1-xFexO3(x = 0, 0.2) was investigated by neutron powder diffraction. It is found that the magnetism of Cr(Fe)3+ can be well understood within mean field theory, while the ordering of Ho3+ was induced by the Cr(Fe)3+ sublattice and can be satisfyingly described by an effective S = 1/2 model. The absences of both the most common GxFz configuration of Cr3+ and the ordering of Ho3+ caused by Ho-Ho interaction evidence a strong Ho3+-Cr3+ interaction which dominates this system. On the other hand, a remarkable magnetoelastic strain was observed accompanying the Cr(Fe)3+ ordering. An analysis based on the equation of state with a Grüneisen approximation was performed and revealed magnetic origin of this strain.

  15. Competing magnetic ground states in nonsuperconducting Ba(Fe1-xCrx)2As2 as seen via neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, Karol J; Christianson, Andrew D; Wang, C H; Matsuda, Masaaki; Cao, Huibo; VanBebber, L. H.; Zarestky, Jerel L; Singh, David J; Sefat, A. S.; Lumsden, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron diffraction measurements on single-crystal samples of nonsuperconducting Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} as a function of Cr doping for 0 {le} x {le} 0.47. The average spin-density-wave moment is independent of concentration for x {le} 0.2 and decreases rapidly for x {ge} 0.3. For concentrations in excess of 30% chromium, we find a new competing magnetic phase consistent with G-type antiferromagnetism which rapidly becomes the dominant magnetic ground state. Strong magnetism is observed for all concentrations measured, naturally explaining the absence of superconductivity in the Cr-doped materials.

  16. Limits on the neutrino magnetic moment from the MUNU experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munu Collaboration; Daraktchieva, Z.; Lamblin, J.; Link, O.; Amsler, C.; Avenier, M.; Broggini, C.; Busto, J.; Cerna, C.; Gervasio, G.; Jeanneret, P.; Jonkmans, G.; Koang, D. H.; Lebrun, D.; Ould-Saada, F.; Puglierin, G.; Stutz, A.; Tadsen, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.

    2003-07-01

    The MUNU experiment was carried out at the Bugey nuclear power reactor. The aim was the study of ν¯ee- elastic scattering at low energy. The recoil electrons were recorded in a gas time projection chamber, immersed in a tank filled with liquid scintillator serving as veto detector, suppressing in particular Compton electrons. The measured electron recoil spectrum is presented. Upper limits on the neutrino magnetic moment were derived and are discussed.

  17. UCLA-KIAE focusing permanent magnet undulator for SASE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, N.; Tolmachev, S.; Varfolomeev, A.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Frigola, P.; Hogan, M.; Pellegrini, C.; Carr, R.; Lidia, S.

    1998-02-01

    A description of a new 2 m undulator is presented which was specially designed and manufactured for a SASE mode FEL experiment. It is a one section two plane focusing permanent magnet construction. The uniform period length is 2.06 cm, total number of periods is 98. The peak field on the axis is 5.4 kG for a 5 mm gap.

  18. Disorder-induced magnetic memory: Experiments and theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, M. S.; Buechler, C. R.; Sorensen, L. B.; Kevan, S. D.; Jagla, E. A.; Deutsch, J. M.; Mai, T.; Narayan, O.; Davies, J. E.; Liu, Kai; Zimanyi, G. T.; Katzgraber, H. G.; Hellwig, O.; Fullerton, E. E.; Fischer, P.; Kortright, J. B.

    2007-04-01

    Beautiful theories of magnetic hysteresis based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. Our goal was to directly compare these theories with precise experiments. To do so, we first developed and then applied coherent x-ray speckle metrology to a series of thin multilayer perpendicular magnetic materials. To directly observe the effects of disorder, we deliberately introduced increasing degrees of disorder into our films. We used coherent x rays, produced at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to generate highly speckled magnetic scattering patterns. The apparently “random” arrangement of the speckles is due to the exact configuration of the magnetic domains in the sample. In effect, each speckle pattern acts as a unique fingerprint for the magnetic domain configuration. Small changes in the domain structure change the speckles, and comparison of the different speckle patterns provides a quantitative determination of how much the domain structure has changed. Our experiments quickly answered one long-standing question: How is the magnetic domain configuration at one point on the major hysteresis loop related to the configurations at the same point on the loop during subsequent cycles? This is called microscopic return-point memory (RPM). We found that the RPM is partial and imperfect in the disordered samples, and completely absent when the disorder is below a threshold level. We also introduced and answered a second important question: How are the magnetic domains at one point on the major loop related to the domains at the complementary point, the inversion symmetric point on the loop, during the same and during subsequent cycles? This is called microscopic complementary-point memory (CPM). We found that the CPM is also partial and imperfect in the disordered samples and completely absent when the disorder is not present. In addition, we found that the RPM is always a little larger than the

  19. Investigations of the La 1- xCa xMn 2Ge 2 (0⩽ x⩽1) solid solution by magnetic measurements and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, R.; Ijjaali, I.; Venturini, G.; Ressouche, E.; Malaman, B.

    1998-09-01

    The La 1- xCa xMn 2Ge 2 (0⩽ x⩽1) solid solution has been studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction, magnetic measurements and neutron diffraction study. For x⩽0.7, all samples exhibit an easy-axis ferromagnetic behaviour below TC (320 K> TC>80 K). The Curie temperature and the maximum magnetisation values (4.2 K, Happl.=17 kOe) decrease continuously with the La substitution rate from 320 K and 1.45 μ B per Mn atom for LaMn 2Ge 2, to 80 K and 0.4 μ B for La 0.3Ca 0.7Mn 2Ge 2. Futhermore, above TC, neutron diffraction study of the La 1- xCa xMn 2Ge 2 ( x=0.2, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0) reveals the occurrence of an additional antiferromagnetic region (not detected by magnetometric measurements) characterised by antiferromagnetic (0 0 1) Mn planes. The Néel temperature increases from 420 K for LaMn 2Ge 2 up to 670 K for CaMn 2Ge 2. The magnetic structures of La 0.8Ca 0.2Mn 2Ge 2, La 0.5Ca 0.5Mn 2Ge 2 and La 0.3Ca 0.7Mn 2Ge 2 have been determined between 2 and 600 K. A new AF DC magnetic type ordering is found in La 0.5Ca 0.5Mn 2Ge 2 between TC and Tt. The results lead to the construction of the x- T magnetic phase diagram and are discussed and compared with the results obtained for the La 1- xY xMn 2Ge 2 solid solution.

  20. Determination of the magnetic structure of SmFe3(BO3)4 by neutron diffraction: comparison with other RFe3(BO3)4 iron borates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, C.; Pankrats, A.; Gudim, I.; Vorotynov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature dependent neutron diffraction studies were performed on SmFe3(BO3)4. The crystallographic structure was determined to stay as R32 over the whole studied temperature range of 2 K < T < 300 K. A magnetic phase transition characterized by the magnetic propagation vector κ = [0 0 3/2] takes place at TN = 34 K. The magnetic structure sees an easy-plane arrangement within the trigonal basal a-b-plane of ferromagnetic layers of iron and samarium having a canting angle of about 70° relative to each other. Neighbouring layers in the c-direction are antiferromagnetically coupled; at 2 K the magnetic moment values amount to μFe = 4.2(1) μB and μSm = 0.8(2) μB. The non-Brillouin type increase of the iron magnetic moment below TN points to a strong Fe-Sm exchange and to the simultaneous appearance of long range magnetic order on both sublattices.

  1. Weissenberg-type neutron diffraction camera and its application to the structural and magnetic phase transitions of KMnF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Yoshimura, M.; Hidaka, M.; Yoshizawa, H.

    2006-07-01

    A Weissenberg-type neutron diffraction camera (W-NDC) equipped with a neutron imaging-plate (NIP) has been developed. The W-NDC gives Weissenberg-type and rotational diffraction patterns at low-temperature (10 Kdiffracted from the aluminum containers and the specimen holder, a radial slit with several polymer sheets coated with 6LiF powder is continuously oscillated around the specimen during measurements. A test structural analysis for a single crystal NaCl suggests that the integrated intensities of reflections obtained from the Weissenberg-type diffraction patterns adequately satisfy a structural refinement by means of a least square method, though a fading effect of the photon energy stored in the NIP should be regarded during measurements. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in KMnF3 have been studied by using the W-NDC, to eliminate an inconsistency for temperature, and to enable an ordering of the phase transition as reported.

  2. Gravitropic mechanisms derived from space experiments and magnetic gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.; Park, Myoung Ryoul

    2016-07-01

    Gravitropism is the result of a complex sequence of events that begins with the movement of dense particles, typically starch-filled amyloplasts in response to reorientation. Although these organelles change positions, it is not clear whether the critical signal is derived from sedimentation or dynamic interactions of amyloplasts with relevant membranes. Substituting gravity by high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) provides a localized stimulus for diamagnetic starch that is specific for amyloplasts and comparable to gravity without affecting other organelles. Experiments with Brassica rapa showed induction of root curvature by HGMF when roots moved sufficiently close to the magnetic gradient-inducing foci. The focused and short-range effectiveness of HGMFs provided a gravity-like stimulus and affected related gene expression. Root curvature was sensitive to the mutual alignment between roots and HGMF direction. Unrelated to any HGMF effects, the size of amyloplasts in space-grown roots increased by 30% compared to ground controls and suggests enhanced sensitivity in a gravity-reduced environment. Accompanying gene transcription studies showed greater differences between HGMF-exposed and space controls than between space and ground controls. This observation may lead to the identification of gravitropism-relevant genes. However, space grown roots showed stronger transcription of common reference genes such as actin and ubiquitin in magnetic fields than in non-magnetic conditions. In contrast, α-amylase, glucokinase and PIN encoding genes were transcribed stronger under non-magnetic conditions than under HGMF. The large number of comparisons between space, ground, and HGMF prompted the assessment of transcription differences between root segments, root-shoot junction, and seeds. Because presumed transcription of reference genes varied more than genes of interest, changes in gene expression cannot be based on reference genes. The data provide an example of complex

  3. Towards shot-noise limited diffraction experiments with table-top femtosecond hard x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Marcel; Hauf, Christoph; Weisshaupt, Jannick; Salvador, Antonio-Andres Hernandez; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Table-top laser-driven hard x-ray sources with kilohertz repetition rates are an attractive alternative to large-scale accelerator-based systems and have found widespread applications in x-ray studies of ultrafast structural dynamics. Hard x-ray pulses of 100 fs duration have been generated at the Cu Kα wavelength with a photon flux of up to 109 photons per pulse into the full solid angle, perfectly synchronized to the sub-100-fs optical pulses from the driving laser system. Based on spontaneous x-ray emission, such sources display a particular noise behavior which impacts the sensitivity of x-ray diffraction experiments. We present a detailed analysis of the photon statistics and temporal fluctuations of the x-ray flux, together with experimental strategies to optimize the sensitivity of optical pump/x-ray probe experiments. We demonstrate measurements close to the shot-noise limit of the x-ray source. PMID:28795079

  4. Towards shot-noise limited diffraction experiments with table-top femtosecond hard x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Marcel; Hauf, Christoph; Weisshaupt, Jannick; Salvador, Antonio-Andres Hernandez; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Table-top laser-driven hard x-ray sources with kilohertz repetition rates are an attractive alternative to large-scale accelerator-based systems and have found widespread applications in x-ray studies of ultrafast structural dynamics. Hard x-ray pulses of 100 fs duration have been generated at the Cu K α wavelength with a photon flux of up to 10(9) photons per pulse into the full solid angle, perfectly synchronized to the sub-100-fs optical pulses from the driving laser system. Based on spontaneous x-ray emission, such sources display a particular noise behavior which impacts the sensitivity of x-ray diffraction experiments. We present a detailed analysis of the photon statistics and temporal fluctuations of the x-ray flux, together with experimental strategies to optimize the sensitivity of optical pump/x-ray probe experiments. We demonstrate measurements close to the shot-noise limit of the x-ray source.

  5. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hess, M. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 10{sup 12} have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm{sup 3}. In these experiments, up to 5 × 10{sup 10} secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm{sup 2}, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 10{sup 10}. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  6. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Harding, Eric C.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Awe, Thomas James; Geissel, Matthias; Rovang, Dean C.; Smith, Ian C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Herrmann, Mark C.; Mark Harry Hess; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew R.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle J.; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Savage, Mark E.; Schroen, Diana G.; Stygar, William A.; Vesey, Roger Alan

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  7. Magnetic shielding of a laboratory Hall thruster. II. Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, Richard R. Goebel, Dan M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2014-01-28

    The physics of magnetic shielding in Hall thrusters were validated through laboratory experiments demonstrating essentially erosionless, high-performance operation. The magnetic field near the walls of a laboratory Hall thruster was modified to effectively eliminate wall erosion while maintaining the magnetic field topology away from the walls necessary to retain efficient operation. Plasma measurements at the walls validate our understanding of magnetic shielding as derived from the theory. The plasma potential was maintained very near the anode potential, the electron temperature was reduced by a factor of two to three, and the ion current density was reduced by at least a factor of two. Measurements of the carbon backsputter rate, wall geometry, and direct measurement of plasma properties at the wall indicate that the wall erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 1000 relative to the unshielded thruster. These changes effectively eliminate wall erosion as a life limitation in Hall thrusters, enabling a new class of deep-space missions that could not previously be attempted.

  8. Design of a Magnetic Reconnection Experiment in the Collisionless Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egedal, J.; Le, A.; Daughton, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    A new model for effective heating of electrons during reconnection is now gaining support from spacecraft observations, theoretical considerations and kinetic simulations [1]. The key ingredient in the model is the physics of trapped electrons whose dynamics causes the electron pressure tensor to be strongly anisotropic [2]. The heating mechanism becomes highly efficient for geometries with low upstream electron pressure, conditions relevant to the magnetotail. We propose a new experiment that will be optimized for the study of kinetic reconnection including the dynamics of trapped electrons and associated pressure anisotropy. This requires an experiment that accesses plasmas with much lower collisionality and lower plasma beta than are available in present reconnection experiments. The new experiment will be designed such that a large variety of magnetic configurations can be established and tailored for continuation of our ongoing study of spontaneous 3D reconnection [3]. The flexible design will also allow for configurations suitable for the study of merging magnetic islands, which may be a source of super thermal electrons in naturally occurring plasmas. [1] Egedal J et al., Nature Physics, 8, 321 (2012). [2] Le A et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 085001 (2009). [3] Katz N et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 255004 (2010).;

  9. Magnetic field experiment for Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Aluna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Ness, N. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment to be carried on the Voyager 1 and 2 missions consists of dual low field (LFM) and high field magnetometer (HFM) systems. The dual systems provide greater reliability and, in the case of the LFM's, permit the separation of spacecraft magnetic fields from the ambient fields. Additional reliability is achieved through electronics redundancy. The wide dynamic ranges of plus or minus 0.5G for the LFM's and plus or minus 20G for the HFM's, low quantization uncertainty of plus or minus 0.002 gamma in the most sensitive (plus or minus 8 gamma) LFM range, low sensor RMS noise level of 0.006 gamma, and use of data compaction schemes to optimize the experiment information rate all combine to permit the study of a broad spectrum of phenomena during the mission. Planetary fields at Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Uranus; satellites of these planets; solar wind and satellite interactions with the planetary fields; and the large-scale structure and microscale characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field are studied. The interstellar field may also be measured.

  10. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  11. Lithium plasma emitter for collisionless magnetized plasma experiment.

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Huang, Yi-Jue; Syugu, Wun-Jheng; Song, Sung-Xuang; Hsieh, Tung-Yuan; Cheng, C Z

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a newly developed lithium plasma emitter, which can provide quiescent and low-temperature collisionless conditions for magnetized plasma experiments. This plasma emitter generates thermal emissions of lithium ions and electrons to produce a lithium plasma. Lithium type beta-eucryptite and lanthanum-hexaboride (LaB(6)) powders were mixed and directly heated with a tungsten heater to synthesize ion and electron emissions. As a result, a plasma with a diameter of ~15 cm was obtained in a magnetic mirror configuration. The typical range of electron density was 10(12)-10(13) m(-3) and that of electron temperature was 0.1-0.8 eV with the emitter operation temperature of about 1500 K. The amplitude fluctuations for the plasma density were lower than 1%. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Interplay between crystal and magnetic structures in YFe2(HαD1-α)4.2 compounds studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul-Boncour, V.; Guillot, M.; Isnard, O.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Hoser, A.; Hansen, T.; Stuesser, N.

    2017-01-01

    We report a detailed magnetic structure investigation of YFe2(HαD1-α)4.2 (α=0, 0.64, 1) compounds presenting a strong (H,D) isotope effect by neutron diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis. They crystallize in the same monoclinic structure (Pc space group) with 8 inequivalent Fe sites having different H(D) environment. At low temperature, the compounds are ferromagnetic (FM) and show an easy magnetization axis perpendicular to the b axis and only slightly tilted away from the c axis. Upon heating, they display a first order transition from a ferromagnetic towards an antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure at TM0 which is sensitive to the H/D isotope nature. The AFM cell is described by doubling the crystal cell along the monoclinic b axis. It presents an unusual coexistence of non magnetic Fe layer sandwiched by two thicker ferromagnetic Fe layers which are antiparallel to each other. This FM-AFM transition is driven by the loss of ordered moment on one Fe site (Fe7) through an itinerant electron metamagnetic (IEM) behaviour. The key role of the Fe7 position is assigned to both its hydrogen rich atomic environment and its geometric position. Above TM0 a field induced metamagnetic transition is observed from the AFM towards the FM structure accompanied by a cell volume increase. Both thermal and magnetic field dependence of the magnetic structure are found strongly related to the anisotropic cell distortion induced by (H,D) order in interstitial sites.

  13. The interplay between the lattice and magnetism in La(Fe11.4Al1.6)C0.02 studied by powder neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Cui; He, Lun-Hua; Wang, Hai; Liu, Rong-Deng; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of La(Fe11.4Al1.6)C0.02 are studied by magnetic measurement and powder neutron diffraction with temperature and applied magnetic field. Rietveld refinement shows that La(Fe11.4Al1.6)C0.02 crystallizes into the cubic NaZn13-type with two different Fe sites: FeI (8b) and FeII (96i), and that Al atoms preferentially occupy the FeII site. A ferromagnetic state can be induced at a medial temperature of 39 K-139 K by an external magnetic field of 0.7 T, and a large lattice is correspondingly found at 100 K and 0.7 T. In all other conditions, La(Fe11.4Al1.6)C0.02 has no net magnetization in the paramagnetic (T > TN = 182 K) or antiferromagnetic states, and thus keeps its small lattice. Analysis of the Fe—Fe bond length indicates that the ferromagnetic state prefers longer Fe—Fe distances.

  14. High power heating of magnetic reconnection in merging tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Gi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Ii, T.; Yamada, T.; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N.; Crowley, B.; Michael, C.

    2015-05-15

    Significant ion/electron heating of magnetic reconnection up to 1.2 keV was documented in two spherical tokamak plasma merging experiment on MAST with the significantly large Reynolds number R∼10{sup 5}. Measured 1D/2D contours of ion and electron temperatures reveal clearly energy-conversion mechanisms of magnetic reconnection: huge outflow heating of ions in the downstream and localized heating of electrons at the X-point. Ions are accelerated up to the order of poloidal Alfven speed in the reconnection outflow region and are thermalized by fast shock-like density pileups formed in the downstreams, in agreement with recent solar satellite observations and PIC simulation results. The magnetic reconnection efficiently converts the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic energy mostly into ion thermal energy through the outflow, causing the reconnection heating energy proportional to square of the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic field B{sub rec}{sup 2}  ∼  B{sub p}{sup 2}. The guide toroidal field B{sub t} does not affect the bulk heating of ions and electrons, probably because the reconnection/outflow speeds are determined mostly by the external driven inflow by the help of another fast reconnection mechanism: intermittent sheet ejection. The localized electron heating at the X-point increases sharply with the guide toroidal field B{sub t}, probably because the toroidal field increases electron confinement and acceleration length along the X-line. 2D measurements of magnetic field and temperatures in the TS-3 tokamak merging experiment also reveal the detailed reconnection heating mechanisms mentioned above. The high-power heating of tokamak merging is useful not only for laboratory study of reconnection but also for economical startup and heating of tokamak plasmas. The MAST/TS-3 tokamak merging with B{sub p} > 0.4 T will enables us to heat the plasma to the alpha heating regime: T{sub i} > 5 keV without using any additional heating facility.

  15. Substituent effect in 2-benzoylmethylenequinoline difluoroborates exhibiting through-space couplings. Multinuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and computational study.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Valkonen, Arto; Haapaniemi, Esa; Rissanen, Kari; Chęcińska, Lilianna; Ośmiałowski, Borys

    2013-01-10

    The series of nine 2-benzoylmethylenequinoline difluoroborates have been synthesized and characterized by multinuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and computational methods. The through-space spin-spin couplings between (19)F and (1)H/(13)C nuclei have been observed in solution. The NMR chemical shifts have been correlated to the Hammett substituent constants. The crystal structures of six compounds have been solved by XRD. For two derivatives the X-ray wave function refinement was performed to evaluate the character of bonds in the NBF(2)O moiety by topological and integrated bond descriptors.

  16. Neutron diffraction study of magnetic field induced behavior in the heavy Fermion Ce3Co4Sn13

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D; Goremychkin, E. A.; Gardner, J. S.; Kang, H. J.; Chung, J.-H.; Manuel, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The specific heat of Ce3Co4Sn13 exhibits a crossover from heavy Fermion behavior with antiferromagnetic correlations at low field to single impurity Kondo behavior above 2 T. We have performed neutron diffraction measurements in magnetic fields up to 6 Tesla on single crystal samples. The (001) position shows a dramatic increase in intensity in field which appears to arise from static polarization of the 4f level and which at 0.14 K also exhibits an anomaly near 2T reflecting the crossover to single impurity behavior.

  17. Chemical magnetization when determining Thellier paleointensity experiments in oceanic basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselebrovskiy, Alexey; Maksimochkin, Valery

    2017-04-01

    The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of oceanic basalts selected in the rift zones of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the Red Sea has been explored. Laboratory simulation shows that the thermoremanent magnetization and chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) in oceanic basalts may be separated by using Tellier-Coe experiment. It was found that the rate of CRM destruction is about four times lower than the rate of the partial thermoremanent magnetization formation in Thellier cycles. The blocking temperatures spectrum of chemical component shifted toward higher temperatures in comparison with the spectrum of primary thermoremanent magnetization. It was revealed that the contribution of the chemical components in the NRM increases with the age of oceanic basalts determined with the analysis of the anomalous geomagnetic field (AGF) and spreading theory. CRM is less than 10% at the basalts aged 0.2 million years, less than 50% at basalts aged 0.35 million years, from 60 to 80% at basalts aged 1 million years [1]. Geomagnetic field paleointensity (Hpl) has been determined through the remanent magnetization of basalt samples of different ages related to Brunhes, Matuyama and Gauss periods of the geomagnetic field polarity. The value of the Hpl determined by basalts of the southern segment of MAR is ranged from 17.5 to 42.5 A/m, by the Reykjanes Ridge basalts — from 20.3 to 44 A/m, by the Bouvet Ridge basalts — from 21.7 to 34.1 A/m. VADM values calculated from these data are in good agreement with the international paleointensity database [2] and PISO-1500 model [3]. Literature 1. Maksimochkin V., Tselebrovskiy A., (2015) The influence of the chemical magnetization of oceanic basalts on determining the geomagnetic field paleointensity by the thellier method, moscow university physics bulletin, 70(6):566-576, 2. Perrin, M., E. Schnepp, and V. Shcherbakov (1998), Update of the paleointensity database, Eos Trans. AGU, 79, 198. 3. Channell JET, Xuan C, Hodell DA (2009

  18. Magnetic properties of GdT2Zn20 (T = Fe, Co) investigated by x-ray diffraction and spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    J. R. L. Mardegan; Fabbris, G.; Francoual, S.; ...

    2016-01-26

    In this study, we investigate the magnetic and electronic properties of the GdT2Zn20 (T=Fe and Co) compounds using x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS), x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The XRMS measurements reveal that GdCo2Zn20 has a commensurate antiferromagnetic spin structure with a magnetic propagation vector →/τ = (12,12,12) below the Néel temperature (TN ~ 5.7 K). Only the Gd ions carry a magnetic moment forming an antiferromagnetic structure with magnetic representation Γ6. For the ferromagnetic GdFe2Zn20 compound, an extensive investigation was performed at low temperature and under magnetic field using XANES and XMCD. Amore » strong XMCD signal of about 12.5% and 9.7% is observed below the Curie temperature (TC ~ 85K) at the Gd L2 and L3 edges, respectively. In addition, a small magnetic signal of about 0.06% of the jump is recorded at the Zn K edge, suggesting that the Zn 4p states are spin polarized by the Gd 5d extended orbitals.« less

  19. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  20. X-ray diffraction experiments on the Materials in Extreme Conditions (MEC) LCLS x-ray FEL beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond; Fratanduono, Dayne; Wicks, June; Duffy, Tom; Lee, Hae Ja; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Philip; Gleason, Arianna; Bolme, Cynthia; Swift, Damian; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon; Collins, Rip

    2015-06-01

    The experiments described here were conducted on the MEC beamline hutch at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source. A 10 ns 527 nm laser pulse was used to shock compress 60-100 μm thick NaCl and Graphite samples. LCLS x-rays (40 fs, 8 keV), scattered off the shocked sample, were recorded on several pixel array detectors positioned downstream. The diffracted x-ray pattern allows us to determine changes in crystal structure at Mbar pressures and over nanosecond timescales. In this talk we detail the experimental setup, the current capabilities of the MEC laser and the considerations for optimizing the target design. We will describe the wave interactions within the shock-compressed target and the use of a 1D hydrocode to describe the pressure, temperature and density conditions within the target assembly as a function of time and Lagrangian position. We present observations of the B1-B2 phase transition in NaCl and subsequent back transformation during release to ambient pressure, and compare these findings to gas gun and static data. We also present results from a preliminary study of the shock-induced graphite to diamond transformation.

  1. "Smart" Magnetic Fluids Experiment Operated on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Lekan, Jack F.

    2004-01-01

    InSPACE is a microgravity fluid physics experiment that was operated on the International Space Station (ISS) in the Microgravity Science Glovebox from late March 2003 through early July 2003. (InSPACE is an acronym for Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates From Colloidal Emulsions.) The purpose of the experiment is to obtain fundamental data of the complex properties of an exciting class of smart materials termed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. MR fluids are suspensions, or colloids, comprised of small (micrometer-sized) superparamagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic medium. Colloids are suspensions of very small particles suspended in a liquid. (Examples of other colloids are blood, milk, and paint.) These controllable fluids can quickly transition into a nearly solid state when exposed to a magnetic field and return to their original liquid state when the magnetic field is removed. Controlling the strength of the magnetic field can control the relative stiffness of these fluids. MR fluids can be used to improve or develop new seat suspensions, robotics, clutches, airplane landing gear, and vibration damping systems. The principal investigator for InSPACE is Professor Alice P. Gast of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The InSPACE hardware was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The InSPACE samples were delivered to the ISS in November 2002, on the Space Shuttle Endeavour, on Space Station Utilization Flight UF-2/STS113. Operations began on March 31, 2003, with the processing of three different particle size samples at multiple test parameters. This investigation focused on determining the structural organization of MR colloidal aggregates when exposed to a pulsing magnetic field. On Earth, the aggregates take the shape of footballs with spiky tips. This characteristic shape may be influenced by the pull of gravity, which causes most particles initially suspended in the fluid to sediment, (i.e., settle and collect at the

  2. HiSPoD: a program for high-speed polychromatic X-ray diffraction experiments and data analysis on polycrystalline samples

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2016-06-17

    Here, a high-speed X-ray diffraction technique was recently developed at the 32-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for studying highly dynamic, yet non-repeatable and irreversible, materials processes. In experiments, the microstructure evolution in a single material event is probed by recording a series of diffraction patterns with extremely short exposure time and high frame rate. Owing to the limited flux in a short pulse and the polychromatic nature of the incident X-rays, analysis of the diffraction data is challenging. Here, HiSPoD, a stand-alone Matlab-based software for analyzing the polychromatic X-ray diffraction data from polycrystalline samples, is described. With HiSPoD,more » researchers are able to perform diffraction peak indexing, extraction of one-dimensional intensity profiles by integrating a two-dimensional diffraction pattern, and, more importantly, quantitative numerical simulations to obtain precise sample structure information.« less

  3. Room temperature neutron diffraction, optical and magnetic properties of Co(Cr1-xMnx)2O4 (x =0.0 and 0.30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ram; Padam, R.; Rayaprol, S.; Siruguri, V.; Pal, D.

    2017-05-01

    We report here the effect of 30% Mn substitution on structure and magnetic properties of multiferroic CoCr2O4. Room temperature neutron diffraction studies were carried out on polycrystalline Co(Cr1-xMnx)2O4 (x=0.00 and 0.30) samples to determine structural properties. It has been observed that 30% Mn substitution for Cr in CoCr2O4 leads to increase in the ferrimagnetic transition temperature, (Tc) from ˜96 K to ˜114 K along with the magneto-structural transition temperature, (Ts) from ˜26 K to ˜32 K. In addition, optical properties were studied by UV-visible technique in the range of 200-800 nm. The energy band gap is found to decrease in compare to parent compound. Both magnetization and band gap variation can be explained using the spin-exchange interactions present in these systems.

  4. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Jair C. C.; Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Bernardes, Leandro V.; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E.; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitanić, Tonči; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at 13C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18–21 T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials. PMID:26434597

  5. FEM numerical model analysis of magnetic nanoparticle tumor heating experiments.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A; Petyk, Alicia A; Hoopes, P Jack

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are currently under investigation as heating agents for hyperthermic treatment of tumors. Major determinants of effective heating include the biodistribution of magnetic materials, the minimum iron oxide loading required to achieve adequate heating, and practically achievable magnetic field strengths. These are inter-related criteria that ultimately determine the practicability of this approach to tumor treatment. Currently, we lack fundamental engineering design criteria that can be used in treatment planning and assessment. Coupling numerical models to experimental studies illuminate the underlying physical processes and can separate physical processes to determine their relative importance. Further, adding thermal damage and cell death process to the models provides valuable perspective on the likelihood of successful treatment. FEM numerical models were applied to increase the understanding of a carefully calibrated series of experiments in mouse mammary carcinoma. The numerical models results indicate that tumor loadings equivalent to approximately 1 mg of Fe3O4 per gram of tumor tissue are required to achieve adequate heating in magnetic field strengths of 34 kA/m (rms) at 160 kHz. Further, the models indicate that direct intratumoral injection of the nanoparticles results in between 1 and 20% uptake in the tissues.

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Diffraction of terahertz waves after passing through a Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu-Lei; Zhou, Qing-Li; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2009-12-01

    The spatiotemporal and spectral characteristics of ultrawide-band terahertz pulses after passing through a Fresnel lens are studied by using the scalar diffraction theory. The simulation shows that the transmitted terahertz waveforms compress with increasing propagation distance, and the multi-frequency focusing phenomenon at different focal points is observed. Additionally, the distribution of terahertz fields in a plane perpendicular to the axis is also discussed, and it is found that the diffraction not only induces focusing on-axis but also inhibits focusing at off-axis positions. Therefore, the Fresnel lens may be a useful alternative approach to being a terahertz filter. Moreover, the terahertz pulses travelling as a basic mode of a Gaussian beam are discussed in detail.

  7. Ratio of the contributions real and virtual photons diffraction in thin perfect crystals. Comparison of calculation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goponov, Yu. A.; Laktionova, S. A.; Sidnin, M. A.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate and improve the previously proposed method of calculating diffracted photon yields in thin perfect crystals, a comparison between calculated and experimental results in wide range of photons and electrons energy was carried out. It is shown that the proposed method describes all investigated experimental results for bremsstrahlung diffraction and transition radiation one with an error less than ten-fifteen percent. Consequently, the method may be used for calculation of the electron beam divergence influence on the diffracted transition radiation angular distribution.

  8. Millimeter-Gap Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line Power Flow Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hutsel, Brian Thomas; Stoltzfus, Brian S.; Fowler, William E.; LeChien, Keith R.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Moore, James K.; Mulville, Thomas D.; Savage, Mark E.; Stygar, William A.; McKenney, John L.; Jones, Peter A.; MacRunnels, Diego J.; Long, Finis W.; Porter, John L.

    2014-09-01

    An experiment platform has been designed to study vacuum power flow in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The platform was driven by the 400-GW Mykonos-V accelerator. The experiments conducted quantify the current loss in a millimeter-gap MITL with respect to vacuum conditions in the MITL for two different gap distances, 1.0 and 1.3 mm. The current loss for each gap was measured for three different vacuum pump down times. As a ride along experiment, multiple shots were conducted with each set of hardware to determine if there was a conditioning effect to increase current delivery on subsequent shots. The experiment results revealed large differences in performance for the 1.0 and 1.3 mm gaps. The 1.0 mm gap resulted in current loss of 40%-60% of peak current. The 1.3 mm gap resulted in current losses of less than 5% of peak current. Classical MITL models that neglect plasma expansion predict that there should be zero current loss, after magnetic insulation is established, for both of these gaps. The experiments result s indicate that the vacuum pressure or pump down time did not have a significant effect on the measured current loss at vacuum pressures between 1e-4 and 1e-5 Torr. Additionally, there was not repeatable evidence of a conditioning effect that reduced current loss for subsequent full-energy shots on a given set of hardware. It should be noted that the experiments conducted likely did not have large loss contributions due to ion emission from the anode due to the relatively small current densi-ties (25-40 kA/cm) in the MITL that limited the anode temperature rise due to ohmic heating. The results and conclusions from these experiments may have limited applicability to MITLs of high current density (>400 kA/cm) used in the convolute and load region of the Z which experience temperature increases of >400° C and generate ion emission from anode surfaces.

  9. Results of railgun experiments powered by magnetic flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Deadrick, J.; Scudder, J.K.; Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Peterson, D.R.

    1981-03-16

    Researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated a joint railgun research and development program to explore the potential of electromagnetic railguns to accelerate projectiles to hypervelocities. The effort was intended to (1) determine experimentally the limits of railgun operation; (2) verify calculations of railgun performance; and (3) establish a data base at megampere currents. The program has led to the selection of a particular magnetic flux compression generator (MFCG) design for a set of initial experiments and the design of small- and large-square-bore railguns to match the expected MFCG power profile. The bore sizes are 12.7 and 50 mm, respectively. In this paper, the design of the railguns and the diagnostic and data reduction techniques, followed by the results of eight experiments with the two railgun types, are presented.

  10. Results of railgun experiments powered by magnetic flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Deadrick, F.J.; Scudder, J.K.; Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Peterson, D.R.

    1980-10-24

    Researchers from LLNL and LANSL initiated a joint railgun research and development program to explore the potential of electromagnetic railguns to accelerate projectiles to hypervelocities. The effort was intended to determine experimentally the limits of railgun operation, to verify calculations of railgun performance, and to establish a data base at megampere currents. The program has led to the selection of a particular magnetic flux compression generator (MFCG) design for a set of initial experiments and to the design of small- and large-square bore railguns to match the expected MFCG power profile. The bore sizes are 12.7 and 50 mm, respectively. The design of the railguns and the diagnostic and data reduction techniques, followed by the results of eight experiments with the two railgun types are presented.

  11. A Fiber Interferometer for the Magnetized Shock Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Christian

    2012-08-30

    The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory requires remote diagnostics of plasma density. Laser interferometry can be used to determine the line-integrated density of the plasma. A multi-chord heterodyne fiber optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer is being assembled and integrated into the experiment. The advantage of the fiber coupling is that many different view chords can be easily obtained by simply moving transmit and receive fiber couplers. Several such fiber sets will be implemented to provide a time history of line-averaged density for several chords at once. The multiple chord data can then be Abel inverted to provide radially resolved spatial profiles of density. We describe the design and execution of this multiple fiber interferometer.

  12. The magnetized steel and scintillator calorimeters of the MINOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minos Collaboration; Michael, D. G.; Adamson, P.; Alexopoulos, T.; Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Anderson, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Arroyo, C.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barker, M. A.; Barnes, P. D.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Beall, E.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, B. R.; Belias, A.; Bergfeld, T.; Bernstein, R. H.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bocean, V.; Bock, B.; Bock, G. J.; Boehm, J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Border, P. M.; Bower, C.; Boyd, S.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Cabrera, A.; Chapman, J. D.; Chase, T. R.; Chernichenko, S. K.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Cobb, J. H.; Coleman, S. J.; Cossairt, J. D.; Courant, H.; Crane, D. A.; Culling, A. J.; Damiani, D.; Dawson, J. W.; de Jong, J. K.; Demuth, D. M.; de Santo, A.; Dierckxsens, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Dorman, M.; Drake, G.; Ducar, R.; Durkin, T.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Fackler, O. D.; Falk Harris, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Felt, N.; Fields, T. H.; Ford, R.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Gebhard, M.; Godley, A.; Gogos, J.; Goodman, M. C.; Gornushkin, Yu.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E. W.; Grossman, N.; Grudzinski, J. J.; Grzelak, K.; Guarino, V.; Habig, A.; Halsall, R.; Hanson, J.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatcher, R.; Heller, K.; Hill, N.; Ho, Y.; Howcroft, C.; Hylen, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Indurthy, D.; Irwin, G. M.; James, C.; Jenner, L.; Jensen, D.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Kafka, T.; Kang, H. J.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kilmer, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kostin, M.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krakauer, D. A.; Kumaratunga, S.; Ladran, A. S.; Lang, K.; Laughton, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, R.; Lee, W. Y.; Libkind, M. A.; Liu, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longley, N. P.; Lucas, P.; Luebke, W.; Madani, S.; Maher, E.; Makeev, V.; Mann, W. A.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marshak, M. L.; Marshall, J. S.; McDonald, J.; McGowan, A. M.; Meier, J. R.; Merzon, G. I.; Messier, M. D.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, J. L.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Moore, C. D.; Morfín, J.; Morse, R.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Murgia, S.; Murtagh, M. J.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, C.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nezrick, F.; Nichol, R. J.; Nicholls, T. C.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oliver, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Onuchin, V. A.; Osiecki, T.; Ospanov, R.; Paley, J.; Paolone, V.; Para, A.; Patzak, T.; Pavlović, Ž.; Pearce, G. F.; Pearson, N.; Peck, C. W.; Perry, C.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Ping, H.; Piteira, R.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Plunkett, R. K.; Price, L. E.; Proga, M.; Pushka, D. R.; Rahman, D.; Rameika, R. A.; Raufer, T. M.; Read, A. L.; Rebel, B.; Reyna, D. E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ruddick, K.; Ryabov, V. A.; Saakyan, R.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Schneps, J.; Schoessow, P. V.; Schreiner, P.; Schwienhorst, R.; Semenov, V. K.; Seun, S.-M.; Shanahan, P.; Shield, P. D.; Shivane, R.; Smart, W.; Smirnitsky, V.; Smith, C.; Smith, P. N.; Sousa, A.; Speakman, B.; Stamoulis, P.; Stefanik, A.; Sullivan, P.; Swan, J. M.; Symes, P. A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Terekhov, A.; Tetteh-Lartey, E.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Thron, J. L.; Trendler, R.; Trevor, J.; Trostin, I.; Tsarev, V. A.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Vakili, M.; Vaziri, K.; Velissaris, C.; Verebryusov, V.; Viren, B.; Wai, L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watabe, M.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; Wehmann, A.; West, N.; White, C.; White, R. F.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wright, D. M.; Wu, Q. K.; Yan, W. G.; Yang, T.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Yun, J. C.; Zheng, H.; Zois, M.; Zwaska, R.; MINOS Collaboration

    2008-11-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment uses an accelerator-produced neutrino beam to perform precision measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the "atmospheric neutrino" sector associated with muon neutrino disappearance. This long-baseline experiment measures neutrino interactions in Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beam with a near detector at Fermilab and again 735 km downstream with a far detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The two detectors are magnetized steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. They are designed to be as similar as possible in order to ensure that differences in detector response have minimal impact on the comparisons of event rates, energy spectra and topologies that are essential to MINOS measurements of oscillation parameters. The design, construction, calibration and performance of the far and near detectors are described in this paper.

  13. The magnetized steel and scintillator calorimeters of the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, : D.G.

    2008-05-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment uses an accelerator-produced neutrino beam to perform precision measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the 'atmospheric neutrino' sector associated with muon neutrino disappearance. This long-baseline experiment measures neutrino interactions in Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beam with a near detector at Fermilab and again 735 km downstream with a far detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The two detectors are magnetized steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. They are designed to be as similar as possible in order to ensure that differences in detector response have minimal impact on the comparisons of event rates, energy spectra and topologies that are essential to MINOS measurements of oscillation parameters. The design, construction, calibration and performance of the far and near detectors are described in this paper.

  14. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1994-06-18

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics experiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three paris of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (NB{sub 3}Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper.

  15. Magnetic Field Experiment on Yinghuo-1 at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua

    Magnetic Field Experiment on Yinghuo-1 at Mars Hua Zhao, G. W. Zhu, J. D. Wang, M. F. Yu, L. Li, Y. Q. Sun, S. W. Chen, H. Z. Liao, and B. Zhou Center for Space Science and Applied Research (CSSAR), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China Abstract: A micro-satellite, Yinghuo-1, would be launched with Phobos-Grunt in October, 2009 to investigate the space environment around Mars. YH-1 and Phobos-Grunt forms a twopoint measurement configuration in the Martian space environment, and equipped with similar magnetic field and plasma detecting payload on two spacecraft would give some coordinated exploration around Mars. YH-1 would orbit Mars with periapsis of 800 km above the Martian surface, and apoapsis about 80000 km to the center of Mars. The orbit inclination is in the range of 0—7o to the Martian equator. A flux-gate type magnetometer, with two sensors, is developed for YH-1 spacecraft. Two sensors are mounted on one-side of the deployable solar panel with a radial separation about 45 cm to function as a gradiometer to minimize the affects of platform remanence. The dynamic range of √ magnetometer is with a 16-bit ADC converter, and the the noise level is better than 0.01 nT/ Hz, to measure three-component magnetic field from DC to 10Hz. Flux-gate magnetometer would work together with the Plasma Package onboard of YH-1 to investigate the Martian bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetic pileup region (MPR). A detail description of the flux-gate magnetometer is presented in this paper, with some test and calibration results.

  16. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dwight D.; Bulmer, R. J.; Chaplin, M. R.; Oconner, T. G.; Slack, D. S.; Wong, R. L.; Zbasnik, J. P.; Schultz, J. H.; Diatchenko, N.; Montgomery, D. B.

    1994-06-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three paris of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (NB3Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (LLNL/MIT/PPPL) collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper.

  17. Disorder-induced magnetic memory: experiments and theories

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, M.S.; Buechler, C.R.; Sorensen, L.B.; Kevan, S.D.; Jagla,E.A.; Deutsch, J.M.; Mai, T.; Narayan, O.; Davies, J.E.; Liu, K.; Zimanyi, G.T.; Katzgraber, H.G.; Hellwig, O.; Fullerton, E.E.; Fischer,P.; Kortright, J.B.

    2007-01-04

    Beautiful theories of magnetic hysteresis based on randommicroscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. Ourgoal was to directly compare these theories with precise experiments. Todo so, we first developed and then applied coherent x-ray specklemetrology to a series of thin multilayer perpendicular magneticmaterials. To directly observe the effects of disorder, we deliberatelyintroduced increasing degrees of disorder into our films. We usedcoherent x rays, produced at the Advanced Light Source at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory, to generate highly speckled magneticscattering patterns. The apparently "random" arrangement of the specklesis due to the exact configuration of the magnetic domains in the sample.In effect, each speckle pattern acts as a unique fingerprint for themagnetic domain configuration. Small changes in the domain structurechange the speckles, and comparison of the different speckle patternsprovides a quantitative determination of how much the domain structurehas changed. Our experiments quickly answered one longstanding question:How is the magnetic domain configuration at one point on the majorhysteresis loop related to the configurations at the same point on theloop during subsequent cycles? This is called microscopic return-pointmemory "RPM". We found that the RPM is partial and imperfect in thedisordered samples, and completely absent when the disorder is below athreshold level. We also introduced and answered a second importantquestion: How are the magnetic domains at one point on the major looprelated to the domains at the complementary point, the inversionsymmetric point on the loop, during the same and during subsequentcycles? This is called microscopic complementary-point memory "CPM". Wefound that the CPM is also partial and imperfect in the disorderedsamples and completely absent when the disorder is not present. Inaddition, we found that the RPM is always a little larger than the CPM.We also studied the

  18. A few simple classroom experiments with a permanent U-shaped magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babović, Miloš; Babović, Vukota

    2017-01-01

    A few simple experiments in the magnetic field of a permanent U-shaped magnet are described. Among them, pin oscillations inside the magnet are particularly interesting. These easy to perform and amusing measurements can help pupils understand magnetic phenomena and mutually connect knowledge of various physics branches.

  19. Magnetic Compton scattering study of the Co2FeGa Heusler alloy: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Aniruddha; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Hiraoka, N.; Sakai, N.

    2001-02-01

    The spin density in Co2FeGa Heusler alloy has been measured in a magnetic Compton scattering experiment using 274-keV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation at the high energy inelastic scattering beamline (BL08W) at SPring-8, Japan. A detailed band-structure calculation including hyperfine field study was performed utilizing the generalized gradient corrected full-potential linear augmented plane-wave (FLAPW-GGA) method. The magnetic Compton profiles for the [100], [110], and [111] principal directions, reported here, show anisotropy in the momentum density which is in good agreement with the FLAPW-GGA results based on ferromagnetic ground state. The conduction electrons were found to have a negative spin polarization of 0.60μB, which is at variance with the prediction of a positive moment from the recent neutron data. In the calculation, 3d spin moment at the Co and Fe site was found to be 1.20μB and 2.66μB, and their respective contribution in the eg and t2g sub-bands are in excellent agreement with the earlier reported neutron-diffraction measurements. It is also seen from our calculated results that the Co and Fe moment are mainly eg in character.

  20. Fiber diffraction without fibers.

    PubMed

    Poon, H-C; Schwander, P; Uddin, M; Saldin, D K

    2013-06-28

    Postprocessing of diffraction patterns of completely randomly oriented helical particles, as measured, for example, in so-called "diffract-and-destroy" experiments with an x-ray free electron laser can yield "fiber diffraction" patterns expected of fibrous bundles of the particles. This will allow "single-axis alignment" to be performed computationally, thus obviating the need to do this by experimental means such as forming fibers and laser or flow alignment. The structure of such particles may then be found by either iterative phasing methods or standard methods of fiber diffraction.

  1. Electronic, spin-state, and magnetic transitions in B a2C o9O14 investigated by x-ray spectroscopies and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Martín, J.; Padilla-Pantoja, J.; Lafuerza, S.; Romaguera, A.; Fauth, F.; Reparaz, J. S.; García-Muñoz, J. L.

    2017-06-01

    The mixed B a2C o9O14C o2 +/C o3 + system undergoes an insulator-insulator transition at TSS˜567 K that arises from a spin-state transition at trivalent cobalt sites. Below this temperature, Co1, Co2, and Co4 are nonmagnetic (S =0 , low spin). Ferromagnetically aligned Co5 spins are sandwiched between antiparallel planes of Co3 spins below TN≈41 K . The successive antiferromagnetic trilayers are inverted along the c axis (compatible with Cc2 /c ,Cc2 /m , or PS-1 magnetic space groups, depending on the moment orientation in the a b plane). The origin of the resistivity drop on warming was investigated by means of neutron and x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Charge-transfer multiplet calculations confirm that the divalent Co sites are both in an S =3 /2 high spin state. Independently, the analysis of measured Co Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy spectra agrees with this model. The magnetic moment from divalent Co5 ions is not fully ordered, likely due to the competition between magnetic anisotropy and weak supersuperexchange interactions, but not to covalency effects. Results agree with the spin blockade of electronic transport being partially removed at the octahedral trimers and also at the Co 4 O6 units within the Cd I2 -type layer.

  2. Recent Results from the PVLAS Experiment on the Magnetized Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantatore, Giovanni

    The vacuum element can be used as a target in a photon-photon collider in order to study its properties. Some of these properties are predicted by Quantum Electrodynamics, while additional and unexpected properties might be linked to the existence of yet undiscovered axion-like particles (ALPs) interacting with two photons. In this low energy case (1 2 texteV), real photons from a polarized laser beam are scattered off virtual photons provided by a magnetic field. Information on the scattering processes can be obtained by measuring changes in the polarization state of the probe photons. In the PVLAS (Polarizzazione del Vuoto con LASer) experiment, running at the Legnaro Laboratory of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), near Padova, Italy, a linearly polarized laser beam is sent through a 5 textT strong magnetic field in vacuum, where it is reflected back and forth, by means of a Fabry-P’erot resonator, ˜ 50,000 times over a distance of 1 textm. A heterodyne ellipsometer allows the simultaneous detection of a birefringence and a rotation of the polarization plane. The sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of rotation or of ellipticity angles of about 10-9 textrad, in an hour of data taking. The measurement technique employed by PVLAS will be illustrated, and recent results on polarization effects due to the magnetized vacuum will be presented in this chapter. The interpretation of these effects in terms of the production of ALPs will also be discussed. Finally, the realization of a photon-regeneration type experiment will be briefly illustrated.

  3. Breast magnetic resonance imaging: initial experience in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Khawari, Hanaa; Kovacs, Agnes; Athyal, Reji; Al-Manfouhi, Huda; Fayaz, Mohammed Salah; Madda, John Patrick

    2009-01-01

    To report our initial experience of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Kuwait in order to identify and characterize breast lesions. In 58 patients ranging in age from 25 to 64 years, breast MRI was performed as a problem-solving tool (29); for suspicious local relapse of the treated breast (6); to search for a primary breast cancer in patients with metastatic axillary lymph nodes (5); for local staging of breast cancer (5); breast implants (6); screening in high-risk patients (3), and differentiation between inflammation and inflammatory carcinoma (4). Sagittal fat-saturated T(2) and axial T(1) images were obtained before, and axial fat-saturated T(1) and dynamic sagittal fat-saturated T(1)-weighted images after contrast enhancement in a 1.5-tesla closed magnet. The diagnostic criteria were based on the morphology and kinetics of the lesion. Findings were validated by tissue sampling or radiological follow-up. Seventy breast lesions (25 malignant, 38 benign and 7 lesions detected by MRI only) were identified in the 58 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MRI in diagnosing malignant breast lesions were 96, 67, 71 and 95%, respectively, while the accuracy was 80%. This initial experience is comparable to other published data. Future plans for improving image spatial resolution and MR-guided procedures have been taken into consideration. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Stability of Magnetically Implode Liners for High Energy Density Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Atchison, W.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Clark, D.A.; Ekdahl, C.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Goforth, J.H.; Keinigs, R.K.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Morgan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Tasker, D.G.; Trainor, R.J.; Shlachter, J.S.

    1998-10-18

    Magnetically imploded cylindrical metal shells (z-pinch liners) are attractive drivers for a wide variety of hydrodynamics and material properties experiments. The ultimate utility of liners depends on the acceleration of near-solid density shells to velocities exceeding 20 km/sec with good azimuthal symmetry and axial uniformity. Two pulse power systems (Ranchero and Atlas) currently operational or under development at Los Alamos provide electrical energy adequate to accelerate {approximately}50 gr. liners to 1-2 MJ/cm kinetic energy. As in all z-pinches, the outer surface of a magnetically imploded liner is unstable to magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) modes during acceleration. Large-scale distortion in the liners from RT modes growing from glide plane interactions or initial imperfections could make liners unusable for man experiments. On the other hand, material strength in the liner should, from first principles, reduce the growth rate of RT modes - and can render some combinations of wavelength and amplitude analytically stable. The growth of instabilities in both soft aluminum liners and in high strength aluminum alloy liners has been studied analytically, computationally and experimentally at liner kinetic energies up to 100 KJ/cm on the Pegasus capacitor bank using driving currents up to 12 MA.

  5. Magnetic Diagnostics for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berzak, L.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Zakharov, L.

    2008-06-20

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R0 = 0.4m, a = 0.26m, BTF ~ 3.4kG, IP ~ 400kA, and pulse length ~ 0.25s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel, low-recycling Lithium Wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double-axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions.

  6. The magnetic and neutron diffraction studies of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticles prepared via molten salt synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kačenka, M.; Kaman, O.; Jirák, Z.; Maryško, M.; Veverka, P.; Veverka, M.; Vratislav, S.

    2015-01-15

    Series of single-phase La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticles (x=0.25−0.47) with the size of about 50 nm was prepared in molten NaNO{sub 2}. TEM evidenced well dispersed particles that are not interconnected by sintering bridges in contrast to traditional products. Interestingly, some reduction of the perovskite cell volume, particularly at higher Sr-contents, was detected by XRD. Moreover, reduced magnetization and decreased Curie temperature in comparison to sol–gel samples were observed. Neutron diffraction analysis of the as-prepared nanoparticles and several comparative samples with x=0.37 indicated that the anomalous behavior of studied particles probably originate in the overdoped outer shell. The overdoping might result from both the surface oxygen chemisorption and from an increased Sr concentration in the shell. By all means, the overdoping would lead to compressive surface stress, driving the x=0.37 ground state toward a mixture of FM and A-type AFM ordering as observed by neutron diffraction. - Graphical abstract: La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticles with the size of about 50 nm were prepared by newly established method in molten NaNO{sub 2}. TEM proved the formation of well-separated particles without sintering bridges, the major advantage over traditional preparation methods. - Highlights: • Series of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticles was prepared by novel method in NaNO{sub 2} melt. • Lower magnetization and Curie temperature in comparison to sol–gel nanoparticles was observed. • Overdoping of outer shell was indicated by neutron diffraction and cerimetric titration. • Overdoping shifts La{sub 0.37}Sr{sub 0.63}MnO{sub 3} ground state to a mixture of FM and A-type AFM ordering.

  7. Magnets producing arbitrarily directed magnetic fields used for SR x-ray diffraction and a proposal for a novel insertion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Masami

    1995-02-01

    After the manner of a goniometrical control of the incident beam and the crystal orientation by a four-circle goniometer, the strength and direction of the resultant magnetic fields produced by a set of three pairs of solenoids was goniometrically controlled by three bipolar electric-power sources. Two types of superconducting and normal Helmholtz-coil magnets were constructed. In the superconducting magnet, the coil constant is about 0.01259 TA-1 and the maximum magnetic field is about 0.5 T. The resultant maximum field is about 0.86 T in the [111] direction. In the normal magnet, the size of each coil is different. Each maximum field is up to about 337 Oe. Alternating- and direct-current magnetic fields applied to a crystal are able to vary from one direction [h1k1l1] to another [h2k2l2] while keeping parallel to an arbitrary curved surface. X-ray topographs of α-Fe-3%Si in magnetic fields swept in (110) from [002] via [22¯2], [11¯0], [22¯2¯], and [002¯] to [002] were taken using an N-type Helmholtz magnet. It is suggested that a coaxial serial connection of the two-dimensional astatic magnet with the above-mentioned specifications could be used as a new definitive-type insertion device, which could control the characteristics of polarized beams.

  8. Design and performance of U7B beamline and X-ray diffraction and scattering station at NSRL and its preliminary experiments in protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guoqiang; Xu, Chaoyin; Fan, Rong; Gao, Chen; Lou, Xiaohua; Teng, Maikun; Huang, Qingqiu; Niu, Liwen

    2005-03-01

    This publication describes the design and performance of the U7B beamline and X-ray diffraction and diffuse scattering station at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The beamline optics comprise a Pt-coated toroidal focusing mirror and a double-crystal Si(1 1 1) monochromator. A preliminary experiment of diffraction data collection and processing was carried out using a commercial imaging plate detector system (Mar345). The data collected from one single crystal of acutohaemolysin, a Lys49-type PLA2 from Agkistrodon acutus venom, are of high quality.

  9. A γ-ray detector with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout for neutron diffraction experiments at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2010-03-01

    Standard detectors for neutron diffraction experiments are typically 3He filled proportional counters. Indeed, in the near future the 3He availability will be greatly reduced, so the R&D activity on alternative neutron counters is a very important issue to be addressed. Scintillator detectors could be considered as one of these alternatives. In this context, a prototype thermal neutron counter composed of a yttrium-aluminium-perovskite scintillator crystal coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and a standard photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used in time of flight neutron diffraction experiments on the INES spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. Neutron detection was realized by attaching the crystal to a natural cadmium sheet, used as a (n, γ) converter. Results show that the SiPM-based readout detection system has promising performances with respect to that based on a standard PMT. Diffraction patterns recorded with the 3He tubes' neutron counters in use on INES allowed a comparative assessment of the SiPM-based device for time of flight neutron diffraction experiments, with respect to the standard detection technique.

  10. Low temperature magnetic structure of CeRhIn5 by neutron diffraction on absorption-optimized samples

    DOE PAGES

    Fobes, David M.; Bauer, Eric Dietzgen; Thompson, Joe David; ...

    2017-03-28

    Here, two aspects of the ambient pressure magnetic structure of heavy fermion material CeRhIn5 have remained under some debate since its discovery: whether the structure is indeed an incommensurate helix or a spin density wave, and what is the precise magnitude of the ordered magnetic moment. By using a single crystal sample optimized for hot neutrons to minimize neutron absorption by Rh and In, here we report an ordered moment ofmore » $$m=0.54(2)\\,{{\\mu}_{\\text{B}}}$$. In addition, by using spherical neutron polarimetry measurements on a similar single crystal sample, we have confirmed the helical nature of the magnetic structure, and identified a single chiral domain.« less

  11. Physics of forced magnetic reconnection in coaxial helicity injection experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Raman, R.; Hooper, E. B.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-05-15

    We numerically examine the physics of fast flux closure in transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). By performing resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with poloidal injector coil currents held constant in time, we find that closed flux surfaces are formed through forced magnetic reconnection. Through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection with an elongated current sheet in the injector region, closed flux surfaces expand in the NSTX global domain. Simulations demonstrate outflows approaching poloidally Alfvénic flows and reconnection times consistent with the Sweet-Parker model. Critical requirements for magnetic reconnection and flux closure are studied in detail. These primary effects, which are magnetic diffusivity, injector flux, injector flux footprint width, and rate of injector voltage reduction, are simulated for transient CHI experiments. The relevant time scales for effective reconnection are τ{sub V}<τ{sub rec}≈τ{sub A}√(S)(1+Pm){sup 1/4}<τ{sub R}, where τ{sub V} is the time for the injector voltage reduction, τ{sub A} is the poloidal Alfvén transit time, τ{sub R} is the global resistive diffusion time, and Pm and S are Prandtl and Lundquist numbers.

  12. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Tran, C. Q.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; Jonge, M. D. de

    2006-07-14

    We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

  13. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  14. Reflectivity (visible and near IR), Moessbauer, static magnetic, and X ray diffraction properties of aluminum-substituted hematites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Schulze, Darrell G.; Lauer, Howard V., Jr.; Agresti, David G.; Shelfer, Tad D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of substituting iron by aluminum in polymorphs of Fe2O3 and FeOOH on their reflectivity characteristics was investigated by comparing data on visible and NIR reflectivities and on static magnetic, XRD, and Moessbauer properties for a family of aluminum-substituted hematites alpha-(Fe,Al)2O3, with compositions where the values of the Al/(Al+Fe) ratio were up to 0.61. Samples were prepared by oxidation of magnetite, dehydroxylation of goethite, and direct precipitation. The analytical methods used for obtaining diffuse reflectivity spectra (350-2200 nm), Moessbauer spectra, and static magnetic data are those described by Morris et al. (1989).

  15. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; ...

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function ofmore » pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.« less

  16. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare-earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic (FM) order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the FM Curie temperature. The temperature of this FM transition decreases at a rate of-16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of FM order is suppressed. The neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the FM ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. A disappearance of FM ordering was observed as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa and is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed structure to an -Sm-type structure at high pressures.

  17. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.

  18. Simple Experiments to Help Students Understand Magnetic Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Kerry; Jackson, David P.

    2007-01-01

    The principles of magnetism are a common topic in most introductory physics courses, yet curricular materials exploring the behavior of permanent magnets and magnetic materials are surprisingly rare in the literature. We reviewed the literature to see how magnetism is typically covered in introductory textbooks and curricula. We found that while…

  19. Simple Experiments to Help Students Understand Magnetic Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Kerry; Jackson, David P.

    2007-01-01

    The principles of magnetism are a common topic in most introductory physics courses, yet curricular materials exploring the behavior of permanent magnets and magnetic materials are surprisingly rare in the literature. We reviewed the literature to see how magnetism is typically covered in introductory textbooks and curricula. We found that while…

  20. Magnetic structure of the quasi-one-dimensional La3OsO7 as determined by neutron powder diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Morrow, Ryan; Susner, Michael A.; Sumption, Michael D.; ...

    2015-10-05

    Insulating 5d3 La3OsO7 and the isostructural hole-doped analog La2.8Ca0.2OsO7 that feature pseudo-one-dimensional zigzag chains of corner-sharing OsO6 octahedra were synthesized and their magnetic and electrical transport properties characterized. Both of these compounds are insulating antiferromagnets. Moreover, for long range magnetic order between the antiferromagnetic chains we determined with a propagation vector k = 1/2,1/2,1 and TN = 45 and 33 K the parent and doped materials. An Os5+ moment of 1.7(1)μB for La3OsO7 and 1.2(2)μB for La2.8Ca0.2OsO7 is refined. The long range magnetic structure is compared to the isostructural compounds La3RuO7 and La3MoO7, both of which adopt different magnetic structures.

  1. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  2. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  3. Searching for primordial magnetism with multifrequency cosmic microwave background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosian, Levon

    2014-03-01

    Bounds on the amplitude of a scale-invariant stochastic primordial magnetic field (PMF) can be significantly improved by measurements of the Faraday rotation (FR) of cosmic microwave background polarization. The mode-coupling correlations induced by FR make it possible to extract it from cross-correlations of the B-mode polarization with the E-mode and the temperature anisotropy. In this paper, we construct an estimator of the rotation measure that appropriately combines measurements of the FR from multiple frequency channels. We study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio in the PMF detection on the resolution and the noise of the detectors, as well as the removal of the weak lensing contribution and the Galactic FR. We show that a recently proposed space-based experiment Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission can detect magnetic fields of 0.1 nG strength at a 2σ level. Higher detection levels can be achieved by reducing the detector noise and improving the resolution or increasing the number of channels in the 30-70 GHz frequency range.

  4. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hooper, E. B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R. H.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.

    2003-07-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX.

  5. Turbulent Reconnection in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Oz, E.; Yoo, J.; Daughton, W.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2009-11-01

    One of the key open questions in Magnetic Reconnection is the nature of the mechanism that governs the reconnection rate in real astrophysical and laboratory systems. For collisonless plasmas, the Hall effect removes an important bottleneck to fast reconnection as the heavier ions exit the reconnection layer over a broader region [1]. However, the Hall term cannot balance the reconnection electric field at the layer center, and the 2-D, collisionless expression for the electric field due to particle dynamics [2] has been shown to be insufficient in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) [1,3]. Turbulent 3-D effects such as lower hybrid frequency range fluctuations [4] may play an important role in fast reconnection in MRX. These electromagnetic fluctuations tend to be associated with high local currents and a rapid local reconnection rate. The precise relation of these fluctuations and associated 3-D asymmetries to fast reconnection is a topic of active investigations; the most up to date results will be discussed. This work was supported by NDSEG, DOE, NASA, and NSF.[4pt] [1] Y. Ren, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 082113 (2008). [2] M. Hesse, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 6:1781 (1999). [3] S. Dorfman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102107 (2008). [4] H. Ji, et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 92 (2004) 115001.

  6. Relationship between magnetic susceptibility and strain in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham; Alford, Craig

    1987-02-01

    Under experimental conditions of 1.5 kbar confining pressure and at a strain-rate of 5 × 10 -6 sec -1 at room temperature the principal directions of magnetic susceptibility of a dry, synthetic, magnetite-bearing sandstone rotate toward principal strain directions. The rotation is faster than that expected from rotation of a line in homogeneous strain. Fluid pressures of 200 or 700 bars do not appear to affect the development of anisotropy of susceptibility. The change in bulk anisotropy shows a power law correlation with strain ratio where the initial susceptibility ellipsoid was nearly coaxial with the bulk strain axes during the experiment. More generally, in those situations, as well as ones in which the initial susceptibility ellipsoid was strongly inclined to the bulk strain axes there exists a common matrix M which relates the initial susceptibility tensor kij, the final susceptibility tensor k' ij and the strain tensor eij: eijk' ij = Mk' ij

  7. Intermittent magnetic reconnection in TS-3 merging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Ii, T.; Tanabe, H.; Ito, S.; Kuwahata, A.; Ito, T.; Kamino, Y.; Yamada, T.; Inomoto, M.; Collaboration: TS-Group

    2011-11-15

    Ejection of current sheet with plasma mass causes impulsive and intermittent magnetic reconnection in the TS-3 spherical tokamak (ST) merging experiment. Under high guide toroidal field, the sheet resistivity is almost classical due to the sheet thickness much longer than the ion gyroradius. Large inflow flux and low current-sheet resistivity result in flux and plasma pileup followed by rapid growth of the current sheet. When the pileup exceeds a critical limit, the sheet is ejected mechanically from the squeezed X-point area. The reconnection (outflow) speed is slow during the flux/plasma pileup and is fast during the ejection, suggesting that intermittent reconnection similar to the solar flare increases the averaged reconnection speed. These transient effects enable the merging tokamaks to have the fast reconnection as well as the high-power reconnection heating, even when their current-sheet resistivity is low under high guide field.

  8. New routes to synthesizing an ordered perovskite CaCu3Fe2Sb2O12 and its magnetic structure by neutron powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Larregola, Sebastian A; Zhou, Jianshi; Alonso, Jose A; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Goodenough, John B

    2014-05-05

    The search for new double-perovskite oxides has grown rapidly in recent years because of their interesting physical properties like ferroelectricity, magnetism, and multiferroics. The synthesis of double perovskites, especially the A-site-ordered perovskites, in most cases needs to be made under high pressure, which is a drawback for applying these materials. Here we have demonstrated synthetic routes at ambient pressure by which we have obtained a high-quality duo-sites-ordered double perovskite, CaCu3Fe2Sb2O12, which has been previously synthesized under high pressure. The availability of a large quantity of the powder sample allows us to determine the crystal and magnetic structures by neutron powder diffraction (NPD) at 300 and 1.3 K. Measurements of the magnetization and heat capacity showed a ferrimagnetic transition at 160 K. A ferrimagnetic structure consisting of the uncompensated antiferromagnetic coupling between neighboring collinear copper and iron spins has been resolved from the low-temperature NPD data.

  9. Magnetic structure of superconducting Eu(Fe0.82Co0.18)2As2 as revealed by single-crystal neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W. T.; Nandi, S.; Xiao, Y.; Su, Y.; Zaharko, O.; Guguchia, Z.; Bukowski, Z.; Price, S.; Jiao, W. H.; Cao, G. H.; Brückel, Th.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetic structure of superconducting Eu(Fe0.82Co0.18)2As2 is unambiguously determined by single-crystal neutron diffraction. A long-range ferromagnetic order of the Eu2+ moments along the c direction is revealed below the magnetic phase transition temperature TC=17 K. In addition, the antiferromagnetism of the Fe2+ moments still survives and the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural phase transition is also observed, although the transition temperatures of the Fe spin-density-wave (SDW) order and the structural phase transition are significantly suppressed to TN=70 K and TS=90 K, respectively, compared to the parent compound EuFe2As2. We present microscopic evidence for the coexistence of the Eu ferromagnetism and the Fe SDW in the superconducting crystal. The superconductivity competes with the Fe SDW in Eu(Fe0.82Co0.18)2As2. Moreover, the comparison between Eu(Fe1-xCox)2As2 and Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 indicates a considerable influence of the rare-earth element Eu on the magnetism of the Fe sublattice.

  10. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  11. In situ powder X-ray diffraction, synthesis, and magnetic properties of the defect zircon structure ScVO(4-x).

    PubMed

    Shafi, Shahid P; Kotyk, Matthew W; Cranswick, Lachlan M D; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Kroeker, Scott; Bieringer, Mario

    2009-11-16

    We report the formation pathway of ScVO(4) zircon from ScVO(3) bixbyite with emphasis on the synthesis and stability of the novel intermediate defect zircon phase ScVO(4-x) (0.0 < x diffraction. The oxidation of ScVO(3) to ScVO(4) involves two intermediates of composition ScVO(3.5+y) (0.00 diffraction, neutron diffraction, and bulk magnetic susceptibility data as well as (45)Sc and (51)V solid state NMR spectroscopy. ScVO(4-x) can only be obtained by oxidation of ScVO(3) or ScVO(3.5+y) while the reduction of ScVO(4) does not yield the novel defect structure. Mechanistic insights into the oxidative formation of ScVO(4) via the defect structure are presented.

  12. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-07

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  13. Conformational isomerism in solid state of AMG 853--structure studies using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Y-H; Nagapudi, Karthik; Wu, Tian; Peterson, Matthew L; Jona, Janan; Staples, Richard J; Stephens, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of an additional resonance peak in the (19) F solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of AMG 853, a dual antagonist of DP and CRTH2 previously in clinical development for asthma, has led to the identification of two conformational isomers coexisting in the crystal lattice in a continuous composition range between 89.7%:10.3% and 96.5%:3.5%. These two isomers differ in the chloro-flurorophenyl moiety orientation-the aromatic ring is flipped by 180° in these two isomers. The level of the minor isomer is directly measured through integration of the two peaks in the (19) F solid-state NMR spectrum. The values obtained from the NMR data are in excellent agreement with the degree of disorder of the fluorine atom in the crystal structure, refined using both single-crystal and high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data.

  14. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  15. Magnetic ordering in UCoNiSi2 and UCoCuSi2 studied by ac-susceptibility and neutron-diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietz, Moshe; Pinto, Haim; Melamud, Mordechai

    1994-05-01

    Polycrystalline samples of intermediate solid solutions of the UM2Si2 compounds (M=Co,Ni,Cu), namely UCoNiSi2 and UCoCuSi2, were prepared and were found to have body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type crystallographic structure. In UCoNiSi2 ac susceptibility indicates a single antiferromagnetic (AF) transition at TN=115±5 K, confirmed by neutron-diffraction observation of the AF-I structure down to 10 K (with uranium moments of 1.6±0.2μB, along the tetragonal c axis). In UCoCuSi2 ac susceptibility indicates ferromagnetic transition at TC=107±5 K, and implies an AF transition at lower temperature, confirmed by the AF-I structure, observed in neutron diffraction below T0=95±5 K down to 10 K (with uranium moments of 1.6±0.1μB, along the c axis). The magnetic properties are discussed in comparison with UM2X2 and U(M,M')2X2 materials (X=Si,Ge).

  16. Computational modeling of joint U.S.-Russian experiments relevant to magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1997-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) experiments, in which a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions, present some challenging computational modeling problems. Recently, joint experiments relevant to MTF (Russian acronym MAGO, for Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) have been performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). Modeling of target plasmas must accurately predict plasma densities, temperatures, fields, and lifetime; dense plasma interactions with wall materials must be characterized. Modeling of magnetically driven imploding solid liners, for compression of target plasmas, must address issues such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in the presence of material strength, and glide plane-liner interactions. Proposed experiments involving liner-on-plasma compressions to fusion conditions will require integrated target plasma and liner calculations. Detailed comparison of the modeling results with experiment will be presented.

  17. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  18. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.; Jensen, B. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Fezzaa, K.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Shimada, T.

    2012-07-01

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (<100 ps) and spatial (˜2 μm) resolutions for bulk-scale shock experiments, as well as single-pulse dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  19. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Luo, S N; Jensen, B J; Hooks, D E; Fezzaa, K; Ramos, K J; Yeager, J D; Kwiatkowski, K; Shimada, T

    2012-07-01

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (<100 ps) and spatial (∼2 μm) resolutions for bulk-scale shock experiments, as well as single-pulse dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  20. An ultrahigh-vacuum apparatus for resonant diffraction experiments using soft x rays (h{nu}=300-2000 eV)

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, T.; Chainani, A.; Takata, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Oura, M.; Tsubota, M.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.; Shin, S.

    2009-02-15

    We have developed an ultrahigh-vacuum instrument for resonant diffraction experiments using polarized soft x rays in the energy range of h{nu}=300-2000 eV at beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. The diffractometer consists of modified differentially pumped rotary feedthroughs for {theta}-2{theta} stages, a sample manipulator with motor-controlled x-y-z-, tilt ({chi})-, and azimuth ({phi})-axes, and a liquid helium flow-type cryostat for temperature dependent measurements between 30 and 300 K. Test results indicate that the diffractometer exhibits high reproducibility (better than 0.001 deg.) for a Bragg reflection of {alpha}-quartz 100 at a photon energy of h{nu}=1950 eV. Typical off- and on-resonance Bragg reflections in the energy range of 530-1950 eV could be measured using the apparatus. The results show that x-ray diffraction experiments with energy-, azimuth-, and incident photon polarization-dependence can be reliably measured using soft x rays in the energy range of {approx}300-2000 eV. The facility can be used for resonant diffraction experiments across the L-edge of transition metals, M-edge of lanthanides, and up to the Si K-edge of materials.

  1. Scaling experiments on a magnetically insulated thermionic vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Eninger, J.E.; Vanderberg, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetic insulation of the electron flow in a cylindrical thermionic vacuum diode has been proposed as a way to achieve a fast high-voltage high-power opening switch. The expected performance of this type of device can be derived from a set of basic scaling laws combined with empirical relationships obtained from experimental studies. Switch losses are mainly due to anode dissipation W{sub a}, which can be normalized to the transferred pulse energy. Leakage current and switch hold-off voltage depend on device geometry, materials, vacuum conditions etc and must be determined experimentally. For this purpose, the MX-1 experiment has been designed and operated. This device is basically a smooth-bore cylindrical magnetron with a 5 cm radius, 400 cm{sup 2} area thermionic dispenser cathode separated from the coaxial water-cooled anode by a few mm wide gap. This design allows pulsed operation at up to {approximately}100 kV, {approximately}4 kA and average power levels of {approximately}1 MW. The MX-1 switch is used as an opening switch to produce 1--2 {mu}s long square pulses from an inductive storage PFN. The current-voltage characteristics of the switch are determined as a function of the applied magnetic field and load condition. Plasma wave measurements are performed to investigate the stability of the electron flow. Results are summarized in the form of scaling diagrams for the important switch parameters, showing possible performance levels and physical and technical limitations identified as far in this work.

  2. X-ray diffraction study of the optimization of MgO growth conditions for magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O, Se Young; Lee, Chan-Gyu; Shapiro, Alexander J.; Egelhoff, William F.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Ruglovsky, Jennifer L.; Mallett, Jonathan; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2008-04-01

    We have carried out a systematic study optimizing the MgO growth via preparation and sputtering conditions and underlayer structures. It was found that to prevent water vapor which is detrimental to MgO (200) growth, the chamber pressure needs to be reduced below 10-8Torr. Simple underlayers such as 5nm CoFeB tend to give better MgO, but we have also succeeded in growing MgO on more complicated underlayers such as 1 Ta/20 Au/5 Co40Fe40B20 and 1 Ta/20 conetic (Ni77Fe14Cu5Mo4)/1.5 Co40Fe40B20 (units in nanometers). We accomplished this by extensive baking of the deposition chamber and use of Ti-getter films. Short sputtering distance and high sputtering power were found to optimize MgO deposition. We found that both preparation and sputtering conditions have important effects on the MgO growth. X-ray diffraction analysis was used as the characterization tool for optimizing the MgO growth conditions.

  3. Refinement of atomic and magnetic structures using neutron diffraction for synthesized bulk and nano-nickel zinc gallate ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata-Allah, S. S.; Balagurov, A. M.; Hashhash, A.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Hamdy, Sh.

    2016-01-01

    The parent NiFe2O4 and Zn/Ga substituted spinel ferrite powders have been prepared by solid state reaction technique. As a typical example, the Ni0.7Zn0.3Fe1.5Ga0.5O4 sample has been prepared by sol-gel auto combustion method with the nano-scale crystallites size. X-ray and Mössbauer studies were carried out for the prepared samples. Structure and microstructure properties were investigated using the time-of-flight HRFD instrument at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor, at a temperatures range 15-473 K. The Rietveld refinement of the neutron diffraction data revealed that all samples possess cubic symmetry corresponding to the space group Fd3m. Cations distribution show that Ni2+ is a complete inverse spinel ion, while Ga3+ equally distributed between the two A and B-sublattices. The level of microstrains in bulk samples was estimated as very small while the size of coherently scattered domains is quite large. For nano-structured sample the domain size is around 120 Å.

  4. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  5. The Magnetic Sentences Industry Game: A Competitive In-Class Experience of Business-Level Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casile, Maureen; Wheeler, Jane V.

    2005-01-01

    The Magnetic Sentences Industry Game is a high-energy in-class exercise designed to help students gain hands-on experience with setting, implementing, evaluating, and revising business-level strategy. Students compete in teams to create and market sentences using Magnetic Poetry (a product of Magnetic Poetry, Inc.). Revenues earned are highly…

  6. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  7. Experiments on the applicability of MAE techniques for predicting sound diffraction by irregular terrains. [Matched Asymptotic Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Yves H.; Pierce, Allan D.; Kearns, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The sound field diffracted by a single smooth hill of finite impedance is studied both analytically, within the context of the theory of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE), and experimentally, under laboratory scale modeling conditions. Special attention is given to the sound field on the diffracting surface and throughout the transition region between the illuminated and the shadow zones. The MAE theory yields integral equations that are amenable to numerical computations. Experimental results are obtained with a spark source producing a pulse of 42 microsec duration and about 130 Pa at 1 m. The insertion loss of the hill is inferred from measurements of the acoustic signals at two locations in the field, with subsequent Fourier analysis on an IBM PC/AT. In general, experimental results support the predictions of the MAE theory, and provide a basis for the analysis of more complicated geometries.

  8. Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, a new Ru{sup 4+/5+} oxy-chloride, solved by precession electron diffraction: Electric and magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel, Pascal; Palatinus, Lukas; Belva, Frédéric; Daviero-Minaud, Sylvie; Mentre, Olivier; Huve, Marielle

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, a new Ru{sup 4+/5+} oxo-chloride, has been determined from Precession Electron Diffraction (PED) data acquired on a nanocrystal in a transmission electron microscope using the technique of electron diffraction tomography. This approach is described in details following a pedagogic route and a systematic comparison is made of this rather new method with other experimental methods of electron diffraction, and with the standard single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Both transport and magnetic measurements, showed a transition at low temperature that may be correlated to Ru{sup 4+}/Ru{sup 5+} charge ordering. - Graphical abstract: Structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, determined using Precession Electron Diffraction data. - Highlights: • Structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18} was solved ab initio using precession electron diffraction. • This was done both on a nanometric sample and on a micrometric one. • Different type of experimental methods of electron diffraction are compared. • Single crystal X-ray diffraction was used to confirm the results. • Transport properties were characterized and show “exotic” behavior.

  9. Neutron diffraction studies on chemical and magnetic structure of multiferroic PbFe{sub 0.67}W{sub 0.33}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Matteppanavar, Shidaling Angadi, Basavaraj; Rayaprol, Sudhindra

    2014-04-24

    We report on the single phase synthesis and room temperature structural characterization of PbFe{sub 0.67}W{sub 0.33}O{sub 3} (PFW) multiferroic. The PFW was synthesized by low temperature sintering, Columbite method. Analysis of powder XRD pattern exhibits single phase formation of PFW with no traces of pyrochlore phase. Detailed analysis of room temperature neutron diffraction (ND) reveals cubic phase at room temperature, space group Pm-3m. The ND pattern clearly reveals magnetic Bragg peak at 2θ = 18.51° (Q = 1.36Å{sup −1}). The refinement of magnetic structure reveals G-type antiferromagnetic structure in PFW at room temperature. The dielectric constant and loss tangent decreases with increasing frequency. The room temperature P-E measurements shows a non-linear slim hysteresis, typical nature of relaxor multiferroics, with saturation and remnant polarizations of P{sub s} = 1.50 μC/cm{sup 2} and P{sub r} = 0.40 μC/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  10. Revealing the Formation Mechanism and Effect of Pressure on the Magnetic Order of Multiferroic BiMn2O5 Through Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, N. T.; Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Jabarov, S. G.; Mammadov, A. I.; Mekhtieva, R. Z.; Phan, T. L.; Smotrakov, V. G.; Eremkin, V. V.; Savenko, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    The crystal and magnetic structures of the strong magnetoelectric BiMn2O5 have been studied as a function of pressure up to 5.7 GPa in the temperature range from 10 K to 60 K by means of neutron powder diffraction. The results reveal that the Pbam orthorhombic crystal structure remains unchanged in the investigated thermodynamic range. At ambient pressure, a long-range commensurate antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase with propagation vector q = (1/2, 0, 1/2) formed below T N = 41(2) K, accompanied by anomalies in the temperature dependence of structural parameters including the lattice parameters, interatomic distances, and bond angles. This AFM phase remained stable in the studied pressure range, and the relevant pressure coefficient of the Néel temperature was determined to be 3.0(4) K/GPa. No incommensurate AFM phase was detected. The magnetic properties of BiMn2O5 and their difference from most other RMn2O5 compounds were analyzed in terms of competing exchange interactions.

  11. Magnetic-field-induced charge order in the filled skutterudite SmRu4P12: Evidence from resonant and nonresonant x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Michimura, Shinji; Inami, Toshiya; Hayashi, Yuya; Fushiya, Kengo; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Aoki, Yuji; Sugawara, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The antiferromagnetic ordered phase in SmRu4P12 below the metal-insulator transition at TMI=16.5 K with an unresolved transition at T*˜14 K has been studied by resonant and nonresonant x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields. In the intermediate phase, a nonresonant Thomson scattering with q =(1,0,0) is induced by applying a magnetic field, which is presumably caused by atomic displacements reflecting the charge order in the p band, as predicted theoretically [R. Shiina, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 82, 083713 (2013), 10.7566/JPSJ.82.083713]. Simultaneously, the antiferromagnetic moment of Sm is enhanced along the field direction, which is considered to reflect the staggered ordering of the Γ7-Γ8 crystal-field states (scalar or hexadecapole order). The present results show that the orbital-dependent p-f hybridization in association with the nesting instability in the p band gives rise to the unconventional charge order similarly with PrRu4P12 and PrFe4P12.

  12. Computation of diffuse scattering arising from one-phonon excitations in a neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Laue diffraction experiment

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Matthias J.; Graziano, Gabriella; Mukhopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Refson, Keith; von Zimmerman, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Direct phonon excitation in a neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Laue diffraction experiment has been observed in a single crystal of NaCl. At room temperature both phonon emission and excitation leave characteristic features in the diffuse scattering and these are well reproduced using ab initio phonons from density functional theory (DFT). A measurement at 20 K illustrates the effect of thermal population of the phonons, leaving the features corresponding to phonon excitation and strongly suppressing the phonon annihilation. A recipe is given to compute these effects combining DFT results with the geometry of the neutron experiment. PMID:26306090

  13. Magnetic ground state of the two isostructual polymeric quantum magnets [Cu(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 and [Co(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 investigated with neutron powder diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Brambleby, J.; Goddard, P. A.; Johnson, R. D.; ...

    2015-10-07

    The magnetic ground state of two isostructural coordination polymers, (i) the quasi-two-dimensional S=1/2 square-lattice antiferromagnet [Cu(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 and (ii) a related compound [Co(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6, was examined with neutron powder diffraction measurements. We find that the ordered moments of the Heisenberg S=1/2 Cu(II) ions in [Cu(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 are 0.6(1)μb, while the ordered moments for the Co(II) ions in [Co(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 are 3.02(6)μb. For Cu(II), this reduced moment indicates the presence of quantum fluctuations below the ordering temperature. We also show from heat capacity and electron spin resonance measurements that due to the crystal electric field splitting of the S=3/2 Co(II) ions in [Co(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6, this isostructualmore » polymer also behaves as an effective spin-half magnet at low temperatures. Furthermore, the Co moments in [Co(HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 show strong easy-axis anisotropy, neutron diffraction data, which do not support the presence of quantum fluctuations in the ground state, and heat capacity data, which are consistent with 2D or close to 3D spatial exchange anisotropy.« less

  14. Magnetic ground state of the two isostructual polymeric quantum magnets [Cu (HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 and [Co (HF2)(pyrazine)2]SbF6 investigated with neutron powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambleby, J.; Goddard, P. A.; Johnson, R. D.; Liu, J.; Kaminski, D.; Ardavan, A.; Steele, A. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Manuel, P.; Baker, P. J.; Singleton, J.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Spurgeon, P. M.; Tran, H. E.; Peterson, P. K.; Corbey, J. F.; Manson, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic ground state of two isostructural coordination polymers, (i) the quasi-two-dimensional S =1 /2 square-lattice antiferromagnet [Cu (HF2)(pyrazine) 2]SbF6 and (ii) a related compound [Co (HF2)(pyrazine) 2]SbF6 , was examined with neutron powder diffraction measurements. We find that the ordered moments of the Heisenberg S =1 /2 Cu(II) ions in [Cu (HF2)(pyrazine) 2]SbF6 are 0.6 (1 )μb, while the ordered moments for the Co(II) ions in [Co (HF2)(pyrazine) 2]SbF6 are 3.02 (6 )μb. For Cu(II), this reduced moment indicates the presence of quantum fluctuations below the ordering temperature. We show from heat capacity and electron spin resonance measurements that due to the crystal electric field splitting of the S =3 /2 Co(II) ions in [Co (HF2)(pyrazine) 2]SbF6 , this isostructual polymer also behaves as an effective spin-half magnet at low temperatures. The Co moments in [Co (HF2)(pyrazine) 2]SbF6 show strong easy-axis anisotropy, neutron diffraction data, which do not support the presence of quantum fluctuations in the ground state, and heat capacity data, which are consistent with 2D or close to 3D spatial exchange anisotropy.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  16. A Compact Pulser for Magnetically Driven Isentropic-Compression Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, R. B.; Bavay, M.; Mervini, J. A.; Avrillaud, G.

    2007-06-01

    The use of magnetic fields to isentropically compress materials for equation-of-state studies has been demonstrated on Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine. Sharing similarities with the GEPI pulser at the Centre de Etudes de Gramat in France, a compact pulser has been designed and built specifically for isentropic compression experiments. In order to be compact and low cost, the design uses a solid dielectric transmission line to couple current from eight low-inductance Haefely capacitors that are switched with ultra-low-inductance multi-channel gas switches. A peaking stage made of 72 General Atomics capacitors enhanced by a low-inductance, multi-channel peaking switch brings the fundamental rise time of the pulser down to 350 ns (10-90%). A varaible inductance in parallel with the peaking switch as well as using various gases in the switch allow us to control the details of the current wave shape. The pulser delivers a peak current of 4 MA at a charge voltage of 80 kV into a short circuit. The rise time can be lengthened to greater than 650 ns to deliver a current of 4.2 MA. The performance of this pulser will be described along with potential design changes that would provide decreases in current rise time and increases in current delivered to real world loads.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: initial experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.

    1983-12-01

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in 21 female subjects: seven volunteers, 12 patients scanned for reasons unrelated to the lower genitourinary tract, and two patients referred with gynecologic disease. The uterus at several stages was examined; the premenarcheal uterus (one patient), the uterus of reproductive age (12 patients), the postmenopausal uterus (two patients), and in an 8 week pregnancy (one patient). The myometrium and cyclic endometrium in the reproductive age separated by a low-intensity line (probably stratum basale), which allows recognition of changes in thickness of the cyclic endometrium during the menstrual cycle. The corpus uteri can be distinguished from the cervix by the transitional zone of the isthmus. The anatomic relation of the uterus to bladder and rectum is easily outlined. The vagina can be distinguished from the cervix, and the anatomic display of the closely apposed bladder, vagina, and rectum is clear on axial and coronal images. The ovary is identified; the signal intensity from the ovary depends on the acquisition parameter used. Uterine leiomyoma, endometriosis, and dermoid cyst were depicted, but further experience is needed to ascertain the specificity of the findings.

  18. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  19. Cycloid spirals and cycloid cone transition in the HoMn6-xCrxGe6 (T, x) magnetic phase diagramm by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobinger-Papamantellos, P.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    2016-06-01

    The structures and magnetic properties of the antiferromagnetic hexagonal pseudo ternary compounds HoMn6-xCrxGe6 (x=1, 1.5 and 2) are studied by neutron diffraction in the temperature range 1.5-300 K. The substitution of nonmagnetic Cr for Mn greatly affects the magnetic properties of HoMn6Ge6 by reducing the ordering temperature from 466 K to 278 K, 205 K and 130 K for (x=0, 1, 1.5 and 2) respectively, increasing the c/a ratio, suppressing the high temperature (HT) commensurate phase with q2=(0, 0, 1/2) and changing the high temperature (LT) q1=(0, 0, q1z) skew spiral rotation plane. HoMn5CrGe6 and HoMn4Cr2Ge6 display in the entire magnetically ordered regime cycloid spiral structures with the wave vector: q=(0, 0, qz), qz≈0.18(3) r.l.u. and Φs≈64.8° turn angle. The Ho and Mn/Cr (001) layers have ferromagnetic arrangements coupled antiferromagnetically. The Ho moments in the z=0 layer are oriented in a direction opposite to the line bisecting the angle 2φMn≈2×28° of the Mn layers at z=±∼0.25. This triple unit changes orientation collectively in the direction of q within the (b, c) plane containing the wave vector. Above 50 K, the wave vector length increases linearly from 0.24 to 0.28(1) r.l.u. below TN. The HT HoMn4.5Cr1.5Ge6 cycloid spiral, is stable in the range Ttmagnetic satellites and the increase of characteristic nuclear intensities. The results are summarised in a (T, x) magnetic phase diagram.

  20. Preliminary Results of the Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, W.; Athena Science Team

    Spirit and Opportunity each carry a set of Magnetic Properties Experiments to investigate the properties of the air-borne dust in the Martian atmosphere. The goal of the magnetic properties experiments is to provide information on how the dust once formed. The objectives are: a) To identify the magnetic mineral(s) in the dust, soil and rocks on Mars. b) To establish if the magnetic material is present in the form of nanosized possibly superparamagnetic crystallites embedded in the micrometer sized airborne dust particles. c) To establish if the magnets are culling a subset of strongly magnetic particles or if essentially all particles of the airborne dust are sufficiently magnetic to be attracted by the magnets. d) Detect compositional differences between the airborne dust and the soil and rock sites which are investigated at two landing sites. Two large magnets (called Capture and Filter magnet) are located such that the attracted dust can be studied by the Panoramic Camera (Pancam), the Mössbauer Spectrometer, the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), and the Microscopic Imager (MI). The dust settles on a circular surface of high purity aluminium (45 mm in diameter), where the central part (25 mm in diameter) is magnetically active. The Capture magnet was designed to be as strong as possible, whereas the strength of the Filter magnet was chosen such that it attracts mainly dust particles with high magnetic susceptibility (hence the name ``filter magnet''). A so-called Sweep Magnet experiment is placed near the Pancam Calibration Target. The purpose of the Sweep Magnet experiment is twofold: 1) to try to detect if any non-magnetic minerals are present in the atmospheric dust in any significant amount. 2) to provide a magnetically attracted dust layer suitable for spectroscopic investigation by the Pancam spectroscopy band pass filters. Each rover carries a Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on the robotic arm (IDD), which can be used to remove dust (by brushing) and

  1. Newton's diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2004-05-01

    This year marks the tercentenary of the publication of Newton's Opticks which contains his celebrated theory and experiments of light and colors as it evolved from the first published version in 1672. It is still fairly unknown, however, that in this book Newton also reported his experiments on diffraction fringes obtained from various "slender" objects placed in a beam of sunlight. These experiments posed an insurmountable difficulty to Newton's corpuscular theory of light, which failed to account for his observations. This failure explains the long delay in the publication of this book. In my talk I will compare Newton's experimental results on diffraction with the predictions of Fresnel's wave theory to demonstrate that his measurements were remarkable accurate. Eventually these measurements paved the way for Young's correct explanation of the diffraction fringes as a wave interference phenomenon.

  2. Preliminary Results of the Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hviid, S. F.; Bertelsen, P.; Goetz, W.; Kinch, K. M.; Knudsen, J. M.; Madsen, M. B.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J. F., III; Yen, A.; Johnson, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers each carry a set of Magnetic Properties Experiments designed to investigate the properties of the air-borne dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is a preferred interpretation of previous experiments (Viking 1 & 2, 1976 and Mars Pathfinder, 1997) that the airborne dust in the Martian atmosphere is primarily composed by composite silicate particles containing one or more highly magnetic minerals as a minor constituent, this minor constituent probably being dominated by the mineral maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3). The ultimate goal of the magnetic properties experiments on the Mars Exploration Rover mission is to provide some information/constraints on whether the dust is formed by volcanic, meteoritic, aqueous, or other processes. In detail, the objectives are: a) To identify the magnetic mineral(s) in the dust, soil and rocks on Mars. b) To establish if the magnetic material is present in the form of nanosized (d < 10 nm) superparamagnetic crystallites embedded in the micrometer sized airborne dust part icles. c) To establish if the magnets are culling a subset of strongly magnetic particles or if essentially all particles of the airborne dust are sufficiently magnetic to be attracted by the magnets. d) Detect compositional differences between the airborne dust and the soil and rock sites which are investigated at two landing sites. To accomplish these goals the Mars Exploration Rovers each carry a set of permanent magnets of several different strengths and sizes. Each magnet has its own specific objective.

  3. Preliminary Results of the Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hviid, S. F.; Bertelsen, P.; Goetz, W.; Kinch, K. M.; Knudsen, J. M.; Madsen, M. B.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J. F., III; Yen, A.; Johnson, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers each carry a set of Magnetic Properties Experiments designed to investigate the properties of the air-borne dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is a preferred interpretation of previous experiments (Viking 1 & 2, 1976 and Mars Pathfinder, 1997) that the airborne dust in the Martian atmosphere is primarily composed by composite silicate particles containing one or more highly magnetic minerals as a minor constituent, this minor constituent probably being dominated by the mineral maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3). The ultimate goal of the magnetic properties experiments on the Mars Exploration Rover mission is to provide some information/constraints on whether the dust is formed by volcanic, meteoritic, aqueous, or other processes. In detail, the objectives are: a) To identify the magnetic mineral(s) in the dust, soil and rocks on Mars. b) To establish if the magnetic material is present in the form of nanosized (d < 10 nm) superparamagnetic crystallites embedded in the micrometer sized airborne dust part icles. c) To establish if the magnets are culling a subset of strongly magnetic particles or if essentially all particles of the airborne dust are sufficiently magnetic to be attracted by the magnets. d) Detect compositional differences between the airborne dust and the soil and rock sites which are investigated at two landing sites. To accomplish these goals the Mars Exploration Rovers each carry a set of permanent magnets of several different strengths and sizes. Each magnet has its own specific objective.

  4. Design the diffractive optical element with large diffraction angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hui; Yin, Shaoyun; Zheng, Guoxing; Deng, Qiling; Shi, Lifang; Du, Chunlei

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a quite effective method is proposed for designing the diffractive optical element (DOE) to generate a pattern with large diffraction angle. Through analyze the difference between the non-paraxial Rayleigh Sommerfeld integral and the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral, we modify the desired output intensity distribution with coordinate transformation and intensity adjustment. Then the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral can be used to design the DOE, which adopts the fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) algorithm to accelerate the computation. To verify our method, the simulation and the experiments are taken. And the result shows that our method can effectively rectify the pillow distortion and can achieve the exact diffraction angle.

  5. Colloidal Suspensions of Rodlike Nanocrystals and Magnetic Spheres under an External Magnetic Stimulus: Experiment and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Eremin, Alexey; Stannarius, Ralf; Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L; Klein, Susanne

    2016-05-24

    Using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we explore magnetic field-induced phase transformations in suspensions of nonmagnetic rodlike and magnetic sphere-shaped particles. We experimentally demonstrate that an external uniform magnetic field causes the formation of small, stable clusters of magnetic particles that, in turn, induce and control the orientational order of the nonmagnetic subphase. Optical birefringence was studied as a function of the magnetic field and the volume fractions of each particle type. Steric transfer of the orientational order was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations; the results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. By reproducing the general experimental trends, the MD simulation offers a cohesive bottom-up interpretation of the physical behavior of such systems, and it can also be regarded as a guide for further experimental research.

  6. Active experiments in space in conjunction with Skylab. [barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two papers are presented which relate to the Skylab barium shaped charge experiments. The first describes the L=6.6 OOSIK barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972. Rocket payload, instrumentation, data reduction methods, geophysical environment at the time of the experiment, and results are given. The second paper presents the observation of an auroral Birkeland current which developed from the distortion of a barium plasma jet during the above experiment.

  7. Applied magnetic field design for the field reversed configuration compression heating experiment.

    PubMed

    Domonkos, M T; Amdahl, D; Camacho, J F; Coffey, S K; Degnan, J H; Delaney, R; Frese, M; Gale, D; Grabowski, T C; Gribble, R; Intrator, T P; McCullough, J; Montano, N; Robinson, P R; Wurden, G

    2013-04-01

    Detailed calculations of the formation, guide, and mirror applied magnetic fields in the FRC compression-heating experiment (FRCHX) were conducted using a commercially available generalized finite element solver, COMSOL Multiphysics(®). In FRCHX, an applied magnetic field forms, translates, and finally captures the FRC in the liner region sufficiently long to enable compression. Large single turn coils generate the fast magnetic fields necessary for FRC formation. Solenoidal coils produce the magnetic field for translation and capture of the FRC prior to liner implosion. Due to the limited FRC lifetime, liner implosion is initiated before the FRC is injected, and the magnetic flux that diffuses into the liner is compressed. Two-dimensional axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations using MACH2 were used to specify optimal magnetic field characteristics, and this paper describes the simulations conducted to design magnetic field coils and compression hardware for FRCHX. This paper presents the vacuum solution for the magnetic field.

  8. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  9. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  10. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments to examine the elastic-plastic transition in shocked magnesium-doped LiF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    Time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements were used to examine the lattice deformation during elastic-plastic deformation in Mg-doped (approximately 100 ppm) LiF single crystals shocked along [100]. The magnesium impurities significantly increase the elastic limit of the LiF crystals, as compared to the low values observed for ultrapure LiF crystals, leading to a large amplitude elastic wave and significant stress relaxation behind the elastic wave. The objective of the current work was to examine lattice deformation throughout this wave profile using time-resolved, x-ray diffraction methods (2 ns resolution) for plate impact experiments to gain insight into time-dependent, elastic-plastic deformation at the microscopic level. The diffraction data were analyzed using an x-ray model coupled to an existing wave propagation code that incorporated dislocation mechanisms for elastic-plastic deformation including stress relaxation. All experimental results revealed a uniaxial lattice compression at the elastic wave front followed by a rapid transition toward isotropic unit cell compression during stress relaxation. Furthermore, comparison between the experimental data and the calculated streak records indicated that the lattice transition proceeds at a faster rate than predicted by the model. Further implications of these results are discussed.

  11. Experience with measuring magnetic moments of permanent magnet blocks at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Barale, P.J.; Green, M.I.; Van Dyke, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    Since May 1985, The Magnetic Measurements Engineering Group at LBL has measured and sorted a total of 3834 permanent magnet blocks. These magnetic blocks have been used in the construction of various successful beam-line elements including dipoles, quadrupoles, and wigglers. We report on observed variations in magnetic moments among blocks supplied by five manufacturers, describe the operational capabilities (accuracy, precision, and resolution) of the LBL Magnetic-moment Measurement and Sorting System (MMSS), cite the results of comparative calibrations by permanent-magnet manufacturers and other National Laboratories, and suggest criteria for automating the MMSS for measuring the large number of permanent-magnet blocks required for the insertion devices for the projected LBL 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Octupole magnet for soft X ray magnetic dichroism experiments: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2003-08-24

    An octupole magnet endstation for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism measurements has been developed at the Advanced Light Source. The system consists of an eight pole electromagnet that surrounds a small vacuum chamber. The magnet provides fields up to 0.9 T that can be applied in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. High precision magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra can be obtained reversing the magnetic field for each photon energy in an energy scan. Moreover, the field dependence of all components of the magnetization vector can be studied in detail by choosing various angles of x-ray incidence while keeping the relative orientation of magnetic field and sample fixed.

  13. Octupole Magnet For Soft X Ray Magnetic Dichroism Experiments: Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2004-05-12

    An octupole magnet endstation for soft x ray magnetic dichroism measurements has been developed at the Advanced Light Source. The system consists of an eight pole electromagnet that surrounds a small vacuum chamber. The magnet provides fields up to 0.9 T that can be applied in any direction relative to the incoming x ray beam. High precision magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra can be obtained reversing the magnetic field for each photon energy in an energy scan. Moreover, the field dependence of all components of the magnetization vector can be studied in detail by choosing various angles of x ray incidence while keeping the relative orientation of magnetic field and sample fixed.

  14. An Analysis of the X-Ray Diffraction Signal for the (alpha) - (epsilon) Transition in Shock-Compressed Iron: Simulation and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Colvin, J D; Kalantar, D H; Lorenzana, H E; Stolken, J S; Davies, H M; Germann, T C; Holian, B L; Kadau, K; Lomdahl, P S; Higginbotham, A; Rosolankova, K; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S

    2006-04-10

    Recent published work has shown that the phase change of shock compressed iron along the [001] direction does transform to the {epsilon} (HCP) phase similar to the case for static measurements. This article provides an indepth analysis of the experiment and NEMD simulations, using x-ray diffraction in both cases to study the crystal structure upon transition. Both simulation and experiment are consistent with a compression and shuffle mechanism responsible for the phase change from BCC to HCP. Also both show a polycrystalline structure upon the phase transition, due to the four degenerate directions the phase change can occur on, with grain sizes measured of 4nm in the NEMD simulations and {approx} 2nm in the experiment. And looking at the time scale of the transition the NEMD shows the transition from the compressed BCC to HCP is less then 1.2 ps where the experimental data places an upper limit on the transition of 80 ps.

  15. Neutron diffraction determination of the magnetic structures of NpCo 2Si 2 and NpCu 2Si 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novion, C. H. de; Gal, J.; Buevoz, J. L.

    1980-07-01

    A small polycrystalline ingot sample of NpCo 2Si 2 (weight ≈ 1.5 g) has been studied by neutron diffration between 2 and 160 K on the multi-detector D1B of ILL, Grenoble. At 100 K, the crystal structure is body-centered tetragonal (space group 14/mmm) with a = 3.886 Å and c =9.649 Å. Below TN = (44 ± 2) K, seven superlattice lines are observed which correspond to a simple tetragonal lattice with lattice constants as above. They are consistent with a type I antiferromagnetic structure of the Np (2a) sublattice, with (001) ferromagnetic sheets coupled antiferromagnetically according to the sequence +-+-. At 6 K, the neptunium moment obtained from the diffracted intensities is: (1.48 ± 0.20) μuB, and makes an angle 52° ± 15° with the c axis. The cobalt moment is certainly smallet than 0.3 μuB. The Np moment correlates well with the 237Np hyperfine field deduced from Mössbauer spectroscopy; the sublattice magnetization-temoperature curve follows very well the J= {1}/{2} brillouin curve. The magnetism is therefore probably of lovalized character in this compound. An isomorphous sample of NpCu 2Si 2 ( a = 3.990 Å c = 9.920 Å) was shown to be ferromagnetic below (41 ± 2) K, with the Np moment [1.5 ± 0.2) μuB] aligned along the c axis.

  16. Magnetic field dependent neutron powder diffraction studies of Ru{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 2}YCu{sub 2.1}O{sub 7.9}

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, R.; Pan, A. V.; Dou, S. X.; Kennedy, S. J.; Studer, A. J.; Stuesser, N.

    2010-05-15

    Temperature and magnetic field dependent neutron diffraction has been used to study the magnetic order in Ru{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 2}YCu{sub 2.1}O{sub 7.9}. The appearance of (1/2, 1/2, 1/2), (1/2, 1/2, 3/2), and (1/2, 1/2, 5/2) peaks below T{sub M}=140 K manifests the antiferromagnetic order. Neutron diffraction patterns measured in applied magnetic fields from 0 to 6 T show the destruction of the antiferromagnetic order with increasing field. There is no evidence of spontaneous or field-induced long range ferromagnetic order. This latter result contradicts the vast majority of other experimental observations for this system.

  17. A new view of the spin echo diffusive diffraction in porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepisnik, J.

    2002-11-01

    Analysis with the characteristic functional of stochastic motion is used to clarify details of the diffraction-like effect at the gradient spin echo measurement of self-diffusion in porous structures. This approach shows that the phase interference of spins rebounding at boundaries brings about the diffraction, when the mean displacement of scattered spins is equal to the phase grating caused by the applied magnetic field gradient. The diffraction patterns convey information about morphology of the surrounding media only at times long enough that boundaries restrict further spin displacements. The method explains the dependence of diffraction on the time and width of gradient pulses, as observed at the experiments and the simulations.

  18. Magnetic MAX phases from theory and experiments; a review.

    PubMed

    Ingason, A S; Dahlqvist, M; Rosen, J

    2016-11-02

    This review presents MAX phases (M is a transition metal, A an A-group element, X is C or N), known for their unique combination of ceramic/metallic properties, as a recently uncovered family of novel magnetic nanolaminates. The first created magnetic MAX phases were predicted through evaluation of phase stability using density functional theory, and subsequently synthesized as heteroepitaxial thin films. All magnetic MAX phases reported to date, in bulk or thin film form, are based on Cr and/or Mn, and they include (Cr,Mn)2AlC, (Cr,Mn)2GeC, (Cr,Mn)2GaC, (Mo,Mn)2GaC, (V,Mn)3GaC2, Cr2AlC, Cr2GeC and Mn2GaC. A variety of magnetic properties have been found, such as ferromagnetic response well above room temperature and structural changes linked to magnetic anisotropy. In this paper, theoretical as well as experimental work performed on these materials to date is critically reviewed, in terms of methods used, results acquired, and conclusions drawn. Open questions concerning magnetic characteristics are discussed, and an outlook focused on new materials, superstructures, property tailoring and further synthesis and characterization is presented.

  19. Characterization by X-Ray Absorption, X-Ray Powder Diffraction, and Magnetic Susceptibility of Cu Zn Co Al Containing Hydroxycarbonates, Oxycarbonates, Oxides, and Their Products of Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porta, Piero; Morpurgo, Simone; Pettiti, Ida

    1996-02-01

    Copper-zinc-cobalt-aluminium-containing crystalline hydroxycarbonates having hydrotalcite structure have been prepared by coprecipitation. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), magnetic susceptibility, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicate that Cu2+, Zn2+, and Co2+are present in an octahedral environment. Calcination of the hydroxycarbonates at 723 K produces quasi-amorphous oxycarbonates where Cu2+and Co2+still retain octahedral coordination and cobalt is almost completely oxidized to Co3+. The coordination of Zn2+, at this stage, is intermediate between the octahedral one of the precursors and the tetrahedral one of ZnO and Zn-based spinels. Further calcination at 973 K produces a mixture of crystalline oxides such as CuO, ZnO, CuAl2O4, ZnAl2O4, and ZnCo2O4. EXAFS analysis of these samples indicates that copper is mainly in a fourfold coordination (although two longer Cu-O distances are also detected), zinc is tetrahedral, and cobalt (as Co3+) is essentially octahedral. EXAFS and XANES investigations performed afterin situreduction (10% H2/N2, at 523 and 623 K) on the oxycarbonates and oxides reveal that the total Cu2+→ Cu0reduction occurs only at 623 K in both series of samples, Co3+is reduced to Co2+only at 623 K in the oxycarbonates, and Zn2+is never reduced.

  20. Viking satellite program - preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Erlandson, R.E.; Gustafsson, G.; Acuna, M.H.

    1986-12-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  1. The Viking satellite program - Preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemra, Thomas A.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Gustafsson, Georg; Acuna, Mario H.

    1986-12-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  2. The Viking satellite program - Preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potemra, Thomas A.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Gustafsson, Georg; Acuna, Mario H.

    1986-01-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  3. Tools and setups for experiments with AC and rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-09-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several experiments and describes setups and tools which are easy to obtain and work with. Free software is offered to generate the required signals by a personal computer. The experiments can be implemented in introductory physics courses on electromagnetism for undergraduates or specialized courses at high schools.

  4. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 31, Magnet sensors. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.M.

    1995-08-18

    The requirement for magnet sensors to verify the TF magnet system operation and aid in diagnostic assessment are defined. However, generally one does not specify such a system in the absence of a definition of the local I&C system. Also, one would expect that there would be great benefit (economy, redundancy, compatibility, etc.) in specifying common components for all of the magnet system. Thus specifying the sensors requirement we have tried to be flexible to accommodate future adjustments to these systems.

  5. Quasi-static magnetic measurements to predict specific absorption rates in magnetic fluid hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coral, D. F.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; de Sousa, M. E.; Muraca, D.; Lassalle, V.; Nicolás, P.; Ferreira, M. L.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the issue on whether dynamic magnetic properties of polydispersed magnetic colloids modeled using physical magnitudes derived from quasi-static magnetic measurement can be extrapolated to analyze specific absorption rate data acquired at high amplitudes and frequencies of excitation fields is addressed. To this end, we have analyzed two colloids of magnetite nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and chitosan in water displaying, under a radiofrequency field, high and low specific heat power release. Both colloids are alike in terms of liquid carrier, surfactant and magnetic phase composition but differ on the nanoparticle structuring. The colloid displaying low specific dissipation consists of spaced magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 4.8 nm inside a large chitosan particle of 52.5 nm. The one displaying high specific dissipation consists of clusters of magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 9.7 nm inside a chitosan particle of 48.6 nm. The experimental evaluation of Néel and Brown relaxation times (˜10-10 s and 10-4 s, respectively) indicate that the nanoparticles in both colloids magnetically relax by Néel mechanism. The isothermal magnetization curves analysis for this mechanism show that the magnetic nanoparticles behave in the interacting superparamagnetic regime. The specific absorption rates were determined calorimetrically at 260 kHz and up to 52 kA/m and were well modeled within linear response theory using the anisotropy density energy retrieved from quasi-static magnetic measurement, validating their use to predict heating ability of a given polydispersed particle suspension. Our findings provide new insight in the validity of quasi-static magnetic characterization to analyze the high frequency behavior of polydispersed colloids within the framework of the linear response and Wohlfarth theories and indicate that dipolar interactions play a key role being their strength larger for the colloid displaying higher dissipation, i

  6. Nonlinear dynamic behaviour of a rotor-foundation system coupled through passive magnetic bearings with magnetic anisotropy - Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of a vertical rigid rotor interacting with a flexible foundation by means of two passive magnetic bearings is quantified and evaluated. The quantification is based on theoretical and experimental investigation of the non-uniformity (anisotropy) of the magnetic field and the weak nonlinearity of the magnetic forces. Through mathematical modelling the nonlinear equations of motion are established for describing the shaft and bearing housing lateral dynamics coupled via the nonlinear and non-uniform magnetic forces. The equations of motion are solved in the frequency domain by the methods of Finite Difference and pseudo-arclength continuation. The theoretical findings are validated against experiments carried out using a dedicated test-rig and a special device for characterisation of the magnetic anisotropy. The characterisation of the magnetic anisotropy shows that it can be quantified as magnetic eccentricities having an amplitude and a phase, which result in linear and parametric excitation. The magnetic eccentricities are also determined using the steady-state response of the rotor-bearing system due to forcing from the magnetic anisotropies and several levels of mass imbalance. Discrepancies in the results from the two methods in terms of magnetic eccentricity magnitude are due to additional geometric eccentricities in the shaft. The steady-state system response shows clear nonlinear phenomena, e.g. bent resonance peaks, jump phenomena and nonlinear cross-coupling between the two orthogonal directions, especially during counter-phase motion between shaft and bearings. The clear nonlinear behaviour is facilitated by the lack of damping resulting in relatively large vibrations. The overall nonlinear dynamic behaviour is well captured by the theoretical model, thereby validating the modelling approach.

  7. Towards liquid-helium-free, persistent-mode MgB2 MRI magnets: FBML experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2017-05-01

    In this article I present our experience at the Magnet Technology Division of the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory on liquid-helium (LHe)-free, persistent-mode MgB2 MRI magnets. Before reporting on our MgB2 magnets, I first summarize the basic work that we began in the late 1990s to develop LHe-free, high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnets cooled in solid cryogen—I begin by discussing the enabling feature, particularly of solid nitrogen (SN2), for adiabatic HTS magnets. The next topic is our first LHe-free, SN2-HTS magnet, for which we chose Bi2223 because in the late 1990s Bi2223 was the only HTS available to build an HTS magnet. I then move on to two MgB2 magnets, I and II, developed after discovery of MgB2 in 2000. The SN2-MgB2 Magnet II—0.5 T/240 mm, SN2-cooled, and operated in persistent mode—was completed in January 2016. The final major topic in this article is a tabletop LHe-free, persistent-mode 1.5 T/70 mm SN2-MgB2 ‘finger’ MRI magnet for osteoporosis screening—we expect to begin this project in 2017. Before concluding this article, I present my current view on challenges and prospects for MgB2 MRI magnets.

  8. Experiments on second- and third-harmonic generation from magnetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias W; Wegener, Martin; Feth, Nils; Linden, Stefan

    2007-04-16

    Photonic metamaterials could provide optical nonlinearities far exceeding those of natural substances due to the combined action of (magnetic) resonances and local-field enhancements. Here, we present our experiments on second- and third-harmonic generation from magnetic metamaterials composed of nanoscale gold split-ring resonators and from control samples for excitation with 170-fs pulses centered at 1.5-microm wavelength. The strongest nonlinear signals are found for resonances with magnetic-dipole character.

  9. Superconducting solenoid magnet of the DCBA-T3 experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, M.; Kondou, Y.; Makida, Y.; Haruyama, T.; Ishihara, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Iwai, G.; Iwase, H.; Ohama, T.; Takahashi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Kato, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tonooka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Igarashi, H.; Kakuno, H.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tajima, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Ito, R.; Tamura, N.

    2014-03-01

    The experiment of neutrinoless double beta decay (0ν β β) is the only realistic method for investigating the Majorana nature and the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. An R&D project called Drift Chamber Beta-ray Analyzer (DCBA) has been developing a magnetic tracking detector for 0ν β β experiments at KEK. A superconducting solenoid magnet (SCSM) has been constructed to produce a uniform magnetic field for the prototype test facility called DCBA-T3. The results of SCSM test runs are described, as well as its design studies. Since the SCSM is a prototype magnet for a future detector temporarily called Magnetic Tracking Detector (MTD), it is essential to understand its long-term operation. The experience of about two years of operation is also described.

  10. In situ MEMS testing: correlation of high-resolution X-ray diffraction with mechanical experiments and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Schifferle, Andreas; Dommann, Alex; Neels, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    New methods are needed in microsystems technology for evaluating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) because of their reduced size. The assessment and characterization of mechanical and structural relations of MEMS are essential to assure the long-term functioning of devices, and have a significant impact on design and fabrication. Within this study a concept for the investigation of mechanically loaded MEMS materials on an atomic level is introduced, combining high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements with finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical testing. In situ HRXRD measurements were performed on tensile loaded single crystal silicon (SCSi) specimens by means of profile scans and reciprocal space mapping (RSM) on symmetrical (004) and (440) reflections. A comprehensive evaluation of the rather complex XRD patterns and features was enabled by the correlation of measured with simulated, 'theoretical' patterns. Latter were calculated by a specifically developed, simple and fast approach on the basis of continuum mechanical relations. Qualitative and quantitative analysis confirmed the admissibility and accuracy of the presented method. In this context [001] Poisson's ratio was determined providing an error of less than 1.5% with respect to analytical prediction. Consequently, the introduced procedure contributes to further going investigations of weak scattering being related to strain and defects in crystalline structures and therefore supports investigations on materials and devices failure mechanisms.

  11. Measurements of Diffractive Vector-Meson Photoproduction at High Momentum Transfer from the ZEUS Experiment at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittendenr, James A.

    We discuss recent preliminary results on the diffractive photoproduction of ρ0, φ, and J/ψ mesons at high momentum transfer reported by the ZEUS collaboration at HERA. A special-purpose calorimeter served to tag the quasi-real photons (Q2<0.01 Gev2) in the process γ+p-->VM+Y, where Y represents a dissociated state of the proton. The resulting range in photon-proton center-of-mass energy extends from 80 to 120 GeV. The differential cross sections (dσ )/(dt) were obtained in the region |t| > 1.2 GeV2, where t denotes the squared momentum transfer to the proton. The measurements provide good sensitivity to the observed power-law dependence (dσ )/(dt) (-t)-n. Over the region in momentum transfer covered by the data, the power is found to be approximately n = 3 for ρ0 and φ photoproduction, and approximately n = 2 for J/ψ photoproduction.

  12. In situ MEMS testing: correlation of high-resolution X-ray diffraction with mechanical experiments and finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schifferle, Andreas; Dommann, Alex; Neels, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract New methods are needed in microsystems technology for evaluating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) because of their reduced size. The assessment and characterization of mechanical and structural relations of MEMS are essential to assure the long-term functioning of devices, and have a significant impact on design and fabrication. Within this study a concept for the investigation of mechanically loaded MEMS materials on an atomic level is introduced, combining high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements with finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical testing. In situ HRXRD measurements were performed on tensile loaded single crystal silicon (SCSi) specimens by means of profile scans and reciprocal space mapping (RSM) on symmetrical (004) and (440) reflections. A comprehensive evaluation of the rather complex XRD patterns and features was enabled by the correlation of measured with simulated, ‘theoretical’ patterns. Latter were calculated by a specifically developed, simple and fast approach on the basis of continuum mechanical relations. Qualitative and quantitative analysis confirmed the admissibility and accuracy of the presented method. In this context [001] Poisson’s ratio was determined providing an error of less than 1.5% with respect to analytical prediction. Consequently, the introduced procedure contributes to further going investigations of weak scattering being related to strain and defects in crystalline structures and therefore supports investigations on materials and devices failure mechanisms. PMID:28533825

  13. Analysis and experiment of eddy current loss in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinji, Sun; Dong, Chen

    2013-08-01

    This paper analyses the eddy current loss in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores produced by the high speed rotation in order to reduce the power loss for the aerospace applications. The analytical model of rotational power loss is proposed in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores considering the magnetic circuit difference between Homopolar and Heteropolar magnetic bearings. Therefore, the eddy current power loss can be calculated accurately using the analytical model by magnetic field solutions according to the distribution of magnetic fields around the pole surface and boundary conditions at the surface of the rotor cores. The measurement method of rotational power loss in Homopolar magnetic bearing is proposed, and the results of the theoretical analysis are verified by experiments in the prototype MSCMG. The experimental results show the correctness of calculation results.

  14. A Technique for High-Throughput Protein Crystallization in Ionically Cross-Linked Polysaccharide Gel Beads for X-Ray Diffraction Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    A simple technique for high-throughput protein crystallization in ionically cross-linked polysaccharide gel beads has been developed for contactless handling of crystals in X-ray crystallography. The method is designed to reduce mechanical damage to crystals caused by physical contact between crystal and mount tool and by osmotic shock during various manipulations including cryoprotection, heavy-atom derivatization, ligand soaking, and diffraction experiments. For this study, protein crystallization in alginate and κ-carrageenan gel beads was performed using six test proteins, demonstrating that proteins could be successfully crystallized in gel beads. Two complete diffraction data sets from lysozyme and ID70067 protein crystals in gel beads were collected at 100 K without removing the crystals; the results showed that the crystals had low mosaicities. In addition, crystallization of glucose isomerase was carried out in alginate gel beads in the presence of synthetic zeolite molecular sieves (MS), a hetero-epitaxic nucleant; the results demonstrated that MS can reduce excess nucleation of this protein in beads. To demonstrate heavy-atom derivatization, lysozyme crystals were successfully derivatized with K2PtBr6 within alginate gel beads. These results suggest that gel beads prevent serious damage to protein crystals during such experiments. PMID:24740192

  15. Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation Experiment, Controlling Fluid Motion With Magnetic Fields in a Low-Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Holt, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    This report details the results of a series of fluid motion experiments to investigate the use of magnets to orient fluids in a low-gravity environment. The fluid of interest for this project was liquid oxygen (LO2) since it exhibits a paramagnetic behavior (is attracted to magnetic fields). However, due to safety and handling concerns, a water-based ferromagnetic mixture (produced by Ferrofluidics Corporation) was selected to simplify procedures. Three ferromagnetic fluid mixture strengths and a nonmagnetic water baseline were tested using three different initial fluid positions with respect to the magnet. Experiment accelerometer data were used with a modified computational fluid dynamics code termed CFX-4 (by AEA Technologies) to predict fluid motion. These predictions compared favorably with experiment video data, verifying the code's ability to predict fluid motion with and without magnetic influences. Additional predictions were generated for LO2 with the same test conditions and geometries used in the testing. Test hardware consisted of a cylindrical Plexiglas tank (6-in. bore with 10-in. length), a 6,000-G rare Earth magnet (10-in. ring), three-axis accelerometer package, and a video recorder system. All tests were conducted aboard the NASA Reduced-Gravity Workshop, a KC-135A aircraft.

  16. Magnetic properties experiments on the Mars Pathfinder lander: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Hviid, S F; Madsen, M B; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Goetz, W; Knudsen, J M; Hargraves, R B; Smith, P; Britt, D; Dinesen, A R; Mogensen, C T; Olsen, M; Pedersen, C T; Vistisen, L

    1997-12-05

    Many of the particles currently suspended in the martian atmosphere are magnetic, with an average saturation magnetization of about 4 A. m2/kg (amperes times square meters per kilogram). The particles appear to consist of claylike aggregates stained or cemented with ferric oxide (Fe2O3); at least some of the stain and cement is probably maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3). The presence of the gamma phase would imply that Fe2+ ions leached from the bedrock, passing through a state as free Fe2+ ions dissolved in liquid water. These particles could be a freeze-dried precipitate from ground water poured out on the surface. An alternative is that the magnetic particles are titanomagnetite occurring in palagonite and inherited directly from a basaltic precursor.

  17. Zero-G processing of magnets. Experiment MA-070

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic compounds under study, manganese-bismuth (MnBi) copper-cobalt-cerium (Cu,Co)5Ce, are representative of magnetic alloy systems that have the potential for the development of high coercive strength and a high energy product. The samples of 50 at. % bismuth and 50 at. % manganese solidified in the low-g environment demonstrated a substantial improvement in the macroscopic chemical homogeneity. The bismuth/manganese-bismuth directionally solidified eutectic flight samples exhibited marked superior magnetic properties. Intrinsic coercive strengths in excess of 185 Koe have been measured in the low-g processed samples at 77 K. The average value of inductance was improved by 76 percent, and the energy product was improved by 57 percent. Additional results indicate that, in the near-absence of the gravitational body force, contained fluids will assume a lowest energy configuration that differs significantly from that found terrestrially.

  18. Backhopping in magnetic tunnel junctions: Micromagnetic approach and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Skowroński, Witold; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Micromagnetic simulations of Current Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS) loops in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB exchange-biased Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJ) are discussed. Our model uses the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with the Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component. The current density for STT is calculated from the applied bias voltage and tunnel magnetoresistance which depends on the local magnetization vectors arrangement. We take into account the change in the anti-parallel state resistance with increasing bias voltage. Using such model we investigate influence of the interlayer exchange coupling, between free and reference layers across the barrier, on the backhopping effect in anti-parallel to parallel switching. We compare our simulated CIMS loops with the experimental data obtained from MTJs with different MgO barrier thicknesses.

  19. Overview of the magnetic properties experiments onboard the two Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leer, K.; Bertelsen, P.; Goetz, W.; Hviid, S. F.; Madsen, D. E.; Madsen, M. B.; Olsen, M.; The, A.

    2007-05-01

    The two Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, are each equipped with seven magnets designed for three different purposes: 1. The Filter and Capture magnets collect dust from the atmosphere. The dust can be investigated by the science instruments on the robotic arm and imaged by the Panoramic Camera. Analyzes of the dust shows that the magnetic component in the martian dust is magnetite, hematite together with paramagnetic and possibly superparamagnetic compounds is responsible for the yellowish color of the dust and the presence of olivine shows that the dust is formed without any appreciable presence of water. 2. The ring shaped Sweep magnet is design to detect non-magnetic particles. The experiment has been negative so far, showing that all particles must be composite and magnetic. This experience has been used to design a new camera calibration target for the Phoenix 2007, the sweep effect significantly preventing the calibration target to get dusty during the mission. 3. The Rock Abrasion Tool magnets are design to support the Mössbauer measurements on rocks giving additional information about the magnetic minerals contained in rocks. We here report on the results from the rovers and the neer future prospective for magnetic properties experiments on Mars.

  20. FURTHER EXPERIENCE WITH SLC PERMANENT MAGNETIC (PM) MULTIPOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, James E.

    2003-05-29

    PM multipoles have been used in the SLAC damping rings (DR) and their injection and extraction lines since 1985. Due to upgrades of the DR vacuum chambers for higher currents in 1993, there was an opportunity to check some of these magnets[1]. Nothing more was done until a program of real-time radiation measurements was begun in the electron ring to determine causes, levels and effects of integrated gamma and neutron doses on the strengths and harmonic contents for NLC purposes. We discuss results of the latest magnetic measurements, radiation measurement program, semiconductor dosimeters and a few unexpected but interesting conclusions.