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Sample records for magnetic domain imaging

  1. Imaging Domains In Magnetic Garnets By Use Of TSMFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Rice, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Tunneling-stabilized magnetic-force microscopy (TSMFM) demonstrated to yield images of magnetic domains in low-coercivity magnetic garnets with perpendicular anisotropy. Ability to generate images of domain walls and minute vertical Bloch lines aids study of vertical-Bloch-line magnetic memory devices that contain garnets. TSMFM provides desired resolution because its resolution not limited by diffraction.

  2. Combination STM/AFM and AFM Images of Magnetic Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, L.; Gallagher, M.; Howells, S.; Chen, T.; Sarid, D.

    1991-12-01

    By employing a cantilevered tip in a scanning tunneling microscope, one obtains images that show an enhancement of features associated with forces whose derivatives vary along the direction of scanning. The theory of this process is described together with experimental results showing magnetic domains on a gold coated floppy disk. Also shown are atomic force microscopy images of a ferrofluid-developed magnetic tape.

  3. Layer Resolved Imaging of Magnetic Domain Motion in Epitaxial Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Sioan; Choi, Yongseong; Love, David; Mansell, Rhodri; Barnes, Crispin; Keavney, David; Rosenberg, Richard

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy (XELM) to image the elemental and layer resolved magnetic domain structure of an epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure in the presence of large magnetic fields. The observed magnetic domains exhibit several unique behaviors that depend on the Cr thickness (tCr) modulated interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) strength. For Cr thickness tCr??1.5?nm, strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal and weakly coupled layer independent reversal are observed, respectively. The transition between these two reversal mechanisms for 0.34?domain wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. We observe domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  4. Dual-domain denoising in three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Zhou, Jiliu; Wu, Xi

    2016-08-01

    Denoising is a crucial preprocessing procedure for three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI). Existing denoising methods are predominantly implemented in a single domain, ignoring information in other domains. However, denoising methods are becoming increasingly complex, making analysis and implementation challenging. The present study aimed to develop a dual-domain image denoising (DDID) algorithm for 3D MRI that encapsulates information from the spatial and transform domains. In the present study, the DDID method was used to distinguish signal from noise in the spatial and frequency domains, after which robust accurate noise estimation was introduced for iterative filtering, which is simple and beneficial for computation. In addition, the proposed method was compared quantitatively and qualitatively with existing methods for synthetic and in vivo MRI datasets. The results of the present study suggested that the novel DDID algorithm performed well and provided competitive results, as compared with existing MRI denoising filters.

  5. Magnetic domain imaging of nano-magnetic films using magnetic force microscopy with polar and longitudinally magnetized tips.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sy-Hann; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Su, Chiung-Wu; Tsay, Jyh-Shen

    2016-10-01

    Perpendicular or parallel magnetic fields are used to magnetize the tips used in magnetic force microscopy (MFM). In this process, perpendicular or parallel magnetic dipole moments are produced on the tip plane, thus leading to the formation of polar magnetized tips (PM-tips) or longitudinally magnetized tips (LM-tips), respectively. The resolution of an MFM image of a magneto-optic disk is used for calibration of these tips, and the saturated magnetic fields of the PM- and LM-tips are found to be 2720 Oe and 680 Oe, respectively. Because both tips can simultaneously magnetize the sample during the scanning process when measuring a Co thin film, clear MFM images are captured, which enable the identification of magnetizable regions and the distribution of the magnetic domains on the sample surface. These results will be useful for improving the manufacturing processes required for soft nano-magnetic film production.

  6. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  7. Magnetic resonance image enhancement using stochastic resonance in Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Rallabandi, V P Subramanyam; Roy, Prasun Kumar

    2010-11-01

    In general, low-field MRI scanners such as the 0.5- and 1-T ones produce images that are poor in quality. The motivation of this study was to lessen the noise and enhance the signal such that the image quality is improved. Here, we propose a new approach using stochastic resonance (SR)-based transform in Fourier space for the enhancement of magnetic resonance images of brain lesions, by utilizing an optimized level of Gaussian fluctuation that maximizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We acquired the T1-weighted MR image of the brain in DICOM format. We processed the original MR image using the proposed SR procedure. We then tested our approach on about 60 patients of different age groups with different lesions, such as arteriovenous malformation, benign lesion and malignant tumor, and illustrated the image enhancement by using just-noticeable difference visually as well as by utilizing the relative enhancement factor quantitatively. Our method can restore the original image from noisy image and optimally enhance the edges or boundaries of the tissues, clarify indistinct structural brain lesions without producing ringing artifacts, as well as delineate the edematous area, active tumor zone, lesion heterogeneity or morphology, and vascular abnormality. The proposed technique improves the enhancement factor better than the conventional techniques like the Wiener- and wavelet-based procedures. The proposed method can readily enhance the image fusing a unique constructive interaction of noise and signal, and enables improved diagnosis over conventional methods. The approach well illustrates the novel potential of using a small amount of Gaussian noise to improve the image quality. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging and Tailoring the Chirality of Domain Walls in Magnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K

    2015-10-14

    Electric-current-induced magnetization switching is a keystone concept in the development of spintronics devices. In the last few years this field has experienced a significant boost with the discovery of ultrafast domain wall motions and very low threshold currents in structures designed to stabilize chiral spin textures. Imaging domain-wall spin textures in situ, while fabricating magnetic multilayer structures, is a powerful way to investigate the forces stabilizing this type of chirality, and informs strategies to engineer structures with controlled spin textures. Here, recent results applying spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy to image chiral domain walls in magnetic multilayer films are summarized. Providing a way to measure the strength of the asymmetric exchange interaction that causes the chirality, this approach can be used to tailor the texture and handedness of magnetic domain walls by interface engineering. These results advance understanding of the underlying physics and offer new insights toward the design of spintronic devices.

  9. Measurement of magnetic domain wall width using energy-filtered Fresnel images.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S J; Loudon, J C; Midgley, P A

    2002-08-01

    Magnetic domain walls in Nd2Fe14B have been examined using a series of energy-filtered Fresnel images in the field emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM). We describe the changes in the intensity distribution of the convergent wall image as a function of defocus, foil thickness and domain wall width. The effect of tilted domain walls and beam convergence on the fringe pattern is also discussed. A comparison of the experimental intensity profile with that from simulations allows the domain wall width to be determined. Measurement of very narrow walls is made possible only by using a relatively thick foil, which necessitates energy-filtering to allow quantitative comparison with simulations. The magnetic domain wall width in Nd2Fe14B was found to be 3 +/- 2 nm.

  10. Feature extraction for magnetic domain images of magneto-optical recording films using gradient feature segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanqing, Zhu; Xinsai, Wang; Xuecheng, Zou; Haihua, Li; Xiaofei, Yang

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method to realize feature extraction on low contrast magnetic domain images of magneto-optical recording films. The method is based on the following three steps: first, Lee-filtering method is adopted to realize pre-filtering and noise reduction; this is followed by gradient feature segmentation, which separates the object area from the background area; finally the common linking method is adopted and the characteristic parameters of magnetic domain are calculated. We describe these steps with particular emphasis on the gradient feature segmentation. The results show that this method has advantages over other traditional ones for feature extraction of low contrast images.

  11. Image characterization by fractal descriptors in variational mode decomposition domain: Application to brain magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The main purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of fractal descriptors estimated in multi-resolution domains to characterize biomedical digital image texture. In this regard, three multi-resolution techniques are considered: the well-known discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and; the newly introduced; variational mode decomposition mode (VMD). The original image is decomposed by the DWT, EMD, and VMD into different scales. Then, Fourier spectrum based fractal descriptors is estimated at specific scales and directions to characterize the image. The support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform supervised classification. The empirical study was applied to the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected with Alzheimer disease (AD). Our results demonstrate that fractal descriptors estimated in VMD domain outperform those estimated in DWT and EMD domains; and also those directly estimated from the original image.

  12. Layer resolved magnetic domain imaging of epitaxial heterostructures in large applied magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, S.; Choi, Y.; Love, D. M.; Mansell, R.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Keavney, DJ.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2015-02-16

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy to investigate the elemental and layer resolved magnetic reversal in an interlayer exchange coupled (IEC) epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure. The transition from strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal for Cr thickness t(Cr) < 0.34 nm to weakly coupled layer independent reversal for t(Cr) > 1.5 nm is punctuated at 0.34 < t(Cr) < 1.5 nm by a combination of IEC guided domain wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. Domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  13. Layer resolved magnetic domain imaging of epitaxial heterostructures in large applied magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, S.; Choi, Y.; Love, D. M.; Mansell, R.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Keavney, D. J.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy to investigate the elemental and layer resolved magnetic reversal in an interlayer exchange coupled (IEC) epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure. The transition from strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal for Cr thickness tCr < 0.34 nm to weakly coupled layer independent reversal for tCr > 1.5 nm is punctuated at 0.34 < tCr < 1.5 nm by a combination of IEC guided domain wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. Domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  14. Analytical modelling and x-ray imaging of oscillations of a single magnetic domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, Lars; Kruger, Benjamin; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2009-07-10

    Domain-wall oscillation in a pinnig potential is described analytically in a one dimensional model for the feld-driven case. For a proper description the pinning potential has to be extended by nonharmonic contributions. Oscillations of a domain wall are observed on its genuine time scale by magnetic X-ray microscopy. It is shown that the nonharmonic terms are present in real samples with a strong restoring potential. In the framework of our model we gain deep insight into the domain-wall motion by looking at different phase spaces. The corrections of the harmonic potential can change the motion of the domain wall significantly. The damping parameter of permalloy is determined via the direct imaging technique.

  15. Imaging and Control of Surface Magnetization Domains in a Magnetoelectric Antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; He, Xi; Wysocki, Aleksander L.; Lanke, Uday; Komesu, Takashi; Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Binek, Christian; Dowben, Peter A.

    2011-02-01

    We report the direct observation of surface magnetization domains of the magnetoelectric Cr2O3 using photoemission electron microscopy with magnetic circular dichroism contrast and magnetic force microscopy. The domain pattern is strongly affected by the applied electric field conditions. Zero-field cooling results in an equal representation of the two domain types, while electric-field cooling selects one dominant domain type. These observations confirm the existence of surface magnetization, required by symmetry in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets.

  16. Frequency-Induced Bulk Magnetic Domain-Wall Freezing Visualized by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-08-01

    We use neutron dark-field imaging to visualize and interpret the response of bulk magnetic domain walls to static and dynamic magnetic excitations in (110)-Goss textured iron silicon high-permeability steel alloy. We investigate the domain-wall motion under the influence of an external alternating sinusoidal magnetic field. In particular, we perform scans combining varying levels of dcoffset (0 - 30 A /m ) , oscillation amplitude Aac (0 - 1500 A /m ) , and frequency fac ((0 - 200 Hz ) . By increasing amplitude Aac while maintaining constant values of dcoffset and fac , we record the transition from a frozen domain-wall structure to a mobile one. Vice versa, increasing fac while keeping Aac and dcoffset constant led to the reverse transition from a mobile domain-wall structure into a frozen one. We show that varying both Aac and fac shifts the position of the transition region. Furthermore, we demonstrate that higher frequencies require higher oscillation amplitudes to overcome the freezing phenomena. The fundamental determination and understanding of the frequency-induced freezing process in high-permeability steel alloys is of high interest to the further development of descriptive models for bulk macromagnetic phenomena. Likewise, the efficiency of transformers can be improved based on our results, since these alloys are used as transformer core material.

  17. Imaging and control of surface magnetization domains in a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ning; He, Xi; Wysocki, Aleksander L; Lanke, Uday; Komesu, Takashi; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Binek, Christian; Dowben, Peter A

    2011-02-25

    We report the direct observation of surface magnetization domains of the magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3) using photoemission electron microscopy with magnetic circular dichroism contrast and magnetic force microscopy. The domain pattern is strongly affected by the applied electric field conditions. Zero-field cooling results in an equal representation of the two domain types, while electric-field cooling selects one dominant domain type. These observations confirm the existence of surface magnetization, required by symmetry in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. © 2011 American Physical Society

  18. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  19. Magnetization Response of the Bulk and Supplementary Magnetic Domain Structure in High-Permeability Steel Laminations Visualized In Situ by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Irastorza-Landa, A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Pomjakushina, E.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-08-01

    Industrial transformer cores are composed of stacked high-permeability steel laminations (HPSLs). The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the magnetic properties of each HPSL. In this article, we show how the neutron dark-field image (DFI) allows for the in situ visualization of the locally resolved response of the bulk and supplementary magnetic domain structures in HPSLs under the influence of externally applied magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate the domain formation and growth along the initial magnetization curve up to the saturated state. For decreasing field, we visualize the recurrence of the hysteretic domain structure down to the remanent state. Additionally, the DFI allows us to derive a correlation between the grain orientation and the corresponding volume and supplementary domain structure. Furthermore, we visualize the influence of the insulation coating, introducing desired tensile stresses on the domain structures. To compare our DFI findings to traditional methods, we perform complementary surface-sensitive magneto-optical Kerr-microscopy investigations.

  20. Compression and denoising in magnetic resonance imaging via SVD on the Fourier domain using computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Felipe

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) data reconstruction can be computationally a challenging task. The signal-to-noise ratio might also present complications, especially with high-resolution images. In this sense, data compression can be useful not only for reducing the complexity and memory requirements, but also to reduce noise, even to allow eliminate spurious components.This article proposes the use of a system based on singular value decomposition of low order for noise reconstruction and reduction in MR imaging system. The proposed method is evaluated using in vivo MRI data. Rebuilt images with less than 20 of the original data and with similar quality in terms of visual inspection are presented. Also a quantitative evaluation of the method is presented.

  1. Magnetic resonance guided optical spectroscopy imaging of human breast cancer using a combined frequency domain and continuous wave approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Davis, Scott C.; Jiang, Shudong; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used to image high-risk patients for breast cancer because of its higher sensitivity to tumors (approaching 100%) than traditional x-ray mammography. We focus on Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an emerging functional and molecular imaging technique that non-invasively quantifies optical properties of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water content, scattering, and lipid concentration to increase the relatively low specificity of DCE-MRI. Our optical imaging system combines six frequency domain wavelengths, measured using PMT detectors with three continuous wave wavelengths measured using CCD/spectrometers. We present methods on combining the synergistic attributes of DCE-MR and NIRS for in-vivo imaging of breast cancer in three dimensions using a custom optical MR breast coil and diffusion based light modeling software, NIRFAST. We present results from phantom studies, healthy subjects, and breast cancer patients. Preliminary results show contrast recovery within 10% in phantoms and spatial resolution less than 5mm. Images from healthy subjects were recovered with properties similar to literature values and previous studies. Patient images have shown elevated total hemoglobin values and water fraction, agreeing with histology and previous results. The additional information gained from NIRS may improve the ability to distinguish between malignant and benign lesions during MR imaging. These dual modality instruments will provide complex anatomical and molecular prognostic information, and may decrease the number of biopsies, thereby improving patient care.

  2. Time-domain finite-difference/finite-element hybrid simulations of radio frequency coils in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H

    2008-05-21

    A hybrid method that combines the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the finite-element time-domain (FETD) method is presented for simulating radio-frequency (RF) coils in magnetic resonance imaging. This method applies a high-fidelity FETD method to RF coils, while the human body is modeled with a low-cost FDTD method. Since the FDTD and the FETD methods are applied simultaneously, the dynamic interaction between RF coils and the human body is fully accounted for. In order to simplify the treatment of the highly irregular FDTD/FETD interface, composite elements are proposed. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the hybrid method in high-field receive-and-transmit coil design. This approach is also applicable to general bio-electromagnetic simulations.

  3. Magnetic resonance image reconstruction using trained geometric directions in 2D redundant wavelets domain and non-convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bende; Qu, Xiaobo; Guo, Di; Hu, Changwei; Chen, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    Reducing scanning time is significantly important for MRI. Compressed sensing has shown promising results by undersampling the k-space data to speed up imaging. Sparsity of an image plays an important role in compressed sensing MRI to reduce the image artifacts. Recently, the method of patch-based directional wavelets (PBDW) which trains geometric directions from undersampled data has been proposed. It has better performance in preserving image edges than conventional sparsifying transforms. However, obvious artifacts are presented in the smooth region when the data are highly undersampled. In addition, the original PBDW-based method does not hold obvious improvement for radial and fully 2D random sampling patterns. In this paper, the PBDW-based MRI reconstruction is improved from two aspects: 1) An efficient non-convex minimization algorithm is modified to enhance image quality; 2) PBDW are extended into shift-invariant discrete wavelet domain to enhance the ability of transform on sparsifying piecewise smooth image features. Numerical simulation results on vivo magnetic resonance images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the original PBDW in terms of removing artifacts and preserving edges.

  4. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, T; Motoyui, Y; Morozumi, K; Rödel, T C; Fortuna, F; Santander-Syro, A F; Shin, S

    2016-06-10

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  5. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  6. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  7. Magnetic surface domain imaging of uncapped epitaxial FeRh(001) thin films across the temperature-induced metamagnetic transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xianzhong; Matthes, Frank; Bürgler, Daniel E. Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-15

    The surface magnetic domain structure of uncapped epitaxial FeRh/MgO(001) thin films was imaged by in-situ scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) at various temperatures between 122 and 450 K. This temperature range covers the temperature-driven antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition in the body of the films that was observed in-situ by means of the more depth-sensitive magneto-optical Kerr effect. The SEMPA images confirm that the interfacial ferromagnetism coexisting with the antiferromagnetic phase inside the film is an intrinsic property of the FeRh(001) surface. Furthermore, the SEMPA data display a reduction of the in-plane magnetization occuring well above the phase transition temperature which, thus, is not related to the volume expansion at the phase transition. This observation is interpreted as a spin reorientation of the surface magnetization for which we propose a possible mechanism based on temperature-dependent tetragonal distortion due to different thermal expansion coefficients of MgO and FeRh.

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging activation detection: fuzzy cluster analysis in wavelet and multiwavelet domains.

    PubMed

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali

    2005-09-01

    To present novel feature spaces, based on multiscale decompositions obtained by scalar wavelet and multiwavelet transforms, to remedy problems associated with high dimension of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series (when they are used directly in clustering algorithms) and their poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that limits accurate classification of fMRI time series according to their activation contents. Using randomization, the proposed method finds wavelet/multiwavelet coefficients that represent the activation content of fMRI time series and combines them to define new feature spaces. Using simulated and experimental fMRI data sets, the proposed feature spaces are compared to the cross-correlation (CC) feature space and their performances are evaluated. In these studies, the false positive detection rate is controlled using randomization. To compare different methods, several points of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves, using simulated data, are estimated and compared. The proposed features suppress the effects of confounding signals and improve activation detection sensitivity. Experimental results show improved sensitivity and robustness of the proposed method compared to the conventional CC analysis. More accurate and sensitive activation detection can be achieved using the proposed feature spaces compared to CC feature space. Multiwavelet features show superior detection sensitivity compared to the scalar wavelet features. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  10. Effect of Fiber Laser Treating on Magnetic Domains in the Grain-Oriented Silicon Steel: Imaging Domains by Bitter, MFM and Kerr Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchý, V.; Kováč, F.; Hvizdoš, P.; Petryshynets, I.; Sopko, M.

    2016-08-01

    A magnetic domain laser scribing technique of grain-oriented 3.2% silicon steel has been investigated for the direct influencing on the magnetic domain wall. The magneto-optical Kerr effect was employed to obtain a visible contrast between antiparallel domains. The effects of laser treating on domain wall were observed. The Bitter, MFM and Kerr microscope pictures showed that domain-wall positions did not repeat precisely from cycle to cycle, particularly at high inductions, and that the average domain-wall spacing decreased with increasing density of laser scribing lines. Two phenomena have been discovered that are difficult to explain (1) that the hardness decreases with increasing laser energy and (2) that the coercivity decreases with decreasing laser energy. A semi-quantitative relationship has been found between the domain patterns and used fiber laser treating method. The behavior of patterns in an applied magnetic field is shown, and based on that a two-dimensional laser lines configuration is proposed for one of the less complicated surface patterns.

  11. Magnetic Force Microscopy Images of Magnetic Garnet With Thin-Film Magnetic Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadas, A.; Moreland, J.; Rice, P.; Katti, R.

    1993-01-01

    We present magnetic force microscopy images of YGdTmGa/YSmTmGa magnetic garnet, usinga thin Fe film deposited on Si_3N_5 tips. We have found correlations between the topography andthe magnetic domain structure. We have observed the domain wall contrast with a iron thin-film tip. We report on domain wall imaging of garnet with magnetic force microscopy.

  12. The influence of laser scribing on magnetic domain formation in grain oriented electrical steel visualized by directional neutron dark-field imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rauscher, P.; Betz, B.; Hauptmann, J.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-01-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the bulk magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel laminations. The core losses can be improved by post manufacturing methods, so-called domain refinement techniques. All these methods induce mechanical or thermal stress that refines the domain structure. The most commonly used technique is laser scribing due to the no-contact nature and the ease of integration in existing production systems. Here we show how directional neutron dark-field imaging allows visualizing the impact of laser scribing on the bulk and supplementary domain structure. In particular, we investigate the domain formation during magnetization of samples depending on laser treatment parameters such as laser energy and line distances. The directional dark-field imaging findings were quantitatively interpreted in the context with global magnetic hysteresis measurements. Especially we exploit the orientation sensitivity in the dark-field images to distinguish between different domain structures alignment and their relation to the laser scribing process. PMID:27910922

  13. The influence of laser scribing on magnetic domain formation in grain oriented electrical steel visualized by directional neutron dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, P; Betz, B; Hauptmann, J; Wetzig, A; Beyer, E; Grünzweig, C

    2016-12-02

    The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the bulk magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel laminations. The core losses can be improved by post manufacturing methods, so-called domain refinement techniques. All these methods induce mechanical or thermal stress that refines the domain structure. The most commonly used technique is laser scribing due to the no-contact nature and the ease of integration in existing production systems. Here we show how directional neutron dark-field imaging allows visualizing the impact of laser scribing on the bulk and supplementary domain structure. In particular, we investigate the domain formation during magnetization of samples depending on laser treatment parameters such as laser energy and line distances. The directional dark-field imaging findings were quantitatively interpreted in the context with global magnetic hysteresis measurements. Especially we exploit the orientation sensitivity in the dark-field images to distinguish between different domain structures alignment and their relation to the laser scribing process.

  14. The influence of laser scribing on magnetic domain formation in grain oriented electrical steel visualized by directional neutron dark-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, P.; Betz, B.; Hauptmann, J.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-12-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the bulk magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel laminations. The core losses can be improved by post manufacturing methods, so-called domain refinement techniques. All these methods induce mechanical or thermal stress that refines the domain structure. The most commonly used technique is laser scribing due to the no-contact nature and the ease of integration in existing production systems. Here we show how directional neutron dark-field imaging allows visualizing the impact of laser scribing on the bulk and supplementary domain structure. In particular, we investigate the domain formation during magnetization of samples depending on laser treatment parameters such as laser energy and line distances. The directional dark-field imaging findings were quantitatively interpreted in the context with global magnetic hysteresis measurements. Especially we exploit the orientation sensitivity in the dark-field images to distinguish between different domain structures alignment and their relation to the laser scribing process.

  15. MISTRAL: a transmission soft X-ray microscopy beamline for cryo nano-tomography of biological samples and magnetic domains imaging.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Nicolás, Josep; Valcárcel, Ricardo; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Rosanes, Marc; Avila, Jose; Tkachuk, Andrei; Irwin, Jeff; Ferrer, Salvador; Pereiro, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The performance of MISTRAL is reported, the soft X-ray transmission microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source (Barcelona, Spain) which is primarily dedicated to cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) for three-dimensional visualization of whole unstained cells at spatial resolutions down to 30 nm (half pitch). Short acquisition times allowing for high-throughput and correlative microscopy studies have promoted cryo-SXT as an emerging cellular imaging tool for structural cell biologists bridging the gap between optical and electron microscopy. In addition, the beamline offers the possibility of imaging magnetic domains in thin magnetic films that are illustrated here with an example.

  16. Magnetic bubble domain memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ypma, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Some attractive features of Bubble Domain Memory and its relation to existing technologies are discussed. Two promising applications are block access mass memory and tape recorder replacement. The required chip capabilities for these uses are listed, and the specifications for a block access mass memory designed to fit between core and HPT disk are presented. A feasibility model for a tape recorder replacement is introduced.

  17. Magnetic domain and domain wall in Co/Pt multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, A.; Mohanty, J.

    2016-05-01

    We report systematic micromagnetic investigation of formation of magnetic domains in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer with the variation in magnetic anisotropy and stack thickness. The lowering of anisotropy makes the domain wall broader and domain formation less efficient. Domain sizeincreases with increasing thickness of the stack to minimize the stray field energy.The minimization of energy of the system due to domain formation makes the M-H loop narrower whereas, lower stack thickness results in a wider loop. The magnetization reversalin this system occurs due tothe nucleation and growth of reverse domains.

  18. Statistical Modeling of Low SNR Magnetic Resonance Images in Wavelet Domain Using Laplacian Prior and Two-Sided Rayleigh Noise for Visual Quality Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new wavelet-based image denoising algorithm using maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion. For this reason we propose Laplace distribution with local variance for clean image and two-sided Rayleigh model for noise in wavelet domain. The local Laplace probability density function (pdf) is able to simultaneously model the heavy-tailed nature of marginal distribution and intrascale dependency between spatial adjacent coefficients. Using local Laplace prior and two-sided Rayleigh noise, we derive a new shrinkage function for image denoising in the wavelet domain. We propose our new spatially adaptive wavelet-based image denoising algorithm for several low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) magnetic resonance (MR) images and compare the results with other methods. The simulation results show that this algorithm is able to truly improve the visual quality of noisy MR images with very low computational cost. In case the input MR image is blurred, a blind deconvolution (BD) algorithm is necessary for visual quality improvement. Since BD techniques are usually sensitive to noise, in this paper we also apply a BD algorithm to an appropriate subband in the wavelet domain to eliminate the effect of noise in the BD procedure and to further improve visual quality.

  19. a Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope with Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect Contrast for the Imaging of Magnetic Domains with 200 Angstrom Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Thomas Joseph

    We describe the development of a scanning near -field optical microscope for magnetic domain imaging in thin-film materials. The near-field probe is a 20-40 nm Ag particle which is optically excited near the surface plasmon resonance frequency. The plasmon resonance in individual Ag particles is characterized by optical spectroscopy for light scattered from single Ag particles. The existence of a near-field form of the magneto-optic Kerr effect is confirmed. In the final form of the microscope, the Ag particle is mounted on a hemispherical glass substrate and brought to within near-field proximity of a flat sample surface. The separation of the probe and sample is regulated by a Newton ring interferometer in closed loop feedback control of a piezoelectric translator. Separation stability can be kept to less than one nanometer. Near-field magneto -optic interactions are measured with a shot-noise limited modulating ellipsometer. We measured the dependence of the near-field Kerr signal on the separation of the probe and sample for longitudinal magnetization, and suggest a potential resolution of 20-40 nm. Two-dimensional images are presented of thermo-magnetically recorded domains in a Co/Pt multilayer material, with less than 100 nm resolution. Domains with a 0.5 micron diameter and one micron spacing are clearly resolved. We discuss future improvements of the instrument and propose an ultimate resolution of 140 A.

  20. Magnetic domains in Ni Mn Ga martensitic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernenko, V. A.; Lopez Anton, R.; Kohl, M.; Ohtsuka, M.; Orue, I.; Barandiaran, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    A series of martensitic Ni52Mn24Ga24 thin films deposited on alumina ceramic substrates has been prepared by using RF (radio-frequency) magnetron sputtering. The film thickness, d, varies from 0.1 to 5.0 µm. Magnetic domain patterns have been imaged by the MFM (magnetic force microscopy) technique. A maze domain structure is found for all studied films. MFM shows a large out-of-plane magnetization component and a rather uniform domain width for each film thickness. The domain width, δ, depends on the film thickness as \\delta \\sim \\sqrt {d} in the whole studied range of film thickness. This dependence is the expected one for magnetic anisotropy and magnetostatic contributions in a perpendicular magnetic domain configuration. The proportionality coefficient is also consistent with the values of saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy determined in the samples.

  1. Characterization of magnetic domain walls using electron magnetic chiral dichroism.

    PubMed

    Che, Ren Chao; Liang, Chong Yun; He, Xiang; Liu, Hai Hua; Duan, Xiao Feng

    2011-04-01

    Domain walls and spin states of permalloy were investigated by electron magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) technique in Lorentz imaging mode using a JEM-2100F transmission electron microscope. EMCD signals from both Fe and Ni L3,2 edges were detected from the Bloch lines but not from the adjacent main wall. The magnetic polarity orientation of the circular Bloch line is opposite to that of the cross Bloch line. The orientations of Fe and Ni spins are parallel rather than antiparallel, both at the cross Bloch line and circular Bloch line.

  2. Collective magnetism at multiferroic vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Lee, N; Choi, Y J; Cheong, S-W; Wu, Weida

    2012-12-12

    Cross-coupled phenomena of multiferroic domains and domain walls are of fundamental scientific and technological interest. Using cryogenic magnetic force microscopy, we find alternating net magnetic moments at ferroelectric domain walls around vortex cores in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO(3), which correlate with each other throughout the entire vortex network. This collective nature of domain wall magnetism originates from the uncompensated Er(3+) moments at domain walls and the self-organization of the vortex network. Our results demonstrate that the collective domain wall magnetism can be controlled by external magnetic fields and represent a major advancement in the manipulation of local magnetic moments by harnessing cross-coupled domain walls.

  3. Cellular Domain Patterns in Magnetic Garnet Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Kenneth Lawrence

    This thesis presents the first experimental study of two-dimensional cellular patterns of magnetic domains in garnet films. Room-temperature observations focused on a Bismuth-substituted film designed for magneto-optic device applications. Measurements of energies and statistical quantities were aided by computer analysis of digitized pattern images. An external bias field H_ B induces pattern evolution that is shown to be governed by three elemental domain structures: (i) Stripe segments that form the cell boundaries. Magnetic field and domain wall energies produce effective tension in the stripe segments that drives the domain motion. (ii) 3 -fold vertices that join the stripe segments. Cellular patterns saturate when the vertices are destroyed at the bias value H_{V} (= 0.79 times 4pi M = 150 Oe), the largest saturation field of all domain pattern topologies. (iii) Pentagonal bubble traps, 5-fold symmetric structures containing trapped magnetic bubble domains. Isolated bubble traps collapse at a critical bias field H_5 (= 0.54 times 4pi M = 103 Oe). A simple geometric model illustrates the energetic mechanism of bubble trap collapse. An analytic pattern model accounts for domain interactions so as to elucidate the bias and configuration dependence of the stripe tension and outline the energetic bias regimes. All stripe segments are under tension in the nonequilibrium regime H _{RI}domains. Cellular patterns in this regime are supported by the robust pentagonal bubble traps acting as 5-fold vertices, an unusual topology among experimental cellular systems. An ac field component is shown to mitigate coercive effects that can hinder the pattern evolution, and criteria are developed for the ac amplitude. Characterized for the first time are several collective phenomena relevant to condense matter systems, including: (i) Coarsening of the cellular patterns in an increasing bias

  4. Magnetic force microscopy reveals meta-stable magnetic domain states that prevent reliable absolute palaeointensity experiments.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Lennart V; Fabian, Karl; Bakelaar, Iman A; Dekkers, Mark J

    2014-08-22

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the absolute palaeointensity of the Earth's magnetic field is notoriously difficult. The heating of samples in most methods induces magnetic alteration--a process that is still poorly understood, but prevents obtaining correct field values. Here we show induced changes in magnetic domain state directly by imaging the domain configurations of titanomagnetite particles in samples that systematically fail to produce truthful estimates. Magnetic force microscope images were taken before and after a heating step typically used in absolute palaeointensity experiments. For a critical temperature (250 °C), we observe major changes: distinct, blocky domains before heating change into curvier, wavy domains thereafter. These structures appeared unstable over time: after 1-year of storage in a magnetic-field-free environment, the domain states evolved into a viscous remanent magnetization state. Our observations qualitatively explain reported underestimates from otherwise (technically) successful experiments and therefore have major implications for all palaeointensity methods involving heating.

  5. Near surface magnetic domain observation with ultra-high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenghua; Li, Xiang; Liu, Dongping; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2014-09-01

    Near field magnetic force microscopy (NF-MFM) has been demonstrated to locally observe the magnetic fine structures in nanosized recording bits at an operating distance of 1 nm. The nanoscale magnetic domains, the polarity of surface magnetic charges, as well as the 3D magnetic fields leaking from the bits are investigated via NF-MFM with a soft NiFe tip. A Fourier analysis of the images suggests that the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The NF-MFM is crucial to the analysis of surface magnetic features and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine.Near field magnetic force microscopy (NF-MFM) has been demonstrated to locally observe the magnetic fine structures in nanosized recording bits at an operating distance of 1 nm. The nanoscale magnetic domains, the polarity of surface magnetic charges, as well as the 3D magnetic fields leaking from the bits are investigated via NF-MFM with a soft NiFe tip. A Fourier analysis of the images suggests that the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The NF-MFM is crucial to the analysis of surface magnetic features and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02215g

  6. Chiral spin torque at magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Thomas, Luc; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Spin-polarized currents provide a powerful means of manipulating the magnetization of nanodevices, and give rise to spin transfer torques that can drive magnetic domain walls along nanowires. In ultrathin magnetic wires, domain walls are found to move in the opposite direction to that expected from bulk spin transfer torques, and also at much higher speeds. Here we show that this is due to two intertwined phenomena, both derived from spin-orbit interactions. By measuring the influence of magnetic fields on current-driven domain-wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co trilayers, we find an internal effective magnetic field acting on each domain wall, the direction of which alternates between successive domain walls. This chiral effective field arises from a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Co/Pt interfaces and, in concert with spin Hall currents, drives the domain walls in lock-step along the nanowire. Elucidating the mechanism for the manipulation of domain walls in ultrathin magnetic films will enable the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  7. High resolution seismic imaging at the Odessa (TX) meteorite impact site: the ground-impact geohazard and integration with magnetic gradiometry and time-domain electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, D.; Everett, M.

    2007-05-01

    Comet and asteroid bombardment along with impact crater formation has occurred continuously throughout Earth's history. The greatest impact-related geohazard is due to moderate sized impactors which represent the worst-case trade-off between frequency of occurrence, difficulty of mitigation, and severity of environmental destruction. Impacts in this size range pose a significant regional threat to densely populated areas. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the ground-impact geohazard via high resolution seismic imaging of the remnants of a moderate-sized impact event, namely that associated with the 50 ka Odessa (TX) Group IAB iron meteorite. We provide high-resolution subsurface images of the 150-m diameter crater, the outcropping crater rim, the ejecta blanket, and the surrounding plain. The subsurface images are analyzed in terms of the deformation and thrusting of the underlying Cretaceous limestone and shale strata and the likely environmental effects caused by the impact. The analysis will build upon and extend our previous geophysical investigations based on magnetic gradiometry and time-domain electromagnetic data.

  8. Visualizing ferromagnetic domains in magnetic topological insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wenbo; Gu, G. D.; Yang, Fang; ...

    2015-05-13

    We report a systematic study of ferromagnetic domains in both single-crystal and thin-film specimens of magnetic topological insulators Cr doped (Bi0.1Sb0.9)2Te3 using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The temperature and field dependences of MFM and in situ resistance data are consistent with previous bulk transport and magnetic characterization. Bubble-like ferromagnetic domains were observed in both single crystals and thin films. Significantly, smaller domain size (~500 nm) with narrower domain wall (~150 – 300 nm) was observed in thin films of magnetic topological insulators, likely due to vertical confinement effect. As a result, these results suggest that thin films are more promisingmore » for visualization of chiral edge states.« less

  9. Magnetic Domain Strain Sensor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    static strain measurement at elevated temperatures. 2.2 Magnetic Strain Measurement Theory The initial work at GED investigated the Barkhausen effect...including large and small Barkhausen jumps. This is a wave propaga- tion phenomenon in which a magnetic wave velocity is measured. The wave velocity in a...theory explaining the phenomenon that deviates from the Barkhausen effect. Some basic concepts had to be examined to better understand magnetic phenomena

  10. Narrowband magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Scott, Greig C; Stang, Pascal P; Conolly, Steven M

    2009-08-01

    The magnetic particle imaging (MPI) method directly images the magnetization of super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, which are contrast agents commonly used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MPI, as originally envisioned, requires a high-bandwidth receiver coil and preamplifier, which are difficult to optimally noise match. This paper introduces Narrowband MPI, which dramatically reduces bandwidth requirements and increases the signal-to-noise ratio for a fixed specific absorption rate. We employ a two-tone excitation (called intermodulation) that can be tailored for a high-Q, narrowband receiver coil. We then demonstrate a new MPI instrument capable of full 3-D tomographic imaging of SPIO particles by imaging acrylic and tissue phantoms.

  11. Magnetic domains and magnetic stability of cohenite from the Morasko iron meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, B.; Kontny, A.; Uehara, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Solheid, P.; Jackson, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic properties, texture and microstructure of cohenite grains from Morasko iron meteorite have been investigated using electron backscattered diffraction, Bitter pattern technique, magneto-optical imaging method and magnetic force microscopy. Cohenite shows much stronger magnetic contrast compared to kamacite because it is magnetically harder than the Fe-Ni alloy, and thus causes higher stray fields. A surprising result is the high stability and reversibility of the global stripe-like magnetic domain structure in cohenite when applying high magnetic fields up to 1.5 T, and exposing it to high temperatures above the Curie temperature of about 220 °C. Heating up to 700 °C under atmosphere conditions has shown that cohenite remains stable and that the global magnetic domain structures mainly recover to its preheating state. This observation suggests that magnetic domains are strongly controlled by the crystal anisotropy of cohenite. Branching magnetic domain structures at the grain boundary to kamacite can be annealed, which indicates that they are very sensitive to record deformation. EBSD observations clearly demonstrate that increasing deviation from the easy [010] crystallographic axis and stress localization are the main factors controlling the distortion of Bitter patterns, and suggest a high sensitivity of the cohenite magnetic domain structure to local microstructural heterogeneities. The results of this study substantiate the theory that cohenite can be a good recorder of magnetic fields in planetary core material.

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  15. Imaging domains in transmission electron microscopy (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.

    1987-04-01

    Magnetic domain walls and domains inside thin electron transparent specimens of ferromagnetic materials can be imaged using the Fresnel and Focault techniques in a transmission electron microscope. Combined with the diffraction, microstructural and microchemical capabilities of modern microscopes, Lorentz microscopy offers one of the most powerful tools to study structure-property relationships in magnetic materials. In addition, using this technique, it is possible to deduce the local magnetization distribution around inhomogeneities and complex Bloch and Néel walls. Lorentz images can be used to quantitatively measure domain wall thickness and estimate domain wall energy. With modified sample holders and pole pieces, one can study in situ domain wall motion and the interaction of domains with microstructural features such as second phases, grain boundaries, structural defects, etc. All these will be illustrated with examples of Lorentz images from soft and hard magnets with special emphasis on the Nd-Fe-B hard magnets. Finally, the limitations of the Lorentz imaging technique utilizing the deflected electron intensities will be outlined and a new technique which utilizes the phase changes in the electron beam as it passes through the material in a scanning transmission microscope will be reviewed.

  16. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  17. Graphene mediated magnetic domain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Iori; Wang, Yi; Kong, Lingmei; Binek, Christian; Pasquale, Frank; Cao, Yuan; Dong, Bin; Kelber, Jeffry; Dowben, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Both graphene on Co and graphene on Co3O4/Co samples were investigate by the Raman spectroscopy and longitudinal magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). While the graphene on Co (111) bilayer thin films exhibited high remnant magnetization in plane easy axis ferromagnetism, the graphene/Co3O4/Co trilayers exhibited little remnant magnetization. The latter is due to formation of a complex multidomain state at zero applied field. The role of graphene and Co3O4 will be discussed.

  18. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Allwood, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300 nm wide, 24 nm thick Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} nanowire. Both transverse and vortex type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences, or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  19. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  20. Influence of domain wall interactions on nanosecond switching in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J.; Kuch, W.; Hertel, R.; Camarero, J.; Fukumoto, K.; Romanens, F.; Pizzini, S.; Bonfim, M.; Petroff, F.; Fontaine, A.; Kirschner, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have obtained microscopic evidence of the influence of domain wall stray fields on the nanosecond magnetization switching in magnetic trilayer systems. The nucleation barrier initiating the magnetic switching of the soft magnetic Fe20Ni80 layer in magnetic tunnel junctionlike FeNi/Al2O3/Co trilayers is considerably lowered by stray fields generated by domain walls present in the hard magnetic Co layer. This internal bias field can significantly increase the local switching speed of the soft layer. The effect is made visible using nanosecond time- and layer-resolved magnetic domain imaging and confirmed by micromagnetic simulations.

  1. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James; Reich, Morris; Danby, Gordon

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager 10 includes a generator 18 for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager 10 also includes a sensor 20 for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object.

  2. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Danby, G.

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager includes a generator for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager also includes a sensor for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object. 25 figs.

  3. Simplified technique demonstrates magnetic domain switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Light from a conventional photographic light source is polarized and projected through thin samples of gadolinium iron garnet and then observed with a conventional polarizing microscope. A distinctive change in color from red to yellow is observed as the magnetic domains are switched.

  4. Levels of Cognitive Control: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Test of an RDoC Domain Across Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smucny, Jason; Lesh, Tyler A; Newton, Keith; Niendam, Tara; Ragland, J Daniel; Carter, Cameron S

    2017-09-26

    In recent years, the boundaries of psychopathology as defined by diagnostic categories have been criticized as inadequately 'carving nature at its joints' with respect to the neurobiology of major mental disorders. In 2010 the NIMH launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework for understanding mental illnesses as brain circuit disorders that extend beyond DSM-defined diagnoses. In the present study we focus on cognitive dysfunction, a core feature of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD), and use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a cognitive control (CC) task in recent onset patients to test the hypothesis that at a behavioral and underlying neural circuitry level these deficits exist on a continuum (as opposed to showing categorical differences) across the two disorders. 53 healthy controls, 24 recent (<1 y) onset patients with BPD Type I with psychotic features, and 70 recent onset patients with SZ performed the AX-Continuous Performance Task while undergoing event-related fMRI at 1.5 T. In addition to behavior, task-associated response was examined in frontoparietal regions-of-interest. In an a priori contrast-based analysis, significant deficits across patient groups (vs controls) were observed on CC-associated performance as well as frontoparietal response. These analyses further revealed a continuum of deficits in which BPD showed intermediate levels of CC relative to controls and SZ. Poor CC was associated with poverty and disorganization symptoms across patient groups. These results support the hypothesis that CC dysfunction in BPD and SZ reflects a continuum of deficits that cuts across traditional, DSM-based classification. Implications for the neurobiology of these diseases are discussed.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 26 September 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.233.

  5. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  6. X-ray study of aligned magnetic stripe domains in perpendicular multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, O.; Denbeaux, G.P.; Kortright, J.B.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2003-03-03

    We have investigated the stripe domain structure and the magnetic reversal of perpendicular Co/Pt based multilayers at room temperature using magnetometry, magnetic imaging and magnetic x-ray scattering. In-plane field cycling aligns the stripe domains along the field direction. In magnetic x-ray scattering the parallel stripe domains act as a magnetic grating resulting in observed Bragg reflections up to 5th order. We model the scattering profile to extract and quantify the domain as well as domain wall widths. Applying fields up to {approx}1.2 kOe perpendicular to the film reversibly changes the relative width of up versus down domains while maintaining the overall stripe periodicity. Fields above 1.2 kOe introduce irreversible changes into the domain structure by contracting and finally annihilating individual stripe domains. We compare the current results with modeling and previous measurements of films with perpendicular anisotropy.

  7. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Magnified time-domain ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Barbier, Margaux; Friberg, Ari T.; Dudley, John M.; Genty, Goëry

    2017-04-01

    Ghost imaging allows the imaging of an object without directly seeing this object. Originally demonstrated in the spatial domain, it was recently shown that ghost imaging can be transposed into the time domain to detect ultrafast signals, even in the presence of distortion. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a temporal ghost imaging scheme which generates a 5× magnified ghost image of an ultrafast waveform. Inspired by shadow imaging in the spatial domain and building on the dispersive Fourier transform of an incoherent supercontinuum in an optical fiber, the approach overcomes the resolution limit of standard time-domain ghost imaging generally imposed by the detectors speed. The method can be scaled up to higher magnification factors using longer fiber lengths and light source with shorter duration.

  9. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning.

    PubMed

    Hu, X F; Wu, J; Niu, D X; Chen, L; Morton, S A; Scholl, A; Huang, Z C; Zhai, Y; Zhang, W; Will, I; Xu, Y B; Zhang, R; van der Laan, G

    2013-10-30

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 10(11) A.m(-2)) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of "Barkhausen jumps". A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime.

  10. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  11. Influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic field on the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Lai, Mei-Feng; Hou, Yun-Fang; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-13

    We investigated the influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of suspended magnetic nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires was obtained using steady-state Joule heating to measure the change in resistance caused by spontaneous heating. The results showed that the thermal conductivity coefficients of straight and wavy magnetic nanowires decreased with an increase in the magnetic domain wall number, implying that the scattering between magnons and domain walls hindered the heat transport process. In addition, we proved that the magnetic field considerably reduced the thermal conductivity of a magnetic nanowire. The influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline magnetic nanowires can be attributed to the scattering of long-wavelength spin waves mediated by intergrain exchange coupling.

  12. Magnetic domain observation of FeCo thin films fabricated by alternate monoatomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuki, T. Kotsugi, M.; Ohkochi, T.; Kojima, T.; Mizuguchi, M.; Takanashi, K.

    2014-01-28

    FeCo thin films are fabricated by alternate monoatomic layer deposition method on a Cu{sub 3}Au buffer layer, which in-plane lattice constant is very close to the predicted value to obtain a large magnetic anisotropy constant. The variation of the in-plane lattice constant during the deposition process is investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The magnetic domain images are also observed by a photoelectron emission microscope in order to microscopically understand the magnetic structure. As a result, element-specific magnetic domain images show that Fe and Co magnetic moments align parallel. A series of images obtained with various azimuth reveal that the FeCo thin films show fourfold in-plane magnetic anisotropy along 〈110〉 direction, and that the magnetic domain structure is composed only of 90∘ wall.

  13. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-11-01

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices.

  14. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-11-24

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices.

  15. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices. PMID:27882932

  16. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  17. Birdsong dialect patterns explained using magnetic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, James; Kenney, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The songs and calls of many bird species, like human speech, form distinct regional dialects. We suggest that the process of dialect formation is analogous to the physical process of magnetic domain formation. We take the coastal breeding grounds of the Puget Sound white crowned sparrow as an example. Previous field studies suggest that birds of this species learn multiple songs early in life, and when establishing a territory for the first time, retain one of these dialects in order to match the majority of their neighbors. We introduce a simple lattice model of the process, showing that this matching behavior can produce single dialect domains provided the death rate of adult birds is sufficiently low. We relate death rate to thermodynamic temperature in magnetic materials, and calculate the critical death rate by analogy with the Ising model. Using parameters consistent with the known behavior of these birds we show that coastal dialect domain shapes may be explained by viewing them as low-temperature "stripe states."

  18. Tailoring the chirality of magnetic domain walls by interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Ma, Tianping; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Kwon, Heeyoung; Won, Changyeon; Wu, Yizheng; Schmid, Andreas K

    2013-01-01

    Contacting ferromagnetic films with normal metals changes how magnetic textures respond to electric currents, enabling surprisingly fast domain wall motions and spin texture-dependent propagation direction. These effects are attributed to domain wall chirality induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at interfaces, which suggests rich possibilities to influence domain wall dynamics if the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be adjusted. Chiral magnetism was seen in several film structures on appropriately chosen substrates where interfacial spin-orbit-coupling effects are strong. Here we use real-space imaging to visualize chiral domain walls in cobalt/nickel multilayers in contact with platinum and iridium. We show that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be adjusted to stabilize either left-handed or right-handed Néel walls, or non-chiral Bloch walls by adjusting an interfacial spacer layer between the multilayers and the substrate. Our findings introduce domain wall chirality as a new degree of freedom, which may open up new opportunities for spintronics device designs.

  19. Tunable resistivity of individual magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-01-20

    Despite the relevance of current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion for new spintronics applications, the exact details of the current-domain wall interaction are not yet understood. A property intimately related to this interaction is the intrinsic DW resistivity. Here, we investigate experimentally how the resistivity inside a DW depends on the wall width Δ, which is tuned using focused ion beam irradiation of Pt/Co/Pt strips. We observe the nucleation of individual DWs with Kerr microscopy, and measure resistance changes in real time. A 1/Δ(2) dependence of DW resistivity is found, compatible with Levy-Zhang theory. Also quantitative agreement with theory is found by taking full account of the current flowing through each individual layer inside the multilayer stack.

  20. Domain wall orientation in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Vedmedenko, E Y; Kubetzka, A; von Bergmann, K; Pietzsch, O; Bode, M; Kirschner, J; Oepen, H P; Wiesendanger, R

    2004-02-20

    Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that domain walls in ultrathin Fe nanowires are oriented along a certain crystallographic direction, regardless of the orientation of the wires. Monte Carlo simulations on a discrete lattice are in accordance with the experiment if the film relaxation is taken into account. We demonstrate that the wall orientation is determined by the atomic lattice and the resulting strength of an effective exchange interaction. The magnetic anisotropy and the magnetostatic energy play a minor role for the wall orientation in that system.

  1. Manipulation of vortices by magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goa, P. E.; Hauglin, H.; Olsen, A.˚. A. F.; Shantsev, D.; Johansen, T. H.

    2003-01-01

    In a type-II superconductor, the magnetic field penetrates in the form of thin filaments called vortices. The controlled behavior of these vortices may provide the basis for a new generation of nanodevices. We present here a series of experiments showing simultaneous manipulation and imaging of individual vortices in a NbSe2 single crystal. The magnetic field from a Bloch wall in a ferrite garnet film (FGF) is used to manipulate the vortices. High-resolution magneto-optical imaging enables real-time observation of the vortex positions using the Faraday effect in the same FGF. Depending on the thickness of the sample, the vortices are either swept away or merely bent with the Bloch wall.

  2. Moment domain representation of nonblind image deblurring.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ahlad; Paramesran, Raveendran; Shakibaei, Barmak Honarvar

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of geometric moments to the field of nonblind image deblurring. Using the developed relationship of geometric moments for original and blurred images, a mathematical formulation based on the Euler-Lagrange identity and variational techniques is proposed. It uses an iterative procedure to deblur the image in moment domain. The theoretical framework is validated by a set of experiments. A comparative analysis of the results obtained using the spatial and moment domains are evaluated using a quality assessment method known as the Blind/Reference-less Image Spatial Quality Evaluator (BRISQUE). The results show that the proposed method yields a higher quality score when compared with the spatial domain method for the same number of iterations.

  3. Local control of magnetic anisotropy in transcritical permalloy thin films using ferroelectric BaTiO3 domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackler, Sean W.; Donahue, Michael J.; Gao, Tieren; Nero, Paris N. A.; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Cumings, John; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the local coupling between dense magnetic stripe domains in transcritical permalloy (tPy) thin films and ferroelectric domains of BaTiO3 single crystals in a tPy/BaTiO3 heterostructure. Two distinct changes in the magnetic stripe domains of tPy were observed from the magnetic force microscopy images after cooling the heterostructure from above the ferroelectric Curie temperature of BaTiO3 (120 °C) to room temperature. First, an abrupt break in the magnetic stripe domain direction was found at the ferroelectric a-c-domain boundaries due to an induced change in in-plane magnetic anisotropy. Second, the magnetic stripe domain period increased when coupled to a ferroelectric a-domain due to a change in out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that local magnetic anisotropy energy from inverse magnetostriction is conserved between in-plane and out-of-plane components.

  4. Investigation of magnetic domains in Ni Mn Ga alloys with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y.; Heczko, O.; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.; Lindroos, V. K.

    2005-10-01

    The magnetic domains of martensite have been investigated with a scanning electron microscope in three Ni-Mn-Ga alloys with five-layered, seven-layered and non-layered (T) martensite structure. Type I magnetic contrast provides an overview of the domain pattern. This contrast arises from the stray field of the specimen and it is observed in a secondary-electron image. The type II magnetic contrast of a backscattered electron image gives the detailed magnetic microstructure together with the crystal morphology. A stripe domain pattern is formed in all the alloys when there is one dominant martensite variant in the sample. The second minor variant might be distorted due to interaction with the magnetic domain structure of the major variant. The mechanism of the deformation is not entirely clear and a tentative explanation for this deformation is suggested.

  5. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  6. Quantum Image Filtering in the Spatial Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Suzhen; Mao, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Xiaofa

    2017-08-01

    Quantum image processing has developed rapidly in recent years. In this paper, we propose a framework of quantum image filtering in the spatial domain. We proved that a high quantum parallel method to correlate the image and the filter mask can be achieved, even though the quantum correlation of two sequences is physically impossible. In order to avoid this impossible, we use quantum addition operation instead of quantum multiplication. We provide the quantum circuit that can realize the filtering task and present several simulation results on grayscale images. The main advantage of the quantum version lies in the efficient correlation between the quantum image and the filter mask.

  7. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. R.

    1996-05-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Imaging, now more commonly referred to as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), developed into an important clinical modality between the years of 1978 and 1985. In 1945 it was demonstrated independently by Bloch(F. Bloch, The Principle of Nuclear Induction, Nobel Lectures in Physics: 1946-1962 New York, Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc. 1964.) and Purcell(E.M. Purcell, Research in Nuclear Magnetism, Nobel Lectures in Physics: 1946-1962, New York. Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc. 1964.) that magnetic nuclei in a sample when placed in a static magnetic field exhibit a characteristic resonance frequency which is proportional to the field strength and unique to nuclei of the same type and same environment. The net magnetization of the sample when irradiated by an RF wave at the resonance frequency could thus be manipulated to produce an induced "NMR signal" in a conducting loop placed near the sample. In the early 1970's, methods were developed whereby the NMR signal could be spatially encoded in both frequency and phase by means of superimposed linear magnetic field gradients to produce NMR images. NMR image contrast is a function of nuclear concentration and magnetic relaxation times (T1 and T2). MRI became the first medical imaging modality to provide both high resolution and high contrast images of soft tissue. Current clinical MRI systems produce images of the distribution of ^1H nuclei (primarily water) within the body. Other biologically important nuclei (^13C, ^23N, ^31P), as well as the imaging of hyperpolarized inert gases (^3He, ^129Xe) are under investigation. Recent developments in ^1H-MRI have included chemical shift imaging (hydrogen containing metabolites), blood flow imaging (MR angiography), ultra high-speed imaging (Echo Planar), and imaging of brain function based upon magnetic susceptibility differences resulting from blood oxygenation changes during brain activity.

  8. Correlation Between Domain Behavior and Magnetic Properties of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leib, Jeffrey Scott

    2003-01-01

    Correlation between length scales in the field of magnetism has long been a topic of intensive study. The long-term desire is simple: to determine one theory that completely describes the magnetic behavior of matter from an individual atomic particle all the way up to large masses of material. One key piece to this puzzle is connecting the behavior of a material's domains on the nanometer scale with the magnetic properties of an entire large sample or device on the centimeter scale. In the first case study involving the FeSiAl thin films, contrast and spacing of domain patterns are clearly related to microstructure and stress. Case study 2 most clearly demonstrates localized, incoherent domain wall motion switching with field applied along an easy axis for a square hysteresis loop. In case study 3, axis-specific images of the complex Gd-Si-Ge material clearly show the influence of uniaxial anisotropy. Case study 4, the only study with the sole intent of creating domain structures for imaging, also demonstrated in fairly simple terms the effects of increasing stress on domain patterns. In case study 5, it was proven that the width of magnetoresistance loops could be quantitatively predicted using only MFM. When all of the case studies are considered together, a dominating factor seems to be that of anisotropy, both magneticrostaylline and stress induced. Any quantitative bulk measurements heavily reliant on K coefficients, such as the saturation fields for the FeSiAl films, Hc in cases 1, 3, and 5, and the uniaxial character of the Gd5(Si2Ge2), transferred to and from the domain scale quite well. In-situ measurements of domain rotation and switching, could also be strongly correlated with bulk magnetic properties, including coercivity, Ms, and hysteresis loop shape. In most cases, the qualitative nature of the domain structures, when properly considered, matched quite well to what might have been expected from

  9. Third type of domain wall in soft magnetic nanostrips.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V D; Fruchart, O; Pizzini, S; Vogel, J; Toussaint, J-C; Rougemaille, N

    2015-07-23

    Magnetic domain walls (DWs) in nanostructures are low-dimensional objects that separate regions with uniform magnetisation. Since they can have different shapes and widths, DWs are an exciting playground for fundamental research, and became in the past years the subject of intense works, mainly focused on controlling, manipulating, and moving their internal magnetic configuration. In nanostrips with in-plane magnetisation, two DWs have been identified: in thin and narrow strips, transverse walls are energetically favored, while in thicker and wider strips vortex walls have lower energy. The associated phase diagram is now well established and often used to predict the low-energy magnetic configuration in a given magnetic nanostructure. However, besides the transverse and vortex walls, we find numerically that another type of wall exists in permalloy nanostrips. This third type of DW is characterised by a three-dimensional, flux closure micromagnetic structure with an unusual length and three internal degrees of freedom. Magnetic imaging on lithographically-patterned permalloy nanostrips confirms these predictions and shows that these DWs can be moved with an external magnetic field of about 1 mT. An extended phase diagram describing the regions of stability of all known types of DWs in permalloy nanostrips is provided.

  10. Advances in breast imaging: magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bartella, Lia; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is rapidly becoming incorporated into clinical practice. Indications for breast MRI include staging of known breast cancer, monitoring response to chemotherapy, assessing recurrence, problem solving, and high-risk screening. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a promising technique that may decrease the number of benign biopsies generated by breast MRI in the clinical setting.

  11. Differential ghost imaging in time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O-oka, Yoshiki; Fukatsu, Susumu

    2017-08-01

    Differential ghost imaging is attempted in time domain, i.e., temporal differential ghost imaging (TDGI), using pseudo-randomized light pulses and a temporal object consisting of no-return-to-zero bit patterns of varying duty. Evaluation of the signal-to-noise characteristics by taking into account errors due to false cross-correlation between the reference and the bucket detector readings indicates that the TDGI outperforms its non-differential counterpart, i.e., time-domain GI, in terms of consistently high and even duty-independent signal-to-noise ratios that are achieved.

  12. Image domain propeller fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Skare, Stefan; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Lilja, Anders; Bammer, Roland

    2013-04-01

    A new pulse sequence for high-resolution T2-weighted (T2-w) imaging is proposed - image domain propeller fast spin echo (iProp-FSE). Similar to the T2-w PROPELLER sequence, iProp-FSE acquires data in a segmented fashion, as blades that are acquired in multiple TRs. However, the iProp-FSE blades are formed in the image domain instead of in the k-space domain. Each iProp-FSE blade resembles a single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequence with a very narrow phase-encoding field of view (FOV), after which N rotated blade replicas yield the final full circular FOV. Our method of combining the image domain blade data to a full FOV image is detailed, and optimal choices of phase-encoding FOVs and receiver bandwidths were evaluated on phantom and volunteers. The results suggest that a phase FOV of 15-20%, a receiver bandwidth of ±32-63 kHz and a subsequent readout time of about 300 ms provide a good tradeoff between signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency and T2 blurring. Comparisons between iProp-FSE, Cartesian FSE and PROPELLER were made on single-slice axial brain data, showing similar T2-w tissue contrast and SNR with great anatomical conspicuity at similar scan times - without colored noise or streaks from motion. A new slice interleaving order is also proposed to improve the multislice capabilities of iProp-FSE.

  13. Multi-color imaging of magnetic Co/Pt heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Willems, Felix; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Weder, David; Günther, Christian M; Schneider, Michael; Pfau, Bastian; Meise, Sven; Guehrs, Erik; Geilhufe, Jan; Merhe, Alaa El Din; Jal, Emmanuelle; Vodungbo, Boris; Lüning, Jan; Mahieu, Benoit; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Gauthier, David; Manfredda, Michele; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We present an element specific and spatially resolved view of magnetic domains in Co/Pt heterostructures in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. Resonant small-angle scattering and coherent imaging with Fourier-transform holography reveal nanoscale magnetic domain networks via magnetic dichroism of Co at the M2,3 edges as well as via strong dichroic signals at the O2,3 and N6,7 edges of Pt. We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous, two-color coherent imaging at a free-electron laser facility paving the way for a direct real space access to ultrafast magnetization dynamics in complex multicomponent material systems.

  14. Multi-color imaging of magnetic Co/Pt heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Felix; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Weder, David; Günther, Christian M.; Schneider, Michael; Pfau, Bastian; Meise, Sven; Guehrs, Erik; Geilhufe, Jan; Merhe, Alaa El Din; Jal, Emmanuelle; Vodungbo, Boris; Lüning, Jan; Mahieu, Benoit; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Gauthier, David; Manfredda, Michele; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We present an element specific and spatially resolved view of magnetic domains in Co/Pt heterostructures in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. Resonant small-angle scattering and coherent imaging with Fourier-transform holography reveal nanoscale magnetic domain networks via magnetic dichroism of Co at the M2,3 edges as well as via strong dichroic signals at the O2,3 and N6,7 edges of Pt. We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous, two-color coherent imaging at a free-electron laser facility paving the way for a direct real space access to ultrafast magnetization dynamics in complex multicomponent material systems. PMID:28289691

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks.

  16. Magnetic force microscopy of nano-size magnetic domain ordering in heavy ion irradiated fullerene films.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D K; Pivin, J C; Papaléo, R M; Tripathi, A; Singh, F; Sulania, I

    2007-06-01

    In the present work, magnetic force microscopy is employed to investigate the magnetic ordering in ion irradiated fullerene films. It is observed that magnetic domain size is approximately 100-200 nm and magnetic signal is stronger at the domain boundaries. Magnetic signal arise in irradiated films is confirmed by magnetic measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device which increases with the ion fluence. The induced magnetism is possibly due to structural defects in the amorphous carbon phase formed by ion irradiation.

  17. Magnetic bubblecade memory based on chiral domain walls.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Duck-Ho; Yoo, Sang-Cheol; Je, Soong-Geun; Chun, Byong Sun; Kim, Wondong; Min, Byoung-Chul; Hwang, Chanyong; Choe, Sug-Bong

    2015-03-16

    Unidirectional motion of magnetic domain walls is the key concept underlying next-generation domain-wall-mediated memory and logic devices. Such motion has been achieved either by injecting large electric currents into nanowires or by employing domain-wall tension induced by sophisticated structural modulation. Herein, we demonstrate a new scheme without any current injection or structural modulation. This scheme utilizes the recently discovered chiral domain walls, which exhibit asymmetry in their speed with respect to magnetic fields. Because of this asymmetry, an alternating magnetic field results in the coherent motion of the domain walls in one direction. Such coherent unidirectional motion is achieved even for an array of magnetic bubble domains, enabling the design of a new device prototype-magnetic bubblecade memory-with two-dimensional data-storage capability.

  18. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    PubMed

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-03

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices.

  19. Engineered magnetic domain textures in exchange bias bilayer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gaul, Alexander; Holzinger, Dennis; Müglich, Nicolas David; Ehresmann, Arno; Hankemeier, Sebastian; Staeck, Philipp; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-07-21

    A magnetic domain texture has been deterministically engineered in a topographically flat exchange-biased (EB) thin film system. The texture consists of long-range periodically arranged unit cells of four individual domains, characterized by individual anisotropies, individual geometry, and with non-collinear remanent magnetizations. The texture has been engineered by a sequence of light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning of the EB layer system. The magnetic texture's in-plane spatial magnetization distribution and the corresponding domain walls have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The influence of magnetic stray fields emerging from neighboring domain walls and the influence of the different anisotropies of the adjacent domains on the Néel type domain wall core's magnetization rotation sense and widths were investigated. It is shown that the usual energy degeneracy of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating magnetization through the walls is revoked, suppressing Bloch lines along the domain wall. Estimates of the domain wall widths for different domain configurations based on material parameters determined by vibrating sample magnetometry were quantitatively compared to the SEMPA data.

  20. Engineered magnetic domain textures in exchange bias bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Alexander; Hankemeier, Sebastian; Holzinger, Dennis; Müglich, Nicolas David; Staeck, Philipp; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter; Ehresmann, Arno

    2016-07-01

    A magnetic domain texture has been deterministically engineered in a topographically flat exchange-biased (EB) thin film system. The texture consists of long-range periodically arranged unit cells of four individual domains, characterized by individual anisotropies, individual geometry, and with non-collinear remanent magnetizations. The texture has been engineered by a sequence of light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning of the EB layer system. The magnetic texture's in-plane spatial magnetization distribution and the corresponding domain walls have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The influence of magnetic stray fields emerging from neighboring domain walls and the influence of the different anisotropies of the adjacent domains on the Néel type domain wall core's magnetization rotation sense and widths were investigated. It is shown that the usual energy degeneracy of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating magnetization through the walls is revoked, suppressing Bloch lines along the domain wall. Estimates of the domain wall widths for different domain configurations based on material parameters determined by vibrating sample magnetometry were quantitatively compared to the SEMPA data.

  1. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... the area being scanned include: Metallic spinal rod Plates, pins, screws, or metal mesh used to repair ...

  3. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  4. AC driven magnetic domain quantification with 5 nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenghua; Li, Xiang; Dong, Dapeng; Liu, Dongping; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2014-07-01

    As the magnetic storage density increases in commercial products, e.g. the hard disc drives, a full understanding of dynamic magnetism in nanometer resolution underpins the development of next-generation products. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Moreover, the dynamic magnetism cannot be characterized because MFM is only sensitive to the static magnetic fields. Here, we develop a side-band magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to locally observe the alternating magnetic fields in nanometer length scales at an operating distance of 1 nm. Variations in alternating magnetic fields and their relating time-variable magnetic domain reversals have been demonstrated by the side-band MFM. The magnetic domain wall motions, relating to the periodical rotation of sample magnetization, are quantified via micromagnetics. Based on the side-band MFM, the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The present technique can be applied to investigate the microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic materials, and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine.

  5. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Devolder, Thibaut; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  6. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    SciTech Connect

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2015-11-02

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  7. Non-volatile polarization switch of magnetic domain wall velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Schott, Marine; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.

    2015-12-21

    Controlled propagation speed of individual magnetic domains in metal channels at the room temperature is obtained via the non-volatile field effect associated with the switchable polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) (polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric polymer. Polarization domains directly written using conducting atomic force microscope probe locally accelerate/decelerate the magnetic domains in the 0.6 nm thick Co film. The change of the magnetic domain wall velocity is consistent with the magnetic anisotropy energy modulation through the polarization upward/downward orientation. Excellent retention is observed. The demonstrated local non-destructive and reversible change of magnetic properties via rewritable patterning of ferroelectric domains could be attractive for exploring the ultimate limit of miniaturization in devices based on ferromagnetic/ferroelectric bilayers.

  8. Study of Magnetic Domain Dynamics Using Nonlinear Magnetic Responses: Magnetic Diagnostics of the Itinerant Magnet MnP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, Masaki; Matsui, Hideaki; Tsuruta, Kazuki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Kishine, Jun-ichiro; Inoue, Katsuya; Kousaka, Yusuke; Yano, Shin-ichiro; Nakao, Yuya; Akimitsu, Jun

    2015-10-01

    The nonlinear and linear magnetic responses to an ac magnetic field H are useful for the study of the magnetic dynamics of both magnetic domains and their constituent spins. In particular, the third-harmonic magnetic response M3ω reflects the dynamics of magnetic domains. Furthermore, by considering the ac magnetic response as a function of H, we can evaluate the degree of magnetic nonlinearity, which is closely related to M3ω. In this study, a series of approaches was used to examine the itinerant magnet MnP, in which both ferromagnetic and helical phases are present. On the basis of this investigation, we systematize the diagnostic approach to evaluating nonlinearity in magnetic responses.

  9. Bias structure to efficiently package a magnetic bubble domain device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Thomas T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A single, compact bias structure to efficiently package a plurality of magnetic bubble domain device chips having different bias requirements. The vertical magnetic field distribution within the bias structure air gap is selectively controlled by a magnetically soft field adjusting assembly suitably attached within the bias structure. The size and configuration of the field adjusting assembly tailors local field variations within the air gap to correspond with the bias requirements of the bubble domain chips disposed therein.

  10. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  11. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-04-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  12. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S F; Gan, W L; Kwon, J; Luo, F L; Lim, G J; Wang, J B; Lew, W S

    2016-04-21

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~10(12) A/m(2). Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 10(11) A/m(2). Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  13. Functional Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Bradley A.

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT) is a high-speed, high resolution imaging modality capable of structural and functional characterization of tissue microstructure. SDOCT fills a niche between histology and ultrasound imaging, providing non-contact, non-invasive backscattering amplitude and phase from a sample. Due to the translucent nature of the tissue, ophthalmic imaging is an ideal space for SDOCT imaging. Structural imaging of the retina has provided new insights into ophthalmic disease. The phase component of SDOCT images remains largely underexplored, though. While Doppler SDOCT has been explored in a research setting, it has yet to gain traction in the clinic. Other, functional exploitations of the phase are possible and necessary to expand the utility of SDOCT. Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy (SDPM) is an extension of SDOCT that is capable of resolving sub-wavelength displacements within a focal volume. Application of sub-wavelength displacement measurement imaging could provide a new method for non-invasive optophysiological measurement. This body of work encompasses both hardware and software design and development for implementation of SDOCT. Structural imaging was proven in both the lab and the clinic. Coarse phase changes associated with Doppler flow frequency shifts were recorded and a study was conducted to validate Doppler measurement. Fine phase changes were explored through SDPM applications. Preliminary optophysiology data was acquired to study the potential of sub-wavelength measurements in the retina. To remove the complexity associated with in-vivo human retinal imaging, a first principles approach using isolated nerve samples was applied using standard SDPM and a depthencoded technique for measuring conduction velocity. Results from amplitude as well as both coarse and fine phase processing are presented. In-vivo optophysiology using SDPM is a promising avenue for exploration, and projects furthering or extending this body

  14. Quantitative analysis of the magnetic domain structure in polycrystalline La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3 thin films by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenghua; Wei, Fulin; Yoshimura, Satoru; Li, Guoqing; Asano, Hidefumi; Saito, Hitoshi

    2013-01-14

    The nanoscale magnetic domain structure of the polycrystalline La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) granular thin films was imaged with a developed magnetic force microscopy technique by simultaneously detecting both the perpendicular and in-plane components of magnetic field gradients during the same scan of the tip oscillation. The characteristics of both the perpendicular and in-plane magnetic field gradient at the grain edges or the nonmagnetic grain boundary phase for LSMO films were demonstrated and can be used to evaluate the magnetic domain structure and magnetic isolation between neighboring grains. A two dimensional signal transformation algorithm to reconstruct the in-plane magnetization distribution of the polycrystalline LSMO thin films from the measured raw MFM images with the aid of the deconvolution technique was presented. The comparison between the experimental and simulated MFM images indicates that the magnetic grains or clusters are in the single domain (SD) or multi-domain (MD) state with the magnetic moments parallel or anti-parallel to the effective magnetic field of each grain, possibly due to the need for minimizing the total energy. The quantitative interpretation of the magnetic domain structure indicates that the large magnetoresistance in the studied LSMO films is mainly due to tunnel effect and scattering of conducted electrons at the nonmagnetic grain boundary phase related to the different configurations of magnetic domain states between neighboring grains.

  15. Thermal variations of domain wall thickness and number of domains in magnetic rectangular grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Merrill, Ronald T.

    1990-12-01

    Equilibrium domain wall thickness and number of domains in rectangular magnetic grains are determined by using a modified Amar model. It is shown that domain structure, particularly domain wall thickness, in a magnetized grain depends strongly on grain shape and orientation. These dependencies are attributed to the existence of two competing self-magnetostatic interactions, one from the ends of the grain and the other from the sides. One of the consequences of this is that the thermal variation of domain wall thickness in an elongated grain is greater (smaller) than predicted by classical theory when the grain is magnetized along the shortest (longest) dimension. For magnetite, classical theory provides a good approximation in predicting both domain wall thickness and number of domains in equal-dimensional grains larger than about 4 μm.

  16. Indexing Flower Patent Images using Domain Knowledge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    approach is illustrated by using it to provide a solution to the problem of indexing images of flowers for searching a flower patents database by color...The flower region is isolated from the background by using an automatic iterative segmentation algorithm with domain knowledge driven feedback. The...color of the flower is defined by the color names present in the flower region and their relative proportions. The database can be queried by example

  17. Domain structures and magnetization reversal in Co/Pd and CoFeB/Pd multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbiaa, R.; Ranjbar, M.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-01

    Domain structures and magnetization reversal of (Co/Pd) and (CoFeB/Pd) multilayers with 7 and 14 repeats were investigated. The Co-based multilayers show much larger coercivities, a better squareness, and a sharper magnetization switching than CoFeB-based multilayers. From magnetic force microscopy observations, both structures show strong reduction in domains size as the number of repeats increases but the magnetic domains for Co-based multilayers are more than one order of magnitude larger than for CoFeB-based multilayers. By imaging domains at different times, breaks in the (CoFeB/Pd) multilayer stripes were observed within only few hours, while no change could be seen for (Co/Pd) multilayers. Although CoFeB single layers are suitable for magnetoresistive devices due to their large spin polarization and low damping constants, their lamination with Pd suffers mainly from thermal instability.

  18. Domain structures and magnetization reversal in Co/Pd and CoFeB/Pd multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.; Ranjbar, M.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Domain structures and magnetization reversal of (Co/Pd) and (CoFeB/Pd) multilayers with 7 and 14 repeats were investigated. The Co-based multilayers show much larger coercivities, a better squareness, and a sharper magnetization switching than CoFeB-based multilayers. From magnetic force microscopy observations, both structures show strong reduction in domains size as the number of repeats increases but the magnetic domains for Co-based multilayers are more than one order of magnitude larger than for CoFeB-based multilayers. By imaging domains at different times, breaks in the (CoFeB/Pd) multilayer stripes were observed within only few hours, while no change could be seen for (Co/Pd) multilayers. Although CoFeB single layers are suitable for magnetoresistive devices due to their large spin polarization and low damping constants, their lamination with Pd suffers mainly from thermal instability.

  19. Magnetic domain patterns on strong perpendicular magnetization of Co/Ni multilayers as spintronics materials: II. Numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kazue; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kojima, Kazuki; Yasue, Tsuneo; Akutsu, Noriko; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Bauer, Ernst; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2013-10-02

    Magnetic domains in ultrathin films form domain patterns, which strongly depend on the magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic anisotropy in Co/Ni multilayers changes with the number of layers. We provide a model to simulate the experimentally observed domain patterns. The model assumes a layer-dependent magnetic anisotropy. With the anisotropy parameter estimated from experimental data, we reproduce the magnetic domain patterns.

  20. Mechanical Actuation of Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Hill, Daniel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically study the motion of a magnetic domain wall induced by transverse elastic waves in a one-dimensional magnetic wire, which respects both rotational and translational symmetries. By invoking the conservation of the associated total angular and linear momenta, we are able to derive the torque and the force on the domain wall exerted by the waves. We then show how ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic domain walls can be driven by circularly and linearly polarized waves, respectively. We envision that elastic waves may provide effective means to drive the dynamics of magnetic solitons in insulators.

  1. Magnetic domain wall engineering in a nanoscale permalloy junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junlin; Zhang, Xichao; Lu, Xianyang; Zhang, Jason; Yan, Yu; Ling, Hua; Wu, Jing; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing

    2017-08-01

    Nanoscale magnetic junctions provide a useful approach to act as building blocks for magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), where one of the key issues is to control the magnetic domain configuration. Here, we study the domain structure and the magnetic switching in the Permalloy (Fe20Ni80) nanoscale magnetic junctions with different thicknesses by using micromagnetic simulations. It is found that both the 90-° and 45-° domain walls can be formed between the junctions and the wire arms depending on the thickness of the device. The magnetic switching fields show distinct thickness dependencies with a broad peak varying from 7 nm to 22 nm depending on the junction sizes, and the large magnetic switching fields favor the stability of the MRAM operation.

  2. Traveling wave magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Ruckert, Martin A; Klauer, Peter; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Behr, Volker C

    2014-02-01

    Most 3-D magnetic particle imaging (MPI) scanners currently use permanent magnets to create the strong gradient field required for high resolution MPI. However, using permanent magnets limits the field of view (FOV) due to the large amount of energy required to move the field free point (FFP) from the center of the scanner. To address this issue, an alternative approach called "Traveling Wave MPI" is here presented. This approach employs a novel gradient system, the dynamic linear gradient array, to cover a large FOV while dynamically creating a strong magnetic gradient. The proposed design also enables the use of a so-called line-scanning mode, which simplifies the FFP trajectory to a linear path through the 3-D volume. This results in simplified mathematics, which facilitates the image reconstruction.

  3. Speckle Patterns in Coherence Domain Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ping

    2006-03-01

    We have shown previously that coherence domain biomedical imaging can be used for optically sectioning small tumors such as rat osteogenic sarcoma (bone tumors). Speckle patterns of such small tumors provided quantitative measures of the health, necrotic, and poisoned tissues. However, the origins of these speckle patterns are not clear. Although the nuclei, mitochondria and other organelles inside cells are responsible for the speckle under the illumination of low coherence light source, these patterns at the imaging plane are related to the photon pathways both inside and outside the tissue. We report systematic experiments and simulation of the speckle patterns from coherence domain imaging of small tumors. The image frames are acquired at different depths inside the tumor tissue and analyzed by using a turbid medium model. The results reveal that the speckle patterns are dominated by the scattering properties of the tissue, which is characterized by the mean free path of the photons, and the collection geometry of the backscattered light photons. This work was supported by a University of Missouri Research Board grant URB-04-072 and NIH grant P50-CA-103130.

  4. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated. PMID:27694953

  5. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated.

  6. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Burn, D M; Atkinson, D

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping 'quasi-static' and low damping 'dynamic' regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... an image. Repeated exposure can be harmful.An MRI scan takes longer to perform (30 to 60 minutes, ... a treatment plan.Depending on your symptoms, an MRI will scan a specific portion of your body to diagnose: ...

  8. THz time domain sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheville, R. A.; Reiten, Matthew T.; O'Hara, John; Grischkowsky, Daniel R.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade the experimental technique of THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has proved to be a versatile method for investigating a wide range of phenomena in the THz or far infrared spectral region from 100 GHz to 5 THz. THz-TDS has wide potential for sensing and imaging. The experimental technique is described along with recent results on THz beam propagation for long base-line THz measurements. THz imaging has been demonstrated using both quasi-optical and synthetic aperture approaches, results are presented including images of scatterers as well as non-destructive evaluation of ceramics. Two potential sensing applications of THz-TDS are discussed, thin film characterization and use of waveguides for sensing.

  9. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic spirals via domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, Ryan D.; Kunz, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics have been investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic nanostructures for potential applications in logic, sensing, and recording. We present a combination of analytic and simulated results describing the reliable field driven motion of a domain wall through the arms of a ferromagnetic spiral nanowire. The spiral geometry is capable of taking advantage of the benefits of both straight and circular wires. Measurements of the in-plane components of the spirals' magnetization can be used to determine the angular location of the domain wall, impacting the magnetoresistive applications dependent on the domain wall location. The spirals' magnetization components are found to depend on the spiral parameters: the initial radius and spacing between spiral arms, along with the domain wall location. The magnetization is independent of the parameters of the rotating field used to move the domain wall, and therefore the model is valid for current induced domain wall motion as well. The speed of the domain wall is found to depend on the frequency of the rotating driving field, and the domain wall speeds can be reliably varied over several orders of magnitude. We further demonstrate a technique capable of injecting multiple domain walls and show the reliable and unidirectional motion of domain walls through the arms of the spiral.

  10. SVD compression for magnetic resonance fingerprinting in the time domain.

    PubMed

    McGivney, Debra F; Pierre, Eric; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Saybasili, Haris; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting is a technique for acquiring and processing MR data that simultaneously provides quantitative maps of different tissue parameters through a pattern recognition algorithm. A predefined dictionary models the possible signal evolutions simulated using the Bloch equations with different combinations of various MR parameters and pattern recognition is completed by computing the inner product between the observed signal and each of the predicted signals within the dictionary. Though this matching algorithm has been shown to accurately predict the MR parameters of interest, one desires a more efficient method to obtain the quantitative images. We propose to compress the dictionary using the singular value decomposition, which will provide a low-rank approximation. By compressing the size of the dictionary in the time domain, we are able to speed up the pattern recognition algorithm, by a factor of between 3.4-4.8, without sacrificing the high signal-to-noise ratio of the original scheme presented previously.

  11. Magnetic domain-wall dynamics in a submicrometre ferromagnetic structure.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Del; Allwood, Dan A; Xiong, Gang; Cooke, Michael D; Faulkner, Colm C; Cowburn, Russell P

    2003-02-01

    As fabrication technology pushes the dimensions of ferromagnetic structures into the nanoscale, understanding the magnetization processes of these structures is of fundamental interest, and key to future applications in hard disk drives, magnetic random access memory and other 'spintronic' devices. Measurements on elongated magnetic nanostructures highlighted the importance of nucleation and propagation of a magnetic boundary, or domain wall, between opposing magnetic domains in the magnetization reversal process. Domain-wall propagation in confined structures is of basic interest and critical to the performance of a recently demonstrated magnetic logic scheme for spintronics. A previous study of a 500-nm-wide NiFe structure obtained very low domain-wall mobility in a three-layer device. Here we report room-temperature measurements of the propagation velocity of a domain wall in a single-layer planar Ni80Fe20 ferromagnetic nanowire 200 nm wide. The wall velocities are extremely high and, importantly, the intrinsic wall mobility is close to that in continuous films, indicating that lateral confinement does not significantly affect the gyromagnetic spin damping parameter to the extreme extent previously suggested. Consequently the prospects for high-speed domain-wall motion in future nanoscale spintronic devices are excellent.

  12. Multiscale Medical Image Fusion in Wavelet Domain

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Wavelet transforms have emerged as a powerful tool in image fusion. However, the study and analysis of medical image fusion is still a challenging area of research. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a multiscale fusion of multimodal medical images in wavelet domain. Fusion of medical images has been performed at multiple scales varying from minimum to maximum level using maximum selection rule which provides more flexibility and choice to select the relevant fused images. The experimental analysis of the proposed method has been performed with several sets of medical images. Fusion results have been evaluated subjectively and objectively with existing state-of-the-art fusion methods which include several pyramid- and wavelet-transform-based fusion methods and principal component analysis (PCA) fusion method. The comparative analysis of the fusion results has been performed with edge strength (Q), mutual information (MI), entropy (E), standard deviation (SD), blind structural similarity index metric (BSSIM), spatial frequency (SF), and average gradient (AG) metrics. The combined subjective and objective evaluations of the proposed fusion method at multiple scales showed the effectiveness and goodness of the proposed approach. PMID:24453868

  13. Scanning of magnetic space groups and the analysis of non-magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Janovec, V; Litvin, D B

    2007-09-01

    Similarly to atomic positions in a crystal being fixed, or at least constrained by the space group of that crystal, the displacements of atoms in a domain wall are determined or constrained by the symmetry of the wall given by the sectional layer group of the corresponding domain pair. The sectional layer group can be interpreted as comprised of operations that leave invariant a plane transecting two overlapping structures, the domain states of the two domains adhering to the domain wall. The procedure of determining the sectional layer groups for all orientations and positions of a transecting plane is called scanning of the space group. Scanning of non-magnetic space groups has been described and tabulated. It is shown here that the scanning of magnetic groups can be determined from that of non-magnetic groups. The information provided by scanning of magnetic space groups can be utilized in the symmetry analysis of domain walls in non-magnetic crystals since, for any dichromatic space group, which expresses the symmetry of overlapped structures of two non-magnetic domains, there exists an isomorphic magnetic space group. Consequently, a sectional layer group of a magnetic space group expresses the symmetry of a non-magnetic domain wall. Examples of this are given in the symmetry analysis of ferroelectric domain walls in non-magnetic perovskites.

  14. Electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion and local magnetization reversal

    PubMed Central

    Lahtinen, Tuomas H. E.; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2012-01-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls by an external magnetic field or spin-polarized current. Achieving the same degree of magnetic controllability using an electric field has potential advantages including enhanced functionality and low power consumption. Here we report on an approach to electrically control local magnetic properties, including the writing and erasure of regular ferromagnetic domain patterns and the motion of magnetic domain walls, in CoFe-BaTiO3 heterostructures. Our method is based on recurrent strain transfer from ferroelastic domains in ferroelectric media to continuous magnetostrictive films with negligible magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Optical polarization microscopy of both ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain structures reveals that domain correlations and strong inter-ferroic domain wall pinning persist in an applied electric field. This leads to an unprecedented electric controllability over the ferromagnetic microstructure, an accomplishment that produces giant magnetoelectric coupling effects and opens the way to electric-field driven spintronics. PMID:22355770

  15. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  16. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information.

  17. Directed Magnetic Particle Transport above Artificial Magnetic Domains Due to Dynamic Magnetic Potential Energy Landscape Transformation.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dennis; Koch, Iris; Burgard, Stefan; Ehresmann, Arno

    2015-07-28

    An approach for a remotely controllable transport of magnetic micro- and/or nanoparticles above a topographically flat exchange-bias (EB) thin film system, magnetically patterned into parallel stripe domains, is presented where the particle manipulation is achieved by sub-mT external magnetic field pulses. Superparamagnetic core-shell particles are moved stepwise by the dynamic transformation of the particles' magnetic potential energy landscape due to the external magnetic field pulses without affecting the magnetic state of the thin film system. The magnetic particle velocity is adjustable in the range of 1-100 μm/s by the design of the substrate's magnetic field landscape (MFL), the particle-substrate distance, and the magnitude of the applied external magnetic field pulses. The agglomeration of magnetic particles is avoided by the intrinsic magnetostatic repulsion of particles due to the parallel alignment of the particles' magnetic moments perpendicular to the transport direction and parallel to the surface normal of the substrate during the particle motion. The transport mechanism is modeled by a quantitative theory based on the precise knowledge of the sample's MFL and the particle-substrate distance.

  18. Magnetic Domains in Magnetostrictive Fe-Ga Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Q. Xing; T.A. Lograsso

    2008-11-03

    Lorentz microscopy was applied to the observation of magnetic domains in iron-gallium (Fe-Ga) alloys. Results did not show any link between the magnetic domains and the magnetostriction enhancement by Ga addition, but did reveal that the drastic decrease in magnetostriction for Fe-31.2 at. % Ga was due to the presence of large scale precipitates. Magnetic domain features did not change in the alloys of A2, D0{sub 3}, A2+D0{sub 3}, A2+B2+D0{sub 3}, and A2+fine scale precipitates. Large scale precipitates within the slow-cooled Fe-31.2 at. % Ga affected both the distribution and wall motion of magnetic domains.

  19. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications.

    PubMed

    Donolato, M; Torti, A; Kostesha, N; Deryabina, M; Sogne, E; Vavassori, P; Hansen, M F; Bertacco, R

    2011-09-07

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain walls technology in lab-on-chip systems devoted to accurate individual cell trapping and manipulation.

  20. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    PubMed Central

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  1. Magnetic Domain Wall Floating on a Spin Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the transfer of angular momentum between a spin superfluid and a domain wall in an exchange coupled easy-axis and easy-plane magnetic insulator system. A domain wall in the easy-axis magnet absorbs spin angular momentum via disrupting the flow of a superfluid spin current in the easy-plane magnet. Focusing on an open geometry, where the spin current is injected electrically via a nonequilibrium spin accumulation, we derive analytical expressions for the resultant superfluid-mediated motion of the domain wall. The analytical results are supported by micromagnetic simulations. The proposed phenomenon extends the regime of magnon-driven domain-wall motion to the case where the magnons are condensed and exhibit superfluidity. Furthermore, by controlling the pinning of the domain wall, we propose a realization of a reconfigurable spin transistor. The long-distance dissipationless character of spin superfluids can thus be exploited for manipulating soliton-based memory and logic devices.

  2. Magnetic vortices as localized mesoscopic domain wall pinning sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, R. L.; Sampaio, L. C.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the controllable pinning of domain walls in a stripe with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by magnetostatic coupling to a magnetic vortex in disks located above the stripe. Pinning mechanisms and depinning fields, studied by means of micromagnetic simulations, are reported. An asymmetric magnetization reversal process is observed and explained in terms of two main contributions to the domain wall pinning: coupling between the in-plane and out-of-plane components of its stray field and the vortex. The in-plane coupling is symmetric with respect to the wall sense of motion while the out-of-plane coupling leads to the observed asymmetry in the hysteresis loops. The energy landscape of the domain wall derived from the micromagnetic simulations supports these findings. This novel pinning strategy, which can be realized by current nanofabrication techniques, opens up new possibilities for the non-destructive control of domain wall mobility in domain wall based spintronic devices.

  3. Dynamics of magnetic domain walls under their own inertia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Luc; Moriya, Rai; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2010-12-24

    The motion of magnetic domain walls induced by spin-polarized current has considerable potential for use in magnetic memory and logic devices. Key to the success of these devices is the precise positioning of individual domain walls along magnetic nanowires, using current pulses. We show that domain walls move surprisingly long distances of several micrometers and relax over several tens of nanoseconds, under their own inertia, when the current stimulus is removed. We also show that the net distance traveled by the domain wall is exactly proportional to the current pulse length because of the lag derived from its acceleration at the onset of the pulse. Thus, independent of its inertia, a domain wall can be accurately positioned using properly timed current pulses.

  4. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of the self structured multilayered bubble domain memory as a mass memory medium for satellite applications is examined. Theoretical considerations of multilayer bubble supporting materials are presented, in addition to the experimental evaluation of current accessed circuitry for various memory functions. The design, fabrication, and test of four device designs is described, and a recommended memory storage area configuration is presented. Memory functions which were demonstrated include the current accessed propagation of bubble domains and stripe domains, pinning of stripe domain ends, generation of single and double bubbles, generation of arrays of coexisting strip and bubble domains in a single garnet layer, and demonstration of different values of the strip out field for single and double bubbles indicating adequate margins for data detection. All functions necessary to develop a multilayer self structured bubble memory device were demonstrated in individual experiments.

  5. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ultrafast domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, R.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic properties of magnetic domain walls in nanotubes and in cylindrical nanowires can be significantly different from the well known domain wall dynamics in thin films and in flat thin strips. The main differences are the occurrence of chiral symmetry breaking and, perhaps more importantly, the possibility to obtain magnetic domain walls that are stable against the usual Walker breakdown. This stability enables the magnetic field-driven propagation of the domain walls in nanotubes and nanocylinders at constant velocities which are significantly higher than the usual propagation speeds of the domain walls. Simulations predict that the ultrafast motion of magnetic domain walls at velocities in a range above 1000 m s-1 can lead to the spontaneous excitation of spin waves in a process that is the magnetic analog of the Cherenkov effect. In the case of solid cylindrical wires, the domain wall can contain a micromagnetic point singularity. We discuss the current knowledge on the ultrafast dynamics of such Bloch points, which remains still largely unexplored.

  7. Creating a magnetic resonance imaging ontology

    PubMed Central

    Lasbleiz, Jérémy; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Duvauferrier, Régis; Burgun, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to build an ontology of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The MRI domain has been analysed regarding MRI simulators and the DICOM standard. Tow MRI simulators have been analysed: JEMRIS, which is developed in XML and C++, has a hierarchical organisation and SIMRI, which is developed in C, has a good representation of MRI physical processes. To build the ontology we have used Protégé 4, owl2 that allows quantitative representations. The ontology has been validated by a reasoner (Fact++) and by a good representation of DICOM headers and of MRI processes. The MRI ontology would improved MRI simulators and eased semantic interoperability. PMID:21893854

  8. Coronary magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza; Appelbaum, Evan; Danias, Peter G; Hauser, Thomas H; Yeon, Susan B

    2007-02-01

    This article highlights the technical challenges and general imaging strategies for coronary MRI. This is followed by a review of the clinical results for the assessment of anomalous CAD, coronary artery aneurysms, native vessel integrity, and coronary artery bypass graft disease using the more commonly applied MRI methods. It concludes with a brief discussion of the advantages/disadvantages and clinical results comparing coronary MRI with multidetector CT (MDCT) coronary angiography.

  9. Papyrus imaging with terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, J.; Jackson, J. B.; Pagès-Camagna, S.; Duling, I. N.; Menu, M.; Mourou, G. A.

    2010-09-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopic imaging (THz-TDSI) is a non-ionizing, non-contact and non-destructive measurement technique that has been recently utilized to study cultural heritage artifacts. We will present this technique and the results of non-contact measurements of papyrus texts, including images of hidden papyri. Inks for modern papyrus specimens were prepared using the historical binder, Arabic gum, and two common pigments used to write ancient texts, carbon black and red ochre. The samples were scanned in reflection at normal incidence with a pulse with a spectral range between 0.1 and 1.5 THz. Temporal analysis of the signals provides the depths of the layers, and their frequency spectra give information about the inks.

  10. Remote Teaching Experiments on Magnetic Domains in Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskii, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our experience in building a remote laboratory for teaching magnetic domains. Fulfilling the proposed on-line experiments, students can observe and study magnetization processes that are often difficult to explain with written material. It is proposed that networks of remotely accessible laboratories could be integrated in the Global…

  11. Remote Teaching Experiments on Magnetic Domains in Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskii, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our experience in building a remote laboratory for teaching magnetic domains. Fulfilling the proposed on-line experiments, students can observe and study magnetization processes that are often difficult to explain with written material. It is proposed that networks of remotely accessible laboratories could be integrated in the Global…

  12. Magnetic domains and surface effects in hollow maghemite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Puntes, Victor; Balcells, Lluis; Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar

    2008-09-30

    In the present work, we investigate the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic and non-interacting maghemite hollow nanoparticles obtained by the Kirkendall effect. From the experimental characterization of their magnetic behavior, we find that polycrystalline hollow maghemite nanoparticles exhibit low blocked-to-superparamagnetic transition temperatures, small magnetic moments, significant coercivities and irreversibility fields, and no magnetic saturation on external magnetic fields up to 5 T. These results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural parameters characterizing the maghemite shells by means of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of an individual spherical shell. The model comprises strongly interacting crystallographic domains arranged in a spherical shell with random orientations and anisotropy axis. The Monte Carlo simulation allows discernment between the influence of the polycrystalline structure and its hollow geometry, while revealing the magnetic domain arranggement in the different temperataure regimes.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  16. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  17. Majorana Fermion Rides on a Magnetic Domain Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tewari, Sumanta; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    Owing to the recent progress on endowing the electronic structure of magnetic nanowires with topological properties, the associated topological solitons in the magnetic texture--magnetic domain walls--appear as very natural hosts for exotic electronic excitations. Here, we propose to use the magnetic domain walls to engender Majorana fermions, which has several notable advantages compared to the existing approaches. First of all, the local tunneling density-of-states anomaly associated with the Majorana zero mode bound to a smooth magnetic soliton is immune to most of parasitic artifacts associated with the abrupt physical ends of a wire, which mar the existing experimental probes. Second, a viable route to move and braid Majorana fermions is offered by domain-wall motion. In particular, we envision the recently demonstrated heat-current induced motion of domain walls in insulating ferromagnets as a promising tool for nonintrusive displacement of Majorana modes. This leads us to propose a feasible scheme for braiding domain walls within a magnetic nanowire network, which manifests the nob-Abelian exchange statistics within the Majorana subspace. This work has been supported in part by the U.S. DOE-BES, FAME, and AFOSR grants.

  18. Soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering from an imprinted magnetic domain pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Kinane,C.; Suszka, A.; Marrows, C.; Hickey, B.; Arena, D.; Dvorak, J.; Charlton, T.; Langridge, S.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report on the use of a Co/Pt multilayer, which exhibits strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, to magnetostatically imprint a domain pattern onto a 50 Angstroms thick Permalloy layer. Element specific soft x-ray magnetic scattering experiments were then performed so as to be sensitive to the magnetic structure of the Permalloy only. Off-specular magnetic satellite peaks, corresponding to a periodic domain stripe width of 270 nm, were observed, confirmed by magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic modeling. Thus the authors have exploited the element specificity of soft x-ray scattering to discern the purely magnetic correlations in a structurally flat Permalloy film.

  19. Magnetic imaging with polarized soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Properties, behavior, and functionalities of magnetic materials are largely determined by microscopic spin textures, particularly their formation into domains, their coupling mechanisms and their dynamic behavior. Advanced characterization tools are prerequisite to fundamentally understand magnetic materials and control spins for novel magnetic applications. Magnetic microscopies allow us to image directly the static and dynamic features of the relevant microscopic magnetization structures in advanced magnetic materials and thus provide detailed and direct insight into underlying physical phenomena. A large variety of magnetic imaging techniques has become available with particular strengths but also certain limitations. Essential features of magnetic microscopies are a high spatial resolution down into the nanometer regime, as this is the fundamental length scale of magnetic exchange interaction and the ultimate length scale in advanced magnetic technologies; magnetic and elemental sensitivity with quantitative capabilities, as the properties of advanced magnetic materials can be tailored by combining various magnetic elements and their magnetic moments; high temporal resolution from the ns to the fs regime to understand the associated spin dynamic processes and the functionality in magnetic devices; tomographic capabilities with nm resolution as new directions in nanoscience and technologies are moving into 3 dim arrangements of spin structures; and interfacial sensitivity as novel ways to control spins harness either the coupling across interfaces in multilayered structures or utilize non-collinear spin arrangements, which often occur from symmetry breaking at surfaces and interfaces. The unique properties of polarized soft x-rays, their abundancy and specific interaction with magnetic materials in form of dichroism effects have triggered the development of various magnetic x-ray imaging techniques. This review will provide an overview of the current state

  20. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  1. In-situ visualization of stress-dependent bulk magnetic domain formation by neutron grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2016-01-04

    The performance and degree of efficiency of industrial transformers are directly influenced by the magnetic properties of high-permeability steel laminations (HPSLs). Industrial transformer cores are built of stacks of single HPSLs. While the insulating coating on each HPSL reduces eddy-current losses in the transformer core, the coating also induces favorable inter-granular tensile stresses that significantly influence the underlying magnetic domain structure. Here, we show that the neutron dark-field image can be used to analyze the influence of the coating on the volume and supplementary surface magnetic domain structures. To visualize the stress effect of the coating on the bulk domain formation, we used an uncoated HPSL and stepwise increased the applied external tensile stress up to 20 MPa. We imaged the domain configuration of the intermediate stress states and were able to reproduce the original domain structure of the coated state. Furthermore, we were able to visualize how the applied stresses lead to a refinement of the volume domain structure and the suppression and reoccurrence of supplementary domains.

  2. In-situ visualization of stress-dependent bulk magnetic domain formation by neutron grating interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-01-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of industrial transformers are directly influenced by the magnetic properties of high-permeability steel laminations (HPSLs). Industrial transformer cores are built of stacks of single HPSLs. While the insulating coating on each HPSL reduces eddy-current losses in the transformer core, the coating also induces favorable inter-granular tensile stresses that significantly influence the underlying magnetic domain structure. Here, we show that the neutron dark-field image can be used to analyze the influence of the coating on the volume and supplementary surface magnetic domain structures. To visualize the stress effect of the coating on the bulk domain formation, we used an uncoated HPSL and stepwise increased the applied external tensile stress up to 20 MPa. We imaged the domain configuration of the intermediate stress states and were able to reproduce the original domain structure of the coated state. Furthermore, we were able to visualize how the applied stresses lead to a refinement of the volume domain structure and the suppression and reoccurrence of supplementary domains.

  3. Stochastic magnetization dynamics in single domain particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Stefano; Dusch, Yannick; Tiercelin, Nicolas; Pernod, Philippe; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic particles are largely utilized in several applications ranging from magnetorheological fluids to bioscience and from nanothechnology to memories or logic devices. The behavior of each single particle at finite temperature (under thermal stochastic fluctuations) plays a central role in determining the response of the whole physical system taken into consideration. Here, the magnetization evolution is studied through the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert formalism and the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics is introduced with the Langevin and Fokker-Planck methodologies. As result of the combination of such techniques we analyse the stochastic magnetization dynamics and we numerically determine the convergence time, measuring the velocity of attainment of thermodynamic equilibrium, as function of the system temperature.

  4. Thermal spin-transfer torques on magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Shuai; Xia, Ke

    2010-04-01

    We studied the spin-transfer torques acting on magnetic domain walls in the presence of a nonequilibrium thermal distribution using a generalized Landauer-Büttiker formalism, where the energy flow is described on the same footing as the electric current. First-principles transport calculations have been performed in Ni and Co domain walls as typical examples. The temperature difference between two sides of the domain wall can induce remarkable spin- transfer torques, which are comparable with the current-induced torques required for the domain wall motion.

  5. Thickness and magnetic-field dependence of domain switching in isolated and interacting permalloy contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pels, C.; Barthelmess, M.; Bolte, M.; Thieme, A.; Meier, G.

    2005-06-01

    Control of the magnetic behavior of microstructured ferromagnets is a crucial prerequisite for magnetoelectronic and spintronic devices. Microstructured permalloy (Ni 83Fe 17) contacts of various thicknesses on the same sample are studied experimentally by means of magnetic-force microscopy at remanence and in external magnetic fields. The results are compared to micromagnetic simulations. Switching fields and corresponding magnetization patterns of the contacts are determined by measuring and simulating entire hysteresis curves. From the simulated magnetization data magnetic-force-microscopy images are calculated, which allow straight-forward comparison. Magnetostatic interaction is probed using contacts located in close vicinity. The domain switching in these contacts occurs at magnetic fields one order of magnitude smaller than in isolated ones.

  6. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    PubMed

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-24

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  7. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  8. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  9. Angular Dependence of Domain Wall Resistivity in Artificial Magnetic Domain Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, A.; Bending, S. J.; Roberts, H. G.; Crampin, S.; Heard, P. J.; Marrows, C. H.

    2006-11-01

    We exploit the ability to precisely control the magnetic domain structure of perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Pt trilayers to fabricate artificial domain wall arrays and study their transport properties. The scaling behavior of this model system confirms the intrinsic domain wall origin of the magnetoresistance, and systematic studies using domains patterned at various angles to the current flow are excellently described by an angular-dependent resistivity tensor containing perpendicular and parallel domain wall resistivities. We find that the latter are fully consistent with Levy-Zhang theory, which allows us to estimate the ratio of minority to majority spin carrier resistivities, ρ↓/ρ↑˜5.5, in good agreement with thin film band structure calculations.

  10. Nerves on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Batra, P.; Brown, K.

    1989-01-01

    Nerves are often visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the soft tissues on the chest and shoulder girdle. To learn the reasons for the contrast between the nerves and adjacent tissues, the authors obtained a fresh specimen containing part of the brachial plexus nerves from the left axilla and compared MRI with x-ray projections and photomicrographs of histologic sections. The results suggest that the high signals from the nerves stand out in contrast to the low signals from their rich vascular supply. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6A Figure 6B Figure 7 PMID:2733051

  11. Microseismic source imaging in a compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Rodriguez, Ismael; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2014-08-01

    Microseismic monitoring is an essential tool for the characterization of hydraulic fractures. Fast estimation of the parameters that define a microseismic event is relevant to understand and control fracture development. The amount of data contained in the microseismic records however, poses a challenge for fast continuous detection and evaluation of the microseismic source parameters. Work inspired by the emerging field of Compressive Sensing has showed that it is possible to evaluate source parameters in a compressed domain, thereby reducing processing time. This technique performs well in scenarios where the amplitudes of the signal are above the noise level, as is often the case in microseismic monitoring using downhole tools. This paper extends the idea of the compressed domain processing to scenarios of microseismic monitoring using surface arrays, where the signal amplitudes are commonly at the same level as, or below, the noise amplitudes. To achieve this, we resort to the use of an imaging operator, which has previously been found to produce better results in detection and location of microseismic events from surface arrays. The operator in our method is formed by full-waveform elastodynamic Green's functions that are band-limited by a source time function and represented in the frequency domain. Where full-waveform Green's functions are not available, ray tracing can also be used to compute the required Green's functions. Additionally, we introduce the concept of the compressed inverse, which derives directly from the compression of the migration operator using a random matrix. The described methodology reduces processing time at a cost of introducing distortions into the results. However, the amount of distortion can be managed by controlling the level of compression applied to the operator. Numerical experiments using synthetic and real data demonstrate the reductions in processing time that can be achieved and exemplify the process of selecting the

  12. Fast fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Lall, Chandana; Aisen, Alex A; Rajesh, Arumugam; Cohen, Mervyn D

    2005-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a problem-solving tool when ultrasonic findings are equivocal. The role of fetal MRI has increased as obstetricians become aware of its potential and in utero therapy for anomalies becomes increasingly sophisticated. In this pictorial essay, we present a wide range of anomalies diagnosed or confirmed using MRI and discuss findings that help in the differential diagnosis.

  13. Atomic-scale magnetic domain walls in quasi-one-dimensional Fe nanostripes.

    PubMed

    Pratzer, M; Elmers, H J; Bode, M; Pietzsch, O; Kubetzka, A; Wiesendanger, R

    2001-09-17

    Fe nanostripes on W(110) are investigated by Kerr magnetometry and spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM). An Arrhenius law is observed for the temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility indicating a one-dimensional magnetic behavior. The activation energy for creating antiparallel spin blocks indicates extremely narrow domain walls with a width on a length scale of the lattice constant. This is confirmed by imaging the domain wall by SP-STM. This information allows the quantification of the exchange stiffness and the anisotropy constant.

  14. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, K.; Kákay, A.; Schultheiss, K.; Henschke, A.; Sebastian, T.; Schultheiss, H.

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry.

  15. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K; Kákay, A; Schultheiss, K; Henschke, A; Sebastian, T; Schultheiss, H

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry.

  16. Domain wall motion driven by an oscillating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Duck-Ho; Kim, Changsoo; Kim, Dae-Yun; Choe, Sug-Bong; Hwang, Chanyong

    2017-03-01

    The coherent unidirectional motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) is a key technology used in memory and logic device applications, as demonstrated in magnetic strips by electric current flow as well as in films by oscillation of a tilted magnetic field. Here we introduce a coherent unidirectional motion of DWs in the strip, utilizing an oscillating field, which is described within a previous 1D model. The essential criterion for DW motion in this approach is the oscillating-field-induced modulation of the DW width, which has not been previously considered. This DW motion driven by width modulation sheds light on high frequency domain manipulation in spin devices. A comprehensive inspection of field angle dependence reveals that unidirectional DW motion in this model requires chiral DWs, followed by asymmetric deformation of the domain shape.

  17. Domain walls in the (Ga,Mn)as diluted magnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akira; Kasai, H; Tonomura, A; Brown, P D; Campion, R P; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Zemen, J; Jungwirth, T

    2008-02-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic domain walls in an in-plane magnetized (Ga,Mn)As dilute moment ferromagnetic semiconductor. Our high-resolution electron holography technique provides direct images of domain wall magnetization profiles. The experiments are interpreted based on microscopic calculations of the micromagnetic parameters and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations. We find that the competition of uniaxial and biaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropies in the film is directly reflected in orientation dependent wall widths, ranging from approximately 40 to 120 nm. The domain walls are of the Néel type and evolve from near-90 degrees walls at low temperatures to large angle [11[over ]0]-oriented walls and small angle [110]-oriented walls at higher temperatures.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2001-11-01

    Over the past twenty years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important imaging modalities available to clinical medicine. It offers great technical flexibility, and is free of the hazards associated with ionizing radiation. In addition to its role as a routine imaging technique with a growing range of clinical applications, the pace of development in MRI methodology remains high, and new ideas with significant potential emerge on a regular basis. MRI is a prime example of the spin-off benefits of basic science, and is an area of medicine in which physical science continues to play a major role, both in supporting clinical applications and in developing new techniques. This article presents a brief history of MRI and an overview of the underlying physics, followed by a short survey of current and emerging clinical applications.

  19. Effects of magnetic resonance imaging on implantable permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M L; Walker, G B; Dormer, K J

    1995-09-01

    Implantable permanent magnets are increasingly used in devices for otolaryngologic applications. It is likely that at least some of the patients with implanted magnets will be in need of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The effect of an MRI scan on the magnetic properties of implanted permanent magnets has not been previously demonstrated. Some of the basic concepts and descriptive terminology used in industry regarding permanent magnets are reviewed. Experiments presented show that the MRI scan is capable of demagnetizing permanent magnets. A case history is also presented that demonstrates demagnetizing of an implanted Audiant magnet by an MRI scan.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection of affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, and evaluation of therapeutic effect. PMID:11563438

  1. A nonlinear, image domain filtering method for cardiac PET images

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, T.H.; Chinn, G.; Hoh, C.K.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1998-08-01

    An adaptive, nonlinear image domain filtering strategy is described which improves positron emission tomography (PET) images. The method was formulated to improve on the linear, low-pass filtering typically applied to each projection in the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm is a potential alternative to linear smoothing which reduces noise but degrades resolution; this method uses the FBP algorithm for reconstruction, but aims to incorporate some of the statistical information and nonlinear smoothing utilized in iterative reconstruction algorithms. The approach uses sinogram segmentation to separate the sinogram elements with higher and lower signal-to-noise ratios, and then reconstruct each with FBP using a more appropriate choice of filter and cut-off frequency. Also, this algorithm addresses the radial streak artifacts introduced by FBP. The algorithm was evaluated using simulations and clinical data of cardiac PET studies on an ECAT 931 PET scanner. The initial results suggest that this technique has advantages over the current clinical protocol. Images processed with the method show generally improved visual image quality and reduced radial streaks without the introduction of artifacts. In simulations, increased contrast recovery and resolution are realized without an increase in the background noise of the reconstructed images.

  2. X-ray topographic observations of magnetic domains in Czochralski-grown nickel single crystals in anomalous transmission geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Boettinger, W. J.; Burdette, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalous transmission effect has been observed in nickel single crystals grown by the Czochralski technique. Sample crystals prepared for X-ray topography are 1.5 to 2.5 cm in diameter and thicker than 0.4 mm; the product of the ordinary linear absorption coefficient and thickness ranges from 17 to 45 for Cu K-alpha radiation. Topographs taken with an asymmetric-crystal-topographic (ACT) camera have revealed extremely straight line images and rectangular arrangements of short line-segment images, along with the images of crystal imperfections. The line images change their arrangement upon application of magnetic fields. These images are attributed to magnetic domains in the interior of crystals. The formation of domain walls near the crystal surface is also observed and distinguished clearly from magnetic domains in the bulk with the use of the ACT camera.

  3. X-ray topographic observations of magnetic domains in Czochralski-grown nickel single crystals in anomalous transmission geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Boettinger, W. J.; Burdette, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalous transmission effect has been observed in nickel single crystals grown by the Czochralski technique. Sample crystals prepared for X-ray topography are 1.5 to 2.5 cm in diameter and thicker than 0.4 mm; the product of the ordinary linear absorption coefficient and thickness ranges from 17 to 45 for Cu K-alpha radiation. Topographs taken with an asymmetric-crystal-topographic (ACT) camera have revealed extremely straight line images and rectangular arrangements of short line-segment images, along with the images of crystal imperfections. The line images change their arrangement upon application of magnetic fields. These images are attributed to magnetic domains in the interior of crystals. The formation of domain walls near the crystal surface is also observed and distinguished clearly from magnetic domains in the bulk with the use of the ACT camera.

  4. Asymmetric angular dependence of domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2013-03-01

    An angular dependence of domain wall (DW) motion is studied in a magnetic wire consisting of a giant-magnetoresistance spin-valve. A DW pinning site is formed by a single notch, where a conventional linear one and a specially designed tilted one are compared. The asymmetric angular dependence was found in the DW depinning behavior with the tilted notch. The geometry control of the pinning site can be useful for DW diode devices using a rotating magnetic field.

  5. Imaging the in-plane magnetization in a Co microstructure by Fourier transform holography.

    PubMed

    Tieg, C; Frömter, R; Stickler, D; Hankemeier, S; Kobs, A; Streit-Nierobisch, S; Gutt, C; Grübel, G; Oepen, H P

    2010-12-20

    We report on experiments using Fourier transform holography to image the in-plane magnetization of a magnetic microstructure. Magnetic sensitivity is achieved via the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect by recording holograms in transmission at off-normal incidence. The reference beam is defined by a narrow hole milled at an inclined angle into the opaque mask. We present magnetic domain images of an in-plane magnetized cobalt element with a size of 2 μm × 2 μm× 20 nm. The domain pattern shows a multi-vortex state that deviates from the simple Landau ground state.

  6. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation determined that current accessed self structured bubble memory devices have the potential of meeting projected data density and speed requirements. Device concepts analyzed include multilayer ferrimagnetic devices where the top layer contains a domain structure which defines the data location and the second contains the data. Current aperture and permalloy assisted current propagation devices were evaluated. Based on the result of this work more detailed device research was initiated. Detailed theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the difference in strip and threshold between a single bubble in the control layer and a double bubble which would exist in both the control layer and data layer is adequate to allow for detection of data. Detailed detector designs were investigated.

  7. Magnetic domains in the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric mixture of (La, Lu, Sr)MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lozanne, Alex; Hur, N.

    2005-03-01

    Single crystals of (La5/8Sr3/8MnO3)x(LuMnO3)1-x (LSMO)(LMO) synthesized by the floating-zone method were studied by Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM). Samples were mechanically cut and polished with the surface normal to the growth direction. Polarized optical microscopy shows that LSMO and LMO are separated in a stripe-like pattern due to the chemical immiscibility.ootnotetextS. Park, et al., PRL 92, 167206 (2004) MFM images show magnetic domains (˜1μm) in the LSMO stripes and no magnetic signal in the LMO phase.

  8. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  9. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya domain walls in magnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goussev, Arseni; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Tretiakov, Oleg A.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytic study of domain-wall statics and dynamics in ferromagnetic nanotubes with spin-orbit-induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Even at the level of statics, dramatic effects arise from the interplay of space curvature and DMI: the domains become chirally twisted, leading to more compact domain walls. The dynamics of these chiral structures exhibits several interesting features. Under weak applied currents, they propagate without distortion. The dynamical response is further enriched by the application of an external magnetic field: the domain-wall velocity becomes chirality dependent and can be significantly increased by varying the DMI. These characteristics allow for enhanced control of domain-wall motion in nanotubes with DMI, increasing their potential as information carriers in future logic and storage devices.

  10. Thermal stability of a magnetic domain wall in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, S.; Ieda, J.; Ohno, H.

    2015-06-01

    We study the thermal stability of a magnetic domain wall pinned in nanowires with various widths and thicknesses made of Co/Ni multilayers and analyze the effective volume that governs the thermal stability. We find that, above a critical wire width, the domain wall depinning is initiated by a subvolume excitation and that the critical width is dependent on the wire thickness. The obtained findings are supported by the distribution of critical current density for domain wall depinning and are qualitatively described by an analytical model in which the balance between the Zeeman energy and domain wall elastic energy is considered. We also show a different behavior between the device size dependence of the thermal stability and that of critical current, leading to an enhancement of domain wall motion efficiency with decreasing the device size.

  11. Ferroelectric control of magnetic domains in ultra-thin cobalt layers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Borrel, J.; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Herrera Diez, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.; Boulle, O.

    2013-11-25

    Non-volatile ferroelectric control of magnetic domains has been demonstrated in ultra-thin cobalt layers at room temperature. The sensitivity of magnetic anisotropy energy to the electronic structure in a few atomic layers adjacent to the interface allows for ferroelectric control of coercivity and magnetic domain dynamics. These effects have been monitored and quantified using magneto-optical Kerr effect. In particular, the regimes, where the ferroelectric domains enhance/inhibit the magnetic domain nucleation or increase/reduce domain wall velocity, have been explored. Thus, non-destructive and reversible ferroelectric domain writing provides a tool to define the magnetic domain paths, create nucleation sites, or control domain movement.

  12. Gynecologic masses: value of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Lacey, C; Schriock, E; Fisher, M R; Amparo, E; Dooms, G; Jaffe, R

    1985-09-01

    Forty-two women with gynecologic abnormalities were studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging correctly assessed the origin of the pelvic mass in all patients. In the evaluation of leiomyoma, magnetic resonance imaging accurately depicted the number, size, and location of the lesion. In the evaluation of endometrial carcinoma, magnetic resonance imaging depicted the location of the lesion, the presence of cervical extension, and the depth of myometrial penetration in the majority of the cases. In the analysis of adnexal cysts, magnetic resonance imaging was sensitive in localizing the lesion and was able to distinguish serous from hemorrhagic fluid. This preliminary report indicates that magnetic resonance imaging may become a valuable imaging modality in the diagnosis of gynecologic abnormalities.

  13. Evolution of magnetic domain structures from Pseudo-Single-Domain to Multidomain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Lesleis; Fabian, Karl; Muxworthy, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic observations over the last 60 years have made a significant contribution to our understanding of the geological structure of the Earth. The interpretation of these recordings is almost entirely based on the assumption that the remanence is held in uniformly magnetised (single-domain) particles. However it has long been recognised that the upper limit for SD magnetite is at about 80nm (for equidimensional grains of magnetite) and it is likely that many palaeomagnetic samples will contain a much broader range of grain sizes, which may be dominated by non-uniformly magnetised pseudo-single-domain (PSD) grains. Recent progress in determining energy barriers between the different possible domain states in a grain (to be discussed in this session by Nagy et al.) shows that the thermal stability of PSD grains are dominated by energy barriers and domain transitions whose characteristics are SD-like. The magnetic structures in PSD grains undergo a form of domain rotation rather than the domain wall motions observed in multidomain (MD) grains. Thus transition in stability and fidelity of palaeomagentic recorders from the more reliable PSD to less reliable MD structures can be mapped to the evolution of domain walls from the vortex cores of PSD grains. In this talk we will discuss our preliminary results for very large scale micromagnetic models using a new parallel numerical model called DUNLOP. We will outline the magnetic properties and structures of what we classify as PSD grains and how these types of domains evolve from vortex-dominated to MD structures for easy-axis aligned domains. Such domains are separated by narrow Bloch and Néel - type walls and we discuss the likely impact on the classification of reliable palaeomagentic domain structures.

  14. Effects of sub-domain structure on initial magnetization curve and domain size distribution of stacked media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Kumagai, S.; Sugita, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, in order to confirm the sub-domain structure in stacked media demagnetized with in-plane field, initial magnetization curves and magnetic domain size distribution were investigated. Both experimental and simulation results showed that an initial magnetization curve for the medium demagnetized with in-plane field (MDI) initially rose faster than that for the medium demagnetized with perpendicular field (MDP). It is inferred that this is because the MDI has a larger number of domain walls than the MDP due to the existence of the sub-domains, resulting in an increase in the probability of domain wall motion. Dispersion of domain size for the MDI was larger than that for the MDP. This is because sub-domains are formed not only inside the domain but also at the domain boundary region, and they change the position of the domain boundary to affect the domain size.

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Microstructure and Magnetic Domains of Iron Films on Liquid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian-Ping; Xia, A.-Gen; Zhang, Chu-Hang; Yang, Bo; Fang, Zheng-Nong; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2009-11-01

    Iron (Fe) films with a thickness ranging from 1.0 nm to 80.0 nm are deposited on silicone oil surfaces by a vapor phase deposition method. The films with a thickness of d < 2.0 nm do not exhibit planar morphology but ramified aggregates instead. Magnetic force microscopy studies for the Fe films (10.0 nm <= d <= 80.0 nm) show that the domain wall structure is widespread and irregularly shaped and the oscillation phase shift Δθ, which records as the magnetic force image, changes from 0.29° to 0.81°. Correspondingly, the magnetic force gradient varies from 1.4 × 10-3 to 4.0 × 10-3 N/m, respectively. In our measurement, the characteristic domain walls, such as Bloch walls, Néel walls and cross-tie walls, are not observed in the film system clearly.

  16. Remote-sensing image encryption in hybrid domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Guiliang; Ma, Shilong

    2012-04-01

    Remote-sensing technology plays an important role in military and industrial fields. Remote-sensing image is the main means of acquiring information from satellites, which always contain some confidential information. To securely transmit and store remote-sensing images, we propose a new image encryption algorithm in hybrid domains. This algorithm makes full use of the advantages of image encryption in both spatial domain and transform domain. First, the low-pass subband coefficients of image DWT (discrete wavelet transform) decomposition are sorted by a PWLCM system in transform domain. Second, the image after IDWT (inverse discrete wavelet transform) reconstruction is diffused with 2D (two-dimensional) Logistic map and XOR operation in spatial domain. The experiment results and algorithm analyses show that the new algorithm possesses a large key space and can resist brute-force, statistical and differential attacks. Meanwhile, the proposed algorithm has the desirable encryption efficiency to satisfy requirements in practice.

  17. Magnetic hardening and domain structure in Co/Pt antidots with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran, C.; Gawronski, P.; Lucas, I.; del Real, R. P.; Strichovanec, P.; Asenjo, A.; Vazquez, M.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2017-02-01

    (Co(0.4 nm)/Pt(0.7 nm)) x (x  =  10, 20, 30) multilayer antidot thin films (films with arrays of nanoholes) have been grown by dc sputtering onto self-assembled pores of anodic alumina membranes with a tailored diameter and a fixed inter-hole distance. The magnetic behavior has been quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry, and the surface magnetization patterns have been imaged by magnetic force microscopy. The magnetization reversal mechanism is characterized by two steps depending on the film thickness and antidot diameter. These steps are ascribed to the nucleation and demagnetization of magnetic stripe domains. Their presence confirms the perpendicular anisotropy of the multilayer antidot films. The coercivity of antidot thin film is larger than that of the continuous films due to additional pinning centers provided by antidots. The width of the stripe domains increases as a function of film thickness. The demagnetization is further investigated through micromagnetic simulations that are in agreement with the measured hysteresis loops and their features. Different reversal mechanisms and an increase of the domain width in antidot thin films are also confirmed as a function of the magnetic anisotropy, antidot diameter and thickness of the thin film. The presence of antidots with a designed geometry is revealed to be successful in tailoring the coercivity of the thin films and magnetic patterns, which is relevant for advances in nanoscale technologies.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  19. MAGNETIC DOMAINS AND TWINNING IN ALPHA-IRON.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Alpha - iron is another instance of mimetic twinning in which an edifice formed by a group of twinned tetragonal crystals presents an appearance of...cubic symmetry. This confirms earlier suggestions that magnetic domains are crystallographic twins. Crystals of alpha - iron were grown in thin strips of

  20. Magnetic properties and magnetic domain structure of grain-oriented Fe-3%Si steel under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevertov, O.; Schäfer, R.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of an applied compressive stress on the magnetic properties and domain structure in Goss-textured (110) [001] Fe-3%Si steel is studied. The magnetic domains and magnetization processes were observed by longitudinal Kerr microscopy at different levels of compressive stress. With stress increase the domain structure without applied field evolves from 180° slab-like domains along the surface-parallel easy axis first into stress pattern I, then into the checkerboard pattern and finally into stress pattern II, in which all internal domains are oriented along the transverse axes. The magnetization process under compression is realized by surface closure [001] domains that grow into the bulk at the expense of transverse domains. The domain evolution by these three stress patterns is not practically noticeable in hysteresis curves above 10 MPa—they change continuously with the same effective field being valid for curves from 10 to 67 MPa. The comparison with previous measurements under different stress/cutting angle combinations shows that for the prediction of a constricted hysteresis loop it is sufficient to consider the energy difference between surface-parallel and transverse easy axes neglecting details of the spatial organization of transverse domains.

  1. Electric-field control of magnetic domain-wall velocity in ultrathin cobalt with perpendicular magnetization.

    PubMed

    Chiba, D; Kawaguchi, M; Fukami, S; Ishiwata, N; Shimamura, K; Kobayashi, K; Ono, T

    2012-06-06

    Controlling the displacement of a magnetic domain wall is potentially useful for information processing in magnetic non-volatile memories and logic devices. A magnetic domain wall can be moved by applying an external magnetic field and/or electric current, and its velocity depends on their magnitudes. Here we show that the applying an electric field can change the velocity of a magnetic domain wall significantly. A field-effect device, consisting of a top-gate electrode, a dielectric insulator layer, and a wire-shaped ferromagnetic Co/Pt thin layer with perpendicular anisotropy, was used to observe it in a finite magnetic field. We found that the application of the electric fields in the range of ± 2-3 MV cm(-1) can change the magnetic domain wall velocity in its creep regime (10(6)-10(3) m s(-1)) by more than an order of magnitude. This significant change is due to electrical modulation of the energy barrier for the magnetic domain wall motion.

  2. Switchable spin-current source controlled by magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Savero Torres, W; Laczkowski, P; Nguyen, V D; Rojas Sanchez, J C; Vila, L; Marty, A; Jamet, M; Attané, J P

    2014-07-09

    Using nonlocal spin injection, spin-orbit coupling, or spincaloritronic effects, the manipulation of pure spin currents in nanostructures underlies the development of new spintronic devices. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to create switchable pure spin current sources, controlled by magnetic domain walls. When the domain wall is located at a given point of the magnetic circuit, a pure spin current is injected into a nonmagnetic wire. Using the reciprocal measurement configuration, we demonstrate that the proposed device can also be used as a pure spin current detector. Thanks to its simple geometry, this device can be easily implemented in spintronics applications; in particular, a single current source can be used both to induce the domain wall motion and to generate the spin signal.

  3. Domain wall propagation tuning in magnetic nanowires through geometric modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzuza, L. C. C.; López-Ruiz, R.; Salazar-Aravena, D.; Knobel, M.; Béron, F.; Pirota, K. R.

    2017-06-01

    The magnetic behavior of nickel modulated nanowires embedded in porous alumina membranes is investigated. Their diameters exhibit a sharp transition between below (35 nm) and above (52 nm) the theoretical limit for transverse and vortex domain walls. Magnetic hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) were measured on several ordered nanowire arrays with different wide-narrow segment lengths ratio and compared with those from homogenous nanowires. The experimental magnetic response evidences a rather complex susceptibility behavior for nanowires with modulated diameter. Micromagnetic simulations on isolated and first-neighbors arrays of nanowires show that the domain wall structure, which depends on the segment diameter, suffers a transformation while crossing the diameter modulation, but without any pinning. The experimental array magnetic behavior can be ascribed to a heterogeneous stray field induced by the diameter modulation, yielding a stronger interaction field at the wide extremity than at the narrow one. The results evidence the possibility to control the domain wall propagation and morphology by modulating the lateral aspect of the magnetic entity.

  4. Designing magnetic superlattices that are composed of single domain nanomagnets

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Feodor V; Kovács, Endre

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: The complex nature of the magnetic interactions between any number of nanosized elements of a magnetic superlattice can be described by the generic behavior that is presented here. The hysteresis characteristics of interacting elliptical nanomagnets are described by a quasi-static method that identifies the critical boundaries between magnetic phases. A full dynamical analysis is conducted in complement to this and the deviations from the quasi-static analysis are highlighted. Each phase is defined by the configuration of the magnetic moments of the chain of single domain nanomagnets and correspondingly the existence of parallel, anti-parallel and canting average magnetization states. Results: We give examples of the phase diagrams in terms of anisotropy and coupling strength for two, three and four magnetic layers. Each phase diagrams character is defined by the shape of the magnetic hysteresis profile for a system in an applied magnetic field. We present the analytical solutions that enable one to define the “phase” boundaries between the emergence of spin-flop, anti-parallel and parallel configurations. The shape of the hysteresis profile is a function of the coupling strength between the nanomagnets and examples are given of how it dictates a systems magnetic response. Many different paths between metastable states can exist and this can lead to instabilities and fluctuations in the magnetization. Conclusion: With these phase diagrams one can find the most stable magnetic configurations against perturbations so as to create magnetic devices. On the other hand, one may require a magnetic system that can easily be switched between phases, and so one can use the information herein to design superlattices of the required shape and character by choosing parameters close to the phase boundaries. This work will be useful when designing future spintronic devices, especially those manipulating the properties of CoFeB compounds. PMID:25161831

  5. Topological defects and misfit strain in magnetic stripe domains of lateral multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Cid, R; Vélez, M; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G; Martín, J I; Álvarez-Prado, L M; Alameda, J M

    2012-09-14

    Stripe domains are studied in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films nanostructured with a periodic thickness modulation that induces the lateral modulation of both stripe periods and in-plane magnetization. The resulting system is the 2D equivalent of a strained superlattice with properties controlled by interfacial misfit strain within the magnetic stripe structure and shape anisotropy. This allows us to observe, experimentally for the first time, the continuous structural transformation of a grain boundary in this 2D magnetic crystal in the whole angular range. The magnetization reversal process can be tailored through the effect of misfit strain due to the coupling between disclinations in the magnetic stripe pattern and domain walls in the in-plane magnetization configuration.

  6. Magnetic imaging by x-ray holography using extended references.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Thomas A; Ogrin, Feodor; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; Langridge, Sean; Whiteside, Amy; Moore, Thomas; Beutier, Guillaume; van der Laan, Gerrit

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate magnetic lensless imaging by Fourier transform holography using extended references. A narrow slit milled through an opaque gold mask is used as a holographic reference and magnetic contrast is obtained by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We present images of magnetic domains in a Co/Pt multilayer thin film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. This technique holds advantages over standard Fourier transform holography, where small holes are used to define the reference beam. An increased intensity through the extended reference reduces the counting time to record the farfield diffraction pattern. Additionally it was found that manufacturing narrow slits is less technologically demanding than the same procedure for holes. We achieve a spatial resolution of ∼30 nm, which was found to be limited by the sample period of the chosen experimental setup. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Magnetic domains driving a Q-switched laser

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Ryohei; Goto, Taichi; Pritchard, John; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yuichi; Lim, Pang Boey; Uchida, Hironaga; Mina, Mani; Taira, Takunori; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-01-01

    A 10-mm cavity length magnetooptically Q-switched Nd:GdVO4 laser was demonstrated using a single-crystalline ferrimagnetic rare-earth iron garnet film. To design the Q-switching system, the magnetic, optical, and magnetooptical properties of the garnet film were measured. The diode pumped solid-state laser cavity was constructed using a 190-μm-thick garnet film with 58% transmittance. The garnet film had maze-shaped magnetic domains, and the domain walls disappeared when a field of over 200 Oe was applied. Therefore, the polarization state of the transmitted light was modified by modulating the magnetization, and a Q-switched pulse output with a pulse width of 5 ns and peak power of 255 W was achieved in the 10-mm-long cavity. The physical limitation of the pulse width was discussed with the calculated results. PMID:27929119

  8. Magnetic domains driving a Q-switched laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryohei; Goto, Taichi; Pritchard, John; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yuichi; Lim, Pang Boey; Uchida, Hironaga; Mina, Mani; Taira, Takunori; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-12-01

    A 10-mm cavity length magnetooptically Q-switched Nd:GdVO4 laser was demonstrated using a single-crystalline ferrimagnetic rare-earth iron garnet film. To design the Q-switching system, the magnetic, optical, and magnetooptical properties of the garnet film were measured. The diode pumped solid-state laser cavity was constructed using a 190-μm-thick garnet film with 58% transmittance. The garnet film had maze-shaped magnetic domains, and the domain walls disappeared when a field of over 200 Oe was applied. Therefore, the polarization state of the transmitted light was modified by modulating the magnetization, and a Q-switched pulse output with a pulse width of 5 ns and peak power of 255 W was achieved in the 10-mm-long cavity. The physical limitation of the pulse width was discussed with the calculated results.

  9. [Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Stippich, C

    2010-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI.

  10. Imaging magnetic vortex configurations in ferromagnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, M.; Mehlin, A.; Gross, B.; Buchter, A.; Farhan, A.; Buzzi, M.; Kleibert, A.; Tütüncüoglu, G.; Heimbach, F.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.; Poggio, M.

    2017-07-01

    We image the remnant magnetization configurations of CoFeB and permalloy nanotubes (NTs) using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy. The images provide direct evidence for flux-closure configurations, including a global vortex state, in which magnetization points circumferentially around the NT axis. Furthermore, micromagnetic simulations predict and measurements confirm that vortex states can be programmed as the equilibrium remnant magnetization configurations by reducing the ratio of the NT's length and diameter.

  11. Magnetic domain structure in small diameter magnetic nanowire arrays [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dong-Huan; Zhang, Hao-Li; Xu, Cai-Ling; Xu, Tao; Li, Hu-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Fe 0.3Co 0.7 alloy nanowire arrays were prepared by ac electrodepositing Fe 2+ and Co 2+ into a porous anodic aluminum oxide (PAO) template with diameter about 50 nm. The surface of the samples were polished by 100 nm diamond particle then chemical polishing to give a very smooth surface (below ±10 nm/μm 2). The morphology properties were characterized by SEM and AFM. The bulk magnetic properties and domain structure of nanowire arrays were investigated by VSM and MFM respectively. We found that such alloy arrays showed strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with easy axis parallel to nanowire arrays. Each nanowire was in single domain structure with several opposite single domains surrounding it. Additionally, we investigated the domain structure with a variable external magnetic field applied parallel to the nanowire arrays. The MFM results showed a good agreement with our magnetic hysteresis loop.

  12. Separation of magnetization precession in 3He-B into two magnetic domains. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, I. A.

    It is shown that even small deviations of the magnetic field from uniformity can substantially modify the magnetization precession in 3He-B. Specifically, a two-domain structure forms if the magnetic-field non-uniformity is linear. The magnetization makes an angle ˜ 104° with the field in one of the domains and is parallel to it in the other. These domains can explain the anomalously long persistence of the induction signal in 3He-B; moreover, the change in the induction-signal frequency with time discovered and investigated by Borovik-Romanov et al. [JETP Lett. 40, 1033 (1984)] is a consequence of the relaxation of the domain structure.

  13. Observations of charge-ordered and magnetic domains in LuFe2O4 using transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, T.; Murakami, Y.; Shindo, D.; Abe, N.; Arima, T.

    2012-08-01

    Both charge-ordered and magnetic domains produced in LuFe2O4, which have attracted significant attention due to the interplay of electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom, have been studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Dark-field images, obtained using a weak satellite reflection, revealed the nanometer-scale charge-ordered domains, which were observed over a wide temperature range below TCO (critical temperature of charge ordering; ˜310 K). Electron holography demonstrated an aspect of the long-range magnetic order wherein the magnetic flux lines were completely parallel to the c axis of LuFe2O4, in a specimen cooled to 17 K under an applied magnetic field. In contrast, there was no appreciable magnetic signal observed in a specimen cooled in a negligible magnetic field. These observations provide useful information for further understanding of the complex magnetic phase transitions in this compound.

  14. Accurate calculation of the transverse anisotropy of a magnetic domain wall in perpendicularly magnetized multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Felix; Krüger, Benjamin; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-08-01

    Bloch domain walls are the most common type of transition between two out-of-plane magnetized domains (one magnetized upwards, one downwards) in films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The rotation of the spins of such domain walls in the plane of the film requires energy, which is described by an effective anisotropy, the so-called transverse or hard axis anisotropy K⊥. This anisotropy and the related Döring mass density of the domain wall are key parameters of the one-dimensional model to describe the motion of magnetic domain walls. In particular, the critical field strength or current density where oscillatory domain wall motion sets in (Walker breakdown) is directly proportional to K⊥. So far, no general framework is available to determine K⊥ from static characterizations such as magnetometry measurements. Here, we derive a universal analytical expression to calculate the transverse anisotropy constant for the important class of perpendicular magnetic multilayers. All the required input parameters of the model, such as the number of repeats, the thickness of a single magnetic layer, and the layer periodicity, as well as the effective perpendicular anisotropy, the saturation magnetization, and the static domain wall width are accessible by static sample characterizations. We apply our model to a widely used multilayer system and find that the effective transverse anisotropy constant is a factor of seven different from that when using the conventional approximations, showing the importance of using our analysis scheme. Our model is also applicable to domain walls in materials with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). The accurate knowledge of K⊥ is needed to determine other unknown parameters from measurements, such as the DMI strength or the spin polarization of the spin current in current-induced domain wall motion experiments.

  15. Magnetic imaging of currencies and secure documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagielinski, Tomasz M.; Chamberlain, Fred

    2002-04-01

    Today the ubiquitous distribution of high technology scanning and printing equipment enables the home user to make counterfeits of high value documents. There is an ever-increasing demand for new technologies and methods to machine authenticate printed documents and safeguard their integrity. Magnetic technology has been used to add hidden information to documents including banknotes, checks, airline tickets, identification cards, and transit documents. A solution to forensics is magnetic imaging where invisible magnetic patterns or recorded information can be displayed as an image for comparison with an optical scan. The use of small, highly sensitive detectors enables high resolution scanning of magnetic documents, creating magnetic images with fine detail. Depending on the design of a document, if the magnetic image is identical to the optical image, the document may be a counterfeit. In this paper, we will address the issues related to magnetic scanning of security documents. We will present and discuss magnetic images of documents printed with magnetic inks. We will also show how magnetic imaging can provide valuable information in understanding the alteration of magnetic data in documents such as tickets, licenses with pictures, and holograms.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayt, M W; Abrahams, J J; Blair, J

    2000-04-01

    The spectrum of disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be varied. To differentiate among the diseases that cause pain and dysfunction, an intimate knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of this region is necessary. Due to the joint's complex anatomy and relationship to the skin, it has been difficult to image in the past. Magnetic resonance imaging is ideally suited for visualizing TMJ because of its superb contrast resolution when imaging soft tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging allows simultaneous bilateral visualization of both joints. The ability to noninvasively resolve anatomic detail can be performed easily and quickly using magnetic resonance imaging. The development of magnetic resonance imaging has greatly aided the diagnosis of TMJ disorders. An understanding of TMJ anatomy and pathogenesis of TMJ pain is crucial for interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent treatment.

  17. Decoding of digital magnetic recording with longitudinal magnetization of a tape from a magneto-optical image of stray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskii, F. V.; Mansvetova, E. G.

    2017-05-01

    For digital magnetic recording of encoded information with longitudinal magnetization of the tape, the connection between the domain structure of a storage medium and magneto-optical image of its stray fields obtained using a magnetic film with a perpendicular anisotropy and a large Faraday rotation has been studied. For two-frequency binary code without returning to zero, an algorithm is developed, that allows uniquely decoding of the information recorded on the tape based on analysis of an image of stray fields.

  18. Quantitative magnetic imaging at the nanometer scale by ballistic electron magnetic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Herve, M.; Tricot, S.; Guezo, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lepine, B.; Schieffer, P.; Turban, P.

    2013-06-21

    We demonstrate quantitative ballistic electron magnetic microscopy (BEMM) imaging of simple model Fe(001) nanostructures. We use in situ nanostencil shadow mask resistless patterning combined with molecular beam epitaxy deposition to prepare under ultra-high vacuum conditions nanostructured epitaxial Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) spin-valves. In this epitaxial system, the magnetization of the bottom Fe/GaAs(001) electrode is parallel to the [110] direction, defining accurately the analysis direction for the BEMM experiments. The large hot-electron magnetoresistance of the Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) epitaxial spin-valve allows us to image various stable magnetic configurations on the as-grown Fe(001) microstructures with a high sensitivity, even for small misalignments of both magnetic electrodes. The angular dependence of the hot-electron magnetocurrent is used to convert magnetization maps calculated by micromagnetic simulations into simulated BEMM images. The calculated BEMM images and magnetization rotation profiles show quantitative agreement with experiments and allow us to investigate the magnetic phase diagram of these model Fe(001) microstructures. Finally, magnetic domain reversals are observed under high current density pulses. This opens the way for further BEMM investigations of current-induced magnetization dynamics.

  19. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, D.; Arai, K.; Glenn, D. R.; DeVience, S. J.; Pham, L. M.; Rahn-Lee, L.; Lukin, M. D.; Yacoby, A.; Komeili, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]1), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing sub-micron resolution (e.g., scanning superconducting quantum interference device [SQUID] microscopy2, electron holography3, and magnetic resonance force microscopy [MRFM]4). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nm), using an optically-detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanoscale layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the NV quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria, and spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field sCMOS acquisition allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with sub-micron resolution and >100 micron field-of-view. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. The results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks5, 6. PMID:23619694

  20. Orientation Relationship Between Magnetic Domains and Twins in Ni52Fe17Ga27Co4 Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiaodan; Yang, Liang; Zhou, Zhenni; Huang, Yujin; Li, Jun; Li, Jianguo

    2017-06-01

    The orientation relationship between magnetic domain and twins in the directional solidified Ni52Fe17Ga27Co4 magnetic shape memory alloy was analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction and magnetic force microscopy. The twin interface plane was determined to be { \\bar{1}10} plates. The magnetic domains walls with a misorientation about 5 deg belong to low angle boundaries. According to the orientation relationship between twins and magnetic domains, the intersection angle on the observed surface can be estimated.

  1. Dissipative dynamics of composite domain walls in magnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O.; Bazaliy, Ya. B.; Tchernyshyov, O.

    2007-03-01

    We describe the dynamics of domain walls in thin magnetic nanostrips of submicron width under the action of magnetic field. Once the fast precession of magnetization is averaged out, the dynamics reduces to purely dissipative motion where the system follows the direction of the local energy gradient (Glauber's model A) [1]. We then apply the method of collective coordinates [2] to our variational model of the domain wall [3] reducing the dynamics to the evolution of two collective coordinates (the location of the vortex core). In weak magnetic fields the wall moves steadily. The calculated velocity is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations (no adjustable parameters were used). In higher fields the steady motion breaks down and acquires an oscillatory character caused by periodic creation and annihilation of topological defects comprising the domain wall [3]. Numerical simulations uncover at least two different modes of oscillation. [1] C. J. Garc'ia-Cervera and W. E, J. Appl. Phys. 90, 370 (2001). [2] A. S'anchez and A. R. Bishop, SIAM Rev. 40, 579 (1998). [3] Preceding talk by O. Tchernyshyov.

  2. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  3. Nanoscale thermoelectrical detection of magnetic domain wall propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysteczko, Patryk; Wells, James; Fernández Scarioni, Alexander; Soban, Zbynek; Janda, Tomas; Hu, Xiukun; Saidl, Vit; Campion, Richard P.; Mansell, Rhodri; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cowburn, Russell P.; Nemec, Petr; Kazakova, Olga; Wunderlich, Joerg; Schumacher, Hans Werner

    2017-06-01

    In magnetic nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) magnetic domain walls (DWs) are narrow and can move rapidly driven by current induced torques. This enables important applications like high-density memories for which the precise detection of the position and motion of a propagating DW is of utmost interest. Today's DW detection tools are often limited in resolution, require complex instrumentation, or can only be applied on specific materials. Here we show that the anomalous Nernst effect provides a simple and powerful tool to precisely track the position and motion of a single DW propagating in a PMA nanowire. We detect field and current driven DW propagation in both metallic heterostructures and dilute magnetic semiconductors over a broad temperature range. The demonstrated spatial accuracy below 20 nm is comparable to the DW width in typical metallic PMA systems.

  4. Magnetic damping: domain wall dynamics versus local ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Weindler, T; Bauer, H G; Islinger, R; Boehm, B; Chauleau, J-Y; Back, C H

    2014-12-05

    Magnetic relaxation is one of the dominating features of magnetization dynamics. Depending on the magnetic structure and the experimental approach, different magnitudes of the damping parameter are reported even for a given material. In this study, we experimentally address this issue by accessing the damping parameter in the same magnetic nanotracks using different approaches: local ferromagnetic resonance (α=0.0072) and field-driven domain wall dynamics (α=0.023). The experimental results cannot fully be accounted for by modeling only roughness in micromagnetic simulations. Consequently, we have included nonlocal texture induced damping to the micromagnetic code. We find excellent agreement with the observed increased damping in the vortex structures for the same input Gilbert alpha when texture-induced nonlocal damping is included.

  5. Magnetic particle imaging for aerosol-based magnetic targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banura, Natsuo; Murase, Kenya

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic targeting is a strategy for improving the efficacy of therapeutic agents and minimizing the unwanted side effects by attaching the therapeutic agents to magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and concentrating them to the targeted region such as solid tumors and regions of infection using external magnetic fields. This study was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) for monitoring the effect of aerosol-based magnetic targeting by phantom experiments using a simple flow model and nebulized MNPs. Our results suggest that MPI is useful for monitoring the effect of aerosol-based magnetic targeting.

  6. Single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in pulsed high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noe, G. Timothy; Katayama, Ikufumi; Katsutani, Fumiya; Allred, James J.; Horowitz, Jeffrey A.; Sullivan, David M.; Zhang, Qi; Sekiguchi, Fumiya; Woods, Gary L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Jun; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a single-shot terahertz time-domain spectrometer to perform optical-pump/terahertz-probe experiments in pulsed, high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The single-shot detection scheme for measuring a terahertz waveform incorporates a reflective echelon to create time-delayed beamlets across the intensity profile of the optical gate beam before it spatially and temporally overlaps with the terahertz radiation in a ZnTe detection crystal. After imaging the gate beam onto a camera, we can retrieve the terahertz time-domain waveform by analyzing the resulting image. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, we measured cyclotron resonance absorption of optically excited carriers in the terahertz frequency range in intrinsic silicon at high magnetic fields, with results that agree well with published values.

  7. Single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in pulsed high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Noe, II, G. Timothy; Katayama, Ikufumi; Katsutani, Fumiya; Allred, James J.; Horowitz, Jeffrey A.; Sullivan, David M.; Zhang, Qi; Sekiguchi, Fumiya; Woods, Gary L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Jun; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-12-22

    Here, we have developed a single-shot terahertz time-domain spectrometer to perform optical-pump/terahertz-probe experiments in pulsed, high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The single-shot detection scheme for measuring a terahertz waveform incorporates a reflective echelon to create time-delayed beamlets across the intensity profile of the optical gate beam before it spatially and temporally overlaps with the terahertz radiation in a ZnTe detection crystal. After imaging the gate beam onto a camera, we can retrieve the terahertz time-domain waveform by analyzing the resulting image. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, we measured cyclotron resonance absorption of optically excited carriers in the terahertz frequency range in intrinsic silicon at high magnetic fields, with results that agree well with published values.

  8. Single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in pulsed high magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Noe, II, G. Timothy; Katayama, Ikufumi; Katsutani, Fumiya; ...

    2016-12-22

    Here, we have developed a single-shot terahertz time-domain spectrometer to perform optical-pump/terahertz-probe experiments in pulsed, high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The single-shot detection scheme for measuring a terahertz waveform incorporates a reflective echelon to create time-delayed beamlets across the intensity profile of the optical gate beam before it spatially and temporally overlaps with the terahertz radiation in a ZnTe detection crystal. After imaging the gate beam onto a camera, we can retrieve the terahertz time-domain waveform by analyzing the resulting image. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, we measured cyclotron resonance absorption of optically excited carriers inmore » the terahertz frequency range in intrinsic silicon at high magnetic fields, with results that agree well with published values.« less

  9. Microstructural, Magnetic Anisotropy, and Magnetic Domain Structure Correlations in Epitaxial FePd Thin Films with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skuza, J. R.; Clavero, C.; Yang, K.; Wincheski, B.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    L1(sub 0)-ordered FePd epitaxial thin films were prepared using dc magnetron sputter deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The films were grown with varying thickness and degree of chemical order to investigate the interplay between the microstructure, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic domain structure. The experimentally measured domain size/period and magnetic anisotropy in this high perpendicular anisotropy system were found to be correlated following the analytical energy model proposed by Kooy and Enz that considers a delicate balance between the domain wall energy and the demagnetizing stray field energy.

  10. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-17

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  11. Electric polarization of magnetic domain walls in magnetoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Lobzenko, I P; Goncharov, P P; Ter-Oganessian, N V

    2015-06-24

    Two prominent magnetoelectrics MnWO4 and CuO possess low-temperature commensurate paraelectric magnetically ordered phase. Here using Monte Carlo simulations we show that the walls between the domains of this phase are ferroelectric with the same electric polarization direction and value as those in the magnetoelectric phases of these compounds. We also suggest that experimental observation of electric polarization of domain walls in MnWO4 should help to determine the macroscopic interactions responsible for its magnetoelectric properties.

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  13. Trajektoriendichte bei Magnetic Particle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, Tobias; Sattel, Timo; Biederer, Sven; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Gleich, Bernhard; Borgert, Jörn; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    Magnetic Particle Imaging ist ein neues bilgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung der räumlichen Verteilung von magnetisierbaren Nanopartikeln. In einer Simulationsstudie wurde zuletzt das Auflösungsvermögen und die Sensitivität dieser Methode untersucht. Die Abtast-trajektorie wurde dabei so gewählt, dass der Messbereich deutlich überabgetastet wurde. In dieser Arbeit wird in einer Simulationsstudie untersucht, welchen Einfluss die Dichte der Trajektorie auf die Bildqualität der rekonstruierten Bilder hat. Es wird gezeigt, dass die Auflösung in den rekonstruierten Bildern durch die Feldstärke des angelegten Magnetfeldes und die Trajektoriendichte beschränkt ist. Die Trajektorie kann bei konstanter Feldstärke bis zu einem gewissen Grad ausgedünnt werden. Der Simulation liegt dabei ein Model zu Grunde, welches das Signal entsprechend der Langevin-Theorie des Paramagnetismus approximiert.

  14. Analysis of thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets using magnetic domain observation

    SciTech Connect

    Takezawa, Masaaki Ikeda, Soichiro; Morimoto, Yuji; Kabashima, Hisayuki

    2016-05-15

    We used magnetic domain observation to statistically observe the thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets at elevated temperatures up to 150 °C. Simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred adjacent grains occurred at 90 °C because of the magnetic interaction among the grains beyond grain boundaries in the Dysprosium (Dy)-free low-coercivity magnet. Conversely, simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred grains did not occur in the Dy-added high-coercivity magnets, and the demagnetizing ratio steadily increased with temperature. Furthermore, the addition of Dy induced high thermal stability by eliminating the simultaneous thermal demagnetization, which was caused by the magnetic interaction among the grains.

  15. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  16. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  17. Domain wall resistance in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, D.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Dietl, T.; Ohno, H.

    2007-03-01

    Domain wall (DW) resistance in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As has been investigated. The observed DW resistance is decomposed into extrinsic and intrinsic contributions. The former is explained quantitatively by the zig-zaging current due to an abrupt polarity change of the Hall electric field at DW. The latter is consistent with the disorder-induced mixing of spin channels due to small non-adiabacity of carrier spins subject to spatially varying local magnetic moment and is shown to be an order of magnitude greater than a contribution from anisotropic magnetoresistance.

  18. Magnetic domain walls of relic fermions as Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yajnik, Urjit A.

    2005-12-02

    We show that relic fermions of the Big Bang can enter a ferromagnetic state if they possess a magnetic moment and satisfy the requirements of Stoner theory of itinerant ferromagnetism. The domain walls of this ferromagnetism can successfully simulate Dark Energy over the observable epoch spanning {approx} 10 billion years. We obtain conditions on the anomalous magnetic moment of such fermions and their masses. Known neutrinos fail to satisfy the requirements thus pointing to the possibility of a new ultralight sector in Particle Physics.

  19. Magnetotransport through magnetic domain patterns in permalloy rectangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, M.; Steiner, M.; Pels, C.; Barthelmeß, M.; Kruse, J.; Merkt, U.; Meier, G.; Holz, M.; Pfannkuche, D.

    2005-12-01

    We study the influence of multidomain configurations on the magnetoresistance of rectangular permalloy microstructures with various thicknesses. The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is the dominating resistance contribution in these systems. Reversible and irreversible magnetization reversals lead to complex AMR signals. Appropriate positioning of the voltage probes allows the local detection of the magnetoresistance. Two methods for calculating the local AMR, the uniform-current model and diffusive transport calculations, are described. The latter takes potential differences and inhomogenous current paths into account. By comparing magnetoresistance measurements, micromagnetic simulations, and images of magnetic-force microscopy for various film thicknesses, we can exactly link the transitions between magnetic configurations to changes observed in the magnetoresistance.

  20. Interplay of domain walls and magnetization rotation on dynamic magnetization process in iron/polymer-matrix soft magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobák, Samuel; Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter; Fáberová, Mária; Bureš, Radovan

    2017-03-01

    This study sheds light on the dynamic magnetization process in iron/resin soft magnetic composites from the viewpoint of quantitative decomposition of their complex permeability spectra into the viscous domain wall motion and magnetization rotation. We present a comprehensive view on this phenomenon over the broad family of samples with different average particles dimension and dielectric matrix content. The results reveal the pure relaxation nature of magnetization processes without observation of spin resonance. The smaller particles and higher amount of insulating resin result in the prevalence of rotations over domain wall movement. The findings are elucidated in terms of demagnetizing effects rising from the heterogeneity of composite materials.

  1. Saliency detection in the compressed domain for adaptive image retargeting.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuming; Chen, Zhenzhong; Lin, Weisi; Lin, Chia-Wen

    2012-09-01

    Saliency detection plays important roles in many image processing applications, such as regions of interest extraction and image resizing. Existing saliency detection models are built in the uncompressed domain. Since most images over Internet are typically stored in the compressed domain such as joint photographic experts group (JPEG), we propose a novel saliency detection model in the compressed domain in this paper. The intensity, color, and texture features of the image are extracted from discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients in the JPEG bit-stream. Saliency value of each DCT block is obtained based on the Hausdorff distance calculation and feature map fusion. Based on the proposed saliency detection model, we further design an adaptive image retargeting algorithm in the compressed domain. The proposed image retargeting algorithm utilizes multioperator operation comprised of the block-based seam carving and the image scaling to resize images. A new definition of texture homogeneity is given to determine the amount of removal block-based seams. Thanks to the directly derived accurate saliency information from the compressed domain, the proposed image retargeting algorithm effectively preserves the visually important regions for images, efficiently removes the less crucial regions, and therefore significantly outperforms the relevant state-of-the-art algorithms, as demonstrated with the in-depth analysis in the extensive experiments.

  2. Study of magnetic domain evolution in an auxetic plane of Galfenol using Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, Ganesh; Flatau, Alison B.

    2015-05-01

    Galfenol (FexGa100-x), a magnetostrictive alloy (3/2λ 110-400 ppm) of Iron and Gallium exhibits an in-plane auxetic response in the ⟨110⟩ crystallographic direction. Negative Poisson's ratios have been observed in response to application of stress fields, where values of as low as -0.7 have been reported for compositions of greater than roughly 20% Ga [Zhang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 108(2), 023513 (2010)] and in response to application of magnetic fields, where values of as low as -2.5 have been reported to be expected for compositions of less than roughly 20% Ga [G. Raghunath and A. B. Flatau, IEEE Trans. Magn. (in press)]. Several models have been proposed to understand these two distinct phenomena. Galfenol samples with less than 20% Ga also exhibit an unusual response to an increasing magnetic field applied along the ⟨110⟩ direction. The longitudinal strain which increases initially with applied field experiences a dip (until ˜10 mT) before increasing again to reach saturation. The transverse strain increases and reaches a maximum value (at the same field of ˜10 mT) and then drops from the maximum by 5%-10% as magnetic saturation is approached [G. Raghunath and A. B. Flatau, IEEE Trans. Magn. (in press)].This work deals with discussing the evolution of magnetic domains in a 16 at. % Ga single crystal Galfenol sample when subjected to magnetic fields in the ⟨110⟩ direction in the (100) plane. The magnetic domains on the surface of mechanically polished Galfenol samples were imaged using Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect microscopy. Simultaneously, the strains along the longitudinal and transverse ⟨110⟩ directions were recorded using a bi-directional strain gauge rosette mounted on the unpolished bottom surface of the planar samples. The energy from the applied magnetic field is expected to grow the ⟨110⟩ oriented domains at the expense of domains oriented along all other directions. But since the plane has an easy ⟨100⟩ axis, we expect the

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  5. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  6. Fundamentals and applications of magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Jörn; Schmidt, Joachim D; Schmale, Ingo; Rahmer, Jürgen; Bontus, Claas; Gleich, Bernhard; David, Bernd; Eckart, Rainer; Woywode, Oliver; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Haegele, Julian; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging technique which performs a direct measurement of magnetic nanoparticles, also known as superparamagnetic iron oxide. MPI can acquire quantitative images of the local distribution of the magnetic material with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its sensitivity is well above that of other methods used for the detection and quantification of magnetic materials, for example, magnetic resonance imaging. On the basis of an intravenous injection of magnetic particles, MPI has the potential to play an important role in medical application areas such as cardiovascular, oncology, and also in exploratory fields such as cell labeling and tracking. Here, we present an introduction to the basic function principle of MPI, together with an estimation of the spatial resolution and the detection limit. Furthermore, the above-mentioned medical applications are discussed with respect to an applicability of MPI.

  7. a Numerical Investigation of Magnetic Domain Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, George Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulation has given new insight into magnetization dynamics in thin films. This thesis reports on a numerical investigation of magnetic domain wall motion in thin iron garnet films. The magnetization is modeled as a continuum field with constant magnitude, subject to exchange, anisotropy, magnetic interactions, and an external drive field. The features of these systems are domains, walls, and lines. A co-moving formulation of the Landau -Lifshitz-Gilbert equation was developed and implemented on the Connection Machine 2. This approach allowed the investigation of large systems for useful length and time scales. This investigation confirms several mechanisms of domain wall motion and reports on one which is new. At low drive fields, the domain wall moves with a constant velocity and time-invariant profile. Beyond a critical field, a single horizontal Bloch line (HBL) is formed and moves through the wall. The HBL reduces the wall mobility and the average wall velocity varies quadratically with the applied field. At larger fields, HBLs are formed in the center of the wall by a local breakdown mechanism, nucleating a pair of HBLs. The HBLs propagate to the surface of the material where they unwind, and the process repeats. The domain wall velocity is a weak function of the external field in this region. The motion of a domain wall in a stripe array is also described and compared with experiment. Simulation results corroborate the features of overshoot and wall oscillation observed in experimental data, and indicate that they are due to the presence of an HBL in the wall. Comparison of the overall time scale indicates that the gyromagnetic ratio is incorrect for this material. This investigation also reports on the statics and dynamics of vertical Bloch line (VBL) pairs. The structure of a domain wall containing two pi VBLs, and a single 2pi VBL has been determined. The VBLs inhibit the formation of HBLs and significantly reduce wall mobility. The 2pi VBL

  8. Genetic Engineering of Single-Domain Magnetic Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-14

    synthesize membrane-bound, nanometer-sized, single- domain magnetic particles known as magnetosomes. Because these bacteria have complex nutritional ...the presence of MNIS. Plasmid analysis indicated that all overlaved ,kith 3 ml soft aizar seeded with strain CL142. The clones carried recombinant...mutants of E. co/i and deoxyribonucleic acid damage in Escher/ chia co/i. MAicrobiol other bacteria. Ann Rev Genet 7:i67 -86 Rev 48:60 -93 Goldberg- 1

  9. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education.

  10. Robustness enhancement for image hiding algorithm in cellular automata domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Kim, Seok-Tae; Lee, In-Kwon

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a cellular automata (CA)-domain image hiding scheme that embedding a secret image into a gray-level image, in which an effective image preprocessor technique is introduced to improve the robustness of the secret image. The image preprocessor works by transforming a secret image into many elemental images based on the lensless integral imaging technique. The properties of data redundancy and distributed memory of the elemental images reinforce the ability to resist some data loss attacks. Besides, we study an improved pixel-wise masking model to optimize the imperceptibility of the stego-image. Experiments verify that the imperceptibility and robustness requirements of the image hiding are both satisfied excellently in the proposed image hiding system.

  11. Multi-stimuli manipulation of antiferromagnetic domains assessed by second-harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Chauleau, J-Y; Haltz, E; Carrétéro, C; Fusil, S; Viret, M

    2017-08-01

    Among the variety of magnetic textures available in nature, antiferromagnetism is one of the most 'discrete' because of the exact cancellation of its staggered internal magnetization. It is therefore very challenging to probe. However, its insensitivity to external magnetic perturbations, together with the intrinsic sub-picosecond dynamics, make it very appealing for tomorrow's information technologies. Thus, it is essential to understand the microscopic mechanisms governing antiferromagnetic domains to achieve accurate manipulation and control. Using optical second-harmonic generation, a unique and laboratory-available tool, we succeeded in imaging with sub-micrometre resolution both electric and antiferromagnetic orders in the model multiferroic BiFeO3. We show here that antiferromagnetic domains can be manipulated with low power consumption, using sub-coercive electric fields and sub-picosecond light pulses. Interestingly, we also show that antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric domains can behave independently, thus revealing that magneto-electric coupling can lead to various arrangements of the two orders.

  12. Multi-stimuli manipulation of antiferromagnetic domains assessed by second-harmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauleau, J.-Y.; Haltz, E.; Carrétéro, C.; Fusil, S.; Viret, M.

    2017-08-01

    Among the variety of magnetic textures available in nature, antiferromagnetism is one of the most `discrete' because of the exact cancellation of its staggered internal magnetization. It is therefore very challenging to probe. However, its insensitivity to external magnetic perturbations, together with the intrinsic sub-picosecond dynamics, make it very appealing for tomorrow's information technologies. Thus, it is essential to understand the microscopic mechanisms governing antiferromagnetic domains to achieve accurate manipulation and control. Using optical second-harmonic generation, a unique and laboratory-available tool, we succeeded in imaging with sub-micrometre resolution both electric and antiferromagnetic orders in the model multiferroic BiFeO3. We show here that antiferromagnetic domains can be manipulated with low power consumption, using sub-coercive electric fields and sub-picosecond light pulses. Interestingly, we also show that antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric domains can behave independently, thus revealing that magneto-electric coupling can lead to various arrangements of the two orders.

  13. Control of magnetic domains in Co/Pd multilayered nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Su Jung; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Okuda, Mitsunobu; Hayashi, Naoto; Kim, Young Keun

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by spin transfer torque in magnetic nanowires is of emerging technological interest for its possible applications in spintronic memory or logic devices. Co/Pd multilayered magnetic nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated on the surfaces of Si wafers by ion-beam sputtering. The nanowires had different sized widths and pinning sites formed by an anodic oxidation method via scanning probe microscopy (SPM) with an MFM tip. The magnetic domain structure was changed by an anodic oxidation method. To discover the current-induced DW motion in the Co/Pd nanowires, we employed micromagnetic modeling based on the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The split DW motions and configurations due to the edge effects of pinning site and nanowire appeared.

  14. Optimal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Quality magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complex and requires optimization of many technical factors. The most important factors are: magnet field and gradient strengths, coil selection, receiver bandwidth, field of view and image matrix size, number of excitations, slice thickness, image weighting and contrast, imaging planes and the direction of the phase, and frequency gradients. The ability to augment a standard MR study with additional sequences, and the need to ensure the completed study is comprehensive and robust must be balanced against the time the patient spends under anesthesia in the magnet.

  15. Magnetic imaging by Fourier transform holography using linearly polarized x-rays.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Maurizio; Popescu, Horia; Jaouen, Nicolas; Tortarolo, Marina; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Spezzani, Carlo

    2012-04-23

    We present a method for imaging magnetic domains via x-ray Fourier transform holography at linearly polarized sources. Our approach is based on the separation of holographic mask and sample and on the Faraday rotation induced on the reference wave. We compare images of perpendicular magnetic domains obtained with either linearly or circularly polarized x-rays and discuss the relevance of this method to future experiments at free-electron laser and high-harmonic-generation sources.

  16. Quantum Annealing and Tunable Magnetic Domain Wall Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2001-03-01

    Traditional simulated annealing utilizes thermal fluctuations for convergence in optimization problems. Quantum tunneling provides a different mechanism for moving between states, with the potential for reduced time scales. We compare thermal and quantum annealing in a model Ising ferromagnet composed of holmium dipoles in a lithium tetrafluoride matrix. The effects of quantum mechanics can be tuned in the laboratory by varying a magnetic field applied transverse to the Ising axis. This new knob permits us to: (1) tune the crossover between a classical Arrhenius response at high temperatures and an athermal response below 100 mK; (2) quantify the tunneling of magnetic domain walls through potential energy barriers in terms of an effective mass [1]; and (3) hasten convergence to the optimal state [2]. [1] "Tunable Quantum Tunneling of Magnetic Domain Walls," J. Brooke, T.F. Rosenbaum and G. Aeppli, preprint (2000). [2] "Quantum Annealing of a Disordered Magnet," J. Brooke, D. Bitko, T.F. Rosenbaum and G. Aeppli, Science 284, 779 (1999).

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  18. Magnetic domain walls in bulk and thin film Fe: first principles noncollinear magnetism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takeda, Y.; Akiyama, T.; Ito, T.; Freeman, A. J.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of domain walls in ferromagnetic Fe bulk and Fe(110) monolayer by using the first-principles FLAPW method(Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert and Freeman, PRB 24, 864(1981)) including noncollinear magnetism with no shape approximation of the magnetization density.(Nakamura, Freeman, Wang, Zhong, and Fernandez-de-Castro, PRB 65, 12402 (2002); 67, 14420 (2003)) In the bulk case, the self-consistent LSDA results demonstrate that the magnetic moments change continuously from one orientation to another as seen in a Bloch wall, and reveal that the formation energy of the domain wall significantly decreases when the domain wall thickness increases, as expected from phenomenological theory. The domain walls in thin film behave very differently: Surprisingly, the magnetic moment directions change rapidly; thus the wall width is only about 8 ÅThis consists and supports the atomically sharp domain wall in Fe/W(110) by the recently proposed SP-STM measurements.(Pratzer, Elmers, Bode, Pietzsch, Kubetzka and Wiesendanger, PRL 87, 127201 (2001))

  19. Chopping skyrmions from magnetic chiral domains with uniaxial stress in magnetic nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Lei, Na; Zhao, Weisheng; Liu, Wenqing; Ruotolo, Antonio; Braun, Hans-Benjamin; Zhou, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are envisioned as ideal candidates as information carriers for future spintronic devices, which have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. Due to their topological protection, the creation and annihilation of magnetic skyrmions have been a challenging task. Here, we numerically demonstrate that a magnetic skyrmion can be created by chopping a chiral stripe domain with a static uniaxial strain/stress pulse. This mechanism not only provides a method to create skyrmions in magnetic nanostructures but also offers promising routes for designing tunable skyrmionic-mechanic devices.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic domain structure and magnetic properties near the morphotropic phase boundary.

    PubMed

    Wei, Songrui; Yang, Sen; Wang, Dong; Song, Xiaoping; Ke, Xiaoqin; Gao, Yipeng; Liao, Xiaoqi; Wang, Yunzhi

    2017-03-08

    The morphotropic phase boundary (MPB), which is the boundary separating a tetragonal phase from a rhombohedral phase by varying the composition or mechanical pressure in ferroelectrics, has been studied extensively for decades because it can lead to strong enhancement of piezoelectricity. Recently, a parallel ferromagnetic MPB was experimentally reported in the TbCo2-DyCo2 ferromagnetic system and this discovery proposes a new way to develop potential materials with giant magnetostriction. However, the role of magnetic domain switching and spin reorientation near the MPB region is still unclear. For the first time, we combine micromagnetic theory with Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the evolution of magnetic domain structures and the corresponding magnetization properties near the MPB region. It is demonstrated that the magnetic domain structure and the corresponding magnetization properties are determined by the interplay among anisotropy energy, magnetostatic energy and exchange energy. If the anisotropy energy barrier is large compared with the magnetostatic energy barrier and the exchange energy barrier, the MPB region is a T and R mixed structure and magnetic domain switching is the dominant mechanism. If the anisotropy energy barrier is small, the MPB region will also contain M phases and spin reorientation is the dominant mechanism. Our work could provide a guide for the design of advanced ferromagnetic materials with enhanced magnetostriction.

  1. Fourier domain OCT imaging of American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Gorczynska, Iwona; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    In this pilot study we demonstrate results of structural Fourier domain OCT imaging of the nervous system of Periplaneta americana L. (American cockroach). The purpose of this research is to develop an OCT apparatus enabling structural imaging of insect neural system. Secondary purpose of the presented research is to develop methods of the sample preparation and handling during the OCT imaging experiments. We have performed imaging in the abdominal nerve cord excised from the American cockroach. For this purpose we have developed a Fourier domain / spectral OCT system operating at 820 nm wavelength range.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... If You Have Questions en español Resonancia magnética: columna lumbar What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Cervical Spine Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  4. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  5. Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation Based Contourlet Domain Image Denoising Framework.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Dong, Fangmin; Sun, Shuifa; Ren, Xuhong; Feng, Shiyu; Gao, Bruce Zhi

    A contourlet domain image denoising framework based on a novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation is proposed, where the difference of subbands in contourlet domain is taken into account. In detail: (1). A novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation (IRKT) is proposed to calculate the direction statistic of the image; The validity of the IRKT is verified by the corresponding extracted edge information comparing with the state-of-the-art edge detection algorithm. (2). The direction statistic represents the difference between subbands and is introduced to the threshold function based contourlet domain denoising approaches in the form of weights to get the novel framework. The proposed framework is utilized to improve the contourlet soft-thresholding (CTSoft) and contourlet bivariate-thresholding (CTB) algorithms. The denoising results on the conventional testing images and the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) medical images show that the proposed methods improve the existing contourlet based thresholding denoising algorithm, especially for the medical images.

  6. Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation Based Contourlet Domain Image Denoising Framework

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Dong, Fangmin; Ren, Xuhong; Feng, Shiyu; Gao, Bruce Zhi

    2016-01-01

    A contourlet domain image denoising framework based on a novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation is proposed, where the difference of subbands in contourlet domain is taken into account. In detail: (1). A novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation (IRKT) is proposed to calculate the direction statistic of the image; The validity of the IRKT is verified by the corresponding extracted edge information comparing with the state-of-the-art edge detection algorithm. (2). The direction statistic represents the difference between subbands and is introduced to the threshold function based contourlet domain denoising approaches in the form of weights to get the novel framework. The proposed framework is utilized to improve the contourlet soft-thresholding (CTSoft) and contourlet bivariate-thresholding (CTB) algorithms. The denoising results on the conventional testing images and the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) medical images show that the proposed methods improve the existing contourlet based thresholding denoising algorithm, especially for the medical images. PMID:27148597

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation. Instead, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, rapidly changing magnetic fields, and a computer to ... in most of the body's tissues. The applied radio waves then cause these protons to produce signals that ...

  8. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    PubMed Central

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  9. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field.

  10. Magnetic anisotropy and magnetic domain structure in C-doped Mn5Ge3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michez, L.-A.; Virot, F.; Petit, M.; Hayn, R.; Notin, L.; Fruchart, O.; Heresanu, V.; Jamet, M.; Le Thanh, V.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic properties of Mn5Ge3C0.7 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied. SQUID-VSM measurements and magnetic force microscopy have been used to probe the magnetic state and determine the relevant magnetic parameters. The results are supported by a combination of improved Saito's and Kittel's models. The moderate perpendicular magnetic anisotropy ( Qe x p=2/Ku μ0MSa t 2 ≈0.2 ) leads to a stripe domain structure for film thicknesses above 28 nm. For thinner films, the magnetization lies in-plane. The uniaxial magnetocrystalline constant has been found to be much weaker than in Mn5Ge3 and is assigned to hybridization effect between the Mn and C atoms.

  11. Chiral damping in magnetic domain-walls (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jue, Emilie; Safeer, C. K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stéphane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurélien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-10-01

    The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is responsible for chiral magnetic textures (skyrmions, spin spiral structures, …) in systems with structural inversion asymmetry and high spin-orbit coupling. It has been shown that the domain wall (DW) dynamics in such materials can be explained by chiral DWs with (partly or fully) Néel structure, whose stability derives from an interfacial DMI [1]. In this work, we show that DMI is not the only effect inducing chiral dynamics and demonstrate the existence of a chiral damping [2]. This result is supported by the study of the asymmetry induced by an in-plane magnetic field on field induced domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. Whereas the asymmetry of the DW motion is consistent with the spatial symmetries expected with the DMI, we show that this asymmetry cannot be attributed to an effective field but originates from a purely dissipative mechanism. The observation of chiral damping, not only enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, but since it can coexist with DMI it is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices. [1] A. Thiaville, et al., EPL 100, 57002 (2012) [2] E. Jué, et al., Nat. Mater., in press (doi: 10.1038/nmat4518)

  12. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian; Zhang, Wen Qing; Chen, Xiang Ming

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu2CoMnO6 has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R3+, Ni2+, Mn4+, and O2- ions in double perovskites R2NiMnO6 (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P21 symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  13. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Xiang Ming E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Wen Qing

    2015-04-13

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 4+}, and O{sup 2−} ions in double perovskites R{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6} (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P2{sub 1} symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  14. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3, in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields.

  15. Suppression of respiratory motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wood, M L; Henkelman, R M

    1986-01-01

    Anatomical structures that are displaced periodically during respiration are repeated as ghosts in magnetic resonance (MR) images. These ghosts can be suppressed in many ways: the averaging of multiple sets of data, respiratory gating, deliberate positioning of ghosts, and respiratory ordering of phase encoding. Each method has a unique mechanism, which is described in detail. A theoretical investigation has been conducted into the effects that the methods have on the point spread function of a moving point. Data acquired in Fourier imaging are actually in the spatial frequency domain, so that respiratory motion can be regarded as a function of spatial frequency. The four methods above modify this functional dependence in different ways, allowing a unified comparison. Motion artifact suppression imposes additional constraints on image acquisition, which can prolong the imaging time. A technique has been developed that keeps the imaging time short by using the configuration of the subject to regulate the timing of image acquisition.

  16. Charge ordering, ferroelectric, and magnetic domains in LuFe2O4 observed by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, I. K.; Kim, Jeehoon; Lee, S. H.; Cheong, S.-W.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2015-04-01

    LuFe2O4 is a multiferroic system which exhibits charge order, ferroelectricity, and ferrimagnetism simultaneously below ˜230 K. The ferroelectric/charge order domains of LuFe2O4 are imaged with both piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), while the magnetic domains are characterized by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Comparison of PFM and EFM results suggests that the proposed ferroelectricity in LuFe2O4 is not of usual displacive type but of electronic origin. Simultaneous characterization of ferroelectric/charge order and magnetic domains by EFM and MFM, respectively, on the same surface of LuFe2O4 reveals that both domains have irregular patterns of similar shape, but the length scales are quite different. The domain size is approximately 100 nm for the ferroelectric domains, while the magnetic domain size is much larger and gets as large as 1 μm. We also demonstrate that the origin of the formation of irregular domains in LuFe2O4 is not extrinsic but intrinsic.

  17. Accelerating dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for lung tumor tracking based on low-rank decomposition in the spatial-temporal domain: a feasibility study based on simulation and preliminary prospective undersampled MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Manoj; Hu, Peng; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Ennis, Daniel; Thomas, Albert; Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate a low-rank decomposition method to reconstruct down-sampled k-space data for the purpose of tumor tracking. Seven retrospective lung cancer patients were included in the simulation study. The fully-sampled k-space data were first generated from existing 2-dimensional dynamic MR images and then down-sampled by 5 × -20 × before reconstruction using a Cartesian undersampling mask. Two methods, a low-rank decomposition method using combined dynamic MR images (k-t SLR based on sparsity and low-rank penalties) and a total variation (TV) method using individual dynamic MR frames, were used to reconstruct images. The tumor trajectories were derived on the basis of autosegmentation of the resultant images. To further test its feasibility, k-t SLR was used to reconstruct prospective data of a healthy subject. An undersampled balanced steady-state free precession sequence with the same undersampling mask was used to acquire the imaging data. In the simulation study, higher imaging fidelity and low noise levels were achieved with the k-t SLR compared with TV. At 10 × undersampling, the k-t SLR method resulted in an average normalized mean square error <0.05, as opposed to 0.23 by using the TV reconstruction on individual frames. Less than 6% showed tracking errors >1 mm with 10 × down-sampling using k-t SLR, as opposed to 17% using TV. In the prospective study, k-t SLR substantially reduced reconstruction artifacts and retained anatomic details. Magnetic resonance reconstruction using k-t SLR on highly undersampled dynamic MR imaging data results in high image quality useful for tumor tracking. The k-t SLR was superior to TV by better exploiting the intrinsic anatomic coherence of the same patient. The feasibility of k-t SLR was demonstrated by prospective imaging acquisition and reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Herps, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2014-06-11

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion.

  19. High-resolution hard x-ray magnetic imaging with dichroic ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Claire; Scagnoli, Valerio; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Holler, Mirko; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Guillou, Francois; Rogalev, Andrei; Detlefs, Carsten; Menzel, Andreas; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2016-08-01

    Imaging the magnetic structure of a material is essential to understanding the influence of the physical and chemical microstructure on its magnetic properties. Magnetic imaging techniques, however, have been unable to probe three-dimensional micrometer-size systems with nanoscale resolution. Here we present the imaging of the magnetic domain configuration of a micrometer-thick FeGd multilayer with hard x-ray dichroic ptychography at energies spanning both the Gd L3 edge and the Fe K edge, providing a high spatial resolution spectroscopic analysis of the complex x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. With a spatial resolution reaching 45 nm , this advance in hard x-ray magnetic imaging is a first step towards the investigation of buried magnetic structures and extended three-dimensional magnetic systems at the nanoscale.

  20. Effect of lithographically-induced strain relaxation on the magnetic domain configuration in microfabricated epitaxially grown Fe81Ga19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, R. P.; Parkes, D. E.; Zemen, J.; Bowe, S.; Edmonds, K. W.; Reardon, C.; Maccherozzi, F.; Isakov, I.; Warburton, P. A.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Cavill, S. A.; Rushforth, A. W.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the role of lithographically-induced strain relaxation in a micron-scaled device fabricated from epitaxial thin films of the magnetostrictive alloy Fe81Ga19. The strain relaxation due to lithographic patterning induces a magnetic anisotropy that competes with the magnetocrystalline and shape induced anisotropies to play a crucial role in stabilising a flux-closing domain pattern. We use magnetic imaging, micromagnetic calculations and linear elastic modelling to investigate a region close to the edges of an etched structure. This highly-strained edge region has a significant influence on the magnetic domain configuration due to an induced magnetic anisotropy resulting from the inverse magnetostriction effect. We investigate the competition between the strain-induced and shape-induced anisotropy energies, and the resultant stable domain configurations, as the width of the bar is reduced to the nanoscale range. Understanding this behaviour will be important when designing hybrid magneto-electric spintronic devices based on highly magnetostrictive materials.

  1. Effect of lithographically-induced strain relaxation on the magnetic domain configuration in microfabricated epitaxially grown Fe81Ga19.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, R P; Parkes, D E; Zemen, J; Bowe, S; Edmonds, K W; Reardon, C; Maccherozzi, F; Isakov, I; Warburton, P A; Campion, R P; Gallagher, B L; Cavill, S A; Rushforth, A W

    2017-02-10

    We investigate the role of lithographically-induced strain relaxation in a micron-scaled device fabricated from epitaxial thin films of the magnetostrictive alloy Fe81Ga19. The strain relaxation due to lithographic patterning induces a magnetic anisotropy that competes with the magnetocrystalline and shape induced anisotropies to play a crucial role in stabilising a flux-closing domain pattern. We use magnetic imaging, micromagnetic calculations and linear elastic modelling to investigate a region close to the edges of an etched structure. This highly-strained edge region has a significant influence on the magnetic domain configuration due to an induced magnetic anisotropy resulting from the inverse magnetostriction effect. We investigate the competition between the strain-induced and shape-induced anisotropy energies, and the resultant stable domain configurations, as the width of the bar is reduced to the nanoscale range. Understanding this behaviour will be important when designing hybrid magneto-electric spintronic devices based on highly magnetostrictive materials.

  2. Domain pattern observations in rock magnetism: progress and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halgedahl, S. L.

    1987-06-01

    Magnetic domain pattern observations that have been conducted in the field of rock magnetism are discussed in the light of several models for domain structure. Comparison of predictions with observations can reveal which of the several internal energies and physical mechanisms exert strongest control upon fine particle behavior. Owing to their great importance as paleomagnetic carriers in many rocks, members of the titanomagnetite series receive special attention here. Magnetite and titanomagnetites that are low in titanium display the expected patterns of 180°, 109°, and 71° walls typical for cubic materials in which K1 is negative. By contrast, intermediate to high x-value titanomagnetites largely exhibit complex patterns with a distinctly non-cubic style, although simple patterns of broadly-spaced, roughly planar walls are sometimes observed. Undoubtedly, complex patterns in Ti-rich compositions result from stress. Many of these non-cubic patterns consist of wavy walls, often with reverse spikes. The wavy patterns are diagnostic of a uniaxial, vertical anisotropy and they are directly analogous to patterns found on the basal plane of many uniaxial industrial ferrites. Analyses of the wavy patterns with the model of Szymczak yield stresses on the order of several hundred bars. Thus the very different domain pattern styles observed throughout the titanomagnetite series indicate the increasing importance of stress with titanium content. Whether this stress is intrinsic or an artifact of the surface preparation methods still remain a topic of debate. Throughout the titanomagnetite series, particles that contain simple arrays of planar walls yield the familiar dependence of the number of domains ( n) upon L 1/2 ( L = grain thickness), in accordance with equilibrium theory. Plots of n vs. L derived from observations invariably have a 'scattered' appearance. It is shown here that much of this scatter is intrinsic and reflects physical processes that drive grains

  3. Distribution of critical current density for magnetic domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, S.; Yamanouchi, M.; Nakatani, Y.; Kim, K.-J.; Koyama, T.; Chiba, D.; Ikeda, S.; Kasai, N.; Ono, T.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-01

    The bit-to-bit distribution of a critical current density for magnetic domain wall (DW) motion is studied using Co/Ni wires with various wire widths (ws). The distribution inherently decreases with the w, and the ratio of standard deviation to average is 9.8% for wires with w = 40 nm. It is found that a self-distribution within one device, which is evaluated through repeated measurement, is a dominant factor in the bit-to-bit distribution. Micromagnetic simulation reveals that the distribution originates from DW configuration, which varies with device size.

  4. Magnetic domain wall depinning assisted by spin wave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Delaney, Tristan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2017-01-01

    Spin waves (SWs) in magnetic structures could potentially be exploited for high-speed, low-power magnonic devices for signal transmission and magnetic logic applications. The short wavelengths and high frequencies of dipole-exchange-mode SWs in metallic ferromagnets make them particularly suitable for nanoscale devices. However, these same characteristics make generation and detection challenging due to the length-scale mismatch of conventional SW interfaces such as microwave striplines. Here we show numerically and experimentally that colliding domain walls (DWs) release energetic spin wave bursts that can couple to and assist depinning of nearby DWs. Hence, DWs can be used as stationary reservoirs of exchange energy that can be efficiently generated, manipulated, and used to release SWs on demand, which can subsequently be detected again using DWs. This work highlights a route towards integrating DWs and SWs for enhanced functionality in spintronics applications.

  5. THz time-domain spectroscopy imaging for mail inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liquan; Wang, Zhongdong; Ma, Yanmei; Hao, Erjuan

    2011-08-01

    Acquiring messages from the mail but not destroying the envelope is a big challenge in the war of intelligence. If one can read the message of the mail when the envelope is closed, he will benefit from the message asymmetry and be on a good wicket in the competition. In this paper, we presented a transmitted imaging system using THz time-domain spectroscopy technology. We applied the system to image the mail inside an envelope by step-scanning imaging technology. The experimental results show that the THz spectroscopy can image the mail in an envelope. The words in the paper can be identified easily from the background. We also present the THz image of a metal blade in the envelope, in which we can see the metal blade clearly. The results show that it is feasible of THz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Imaging for mail inspection applications.

  6. Imaging of the Magnetization of a Symmetric Spin Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenko, V. I.; Gornakov, V. S.; Dedukh, L. M.; Kabanov, Yu. P.; Khapikov, A. F.; Bennett, L. H.; Egelhoff, W. F.; Chen, P. J.; McMichael, R. D.; Donahue, M. J.; Swartzendruber, L. J.; Shapiro, A. J.; Brown, H. J.

    1996-03-01

    The magnetization reversal processes in a 50nmNiO/2.5nmCo/2.3nmCu/6.1nmNiFe2.3nmCu2.5nmCo/50nmNiO spin valve were studied by a magneto-optical indicator film technique (MOIF), SQUID magnetometry, and giant magnetoresistance measurements. Stray magnetic fields from the sample edge and from domain walls were imaged using polarized light optical microscopy in reflective mode with a Bi-substituted YIG indicator film with in-plane anisotropy. The images indicate that magnetization reversal in the center NiFe layer of the spin valve occurs by a non-uniform process with a length scale on the order kof 10--50 μm. Magnetization reversal in the top and bottom Co layers proceeds by nucleation of domain walls at a much larger value of applied field. The ability of MOIF to observe the dynamics of the magnetization reversal processes suggests its use for fast nondestructive quality control in different stages of spin-valve manufacturing.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  8. Frequency-domain sensitivity analysis for small imaging domains using the equation of radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuejun; Ren, Kui; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-04-01

    Optical tomography of small imaging domains holds great promise as the signal-to-noise ratio is usually high, and the achievable spatial resolution is much better than in large imaging domains. Emerging applications range from the imaging of joint diseases in human fingers to monitoring tumor growth or brain activity in small animals. In these cases, the diameter of the tissue under investigation is typically smaller than 3 cm, and the optical path length is only a few scattering mean-free paths. It is well known that under these conditions the widely applied diffusion approximation to the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) is of limited applicability. To accurately model light propagation in these small domains, the ERT has to be solved directly. We use the frequency-domain ERT to perform a sensitivity study for small imaging domains. We found optimal source-modulation frequencies for which variations in optical properties, size, and location of a tissue inhomogeneity lead to maximal changes in the amplitude and phase of the measured signal. These results will be useful in the design of experiments and optical tomographic imaging systems that probe small tissue volumes.

  9. Coronary computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C

    2009-04-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cryptorchid testis.

    PubMed

    Landa, H M; Gylys-Morin, V; Mattrey, R F; Krous, H F; Kaplan, G W; Packer, M G

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate seven patients with undescended testes. In six patients the presence or absence of testicular tissue was predicted correctly prior to surgery. Spermatic cord structures, if present, were accurately visualized in all patients.

  11. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  12. Trajectory analysis for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Knopp, T; Biederer, S; Sattel, T; Weizenecker, J; Gleich, B; Borgert, J; Buzug, T M

    2009-01-21

    Recently a new imaging technique called magnetic particle imaging was proposed. The method uses the nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles when a time varying magnetic field is applied. Spatial encoding is achieved by moving a field-free point through an object of interest while the field strength in the vicinity of the point is high. A resolution in the submillimeter range is provided even for fast data acquisition sequences. In this paper, a simulation study is performed on different trajectories moving the field-free point through the field of view. The purpose is to provide mandatory information for the design of a magnetic particle imaging scanner. Trajectories are compared with respect to density, speed and image quality when applied in data acquisition. Since simulation of the involved physics is a time demanding task, moreover, an efficient implementation is presented utilizing caching techniques.

  13. Interplay between intrinsic and stacking-fault magnetic domains in bi-layered manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M.A; Burkhardt, Mark H.; Sarkar, S.; Ohldag, H.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.T.; Doran, A.; Dessau, D.S.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J.F.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-09-11

    We present a low temperature X-ray photoemission electron microscopy study of the bi-layered manganite compound La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} (BL-LSMO) to investigate the influence of stacking faults, which are structurally and magnetically different from the bi-layered host. In BL-LSMO small magnetic moment persists to T* = 300K, well above the Curie temperature of 120K (T{sub C}). Our magnetic images show that 3D stacking faults are responsible for the T* transition. Furthermore, close to the T{sub C}, stacking faults are well coupled to the bi-layered host with latter magnetic domains controlling the spin direction of the stacking faults. Contrary to recent reports, we find that stacking faults do not seed magnetic domains in the host via an exchange spring mechanism and the intrinsic T{sub C} of the BL-LSMO is not lower than 120K.

  14. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads{sup ®} MyOne{sup ™}) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔB{sub dep} = 4.5–27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  15. Theoretical study of magnetic domain walls through a cobalt nanocontact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, László; Palotás, Krisztián; Udvardi, László; Szunyogh, László; Nowak, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    To calculate the magnetic ground state of nanoparticles we present a self-consistent first-principles method in terms of a fully relativistic embedded cluster multiple scattering Green's function technique. Based on the derivatives of the band energy, a Newton-Raphson algorithm is used to find the ground-state configuration. The method is applied to a cobalt nanocontact that turned out to show a cycloidal domain wall configuration between oppositely magnetized leads. We found that a wall of cycloidal spin structure is about 30 meV lower in energy than the one of helical spin structure. A detailed analysis revealed that the uniaxial on-site anisotropy of the central atom is mainly responsible to this energy difference. This high uniaxial anisotropy energy is accompanied by a huge enhancement and anisotropy of the orbital magnetic moment of the central atom. By varying the magnetic orientation at the central atom, we identified the term related to exchange couplings (Weiss-field term), various on-site anisotropy terms, and also those due to higher order spin interactions.

  16. Terahertz grayscale imaging using spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhihui; Sun, Lin; Zhang, Dongwen; Yuan, Jianmin

    2011-11-01

    We reported a technology of gray-scale imaging using broadband terahertz pulse. Utilizing the spatial distribution of different frequency content, image information can be acquired from the terahertz frequency domain analysis. Unlike CCDs(charge-coupled devices) or spot scanning technology are used in conversional method, a single-pixels detector with single measurement can meet the demand of our scheme. And high SNR terahertz imaging with fast velocity is believed.

  17. Terahertz grayscale imaging using spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhihui; Sun, Lin; Zhang, Dongwen; Yuan, Jianmin

    2012-03-01

    We reported a technology of gray-scale imaging using broadband terahertz pulse. Utilizing the spatial distribution of different frequency content, image information can be acquired from the terahertz frequency domain analysis. Unlike CCDs(charge-coupled devices) or spot scanning technology are used in conversional method, a single-pixels detector with single measurement can meet the demand of our scheme. And high SNR terahertz imaging with fast velocity is believed.

  18. Detection of atherosclerosis via magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Andrew L.; Pytlewski, Victor T.; Brown, Michael F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    1992-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of atherosclerotic lipids using a stimulated-echo diffusion- weighted (STED) sequence is demonstrated. The STED sequence exploits the large difference in diffusion between lipid (primarily cholesteryl ester) and water. The optimization of the STED sequence is discussed. The results of lipid imaging are corroborated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique is non-invasive, and therefore, it is potentially useful in following the progression of the disease in animal models and in humans.

  19. Geometrical Dependence of Domain-Wall Propagation and Nucleation Fields in Magnetic-Domain-Wall Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borie, B.; Kehlberger, A.; Wahrhusen, J.; Grimm, H.; Kläui, M.

    2017-08-01

    We study the key domain-wall properties in segmented nanowire loop-based structures used in domain-wall-based sensors. The two reasons for device failure, namely, distribution of the domain-wall propagation field (depinning) and the nucleation field are determined with magneto-optical Kerr effect and giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) measurements for thousands of elements to obtain significant statistics. Single layers of Ni81 Fe19 , a complete GMR stack with Co90 Fe10 /Ni81Fe19 as a free layer, and a single layer of Co90 Fe10 are deposited and industrially patterned to determine the influence of the shape anisotropy, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and the fabrication processes. We show that the propagation field is influenced only slightly by the geometry but significantly by material parameters. Simulations for a realistic wire shape yield a curling-mode type of magnetization configuration close to the nucleation field. Nonetheless, we find that the domain-wall nucleation fields can be described by a typical Stoner-Wohlfarth model related to the measured geometrical parameters of the wires and fitted by considering the process parameters. The GMR effect is subsequently measured in a substantial number of devices (3000) in order to accurately gauge the variation between devices. This measurement scheme reveals a corrected upper limit to the nucleation fields of the sensors that can be exploited for fast characterization of the working elements.

  20. Remote sensing image fusion based on frequency domain segmenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deren; Li, Linyi; Yu, Xin

    2006-10-01

    Remote sensing image fusion has become one of hotspots in the researches and applications of Geoinformatics in recent years. It has been widely used to integrate low-resolution multispectral images with high-resolution panchromatic images. In order to obtain good fusion effects, high frequency components of panchromatic images and low frequency components of multispectral images should be identified and combined in a reasonable way. However, it is very difficult due to complex processes of remote sensing image formation. In order to solve this problem, a new remote sensing image fusion method based on frequency domain segmenting is proposed in this paper. Discrete wavelet packet transform is used as the mathematical tool to segment the frequency domain of remote sensing images after analyzing the frequency relationship between high-resolution panchromatic images and low-resolution multispectral images. And several wavelet packet coefficient features are extracted and combined as the fusion decision criteria. Besides visual perception and some statistical parameters, classification accuracy parameters are also used to evaluate the fusion effects in the experiment. And the results show that fused images by the proposed method are not only suitable for human perception but also suitable for some computer applications such as remote sensing image classification.

  1. Magnetic force microscopy studies of the domain structure of Co/Pd multilayers in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.; Main, P. C.; Gallagher, B. L.; Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.; Dahlberg, E. D.; Eames, P.

    2001-06-01

    We have measured the magnetic domain patterns in Co/Pd multilayers of varying thickness using magnetic force microscopy in the presence of an external magnetic field applied perpendicular to the multilayers. We find that the domain patterns evolution is in qualitative agreement with existing theories for single layer thin films. Our results are in reasonable agreement with a theoretical model of domains appropriate to multilayer films. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Frequency-domain synthetic aperture focusing for helical ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, H.; Chen, J.; Wu, E.; Yang, K.

    2017-04-01

    The synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is widely used to provide significant improvement in the lateral resolution of ultrasonic images. Frequency-domain SAFT has shown higher accuracy and greater efficiency than time-domain SAFT. However, frequency-domain SAFT should be helix-based for ultrasonic scanning of cylindrical structures such as pipes and axletrees. In this study, a frequency-domain SAFT is proposed for 3D helical ultrasonic imaging applications. This technique adjusts the phase spectra of the images to complete the synthetic aperture focusing process. The focused image is precise because the proposed algorithm is established on the basis of the wave equation in a helical coordinate system. In addition, the algorithm can efficiently separate out point scatterers and present volume scatterers. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm yields lower side lobes and enhances the angular resolution of the ultrasonic image to approximately 1°- 1.5°, which is much better than the performance of time-domain SAFT. The maximum deviations are only 0.6 mm, 0.5°, and 0.4 mm along the r-axes, θ-axes, and z-axes, respectively, which are appropriate for normal ultrasonic nondestructive testing.

  3. Effect of residual strain in Fe-based amorphous alloys on field induced magnetic anisotropy and domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Daichi; Hasegawa, Ryusuke; Saito, Shin; Takahashi, Migaku

    2013-05-01

    Field induced magnetic anisotropy in two Fe-based amorphous alloys with different saturation induction levels (1.56 T and 1.64 T) was investigated by varying magnetic field strength and annealing temperature and domain images were taken on these samples. Residual strain was evaluated by measuring coercivities of the materials after stress-relief annealing. These results are discussed, clarifying the difference between the two Fe-based amorphous alloys.

  4. Optical magnetic resonance imaging of Rb vapor in low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalla, J.; Wäckerle, G.; Mehring, M.; Pines, A.

    1997-02-01

    By applying magnetic field gradients to alkali vapor cells, images of the spatial distribution of spin-polarized Rb atoms were obtained. Optical pumping is used to produce precessing spin-polarization in the ground state. Detection of the coherent spin transients is performed in the time-domain by a single optical probe beam covering the whole sample cell. Spatial resolution of better than 1 mm has been achieved by a projection-reconstruction method.

  5. Rotationally induced magnetic chirality in clusters of single-domain permalloy islands and gapped nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Jie; Bartell, Jason; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent; Schiffer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We have studied magnetic moment configurations of clusters of single-domain ferromagnetic islands in different geometries. The magnetic moments of these clusters are imaged by MFM after rotational demagnetization, following our previous protocols. We observed that two types of the clusters showed a significant imbalance of their two-fold degenerate ground states after demagnetization, and this inequality is correlated to the rotational direction of the demagnetization. A similar imbalance was also found in nano-scale rings with a small gap: the chirality of their magnetic state can be precisely controlled by the rotational direction during demagnetization. We acknowledge the financial support from DOE and Army Research Office. We are grateful to Prof. Chris Leighton and Mike Erickson for assistance with sample preparation.

  6. Basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Joseph C

    2008-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become the dominant clinical imaging modality with widespread, primarily noninvasive, applicability throughout the body and across many disease processes. The flexibility of MR imaging enables the development of purpose-built optimized applications. Concurrent developments in digital image processing, microprocessor power, storage, and computer-aided design have spurred and enabled further growth in capability. Although MR imaging may be viewed as "mature" in some respects, the field is rich with new proposals and applications that hold great promise for future research health care uses. This article delineates the basic principles of MR imaging and illuminates specific applications.

  7. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  8. Magnetic particle imaging: introduction to imaging and hardware realization.

    PubMed

    Buzug, Thorsten M; Bringout, Gael; Erbe, Marlitt; Gräfe, Ksenija; Graeser, Matthias; Grüttner, Mandy; Halkola, Aleksi; Sattel, Timo F; Tenner, Wiebke; Wojtczyk, Hanne; Haegele, Julian; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Lüdtke-Buzug, Kerstin

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a recently invented tomographic imaging method that quantitatively measures the spatial distribution of a tracer based on magnetic nanoparticles. The new modality promises a high sensitivity and high spatial as well as temporal resolution. There is a high potential of MPI to improve interventional and image-guided surgical procedures because, today, established medical imaging modalities typically excel in only one or two of these important imaging properties. MPI makes use of the non-linear magnetization characteristics of the magnetic nanoparticles. For this purpose, two magnetic fields are created and superimposed, a static selection field and an oscillatory drive field. If superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) are subjected to the oscillatory magnetic field, the particles will react with a non-linear magnetization response, which can be measured with an appropriate pick-up coil arrangement. Due to the non-linearity of the particle magnetization, the received signal consists of the fundamental excitation frequency as well as of harmonics. After separation of the fundamental signal, the nanoparticle concentration can be reconstructed quantitatively based on the harmonics. The spatial coding is realized with the static selection field that produces a field-free point, which is moved through the field of view by the drive fields. This article focuses on the frequency-based image reconstruction approach and the corresponding imaging devices while alternative concepts like x-space MPI and field-free line imaging are described as well. The status quo in hardware realization is summarized in an overview of MPI scanners. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Fractal image coding based on replaced domain pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masaki; Fujii, Toshiaki; Kimoto, Tadahiko; Tanimoto, Masayuki

    1998-01-01

    Fractal image coding based on iterated function system has been attracting much interest because of the possibilities of drastic data compression. It performs compression by using the self-similarity included in an image. In the conventional schemes, under the assumption of the self- similarity in the image, each block is mapped from that larger block which is considered as the most suitable block to approximate the range block. However, even if the exact self-similarity of an image is found at the encoder, it hardly holds at the decoder because a domain pool of the encoder is different from that of the decoder. In this paper, we prose a fractal image coding scheme by using domain pools replaced with decoded or transformed values to reduce the difference between the domain pools of the encoder and that of the decoder. The proposed scheme performs two-stage encoding. The domain pool is replaced with decoded non-contractive blocks first and then with transformed values for contractive blocks. It is expected that the proposed scheme reduces errors of contractive blocks in the reconstructed image while those of non- contractive blocks are kept unchanged. The experimental result show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. Magnetic domain structure, crystal orientation, and magnetostriction of Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe1.95 solidified in various high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pengfei; Liu, Tie; Dong, Meng; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we studied how applying a high magnetic field during solidification of Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe1.95 alloys affected their magnetic domain structure, crystal orientation, and magnetostriction. We observed the morphology of the magnetic domain during solidification, finding it change with the applied field: from fiber like (0 T) to dot like and closure mixed (4.4 T) to fiber like (8.8 T) to fishbone like (11.5 T). The alloy solidified at 4.4 T showed the best contrast of light and dark in its domain image, widest magnetic domain, fastest magnetization, and highest magnetostriction; this alloy is followed in descending order by the alloys solidified at 11.5 T, 8.8 T, and 0 T. The orientation of the (Tb, Dy)Fe2 phase changed with magnetic field from random (0 T) to <111> (4.4 T) to <113> (8.8 T) to <110> (11.5 T). The improvement in magnetostriction was likely caused by modification of both the magnetization process and the alloy microstructure.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  12. Size effect on quantum magnetic and thermo-magnetic oscillations in the non-spin domain phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakaleinikov, L. A.; Gordon, A.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic and thermo-magnetic (magneto-caloric) oscillations are studied in quantizing magnetic fields in slabs under conditions of the existence of non-spin (Condon) domains. Size effects on the magnetization oscillations in thin samples are calculated in the domain phase. Computations are carried out in the center of the period of the magnetization and temperature oscillations, taking into account the sample size. Phase diagrams, describing diamagnetic phase transitions and formation of Condon domains, are presented in finite size silver and quasi-two-dimensional organic conductors (2D) samples.

  13. Coarsening of cellular domain patterns in magnetic garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, K. L.; Seshadri, R.; Westervelt, R. M.

    1990-02-01

    We experimentally study the coarsening of two-dimensional cellular domain patterns in an increasing bias field. As in soap froths and polycrystalline materials, the coarsening is driven by effective cell surface energy. We find that the domain patterns are distinguished by a nonmonotonic change in the total cell surface energy and by topological evolution that proceeds almost exclusively by cell elimination. Aboav's law describing topological correlations between neighboring cells is found to hold over a wide range of bias and cell density. We have also evaluated the distribution P(n) of n-sided cells over three decades in cell density. The patterns show a form of partial scaling: over a two-decade drop in cell density, the fraction of all cells that are pentagonal bubble traps (fivefold symmetric domain structures containing trapped magnetic bubbles) remains nearly constant at f5~=0.2 while P(n) changes rapidly. The partial scaling may be related to a novel topological structure in which the bubble traps act as stable fivefold vertices.

  14. Open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners.

    PubMed

    Hailey, D

    2006-11-01

    (1) In most MRI scanners, the patient examination table fits inside a long cylindrical tube. Large patients cannot be accommodated, and some persons experience claustrophobic reactions. Open MRI systems, in which the patient is placed between two plates, overcome these disadvantages. (2) Open MRI scanners are widely used in health care. High-field closed MRI systems are preferred for many examinations. (3) Early versions of open MRI scanners had low magnetic field strength, gave poorer image quality than most closed systems, and required longer examination times. Newer open scanners include machines with higher magnetic field strengths and improved image quality. (4) Closed high magnetic field scanners with short magnets and wide bore tubes offer improved comfort to patients, and may be an alternative to open scanners. (5) There is interest in using open systems for intra-operative and image-guided interventions.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    PubMed Central

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  17. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  18. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  20. Magnetic domain wall shift registers for data storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Dan; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Sampaio, J.; Thevenard, L.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through permalloy (Py) nanowires have been proposed [Allwood et al. Science 309, 1688 (2005), S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004)] and have attracted a great deal of attention. We experimentally demonstrate such a device using shift registers constructed from magnetic NOT gates used in combination with a globally applied rotating magnetic field. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable Py nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Electrical data writing is achieved using the Oersted field due to current pulses in gold stripes (4 μm wide, 150 nm thick), patterned on top of and perpendicular to the nanowires. The conduit-like properties of the nanowires allow the propagation of data sequences over distances greater than 100 μm. Using spatially resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements we can directly detect the propagation of single DWs in individual nanostructures without requiring data averaging. Electrical readout was demonstrated by detecting the presence of DWs at deliberately introduced pinning sites in the wire.

  1. Strain-Magnetization Properties and Domain Structures of Silicon Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notoji, Atsushi; Saito, Akihiko; Hayakawa, Motozo

    The effects of tensile stress and strain on magnetization and magnetic domains in silicon steel sheets were investigated. The magnetization of elastic deformation regions decreased with increase of strain and the strain-magnetization properties of plastic deformation regions under stress showed peculiar characteristics. The magnetization increased with decreasing strain. We observed Lancet and other domains in a sample, especially around the boundary of crystal, after removing stress applied to a plastic deformation region. This phenomenon can be explained by changes in the domain structures, which were partly observed. This results obtained in this investigation can be applied to the nondestructive detection of fatigue in metallic magnetic materials.

  2. Imaging and manipulation of skyrmion lattice domains in Cu2OSeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. L.; Bauer, A.; Berger, H.; Pfleiderer, C.; van der Laan, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-11-01

    Nanoscale chiral skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets are promising binary state variables in high-density, low-energy nonvolatile memory. Skyrmions are ubiquitous as an ordered, single-domain lattice phase, which makes it difficult to write information unless they are spatially broken up into smaller units, each representing a bit. Thus, the formation and manipulation of skyrmion lattice domains is a prerequisite for memory applications. Here, using an imaging technique based on resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction, we demonstrate the mapping and manipulation of skyrmion lattice domains in Cu2OSeO3. The material is particularly interesting for applications owing to its insulating nature, allowing for electric field-driven domain manipulation.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathryn J

    2010-05-01

    Elbow pain is frequently encountered in clinical practice and can result in significant morbidity, particularly in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent diagnostic imaging tool for the evaluation of soft tissue and osteochondral pathology around the elbow. Recent advances in magnetic field strength and coil design have lead to improved spatial resolution and superior soft tissue contrast, making it ideal for visualization of complex joint anatomy. This article describes the normal imaging appearances of anatomy around the elbow and reviews commonly occurring ligamentous, myotendinous, neural, and bursal pathology around the elbow.

  4. Multidimensional x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising new medical imaging tracer modality with potential applications in human angiography, cancer imaging, in vivo cell tracking, and inflammation imaging. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that multidimensional MPI is a linear shift-invariant imaging system with an analytic point spread function. We also introduce a fast image reconstruction method that obtains the intrinsic MPI image with high signal-to-noise ratio via a simple gridding operation in x-space. We also demonstrate a method to reconstruct large field-of-view (FOV) images using partial FOV scanning, despite the loss of first harmonic image information due to direct feedthrough contamination. We conclude with the first experimental test of multidimensional x-space MPI.

  5. Multidimensional X-Space Magnetic Particle Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Conolly, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising new medical imaging tracer modality with potential applications in human angiography, cancer imaging, in vivo cell tracking, and inflammation imaging. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that multidimensional MPI is a linear shift-in-variant imaging system with an analytic point spread function. We also introduce a fast image reconstruction method that obtains the intrinsic MPI image with high signal-to-noise ratio via a simple gridding operation in x-space. We also demonstrate a method to reconstruct large field-of-view (FOV) images using partial FOV scanning, despite the loss of first harmonic image information due to direct feedthrough contamination. We conclude with the first experimental test of multidimensional x-space MPI. PMID:21402508

  6. Mobile metallic domain walls in an all-in-all-out magnetic insulator.

    PubMed

    Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Ueda, Kentaro; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Wu, Phillip M; Fujioka, Jun; Tokura, Yoshinori; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-10-30

    Magnetic domain walls are boundaries between regions with different configurations of the same magnetic order. In a magnetic insulator, where the magnetic order is tied to its bulk insulating property, it has been postulated that electrical properties are drastically different along the domain walls, where the order is inevitably disturbed. Here we report the discovery of highly conductive magnetic domain walls in a magnetic insulator, Nd2Ir2O7, that has an unusual all-in-all-out magnetic order, via transport and spatially resolved microwave impedance microscopy. The domain walls have a virtually temperature-independent sheet resistance of ~1 kilohm per square, show smooth morphology with no preferred orientation, are free from pinning by disorders, and have strong thermal and magnetic field responses that agree with expectations for all-in-all-out magnetic order.

  7. Accelerating Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Lung Tumor Tracking Based on Low-Rank Decomposition in the Spatial–Temporal Domain: A Feasibility Study Based on Simulation and Preliminary Prospective Undersampled MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Manoj; Hu, Peng; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Ennis, Daniel; Thomas, Albert; Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a low-rank decomposition method to reconstruct down-sampled k-space data for the purpose of tumor tracking. Methods and Materials: Seven retrospective lung cancer patients were included in the simulation study. The fully-sampled k-space data were first generated from existing 2-dimensional dynamic MR images and then down-sampled by 5 × -20 × before reconstruction using a Cartesian undersampling mask. Two methods, a low-rank decomposition method using combined dynamic MR images (k-t SLR based on sparsity and low-rank penalties) and a total variation (TV) method using individual dynamic MR frames, were used to reconstruct images. The tumor trajectories were derived on the basis of autosegmentation of the resultant images. To further test its feasibility, k-t SLR was used to reconstruct prospective data of a healthy subject. An undersampled balanced steady-state free precession sequence with the same undersampling mask was used to acquire the imaging data. Results: In the simulation study, higher imaging fidelity and low noise levels were achieved with the k-t SLR compared with TV. At 10 × undersampling, the k-t SLR method resulted in an average normalized mean square error <0.05, as opposed to 0.23 by using the TV reconstruction on individual frames. Less than 6% showed tracking errors >1 mm with 10 × down-sampling using k-t SLR, as opposed to 17% using TV. In the prospective study, k-t SLR substantially reduced reconstruction artifacts and retained anatomic details. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance reconstruction using k-t SLR on highly undersampled dynamic MR imaging data results in high image quality useful for tumor tracking. The k-t SLR was superior to TV by better exploiting the intrinsic anatomic coherence of the same patient. The feasibility of k-t SLR was demonstrated by prospective imaging acquisition and reconstruction.

  8. Holographic security system based on image domain joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.; Matveyev, Sergey V.; Belyaev, V. S.

    2002-04-01

    We describe holographic security system providing machine reading of the holographic information and matching it with the reference one by optical means. The security holographic mark includes several test holograms and should be applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. The system proposed works like usual JTC with a few useful differences. The image domain recognizing is a result of Fresnel holographic technique of the images recording. It provides more effective usage of the light addressed SLM (LASLM) work pupil and resolution in more simple and compact device. Few correlation peaks enhances the device recognizing probability. We describe the real-time experimental arrangement based on LASLM. The experimental results are in a good correspondence with computer simulations. We also show in practice that good results may be obtained while using the image domain JTC technique in despite of the low LASLM resolution and the device compact size.

  9. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  12. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    PubMed Central

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated. PMID:26839036

  13. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-02-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated.

  14. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure.

    PubMed

    Murapaka, C; Sethi, P; Goolaup, S; Lew, W S

    2016-02-03

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Muir, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its application to image anatomy, physiology, and function in the retina of animals. It describes technical issues and solutions in performing retinal MRI, anatomical MRI, blood oxygenation level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI), and blood-flow MRI both of normal retinas and of retinal degeneration. MRI offers unique advantages over existing retinal imaging techniques, including the ability to image multiple layers without depth limitation and to provide multiple clinically relevant data in a single setting. Retinal MRI has the potential to complement existing retinal imaging techniques. PMID:19763752

  16. Switchable bi-stable multilayer magnetic probes for imaging of soft magnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tom; Puttock, Robb; Gribkov, Boris; Vdovichev, Sergey; Kazakova, Olga

    2017-03-28

    We present the use of custom-made multilayer (ML) magnetic probes in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) for imaging soft magnetic structures, i.e. nickel submicron disks of different dimensions. One of the main advantages of a custom-made ML probe is that it can be controllably switched between standard (parallel) and low moment (antiparallel) states. We demonstrate that the predicted vortex and stripe domain states in the disks are observed when using the ML probes both in the antiparallel and parallel states. However, while the phase contrast is significantly larger in the parallel state, the images are dominated by strong sample - probe interactions that obscure the image. By comparison of the stripe domain width observed by MFM with the ML probe and those expected from the Kittel model, we show that the resolution of the probe in the AP and P states is ∼30-40nm, i.e. of the order of the probe geometrical apex and thus approaching the limit of spatial resolution. The ML probes are further compared to the commercial standard and low moment ones, showing that the quality of images obtained with the ML probe is superior to both commercial probes.

  17. Frequency Domain Magnetic Measurements from Kilohertz to Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, John F.

    "......we applied much prolonged labor on investigating the magnetical forces; so wonderful indeed are they, compared with the forces in all other minerals, surpassing even the virtues of all bodies around us. Nor have we found this labor idle or unfruitful; since daily in our experimenting new unexpected properties came to light."William Gilbert, De Magnete, 1600Abstract. This review deals with practical aspects of making frequency-domain measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic losses from 200 kHz up to 10 GHz. It sets out the types of measurement concerned, distinguishing resonant from nonresonant phenomena. The techniques available are categorized according to suitability for the different frequency regimes and types of investigation. Practical recipes are provided for undertaking such experiments across the entire frequency range. Marginal oscillator spectrometry is discussed which is applicable across the whole frequency range. Different instruments are presented, and particular emphasis is placed on designs which function on the Robinson principle. Analysis of oscillation condition and signal-to-noise performance is dealt with, also sample considerations such as filling factor. Practical circuits are presented and their merits and demerits evaluated. Layout and radio-frequency design considerations are dealt with. Ultrahigh/microwave frequency marginal oscillator spectrometry is given special treatment and several practical designs are given. The essentials of good microwave design are emphasized. A general discussion of resonant structures is included which treats multiple layer coil design, slow wave line structures, stripline and cavities. Unusual cavity designs such as the rhumbatron are treated. Use of striplines with microwave marginal spectrometry is described and compared with conventional network-analysis techniques. The use of parameter matrices for high-frequency analysis is alluded to. Some details of good construction practice are

  18. Unexpected Magnetic Domain Behavior in LTP-MnBi

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, PK; Jin, S; Berkowitz, AE

    2013-07-01

    Low-temperature-phase MnBi (LTP-MnBi) has attracted much interest as a potential rare-earth-free permanent magnet material because of its high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy at room temperature, K approximate to 10(7) ergs/cc, and the unusual increase of anisotropy with increasing temperature, with an accompanying increasing coercive force (H-C) with temperature. However, due to the complex Mn-Bi phase diagram, bulk samples of LTP-MnBi with the optimum saturation moment, similar to 75-76 emu/g have been achieved only with zone-refined single crystals. We have prepared polycrystalline samples of LTP-MnBi by induction melting and annealing at 300 degrees C. The moment in 70 kOe is 73.5 emu/g, but H-C is only 50 Oe. This is quite surprising-the high saturation moment indicates the dominating presence of LTP-MnBi. Therefore, an H-C c of some significant fraction of 2K/M-S approximate to 30 kOe would seem reasonable in this polycrystalline sample. By examining "Bitter" patterns, we show that the sample is composed of similar to 50 - 100 mu m crystallites. The randomly oriented crystallites exhibit the variety of magnetic domain structures and orientations expected from the hexagonal-structured MnBi with its strong uniaxial anisotropy. Clearly, the reversal of magnetization in the sample proceeds by the low-field nucleation of reversed magnetization in each crystallite, rather than by a wall-pinning mechanism. When the annealed sample was milled into fine particles, H-C increased by several orders of magnitude, as expected.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging based functional imaging in paediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Manias, Karen A; Gill, Simrandip K; MacPherson, Lesley; Foster, Katharine; Oates, Adam; Peet, Andrew C

    2017-02-01

    Imaging is central to management of solid tumours in children. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard imaging modality for tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs and is increasingly used in the abdomen. It provides excellent structural detail, but imparts limited information about tumour type, aggressiveness, metastatic potential or early treatment response. MRI based functional imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, probe tissue properties to provide clinically important information about metabolites, structure and blood flow. This review describes the role of and evidence behind these functional imaging techniques in paediatric oncology and implications for integrating them into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanoscale imaging of magnetization reversal driven by spin-orbit torque

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P.J.; Gopman, Daniel B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Stiles, Mark D.; Unguris, John

    2016-01-01

    We use scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis to image deterministic, spin-orbit torque-driven magnetization reversal of in-plane magnetized CoFeB rectangles in zero applied magnetic field. The spin-orbit torque is generated by running a current through heavy metal microstrips, either Pt or Ta, upon which the CoFeB rectangles are deposited. We image the CoFeB magnetization before and after a current pulse to see the effect of spin-orbit torque on the magnetic nanostructure. The observed changes in magnetic structure can be complex, deviating significantly from a simple macrospin approximation, especially in larger elements. Overall, however, the directions of the magnetization reversal in the Pt and Ta devices are opposite, consistent with the opposite signs of the spin Hall angles of these materials. Our results elucidate the effects of current density, geometry, and magnetic domain structure on magnetization switching driven by spin-orbit torque. PMID:27957557

  1. Nanoscale imaging of magnetization reversal driven by spin-orbit torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Chen, P. J.; Gopman, Daniel B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Stiles, Mark D.; Unguris, John

    2016-09-01

    We use scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis to image deterministic, spin-orbit torque-driven magnetization reversal of in-plane magnetized CoFeB rectangles in zero applied magnetic field. The spin-orbit torque is generated by running a current through heavy metal microstrips, either Pt or Ta, upon which the CoFeB rectangles are deposited. We image the CoFeB magnetization before and after a current pulse to see the effect of spin-orbit torque on the magnetic nanostructure. The observed changes in magnetic structure can be complex, deviating significantly from a simple macrospin approximation, especially in larger elements. Overall, however, the directions of the magnetization reversal in the Pt and Ta devices are opposite, consistent with the opposite signs of the spin Hall angles of these materials. Our results elucidate the effects of current density, geometry, and magnetic domain structure on magnetization switching driven by spin-orbit torque.

  2. Nanoscale imaging of magnetization reversal driven by spin-orbit torque

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Ian; Chen, P. J.; Gopman, Daniel B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Stiles, Mark D.; Unguris, John

    2016-09-23

    We use scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis to image deterministic, spin-orbit torque-driven magnetization reversal of in-plane magnetized CoFeB rectangles in zero applied magnetic field. The spin-orbit torque is generated by running a current through heavy metal microstrips, either Pt or Ta, upon which the CoFeB rectangles are deposited. We image the CoFeB magnetization before and after a current pulse to see the effect of spin-orbit torque on the magnetic nanostructure. The observed changes in magnetic structure can be complex, deviating significantly from a simple macrospin approximation, especially in larger elements. Overall, however, the directions of the magnetization reversal in the Pt and Ta devices are opposite, consistent with the opposite signs of the spin Hall angles of these materials. Lastly, our results elucidate the effects of current density, geometry, and magnetic domain structure on magnetization switching driven by spin-orbit torque.

  3. Detection of current-driven magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowire by tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Mitsunobu; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Saito, Nobuo; Hayashi, Naoto; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2015-05-01

    Current-driven magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of interest in terms of both physical studies and engineering applications. The anomalous Hall effect measurement is widely used for detecting the magnetization direction of current-driven magnetic domains in a magnetic nanowire. However, the problem with this measurement is that the detection point for current-driven domain wall motion is fixed at only the installed sensing wire across the specimen nanowire. A potential solution is the magnetic domain scope method, whereby the distribution of the magnetic flux leaking from the specimen can be analyzed directly by contact-scanning a tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor on a sample. In this study, we fabricated specimen nanowires consisting of [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]21/Ta(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on Si substrates. A tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was placed on the nanowire surface and a predetermined current pulse was applied. Real-time detection of the current-driven magnetic domain motion was successful in that the resistance of the tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was changed with the magnetization direction beneath the sensor. This demonstrates that magnetic domain detection using a tunneling magnetoresistive sensor is effective for the direct analysis of micro magnetic domain motion.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging measurement of iron overload

    PubMed Central

    Wood, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging estimation of somatic iron overload. This review will discuss the need and principles of magnetic resonance imaging-based iron measurements, the validation of liver and cardiac iron measurements, and the key institutional requirements for implementation. Recent findings Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of liver and cardiac iron has achieved critical levels of availability, utility, and validity to serve as the primary endpoint of clinical trials. Calibration curves for the magnetic resonance imaging parameters R2 and R2* (or their reciprocals, T2 and T2*) have been developed for the liver and the heart. Interscanner variability for these techniques has proven to be on the order of 5–7%. Summary Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of tissue iron is becoming increasingly important in the management of transfusional iron load because it is noninvasive, relatively widely available and offers a window into presymptomatic organ dysfunction. The techniques are highly reproducible within and across machines and have been chemically validated in the liver and the heart. These techniques will become the standard of care as industry begins to support the acquisition and postprocessing software. PMID:17414205

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, Martin; Yousry, Tarek

    2007-10-01

    Clinical investigations of neuromuscular diseases routinely involve genetic, neurophysiological, biochemical and histopathological methods. More recently, various magnetic resonance imaging techniques have become available and extended the differential diagnostic possibilities. Using magnetic resonance imaging it is now possible to quantify muscle volume in selected body regions and measure wasting and exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy. Evidence is forthcoming that many hereditary myopathies are characterized by distinct patterns of muscle degeneration and this helps in selecting other relevant genetic and biochemical investigations. With diffusion-weighted tensor imaging it is possible to identify the microstructure of normal and diseased muscles. Arterial spin labelling is an emerging non-invasive tool to assess blood-flow changes in individual muscles. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy now provides an exciting opportunity to visualize metabolic changes and the pathophysiologically relevant cellular perturbations in muscle channelopathies affecting the muscle-specific sodium-channel isoform Na(v)1.4. Magnetic resonance imaging supplements investigations for the differential diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. An advantage over routine neurophysiological or histopathological methods is that they are operator-independent, non-invasive and painless. Magnetic resonance imaging also has the advantage of providing a lasting detailed topographical picture of regional variations and allows robust measurements of muscle volume and various functional parameters.

  6. Continuous data stream FIFO magnetic bubble domain shift register

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Thomas T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    There is described a simple first-in, first out (FIFO) magnetic bubble domain shift register which has continuous data storage capability. In a preferred embodiment, two parallel detector branches are associated with a main storage loop. The bubbles in the storage loop are replicated toward each detector branch by passive replicators in the storage loop. Annihilators associated with each of the replicators and each of the detectors are arranged an appropriate distance from the replicators so that selective energization of the annihilators permits certain bits to propagate to one detector and other bits to propagate to the other detector. Connection of the detectors in an appropriate bridge circuit permits full data rate reclamation.

  7. Effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, T.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Kasama, T.; Williams, W.; Damsgaard, C.; Frandsen, C.; Pennycook, T. J.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.

    2015-12-01

    During formation, magnetic minerals record the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field. Paleomagnetists use this information to investigate, for example, past tectonic plate motion and geodynamo evolution. However, subsequent to formation the constituent magnetic minerals are commonly exposed to a range of weathering conditions and environments. One of the most common weathering processes is maghemization, which is the oxidation of magnetite (Fe3O4) at ambient temperatures, i.e., the slow oxidation of Fe3O4 to maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), and is known to alter the original remanent magnetization. Of the constituent magnetic minerals, particles in the single domain (SD) grain size range (< 100 nm) are regarded as ideal paleomagnetic recorders because of their strong remanence and high magnetic stability, with potential relaxation times greater than that of the age of the Universe. However, magnetic signals from rocks are often dominated by small grains with non-uniform magnetization that exhibit magnetic recording fidelities similar to those of SD grains (termed pseudo-SD (PSD)). In this context, the effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of Fe3O4 grains in the PSD size range is investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirms the precursor grains as Fe3O4 ranging from ~ 150 nm to ~ 250 nm in diameter, whilst Mössbauer spectrometry suggests the grains are initially near-stoichiometric. The Fe3O4 grains are heated to increasing reaction temperatures of 120 - 220 ºC to investigate their oxidation to γ-Fe2O3. High-angle annular dark field imaging and localized electron energy-loss spectroscopy reveals slightly oxidized Fe3O4 grains, heated to 140 ºC, exhibit higher oxygen content at the surface. Off-axis electron holography allows for construction of magnetic induction maps of individual Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 grains, revealing their PSD (vortex) nature, which is supported by

  8. Image-optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Uritsky, Vadim; Davila, Joseph M.

    2017-08-01

    We have reported previously on a new method we are developing for using image-based information to improve global coronal magnetic field models. In that work, we presented early tests of the method, which proved its capability to improve global models based on flawed synoptic magnetograms, given excellent constraints on the field in the model volume. In this follow-up paper, we present the results of similar tests given field constraints of a nature that could realistically be obtained from quality white-light coronagraph images of the lower corona. We pay particular attention to difficulties associated with the line-of-sight projection of features outside of the assumed coronagraph image plane and the effect on the outcome of the optimization of errors in the localization of constraints. We find that substantial improvement in the model field can be achieved with these types of constraints, even when magnetic features in the images are located outside of the image plane.

  9. An efficient multiple exposure image fusion in JPEG domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbalaguppe, Ramya; Kakarala, Ramakrishna

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method to fuse multiple images taken with varying exposure times in the JPEG domain. The proposed algorithm finds its application in HDR image acquisition and image stabilization for hand-held devices like mobile phones, music players with cameras, digital cameras etc. Image acquisition at low light typically results in blurry and noisy images for hand-held camera's. Altering camera settings like ISO sensitivity, exposure times and aperture for low light image capture results in noise amplification, motion blur and reduction of depth-of-field respectively. The purpose of fusing multiple exposures is to combine the sharp details of the shorter exposure images with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of the longer exposure images. The algorithm requires only a single pass over all images, making it efficient. It comprises of - sigmoidal boosting of shorter exposed images, image fusion, artifact removal and saturation detection. Algorithm does not need more memory than a single JPEG macro block to be kept in memory making it feasible to be implemented as the part of a digital cameras hardware image processing engine. The Artifact removal step reuses the JPEGs built-in frequency analysis and hence benefits from the considerable optimization and design experience that is available for JPEG.

  10. Evaluation of magnetic nanoparticle samples made from biocompatible ferucarbotran by time-correlation magnetic particle imaging reconstruction method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs)—magnetic particle imaging (MPI)—has attracted interest for the early diagnosis of cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, because a steep local magnetic field distribution is required to obtain a defined image, sophisticated hardware is required. Therefore, it is desirable to realize excellent image quality even with low-performance hardware. In this study, the spatial resolution of MPI was evaluated using an image reconstruction method based on the correlation information of the magnetization signal in a time domain and by applying MNP samples made from biocompatible ferucarbotran that have adjusted particle diameters. Methods The magnetization characteristics and particle diameters of four types of MNP samples made from ferucarbotran were evaluated. A numerical analysis based on our proposed method that calculates the image intensity from correlation information between the magnetization signal generated from MNPs and the system function was attempted, and the obtained image quality was compared with that using the prototype in terms of image resolution and image artifacts. Results MNP samples obtained by adjusting ferucarbotran showed superior properties to conventional ferucarbotran samples, and numerical analysis showed that the same image quality could be obtained using a gradient magnetic field generator with 0.6 times the performance. However, because image blurring was included theoretically by the proposed method, an algorithm will be required to improve performance. Conclusions MNP samples obtained by adjusting ferucarbotran showed magnetizing properties superior to conventional ferucarbotran samples, and by using such samples, comparable image quality (spatial resolution) could be obtained with a lower gradient magnetic field intensity. PMID:23734917

  11. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica , UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica , UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  12. Coronary magnetic resonance vein imaging: imaging contrast, sequence, and timing.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Reza; Han, Yuchi; Peters, Dana C; Herzka, Daniel A; Wylie, John V; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig K; Yeon, Susan B; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Manning, Warren J

    2007-12-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in imaging the coronary vein anatomy to guide interventional cardiovascular procedures such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), a device therapy for congestive heart failure (CHF). With CRT the lateral wall of the left ventricle is electrically paced using a transvenous coronary sinus lead or surgically placed epicardial lead. Proper transvenous lead placement is facilitated by the knowledge of the coronary vein anatomy. Cardiovascular MR (CMR) has the potential to image the coronary veins. In this study we propose and test CMR techniques and protocols for imaging the coronary venous anatomy. Three aspects of design of imaging sequence were studied: magnetization preparation schemes (T(2) preparation and magnetization transfer), imaging sequences (gradient-echo (GRE) and steady-state free precession (SSFP)), and imaging time during the cardiac cycle. Numerical and in vivo studies both in healthy and CHF subjects were performed to optimize and demonstrate the utility of CMR for coronary vein imaging. Magnetization transfer was superior to T(2) preparation for contrast enhancement. Both GRE and SSFP were viable imaging sequences, although GRE provided more robust results with better contrast. Imaging during the end-systolic quiescent period was preferable as it coincided with the maximum size of the coronary veins.

  13. Imaging of domain wall inertia in Permalloy half-ring nanowires by time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rhensius, J; Heyne, L; Backes, D; Krzyk, S; Heyderman, L J; Joly, L; Nolting, F; Kläui, M

    2010-02-12

    Using photoemission electron microscopy, we image the dynamics of a field pulse excited domain wall in a Permalloy nanowire. We find a delay in the onset of the wall motion with respect to the excitation and an oscillatory relaxation of the domain wall back to its equilibrium position, defined by an external magnetic field. The origin of both of these inertia effects is the transfer of energy between energy reservoirs. By imaging the distribution of the exchange energy in the wall spin structure, we determine these reservoirs, which are the basis of the domain wall mass concept.

  14. Persistent placoid maculopathy imaged with spectral domain OCT and autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Jaclyn L

    2010-01-01

    Persistent placoid maculopathy is a rare entity characterized by bilateral well-delineated whitish plaque-like lesions in the macula. Secondary choroidal neovascularization and extensive retinal pigment epithelial damage, highlighted by spectral domain optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging, can limit visual prognosis. Aggressive immunosuppression can preserve vision and perhaps delay the onset of choroidal neovascularization. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Direct observation of transverse and vortex metastable magnetic domains in cylindrical nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran, C.; Fernandez-Roldan, J. A.; Palmero, E. M.; Berganza, E.; Guzman, J.; del Real, R. P.; Asenjo, A.; Fraile Rodríguez, A.; Foerster, M.; Aballe, L.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Vazquez, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present experimental evidence of transverse magnetic domains, previously observed only in nanostrips, in CoNi cylindrical nanowires with designed crystal symmetry and tailored magnetic anisotropy. The transverse domains are found together with more conventional vortex domains along the same cylindrical nanowire, denoting a bistable system with similar energies. The surface and the inner magnetization distribution in both types of domains are analyzed by photoemission electron microscopy with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism contrast, and hysteresis loop in individual nanowires are measured by magneto-optical Kerr effect. These experimental data are understood and compared with complementary micromagnetic simulations.

  16. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David A; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; McCoey, Julia M; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Hall, Liam T; Petrou, Steven; Scholten, Robert E; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2016-03-14

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect, x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. Here we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100 × 100 μm(2) with sub-micron spatial resolution at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate an all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-μT sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals.

  17. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, David A.; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; McCoey, Julia M.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Hall, Liam T.; Petrou, Steven; Scholten, Robert E.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect, x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. Here we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100 × 100 μm2 with sub-micron spatial resolution at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate an all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-μT sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals. PMID:26972730

  18. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  19. Natural language processing and visualization in the molecular imaging domain.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, P Karina; Tao, Ying; Millar, William S; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Xu, Hua; Yu, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Lussier, Yves A; Friedman, Carol

    2007-06-01

    Molecular imaging is at the crossroads of genomic sciences and medical imaging. Information within the molecular imaging literature could be used to link to genomic and imaging information resources and to organize and index images in a way that is potentially useful to researchers. A number of natural language processing (NLP) systems are available to automatically extract information from genomic literature. One existing NLP system, known as BioMedLEE, automatically extracts biological information consisting of biomolecular substances and phenotypic data. This paper focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE to the molecular imaging domain. In order to adapt BioMedLEE for this domain, we extend an existing molecular imaging terminology and incorporate it into BioMedLEE. BioMedLEE's performance is assessed with a formal evaluation study. The system's performance, measured as recall and precision, is 0.74 (95% CI: [.70-.76]) and 0.70 (95% CI [.63-.76]), respectively. We adapt a JAVA viewer known as PGviewer for the simultaneous visualization of images with NLP extracted information.

  20. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-09

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions.

  1. DANCING WITH THE ELECTRONS: TIME-DOMAIN AND CW IN VIVO EPR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the development of imaging the distribution of unpaired electrons in living systems and the functional and the potential diagnostic dimensions of such an imaging process, using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI), is traced from its origins with emphasis on our own work. The importance of EPR imaging stems from the fact that many paramagnetic probes show oxygen dependent spectral broadening. Assessment of in vivo oxygen concentration is an important factor in radiation oncology in treatment-planning and monitoring treatment-outcome. The emergence of narrow-line trairylmethyl based, bio-compatible spin probes has enabled the development of radiofrequency time-domain EPRI. Spectral information in time-domain EPRI can be achieved by generating a time sequence of T2* or T2 weighted images. Progress in CW imaging has led to the use of rotating gradients, more recently rapid scan with direct detection, and a combination of all the three. Very low field MRI employing Dynamic Nuclear polarization (Overhauser effect) is also employed for monitoring tumor hypoxia, and re-oxygenation in vivo. We have also been working on the co-registration of MRI and time domain EPRI on mouse tumor models at 300 MHz using a specially designed resonator assembly. The mapping of the unpaired electron distribution and unraveling the spectral characteristics by using magnetic resonance in presence of stationary and rotating gradients in indeed ‘dancing with the (unpaired) electrons’, metaphorically speaking. PMID:22025900

  2. Origin and tailoring of the antiferromagnetic domain structure in α-Fe2O3 thin films unraveled by statistical analysis of dichroic spectromicroscopy (x-ray photoemission electron microscopy) images.

    PubMed

    Bezencenet, Odile; Bonamy, Daniel; Belkhou, Rachid; Ohresser, Philippe; Barbier, Antoine

    2011-03-11

    The magnetic microstructure and domain wall distribution of antiferromagnetic α-Fe2O3 epitaxial layers is determined by statistical image analyses. Using dichroic spectromicroscopy images, we demonstrate that the domain structure is statistically invariant with thickness and that the antiferromagnetic domain structure of the thin films is inherited from the ferrimagnetic precursor layer one, even after complete transformation into antiferromagnetic α-Fe2O3. We show that modifying the magnetic domain structure of the precursor layer is a genuine way to tune the magnetic domain structure and domain walls of the antiferromagnetic layers.

  3. Mirror-image-induced magnetic modes.

    PubMed

    Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Shi, Lei; Tuzer, Umut; Fenollosa, Roberto; Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Quidant, Romain; Meseguer, Francisco

    2013-01-22

    Reflection in a mirror changes the handedness of the real world, and right-handed objects turn left-handed and vice versa (M. Gardner, The Ambidextrous Universe, Penguin Books, 1964). Also, we learn from electromagnetism textbooks that a flat metallic mirror transforms an electric charge into a virtual opposite charge. Consequently, the mirror image of a magnet is another parallel virtual magnet as the mirror image changes both the charge sign and the curl handedness. Here we report the dramatic modification in the optical response of a silicon nanocavity induced by the interaction with its image through a flat metallic mirror. The system of real and virtual dipoles can be interpreted as an effective magnetic dipole responsible for a strong enhancement of the cavity scattering cross section.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Rosa Delia Delgado; Durán, Bernando Boleaga; Lujambio, Perla Salgado

    2014-06-01

    Cysticercosis in one of the most common parasitic infections in the central nervous system. The complex and unpredictable nature of the host immune reaction against cysticercosis as well as the pleomorphism of your injuries make the disease neurocysticercosis interesting and fascinating to study. Imaging studies play an important role in the diagnosis of this disease. Advanced imaging techniques have improved detection and visualization of scolex cysts extraparenchymal spaces.

  5. Bi-directional magnetic domain wall shift register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D. E.; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2010-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through ferromagnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years [1,2]. Here we experimentally demonstrate a shift register based on an open-ended chain of ferromagnetic NOT gates. When used in combination with a globally applied magnetic field such devices can support bi-directional data flow [3]. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable NiFe nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Up to eight data bits are electrically input to the device, stored for extended periods without power supplied to the device, and then output using either a first in first out or a last in first out mode of operation. Compared to traditional electronic transistor-based circuits, the inherent bi-directionality afforded by these DW logic gates offers a range of devices that are reversible and not limited to only one mode of operation. [1] S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004) [2] D. A. Allwod, et al., Science 309 (5741), 1688 (2005) [3] L. O'Brien, et al. accepted for publication in APL (2009)

  6. Reconfigurable magnetic logic based on the energetics of pinned domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López González, Diego; Casiraghi, Arianna; Van de Wiele, Ben; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    A magnetic logic concept based on magnetic switching in three stripe domains separated by pinned magnetic domain walls is proposed. The relation between the inputs and the output of the logic operator is determined by the energetics of the domain walls, which can be switched between two distinctive states by an external magnetic field. Together with magnetic read-out along two orthogonal directions, non-volatile AND, OR, NAND, and NOR gates can be created. The logic concept is experimentally demonstrated using CoFeB films on BaTiO3 substrates, and micromagnetic simulations are used to analyze the energetics of the system.

  7. Quantification of magnetic domain disorder and correlations in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayers by neutron reflectometry

    PubMed

    Langridge; Schmalian; Marrows; Dekadjevi; Hickey

    2000-12-04

    The in-plane correlation lengths and angular dispersion of magnetic domains in a transition metal multilayer have been studied using off-specular neutron reflectometry techniques. A theoretical framework considering both structural and magnetic disorder has been developed, quantitatively connecting the observed scattering to the in-plane correlation length and the dispersion of the local magnetization vector about the mean macroscopic direction. The antiferromagnetic domain structure is highly vertically correlated throughout the multilayer. We are easily able to relate the neutron determined magnetic domain dispersion to magnetization and magnetoresistance experiments.

  8. Magnetic domain pattern in hierarchically twinned epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films.

    PubMed

    Diestel, Anett; Neu, Volker; Backen, Anja; Schultz, Ludwig; Fähler, Sebastian

    2013-07-03

    Magnetic shape memory alloys exhibit a hierarchically twinned microstructure, which has been examined thoroughly in epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films. Here we analyze the consequences of this 'twin within twins' microstructure on the magnetic domain pattern. Atomic and magnetic force microscopy are used to probe the correlation between the martensitic microstructure and magnetic domains. We examine the consequences of different twin boundary orientations with respect to the substrate normal as well as variant boundaries between differently aligned twinned laminates. A detailed micromagnetic analysis is given which describes the influence of the finite film thickness on the formation of magnetic band domains in these multiferroic materials.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Spinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kawakyu-O'Connor, Daniel; Bordia, Ritu; Nicola, Refky

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine is increasingly being used in the evaluation of spinal emergencies because it is highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of acute conditions of the spine. The prompt and accurate recognition allows for appropriate medical and surgical intervention. This article reviews the MR imaging features of common emergent conditions, such as spinal trauma, acute disc herniation, infection, and tumors. In addition, we describe common MR imaging sequences, discuss challenges encountered in emergency imaging of the spine, and illustrate multiple mimics of acute conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  11. Regulated magnetic domains and high-frequency property in magnetic materials with columnar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cai; Wei, Wenwen; Jiang, Changjun

    2015-10-01

    The regulation of magnetic domains and high-frequency property in Fe20Ni80 thin films sputtered on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with different apertures and a Si substrate were investigated. The obvious stripe domain structure was observed in FeNi thin film sputtered on AAO (pore in diameter d ~ 20 nm) substrate. The distinct cross-sectional columnar structures prepared on three different substrates and measured by scanning electron microscope were shown, which arose from different growth mechanisms on various kinds of substrates. The structure of AAO substrate could modulate the growth mechanism of thin films and the appearance of stripe domains structure. In addition, the resonant frequency was enhanced in FeNi thin film prepared on AAO ( d ~ 20 nm) substrate.

  12. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kenya Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  13. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Domain decomposition methods for solving an image problem

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, W.K.; Tong, C.S.

    1994-12-31

    The domain decomposition method is a technique to break up a problem so that ensuing sub-problems can be solved on a parallel computer. In order to improve the convergence rate of the capacitance systems, pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods are commonly used. In the last decade, most of the efficient preconditioners are based on elliptic partial differential equations which are particularly useful for solving elliptic partial differential equations. In this paper, the authors apply the so called covering preconditioner, which is based on the information of the operator under investigation. Therefore, it is good for various kinds of applications, specifically, they shall apply the preconditioned domain decomposition method for solving an image restoration problem. The image restoration problem is to extract an original image which has been degraded by a known convolution process and additive Gaussian noise.

  15. Microcirculation monitoring with real time spatial frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinlin; Cao, Zili; Lin, Weihao; Zhu, Danfeng; Zhu, Xiuwei; Zeng, Bixin; Xu, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) study of local hemodynamics in the forearm of healthy volunteers performing paced breathing. Real time Single Snapshot Multiple Frequency Demodulation - Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SSMD-SFDI) was used to map the optical properties of the subsurface of the forearm continuously. The oscillations of the concentrations of deoxy- and oxyhemoglobin at the subsurface of the forearm induced by paced breathing are found to be close to out-of-phase, attributed to the dominance of the blood flow modulation by paced breathing. The properties of local microcirculation including the blood transit times through capillaries and venules are extracted by fitting to Simplified Hemodynamics Model. Our preliminary results suggest that the real time SSMD-SFDI platform may serve as one effective imaging modality for microcirculation monitoring.

  16. Frequency-domain imaging of thick tissues using a CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Todd E.; Gratton, Enrico; Maier, John S.

    1992-04-01

    Imaging of thick tissue has been an area of active research during the past several years. Among the methods proposed to deal with the high scattering of biological tissues, the time resolution of a short light probe traversing a tissue seems to be the most promising. Time resolution can be achieved in the time domain using correlated single photon counting techniques or in the frequency domain using phase resolved methods. We have developed a CCD camera system which provides ultra high time resolution on the entire field of view. The phase of the photon diffusion wave traveling in the highly turbid medium can be measured with an accuracy of about one degree at each pixel. The camera has been successfully modulated at frequencies on the order of 100 MHz. At this frequency, one degree of phase shift corresponds to about 30 ps maximum time resolution. Powerful image processing software displays in real time the phase resolved image on the computer screen.

  17. Magnonic holographic imaging of magnetic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, D.; Chiang, H.; Bhowmick, T.; Volodchenkov, A. D.; Ranjbar, M.; Liu, G.; Jiang, C.; Warren, C.; Khivintsev, Y.; Filimonov, Y.; Garay, J.; Lake, R.; Balandin, A. A.; Khitun, A.

    2017-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves. In this approach, the object of interest is placed on top of a magnetic testbed made of material with low spin wave damping. There are micro-antennas incorporated in the testbed. Two of these antennas are used for spin wave excitation while another one is used for the detecting of inductive voltage produced by the interfering spin waves. The measurements are repeated for different phase differences between the spin wave generating antennas which is equivalent to changing the angle of illumination. The collected data appear as a 3D plot - the holographic image of the object. We present experimental data showing magnonic holographic images of a low-coercivity Si/Co sample, a high-coercivity sample made of SrFe12O19 and a diamagnetic copper sample. We also present images of the three samples consisting of a different amount of SrFe12O19 powder. The imaging was accomplished on a Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 testbed at room temperature. The obtained data reveal the unique magnonic signatures of the objects. Experimental data is complemented by the results of numerical modeling, which qualitatively explain the characteristic features of the images. Potentially, magnonic holographic imaging may complement existing techniques and be utilized for non-destructive in-situ magnetic object characterization. The fundamental physical limits of this approach are also discussed.

  18. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  19. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Effects of Magnetic Domain Walls on the Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in NiFe Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-10-01

    We show that a type of magnetic domain walls (DWs) can be monitored by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) measurements due to a specific DW volume depending on the DW type in NiFe magnetic wires. A circular DW injection pad is used to generate DWs at a low magnetic field, resulting in reliable DW introduction into magnetic wires. DW pinning is induced by a change of DW energy at an asymmetric single notch. The injection of DW from the circular pad and its pinning at the notch is observed by using AMR and magnetic force microscope (MFM) measurements. A four-point probe AMR measurement allows us to distinguish the DW type in the switching process because DWs are pinned at the single notch, where voltage probes are closely placed around the notch. Two types of AMR behavior are observed in the AMR measurements, which is owing to a change of DW structures. MFM images and micromagnetic simulations are consistent with the AMR results.

  1. [Development of RF coil of permanent magnet mini-magnetic resonance imager and mouse imaging experiments].

    PubMed

    Hou, Shulian; Xie, Huantong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Shiyu

    2014-10-01

    In the development of radio frequency (RF) coils for better quality of the mini-type permanent magnetic resonance imager for using in the small animal imaging, the solenoid RF coil has a special advantage for permanent magnetic system based on analyses of various types.of RF coils. However, it is not satisfied for imaging if the RF coils are directly used. By theoretical analyses of the magnetic field properties produced from the solenoid coil, the research direction was determined by careful studies to raise further the uniformity of the magnetic field coil, receiving coil sensitivity for signals and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The method had certain advantages and avoided some shortcomings of the other different coil types, such as, birdcage coil, saddle shaped coil and phased array coil by using the alloy materials (from our own patent). The RF coils were designed, developed and made for keeled applicable to permanent magnet-type magnetic resonance imager, multi-coil combination-type, single-channel overall RF receiving coil, and applied for a patent. Mounted on three instruments (25 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.5 T or 1.5 T, and 50 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.48 T), we performed experiments with mice, rats, and nude mice bearing tumors. The experimental results indicated that the RF receiving coil was fully applicable to the permanent magnet-type imaging system.

  2. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M’(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σv, equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI. PMID:22434939

  3. General planar transverse domain walls realized by optimized transverse magnetic field pulses in magnetic biaxial nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Wang, Jianbo; Lu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The statics and field-driven dynamics of transverse domain walls (TDWs) in magnetic nanowires (NWs) have attracted continuous interests because of their theoretical significance and application potential in future magnetic logic and memory devices. Recent results demonstrate that uniform transverse magnetic fields (TMFs) can greatly enhance the wall velocity, meantime leave a twisting in the TDW azimuthal distribution. For application in high-density NW devices, it is preferable to erase the twisting so as to minimize magnetization frustrations. Here we report the realization of a completely planar TDW with arbitrary tilting attitude in a magnetic biaxial NW under a TMF pulse with fixed strength and well-designed orientation profile. We smooth any twisting in the TDW azimuthal plane thus completely decouple the polar and azimuthal degrees of freedom. The analytical differential equation describing the polar angle distribution is derived and the resulting solution is not the Walker-ansatz form. With this TMF pulse comoving, the field-driven dynamics of the planar TDW is investigated with the help of the asymptotic expansion method. It turns out the comoving TMF pulse increases the wall velocity under the same axial driving field. These results will help to design a series of modern magnetic devices based on planar TDWs. PMID:28220893

  4. General planar transverse domain walls realized by optimized transverse magnetic field pulses in magnetic biaxial nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Wang, Jianbo; Lu, Jie

    2017-02-21

    The statics and field-driven dynamics of transverse domain walls (TDWs) in magnetic nanowires (NWs) have attracted continuous interests because of their theoretical significance and application potential in future magnetic logic and memory devices. Recent results demonstrate that uniform transverse magnetic fields (TMFs) can greatly enhance the wall velocity, meantime leave a twisting in the TDW azimuthal distribution. For application in high-density NW devices, it is preferable to erase the twisting so as to minimize magnetization frustrations. Here we report the realization of a completely planar TDW with arbitrary tilting attitude in a magnetic biaxial NW under a TMF pulse with fixed strength and well-designed orientation profile. We smooth any twisting in the TDW azimuthal plane thus completely decouple the polar and azimuthal degrees of freedom. The analytical differential equation describing the polar angle distribution is derived and the resulting solution is not the Walker-ansatz form. With this TMF pulse comoving, the field-driven dynamics of the planar TDW is investigated with the help of the asymptotic expansion method. It turns out the comoving TMF pulse increases the wall velocity under the same axial driving field. These results will help to design a series of modern magnetic devices based on planar TDWs.

  5. General planar transverse domain walls realized by optimized transverse magnetic field pulses in magnetic biaxial nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Wang, Jianbo; Lu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    The statics and field-driven dynamics of transverse domain walls (TDWs) in magnetic nanowires (NWs) have attracted continuous interests because of their theoretical significance and application potential in future magnetic logic and memory devices. Recent results demonstrate that uniform transverse magnetic fields (TMFs) can greatly enhance the wall velocity, meantime leave a twisting in the TDW azimuthal distribution. For application in high-density NW devices, it is preferable to erase the twisting so as to minimize magnetization frustrations. Here we report the realization of a completely planar TDW with arbitrary tilting attitude in a magnetic biaxial NW under a TMF pulse with fixed strength and well-designed orientation profile. We smooth any twisting in the TDW azimuthal plane thus completely decouple the polar and azimuthal degrees of freedom. The analytical differential equation describing the polar angle distribution is derived and the resulting solution is not the Walker-ansatz form. With this TMF pulse comoving, the field-driven dynamics of the planar TDW is investigated with the help of the asymptotic expansion method. It turns out the comoving TMF pulse increases the wall velocity under the same axial driving field. These results will help to design a series of modern magnetic devices based on planar TDWs.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  7. Effect of substrate rotation on domain structure and magnetic relaxation in magnetic antidot lattice arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, Sougata; Mallik, Srijani; Bedanta, Subhankar

    2015-08-28

    Microdimensional triangular magnetic antidot lattice arrays were prepared by varying the speed of substrate rotation. The pre-deposition patterning has been performed using photolithography technique followed by a post-deposition lift-off. Surface morphology taken by atomic force microscopy depicted that the growth mechanism of the grains changes from chain like formation to island structures due to the substrate rotation. Study of magnetization reversal via magneto optic Kerr effect based microscopy revealed reduction of uniaxial anisotropy and increase in domain size with substrate rotation. The relaxation measured under constant magnetic field becomes faster with rotation of the substrate during deposition. The nature of relaxation for the non-rotating sample can be described by a double exponential decay. However, the relaxation for the sample with substrate rotation is well described either by a double exponential or a Fatuzzo-Labrune like single exponential decay, which increases in applied field.

  8. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  9. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-05-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  10. Magnetic domain patterns on strong perpendicular magnetization of Co/Ni multilayers as spintronics materials: I. Dynamic observations.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masahiko; Kudo, Kazue; Kojima, Kazuki; Yasue, Tsuneo; Akutsu, Noriko; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Bauer, Ernst; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2013-10-09

    Materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy can reduce the threshold current density of the current-induced domain wall motion. Co/Ni multilayers show strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and therefore it has become a highly potential candidate of current-induced domain wall motion memories. However, the details of the mechanism which stabilizes the strong perpendicular magnetization in Co/Ni multilayers have not yet been understood. In the present work, the evolution of the magnetic domain structure of multilayers consisting of pairs of 2 or 3 monolayers (ML) of Ni and 1 ML of Co on W(110) was investigated during growth with spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy. An interesting phenomenon, that the magnetic domain structure changed drastically during growth, was revealed. In the early stages of the growth the magnetization alternated between in-plane upon Co deposition and out-of-plane upon Ni deposition. The change of the magnetization direction occurred within a range of less than 0.2 ML during Ni or Co deposition, with break-up of the existing domains followed by growth of new domains. The Ni and Co thickness at which the magnetization direction switched shifted gradually with the number of Co/Ni pairs. Above 3-4 Co/Ni pairs it stayed out-of-plane. The results indicate clearly that the Co-Ni interfaces play the important role of enhancing the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  11. Formation of magnetic single-domain magnetite in ocean ridge basalts with implications for sea-floor magnetism.

    PubMed

    Shau, Y H; Peacor, D R; Essene, E J

    1993-07-16

    Although magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading, the processes by which magnetic phases in ocean floor basalts are formed remain poorly constrained. Scanning transmission electron microscopic observations show that magnetic single-domain magnetite in sheeted dike basalts of Deep Sea Drilling Project hole 504B formed through oxidation-exsolution of ilmenite, exsolution of ulvöspinel lamellae, and recrystallization of end-member magnetite by interaction with convecting fluids. The data suggest that the sheeted dike basalts, with single-domain magnetite as an efficient and stable magnetic carrier, contribute significantly to sea-floor magnetism.

  12. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  13. POLARIZED SPATIAL FREQUENCY DOMAIN IMAGING OF HEART VALVE FIBER STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues’ elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants. PMID:28775394

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging. South Carolina Health Service Area 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Contents include: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI); (Clinical applications, Magnet types, Comparisons with other systems, Manpower, Manufacturers, Contraindications); Analysis of systems; (Availability, Accessibility, Cost, Quality, Continuity, Acceptability).

  15. Angular domain fluorescence imaging for small animal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Belton, Michelle; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel macroscopic fluorescent imaging technique called angular domain fluorescence imaging (ADFI) applicable to the detection of fluorophores embedded in biological tissues. The method exploits the collimation detection capabilities of an angular filter array (AFA). The AFA uses the principle of acceptance angle filtration to extract minimally scattered photons emitted from fluorophores deep within tissue. Our goal was to develop an ADFI system for imaging near-infrared fluorescent markers for small animal imaging. According to the experimental results, the ADFI system offered higher resolution and contrast compared to a conventional lens and lens-pinhole fluorescent detection system. Furthermore, ADFI of a hairless mouse injected with a fluorescent bone marker revealed vertebral structural and morphometric data that correlated well with data derived from volumetric x-ray computed tomography images. The results suggested that ADFI is a useful technique for submillimeter mapping of the distribution of fluorescent biomarkers in small animals.

  16. Direct imaging of structural domains in iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanatar, Makariy

    2010-03-01

    The parent compounds of iron-arsenide superconductors undergo first order structural transition between tetragonal and orthorhombic phases at a temperature, TS. In AFe2As2 (122) compounds (A=Ca,Sr,Ba) this occurs simultaneously with magnetic transition at TM. Using a combination of polarized light microscopy and spatially-resolved high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction we show the orthorhombic distortion leads to the formation of 45^o-type structural domains in both 122 and 1111 single crystals. Domains penetrate through the sample thickness in the c-direction and are not affected by crystal imperfections such as growth terraces. The domains form regular stripe patterns in the plane with a characteristic dimension of 10-50 μm. In a range of low Co-doped compositions structural domains and superconductivity coexist. With the increasing doping level the domain structure becomes more intertwined and fine due to a decrease in the orthorhombic distortion. This results in an energy landscape with maze-like spatial modulations favorable for pinning and intrinsically high critical current densities in the underdoped regime. M.A.Tanatar et al. Phys. Rev. B 79, 180508 (R) (2009). R. Prozorov et al. arxiv: 0909.0923, Phys. Rev.B accepted.

  17. Adjoint time domain method for fluorescent imaging in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Brambilla, Marco; Valentini, Gianluca; Schulz, Ralf B.; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Arridge, Simon R.

    2008-05-01

    Application of adjoint time domain methods to the inverse problem in 3D fluorescence imaging is a novel approach. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach experimentally on the basis of a time gating technique completely in the time domain by using a small number of time windows. The evolution of the fluorescence energy density function inside a highly scattering cylinder was reconstructed together with optical parameters. Reconstructed energy density was used in localizing two fluorescent tubes. Relatively accurate reconstruction demonstrates the effectiveness and the potential of the proposed technique.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need for contrast material. See the MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. ...

  19. Neurosurgical uses for intraprocedural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2005-10-01

    Neurosurgical procedures demand precision, and efforts to create accurate neurosurgical navigation have been central to the profession through its history. Magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided navigation offers the possibility of real-time, image-based stereotactic information for the neurosurgeon, which makes possible a number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This article will review both current options for intraoperative MRI operative suite arrangements and the current therapeutic/diagnostic uses of intraoperative MRI.

  20. Magnetic Hardening from the Suppression of Domain Walls by Nonmagnetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-03-07

    Magnetic domain switching and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with and without nonmagnetic particles were simulated based on the magnetization dynamics of the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. It is found that the 360o Bloch domain wall is the easiest nucleation site for an anti-direction domain. The nucleation occurs by splitting the 360o Bloch domain wall into two 180o domain walls. However, the existence of nonmagnetic particles destroys the 180o domain walls and prevents the formation of 360o Bloch domain walls. Simulation results demonstrate that the impact of nonmagnetic particle on the formation of the 360o Bloch domain wall is a magnetic hardening mechanism.

  1. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Solitary Hypothalamitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing; Wu, Yue; Tang, Ying; Tao, Ran; Ye, Hongying; Yao, Zhenwei

    The study aimed to characterize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of solitary hypothalamitis and evaluate their clinical value in diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, including T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences, of 8 biopsy-proven hypothalamitis lesions were retrospectively analyzed along with MRI features including size, shape, signal intensity, enhancement pattern, correlation with adjacent tissues, and changes in infundibular stalk and sella turcica. Of 8 patients, 5 were diagnosed with lymphoplasmacytic proliferative inflammation, 2 with Langerhans cell histocytosis, and 1 with Rosai-Dorfman disease. Solitary hypothalamitis predominantly demonstrated mild hypointensity/isointensity in T1WI and mild hyperintensity in T2-weighted imaging. In contrast-enhanced T1WI, all lesions showed heterogeneous but primarily peripheral enhancement patterns. Seven cases showed the polygon sign. In T1WI, the normal high signal intensity of neurohypophysis was absent from all patients, with no infundibular stalk thickening. Seven patients presented with optic chiasma edema, and 5 with edema-like changes along the optic tract (OTE), but most showed no visual impairment (n = 7). Magnetic resonance imaging, particularly postcontrast MRI, is the optimal modality for assessment of hypothalamic lesions. Peripheral enhancement with polygon sign and optic tract or chiasm edema without visual impairment are highly suggestive of hypothalamitis.

  3. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  4. Time Domain Filtering of Resolved Images of Sgr A∗

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Hotaka; Gammie, Charles F.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is to provide spatially resolved images of Sgr A*, the source associated with the Galactic Center black hole. Because Sgr A* varies on timescales that are short compared to an EHT observing campaign, it is interesting to ask whether variability contains information about the structure and dynamics of the accretion flow. In this paper, we introduce “time-domain filtering,” a technique to filter time fluctuating images with specific temporal frequency ranges and to demonstrate the power and usage of the technique by applying it to mock millimeter wavelength images of Sgr A*. The mock image data is generated from the General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation and the general relativistic ray-tracing method. We show that the variability on each line of sight is tightly correlated with a typical radius of emission. This is because disk emissivity fluctuates on a timescale of the order of the local orbital period. Time-domain filtered images therefore reflect the model dependent emission radius distribution, which is not accessible in time-averaged images. We show that, in principle, filtered data have the power to distinguish between models with different black-hole spins, different disk viewing angles, and different disk orientations in the sky.

  5. Classification of similar medical images in the lifting domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallee, Chad W.; Tashakkori, Rahman

    2002-03-01

    In this paper lifting is used for similarity analysis and classification of sets of similar medical images. The lifting scheme is an invertible wavelet transform that maps integers to integers. Lifting provides efficient in-place calculation of transfer coefficients and is widely used for analysis of similar image sets. Images of a similar set show high degrees of correlation with one another. The inter-set redundancy can be exploited for the purposes of prediction, compression, feature extraction, and classification. This research intends to show that there is a higher degree of correlation between images of a similar set in the lifting domain than in the pixel domain. Such a high correlation will result in more accurate classification and prediction of images in a similar set. Several lifting schemes from Calderbank-Daubechies-Fauveue's family were used in this research. The research shows that some of these lifting schemes decorrelates the images of similar sets more effectively than others. The research presents the statistical analysis of the data in scatter plots and regression models.

  6. [Surface coils for magnetic-resonance images].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Alfredo Odón; Amador-Baheza, Ricardo; Rojas-Jasso, Rafael; Barrios-Alvarez, Fernando Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico, the development of this important medical imaging technology has been almost non-existing in our country. The very first surface coil prototypes for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging has been developed at the Center of Research in Medical Imaging and Instrumentation of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Iztapalapa). Two surface coil prototypes were built: a) a circular-shaped coil and b) a square-shaped coil for multiple regions of the body, such as heart, brain, knee, hands, and ankles. These coils were tested on the 1.5T imager of the ABC Hospital-Tacubaya, located in Mexico City. Brain images of healthy volunteers were obtained in different orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Since images showed a good-enough clinical quality for diagnosis, it is fair to say that these coil prototypes can be used in the clinical environment, and with small modifications, they can be made compatible with almost any commercial scanner. This type of development can offer new alternatives for further collaboration between the research centers and the radiology community, in the search of new applications and developments of this imaging technique.

  7. Magnetic Images & A Novel Stable Ferro-Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaizhou

    In 2010 the Physics Nobel prize was awarded to A.K. Geim and K. Novoselov [1], famous for their spectacular demonstrations of diamagnetically levitated living animals. My MS research is an investigation to develop a novel magnetic suspension capable of operating under ambient conditions without any cryogenics. The physical problem is to freely suspended an object, the proof mass (PM) in stable equilibrium under the combined actions of gravity and magnetic forces. Earshaws's theorem enunciated in 1842 prohibits such a possibility. After the discovery of diamagnetism by Michael Faraday, Lord Kelvin predicted that diamagnetic systems are immune to this theorem. As the Bohr_Van Leeuwen's theorem proved that the origin of magnetism is quantum mechanical, however, many aspects of magnetic behavior can be treated classically. Recently, Berry, Geim and collaborators [Eur J Phy, 18, 307 (1997); J. of Appld. Phys 87, 6200 (2000)] showed that stability of a diamagnetic PM, or a magnetized PM. The proof masses in this work can be even be unmagnetized still we show that with an appropriate diamagnetic stabilizer equilibrium is achieved along all three Cartesian axes. The forces follow the Bio-Savart field due to localized current loops but at short distances are well represented by algebraic power laws. Experimental procedures for direct measurements of the magnetic image forces and physical modeling will be discussed.

  8. Relaxation time based classification of magnetic resonance brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2015-03-01

    Brain tissue classification in Magnetic Resonance Imaging is useful for a wide range of applications. Within this manuscript a novel approach for brain tissue joint segmentation and classification is presented. Starting from the relaxation time estimation, we propose a novel method for identifying the optimal decision regions. The approach exploits the statistical distribution of the involved signals in the complex domain. The technique, compared to classical threshold based ones, is able to improve the correct classification rate. The effectiveness of the approach is evaluated on a simulated case study.

  9. Employing soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering to study domain sizes and anisotropy in Co/Pd multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagschik, Kai; Frömter, Robert; Bach, Judith; Beyersdorff, Björn; Müller, Leonard; Schleitzer, Stefan; Berntsen, Magnus Hârdensson; Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Viefhaus, Jens; Schneider, Claus Michael; Grübel, Gerhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-10-01

    It is demonstrated that the magnetic diffraction pattern of the isotropic disordered maze pattern is well described utilizing a gamma distribution of domain sizes in a one-dimensional model. From the analysis, the mean domain size and the shape parameter of the distribution are obtained. The model reveals an average domain size that is significantly different from the value that is determined from the peak position of the structure factor in reciprocal space. As a proof of principle, a wedge-shaped (Cot Å/Pd10 Å)8 multilayer film, that covers the thickness range of the spin-reorientation transition, has been used. By means of soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) and imaging techniques the thickness-driven evolution of the magnetic properties of the cobalt layers is explored. It is shown that minute changes of the domain pattern concerning domain size and geometry can be investigated and analyzed due to the high sensitivity and lateral resolution of the XRMS technique. The latter allows for the determination of the magnetic anisotropies of the cobalt layers within a thickness range of a few angstroms.

  10. Image Fusion Algorithms Using Human Visual System in Transform Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadhi, Radhika; Swamy Kilari, Veera; Samayamantula, Srinivas Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The endeavor of digital image fusion is to combine the important visual parts from various sources to advance the visibility eminence of the image. The fused image has a more visual quality than any source images. In this paper, the Human Visual System (HVS) weights are used in the transform domain to select appropriate information from various source images and then to attain a fused image. In this process, mainly two steps are involved. First, apply the DWT to the registered source images. Later, identify qualitative sub-bands using HVS weights. Hence, qualitative sub-bands are selected from different sources to form high quality HVS based fused image. The quality of the HVS based fused image is evaluated with general fusion metrics. The results show the superiority among the state-of-the art resolution Transforms (MRT) such as Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT), Contourlet Transform (CT), and Non Sub Sampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) using maximum selection fusion rule.

  11. AC driven magnetic domain quantification with 5 nm resolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenghua; Li, Xiang; Dong, Dapeng; Liu, Dongping; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2014-01-01

    As the magnetic storage density increases in commercial products, e.g. the hard disc drives, a full understanding of dynamic magnetism in nanometer resolution underpins the development of next-generation products. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Moreover, the dynamic magnetism cannot be characterized because MFM is only sensitive to the static magnetic fields. Here, we develop a side-band magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to locally observe the alternating magnetic fields in nanometer length scales at an operating distance of 1 nm. Variations in alternating magnetic fields and their relating time-variable magnetic domain reversals have been demonstrated by the side-band MFM. The magnetic domain wall motions, relating to the periodical rotation of sample magnetization, are quantified via micromagnetics. Based on the side-band MFM, the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The present technique can be applied to investigate the microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic materials, and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine. PMID:25011670

  12. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection processes.

  13. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  14. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  15. Giant infantile gliosarcoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Onguru, Onder; Chen, Lina

    2008-08-01

    Gliosarcoma is an uncommon variant of glioblastoma multiforme, which is composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous elements. The tumor is rarely encountered in childhood. This case report presents the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of a giant gliosarcoma in a 3-year-old girl. Size and location of the tumor are described.

  16. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Saeed, S R; Birzgalis, A R; Ramsden, R T

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Meniéres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery.

  17. "Anomalous" magnetic fabrics of dikes in the stable single domain/superparamagnetic threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, Carles; Beamud, Elisabet; Garcés, Miguel; Ort, Michael

    2017-04-01

    "Anomalous" magnetic fabrics in dikes that appear to indicate flow into the wall confound many workers. Here, we present extensive magnetic data on five dikes from Tenerife, Canary Islands, and use these to interpret the causes of the anomalous fabrics. Comparison of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anhysteretic magnetization (AARM) results show that, in some cases, the anomalous fabrics are caused by single-domain grains, which produce AMS fabrics perpendicular to the grain elongation, whereas AARM fabrics are parallel. To check this, hysteresis experiments were used to characterize the domain state. These show most are mixtures of pseudo-single-domain or single-domain plus multi-domain particles, but many have wasp-waisted hysteresis loops, likely indicating mixed populations of stable single-domain and superparamagnetic grains. First-order reversal curves were used to better characterize this and show mixtures of stable single-domain and superparamagnetic grains dominate the magnetic signal. Magnetic particles at the stable single-domain/superparamagnetic threshold are unstable at timespans relevant to the analytical techniques, so they produce complicated results. This suggests that anomalous AMS fabrics in dikes cannot simply be attributed to elongated stable single-domain particles and that mixtures of the different grain types can produce hybrid fabrics, in which the fabrics are neither perpendicular or parallel to the dike plane, that are difficult to interpret without extensive magnetic analysis.

  18. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, L. H.; Wang, P. S.; Donahue, M. J.

    1996-04-01

    Metallic biomedical implants, such as aneurysm clips, endoprostheses, and internal orthopedic devices give rise to artifacts in the magnetic resonance image (MRI) of patients. Such artifacts impair the information contained in the image in precisely the region of most interest, namely near the metallic device. Ferromagnetic materials are contraindicated because of the hazards associated with their movement during the MRI procedure. In less-magnetic metals, it has been suggested that the extent of the artifact is related to the magnetic susceptibility of the metal, but no systematic data appear to be available. When the susceptibility is sufficiently small, an additional artifact due to electrical conductivity is observed. We present an initial systematic study of MRI artifacts produced by two low susceptibility metals, titanium (relative permeability μr≊1.0002) and copper (μr≊0.99998), including experimental, theoretical, and computer simulation results.

  19. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions.

  20. Electric-field-driven domain wall dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López González, Diego; Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Van de Wiele, Ben; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Casiraghi, Arianna; Taniyama, Tomoyasu; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2017-03-01

    We report on reversible electric-field-driven magnetic domain wall motion in a Cu/Ni multilayer on a ferroelectric BaTiO3 substrate. In our heterostructure, strain-coupling to ferroelastic domains with in-plane and perpendicular polarization in the BaTiO3 substrate causes the formation of domains with perpendicular and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, respectively, in the Cu/Ni multilayer. Walls that separate magnetic domains are elastically pinned onto ferroelectric domain walls. Using magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy, we demonstrate that out-of-plane electric field pulses across the BaTiO3 substrate move the magnetic and ferroelectric domain walls in unison. Our experiments indicate an exponential increase of domain wall velocity with electric field strength and opposite domain wall motion for positive and negative field pulses. The application of a magnetic field does not affect the velocity of magnetic domain walls, but independently tailors their internal spin structure, causing a change in domain wall dynamics at high velocities.

  1. Chapter 4: Regional magnetic domains of the Circum-Arctic: A framework for geodynamic interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Miller, E.L.; Gaina, C.; Brown, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    We identify and discuss 57 magnetic anomaly pattern domains spanning the Circum-Arctic. The domains are based on analysis of a new Circum-Arctic data compilation. The magnetic anomaly patterns can be broadly related to general geodynamic classification of the crust into stable, deformed (magnetic and nonmagnetic), deep magnetic high, oceanic and large igneous province domains. We compare the magnetic domains with topography/bathymetry, regional geology, regional free air gravity anomalies and estimates of the relative magnetic 'thickness' of the crust. Most of the domains and their geodynamic classification assignments are consistent with their topographic/bathymetric and geological expression. A few of the domains are potentially controversial. For example, the extent of the Iceland Faroe large igneous province as identified by magnetic anomalies may disagree with other definitions for this feature. Also the lack of definitive magnetic expression of oceanic crust in Baffin Bay, the Norwegian-Greenland Sea and the Amerasian Basin is at odds with some previous interpretations. The magnetic domains and their boundaries provide clues for tectonic models and boundaries within this poorly understood portion of the globe. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  2. Application of image processing for terahertz time domain spectroscopy imaging quantitative detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-juan; Wang, Sheng; Ren, Jiao-jiao; Zhou, Ming-xing; Zhao, Duo

    2015-03-01

    According to nondestructive testing principle for the terahertz time domain spectroscopy Imaging, using digital image processing techniques, through Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system collected images and two-dimensional datas and using a range of processing methods, including selecting regions of interest, contrast enhancement, edge detection, and defects being detected. In the paper, Matlab programming is been use to defect recognition of Terahertz, by figuring out the pixels to determine defects defect area and border length, roundness, diameter size. Through the experiment of the qualitative analysis and quantitative calculation of Matlab image processing, this method of detection of defects of geometric dimension of the sample to get a better result.

  3. Antiphase domains and reverse thermoremanent magnetism in ilmenite-hematite minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawson, C.A.; Nord, G.L.; Dowty, Eric; Hargraves, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of synthetic ilmenite-hematite samples by transmission electron microscopy has for the first time revealed the presence of well-defined antiphase domains and antiphase domain boundaries in this mineral system. Samples quenched from 1300??C have a high density of domain boundaries, whereas samples quenched from 900??C have a much lower density. Only the high-temperature samples acquire reverse thermoremanent magnetism when cooled in an applied magnetic field. The presence of a high density of domain boundaries seems to be a necessary condition for the acquisition of reverse thermoremanent magnetism.

  4. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomicmagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-05-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive andversatile methodology that has been applied in many disciplines1,2. Thedetection sensitivity of conventional Faraday detection of MRI depends onthe strength of the static magnetic field and the sample "fillingfactor." Under circumstances where only low magnetic fields can be used,and for samples with low spin density or filling factor, the conventionaldetection sensitivity is compromised. Alternative detection methods withhigh sensitivity in low magnetic fields are thus required. Here we showthe first use of a laser-based atomic magnetometer for MRI detection inlow fields. Our technique also employs remote detection which physicallyseparates the encoding and detection steps3-5, to improve the fillingfactor of the sample. Potentially inexpensive and using a compactapparatus, our technique provides a novel alternative for MRI detectionwith substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution whileavoiding the need for cryogenics.

  6. Influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamus, Z.; Cieplak, Marta Z.; Kończykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-02-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the influence of the magnetic domain distribution on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers. Two bilayers are built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in-between to avoid proximity effect. The magnetic domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayers using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The Pt thickness is different in the two bilayers, resulting in different width and length of the domains, which profoundly affects vortex dynamics. We show that narrow short domains lead to strong confinement of vortices at the sample edge, while narrow elongated domains of uniform width induce smaller confinement and easy vortex entry. Large enhancement of flux pinning and critical current density, by a factor of more than 7, is observed in the last case, while the former results in smaller enhancement. When domains are wide, the disorder in the domain widths becomes beneficial for larger enhancement of pinning, while more uniform distribution of domain widths results in a precipitous drop of the enhancement. The analysis of these results suggests that with increasing domain width, a transition occurs from vortex chains pinned by narrow domains to disordered triangular vortex lattice pinned by a maze of multiply interconnected magnetic domains.

  7. Suppression of the intrinsic stochastic pinning of domain walls in magnetic nanostripes

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanofabrication has allowed the development of new concepts such as magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls on magnetic nanostripes. One of the issues that has to be solved before devices can meet the market demands is the stochastic behaviour of the domain wall movement in magnetic nanostripes. Here we show that the stochastic nature of the domain wall motion in permalloy nanostripes can be suppressed at very low fields (0.6–2.7 Oe). We also find different field regimes for this stochastic motion that match well with the domain wall propagation modes. The highest pinning probability is found around the precessional mode and, interestingly, it does not depend on the external field in this regime. These results constitute an experimental evidence of the intrinsic nature of the stochastic pinning of domain walls in soft magnetic nanostripes. PMID:22127058

  8. Current-driven magnetic domain wall motion and its real-time detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Yoshimura, Yoko; Ono, Teruo

    2017-08-01

    Current-controlled magnetic domain wall motion has opened the possibility of a novel type of shift register memory device, which has been optimistically predicted to replace existing magnetic memories. Owing to this promising prospect, intensive work has been carried out during the last few decades. In this article, we first review the progress in the study of current-induced magnetic domain wall motion. Underlying mechanisms behind the domain wall motion, which have been discovered during last few decades, as well as technological achievements are presented. We then present our recent experimental results on the real-time detection of current-driven multiple magnetic domain wall motion, which directly demonstrates the operation of a magnetic domain wall shift register.

  9. Suppression of the intrinsic stochastic pinning of domain walls in magnetic nanostripes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L

    2011-11-29

    Nanofabrication has allowed the development of new concepts such as magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls on magnetic nanostripes. One of the issues that has to be solved before devices can meet the market demands is the stochastic behaviour of the domain wall movement in magnetic nanostripes. Here we show that the stochastic nature of the domain wall motion in permalloy nanostripes can be suppressed at very low fields (0.6-2.7 Oe). We also find different field regimes for this stochastic motion that match well with the domain wall propagation modes. The highest pinning probability is found around the precessional mode and, interestingly, it does not depend on the external field in this regime. These results constitute an experimental evidence of the intrinsic nature of the stochastic pinning of domain walls in soft magnetic nanostripes.

  10. Achievement of Diverse Domain Structures in Soft Magnetic Thin Film through Adjusting Intrinsic Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Juanying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Li, Fashen

    2017-01-01

    Oriented soft magnetic hcp-Co1 - x Ir x films with a fixed thickness of 120 nm were fabricated. All prepared films exhibit soft magnetic properties but various magnetocrystalline anisotropies with the variation of Ir content. The measured data shows that diverse domain structures including the Néel wall, Bloch wall, and stripe domains present in a fixed film thickness. It is singular for the single-layer soft magnetic film to possess diverse domains in a fixed thickness. This phenomenon was explained by introducing intrinsic magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into soft magnetic films rather than the structural parameters of the film, inner stress, and microstructure effect.

  11. Domain wall pinning controlled by the magnetic field of four nanoparticles in a ferromagnetic nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, O. L.; Skorokhodov, E. V.; Mironov, V. L.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the domain wall pinning in a planar ferromagnetic system consisting of a nanowire and four rectangular uniformly magnetized nanoparticles located at an angle to the nanowire axis. Based on the calculations of the interaction energy of the domain wall with stray fields of nanoparticles and the micromagnetic simulation, it has been demonstrated that, in this system, there are different variants of the domain wall pinning, which are determined by the relative orientation of the magnetic moments of nanoparticles and the magnetization of the nanowire. The possibility of the creation of magnetic logic cells based on the structures under consideration has been discussed.

  12. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  13. Achievement of Diverse Domain Structures in Soft Magnetic Thin Film through Adjusting Intrinsic Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Juanying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Li, Fashen

    2017-12-01

    Oriented soft magnetic hcp-Co1 - x Ir x films with a fixed thickness of 120 nm were fabricated. All prepared films exhibit soft magnetic properties but various magnetocrystalline anisotropies with the variation of Ir content. The measured data shows that diverse domain structures including the Néel wall, Bloch wall, and stripe domains present in a fixed film thickness. It is singular for the single-layer soft magnetic film to possess diverse domains in a fixed thickness. This phenomenon was explained by introducing intrinsic magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into soft magnetic films rather than the structural parameters of the film, inner stress, and microstructure effect.

  14. Domain wall trapping and influence of the asymmetry in magnetic nanoring studied by micromagnetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, X H; Wang, W Z; Kong, T F; Lew, W S

    2011-03-01

    We have studied the magnetic switching behavior of permalloy asymmetric rings using micromagnetic simulations. The simulation results have revealed that a domain wall trapping feature is present at the narrow arm of the asymmetric ring. This trapping feature is obtained via precise control of the lateral geometric features, the ring asymmetry and the film thickness. Our results show that the trapped domain walls do not annihilate until the magnetization in the wide arm is reversed under a relatively large magnetic field. Furthermore, the magnetic field strength needed to annihilate the domain wall is found to be decreasing with larger asymmetry ratio.

  15. Magneto-optic imaging: Normal and parallel field components of in-plane magnetized samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, H.; Bekeris, V.; Thibeault, M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2007-06-01

    Magneto-optical (MO) imaging has become a powerful tool for determining magnetic properties of materials by detecting the stray magnetic fields. The technique consists in measuring the Faraday rotation, θF, in the light polarization plane when light travels through a transparent sensitive garnet (ferrite garnet film, FGF) placed in close contact to the sample. For in-plane magnetized samples, the MO image is not trivially related to the sample magnetization, and to contribute to this understanding we have imaged commercial audio tapes in which computer-generated functions were recorded. We present MO images of periodically in-plane magnetized tapes with square, sawtooth, triangular and sinusoidal waveforms, for which we analytically calculate the perpendicular and parallel stray magnetic field components generated by the tape. As a first approach we correlate the measured light intensity with the perpendicular magnetic field component at the FGF, and we show that it can be approximated to the gradient of the sample magnetization. A more detailed calculation, taking into account the effect of both field components in the Faraday rotation, is presented and satisfactorily compared with the obtained MO images. The presence of magnetic domains in the garnet is shown to be related to the change in sign of the parallel component of the stray magnetic field, which can be approximated to the second derivative of the sample magnetization.

  16. Time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging applied to biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Elson, Dan; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Munro, Ian; Reavell, Fred; Siegel, Jan; Suhling, Klaus; Tadrous, Paul; Benninger, Richard; Lanigan, Peter; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Treanor, Bebhinn; Webb, Stephen; Sandison, Ann; Wallace, Andrew; Davis, Dan; Lever, John; Neil, Mark; Phillips, David; Stamp, Gordon; French, Paul

    2004-08-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is a functional imaging methodology that can provide information, not only concerning the localisation of specific fluorophores, but also about the local fluorophore environment. It may be implemented in scanning confocal or multi-photon microscopes, or in wide-field microscopes and endoscopes. When applied to tissue autofluorescence, it reveals intrinsic excellent contrast between different types and states of tissue. This article aims to review our recent progress in developing time-domain FLIM technology for microscopy and endoscopy and applying it to biological tissue.

  17. A symmetrical image encryption scheme in wavelet and time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuling; Du, Minghui; Liu, Junxiu

    2015-02-01

    There has been an increasing concern for effective storages and secure transactions of multimedia information over the Internet. Then a great variety of encryption schemes have been proposed to ensure the information security while transmitting, but most of current approaches are designed to diffuse the data only in spatial domain which result in reducing storage efficiency. A lightweight image encryption strategy based on chaos is proposed in this paper. The encryption process is designed in transform domain. The original image is decomposed into approximation and detail components using integer wavelet transform (IWT); then as the more important component of the image, the approximation coefficients are diffused by secret keys generated from a spatiotemporal chaotic system followed by inverse IWT to construct the diffused image; finally a plain permutation is performed for diffusion image by the Logistic mapping in order to reduce the correlation between adjacent pixels further. Experimental results and performance analysis demonstrate the proposed scheme is an efficient, secure and robust encryption mechanism and it realizes effective coding compression to satisfy desirable storage.

  18. A Time Domain Fluorescence Tomography System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Scott B.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a time domain diffuse fluorescence tomography system for whole body small animal imaging. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free space using ultrashort laser pulses and noncontact detection using a gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Mouse shaped epoxy phantoms, with embedded fluorescent inclusions, were used to verify the performance of a recently developed asymptotic lifetime-based tomography algorithm. The asymptotic algorithm is based on a multiexponential analysis of the decay portion of the data. The multiexponential model is shown to enable the use of a global analysis approach for a robust recovery of the lifetime components present within the imaging medium. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume were acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in a Monte-Carlo model of photon propagation in tissue. The tomography results show that the asymptotic approach is able to separate axially located fluorescent inclusions centered at depths of 4 and 10 mm from the surface of the mouse phantom. The fluorescent inclusions had distinct lifetimes of 0.5 and 0.95 ns. The inclusions were nearly overlapping along the measurement axis and shown to be not resolvable using continuous wave (CW) methods. These results suggest the practical feasibility and advantages of a time domain approach for whole body small animal fluorescence molecular imaging, particularly with the use of lifetime as a contrast mechanism. PMID:18672432

  19. Real-time photo-magnetic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nouizi, Farouk; Erkol, Hakan; Luk, Alex; Unlu, Mehmet B.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-01-01

    We previously introduced a new high resolution diffuse optical imaging modality termed, photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI irradiates the object under investigation with near-infrared light and monitors the variations of temperature using magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT). In this paper, we present a real-time PMI image reconstruction algorithm that uses analytic methods to solve the forward problem and assemble the Jacobian matrix much faster. The new algorithm is validated using real MRT measured temperature maps. In fact, it accelerates the reconstruction process by more than 250 times compared to a single iteration of the FEM-based algorithm, which opens the possibility for the real-time PMI. PMID:27867701

  20. Magnetic Transitions and Domain Properties in Terbium, Dysprosium and Gadolinium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Timothy John

    The magnetic behaviour of the heavy rare earth metals Tb and Dy has been examined by a variety of ac techniques based on phase sensitive detection methods. Measurements of the ac magnetic susceptibility (chi), the transient enhancement of (chi), its temperature modulation signal. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). and ac specific heat have been made on a high purity Tb single crystal (99.98 (wt)% pure) and polycrystalline Tb and Dy samples over the temperature range 4.2 - 300 K. In particular the ferromagnetic (T < T(,c)) and antiferromagnetic (T(,c) < T < T(,N)) regions of both materials (Tb: Tc = 221 K, T(,N) = 229 K; Dy: T(,c) (TURN) 85 K, T(,N) = 178 K) have been studied in low applied ac magnetic fields (< 1000 Am('-1)). The results provide strong evidence for the existence of spiral spin antiferromagnetic (AF) domains in the AF region of rare earth helical antiferromagnets. A discontinuous change in (chi) was observed at the ferromagnetic-AF transition in the Tb single crystal. Hysteresis in this transition temperature (T(,+) (warming) (TURNEQ) T(,-) (cooling) + 0.2 K), indicated by the susceptibility measurements, was confirmed by ac and dc specific heat results. The susceptibility and specific heat results confirmed the first order nature of the ferromagnetic-AF transition in Tb. A latent heat value of L = 13 (+OR-) 3 J mole('-1) was derived from the dc specific heat measurements of this study. A theoretical examination of the effects of a distribution of T(,c) values on the high temperature critical susceptibility exponent (gamma) was undertaken. Both analytical and numerical solutions for (gamma) were derived for the fitting of broadened susceptibility data to the simple critical equation. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). An experimental situation was simulated by fitting (chi) data which was broadened by a distribution of T(,c) values. It was concluded that, if a (gamma) value deduced from fitting. experimental

  1. Finding the Secret of Image Saliency in the Frequency Domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Duan, Ling-Yu; Chen, Xiaowu; Huang, Tiejun; Tian, Yonghong

    2015-12-01

    There are two sides to every story of visual saliency modeling in the frequency domain. On the one hand, image saliency can be effectively estimated by applying simple operations to the frequency spectrum. On the other hand, it is still unclear which part of the frequency spectrum contributes the most to popping-out targets and suppressing distractors. Toward this end, this paper tentatively explores the secret of image saliency in the frequency domain. From the results obtained in several qualitative and quantitative experiments, we find that the secret of visual saliency may mainly hide in the phases of intermediate frequencies. To explain this finding, we reinterpret the concept of discrete Fourier transform from the perspective of template-based contrast computation and thus develop several principles for designing the saliency detector in the frequency domain. Following these principles, we propose a novel approach to design the saliency detector under the assistance of prior knowledge obtained through both unsupervised and supervised learning processes. Experimental results on a public image benchmark show that the learned saliency detector outperforms 18 state-of-the-art approaches in predicting human fixations.

  2. Demonstration of Time Domain Multiplexed Readout for Magnetically Coupled Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porst, J.-P.; Adams, J. S.; Balvin, M.; Bandler, S.; Beyer, J.; Busch, S. E.; Drung, D.; Seidel, G. M.; Smith, S. J.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically coupled calorimeters (MCC) have extremely high potential for x-ray applications due to the inherent high energy resolution capability and being non-dissipative. Although very high energy-resolution has been demonstrated, until now there has been no demonstration of multiplexed read-out. We report on the first realization of a time domain multiplexed (TDM) read-out. While this has many similarities with TDM of transition-edge-sensors (TES), for MGGs the energy resolution is limited by the SQUID read-out noise and requires the well established scheme to be altered in order to minimize degradation due to noise aliasing effects. In cur approach, each pixel is read out by a single first stage SQUID (SQ1) that is operated in open loop. The outputs of the SQ1 s are low-pass filtered with an array of low cross-talk inductors, then fed into a single-stage SQUID TD multiplexer. The multiplexer is addressed from room temperature and read out through a single amplifier channel. We present results achieved with a new detector platform. Noise performance is presented and compared to expectations. We have demonstrated multiplexed X-ray spectroscopy at 5.9keV with delta_FWHM=10eV. In an optimized setup, we show it is possible to multiplex 32 detectors without significantly degrading the Intrinsic detector resolution.

  3. Evolution of magnetic properties and domain structures in Co/Ni multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianpeng; Jin, Tianli; Wang, Ying; Ren, Yang; Wang, Lianwen; Bai, Jianmin; Cao, Jiangwei

    2016-11-01

    Co/Ni multilayers with different layer thicknesses and repetition numbers were fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The films with appropriate Co and Ni layer thicknesses show strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The results of magnetic force microscopy indicate that the films show a maze domain in the demagnetization state and that the domain width decreases with increasing layer thickness and repetition number. The magnetostatic and domain wall energies of the film stack were calculated on the basis of an irregular maze domain pattern. The results suggest that the magnetostatic energy is the main reason for the variation of the domain width in Co/Ni multilayers.

  4. Dynamics of magnetic domain wall motion after nucleation: dependence on the wall energy.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, K; Kuch, W; Vogel, J; Romanens, F; Pizzini, S; Camarero, J; Bonfim, M; Kirschner, J

    2006-03-10

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall motion in the FeNi layer of a FeNi/Al2O3/Co trilayer has been investigated by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, photoelectron emission microscopy, and a stroboscopic pump-probe technique. The nucleation of domains and subsequent expansion by domain wall motion in the FeNi layer during nanosecond-long magnetic field pulses was observed in the viscous regime up to the Walker limit field. We attribute an observed delay of domain expansion to the influence of the domain wall energy that acts against the domain expansion and that plays an important role when domains are small.

  5. Ferritin protein imaging and detection by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Zheng, Bin; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-03-14

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to image and detect ferritin proteins and the strength of the magnetic signal is discussed, revealing a large workable lift height between the magnetic tip and the ferritin sample.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols for paediatric neuroradiology

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Clare; Gunny, Roxanne; Jones, Rod; Cox, Tim; Chong, Wui Khean

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, radiologists are encouraged to have protocols for all imaging studies and to include imaging guidelines in care pathways set up by the referring clinicians. This is particularly advantageous in MRI where magnet time is limited and a radiologist’s review of each patient’s images often results in additional sequences and longer scanning times without the advantage of improvement in diagnostic ability. The difficulties of imaging small children and the challenges presented to the radiologist as the brain develops are discussed. We present our protocols for imaging the brain and spine of children based on 20 years experience of paediatric neurological MRI. The protocols are adapted to suit children under the age of 2 years, small body parts and paediatric clinical scenarios. PMID:17487479

  7. Basic study of magnetic microwires for sensor applications: Variety of magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhik, Alexander; Zhukov, Arcady; Gonzalez, Julian; Stupakiewicz, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    We examine magnetic glass-coated microwires used for magnetic sensors. Images of domain structures and magnetization reversal were obtained with magneto-optical Kerr microscopy. Of particular importance were temperature-induced transformations of surface magnetic structures. Different surface magnetic domains coexist, characterized by various domain periods, magnetization directions, and nobilities of domain walls.

  8. Correlation between magnetic interactions and domain structure in A1 FePt ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, N.; Sallica Leva, E.; Valente, R. C.; Vásquez Mansilla, M.; Gómez, J.; Milano, J.; Butera, A.

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the relationship between the domain structure and the magnetic interactions in a series of FePt ferromagnetic thin films of varying thickness. As-made films grow in the magnetically soft and chemically disordered A1 phase that may have two distinct domain structures. Above a critical thickness dcr ˜ 30 nm the presence of an out of plane anisotropy induces the formation of stripes, while for d < dcr planar domains occur. Magnetic interactions have been characterized using the well known DC demagnetization - isothermal remanent magnetization remanence protocols, δM plots, and magnetic viscosity measurements. We have observed a strong correlation between the domain configuration and the sign of the magnetic interactions. Planar domains are associated with positive exchange-like interactions, while stripe domains have a strong negative dipolar-like contribution. In this last case we have found a close correlation between the interaction parameter and the surface dipolar energy of the stripe domain structure. Using time dependent magnetic viscosity measurements, we have also estimated an average activation volume for magnetic reversal, ⟨Vac⟩˜1.37×104 nm3, which is approximately independent of the film thickness or the stripe period.

  9. Domain wall motion and Barkhausen effect in magnetic nanoparticles for EOR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Mirza Khurram; Soleimani, Hassan; Yahya, Noorhana

    2016-11-01

    The domain wall motion in magnetic nanoparticles is a useful parameter of study. The subject of this research is to study of the phenomenon of discontinuous domain wall motion, or the Barkhausen Effect in magnetic nanoparticles. In this work hematite (Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using sol-gel auto-combustion and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) for crystal structure, morphology, shape, size and magnetic properties respectively. The FESEM and TEM results show that the particles are spherical in nature and average size is 60nm that is suitable for domain walls and barkhuasen effect. The VSM results show high coercivity 175 Oe and low saturation magnetization due to domain wall pinning and barkhausen effect. The size and magnetic properties reveals the existence of domain walls in the synthesized sample. The magnetic properties confirm the energy losses due to domain wall pinning, discontinuous domain rotation or barkhausen effect during magnetization which is useful for oil-water interfacial tension reduction and viscosity of oil. The high surface charge of magnetic nanoparticles and adsorption at the rock surface is useful for wettability alteration of rocks.

  10. Image contrast enhancement in angular domain optical imaging of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2008-12-22

    Imaging structures within a turbid medium using Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter array to separate weakly scattered photons from those that are highly scattered. At high scattering coefficients, ADI contrast declines due to the large fraction of non-uniform background scattered light still within the acceptance angle. This paper demonstrates various methods to enhance the image contrast in ADI. Experiments where a wedge prism was used to deviate the laser source so that scattered photons could be imaged and subtracted from the image obtained by standard ADI provided the greatest improvement in image contrast.

  11. Quantification of magnetic nanoparticles with broadband measurements of magnetic susceptibility in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto; An, Zhisheng; Chang, Hong; Qiang, Xiaoke

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of low-field magnetic susceptibility over a wide band of frequencies spanning four orders of magnitude is a useful method for the assessment of the grain size distribution of ultrafine magnetic particles smaller than the SP/SSD boundary. This method has been applied to a loess/paleosol sequence at Luochuan in the Chinese Loess Plateau. The studied succession consists of sequences from the latest paleosol unit to the upper part of the loess unit, spanning the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Reconstructed grain size distributions (GSDs) consist of volume fractions on the order of 10-24 m3, and the mean GSDs are modal but with distinctive skewness among the loess, the weakly developed paleosol (weak paleosol), and the mature paleosol. This indicates that the mean volume of SP particles in this sequence tends to increase during the transition from the loess to the paleosol. An index, defined as the difference between χ130 at the lowest (130 Hz) and χ500k at the highest (500 kHz) frequencies normalized to χ130, is judged to be a more suitable index than previous frequency dependence parameters for the concentration of SP particles. This index has a strong correlation with χ130, showing a continuous 'growth curve' with the rate of increase being highest for the loess, moderate for the weak paleosol, and saturated for the paleosol. The characteristic curve suggests that smaller SP particles are preferentially formed in the earlier stage of pedogenesis rather than the later phase when even larger particles are formed in the mature paleosol. These results demonstrate that the broad-band-frequency susceptibility measurement will be useful for the quantitative assessment of magnetic nanoparticles in soils and sediments. Additionally, we point out that the measurement in the frequency domain generally requires time and may not be most suitable to routine measurements. We thus propose an alternative manner, the measurement in the time domain that can be

  12. Projection x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Konkle, Justin J; Zheng, Bo; Saritas, Emine U; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-05-01

    Projection magnetic particle imaging (MPI) can improve imaging speed by over 100-fold over traditional 3-D MPI. In this work, we derive the 2-D x-space signal equation, 2-D image equation, and introduce the concept of signal fading and resolution loss for a projection MPI imager. We then describe the design and construction of an x-space projection MPI scanner with a field gradient of 2.35 T/m across a 10 cm magnet free bore. The system has an expected resolution of 3.5 × 8.0 mm using Resovist tracer, and an experimental resolution of 3.8 × 8.4 mm resolution. The system images 2.5 cm × 5.0 cm partial field-of views (FOVs) at 10 frames/s, and acquires a full field-of-view of 10 cm × 5.0 cm in 4 s. We conclude by imaging a resolution phantom, a complex "Cal" phantom, mice injected with Resovist tracer, and experimentally confirm the theoretically predicted x-space spatial resolution.

  13. Semiconductor Circuit Diagnostics By Magnetic Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    2011-03-01

    At the forefront of IC technology development are 3D circuit technologies such as system-in-package (SiP), wafer-level-packaging (WLP), through-silicon-vias (TSV), stacked die approaches, flex packages, etc. They integrate multiple devices, many times stacking them in layers with complex, intricate and very long interconnections in significantly reduced area, in addition to an ever-increasing number of opaque layers.~ We could very well say that the near future looks like the perfect nightmare for the Failure Analysis (FA) engineer with localization of defects becoming a major challenge. Magnetic field imaging (MFI) allows the fields generated by the circuit currents to go through various packaging layers and be imaged. I will describe in this talk Magma, a scanning magnetic field imaging system based on a high temperature superconducting SQUID device based on YBa2Cu3O7- δ . The HTS SQUIDs used have a noise level of ~ 20 pT/ √ (Hz) and for typical scanning conditions, a field sensitivity of about 0.7 nT. While current shorts are imaged with spatial resolution, up to 3 micron (with peak localization) resistive opens can also be imaged and currently different strategies are being adapted for imaging opens with large working distances of 50-100s of microns. Higher spatial resolution (~ 250 nm) is obtained by the use of magneto-resistive devices as sensors though the working distance requirement is sever

  14. Projection X-Space Magnetic Particle Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Konkle, Justin J.; Zheng, Bo; Saritas, Emine U.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Projection magnetic particle imaging (MPI) can improve imaging speed by over 100-fold over traditional 3-D MPI. In this work, we derive the 2-D x-space signal equation, 2-D image equation, and introduce the concept of signal fading and resolution loss for a projection MPI imager. We then describe the design and construction of an x-space projection MPI scanner with a field gradient of 2.35 T/m across a 10 cm magnet free bore. The system has an expected resolution of 3.5 × 8.0 mm using Resovist tracer, and an experimental resolution of 3.8 × 8.4 mm resolution. The system images 2.5 cm × 5.0 cm partial field-of views (FOVs) at 10 frames/s, and acquires a full field-of-view of 10 cm × 5.0 cm in 4 s. We conclude by imaging a resolution phantom, a complex “Cal” phantom, mice injected with Resovist tracer, and experimentally confirm the theoretically predicted x-space spatial resolution. PMID:22552332

  15. INVITED TOPICAL REVIEW: Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkman, David J.; Nunes, Rita G.

    2007-04-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed.

  16. IDEAL: Images Across Domains, Experiments, Algorithms and Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Bethel, E. Wes; Ercius, Peter; Helms, Brett A.; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Grinberg, Lea T.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Macdowell, Alastair A.; Odziomek, Katarzyna; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Perciano, Talita; Ritchie, Robert O.; Yang, Chao

    2016-11-01

    Research across science domains is increasingly reliant on image-centric data. Software tools are in high demand to uncover relevant, but hidden, information in digital images, such as those coming from faster next generation high-throughput imaging platforms. The challenge is to analyze the data torrent generated by the advanced instruments efficiently, and provide insights such as measurements for decision-making. In this paper, we overview work performed by an interdisciplinary team of computational and materials scientists, aimed at designing software applications and coordinating research efforts connecting (1) emerging algorithms for dealing with large and complex datasets; (2) data analysis methods with emphasis in pattern recognition and machine learning; and (3) advances in evolving computer architectures. Engineering tools around these efforts accelerate the analyses of image-based recordings, improve reusability and reproducibility, scale scientific procedures by reducing time between experiments, increase efficiency, and open opportunities for more users of the imaging facilities. This paper describes our algorithms and software tools, showing results across image scales, demonstrating how our framework plays a role in improving image understanding for quality control of existent materials and discovery of new compounds.

  17. Wavelet domain textual coding of Ottoman script images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerek, Oemer N.; Cetin, Enis A.; Tewfik, Ahmed H.

    1996-02-01

    Image coding using wavelet transform, DCT, and similar transform techniques is well established. On the other hand, these coding methods neither take into account the special characteristics of the images in a database nor are they suitable for fast database search. In this paper, the digital archiving of Ottoman printings is considered. Ottoman documents are printed in Arabic letters. Witten et al. describes a scheme based on finding the characters in binary document images and encoding the positions of the repeated characters This method efficiently compresses document images and is suitable for database research, but it cannot be applied to Ottoman or Arabic documents as the concept of character is different in Ottoman or Arabic. Typically, one has to deal with compound structures consisting of a group of letters. Therefore, the matching criterion will be according to those compound structures. Furthermore, the text images are gray tone or color images for Ottoman scripts for the reasons that are described in the paper. In our method the compound structure matching is carried out in wavelet domain which reduces the search space and increases the compression ratio. In addition to the wavelet transformation which corresponds to the linear subband decomposition, we also used nonlinear subband decomposition. The filters in the nonlinear subband decomposition have the property of preserving edges in the low resolution subband image.

  18. Nonlinear Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Bradley W; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G

    2015-03-15

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R(2) = 0.99, CNR = 84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R(2) > 0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination. PMID:27826171

  20. Quantitative Pulmonary Imaging Using Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Washko, George R.; Parraga, Grace; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of lung function, including spirometry and body plethesmography, are easy to perform and are the current clinical standard for assessing disease severity. However, these lung functional techniques do not adequately explain the observed variability in clinical manifestations of disease and offer little insight into the relationship of lung structure and function. Lung imaging and the image based assessment of lung disease has matured to the extent that it is common for clinical, epidemiologic, and genetic investigation to have a component dedicated to image analysis. There are several exciting imaging modalities currently being used for the non-invasive study of lung anatomy and function. In this review we will focus on two of them, x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Following a brief introduction of each method we detail some of the most recent work being done to characterize smoking-related lung disease and the clinical applications of such knowledge. PMID:22142490

  1. Combined frequency domain photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging for intravascular applications

    PubMed Central

    Castelino, Robin F.; Hynes, Michael; Munding, Chelsea E.; Telenkov, Sergey; Foster, F. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging has the potential to characterize lipid-rich structures based on the optical absorption contrast of tissues. In this study, we explore frequency domain photoacoustics (FDPA) for intravascular applications. The system employed an intensity-modulated continuous wave (CW) laser diode, delivering 1W over an intensity modulated chirp frequency of 4-12MHz. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach on an agar vessel phantom with graphite and lipid targets, imaged using a planar acoustic transducer co-aligned with an optical fibre, allowing for the co-registration of IVUS and FDPA images. A frequency domain correlation method was used for signal processing and image reconstruction. The graphite and lipid targets show an increase in FDPA signal as compared to the background of 21dB and 16dB, respectively. Use of compact CW laser diodes may provide a valuable alternative for the development of photoacoustic intravascular devices instead of pulsed laser systems. PMID:27895986

  2. Spatial frequency domain imaging for monitoring palpable breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Constance M.; Antaki, James F.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a novel approach for monitoring breast lesions, utilizing spatial frequency domain imaging, a diffuse optical imaging method to detect hemoglobin contrast, in combination with mechanical compression of the tissue. The project is motivated by the growing rate of unnecessary breast biopsies, caused by uncertainty in X-ray mammographic diagnoses. We believe there is a need for an alternate means of tracking the progression palpable lesions exhibiting probably benign features, that can be performed non-invasively and hence frequently: at home or in the clinic. The proposed approach capitalizes on two distinguishing properties of cancerous lesions, namely the relative stiffness with respect to surrounding tissue and the optical absorption due to the greater vascularization, hence hemoglobin concentration. The current research project is a pilot study to evaluate the principle on soft, breast tissue-mimicking phantoms containing stiffer, more highly absorbing inclusions. Spatial frequency domain imaging was performed by projecting onto the phantom a series of wide-field patterns at multiple spatial frequencies. Image analysis then was performed to map absorption and scattering properties. The results of the study demonstrate that compression significantly increases the optical contrast observed for inclusions located 10 and 15 mm beneath the surface. In the latter case, the inclusion was not detectable without compression.

  3. Chaotic CDMA watermarking algorithm for digital image in FRFT domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weizhong; Yang, Wentao; Feng, Zhuoming; Zou, Xuecheng

    2007-11-01

    A digital image-watermarking algorithm based on fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) domain is presented by utilizing chaotic CDMA technique in this paper. As a popular and typical transmission technique, CDMA has many advantages such as privacy, anti-jamming and low power spectral density, which can provide robustness against image distortions and malicious attempts to remove or tamper with the watermark. A super-hybrid chaotic map, with good auto-correlation and cross-correlation characteristics, is adopted to produce many quasi-orthogonal codes (QOC) that can replace the periodic PN-code used in traditional CDAM system. The watermarking data is divided into a lot of segments that correspond to different chaotic QOC respectively and are modulated into the CDMA watermarking data embedded into low-frequency amplitude coefficients of FRFT domain of the cover image. During watermark detection, each chaotic QOC extracts its corresponding watermarking segment by calculating correlation coefficients between chaotic QOC and watermarked data of the detected image. The CDMA technique not only can enhance the robustness of watermark but also can compress the data of the modulated watermark. Experimental results show that the watermarking algorithm has good performances in three aspects: better imperceptibility, anti-attack robustness and security.

  4. Geomorphic domains and linear features on Landsat images, Circle Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    A remote sensing study using Landsat images was undertaken as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). Geomorphic domains A and B, identified on enhanced Landsat images, divide Circle quadrangle south of Tintina fault zone into two regional areas having major differences in surface characteristics. Domain A is a roughly rectangular, northeast-trending area of relatively low relief and simple, widely spaced drainages, except where igneous rocks are exposed. In contrast, domain B, which bounds two sides of domain A, is more intricately dissected showing abrupt changes in slope and relatively high relief. The northwestern part of geomorphic domain A includes a previously mapped tectonostratigraphic terrane. The southeastern boundary of domain A occurs entirely within the adjoining tectonostratigraphic terrane. The sharp geomorphic contrast along the southeastern boundary of domain A and the existence of known faults along this boundary suggest that the southeastern part of domain A may be a subdivision of the adjoining terrane. Detailed field studies would be necessary to determine the characteristics of the subdivision. Domain B appears to be divisible into large areas of different geomorphic terrains by east-northeast-trending curvilinear lines drawn on Landsat images. Segments of two of these lines correlate with parts of boundaries of mapped tectonostratigraphic terranes. On Landsat images prominent north-trending lineaments together with the curvilinear lines form a large-scale regional pattern that is transected by mapped north-northeast-trending high-angle faults. The lineaments indicate possible lithlogic variations and/or structural boundaries. A statistical strike-frequency analysis of the linear features data for Circle quadrangle shows that northeast-trending linear features predominate throughout, and that most northwest-trending linear features are found south of Tintina fault zone. A major trend interval of N.64-72E. in the linear

  5. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the proposed method but

  6. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the

  7. Reconstruction of magnetic source images using the Wiener filter and a multichannel magnetic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Cruz, J A; Ferreira, E S; Miltão, M S R; Andrade-Neto, A V; Alves, A S; Estrada, J C; Cano, M E

    2014-07-01

    A system for imaging magnetic surfaces using a magnetoresistive sensor array is developed. The experimental setup is composed of a linear array of 12 sensors uniformly spaced, with sensitivity of 150 pT*Hz(-1/2) at 1 Hz, and it is able to scan an area of (16 × 18) cm(2) from a separation of 0.8 cm of the sources with a resolution of 0.3 cm. Moreover, the point spread function of the multi-sensor system is also studied, in order to characterize its transference function and to improve the quality in the restoration of images. Furthermore, the images are generated by mapping the response of the sensors due to the presence of phantoms constructed of iron oxide, which are magnetized by a pulse of 80 mT. The magnetized phantoms are linearly scanned through the sensor array and the remanent magnetic field is acquired and displayed in gray levels using a PC. The images of the magnetic sources are reconstructed using two-dimensional generalized parametric Wiener filtering. Our results exhibit a very good capability to determine the spatial distribution of magnetic field sources, which produce magnetic fields of low intensity.

  8. Multimodal optical molecular image reconstruction with frequency domain measurements.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Chen, W; Bardhan, R; Ke, S; Halas, N J; Wareing, T; McGhee, J; Joshi, A

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging is becoming more and more important to understand both the structural and the functional characteristics of tissue, organs and tumors. So far, invasive nuclear methods utilizing ionizing radiation have been the "gold standard" of molecular imaging. We investigate non-contact, non-invasive, patient-tolerant and inexpensive near infrared (NIR) frequency domain optical tomography (FDOT) as a functional complement to structural X-ray computed tomography (CT) data. We show a novel multifrequency NIR FDOT approach both in transmission and reflectance mode and employ radiative transport equation (RTE) for 3D reconstruction of a target with novel fluorescent gold nanoshell indocyanine green (NS ICG) in an ex vivo nude mouse. The results demonstrate that gold NS ICG with multifrequency NIR FDOT is a promising fluorophore for multimodal optical molecular image reconstruction.

  9. Sparsity based denoising of spectral domain optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Leyuan; Li, Shutao; Nie, Qing; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we make contact with the field of compressive sensing and present a development and generalization of tools and results for reconstructing irregularly sampled tomographic data. In particular, we focus on denoising Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT) volumetric data. We take advantage of customized scanning patterns, in which, a selected number of B-scans are imaged at higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We learn a sparse representation dictionary for each of these high-SNR images, and utilize such dictionaries to denoise the low-SNR B-scans. We name this method multiscale sparsity based tomographic denoising (MSBTD). We show the qualitative and quantitative superiority of the MSBTD algorithm compared to popular denoising algorithms on images from normal and age-related macular degeneration eyes of a multi-center clinical trial. We have made the corresponding data set and software freely available online. PMID:22567586

  10. Frequency-domain optical tomographic imaging of arthritic finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Blaschke, Sabine; Netz, Uwe J; Zwaka, Paul A; Illing, Gerd; Muller, Gerhard A; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    We are presenting data from the largest clinical trial on optical tomographic imaging of finger joints to date. Overall we evaluated 99 fingers of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 120 fingers from healthy volunteers. Using frequency-domain imaging techniques we show that sensitivities and specificities of 0.85 and higher can be achieved in detecting RA. This is accomplished by deriving multiple optical parameters from the optical tomographic images and combining them for the statistical analysis. Parameters derived from the scattering coefficient perform slightly better than absorption derived parameters. Furthermore we found that data obtained at 600 MHz leads to better classification results than data obtained at 0 or 300 MHz.

  11. Structure and dynamic properties of the twisted magnetic domain wall in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borich, M. A.; Tankeev, A. P.; Smagin, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the domain wall in a magnetically uniaxial ferromagnetic film placed in an external electric field has been studied. It has been shown that the domain wall has a complex twisted structure whose characteristics (thickness, profile, and limit velocity of steady motion) depend on the film thickness, quality factor, and external electric field. The effect of the electric field on the domain wall is caused by inhomogeneous magnetoelectric coupling taking place in domain walls with a twisted structure.

  12. Clinical skin imaging using color spatial frequency domain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Moy, Austin J.; Reichenberg, Jason; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-02-01

    Skin diseases are typically associated with underlying biochemical and structural changes compared with normal tissues, which alter the optical properties of the skin lesions, such as tissue absorption and scattering. Although widely used in dermatology clinics, conventional dermatoscopes don't have the ability to selectively image tissue absorption and scattering, which may limit its diagnostic power. Here we report a novel clinical skin imaging technique called color spatial frequency domain imaging (cSFDI) which enhances contrast by rendering color spatial frequency domain (SFD) image at high spatial frequency. Moreover, by tuning spatial frequency, we can obtain both absorption weighted and scattering weighted images. We developed a handheld imaging system specifically for clinical skin imaging. The flexible configuration of the system allows for better access to skin lesions in hard-to-reach regions. A total of 48 lesions from 31 patients were imaged under 470nm, 530nm and 655nm illumination at a spatial frequency of 0.6mm^(-1). The SFD reflectance images at 470nm, 530nm and 655nm were assigned to blue (B), green (G) and red (R) channels to render a color SFD image. Our results indicated that color SFD images at f=0.6mm-1 revealed properties that were not seen in standard color images. Structural features were enhanced and absorption features were reduced, which helped to identify the sources of the contrast. This imaging technique provides additional insights into skin lesions and may better assist clinical diagnosis.

  13. Magnetic stripe domains of [Pt/Co/Cu]{sub 10} multilayer near spin reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Liang, J. H.; Xiao, X.; Zhou, C.; Huo, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, G.

    2016-05-15

    The dependence of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic domain patterns and magnetization reversal processes in [Pt/Co(t{sub Co})/Cu]{sub 10} film stack epitaxied on Cu (111) substrate have been studied as a function of the Co layer thickness t{sub Co}, by magneto-optic polar Kerr magnetometry and microscopy. We find the film undergoes spin reorientation transition from out-of-plane to in-plane as t{sub Co} increases. The SRT thickness is verified by Rotating-field Magneto-Optic Kerr effect method. The film exhibits the stripe domain structures at remanence with the width decreasing while t{sub Co} approaches SRT. As demonstrated by the first order reversal curve measurement, the magnetization reversal process encompasses irreversible domain nucleation, domain annihilation at large field and reversible domain switching near remanence.

  14. Topological repulsion between domain walls in magnetic nanowires leading to the formation of bound states.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Luc; Hayashi, Masamitsu; Moriya, Rai; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart

    2012-05-01

    Head-to-head and tail-to-tail magnetic domain walls in nanowires behave as free magnetic monopoles carrying a single magnetic charge. Since adjacent walls always carry opposite charges, they attract one another. In most cases this long-range attractive interaction leads to annihilation of the two domain walls. Here, we show that, in some cases, a short-range repulsive interaction suppresses annihilation of the walls, even though the lowest energy state is without any domain walls. This repulsive interaction is a consequence of topological edge defects that have the same winding number. We show that the competition between the attractive and repulsive interactions leads to the formation of metastable bound states made up of two or more domain walls. We have created bound states formed from up to eight domain walls, corresponding to the magnetization winding up over four complete 360° rotations.

  15. Scaling Behavior of the First Arrival Time of a Random-Walking Magnetic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Im, M.-Y.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2008-02-04

    We report a universal scaling behavior of the first arrival time of a traveling magnetic domain wall into a finite space-time observation window of a magneto-optical microscope enabling direct visualization of a Barkhausen avalanche in real time. The first arrival time of the traveling magnetic domain wall exhibits a nontrivial fluctuation and its statistical distribution is described by universal power-law scaling with scaling exponents of 1.34 {+-} 0.07 for CoCr and CoCrPt films, despite their quite different domain evolution patterns. Numerical simulation of the first arrival time with an assumption that the magnetic domain wall traveled as a random walker well matches our experimentally observed scaling behavior, providing an experimental support for the random-walking model of traveling magnetic domain walls.

  16. Magnetic stripe domains of [Pt/Co/Cu]10 multilayer near spin reorientation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Liang, J. H.; Xiao, X.; Zhou, C.; Chen, G.; Huo, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic domain patterns and magnetization reversal processes in [Pt/Co(tCo)/Cu]10 film stack epitaxied on Cu (111) substrate have been studied as a function of the Co layer thickness tCo, by magneto-optic polar Kerr magnetometry and microscopy. We find the film undergoes spin reorientation transition from out-of-plane to in-plane as tCo increases. The SRT thickness is verified by Rotating-field Magneto-Optic Kerr effect method. The film exhibits the stripe domain structures at remanence with the width decreasing while tCo approaches SRT. As demonstrated by the first order reversal curve measurement, the magnetization reversal process encompasses irreversible domain nucleation, domain annihilation at large field and reversible domain switching near remanence.

  17. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    PubMed

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  1. Perceptual image quality in normalized LOG domain for Adaptive Optics image post-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shiping; Zhang, Rongzhi; Li, Jisheng; Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Changhai; Gao, Weizhe

    2015-08-01

    Adaptive Optics together with subsequent post-processing techniques obviously improve the resolution of turbulencedegraded images in ground-based space objects detection and identification. The most common method for frame selection and stopping iteration in post-processing has always been subjective viewing of the images due to a lack of widely agreed-upon objective quality metric. Full reference metrics are not applicable for assessing the field data, no-reference metrics tend to perform poor sensitivity for Adaptive Optics images. In the present work, based on the Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) local contrast feature, a nonlinear normalization is applied to transform the input image into a normalized LOG domain; a quantitative index is then extracted in this domain to assess the perceptual image quality. Experiments show this no-reference quality index is highly consistent with the subjective evaluation of input images for different blur degree and different iteration number.

  2. Magnetic thin-film split-domain current sensor-recorder

    DOEpatents

    Hsieh, Edmund J.

    1979-01-01

    A sensor-recorder for recording a representation of the direction and peak amplitude of a transient current. A magnetic thin film is coated on a glass substrate under the influence of a magnetic field so that the finished film is magnetically uniaxial and anisotropic. The film is split into two oppositely magnetized contiguous domains with a central boundary by subjecting adjacent portions of the film simultaneously to magnetic fields that are opposed 180.degree.. With the split-domain sensor-recorder placed with the film plane and domain boundary either perpendicular or parallel to the expected conductive path of a transient current, the occurrence of the transient causes switching of a portion of one domain to the direction of the other domain. The amount of the switched domain portion is indicative of the amplitude of the peak current of the transient, while the particular domain that is switched is indicative of the direction of the current. The resulting domain patterns may be read with a passive magnetic tape viewer.

  3. Robustness of magnetic and electric domains against charge carrier doping in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO 3

    DOE PAGES

    Hassanpour, E.; Wegmayr, V.; Schaab, J.; ...

    2016-04-12

    We investigate the effect of chemical doping on the electric and magnetic domain pattern in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO 3 . Hole- and electron doping are achieved through the growth of Er 1-x Ca x MnO 3 and Er 1-x Zr x MnO 3 single crystals, which allows for a controlled introduction of divalent and tetravalent ions, respectively. Using conductance measurements, piezoresponse force microscopy and nonlinear optics we study doping-related variations in the electronic transport and image the corrsponding ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic domains. We find that moderate doping levels allow for adjusting the electronic conduction properties of ErMnO 3 without destroyingmore » its characteristic domain patterns. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of chemical doping for nonperturbative property-engineering of intrinsic domain states in this important class of multiferroics.« less

  4. Robustness of magnetic and electric domains against charge carrier doping in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanpour, E.; Wegmayr, V.; Schaab, J.; Yan, Z.; Bourret, E.; Lottermoser, Th; Fiebig, M.; Meier, D.

    2016-04-12

    We investigate the effect of chemical doping on the electric and magnetic domain pattern in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO 3 . Hole- and electron doping are achieved through the growth of Er 1-x Ca x MnO 3 and Er 1-x Zr x MnO 3 single crystals, which allows for a controlled introduction of divalent and tetravalent ions, respectively. Using conductance measurements, piezoresponse force microscopy and nonlinear optics we study doping-related variations in the electronic transport and image the corrsponding ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic domains. We find that moderate doping levels allow for adjusting the electronic conduction properties of ErMnO 3 without destroying its characteristic domain patterns. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of chemical doping for nonperturbative property-engineering of intrinsic domain states in this important class of multiferroics.

  5. Multiscan time-domain optical coherence tomography for retina imaging.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carla Carmelo; Rogers, John; Pedro, Justin; Rosen, Richard; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2007-04-01

    A versatile time-domain optical coherence tomography system is presented that can generate cross-sectional images by using either transverse priority or depth priority scanning. This is made possible by using a transmissive scanning delay line compatible with balance detection operating at a speed similar to that of the transverse scanner used to scan the beam across the target. In vivo images from the retina are generated and shown using the same system switched to either transverse or depth priority scanning regime, by using the scanning delay line either in slow or fast scanning modes, respectively. A comparative analysis of different scanning regimes depending on image size to fit different areas to be imaged is presented. Safety thresholds due to the different continuous irradiation time per transverse pixel in different scanning regimes are also considered. We present the maximum exposure level for a variety of scanning procedures, employing either A scanning (depth priority) or T scanning (transverse priority) when generating cross-sectional images, en face images, or collecting 3D volumes.

  6. Variation of magnetic domain structure during martensite variants rearrangement in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingzhe; Li, Fang

    2012-07-01

    Studies of magnetic domain and anisotropy in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) are crucial for both understanding their ferromagnetism and engineering in applications. The experimental measurements showed that magnetization rotations and domain-wall motions exhibit distinct characteristics in the field-preferred variants and stress-preferred variants of FSMAs [Y. W. Lai, N. Scheerbaum, D. Hinz, O. Gutfleisch, R. Schäfer, L. Schultz, and J. McCord, Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 192504 (2007)]. Aiming at characterization of formation and variation of the complex magnetic microstructure in FSMAs, we present an analytical approach based on the energy minimization theory and Boltzmann relation on magnetic domains. The magnetic domain behavior during the martensite variants rearrangement is captured to show a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Ultrahigh speed spectral/Fourier domain ophthalmic OCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potsaid, Benjamin; Gorczynska, Iwona; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Chen, Yueli; Liu, Jonathan; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using a CMOS line scan camera with acquisition rates of 70,000 - 312,500 axial scans per second is investigated. Several design configurations are presented to illustrate trade-offs between acquisition speed, sensitivity, resolution and sensitivity roll-off performance. We demonstrate: extended imaging range and improved sensitivity roll-off at 70,000 axial scans per second , high speed and ultrahigh resolution imaging at 106,382 axial scans per second, and ultrahigh speed imaging at 250,000-312,500 axial scans per second. Each configuration is characterized through optical testing and the trade-offs demonstrated with in vivo imaging of the fovea and optic disk in the human retina. OCT fundus images constructed from 3D-OCT data acquired at 250,000 axial scans per second have no noticeable discontinuity of retinal features and show that there are minimal motion artifacts. The fine structures of the lamina cribrosa can be seen. Long cross sectional scans are acquired at 70,000 axial scans per second for imaging large areas of the retina, including the fovea and optic disk. Rapid repeated imaging of a small volume (4D-OCT) enables time resolved visualization of the capillary network surrounding the INL and may show individual red blood cells. The results of this study suggest that high speed CMOS cameras can achieve a significant improvement in performance for ophthalmic imaging. This promises to have a powerful impact in clinical applications by improving early diagnosis, reproducibility of measurements and enabling more sensitive assessment of disease progression or response to therapy.

  8. Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L. A.; Magen, C.; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C.; Serrano-Ramon, L.; and others

    2013-01-14

    Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Ozmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Akata, Deniz; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2016-12-01

    Liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the gold standard in liver metastasis detection and treatment response assessment. The most sensitive magnetic resonance sequences are diffusion-weighted images and hepatobiliary phase images after Gd-EOB-DTPA. Peripheral ring enhancement, diffusion restriction, and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images are hallmarks of liver metastases. In patients with normal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT findings and high clinical suspicion of metastasis, MRI should be performed for diagnosis of unseen metastasis. In melanoma, colon cancer, and neuroendocrine tumor metastases, MRI allows confident diagnosis of treatment-related changes in liver and enables differential diagnosis from primary liver tumors. Focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules in patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, hypersteatosis, and focal fat can mimic metastasis. In cancer patients with fatty liver, MRI should be preferred to CT. Although the first-line imaging for metastases is CT, MRI can be used as a problem-solving method. MRI may be used as the first-line method in patients who would undergo curative surgery or metastatectomy. Current limitation of MRI is low sensitivity for metastasis smaller than 3mm. MRI fingerprinting, glucoCEST MRI, and PET-MRI may allow simpler and more sensitive diagnosis of liver metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  11. Magnetic source imaging studies of dyslexia interventions.

    PubMed

    Simos, Panagiotis G; Fletcher, Jack M; Denton, Carolyn; Sarkari, Shirin; Billingsley-Marshall, Rebecca; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2006-01-01

    Rapidly accumulating evidence from functional brain imaging studies indicates that developmental reading disability is associated with a functional disruption of the brain circuits that normally develop to support reading-related processes. This article briefly overviews recent advances in methods that capture the anatomical outline and temporal (dynamic) features of regional brain activation during performance of reading tasks. One of these methods, magnetoencephalography (MEG) or magnetic sources imaging (MSI) is described in more detail in the context of investigations of changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity associated with improvement in reading skills in response to various types of educational interventions.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  14. Shift registers based on magnetic domain wall ratchets with perpendicular anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-08-01

    The movement of magnetic domain walls can be used to build a device known as a shift register, which has applications in memory and logic circuits. However, the application of magnetic domain wall shift registers has been hindered by geometrical restrictions, by randomness in domain wall displacement and by the need for high current densities or rotating magnetic fields. Here, we propose a new approach in which the energy landscape experienced by the domain walls is engineered to favour a unidirectional ratchet-like propagation. The domain walls are defined between domains with an out-of-plane (perpendicular) magnetization, which allows us to route domain walls along arbitrary in-plane paths using a time-varying applied magnetic field with fixed orientation. In addition, this ratchet-like motion causes the domain walls to lock to discrete positions along these paths, which is useful for digital devices. As a proof-of-principle experiment we demonstrate the continuous propagation of two domain walls along a closed-loop path in a platinum/cobalt/platinum strip.

  15. The Spatial Resolution Limit for an Individual Domain Wall in Magnetic Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sumit; Siddiqui, Saima A; Currivan-Incorvia, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline A; Baldo, Marc A

    2017-09-13

    Magnetic nanowires are the foundation of several promising nonvolatile computing devices, most notably magnetic racetrack memory and domain wall logic. Here, we determine the analog information capacity in these technologies, analyzing a magnetic nanowire containing a single domain wall. Although wires can be deliberately patterned with notches to define discrete positions for domain walls, the line edge roughness of the wire can also trap domain walls at dimensions below the resolution of the fabrication process, determining the fundamental resolution limit for the placement of a domain wall. Using a fractal model for the edge roughness, we show theoretically and experimentally that the analog information capacity for wires is limited by the self-affine statistics of the wire edge roughness, a relevant result for domain wall devices scaled to regimes where edge roughness dominates the energy landscape in which the walls move.

  16. Magnetic domain response to strain generated by focused surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Uday; Adenwalla, Shireen

    The effects of strain on magnetostrictive ferromagnets include changes in the magnetization, anisotropy and domain wall velocities. A ferromagnet (FM) on the surface of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) is subjected to periodic compressive and tensile strain that has resulted in coherent rotation of the magnetization, as well as inducing ferromagnetic resonance in FM films. We describe the response of magnetic domains in Co/Pt multilayers when subjected to the high strains generated by a focused SAW. Annular interdigital transducers (AIDT) patterned on LiNbO3 form a SAW standing wave pattern with large strain amplitude at the focal center. Domains in [Co(3A)/Pt(8A)]x5 with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were observed using a MOKE microscope within this focal region. Controlled magnetic pulses steered a magnetic domain boundary to the large strain region after nucleation.Excitation of the AIDT resulted in a reversible change in the domain wall boundary in the high strain region. We attribute this to magnetic anisotropy changes in the presence of RF strain, which results in changes in the domain configuration to minimize the free energy. We will present results showing both slow and fast magnetization changes in Co/Pt occurring in the presence of high frequency strain. This work is supported by NSF (DMR 1409622) and Nebraska MRSEC (DMR-1420645). This work is supported by NSF (DMR 1409622) and Nebraska MRSEC (DMR-1420645).

  17. F-k Domain Imaging for Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hendrik J; van Neer, Paul L M J; Mota, Mariana Melo; Verweij, Martin D; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Volker, Arno W F

    2016-01-01

    Spatial resolution in medical ultrasound images is a key component in image quality and an important factor for clinical diagnosis. In early systems, the lateral resolution was optimal in the focus but rapidly decreased outside the focal region. Improvements have been found in, e.g., dynamic-receive beamforming, in which the entire image is focused in receive, but this requires complex processing of element data and is not applicable for mechanical scanning of single-element images. This paper exploits the concept of two-stage beamforming based on virtual source-receivers, which reduces the front-end computational load while maintaining a similar data rate and frame rate compared to dynamic-receive beamforming. We introduce frequency-wavenumber domain data processing to obtain fast second-stage data processing while having similarly high lateral resolution as dynamic-receive beamforming and processing in time-space domain. The technique is very suitable in combination with emerging technologies such as application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), hand-held devices, and wireless data transfer. The suggested method consists of three steps. In the first step, single-focused RF line data are shifted in time to relocate the focal point to a new origin t' = 0, z' = 0. This new origin is considered as an array of virtual source/receiver pairs, as has been suggested previously in literature. In the second step, the dataset is efficiently processed in the wavenumber-frequency domain to form an image that is in focus throughout its entire depth. In the third step, the data shift is undone to obtain a correct depth axis in the image. The method has been tested first with a single-element scanning system and second in a tissue-mimicking phantom using a linear array. In both setups, the method resulted in a −6-dB lateral point spread function (PSF) which was constant over the entire depth range, and similar to dynamic-receive beamforming and synthetic aperture sequential

  18. Relating surface roughness and magnetic domain structure to giant magneto-impedance of Co-rich melt-extracted microwires

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, S. D.; Eggers, T.; Thiabgoh, O.; ...

    2017-04-11

    Understanding the relationship between the surface conditions and giant magneto-impedance (GMI) in Co-rich melt-extracted microwires is key to optimizing their magnetic responses for magnetic sensor applications. The surface magnetic domain structure (SMDS) parameters of ~45 μm diameter Co69.25Fe4.25Si13B13.5-xZrx (x = 0, 1, 2, 3) microwires, including the magnetic domain period (d) and surface roughness (Rq) as extracted from the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) images, have been correlated with GMI in the range 1–1000 MHz. It was found that substitution of B with 1 at. % Zr increased d of the base alloy from 729 to 740 nm while retaining Rqmore » from ~1 nm to ~3 nm. A tremendous impact on the GMI ratio was found, increasing the ratio from ~360% to ~490% at an operating frequency of 40 MHz. Further substitution with Zr decreased the high frequency GMI ratio, which can be understood by the significant increase in surface roughness evident by force microscopy. Lastly, this study demonstrates the application of the domain period and surface roughness found by force microscopy to the interpretation of the GMI in Co-rich microwires.« less

  19. Magnetic domain structure study of a ferromagnetic semiconductor using a home-made low temperature scanning Hall probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Seongsoo; de Lozanne, Alex; Samarth, Nitin

    2008-03-01

    GaMnAs is a ferromagnetic semiconductor actively studied for basic research and for the possibility of application to spintronic devices. To study the local magnetic properties of this material the magnetic force microscope (MFM) is too invasive (by affecting the domains in the sample) or not sensitive enough (due to the weak magnetization of the GaMnAs). We have therefore built a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) to complement our MFM studies. We use a lock-in amplifier to supply a bias current of 1-10μA and to measure the Hall voltage. We calibrated this home-made SHPM with a computer hard disk sample. Comparing images of this sample obtained with MFM and SHPM we show that our home-made SHPM is operating well. We observed the domain structure of 30-nm thick Ga0.94Mn0.06As epilayer grown on a 700nm-thick In0.13Ga0.87As buffer covering a GaAs substrate. We will study the magnetic domain structure as a function of temperature with varying external magnetic fields.

  20. Relating surface roughness and magnetic domain structure to giant magneto-impedance of Co-rich melt-extracted microwires

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, S. D.; Eggers, T.; Thiabgoh, O.; Xing, D. W.; Fei, W. D.; Shen, H. X.; Liu, J. S.; Zhang, J. R.; Fang, W. B.; Sun, J. F.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between the surface conditions and giant magneto-impedance (GMI) in Co-rich melt-extracted microwires is key to optimizing their magnetic responses for magnetic sensor applications. The surface magnetic domain structure (SMDS) parameters of ~45 μm diameter Co69.25Fe4.25Si13B13.5-xZrx (x = 0, 1, 2, 3) microwires, including the magnetic domain period (d) and surface roughness (Rq) as extracted from the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) images, have been correlated with GMI in the range 1–1000 MHz. It was found that substitution of B with 1 at. % Zr increased d of the base alloy from 729 to 740 nm while retaining Rq from ~1 nm to ~3 nm. A tremendous impact on the GMI ratio was found, increasing the ratio from ~360% to ~490% at an operating frequency of 40 MHz. Further substitution with Zr decreased the high frequency GMI ratio, which can be understood by the significant increase in surface roughness evident by force microscopy. This study demonstrates the application of the domain period and surface roughness found by force microscopy to the interpretation of the GMI in Co-rich microwires. PMID:28397832