Sample records for magnetic field gradient

  1. Compensation of Gradient-Induced Magnetic Field Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic field gradients are essential for MR imaging and localized spectroscopy applications. However, besides the desired linear field gradients, pulsed currents in a strong external magnetic field also generate unwanted effects like eddy currents, gradient coil vibrations and acoustic noise. While the temporal magnetic field perturbations associated with eddy currents lead to spectral line shape distortions and signal loss, the vibration-related modulations lead to anti-symmetrical sidebands of any large signal (i.e. water), thereby obliterating the signals from smaller signals (i.e. metabolites). Here the measurement, characterization and compensation of vibrations-related magnetic field perturbations is presented. Following a quantitative evaluation of the various temporal components of the main magnetic field, a digital B0 magnetic field waveform is generated which reduces all temporal variations of the main magnetic field to within the spectral noise level. PMID:18329304

  2. Tailoring magnetic field gradient design to magnet cryostat geometry.

    PubMed

    Trakic, A; Liu, F; Lopez, H S; Wang, H; Crozier, S

    2006-01-01

    Eddy currents induced within a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cryostat bore during pulsing of gradient coils can be applied constructively together with the gradient currents that generate them, to obtain good quality gradient uniformities within a specified imaging volume over time. This can be achieved by simultaneously optimizing the spatial distribution and temporal pre-emphasis of the gradient coil current, to account for the spatial and temporal variation of the secondary magnetic fields due to the induced eddy currents. This method allows the tailored design of gradient coil/magnet configurations and consequent engineering trade-offs. To compute the transient eddy currents within a realistic cryostat vessel, a low-frequency finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method using total-field scattered-field (TFSF) scheme has been performed and validated.

  3. Magnetic field gradients and their uses in the study of the earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Southam, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients are discussed from the standpoint of their usefulness in modeling crustal magnetizations. The fact that gradients enhance shorter wavelength features helps reduce both the core signal and the signal from external fields in comparison with the crustal signal. If the gradient device can be oriented, then directions of lineation can be determined from single profiles, and anomalies caused by unlineated sources can be identified.

  4. Levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Wang, G.; Zhou, D. J.; Zhao, L. F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying high and low magnetic fields generated from a superconducting magnet were investigated. The magnetic field intensity of the superconducting magnet was measured when the exciting current was 90 A. The magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field were both calculated. The YBCO bulk was cooled by liquid nitrogen in field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) condition. The results showed that the levitation forces increased with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Moreover, the levitation forces were more dependent on magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field than magnetic field intensity.

  5. MEMS cantilever based magnetic field gradient sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabsch, Alexander; Rosenberg, Christoph; Stifter, Michael; Keplinger, Franz

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes major contributions to a MEMS magnetic field gradient sensor. An H-shaped structure supported by four arms with two circuit paths on the surface is designed for measuring two components of the magnetic flux density and one component of the gradient. The structure is produced from silicon wafers by a dry etching process. The gold leads on the surface carry the alternating current which interacts with the magnetic field component perpendicular to the direction of the current. If the excitation frequency is near to a mechanical resonance, vibrations with an amplitude within the range of 1-103 nm are expected. Both theoretical (simulations and analytic calculations) and experimental analysis have been carried out to optimize the structures for different strength of the magnetic gradient. In the same way the impact of the coupling structure on the resonance frequency and of different operating modes to simultaneously measure two components of the flux density were tested. For measuring the local gradient of the flux density the structure was operated at the first symmetrical and the first anti-symmetrical mode. Depending on the design, flux densities of approximately 2.5 µT and gradients starting from 1 µT mm-1 can be measured.

  6. Quantification and Compensation of Eddy-Current-Induced Magnetic Field Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Spees, William M.; Buhl, Niels; Sun, Peng; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2011-01-01

    Two robust techniques for quantification and compensation of eddy-current-induced magnetic-field gradients and static magnetic-field shifts (ΔB0) in MRI systems are described. Purpose-built 1-D or 6-point phantoms are employed. Both procedures involve measuring the effects of a prior magnetic-field-gradient test pulse on the phantom’s free induction decay (FID). Phantom-specific analysis of the resulting FID data produces estimates of the time-dependent, eddy-current-induced magnetic field gradient(s) and ΔB0 shift. Using Bayesian methods, the time dependencies of the eddy-current-induced decays are modeled as sums of exponentially decaying components, each defined by an amplitude and time constant. These amplitudes and time constants are employed to adjust the scanner’s gradient pre-emphasis unit and eliminate undesirable eddy-current effects. Measurement with the six-point sample phantom allows for simultaneous, direct estimation of both on-axis and cross-term eddy-current-induced gradients. The two methods are demonstrated and validated on several MRI systems with actively-shielded gradient coil sets. PMID:21764614

  7. Quantification and compensation of eddy-current-induced magnetic-field gradients.

    PubMed

    Spees, William M; Buhl, Niels; Sun, Peng; Ackerman, Joseph J H; Neil, Jeffrey J; Garbow, Joel R

    2011-09-01

    Two robust techniques for quantification and compensation of eddy-current-induced magnetic-field gradients and static magnetic-field shifts (ΔB0) in MRI systems are described. Purpose-built 1-D or six-point phantoms are employed. Both procedures involve measuring the effects of a prior magnetic-field-gradient test pulse on the phantom's free induction decay (FID). Phantom-specific analysis of the resulting FID data produces estimates of the time-dependent, eddy-current-induced magnetic field gradient(s) and ΔB0 shift. Using Bayesian methods, the time dependencies of the eddy-current-induced decays are modeled as sums of exponentially decaying components, each defined by an amplitude and time constant. These amplitudes and time constants are employed to adjust the scanner's gradient pre-emphasis unit and eliminate undesirable eddy-current effects. Measurement with the six-point sample phantom allows for simultaneous, direct estimation of both on-axis and cross-term eddy-current-induced gradients. The two methods are demonstrated and validated on several MRI systems with actively-shielded gradient coil sets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pure phase encode magnetic field gradient monitor.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui; MacGregor, Rodney P; Balcom, Bruce J

    2009-12-01

    Numerous methods have been developed to measure MRI gradient waveforms and k-space trajectories. The most promising new strategy appears to be magnetic field monitoring with RF microprobes. Multiple RF microprobes may record the magnetic field evolution associated with a wide variety of imaging pulse sequences. The method involves exciting one or more test samples and measuring the time evolution of magnetization through the FIDs. Two critical problems remain. The gradient waveform duration is limited by the sample T(2)*, while the k-space maxima are limited by gradient dephasing. The method presented is based on pure phase encode FIDs and solves the above two problems in addition to permitting high strength gradient measurement. A small doped water phantom (1-3 mm droplet, T(1), T(2), T(2)* < 100 micros) within a microprobe is excited by a series of closely spaced broadband RF pulses each followed by FID single point acquisition. Two trial gradient waveforms have been chosen to illustrate the technique, neither of which could be measured by the conventional RF microprobe measurement. The first is an extended duration gradient waveform while the other illustrates the new method's ability to measure gradient waveforms with large net area and/or high amplitude. The new method is a point monitor with simple implementation and low cost hardware requirements.

  9. Effects of high-gradient magnetic fields on living cell machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Kubinova, S.; Polyakova, T.; Sykova, E.; Dejneka, A.

    2016-12-01

    A general interest in biomagnetic effects is related to fundamental studies of the influence of magnetic fields on living objects on the cellular and whole organism levels. Emerging technologies offer new directions for the use of high-gradient magnetic fields to control cell machinery and to understand the intracellular biological processes of the emerging field of nanomedicine. In this review we aim at highlighting recent advances made in identifying fundamental mechanisms by which magnetic gradient forces act on cell fate specification and cell differentiation. The review also provides an analysis of the currently available magnetic systems capable of generating magnetic fields with spatial gradients of up to 10 MT m-1, with the focus on their suitability for use in cell therapy. Relationships between experimental factors and underlying biophysical mechanisms and assumptions that would ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cell machinery and the development of more predictive models for the evaluation of the effects of magnetic fields on cells, tissue and organisms are comprehensively discussed.

  10. Permanent Magnet Spiral Motor for Magnetic Gradient Energy Utilization: Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    The Spiral Magnetic Motor, which can accelerate a magnetized rotor through 90% of its cycle with only permanent magnets, was an energy milestone for the 20th century patents by Kure Tekkosho in the 1970's. However, the Japanese company used old ferrite magnets which are relatively weak and an electrically-powered coil to jump start every cycle, which defeated the primary benefit of the permanent magnet motor design. The principle of applying an inhomogeneous, anisotropic magnetic field gradient force Fz = μ cos φ dB/dz, with permanent magnets is well-known in physics, e.g., Stern-Gerlach experiment, which exploits the interaction of a magnetic moment with the aligned electron spins of magnetic domains. In this case, it is applied to dB/dθ in polar coordinates, where the force Fθ depends equally on the magnetic moment, the cosine of the angle between the magnetic moment and the field gradient. The radial magnetic field increases in strength (in the attractive mode) or decreases in strength (in the repulsive mode) as the rotor turns through one complete cycle. An electromagnetic pulsed switching has been historically used to help the rotor traverse the gap (detent) between the end of the magnetic stator arc and the beginning (Kure Tekko, 1980). However, alternative magnetic pulse and switching designs have been developed, as well as strategic eddy current creation. This work focuses on the switching mechanism, novel magnetic pulse methods and advantageous angular momentum improvements. For example, a collaborative effort has begun with Toshiyuki Ueno (University of Tokyo) who has invented an extremely low power, combination magnetostrictive-piezoelectric (MS-PZT) device for generating low frequency magnetic fields and consumes "zero power" for static magnetic field production (Ueno, 2004 and 2007a). Utilizing a pickup coil such as an ultra-miniature millihenry inductor with a piezoelectric actuator or simply Wiegand wire geometry, it is shown that the necessary

  11. Transmitted light relaxation and microstructure evolution of ferrofluids under gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Li, Decai; Li, Feng; Zhu, Quanshui; Xie, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Using light transmission experiments and optical microscope observations with a longitudinal gradient magnetic field configuration, the relationship between the behavior of the transmitted light relaxation and the microstructure evolution of ionic ferrofluids in the central region of an axisymmetric field is investigated. Under a low-gradient magnetic field, there are two types of relaxation process. When a field is applied, the transmitted light intensity decreases to a minimum within a time on the order of 101-102 s. It is then gradually restored, approaching its initial value within a time on the order of 102 s. This is type I relaxation, which corresponds to the formation of magnetic columns. After the transmission reaches this value, it either increases or decreases slowly, stabilizing within a time on the order of 103 s, according to the direction of the field gradient. This is a type II relaxation, which results from the shadowing effect, corresponding to the motion of the magnetic columns under the application of a gradient force. Under a magnetic field with a centripetal high-gradient (magnetic materials subjected to a force pointing toward the center of the axisymmetric field), the transmitted light intensity decreases monotonously and more slowly than that under a low-gradient field. Magnetic transport and separation resulted from magnetophoresis under high-gradient fields, changing the formation dynamics of the local columns and influencing the final state of the column system.

  12. Induction of cell death by magnetic particles in response to a gradient magnetic field inside a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Jaramillo, Carlos David; Pérez-Portilla, Adriana Patricia; Serrano-Olmedo, José Javier; Ramos-Gómez, Milagros

    2017-10-01

    A new instrument based on a magnetic force produced by an alternating magnetic field gradient, which is obtained through Maxwell coils, inside a constant field magnet has been designed and used to produce cell death. We have determined the interaction of microparticles and cells under different conditions such as incubation time with microparticles, particle size, magnetic field exposition time, and different current waveforms at different frequencies to produce a magnetic field gradient. We determined that the highest rate of cell death occurs at a frequency of 1 Hz with a square waveform and 1 h of irradiation. This method could be of great interest to remove cancer cells due mainly to the alterations in stiffness observed in the membranes of the tumor cells. Cancer cells can be eliminated in response to the forces caused by the movement of magnetic nanoparticles of the appropriate size under the application of a specific magnetic field. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Synchrotron Intensity Gradients as Tracers of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.; Yuen, Ka Ho; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, J.

    2017-06-01

    On the basis of the modern understanding of MHD turbulence, we propose a new way of using synchrotron radiation: using synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) for tracing astrophysical magnetic fields. We successfully test the new technique using synthetic data obtained with 3D MHD simulations and provide the demonstration of the practical utility of the technique by comparing the directions of magnetic fields that are obtained with PLANCK synchrotron intensity data to the directions obtained with PLANCK synchrotron polarization data. We demonstrate that the SIGs can reliably trace magnetic fields in the presence of noise and can provide detailed maps of magnetic field directions. We also show that the SIGs are relatively robust for tracing magnetic fields while the low spatial frequencies of the synchrotron image are removed. This makes the SIGs applicable to the tracing of magnetic fields using interferometric data with single-dish measurement absent. We discuss the synergy of using the SIGs together with synchrotron polarization in order to find the actual direction of the magnetic fields and quantify the effects of Faraday rotation as well as with other ways of studying astrophysical magnetic fields. We test our method in the presence of noise and the resolution effects. We stress the complementary nature of the studies using the SIG technique and those employing the recently introduced velocity gradient techniques that trace magnetic fields using spectroscopic data.

  14. Magnetic field of longitudinal gradient bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiba, Masamitsu; Böge, Michael; Ehrlichman, Michael; Streun, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    The longitudinal gradient bend is an effective method for reducing the natural emittance in light sources. It is, however, not a common element. We have analyzed its magnetic field and derived a set of formulae. Based on the derivation, we discuss how to model the longitudinal gradient bend in accelerator codes that are used for designing electron storage rings. Strengths of multipole components can also be evaluated from the formulae, and we investigate the impact of higher order multipole components in a very low emittance lattice.

  15. Synchrotron Intensity Gradients as Tracers of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lazarian, A.; Yuen, Ka Ho; Lee, Hyeseung

    On the basis of the modern understanding of MHD turbulence, we propose a new way of using synchrotron radiation: using synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) for tracing astrophysical magnetic fields. We successfully test the new technique using synthetic data obtained with 3D MHD simulations and provide the demonstration of the practical utility of the technique by comparing the directions of magnetic fields that are obtained with PLANCK synchrotron intensity data to the directions obtained with PLANCK synchrotron polarization data. We demonstrate that the SIGs can reliably trace magnetic fields in the presence of noise and can provide detailed maps of magneticmore » field directions. We also show that the SIGs are relatively robust for tracing magnetic fields while the low spatial frequencies of the synchrotron image are removed. This makes the SIGs applicable to the tracing of magnetic fields using interferometric data with single-dish measurement absent. We discuss the synergy of using the SIGs together with synchrotron polarization in order to find the actual direction of the magnetic fields and quantify the effects of Faraday rotation as well as with other ways of studying astrophysical magnetic fields. We test our method in the presence of noise and the resolution effects. We stress the complementary nature of the studies using the SIG technique and those employing the recently introduced velocity gradient techniques that trace magnetic fields using spectroscopic data.« less

  16. Theoretical predictions for spatially-focused heating of magnetic nanoparticles guided by magnetic particle imaging field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) transfer some of the field's energy to their surroundings in the form of heat, a property that has attracted significant attention for use in cancer treatment through hyperthermia and in developing magnetic drug carriers that can be actuated to release their cargo externally using magnetic fields. To date, most work in this field has focused on the use of AMFs that actuate heat release by nanoparticles over large regions, without the ability to select specific nanoparticle-loaded regions for heating while leaving other nanoparticle-loaded regions unaffected. In parallel, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a promising approach to image the distribution of magnetic nanoparticle tracers in vivo, with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The underlying principle in MPI is the application of a selection magnetic field gradient, which defines a small region of low bias field, superimposed with an AMF (of lower frequency and amplitude than those normally used to actuate heating by the nanoparticles) to obtain a signal which is proportional to the concentration of particles in the region of low bias field. Here we extend previous models for estimating the energy dissipation rates of magnetic nanoparticles in uniform AMFs to provide theoretical predictions of how the selection magnetic field gradient used in MPI can be used to selectively actuate heating by magnetic nanoparticles in the low bias field region of the selection magnetic field gradient. Theoretical predictions are given for the spatial decay in energy dissipation rate under magnetic field gradients representative of those that can be achieved with current MPI technology. These results underscore the potential of combining MPI and higher amplitude/frequency actuation AMFs to achieve selective magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) guided by MPI.

  17. Disaggregation and separation dynamics of magnetic particles in a microfluidic flow under an alternating gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Quanliang; Li, Zhenhao; Wang, Zhen; Qi, Fan; Han, Xiaotao

    2018-05-01

    How to prevent particle aggregation in the magnetic separation process is of great importance for high-purity separation, while it is a challenging issue in practice. In this work, we report a novel method to solve this problem for improving the selectivity of size-based separation by use of a gradient alternating magnetic field. The specially designed magnetic field is capable of dynamically adjusting the magnetic field direction without changing the direction of magnetic gradient force acting on the particles. Using direct numerical simulations, we show that particles within a certain center-to-center distance are inseparable under a gradient static magnetic field since they are easy aggregated and then start moving together. By contrast, it has been demonstrated that alternating repulsive and attractive interaction forces between particles can be generated to avoid the formation of aggregations when the alternating gradient magnetic field with a given alternating frequency is applied, enabling these particles to be continuously separated based on size-dependent properties. The proposed magnetic separation method and simulation results have the significance for fundamental understanding of particle dynamic behavior and improving the separation efficiency.

  18. Computational study of the effect of gradient magnetic field in navigation of spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvelas, E. G.; Lampropoulos, N. K.; Papadimitriou, D. I.; Karakasidis, T. E.; Sarris, I. E.

    2017-11-01

    The use of spherical magnetic nanoparticles that are coated with drugs and can be navigated in arteries to attack tumors is proposed as an alternative to chemotherapy. Navigation of particles is due to magnetic field gradients that may be produced in an MRI device. In the present work, a computational study for the evaluation of the magnitude of the gradient magnetic field for particles navigation in Y bifurcations is presented. For this purpose, the presented method solves for the fluid flow and includes all the important forces that act on the particles in their discrete motion. The method is based on an iteration algorithm that adjusts the gradient magnetic field to minimize the particles’ deviation from a desired trajectory. Using the above mentioned method, the appropriate range of the gradient magnetic field for optimum navigation of nanoparticles’s aggregation is found.

  19. Mode transition induced by the magnetic field gradient in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Liang; Wei, Liqiu; Yu, Daren

    2016-09-01

    A mode transition phenomenon was found in Hall thrusters, which was induced by the increase of the magnetic field gradient. In the transition process, we observed experimentally that there have been obvious changes in the oscillation, the mean value of the discharge current, the thrust, the anode efficiency, and the plume pattern. The shifting and compression of the high magnetic field causes the electron density in the discharge channel to decrease and the ionization zone to move towards the exit plane. This also corresponds to a low atom density in the discharge channel, resulting in a loss of stability of the ionization at a high magnetic field gradient, which presents the transition of the discharge mode.

  20. Single ion as a shot-noise-limited magnetic-field-gradient probe

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Walther, A.; Poschinger, U.; Ziesel, F.

    2011-06-15

    It is expected that ion-trap quantum computing can be made scalable through protocols that make use of transport of ion qubits between subregions within the ion trap. In this scenario, any magnetic field inhomogeneity the ion experiences during the transport may lead to dephasing and loss of fidelity. Here we demonstrate how to measure, and compensate for, magnetic field gradients inside a segmented ion trap, by transporting a single ion over variable distances. We attain a relative magnetic field sensitivity of {Delta}B/B{sub 0{approx}}5x10{sup -7} over a test distance of 140 {mu}m, which can be extended to the mm range, stillmore » with sub-{mu}m resolution. A fast experimental sequence is presented, facilitating its use as a magnetic-field-gradient calibration routine, and it is demonstrated that the main limitation is the quantum shot noise.« less

  1. Measurement of magnetic field gradients using Raman spectroscopy in a fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Arvind; Zimmermann, Matthias; Efremov, Maxim A.; Davis, Jon P.; Narducci, Frank A.

    2017-02-01

    In many experiments involving cold atoms, it is crucial to know the strength of the magnetic field and/or the magnetic field gradient at the precise location of a measurement. While auxiliary sensors can provide some of this information, the sensors are usually not perfectly co-located with the atoms and so can only provide an approximation to the magnetic field strength. In this article, we describe a technique to measure the magnetic field, based on Raman spectroscopy, using the same atomic fountain source that will be used in future magnetically sensitive measurements.

  2. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  3. Arbitrary magnetic field gradient waveform correction using an impulse response based pre-equalization technique.

    PubMed

    Goora, Frédéric G; Colpitts, Bruce G; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    The time-varying magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance applications result in the induction of eddy currents on conductive structures in the vicinity of both the sample under investigation and the gradient coils. These eddy currents typically result in undesired degradations of image quality for MRI applications. Their ubiquitous nature has resulted in the development of various approaches to characterize and minimize their impact on image quality. This paper outlines a method that utilizes the magnetic field gradient waveform monitor method to directly measure the temporal evolution of the magnetic field gradient from a step-like input function and extracts the system impulse response. With the basic assumption that the gradient system is sufficiently linear and time invariant to permit system theory analysis, the impulse response is used to determine a pre-equalized (optimized) input waveform that provides a desired gradient response at the output of the system. An algorithm has been developed that calculates a pre-equalized waveform that may be accurately reproduced by the amplifier (is physically realizable) and accounts for system limitations including system bandwidth, amplifier slew rate capabilities, and noise inherent in the initial measurement. Significant improvements in magnetic field gradient waveform fidelity after pre-equalization have been realized and are summarized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Consideration of magnetically-induced and conservative electric fields within a loaded gradient coil.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weihua; Chronik, Blaine A; Feldman, Rebecca E; Smith, Michael B; Collins, Christopher M

    2006-06-01

    We present a method to calculate the electric (E)-fields within and surrounding a human body in a gradient coil, including E-fields induced by the changing magnetic fields and "conservative" E-fields originating with the scalar electrical potential in the coil windings. In agreement with previous numerical calculations, it is shown that magnetically-induced E-fields within the human body show no real concentration near the surface of the body, where nerve stimulation most often occurs. Both the magnetically-induced and conservative E-fields are shown to be considerably stronger just outside the human body than inside it, and under some circumstances the conservative E-fields just outside the body can be much larger than the magnetically-induced E-fields there. The order of gradient winding and the presence of conductive RF shield can greatly affect the conservative E-field distribution in these cases. Though the E-fields against the outer surface of the body are not commonly considered, understanding gradient E-fields may be important for reasons other than peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS), such as potential interaction with electrical equipment. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Tracing Interstellar Magnetic Field Using Velocity Gradient Technique: Application to Atomic Hydrogen Data

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yuen, Ka Ho; Lazarian, A., E-mail: kyuen2@wisc.edu, E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu

    The advancement of our understanding of MHD turbulence opens ways to develop new techniques to probe magnetic fields. In MHD turbulence, the velocity gradients are expected to be perpendicular to magnetic fields and this fact was used by González-Casanova and Lazarian to introduce a new technique to trace magnetic fields using velocity centroid gradients (VCGs). The latter can be obtained from spectroscopic observations. We apply the technique to GALFA-H i survey data and then compare the directions of magnetic fields obtained with our technique to the direction of magnetic fields obtained using PLANCK polarization. We find an excellent correspondence betweenmore » the two ways of magnetic field tracing, which is obvious via the visual comparison and through the measuring of the statistics of magnetic field fluctuations obtained with the polarization data and our technique. This suggests that the VCGs have a potential for measuring of the foreground magnetic field fluctuations, and thus provide a new way of separating foreground and CMB polarization signals.« less

  6. Sudden motility reversal indicates sensing of magnetic field gradients in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain

    PubMed Central

    González, Lina M; Ruder, Warren C; Mitchell, Aaron P; Messner, William C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Many motile unicellular organisms have evolved specialized behaviors for detecting and responding to environmental cues such as chemical gradients (chemotaxis) and oxygen gradients (aerotaxis). Magnetotaxis is found in magnetotactic bacteria and it is defined as the passive alignment of these cells to the geomagnetic field along with active swimming. Herein we show that Magnetospirillum magneticum (AMB-1) show a unique set of responses that indicates they sense and respond not only to the direction of magnetic fields by aligning and swimming, but also to changes in the magnetic field or magnetic field gradients. We present data showing that AMB-1 cells exhibit sudden motility reversals when we impose them to local magnetic field gradients. Our system employs permalloy (Ni80Fe20) islands to curve and diverge the magnetic field lines emanating from our custom-designed Helmholtz coils in the vicinity of the islands (creating a drop in the field across the islands). The three distinct movements we have observed as they approach the permalloy islands are: unidirectional, single reverse and double reverse. Our findings indicate that these reverse movements occur in response to magnetic field gradients. In addition, using a permanent magnet we found further evidence that supports this claim. Motile AMB-1 cells swim away from the north and south poles of a permanent magnet when the magnet is positioned less than ∼30 mm from the droplet of cells. All together, these results indicate previously unknown response capabilities arising from the magnetic sensing systems of AMB-1 cells. These responses could enable them to cope with magnetic disturbances that could in turn potentially inhibit their efficient search for nutrients. PMID:25478682

  7. Sudden motility reversal indicates sensing of magnetic field gradients in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain.

    PubMed

    González, Lina M; Ruder, Warren C; Mitchell, Aaron P; Messner, William C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2015-06-01

    Many motile unicellular organisms have evolved specialized behaviors for detecting and responding to environmental cues such as chemical gradients (chemotaxis) and oxygen gradients (aerotaxis). Magnetotaxis is found in magnetotactic bacteria and it is defined as the passive alignment of these cells to the geomagnetic field along with active swimming. Herein we show that Magnetospirillum magneticum (AMB-1) show a unique set of responses that indicates they sense and respond not only to the direction of magnetic fields by aligning and swimming, but also to changes in the magnetic field or magnetic field gradients. We present data showing that AMB-1 cells exhibit sudden motility reversals when we impose them to local magnetic field gradients. Our system employs permalloy (Ni(80)Fe(20)) islands to curve and diverge the magnetic field lines emanating from our custom-designed Helmholtz coils in the vicinity of the islands (creating a drop in the field across the islands). The three distinct movements we have observed as they approach the permalloy islands are: unidirectional, single reverse and double reverse. Our findings indicate that these reverse movements occur in response to magnetic field gradients. In addition, using a permanent magnet we found further evidence that supports this claim. Motile AMB-1 cells swim away from the north and south poles of a permanent magnet when the magnet is positioned less than ∼30 mm from the droplet of cells. All together, these results indicate previously unknown response capabilities arising from the magnetic sensing systems of AMB-1 cells. These responses could enable them to cope with magnetic disturbances that could in turn potentially inhibit their efficient search for nutrients.

  8. RF Pulse Design using Nonlinear Gradient Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Kopanoglu, Emre; Constable, R. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An iterative k-space trajectory and radio-frequency (RF) pulse design method is proposed for Excitation using Nonlinear Gradient Magnetic fields (ENiGMa). Theory and Methods The spatial encoding functions (SEFs) generated by nonlinear gradient fields (NLGFs) are linearly dependent in Cartesian-coordinates. Left uncorrected, this may lead to flip-angle variations in excitation profiles. In the proposed method, SEFs (k-space samples) are selected using a Matching-Pursuit algorithm, and the RF pulse is designed using a Conjugate-Gradient algorithm. Three variants of the proposed approach are given: the full-algorithm, a computationally-cheaper version, and a third version for designing spoke-based trajectories. The method is demonstrated for various target excitation profiles using simulations and phantom experiments. Results The method is compared to other iterative (Matching-Pursuit and Conjugate Gradient) and non-iterative (coordinate-transformation and Jacobian-based) pulse design methods as well as uniform density spiral and EPI trajectories. The results show that the proposed method can increase excitation fidelity significantly. Conclusion An iterative method for designing k-space trajectories and RF pulses using nonlinear gradient fields is proposed. The method can either be used for selecting the SEFs individually to guide trajectory design, or can be adapted to design and optimize specific trajectories of interest. PMID:25203286

  9. Radiofrequency pulse design using nonlinear gradient magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kopanoglu, Emre; Constable, R Todd

    2015-09-01

    An iterative k-space trajectory and radiofrequency (RF) pulse design method is proposed for excitation using nonlinear gradient magnetic fields. The spatial encoding functions (SEFs) generated by nonlinear gradient fields are linearly dependent in Cartesian coordinates. Left uncorrected, this may lead to flip angle variations in excitation profiles. In the proposed method, SEFs (k-space samples) are selected using a matching pursuit algorithm, and the RF pulse is designed using a conjugate gradient algorithm. Three variants of the proposed approach are given: the full algorithm, a computationally cheaper version, and a third version for designing spoke-based trajectories. The method is demonstrated for various target excitation profiles using simulations and phantom experiments. The method is compared with other iterative (matching pursuit and conjugate gradient) and noniterative (coordinate-transformation and Jacobian-based) pulse design methods as well as uniform density spiral and EPI trajectories. The results show that the proposed method can increase excitation fidelity. An iterative method for designing k-space trajectories and RF pulses using nonlinear gradient fields is proposed. The method can either be used for selecting the SEFs individually to guide trajectory design, or can be adapted to design and optimize specific trajectories of interest. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Magnetical asymmetry effect in capacitively coupled plasmas: effects of the magnetic field gradient, pressure, and gap length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shali; Chang, Lijie; Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    By applying the asymmetric magnetic field to a discharge, the dc self-bias and asymmetric plasma response can be generated even in a geometrically and electrically symmetric system. This is called magnetical asymmetric effect (MAE), which can be a new method to control the ion energy and flux independently (Yang et al 2017 Plasma Process. Polym. 14 1700087). In the present work, the effects of magnetic field gradient, gas pressure and gap length on MAE are investigated by using a one-dimensional implicit particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulation. It found that by appropriately increasing the magnetic field gradient and the gap length, the range of the self-bias voltage will be enlarged, which can be used as the effective approach to control the ion bombarding energy at the electrodes since the ion energy is determined by the voltage drop across the sheath. It also found that the ion flux asymmetry will disappear at high pressure when the magnetic field gradient is relative low, due to the frequent electron-neutral collisions can disrupt electron gyromotion and thus the MAE is greatly reduced.

  11. How a High-Gradient Magnetic Field Could Affect Cell Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Polyakova, Tatyana; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-11-01

    The biological effects of high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMFs) have steadily gained the increased attention of researchers from different disciplines, such as cell biology, cell therapy, targeted stem cell delivery and nanomedicine. We present a theoretical framework towards a fundamental understanding of the effects of HGMFs on intracellular processes, highlighting new directions for the study of living cell machinery: changing the probability of ion-channel on/off switching events by membrane magneto-mechanical stress, suppression of cell growth by magnetic pressure, magnetically induced cell division and cell reprograming, and forced migration of membrane receptor proteins. By deriving a generalized form for the Nernst equation, we find that a relatively small magnetic field (approximately 1 T) with a large gradient (up to 1 GT/m) can significantly change the membrane potential of the cell and thus have a significant impact on not only the properties and biological functionality of cells but also cell fate.

  12. How a High-Gradient Magnetic Field Could Affect Cell Life

    PubMed Central

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Polyakova, Tatyana; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMFs) have steadily gained the increased attention of researchers from different disciplines, such as cell biology, cell therapy, targeted stem cell delivery and nanomedicine. We present a theoretical framework towards a fundamental understanding of the effects of HGMFs on intracellular processes, highlighting new directions for the study of living cell machinery: changing the probability of ion-channel on/off switching events by membrane magneto-mechanical stress, suppression of cell growth by magnetic pressure, magnetically induced cell division and cell reprograming, and forced migration of membrane receptor proteins. By deriving a generalized form for the Nernst equation, we find that a relatively small magnetic field (approximately 1 T) with a large gradient (up to 1 GT/m) can significantly change the membrane potential of the cell and thus have a significant impact on not only the properties and biological functionality of cells but also cell fate. PMID:27857227

  13. Simulation of concomitant magnetic fields on fast switched gradient coils used in advanced application of MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Muciño, G.; Torres-García, E.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.

    2012-10-01

    The process to produce an MR image includes nuclear alignment, RF excitation, spatial encoding, and image formation. To form an image, it is necessary to perform spatial localization of the MR signals, which is achieved using gradient coils. MRI requires the use of gradient coils that generate magnetic fields, which vary linearly with position over the imaging volume. Safety issues have been a motivation to study deeply the relation between the interaction of gradient magnetic field and the peripheral nerve stimulation. In this work is presented a numerical modeling between the concomitant magnetic fields produced by the gradient coils and the electric field induced in a cube with σ conductivity by the gradient field switching in pulse sequences as Eco planar Imaging (EPI), due to this kind of sequence is the most used in advance applications of magnetic resonance imaging as functional MRI, cardiac imaging or diffusion.

  14. Gradient of the stellar magnetic field in measurements of hydrogen line cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Dimitry O.; Romanyuk, Iosif I.

    2009-04-01

    We report the observed systematic differences in longitudinal magnetic field values, obtained from measurements of metal lines and the core of the Hβ line for a number of Ap stars, having strong global magnetic fields. In overwhelming majority of cases the magnetic field values, obtained from measurements of hydrogen lines cores, is smaller then the ones obtained from metal lines. We discuss some possible explanations of this effect, the most probable of which is the existence of the gradient of the magnetic field in stellar atmospheres.

  15. Effects of the magnetic field gradient on the wall power deposition of Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yongjie; Li, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Wei, Liqiu; Sun, Hezhi; Peng, Wuji; Yu, Daren

    2017-04-01

    The effect of the magnetic field gradient in the discharge channel of a Hall thruster on the ionization of the neutral gas and power deposition on the wall is studied through adopting the 2D-3V particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte Carlo collisions (MCC) model. The research shows that by gradually increasing the magnetic field gradient while keeping the maximum magnetic intensity at the channel exit and the anode position unchanged, the ionization region moves towards the channel exit and then a second ionization region appears near the anode region. Meanwhile, power deposition on the walls decreases initially and then increases. To avoid power deposition on the walls produced by electrons and ions which are ionized in the second ionization region, the anode position is moved towards the channel exit as the magnetic field gradient is increased; when the anode position remains at the zero magnetic field position, power deposition on the walls decreases, which can effectively reduce the temperature and thermal load of the discharge channel.

  16. Electric fields induced in the human body by time-varying magnetic field gradients in MRI: numerical calculations and correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Martin; Bowtell, Richard; Bowley, Roger

    2007-05-07

    The spatial distributions of the electric fields induced in the human body by switched magnetic field gradients in MRI have been calculated numerically using the commercial software package, MAFIA, and the three-dimensional, HUGO body model that comprises 31 different tissue types. The variation of |J|, |E| and |B| resulting from exposure of the body model to magnetic fields generated by typical whole-body x-, y- and z-gradient coils has been analysed for three different body positions (head-, heart- and hips-centred). The magnetic field varied at 1 kHz, so as to produce a rate of change of gradient of 100 T m(-1) s(-1) at the centre of each coil. A highly heterogeneous pattern of induced electric field and current density was found to result from the smoothly varying magnetic field in all cases, with the largest induced electric fields resulting from application of the y-gradient, in agreement with previous studies. By applying simple statistical analysis to electromagnetic quantities within axial planes of the body model, it is shown that the induced electric field is strongly correlated to the local value of resistivity, and the induced current density exhibits even stronger correlation with the local conductivity. The local values of the switched magnetic field are however shown to bear little relation to the local values of the induced electric field or current density.

  17. Detection of magnetic field intensity gradient by homing pigeons (Columba livia) in a novel "virtual magnetic map" conditioning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Mora, Cordula V; Bingman, Verner P

    2013-01-01

    It has long been thought that birds may use the Earth's magnetic field not only as a compass for direction finding, but that it could also provide spatial information for position determination analogous to a map during navigation. Since magnetic field intensity varies systematically with latitude and theoretically could also provide longitudinal information during position determination, birds using a magnetic map should be able to discriminate magnetic field intensity cues in the laboratory. Here we demonstrate a novel behavioural paradigm requiring homing pigeons to identify the direction of a magnetic field intensity gradient in a "virtual magnetic map" during a spatial conditioning task. Not only were the pigeons able to detect the direction of the intensity gradient, but they were even able to discriminate upward versus downward movement on the gradient by differentiating between increasing and decreasing intensity values. Furthermore, the pigeons typically spent more than half of the 15 second sampling period in front of the feeder associated with the rewarded gradient direction indicating that they required only several seconds to make the correct choice. Our results therefore demonstrate for the first time that pigeons not only can detect the presence and absence of magnetic anomalies, as previous studies had shown, but are even able to detect and respond to changes in magnetic field intensity alone, including the directionality of such changes, in the context of spatial orientation within an experimental arena. This opens up the possibility for systematic and detailed studies of how pigeons could use magnetic intensity cues during position determination as well as how intensity is perceived and where it is processed in the brain.

  18. Evaporation Rate of Water as a Function of a Magnetic Field and Field Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air. PMID:23443127

  19. Evaporation rate of water as a function of a magnetic field and field gradient.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-12-11

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air.

  20. A linear helicon plasma device with controllable magnetic field gradient

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.

    2012-06-15

    Current free double layers (CFDLs) are localized potential structures having spatial dimensions - Debye lengths and potential drops of more than local electron temperature across them. CFDLs do not need a current for them to be sustained and hence they differ from the current driven double layers. Helicon antenna produced plasmas in an expanded chamber along with an expanding magnetic field have shown the existence of CFDL near the expansion region. A helicon plasma device has been designed, fabricated, and installed in the Institute for Plasma Research, India to study the role of maximum magnetic field gradient as well asmore » its location with respect to the geometrical expansion region of the chamber in CFDL formation. The special feature of this machine consisting of two chambers of different radii is its capability of producing different magnetic field gradients near the physical boundary between the two chambers either by changing current in one particular coil in the direction opposite to that in other coils and/or by varying the position of this particular coil. Although, the machine is primarily designed for CFDL experiments, it is also capable of carrying out many basic plasma physics experiments such as wave propagation, wave coupling, and plasma instabilities in a varying magnetic field topology. In this paper, we will present the details of the machine construction, its specialties, and some preliminary results about the production and characterization of helicon plasma in this machine.« less

  1. A linear helicon plasma device with controllable magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Barada, Kshitish K; Chattopadhyay, P K; Ghosh, J; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y C

    2012-06-01

    Current free double layers (CFDLs) are localized potential structures having spatial dimensions - Debye lengths and potential drops of more than local electron temperature across them. CFDLs do not need a current for them to be sustained and hence they differ from the current driven double layers. Helicon antenna produced plasmas in an expanded chamber along with an expanding magnetic field have shown the existence of CFDL near the expansion region. A helicon plasma device has been designed, fabricated, and installed in the Institute for Plasma Research, India to study the role of maximum magnetic field gradient as well as its location with respect to the geometrical expansion region of the chamber in CFDL formation. The special feature of this machine consisting of two chambers of different radii is its capability of producing different magnetic field gradients near the physical boundary between the two chambers either by changing current in one particular coil in the direction opposite to that in other coils and/or by varying the position of this particular coil. Although, the machine is primarily designed for CFDL experiments, it is also capable of carrying out many basic plasma physics experiments such as wave propagation, wave coupling, and plasma instabilities in a varying magnetic field topology. In this paper, we will present the details of the machine construction, its specialties, and some preliminary results about the production and characterization of helicon plasma in this machine.

  2. Full magnetic gradient tensor from triaxial aeromagnetic gradient measurements: Calculation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yao; Wu, Mei-Ping; Wang, Ping; Duan, Shu-Ling; Liu, Hao-Jun; Wang, Jin-Long; An, Zhan-Feng

    2015-09-01

    The full magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) refers to the spatial change rate of the three field components of the geomagnetic field vector along three mutually orthogonal axes. The tensor is of use to geological mapping, resources exploration, magnetic navigation, and others. However, it is very difficult to measure the full magnetic tensor gradient using existing engineering technology. We present a method to use triaxial aeromagnetic gradient measurements for deriving the full MGT. The method uses the triaxial gradient data and makes full use of the variation of the magnetic anomaly modulus in three dimensions to obtain a self-consistent magnetic tensor gradient. Numerical simulations show that the full MGT data obtained with the proposed method are of high precision and satisfy the requirements of data processing. We selected triaxial aeromagnetic gradient data from the Hebei Province for calculating the full MGT. Data processing shows that using triaxial tensor gradient data allows to take advantage of the spatial rate of change of the total field in three dimensions and suppresses part of the independent noise in the aeromagnetic gradient. The calculated tensor components have improved resolution, and the transformed full tensor gradient satisfies the requirement of geological mapping and interpretation.

  3. Minimising the Residual Field and Field Gradient in a Magnetically Shielded Room for an nEDM experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Chamindu; LANL nEDM Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The LANL neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment is an effort to set a sensitivity limit of 3.2 × 10-27 e cm on the electric dipole moment of the neutron, an order of magnitude smaller than the current upper limit. This measurement uses Ramsey's method of oscillating magnetic fields. The magnetic field and field gradient have to be low enough to avoid the smearing of the Ramsey fringes and to increase the neutron dephasing time respectively. The experiment is enclosed in a two layer Mu-metal magnetically shielded room (MSR) to null any external magnetic fields from the environment. The MSR is degaussed to sufficiently reduce its residual magnetic field and field gradient. The MSR is designed for residual fields as low as 30 nT. The experiment further requires a field gradient of 1 nT/m or smaller. Here we report on the degaussing procedure and the resulting improvement in the shielding prowess of the MSR. Funded by an NSF Grant.

  4. Working principle and application of magnetic separation for biomedical diagnostic at high- and low-field gradients.

    PubMed

    Leong, Sim Siong; Yeap, Swee Pin; Lim, JitKang

    2016-12-06

    Magnetic separation is a versatile technique used in sample preparation for diagnostic purpose. For such application, an external magnetic field is applied to drive the separation of target entity (e.g. bacteria, viruses, parasites and cancer cells) from a complex raw sample in order to ease the subsequent task(s) for disease diagnosis. This separation process not only can be achieved via the utilization of high magnetic field gradient, but also, in most cases, low magnetic field gradient with magnitude less than 100 T m -1 is equally feasible. It is the aim of this review paper to summarize the usage of both high gradient magnetic separation and low gradient magnetic separation (LGMS) techniques in this area of research. It is noteworthy that effectiveness of the magnetic separation process not only determines the outcome of a diagnosis but also directly influences its accuracy as well as sensing time involved. Therefore, understanding the factors that simultaneously influence the efficiency of both magnetic separation process and target detection is necessary. Moreover, for LGMS, there are several important considerations that should be taken into account in order to ensure its successful implementation. Hence, this review paper aims to provide an overview to relate all this crucial information by linking the magnetic separation theory to biomedical diagnostic applications.

  5. Detection of Magnetic Field Intensity Gradient by Homing Pigeons (Columba livia) in a Novel “Virtual Magnetic Map” Conditioning Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Cordula V.; Bingman, Verner P.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been thought that birds may use the Earth's magnetic field not only as a compass for direction finding, but that it could also provide spatial information for position determination analogous to a map during navigation. Since magnetic field intensity varies systematically with latitude and theoretically could also provide longitudinal information during position determination, birds using a magnetic map should be able to discriminate magnetic field intensity cues in the laboratory. Here we demonstrate a novel behavioural paradigm requiring homing pigeons to identify the direction of a magnetic field intensity gradient in a “virtual magnetic map” during a spatial conditioning task. Not only were the pigeons able to detect the direction of the intensity gradient, but they were even able to discriminate upward versus downward movement on the gradient by differentiating between increasing and decreasing intensity values. Furthermore, the pigeons typically spent more than half of the 15 second sampling period in front of the feeder associated with the rewarded gradient direction indicating that they required only several seconds to make the correct choice. Our results therefore demonstrate for the first time that pigeons not only can detect the presence and absence of magnetic anomalies, as previous studies had shown, but are even able to detect and respond to changes in magnetic field intensity alone, including the directionality of such changes, in the context of spatial orientation within an experimental arena. This opens up the possibility for systematic and detailed studies of how pigeons could use magnetic intensity cues during position determination as well as how intensity is perceived and where it is processed in the brain. PMID:24039812

  6. Hyperfine field, electric field gradient, quadrupole coupling constant and magnetic properties of challenging actinide digallide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sajid; Yazdani-Kachoei, M.; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the structural and magnetic properties as well as electric field gradient (EFG), hyperfine field (HFF) and quadrupole coupling constant in actinide digallide AcGa2 (Ac = U, Np, Pu) using LDA, GGA, LDA+U, GGA+U and hybrid functional with Wu-Cohen Generalized Gradient approximation HF-WC. Relativistic effects of the electrons are considered by including spin-orbit coupling. The comparison of the calculated structural parameters and magnetic properties with the available experimental results confirms the consistency and hence effectiveness of our theoretical tools. The calculated magnetic moments demonstrate that UGa2 and NpGa2 are ferromagnetic while PuGa2 is antiferromagnetic in nature. The EFG of AcGa2 is reported for the first time. The HFF, EFG and quadrupole coupling constant in AcGa2 (Ac = U, Np, Pu) are mainly originated from f-f and p-p contributions of Ac atom and p-p contribution of Ga atom.

  7. Calculation and Analysis of magnetic gradient tensor components of global magnetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffler, Markus; Queitsch, Matthias; Schneider, Michael; Stolz, Ronny; Krech, Wolfram; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Kukowski, Nina

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic mapping missions like SWARM and its predecessors, e.g. the CHAMP and MAGSAT programs, offer high resolution Earth's magnetic field data. These datasets are usually combined with magnetic observatory and survey data, and subject to harmonic analysis. The derived spherical harmonic coefficients enable magnetic field modelling using a potential series expansion. Recently, new instruments like the JeSSY STAR Full Tensor Magnetic Gradiometry system equipped with very high sensitive sensors can directly measure the magnetic field gradient tensor components. The full understanding of the quality of the measured data requires the extension of magnetic field models to gradient tensor components. In this study, we focus on the extension of the derivation of the magnetic field out of the potential series magnetic field gradient tensor components and apply the new theoretical framework to the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and the High Definition Magnetic Model (HDGM). The gradient tensor component maps for entire Earth's surface produced for the IGRF show low values and smooth variations reflecting the core and mantle contributions whereas those for the HDGM gives a novel tool to unravel crustal structure and deep-situated ore bodies. For example, the Thor Suture and the Sorgenfrei-Thornquist Zone in Europe are delineated by a strong northward gradient. Derived from Eigenvalue decomposition of the magnetic gradient tensor, the scaled magnetic moment, normalized source strength (NSS) and the bearing of the lithospheric sources are presented. The NSS serves as a tool for estimating the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary as well as the depth of plutons and ore bodies. Furthermore changes in magnetization direction parallel to the mid-ocean ridges can be obtained from the scaled magnetic moment and the normalized source strength discriminates the boundaries between the anomalies of major continental provinces like southern Africa or the Eastern European

  8. Gradient-induced Longitudinal Relaxation of Hyperpolarized Noble Gases in the Fringe Fields of Superconducting Magnets Used for Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2010-01-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of 3He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum 3He relaxation rate of 3.83 × 10−3 s−1 (T1 = 4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T1 would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T1 of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. PMID:21134771

  9. Gradient-induced longitudinal relaxation of hyperpolarized noble gases in the fringe fields of superconducting magnets used for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I; Möller, Harald E; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-02-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of (3)He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum (3)He relaxation rate of 3.83×10(-3) s(-1) (T(1)=4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T(1) would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T(1) of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient-induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Working principle and application of magnetic separation for biomedical diagnostic at high- and low-field gradients

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Swee Pin; Lim, JitKang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic separation is a versatile technique used in sample preparation for diagnostic purpose. For such application, an external magnetic field is applied to drive the separation of target entity (e.g. bacteria, viruses, parasites and cancer cells) from a complex raw sample in order to ease the subsequent task(s) for disease diagnosis. This separation process not only can be achieved via the utilization of high magnetic field gradient, but also, in most cases, low magnetic field gradient with magnitude less than 100 T m−1 is equally feasible. It is the aim of this review paper to summarize the usage of both high gradient magnetic separation and low gradient magnetic separation (LGMS) techniques in this area of research. It is noteworthy that effectiveness of the magnetic separation process not only determines the outcome of a diagnosis but also directly influences its accuracy as well as sensing time involved. Therefore, understanding the factors that simultaneously influence the efficiency of both magnetic separation process and target detection is necessary. Moreover, for LGMS, there are several important considerations that should be taken into account in order to ensure its successful implementation. Hence, this review paper aims to provide an overview to relate all this crucial information by linking the magnetic separation theory to biomedical diagnostic applications. PMID:27920891

  11. High gradient magnetic field microstructures for magnetophoretic cell separation.

    PubMed

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidics has advanced magnetic blood fractionation by making integrated miniature devices possible. A ferromagnetic microstructure array that is integrated with a microfluidic channel rearranges an applied magnetic field to create a high gradient magnetic field (HGMF). By leveraging the differential magnetic susceptibilities of cell types contained in a host medium, such as paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs) and diamagnetic white blood cells (WBCs), the resulting HGMF can be used to continuously separate them without attaching additional labels, such as magnetic beads, to them. We describe the effect of these ferromagnetic microstructure geometries have on the blood separation efficacy by numerically simulating the influence of microstructure height and pitch on the HGMF characteristics and resulting RBC separation. Visualizations of RBC trajectories provide insight into how arrays can be optimized to best separate these cells from a host fluid. Periodic microstructures are shown to moderate the applied field due to magnetic interference between the adjacent teeth of an array. Since continuous microstructures do not similarly weaken the resultant HGMF, they facilitate significantly higher RBC separation. Nevertheless, periodic arrays are more appropriate for relatively deep microchannels since, unlike continuous microstructures, their separation effectiveness is independent of depth. The results are relevant to the design of microfluidic devices that leverage HGMFs to fractionate blood by separating RBCs and WBCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Zero- to low-field MRI with averaging of concomitant gradient fields.

    PubMed

    Meriles, Carlos A; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Trabesinger, Andreas H; Demas, Vasiliki; Pines, Alexander

    2005-02-08

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) encounters fundamental limits in circumstances in which the static magnetic field is not sufficiently strong to truncate unwanted, so-called concomitant components of the gradient field. This limitation affects the attainable optimal image fidelity and resolution most prominently in low-field imaging. In this article, we introduce the use of pulsed magnetic-field averaging toward relaxing these constraints. It is found that the image of an object can be retrieved by pulsed low fields in the presence of the full spatial variation of the imaging encoding gradient field even in the absence of the typical uniform high-field time-independent contribution. In addition, error-compensation schemes can be introduced through the application of symmetrized pulse sequences. Such schemes substantially mitigate artifacts related to evolution in strong magnetic-field gradients, magnetic fields that vary in direction and orientation, and imperfections of the applied field pulses.

  13. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  14. Analysis of magnetic gradients to study gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Hasenstein, Karl H; John, Susan; Scherp, Peter; Povinelli, Daniel; Mopper, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Gravitropism typically is generated by dense particles that respond to gravity. Experimental stimulation by high-gradient magnetic fields provides a new approach to selectively manipulate the gravisensing system. The movement of corn, wheat, and potato starch grains in suspension was examined with videomicroscopy during parabolic flights that generated 20 to 25 s of weightlessness. During weightlessness, a magnetic gradient was generated by inserting a wedge into a uniform, external magnetic field that caused repulsion of starch grains. The resultant velocity of movement was compared with the velocity of sedimentation under 1 g conditions. The high-gradient magnetic fields repelled the starch grains and generated a force of at least 0.6 g. Different wedge shapes significantly affected starch velocity and directionality of movement. Magnetic gradients are able to move diamagnetic compounds under weightless or microgravity conditions and serve as directional stimulus during seed germination in low-gravity environments. Further work can determine whether gravity sensing is based on force or contact between amyloplasts and statocyte membrane system.

  15. Determination Gradients of the Earth's Magnetic Field from the Measurements of the Satellites and Inversion of the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karoly, Kis; Taylor, Patrick T.; Geza, Wittmann

    2014-01-01

    We computed magnetic field gradients at satellite altitude, over Europe with emphasis on the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly (KMA). They were calculated using the CHAMP satellite total magnetic anomalies. Our computations were done to determine how the magnetic anomaly data from the new ESA/Swarm satellites could be utilized to determine the structure of the magnetization of the Earths crust, especially in the region of the KMA. Since the ten years of 2 CHAMP data could be used to simulate the Swarm data. An initial East magnetic anomaly gradient map of Europe was computed and subsequently the North, East and Vertical magnetic gradients for the KMA region were calculated. The vertical gradient of the KMA was determined using Hilbert transforms. Inversion of the total KMA was derived using Simplex and Simulated Annealing algorithms. Our resulting inversion depth model is a horizontal quadrangle with upper 300-329 km and lower 331-339 km boundaries.

  16. Magnetic Control of Concentration Gradient in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2005-01-01

    A report describes a technique for rapidly establishing a fluid-concentration gradient that can serve as an initial condition for an experiment on solutal instabilities associated with crystal growth in microgravity. The technique involves exploitation of the slight attractive or repulsive forces exerted on most fluids by a magnetic-field gradient. Although small, these forces can dominate in microgravity and therefore can be used to hold fluids in position in preparation for an experiment. The magnetic field is applied to a test cell, while a fluid mixture containing a concentration gradient is prepared by introducing an undiluted solution into a diluting solution in a mixing chamber. The test cell is then filled with the fluid mixture. Given the magnetic susceptibilities of the undiluted and diluting solutions, the magnetic-field gradient must be large enough that the magnetic force exceeds both (1) forces associated with the flow of the fluid mixture during filling of the test cell and (2) forces imposed by any residual gravitation and fluctuations thereof. Once the test cell has been filled with the fluid mixture, the magnetic field is switched off so that the experiment can proceed, starting from the proper initial conditions.

  17. Magnetic field gradient driven self-assembly of superparamagnetic nanoparticles using programmable magnetically-recorded templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Qi, B.; Lawton, T. G.; Mefford, O. T.; Rinaldi, C.; Garzon, S.; Crawford, T. M.

    2013-03-01

    Using the enormous magnetic field gradients (100 MT/m @ z =20 nm) present near the surface of magnetic recording media, we demonstrate the fabrication of diffraction gratings with lines consisting entirely of magnetic nanoparticles assembled from a colloidal fluid onto a disk drive medium, followed by transfer to a flexible and transparent polymer thin film. These nanomanufactured gratings have line spacings programmed with commercial magnetic recording and are inherently concave with radii of curvature controlled by varying the polymer film thickness. The diffracted intensity increases non-monotonically with the length of time the colloidal fluid remains on the disk surface. In addition to comparing longitudinal and perpendicular magnetic recording, a combination of spectral diffraction efficiency measurements, magnetometry, scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emmission spectroscopy of these gratings are employed to understand colloidal nanoparticle dynamics in this extreme gradient limit. Such experiments are necessary to optimize nanoparticle assembly and obtain uniform patterned features. This low-cost and sustainable approach to nanomanufacturing could enable low-cost, high-quality diffraction gratings as well as more complex polymer nanocomposite materials assembled with single-nanometer precision.

  18. Magnetic field gradients inferred from multi-point measurements of Cluster FGM and EDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teubenbacher, Robert; Nakamura, Rumi; Giner, Lukas; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Magnes, Werner; Eichelberger, Hans; Steller, Manfred; Torbert, Roy

    2013-04-01

    We use Cluster data from fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) and electron drift instrument (EDI) to determine the magnetic field gradients in the near-Earth magnetotail. Here we use the magnetic field data from FGM measurements as well as the gyro-time data of electrons determined from the time of flight measurements of EDI. The results are compared with the values estimated from empirical magnetic field models for different magnetospheric conditions. We also estimated the spin axis offset of FGM based on comparison between EDI and FGM data and discuss the possible effect in determining the current sheet characteristics.

  19. The use of magnetic fields in vertical Bridgman/Gradient Freeze-type crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pätzold, Olf; Niemietz, Kathrin; Lantzsch, Ronny; Galindo, Vladimir; Grants, Ilmars; Bellmann, Martin; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines advanced vertical Bridgman/Gradient Freeze techniques with flow control using magnetic fields developed for the growth of semiconductor crystals. Low-temperature flow modelling, as well as laboratory-scaled crystal growth under the influence of rotating, travelling, and static magnetic fields are presented. Experimental and numerical flow modelling demonstrate the potential of the magnetic fields to establish a well-defined flow for tailoring heat and mass transfer in the melt during growth. The results of the growth experiments are discussed with a focus on the influence of a rotating field on the segregation of dopants, the influence of a travelling field on the temperature field and thermal stresses, and the potential of rotating and static fields for a stabilization of the melt flow.

  20. Oval gradient coils for an open magnetic resonance imaging system with a vertical magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Koki; Abe, Mitsushi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Existing open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems use biplanar gradient coils for the spatial encoding of signals. We propose using novel oval gradient coils for an open vertical-field MRI. We designed oval gradients for a 0.3T open MRI system and showed that such a system could outperform a traditional biplanar gradient system while maintaining adequate gradient homogeneity and subject accessibility. Such oval gradient coils would exhibit high efficiency, low inductance and resistance, and high switching capability. Although the designed oval Y and Z coils showed more heat dissipation and less cooling capability than biplanar coils with the same gap, they showed an efficient heat-dissipation path to the surrounding air, which would alleviate the heat problem. The performance of the designed oval-coil system was demonstrated experimentally by imaging a human hand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electronic and Magnetic Structures, Magnetic Hyperfine Fields and Electric Field Gradients in UX3 (X = In, Tl, Pb) Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sajid; Yazdani-Kachoei, Majid; Jalali-Asadabadi, Saeid; Farooq, Muhammad Bilal; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2018-02-01

    Cubic uranium compounds such as UX3 (X is a non-transition element of groups IIIA or IVA) exhibit highly diverse magnetic properties, including Pauli paramagnetism, spin fluctuation and anti-ferromagnetism. In the present paper, we explore the structural, electronic and magnetic properties as well as the hyperfine fields (HFFs) and electric field gradients (EFGs) with quadrupole coupling constant of UX3 (X = In, Tl, Pb) compounds using local density approximation, Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrization of generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) including the Hubbard U parameter (GGA + U), a revised version of PBE-GGA that improves equilibrium properties of densely packed solids and their surfaces (PBEsol-GGA), and a hybrid functional (HF-PBEsol). The spin orbit-coupling calculations have been added to investigate the relativistic effect of electrons in these materials. The comparison between the experimental parameters and our calculated structural parameters we confirm the consistency and effectiveness of our theoretical tools. The computed magnetic moments show that magnetic moment increases from indium to lead in the UX3 family, and all these compounds are antiferromagnetic in nature. The EFGs and HFFs, as well as the quadrupole coupling constant of UX3 (X = In, Tl, Pb), are discussed in detail. These properties primarily originate from f and p states of uranium and post-transition sites.

  2. Modulation of monocytic leukemia cell function and survival by high gradient magnetic fields and mathematical modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Syrovets, Tatiana; Schmidt, Zoe W; Dejneka, Alexandr; Simmet, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of spatially modulated high gradient magnetic fields on cellular functions of human THP-1 leukemia cells is studied. We demonstrate that arrays of high-gradient micrometer-sized magnets induce i) cell swelling, ii) prolonged increased ROS production, and iii) inhibit cell proliferation, and iv) elicit apoptosis of THP-1 monocytic leukemia cells in the absence of chemical or biological agents. Mathematical modeling indicates that mechanical stress exerted on the cells by high magnetic gradient forces is responsible for triggering cell swelling and formation of reactive oxygen species followed by apoptosis. We discuss physical aspects of controlling cell functions by focused magnetic gradient forces, i.e. by a noninvasive and nondestructive physical approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. On the use of high-gradient magnetic force field in capturing airborne particles

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Murphy, Bart L.; Moon, Ji Won; ...

    2018-06-01

    Airborne particles in the environment are generally smaller than a couple of microns. Use of magnetic force to collect aerosol particles thus has not been popular as the other means. There are billions of airborne particles emitted by a host of man-made sources with the particle size smaller than 1 µm and possess some magnetic susceptibility. We are thus interested in the use of high-gradient magnetic collection to extract the magnetic fraction in an aerosol population. Here in this study, we reported that the magnetic force is the dominant force in collection of ferromagnetic particles of mobility equivalent size largermore » than or equal to 50 nm in a high-gradient permanent-magnetic aerosol collector, while the diffusiophoretic force is responsible for particles smaller than 10 nm. Both forces compete for particles in between these two sizes in the magnetic aerosol collector designed for this study. To enable a wide-range effective collection of aerosol particles across entire size spectrum from a few nanometers to tens of a micron, the ORNL-designed high-gradient magnetic collector would require the use of an engineered matrix. Thus, the matrix design for a specific application becomes application specific. Irrespective of the collection efficiency, the use of permanent magnets to collect magnetic particles is feasible and also highly selective because it tunes into the magnetic susceptibility of the particles as well as the size. Lastly, the use of permanent magnets enables the collector to be operated at a minimal power requirement, which is a critical factor in long-term field operation.« less

  4. On the use of high-gradient magnetic force field in capturing airborne particles

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Murphy, Bart L.; Moon, Ji Won

    Airborne particles in the environment are generally smaller than a couple of microns. Use of magnetic force to collect aerosol particles thus has not been popular as the other means. There are billions of airborne particles emitted by a host of man-made sources with the particle size smaller than 1 µm and possess some magnetic susceptibility. We are thus interested in the use of high-gradient magnetic collection to extract the magnetic fraction in an aerosol population. Here in this study, we reported that the magnetic force is the dominant force in collection of ferromagnetic particles of mobility equivalent size largermore » than or equal to 50 nm in a high-gradient permanent-magnetic aerosol collector, while the diffusiophoretic force is responsible for particles smaller than 10 nm. Both forces compete for particles in between these two sizes in the magnetic aerosol collector designed for this study. To enable a wide-range effective collection of aerosol particles across entire size spectrum from a few nanometers to tens of a micron, the ORNL-designed high-gradient magnetic collector would require the use of an engineered matrix. Thus, the matrix design for a specific application becomes application specific. Irrespective of the collection efficiency, the use of permanent magnets to collect magnetic particles is feasible and also highly selective because it tunes into the magnetic susceptibility of the particles as well as the size. Lastly, the use of permanent magnets enables the collector to be operated at a minimal power requirement, which is a critical factor in long-term field operation.« less

  5. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  6. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  7. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  8. A gradient field defeats the inherent repulsion between magnetic nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yu; Burtovyy, Ruslan; Custer, John; Luzinov, Igor; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2014-01-01

    When controlling the assembly of magnetic nanorods and chains of magnetic nanoparticles, it is extremely challenging to bring them together side by side while keeping a desired spacing between their axes. We show that this challenge can be successfully resolved by using a non-uniform magnetic field that defeats an inherent repulsion between nanorods. Nickel nanorods were suspended in a viscous film and a non-uniform field was used to control their placement. The in-plane movement of nanorods was tracked with a high-speed camera and a detailed image analysis was conducted to quantitatively characterize the behaviour of the nanorods. The analysis focused on the behaviour of a pair of neighbour nanorods, and a corresponding dynamic model was formulated and investigated. The complex two-dimensional dynamics of a nanorod pair was analysed analytically and numerically, and a phase portrait was constructed. Using this phase portrait, we classified the nanorod behaviour and revealed the experimental conditions in which nanorods could be placed side by side. Dependence of the distance between a pair of neighbour nanorods on physical parameters was analysed. With the aid of the proposed theory, one can build different lattices and control their spacing by applying different field gradients. PMID:26064550

  9. Influence of Applied Thermal Gradients and a Static Magnetic Field on Bridgman-Grown GeSi Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Szofran, F. R.; Cobb, S. D.; Ritter, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of applied axial and radial thermal gradients and an axial static magnetic field on the macrosegregation profiles of Bridgman-grown GeSi alloy crystals has been assessed. The axial thermal gradients were adjusted by changing the control setpoints of a seven-zone vertical Bridgman furnace. The radial thermal gradients were affected by growing samples in ampoules with different thermal conductivities, namely graphite, hot-pressed boron nitride (BN), and pyrolytic boron nitride (PBN). Those samples grown in a graphite ampoule exhibited radial profiles consistent with a highly concave interface and axial profiles indicative of complete mixing in the melt. The samples grown in BN and PBN ampoules had less radial variation. Axial macrosegregation profiles of these samples fell between the predictions for a completely mixed melt and one where solute transport is dominated by diffusion. All of the samples were grown on Ge seeds. This resulted in a period of free growth until the Si concentration in the solid was in equilibrium with the Si concentration in the liquid. The length of crystal grown during this period was inversely proportional to the applied axial thermal gradient. Several samples were grown in an axial 5 Tesla magnetic field. Measured macroscopic segregation profiles on these samples indicate that the magnetic field did not, in general, reduce the melt flow velocities to below the growth velocities.

  10. Calculation and Analysis of Magnetic Gradient Tensor Components of Global Magnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Schneider, M.; Goepel, A.; Stolz, R.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H. G.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-12-01

    Global Earth's magnetic field models like the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), the World Magnetic Model (WMM) or the High Definition Geomagnetic Model (HDGM) are harmonic analysis regressions to available magnetic observations stored as spherical harmonic coefficients. Input data combine recordings from magnetic observatories, airborne magnetic surveys and satellite data. The advance of recent magnetic satellite missions like SWARM and its predecessors like CHAMP offer high resolution measurements while providing a full global coverage. This deserves expansion of the theoretical framework of harmonic synthesis to magnetic gradient tensor components. Measurement setups for Full Tensor Magnetic Gradiometry equipped with high sensitive gradiometers like the JeSSY STAR system can directly measure the gradient tensor components, which requires precise knowledge about the background regional gradients which can be calculated with this extension. In this study we develop the theoretical framework for calculation of the magnetic gradient tensor components from the harmonic series expansion and apply our approach to the IGRF and HDGM. The gradient tensor component maps for entire Earth's surface produced for the IGRF show low gradients reflecting the variation from the dipolar character, whereas maps for the HDGM (up to degree N=729) reveal new information about crustal structure, especially across the oceans, and deeply situated ore bodies. From the gradient tensor components, the rotational invariants, the Eigenvalues, and the normalized source strength (NSS) are calculated. The NSS focuses on shallower and stronger anomalies. Euler deconvolution using either the tensor components or the NSS applied to the HDGM reveals an estimate of the average source depth for the entire magnetic crust as well as individual plutons and ore bodies. The NSS reveals the boundaries between the anomalies of major continental provinces like southern Africa or the Eastern

  11. Effects of a high-gradient magnetic field on the migratory behavior of primary crystal silicon in hypereutectic Al–Si alloy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Fangwei; Ren, Zhongming; Ren, Weili; Deng, Kang; Zhong, Yunbo; Yu, Jianbo

    2008-01-01

    The migration of primary Si grains during the solidification of Al–18 wt%Si alloy under a high-gradient magnetic field has been investigated experimentally. It was found that under a gradient magnetic field, the primary Si grains migrated toward one end of the specimen, forming a Si-rich layer, and the thickness of the Si-rich layer increased with increasing magnetic flux density. No movement of Si grains was apparent under a magnetic field below 2.3 T. For magnetic fields above 6.6 T, however, the thickness of the Si-rich layer was almost constant. It was shown that the static field also played a role in impeding the movement of the grains. The primary Si grains were refined in the Si layer, even though the primary silicon grains were very dense. The effect of the magnetic flux density on the migratory behavior is discussed. PMID:27877953

  12. Design of shared instruments to utilize simulated gravities generated by a large-gradient, high-field superconducting magnet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Yin, D C; Liu, Y M; Shi, J Z; Lu, H M; Shi, Z H; Qian, A R; Shang, P

    2011-03-01

    A high-field superconducting magnet can provide both high-magnetic fields and large-field gradients, which can be used as a special environment for research or practical applications in materials processing, life science studies, physical and chemical reactions, etc. To make full use of a superconducting magnet, shared instruments (the operating platform, sample holders, temperature controller, and observation system) must be prepared as prerequisites. This paper introduces the design of a set of sample holders and a temperature controller in detail with an emphasis on validating the performance of the force and temperature sensors in the high-magnetic field.

  13. Design of shared instruments to utilize simulated gravities generated by a large-gradient, high-field superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Yin, D. C.; Liu, Y. M.; Shi, J. Z.; Lu, H. M.; Shi, Z. H.; Qian, A. R.; Shang, P.

    2011-03-01

    A high-field superconducting magnet can provide both high-magnetic fields and large-field gradients, which can be used as a special environment for research or practical applications in materials processing, life science studies, physical and chemical reactions, etc. To make full use of a superconducting magnet, shared instruments (the operating platform, sample holders, temperature controller, and observation system) must be prepared as prerequisites. This paper introduces the design of a set of sample holders and a temperature controller in detail with an emphasis on validating the performance of the force and temperature sensors in the high-magnetic field.

  14. Absolute Quantification of Human Liver Phosphorus-Containing Metabolites In Vivo Using an Inhomogeneous Spoiling Magnetic Field Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Adil; Gropler, Robert; Ackerman, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Absolute concentrations of high-energy phosphorus (31P) metabolites in liver provide more important insight into physiologic status of liver disease compared to resonance integral ratios. A simple method for measuring absolute concentrations of 31P metabolites in human liver is described. The approach uses surface spoiling inhomogeneous magnetic field gradient to select signal from liver tissue. The technique avoids issues caused by respiratory motion, chemical shift dispersion associated with linear magnetic field gradients, and increased tissue heat deposition due to radiofrequency absorption, especially at high field strength. Methods A method to localize signal from liver was demonstrated using superficial and highly non-uniform magnetic field gradients, which eliminate signal(s) from surface tissue(s) located between the liver and RF coil. A double standard method was implemented to determine absolute 31P metabolite concentrations in vivo. 8 healthy individuals were examined in a 3 T MR scanner. Results Concentrations of metabolites measured in eight healthy individuals are: γ-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) = 2.44 ± 0.21 (mean ± sd) mmol/l of wet tissue volume, α-ATP = 3.2 ± 0.63 mmol/l, β-ATP = 2.98 ± 0.45 mmol/l, inorganic phosphates (Pi) = 1.87 ± 0.25 mmol/l, phosphodiesters (PDE) = 10.62 ± 2.20 mmol/l and phosphomonoesters (PME) = 2.12 ± 0.51 mmol/l. All are in good agreement with literature values. Conclusions The technique offers robust and fast means to localize signal from liver tissue, allows absolute metabolite concentration determination, and avoids problems associated with constant field gradient (linear field variation) localization methods. PMID:26633549

  15. Gradient pre-emphasis to counteract first-order concomitant fields on asymmetric MRI gradient systems.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shengzhen; Weavers, Paul T; Trzasko, Joshua D; Shu, Yunhong; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Frigo, Louis M; Bernstein, Matt A

    2017-06-01

    To develop a gradient pre-emphasis scheme that prospectively counteracts the effects of the first-order concomitant fields for any arbitrary gradient waveform played on asymmetric gradient systems, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach using a real-time implementation on a compact gradient system. After reviewing the first-order concomitant fields that are present on asymmetric gradients, we developed a generalized gradient pre-emphasis model assuming arbitrary gradient waveforms to counteract their effects. A numerically straightforward, easily implemented approximate solution to this pre-emphasis problem was derived that was compatible with the current hardware infrastructure of conventional MRI scanners for eddy current compensation. The proposed method was implemented on the gradient driver subsystem, and its real-time use was tested using a series of phantom and in vivo data acquired from two-dimensional Cartesian phase-difference, echo-planar imaging, and spiral acquisitions. The phantom and in vivo results demonstrated that unless accounted for, first-order concomitant fields introduce considerable phase estimation error into the measured data and result in images with spatially dependent blurring/distortion. The resulting artifacts were effectively prevented using the proposed gradient pre-emphasis. We have developed an efficient and effective gradient pre-emphasis framework to counteract the effects of first-order concomitant fields of asymmetric gradient systems. Magn Reson Med 77:2250-2262, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. High field gradient targeting of magnetic nanoparticle-loaded endothelial cells to the surfaces of steel stents

    PubMed Central

    Polyak, Boris; Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Alferiev, Ivan; Williams, Darryl; Yellen, Ben; Friedman, Gary; Levy, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    A cell delivery strategy was investigated that was hypothesized to enable magnetic targeting of endothelial cells to the steel surfaces of intraarterial stents because of the following mechanisms: (i) preloading cells with biodegradable polymeric superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), thereby rendering the cells magnetically responsive; and (ii) the induction of both magnetic field gradients around the wires of a steel stent and magnetic moments within MNPs because of a uniform external magnetic field, thereby targeting MNP-laden cells to the stent wires. In vitro studies demonstrated that MNP-loaded bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) could be magnetically targeted to steel stent wires. In vivo MNP-loaded BAECs transduced with adenoviruses expressing luciferase (Luc) were targeted to stents deployed in rat carotid arteries in the presence of a uniform magnetic field with significantly greater Luc expression, detected by in vivo optical imaging, than nonmagnetic controls. PMID:18182491

  17. Correcting Concomitant Gradient Distortion in Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Whittier

    2005-03-01

    Progress in ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an untuned gradiometer coupled to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) has resulted in three-dimensional images with an in-plane resolution of 2 mm. Protons in samples up to 80 mm in size were prepolarized in a 100 mT field, manipulated by ˜100 μT/m gradients for image encoding, and detected by the SQUID in the ˜65 μT precession field. Maxwell's equations prohibit a unidirectional magnetic field gradient. While the additional concomitant gradients can be neglected in high-field MRI, they distort high-resolution images of large samples taken in microtesla precession fields. We propose two methods to mitigate such distortion: raising the precession field during image encoding, and software post-processing. Both approaches are demonstrated using computer simulations and MRI images. Simulations show that the combination of these techniques can correct the concomitant gradient distortion present in a 4-mm resolution image of an object the size of a human brain with a precession field of 50 μT. Supported by USDOE.

  18. Field gradients can control the alignment of nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chinchun; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2008-08-19

    This work is motivated by the unexpected experimental observation that field gradients can control the alignment of nonmagnetic nanorods immersed inside magnetic fluids. In the presence of local field gradients, nanorods were observed to align perpendicular to the external field at low field strengths, but parallel to the external field at high field strengths. The switching behavior results from the competition between a preference to align with the external field (orientational potential energy) and preference to move into regions of minimum magnetic field (positional potential energy). A theoretical model is developed to explain this experimental behavior by investigating the statistics of nanorod alignment as a function of both the external uniform magnetic field strength and the local magnetic field variation above a periodic array of micromagnets. Computational phase diagrams are developed which indicate that the relative population of nanorods in parallel and perpendicular states can be adjusted through several control parameters. However, an energy barrier to rotation was discovered to influence the rate kinetics and restrict the utility of this assembly technique to nanorods which are slightly shorter than the micromagnet length. Experimental results concerning the orientation of nanorods inside magnetic fluid are also presented and shown to be in strong agreement with the theoretical work.

  19. Magnetomigration of rare-earth ions in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Franczak, Agnieszka; Binnemans, Koen; Jan Fransaer

    2016-10-05

    The effects of external inhomogenous (gradient) magnetic fields on the movement of the rare-earth ions: Dy 3+ , Gd 3+ and Y 3+ , in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions have been investigated. Differences in the migration of rare-earth ions in gradient magnetic fields were observed, depending on the magnetic character of the ions: paramagnetic ions of Dy 3+ and Gd 3+ move towards regions of the sample where the magnetic field gradient is the strongest, while diamagnetic ions of Y 3+ move in the opposite direction. It has been showed that the low magnetic field gradients, such the ones generated by permanent magnets, are sufficient to observe the magnetomigration effects of the ions in solution. The present work clearly establishes the behavior of magnetically different ions in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions exposed to magnetic field gradients. To this avail, a methodology for measuring the local concentration differences of metal ions in liquid samples was developed.

  20. Analysis of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer during structured electrodeposition of copper in high magnetic gradient fields.

    PubMed

    König, Jörg; Tschulik, Kristina; Büttner, Lars; Uhlemann, Margitta; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    To experimentally reveal the correlation between electrodeposited structure and electrolyte convection induced inside the concentration boundary layer, a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field, generated by a magnetized Fe-wire, has been applied to an electrochemical system. The influence of Lorentz and magnetic field gradient force to the local transport phenomena of copper ions has been studied using a novel two-component laser Doppler velocity profile sensor. With this sensor, the electrolyte convection within 500 μm of a horizontally aligned cathode is presented. The electrode-normal two-component velocity profiles below the electrodeposited structure show that electrolyte convection is induced and directed toward the rim of the Fe-wire. The measured deposited structure directly correlates to the observed boundary layer flow. As the local concentration of Cu(2+) ions is enhanced due to the induced convection, maximum deposit thicknesses can be found at the rim of the Fe-wire. Furthermore, a complex boundary layer flow structure was determined, indicating that electrolyte convection of second order is induced. Moreover, the Lorentz force-driven convection rapidly vanishes, while the electrolyte convection induced by the magnetic field gradient force is preserved much longer. The progress for research is the first direct experimental proof of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer that correlates to the deposited structure and reveals that the magnetic field gradient force is responsible for the observed structuring effect.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Solids Using Oscillating Field Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, Yaacob Mat

    1992-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A fully automatic solid state NMR imaging spectrometer is described. Use has been made of oscillating field gradients to frequency and phase encode the spatial localisation of the nuclear spins. The RF pulse is applied during the zero crossing of the field gradient, so only low RF power is needed to cover the narrow spectral width of the spins. The oscillating field gradient coils were operated on resonance hence large gradient strength could be applied (up to 200G/cm). Two image reconstruction methods were used, filtered back-projection and two dimensional Fourier transformation. The use of phase encoding, both with oscillating and with pulsed field gradients, enabled us to acquire the data when the gradients were off, and this method proved to be insensitive to eddy currents. It also allowed the use of narrow bandwidth receiver thus improving the signal to noise ratio. The maximum entropy method was used in an effort to remove data truncation effects, although the results were not too convincing. The application of these new imaging schemes, was tested by mapping the T_1 and T_2 of polymers. The calculated relaxation maps produced precise spatial information about T_1 and T_2 which is not possible to achieve by conventional relaxation weight mapping. In a second application, the diffusion of water vapour into dried zeolite powder was studied. We found that the diffusion process is not Fickian.

  2. Numerical field evaluation of healthcare workers when bending towards high-field MRI magnets.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Trakic, A; Liu, F; Crozier, S

    2008-02-01

    In MRI, healthcare workers may be exposed to strong static and dynamic magnetic fields outside of the imager. Body motion through the strong, non-uniform static magnetic field generated by the main superconducting magnet and exposure to gradient-pulsed magnetic fields can result in the induction of electric fields and current densities in the tissue. The interaction of these fields and occupational workers has attracted an increasing awareness. To protect occupational workers from overexposure, the member states of the European Union are required to incorporate the Physical Agents Directive (PAD) 2004/40/EC into their legislation. This study presents numerical evaluations of electric fields and current densities in anatomically equivalent male and female human models (healthcare workers) as they lean towards the bores of three superconducting magnet models (1.5, 4, and 7 T) and x-, y-, and z- gradient coils. The combined effect of the 1.5 T superconducting magnet and the three gradient coils on the body models is compared with the contributions of the magnet and gradient coils in separation. The simulation results indicate that it is possible to induce field quantities of physiological significance, especially when the MRI operator is bending close towards the main magnet and all three gradient coils are switched simultaneously. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Evidence of Magnetic Breakdown on the Defects With Thermally Suppressed Critical Field in High Gradient SRF Cavities

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Palczewski, Ari

    2013-09-01

    At SRF 2011 we presented the study of quenches in high gradient SRF cavities with dual mode excitation technique. The data differed from measurements done in 80's that indicated thermal breakdown nature of quenches in SRF cavities. In this contribution we present analysis of the data that indicates that our recent data for high gradient quenches is consistent with the magnetic breakdown on the defects with thermally suppressed critical field. From the parametric fits derived within the model we estimate the critical breakdown fields.

  4. Tessellated permanent magnet circuits for flow-through, open gradient separations of weakly magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2017-04-01

    Emerging microfluidic-based cell assays favor label-free red blood cell (RBC) depletion. Magnetic separation of RBC is possible because of the paramagnetism of deoxygenated hemoglobin but the process is slow for open-gradient field configurations. In order to increase the throughput, periodic arrangements of the unit magnets were considered, consisting of commercially available Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets and soft steel flux return pieces. The magnet design is uniquely suitable for multiplexing by magnet tessellation, here meaning the tiling of the magnet assembly cross-sectional plane by periodic repetition of the magnet and the flow channel shapes. The periodic pattern of magnet magnetizations allows a reduction of the magnetic material per channel with minimal distortion of the field cylindrical symmetry inside the magnet apertures. A number of such magnet patterns are investigated for separator performance, size and economy with the goal of designing an open-gradient magnetic separator capable of reducing the RBC number concentration a hundred-fold in 1 mL whole blood per hour.

  5. Improved convection compensating pulsed field gradient spin-echo and stimulated-echo methods.

    PubMed

    Sørland, G H; Seland, J G; Krane, J; Anthonsen, H W

    2000-02-01

    The need for convection compensating methods in NMR has been manifested through an increasing number of publications related to the subject over the past few years (J. Magn. Reson. 125, 372 (1997); 132, 13 (1998); 131, 126 (1998); 118, 50 (1996); 133, 379 (1998)). When performing measurements at elevated temperature, small convection currents may give rise to erroneous values of the diffusion coefficient. In work with high resolution NMR spectroscopy, the application of magnetic field gradients also introduces an eddy-current magnetic field which may result in errors in phase and baseline in the FFT-spectra. The eddy current field has been greatly suppressed by the application of bipolar magnetic field gradients. However, when introducing bipolar magnetic field gradients, the pulse sequence is lengthened significantly. This has recently been pointed out as a major drawback because of the loss of coherence and of NMR-signal due to transverse relaxation processes. Here we present modified convection compensating pulsed field gradient double spin echo and double stimulated echo sequences which suppress the eddy-current magnetic field without increasing the duration of the pulse sequences. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. High-precision control of static magnetic field magnitude, orientation, and gradient using optically pumped vapour cell magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Ingleby, S J; Griffin, P F; Arnold, A S; Chouliara, M; Riis, E

    2017-04-01

    An integrated system of hardware and software allowing precise definition of arbitrarily oriented magnetic fields up to |B| = 1 μT within a five-layer Mumetal shield is described. The system is calibrated with reference to magnetic resonance observed between Zeeman states of the 6S 1/2 F = 4 133 Cs ground state. Magnetic field definition over the full 4π solid angle is demonstrated with one-sigma tolerances in magnitude, orientation, and gradient of δ|B| = 0.94 nT, δθ = 5.9 mrad, and δ|∇B|=13.0 pT/mm, respectively. This field control is used to empirically map M x magnetometer signal amplitude as a function of the static field (B 0 ) orientation.

  7. Thermal gradients for the stabilization of a single domain wall in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mejía-López, J; Velásquez, E A; Mazo-Zuluaga, J; Altbir, D

    2018-08-24

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations we studied field driven nucleation and propagation of transverse domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires subjected to temperature gradients. Simulations identified the existence of critical thermal gradients that allow the existence of reversal processes driven by a single DW. Critical thermal gradients depend on external parameters such as temperature, magnetic field and wire length, and can be experimentally obtained through the measurement of the mean velocity of the magnetization reversal as a function of the temperature gradient. Our results show that temperature gradients provide a high degree of control over DW propagation, which is of great importance for technological applications.

  8. Detection, localization and classification of multiple dipole-like magnetic sources using magnetic gradient tensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Yin; Yingtang, Zhang; Hongbo, Fan; Zhining, Li; Guoquan, Ren

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a method for automatic detection, localization and classification (DLC) of multiple dipole sources using magnetic gradient tensor data. First, we define modified tilt angles to estimate the approximate horizontal locations of the multiple dipole-like magnetic sources simultaneously and detect the number of magnetic sources using a fixed threshold. Secondly, based on the isotropy of the normalized source strength (NSS) response of a dipole, we obtain accurate horizontal locations of the dipoles. Then the vertical locations are calculated using magnitude magnetic transforms of magnetic gradient tensor data. Finally, we invert for the magnetic moments of the sources using the measured magnetic gradient tensor data and forward model. Synthetic and field data sets demonstrate effectiveness and practicality of the proposed method.

  9. A spiral, bi-planar gradient coil design for open magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Shi, Yikai; Wang, Wendong; Wang, Yaohui

    2018-01-01

    To design planar gradient coil for MRI applications without discretization of continuous current density and loop-loop connection errors. In the new design method, the coil current is represented using a spiral curve function described by just a few control parameters. Using a proper parametric equation set, an ensemble of spiral contours is reshaped to satisfy the coil design requirements, such as gradient linearity, inductance and shielding. In the given case study, by using the spiral coil design, the magnetic field errors in the imaging area were reduced from 5.19% (non-spiral design) to 4.47% (spiral design) for the transverse gradient coils, and for the longitudinal gradient coil design, the magnetic field errors were reduced to 5.02% (spiral design). The numerical evaluation shows that when compared with conventional wire loop, the inductance and resistance of spiral coil was reduced by 11.55% and 8.12% for x gradient coil, respectively. A novel spiral gradient coil design for biplanar MRI systems, the new design offers better magnetic field gradients, smooth contours than the conventional connected counterpart, which improves manufacturability.

  10. Stability of Gradient Field Corrections for Quantitative Diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Baxter P; Blaber, Justin; Welch, E Brian; Ding, Zhaohua; Anderson, Adam W; Landman, Bennett A

    2017-02-11

    In magnetic resonance diffusion imaging, gradient nonlinearity causes significant bias in the estimation of quantitative diffusion parameters such as diffusivity, anisotropy, and diffusion direction in areas away from the magnet isocenter. This bias can be substantially reduced if the scanner- and coil-specific gradient field nonlinearities are known. Using a set of field map calibration scans on a large (29 cm diameter) phantom combined with a solid harmonic approximation of the gradient fields, we predicted the obtained b-values and applied gradient directions throughout a typical field of view for brain imaging for a typical 32-direction diffusion imaging sequence. We measured the stability of these predictions over time. At 80 mm from scanner isocenter, predicted b-value was 1-6% different than intended due to gradient nonlinearity, and predicted gradient directions were in error by up to 1 degree. Over the course of one month the change in these quantities due to calibration-related factors such as scanner drift and variation in phantom placement was <0.5% for b-values, and <0.5 degrees for angular deviation. The proposed calibration procedure allows the estimation of gradient nonlinearity to correct b-values and gradient directions ahead of advanced diffusion image processing for high angular resolution data, and requires only a five-minute phantom scan that can be included in a weekly or monthly quality assurance protocol.

  11. Response of Materials Subjected to Magnetic Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-31

    is a superconducting Helmholtz coil capable of operating at up to 6 Tesla. Access to the high magnetic field at the center of the magnet is by...conducting sphere moves through the magnetic field gradient (0 to 4 Tesla over ~20cm) at low velocity (under the influence of gravity for 1 meter). Area...sphere moves through the magnetic field gradient (0 to 4 Tesla over ~20cm) at high velocity (under the influence of gravity for 1 meter). Figure 8

  12. Magnetophoresis of iron oxide nanoparticles at low field gradient: the role of shape anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jitkang; Yeap, Swee Pin; Leow, Chee Hoe; Toh, Pey Yi; Low, Siew Chun

    2014-05-01

    Magnetophoresis of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (IOMNP) under low magnetic field gradient (<100 T/m) is significantly enhanced by particle shape anisotropy. This unique feature of magnetophoresis is influenced by the particle concentration and applied magnetic field gradient. By comparing the nanosphere and nanorod magnetophoresis at different concentration, we revealed the ability for these two species of particles to achieve the same separation rate by adjusting the field gradient. Under cooperative magnetophoresis, the nanorods would first go through self- and magnetic field induced aggregation followed by the alignment of the particle clusters formed with magnetic field. Time scale associated to these two processes is investigated to understand the kinetic behavior of nanorod separation under low field gradient. Surface functionalization of nanoparticles can be employed as an effective strategy to vary the temporal evolution of these two aggregation processes which subsequently influence the magnetophoretic separation time and rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tessellated permanent magnet circuits for flow-through, open gradient separations of weakly magnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Williams, P. Stephen; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Emerging microfluidic-based cell assays favor label-free red blood cell (RBC) depletion. Magnetic separation of RBC is possible because of the paramagnetism of deoxygenated hemoglobin but the process is slow for open-gradient field configurations. In order to increase the throughput, periodic arrangements of the unit magnets were considered, consisting of commercially available Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets and soft steel flux return pieces. The magnet design is uniquely suitable for multiplexing by magnet tessellation, here meaning the tiling of the magnet assembly cross-sectional plane by periodic repetition of the magnet and the flow channel shapes. The periodic pattern of magnet magnetizations allows a reduction of the magnetic material per channel with minimal distortion of the field cylindrical symmetry inside the magnet apertures. A number of such magnet patterns are investigated for separator performance, size and economy with the goal of designing an open-gradient magnetic separator capable of reducing the RBC number concentration a hundred-fold in 1 mL whole blood per hour. PMID:29104346

  14. Equatorial magnetic field of the near-Earth magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, S.; Motoba, T.

    2017-08-01

    The equatorial magnetic field of the nightside magnetosphere is critical for understanding not only the configuration of the magnetotail but also its state and dynamics. The present study observationally addresses various aspects of the equatorial magnetic field, such as its spatial distribution, possible antisunward gradients, and extremely weak magnetic fields, with emphasis on the transition region between dipolar and stretched magnetic configurations. The results are summarized as follows: (1) the transition of the tail magnetic field from a near-Earth dipolar configuration to a stretched one farther out takes place around -12 ≤ Xagsm ≤ -9 RE, although instantaneous configurations can vary significantly; (2) the average equatorial magnetic field in this transition region is noticeably weaker at solar minimum presumably reflecting weaker nightside magnetospheric currents closer to Earth; (3) the statistical comparison of equatorial magnetic fields measured simultaneously at two locations indicates that the gradient of the equatorial magnetic field is directed predominantly earthward, and it is suggested that apparent tailward gradients observed can be very often attributed to other factors such as structures in the Y direction and local fluctuations; (4) however, the gradient can be transiently directed tailward in association with the dipolarization of local magnetic field; (5) extremely weak (≤ 2 nT) magnetic fields are occasionally observed in the transition region during the substorm growth phase and during prolonged quiet intervals, but the association with steady magnetospheric convection, which was suggested before, cannot be confirmed possibly because of its rare occurrence.

  15. Conceptual design of a compact high gradient quadrupole magnet of varying strength using permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Gautam

    2018-02-01

    A concept is presented to design magnets using cylindrical-shaped permanent-magnet blocks, where various types of magnetic fields can be produced by either rotating or varying the size of the magnetic blocks within a given mechanical structure. A general method is introduced to calculate the 3D magnetic field produced by a set of permanent magnets. An analytical expression of the 2D field and the condition to generate various magnetic fields like dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole are derived. Using the 2D result as a starting point, a computer code is developed to get the optimum orientation of the magnets to obtain the user-specific target field profile over a given volume in 3D. Designs of two quadrupole magnets are presented, one using 12 and the other using 24 permanent-magnet blocks. Variation of the quadrupole strength is achieved using tuning coils of a suitable current density and specially designed end tubes. A new concept is introduced to reduce the integrated quadrupole field strength by inserting two hollow cylindrical tubes made of iron, one at each end. This will not affect the field gradient at the center but reduce the integrated field strength by shielding the magnetic field near the ends where the tubes are inserted. The advantages of this scheme are that it is easy to implement, the magnetic axis will not shift, and it will prevent interference with nearby devices. Around 40% integrated field variation is achieved using this method in the present example. To get a realistic estimation of the field quality, a complete 3D model using a nonlinear B -H curve is also studied using a finite-element-based computer code. An example to generate around an 80 T /m quadrupole field gradient is also presented.

  16. Magnetophoretic velocimetry of manganese(II) in a single microdroplet in a flow system under a high gradient magnetic field generated with a superconducting magnet.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masayori; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2002-10-01

    An experimental system for magnetophoretic velocimetry, which could determine the volume magnetic susceptibility of a single particle dispersed in a liquid phase from a magnetophoretic velocity, has been developed. A micrometer-sized high-gradient magnetic field could be generated in a capillary by a pair of iron pole pieces in a superconducting magnet (10 T). The magnetophoretic behavior of a single particle in a capillary flow system was investigated under the inhomogeneous magnetic field. From the magnetophoretic velocity of a polystyrene latex particle dispersed in a MnCl2 aqueous solution, the product of the magnetic flux density and the gradient, B(dB/dx), was determined as a function of the position along the capillary. The maximum value of B(dB/dx) was 4.7 x 10(4) T2 m(-1), which was approximately 100 times higher than that obtained by two Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets (0.4 T). Organic droplets extracting manganese(II) with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide from MnCl2 solution were used as test samples. The difference of the volume magnetic susceptibility between the droplet and the medium could be determined from the magnetophoretic velocity. This method allowed us to continuously measure a volume magnetic susceptibility of 10-6 level for a picoliter droplet and to determine manganese(II) in the single droplet at the attomole level.

  17. Magnetic Turbulence, Fast Magnetic Field line Diffusion and Small Magnetic Structures in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbardo, G.; Pommois, P.; Veltri, P.

    2003-09-01

    The influence of magnetic turbulence on magnetic field line diffusion has been known since the early days of space and plasma physics. However, the importance of ``stochastic diffusion'' for energetic particles has been challenged on the basis of the fact that sharp gradients of either energetic particles or ion composition are often observed in the solar wind. Here we show that fast transverse field line and particle diffusion can coexist with small magnetic structures, sharp gradients, and with long lived magnetic flux tubes. We show, by means of a numerical realization of three dimensional magnetic turbulence and by use of the concepts of deterministic chaos and turbulent transport, that turbulent diffusion is different from Gaussian diffusion, and that transport can be inhomogeneous even if turbulence homogeneously fills the heliosphere. Several diagnostics of field line transport and flux tube evolution are shown, and the size of small magnetic structures in the solar wind, like gradient scales and flux tube thickness, are estimated and compared to the observations.

  18. Experimental and Computational Studies of the Control of Convection of Non-Conducting Liquids During solidification by Means of a Magnetic Field Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, F.; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The elimination of convection is essential in experimental investigations of diffusive transport (of heat and matter) during solidification. One classical approach to damping convection in a conducting liquid is the application of a magnetic field. The damping phenomenon is the induction, by the motion of a conductor in a magnetic field, of currents which interact with the field to produce Lorentz forces that oppose the flow. However, there are many liquids which are not sufficiently conducting to exploit this phenomenon; examples include the transparent liquids (such as succinonitrile-acetone) that are used as "model alloys" in fundamental solidification studies. There have been several investigations of the solidification of these liquids that have been carried out in orbiting laboratories to eliminate natural convection. The paper describes an investigation of an alternative approach whereby a magnetic field gradient is applied to the liquid. A magnetic body force then arises which is dependent on the susceptibility of the liquid and thereby on the temperature and or concentration. With the field gradient aligned vertically and of correct magnitude, the variation of gravitational body force due to temperature/concentration dependent density can be counterbalanced by a variation in magnetic body force. Experiments have been carried out in a super-conducting magnet at Marshall Space Flight Center to measure velocities in an aqueous manganese chloride solution. The solution was contained in a chamber with temperature controlled end walls and glass side walls. Velocities were measured by particle image velocimetry. Starting from zero current in the magnet (zero field gradient) flow driven by the temperature difference between the end walls was measured. At a critical current the flow was halted. At higher currents the normal convection was reversed. The experiments included ones where the solution was solidified and were accompanied by solution of the flow

  19. [Quantitative experiment and analysis of gradient-induced eddy currents on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Wenzhou; Zou, Kai; Zhang, Kai; He, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Pulsed magnetic field gradients generated by gradient coils are widely used in signal location in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, gradient coils can also induce eddy currents in final magnetic field in the nearby conducting structures which lead to distortion and artifact in images, misguiding clinical diagnosis. We tried in our laboratory to measure the magnetic field of gradient-induced eddy current in 1.5 T superconducting magnetic resonance imaging device; and extracted key parameters including amplitude and time constant of exponential terms according to inductance-resistance series mathematical module. These parameters of both self-induced component and crossing component are useful to design digital filters to implement pulse pre-emphasize to reshape the waveform. A measure device that is a basement equipped with phantoms and receiving coils was designed and placed in the isocenter of the magnetic field. By applying testing sequence, contrast experiments were carried out in a superconducting magnet before and after eddy current compensation. Sets of one dimension signal were obtained as raw data to calculate gradient-induced eddy currents. Curve fitting by least squares method was also done to match inductance-resistance series module. The results also illustrated that pulse pre-emphasize measurement with digital filter was correct and effective in reducing eddy current effect. Pre-emphasize waveform was developed based on system function. The usefulness of pre-emphasize measurement in reducing eddy current was confirmed and the improvement was also presented. All these are valuable for reducing artifact in magnetic resonance imaging device.

  20. Ion-temperature-gradient sensitivity of the hydrodynamic instability caused by shear in the magnetic-field-aligned plasma flow

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mikhailenko, V. V., E-mail: vladimir@pusan.ac.kr; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Faculty of Transportation Systems, Kharkiv National Automobile and Highway University, 61002 Kharkiv

    2014-07-15

    The cross-magnetic-field (i.e., perpendicular) profile of ion temperature and the perpendicular profile of the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) plasma flow are sometimes inhomogeneous for space and laboratory plasma. Instability caused either by a gradient in the ion-temperature profile or by shear in the parallel flow has been discussed extensively in the literature. In this paper, (1) hydrodynamic plasma stability is investigated, (2) real and imaginary frequency are quantified over a range of the shear parameter, the normalized wavenumber, and the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths, and (3) the role of inverse Landau damping is illustrated for the case of combinedmore » ion-temperature gradient and parallel-flow shear. We find that increasing the ion-temperature gradient reduces the instability threshold for the hydrodynamic parallel-flow shear instability, also known as the parallel Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or the D'Angelo instability. We also find that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled, reinforcing action of both free-energy sources. For the case of comparable electron and ion temperature, we illustrate analytically the transition of the D'Angelo instability to the kinetic instability as (a) the shear parameter, (b) the normalized wavenumber, and (c) the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths are varied and we attribute the changes in stability to changes in the amount of inverse ion Landau damping. We show that near a normalized wavenumber k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} of order unity (i) the real and imaginary values of frequency become comparable and (ii) the imaginary frequency, i.e., the growth rate, peaks.« less

  1. Ion Beam Neutralization Using FEAs and Mirror Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaescu, Dan; Sakai, Shigeki; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2011-01-01

    Advanced implantation systems used for semiconductor processing require transportation of ion beams which are quasi-parallel and have low energy, such as (11B+,31P+,75As+) with energy in the range Eion = 200-1000 eV. Compensation of ion beam divergence may be obtained through electron injection and confinement in regions of non-uniform magnetic fields. Field emitter arrays with special properties are used as electron sources. The present study shows that electron confinement takes place in regions of gradient magnetic field, such as nearby analyzing, collimator and final energy magnets of the ion beam line. Modeling results have been obtained using Opera3D/Tosca/Scala. In regions of gradient magnetic field, electrons have helical trajectories which are confined like a cloud inside curved "magnetic bottles". An optimal range of positions with respect to the magnet for placing electron sources in gradient magnetic field has been shown to exist.

  2. Large gradient high magnetic field affects the association of MACF1 with actin and microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ai-Rong; Hu, Li-Fang; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Di, Sheng-Meng; Tian, Zong-Cheng; Yang, Peng-Fei; Yin, Da-Chuan; Weng, Yuan-Yuan; Shang, Peng

    2009-10-01

    The intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields acting on the diamagnetic materials naturally present in cells can generate strong magnetic forces. We have developed a superconducting magnet platform with large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can produce three magnetic force fields of -1360, 0, and 1312 T(2)/m, and three corresponding apparent gravity levels, namely 0, 1, and 2-g for diamagnetic materials. In this study, the effects of different magnetic force fields on osteoblast-like cells (MG-63 and MC3T3-E1) viability, microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 (MACF1) expression and its association with cytoskeleton were investigated. Results showed that cell viability increased to different degrees after exposure to 0 or 1-g conditions for 24 h, but it decreased by about 30% under 2-g conditions compared with control conditions. An increase in MACF1 expression at the RNA or protein level was observed in osteoblast-like cells under the magnetic force field of -1360 T(2)/m (0-g) relative to 1312 T(2)/m (2-g). Under control conditions, anti-MACF1 staining was scattered in the cytoplasm and partially colocalized with actin filaments (AFs) or microtubules (MTs) in the majority of osteoblast-like cells. Under 0-g conditions, MACF1 labeling was concentrated at perinuclear region and colocalization was not apparent. The patterns of anti-MACF1 labeling on MTs varied with MTs' changing under LG-HMF environment. In conclusion, LG-HMF affects osteoblast-like cell viability, MACF1 distribution, expression, and its association with cytoskeleton to some extent.

  3. Effects of finite electron temperature on gradient drift instabilities in partially magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Sorokina, E. A.; Marusov, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    The gradient-drift instabilities of partially magnetized plasmas in plasma devices with crossed electric and magnetic fields are investigated in the framework of the two-fluid model with finite electron temperature in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The finite electron Larmor radius (FLR) effects are also included via the gyroviscosity tensor taking into account the magnetic field gradient. This model correctly describes the electron dynamics for k⊥ρe>1 in the sense of Padé approximants (here, k⊥ and ρe are the wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electron Larmor radius, respectively). The local dispersion relation for electrostatic plasma perturbations with the frequency in the range between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies and propagating strictly perpendicular to the magnetic field is derived. The dispersion relation includes the effects of the equilibrium E ×B electron current, finite ion velocity, electron inertia, electron FLR, magnetic field gradients, and Debye length effects. The necessary and sufficient condition of stability is derived, and the stability boundary is found. It is shown that, in general, the electron inertia and FLR effects stabilize the short-wavelength perturbations. In some cases, such effects completely suppress the high-frequency short-wavelength modes so that only the long-wavelength low-frequency (with respect to the lower-hybrid frequency) modes remain unstable.

  4. Modeling the static fringe field of superconducting magnets.

    PubMed

    Jeglic, P; Lebar, A; Apih, T; Dolinsek, J

    2001-05-01

    The resonance frequency-space and the frequency gradient-space relations are evaluated analytically for the static fringe magnetic field of superconducting magnets used in the NMR diffusion measurements. The model takes into account the actual design of the high-homogeneity magnet coil system that consists of the main coil and the cryoshim coils and enables a precise calibration of the on-axis magnetic field gradient and the resonance frequency inside and outside of the superconducting coil. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Gradient and shim technologies for ultra high field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Simone A.; Schmitt, Franz; Landes, Hermann; DeBever, Josh; Wade, Trevor; Alejski, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Ultra High Field (UHF) MRI requires improved gradient and shim performance to fully realize the promised gains (SNR as well as spatial, spectral, diffusion resolution) that higher main magnetic fields offer. Both the more challenging UHF environment by itself, as well as the higher currents used in high performance coils, require a deeper understanding combined with sophisticated engineering modeling and construction, to optimize gradient and shim hardware for safe operation and for highest image quality. This review summarizes the basics of gradient and shim technologies, and outlines a number of UHF-related challenges and solutions. In particular, Lorentz forces, vibroacoustics, eddy currents, and peripheral nerve stimulation are discussed. Several promising UHF-relevant gradient concepts are described, including insertable gradient coils aimed at higher performance neuroimaging. PMID:27915120

  6. Measurements of the ripple effect and geometric distribution of switched gradient fields inside a magnetic resonance scanner.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Henrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson; Wilén, Jonna

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of patient exposure during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures is limited, and the need for such knowledge has been demonstrated in recent in vitro and in vivo studies of the genotoxic effects of MRI. This study focuses on the dB/dt of the switched gradient field (SGF) and its geometric distribution. These values were characterized by measuring the peak dB/dt generated by a programmed gradient current of alternating triangles inside a 1.5T MR scanner. The maximum dB/dt exposure to the gradient field was 6-14 T/s, and this occurred at the edges of the field of view (FOV) 20-25 cm from the isocenter in the longitudinal direction. The dB/dt exposure dropped off to roughly half the maximum (3-7 T/s) at the edge of the bore. It was found that the dB/dt of the SGF was distorted by a 200 kHz ripple arising from the amplifier. The ripple is small in terms of B-field, but the high frequency content contributes to a peak dB/dt up to 18 times larger than that predicted by the slew rate (4 T/s m) and the distance from the isocenter. Measurements on a 3 T MRI scanner, however, revealed a much smaller filtered ripple of 100 kHz in dB/dt. These findings suggest that the gradient current to each coil together with information on the geometrical distribution of the gradient field and ripple effects could be used to assess the SGF exposure within an MRI bore. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Simulated Design Strategies for SPECT Collimators to Reduce the Eddy Currents Induced by MRI Gradient Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoudi, Amine M.; Van Audenhaege, Karen; Vermeeren, Günter; Verhoyen, Gregory; Martens, Luc; Van Holen, Roel; Joseph, Wout

    2015-10-01

    Combining single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the insertion of highly conductive SPECT collimators inside the MRI scanner, resulting in an induced eddy current disturbing the combined system. We reduced the eddy currents due to the insert of a novel tungsten collimator inside transverse and longitudinal gradient coils. The collimator was produced with metal additive manufacturing, that is part of a microSPECT insert for a preclinical SPECT/MRI scanner. We characterized the induced magnetic field due to the gradient field and adapted the collimators to reduce the induced eddy currents. We modeled the x-, y-, and z-gradient coil and the different collimator designs and simulated them with FEKO, a three-dimensional method of moments / finite element methods (MoM/FEM) full-wave simulation tool. We used a time analysis approach to generate the pulsed magnetic field gradient. Simulation results show that the maximum induced field can be reduced by 50.82% in the final design bringing the maximum induced magnetic field to less than 2% of the applied gradient for all the gradient coils. The numerical model was validated with measurements and was proposed as a tool for studying the effect of a SPECT collimator within the MRI gradient coils.

  8. Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields Affect Osteoblast Ultrastructure and Function by Disrupting Collagen I or Fibronectin/αβ1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ai-Rong; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing-Bao; Wang, Yang; Di, Sheng-Meng; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The superconducting magnet generates a field and field gradient product that can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. The effects of LG-HMF on the ultrastructure and function of osteoblast-like cells (MG-63 and MC3T3-E1) and the underlying mechanism were investigated by transmission electromicroscopy (TEM), MTT, and cell western (ICW) assays. Under LG-HMF significant morphologic changes in osteoblast-like cells occurred, including expansion of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, an increased number of lysosomes, distorted microvilli, and aggregates of actin filaments. Compared to controls, cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) secretion were significantly increased, and collagen I (col I), fibronectin (FN), vinculin, integrin α3, αv, and β1 expression were changed under LG-HMF conditions. In conclusion, LG-HMF affects osteoblast ultrastructure, cell viability, and ALP secretion, and the changes caused by LG-HMF may be related to disrupting col I or FN/αβ1 integrin. PMID:23382804

  9. Large gradient high magnetic fields affect osteoblast ultrastructure and function by disrupting collagen I or fibronectin/αβ1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ai-Rong; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing-Bao; Wang, Yang; Di, Sheng-Meng; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The superconducting magnet generates a field and field gradient product that can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. The effects of LG-HMF on the ultrastructure and function of osteoblast-like cells (MG-63 and MC3T3-E1) and the underlying mechanism were investigated by transmission electromicroscopy (TEM), MTT, and cell western (ICW) assays. Under LG-HMF significant morphologic changes in osteoblast-like cells occurred, including expansion of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, an increased number of lysosomes, distorted microvilli, and aggregates of actin filaments. Compared to controls, cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) secretion were significantly increased, and collagen I (col I), fibronectin (FN), vinculin, integrin α3, αv, and β1 expression were changed under LG-HMF conditions. In conclusion, LG-HMF affects osteoblast ultrastructure, cell viability, and ALP secretion, and the changes caused by LG-HMF may be related to disrupting col I or FN/αβ1 integrin.

  10. Enrichment of magnetic particles using temperature and magnetic field gradients induced by benchtop fabricated micro-electromagnets.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, A; Philpott, D N; Soleymani, L

    2017-11-21

    The active transport of analytes inside biosensing systems is important for reducing the response time and enhancing the limit-of-detection of these systems. Due to the ease of functionalization with bio-recognition agents and manipulation with magnetic fields, magnetic particles are widely used for active and directed transport of biological analytes. On-chip active electromagnets are ideally suited for manipulating magnetic particles in an automated and miniaturized fashion inside biosensing systems. Unfortunately, the magnetic force exerted by these devices decays rapidly as we move away from the device edges, and increasing the generated force to the levels necessary for particle manipulation requires a parallel increase in the applied current and the resultant Joule heating. In this paper, we designed a study to understand the combined role of thermal and magnetic forces on the movement of magnetic particles in order to extend the interaction distance of on-chip magnetic devices beyond the device edges. For this purpose, we used a rapid prototyping method to create an active/passive on-chip electromagnet with a micro/nano-structured active layer and a patterned ferromagnetic passive layer. We demonstrated that the measured terminal velocities of particles positioned near the electromagnet edge (∼5.5 μm) closely reflect the values obtained by multi-physics modelling. Interestingly, we observed a two orders of magnitude deviation between the experimental and modelling results for the terminal velocities of particles far from the electromagnet edge (∼55.5 μm). Heat modelling of the system using experimentally-measured thermal gradients indicates that this discrepancy is related to the enhanced fluid movement caused by thermal forces. This study enables the rational design of thermo-magnetic systems for thermally driving and magnetically capturing particles that are positioned at distances tens to hundreds of microns away from the edges of on-chip magnetic

  11. Fundamental study on the magnetic field control method using multiple HTS coils for Magnetic Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, R.; Kim, S. B.; Nakagawa, T.; Tomisaka, Y.; Ueda, H.

    2017-07-01

    The magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is a key technology to reduce the side effects in the medical applications, and the magnetic force control is very important issue in MDDS. In this application, the strength of magnetic field and gradient required to MDDS devices are 54 mT and 5.5 T/m, respectively. We proposed the new magnetic force control system that consists of the multiple racetrack HTS magnets. We can control the magnetic field gradient along the longitudinal direction by the arrangement of the multiple racetrack HTS magnets and operating current of each magnet. When the racetrack HTS magnets were used, the critical current was reduced by the self-magnetic field. Therefore, the shape design of HTS magnet to reduce the magnet field into the surface of HTS tapes was required. Therefore, the electromagnetic analysis based on finite element method (FEM) was carried out to design and optimize the shape of multiple racetrack HTS magnet. We were able to suppress the reduction of critical current by placing the magnetic substance at upper and lower side of the HTS magnets. It was confirmed that obtained maximum values of magnetic field strength and field gradient were 33 mT and 0.18 T/m, respectively.

  12. Electric field gradient in FeTiO3 by nuclear magnetic resonance and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Procházka, V; Stěpánková, H; Chlan, V; Tuček, J; Cuda, J; Kouřil, K; Filip, J; Zbořil, R

    2011-05-25

    Temperature dependence of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of (47)Ti and (49)Ti in polycrystalline ilmenite FeTiO(3) was measured in the range from 5 to 300 K under an external magnetic field of 9.401 T. NMR spectra collected between 300 and 77 K exhibit a resolved quadrupole splitting. The electric field gradient (EFG) tensor was evaluated for Ti nuclei and the ratio of (47)Ti and (49)Ti nuclear quadrupole moments was refined during the fitting procedure. Below 77 K, the fine structure of quadrupole splitting disappears due to the enormous increase of anisotropy. As a counterpart, ab initio calculations were performed using full potential augmented plane waves + local orbitals. The calculated EFG tensors for Ti and Fe were compared to the experimental ones evaluated from NMR and the Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments.

  13. Concurrent recording of RF pulses and gradient fields - comprehensive field monitoring for MRI.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Çavuşoğlu, Mustafa; Wilm, Bertram J; Schmid, Thomas; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-09-01

    Reconstruction of MRI data is based on exact knowledge of all magnetic field dynamics, since the interplay of RF and gradient pulses generates the signal, defines the contrast and forms the basis of resolution in spatial and spectral dimensions. Deviations caused by various sources, such as system imperfections, delays, eddy currents, drifts or externally induced fields, can therefore critically limit the accuracy of MRI examinations. This is true especially at ultra-high fields, because many error terms scale with the main field strength, and higher available SNR renders even smaller errors relevant. Higher baseline field also often requires higher acquisition bandwidths and faster signal encoding, increasing hardware demands and the severity of many types of hardware imperfection. To address field imperfections comprehensively, in this work we propose to expand the concept of magnetic field monitoring to also encompass the recording of RF fields. In this way, all dynamic magnetic fields relevant for spin evolution are covered, including low- to audio-frequency magnetic fields as produced by main magnets, gradients and shim systems, as well as RF pulses generated with single- and multiple-channel transmission systems. The proposed approach permits field measurements concurrently with actual MRI procedures on a strict common time base. The combined measurement is achieved with an array of miniaturized field probes that measure low- to audio-frequency fields via (19) F NMR and simultaneously pick up RF pulses in the MRI system's (1) H transmit band. Field recordings can form the basis of system calibration, retrospective correction of imaging data or closed-loop feedback correction, all of which hold potential to render MRI more robust and relax hardware requirements. The proposed approach is demonstrated for a range of imaging methods performed on a 7 T human MRI system, including accelerated multiple-channel RF pulses. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  14. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magneticmore » properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.« less

  15. Fluid flow analysis and vertical gradient freeze crystal growth in a travelling magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantzsch, R.; Grants, I.; Galindo, V.; Patzold, O.; Gerbeth, G.; Stelter, M.; Croll, A.

    2006-12-01

    In bulk crystal growth of semiconductors the concept of remote flow control by means of alternating magnetic fields has attracted considerable interest (see, e.g., te{1,2,3,4,5,6}). In this way the melt flow can be tailored for growth under optimised conditions to improve the crystal properties and/or the growth yield. A promising option is to apply an axially travelling magnetic wave to the melt (Travelling Magnetic Field - TMF). It introduces a mainly axial Lorentz force, which leads to meridional flow patterns. In recent numerical studies te{3}, te{6} the TMF has been recognised to be a versatile and efficient tool to control the heat and mass transport in the melt. For the Vertical Bridgman/Vertical Gradient Freeze (VB/VGF) growth, the beneficial effect of an adequately adjusted TMF-induced flow was clearly demonstrated in te{6} in terms of the reduction of thermal shear stress at the solid-liquid interface. In this paper, we present experimental and numerical results on the TMF driven convection in an isothermal model fluid as well as first VGF-TMF crystal growth experiments. The model investigations are focused on the transition from laminar to instationary flow conditions that should be avoided in crystal growth applications. The VGF experiments were aimed at growing Ga doped germanium single crystals under the influence of the travelling field in a newly developed VGF-TMF equipment. Figs 4, Refs 10.

  16. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Wu, R. G.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2016-06-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells.

  17. Contribution of Field Strength Gradients to the Net Vertical Current of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.

    2017-12-01

    We examined the contribution of field strength gradients for the degree of net vertical current (NVC) neutralization in active regions (ARs). We used photospheric vector magnetic field observations of AR 11158 obtained by Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO and Hinode. The vertical component of the electric current is decomposed into twist and shear terms. The NVC exhibits systematic evolution owing to the presence of the sheared polarity inversion line between rotating and shearing magnetic regions. We found that the sign of shear current distribution is opposite in dominant pixels (60%–65%) to that of twist current distribution, and its time profile bears no systematic trend. This result indicates that the gradient of magnetic field strength contributes to an opposite signed, though smaller in magnitude, current to that contributed by the magnetic field direction in the vertical component of the current. Consequently, the net value of the shear current is negative in both polarity regions, which when added to the net twist current reduces the direct current value in the north (B z > 0) polarity, resulting in a higher degree of NVC neutralization. We conjecture that the observed opposite signs of shear and twist currents are an indication, according to Parker, that the direct volume currents of flux tubes are canceled by their return currents, which are contributed by field strength gradients. Furthermore, with the increase of spatial resolution, we found higher values of twist, shear current distributions. However, the resolution effect is more useful in resolving the field strength gradients, and therefore suggests more contribution from shear current for the degree of NVC neutralization.

  18. A uniplanar three-axis gradient set for in vivo magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Demyanenko, Andrey V; Zhao, Lin; Kee, Yun; Nie, Shuyi; Fraser, Scott E; Tyszka, J Michael

    2009-09-01

    We present an optimized uniplanar magnetic resonance gradient design specifically tailored for MR imaging applications in developmental biology and histology. Uniplanar gradient designs sacrifice gradient uniformity for high gradient efficiency and slew rate, and are attractive for surface imaging applications where open access from one side of the sample is required. However, decreasing the size of the uniplanar gradient set presents several unique engineering challenges, particularly for heat dissipation and thermal insulation of the sample from gradient heating. We demonstrate a new three-axis, target-field optimized uniplanar gradient coil design that combines efficient cooling and insulation to significantly reduce sample heating at sample-gradient distances of less than 5mm. The instrument is designed for microscopy in horizontal bore magnets. Empirical gradient current efficiencies in the prototype coils lie between 3.75G/cm/A and 4.5G/cm/A with current and heating-limited maximum gradient strengths between 235G/cm and 450G/cm at a 2% duty cycle. The uniplanar gradient prototype is demonstrated with non-linearity corrections for both high-resolution structural imaging of tissue slices and for long time-course imaging of live, developing amphibian embryos in a horizontal bore 7T magnet.

  19. Orientation of Magnetized MnBi in a Strong Static Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Zhong, Yunbo; Dong, Licheng; Zhou, Bangfei; Ren, Zhongming; Debray, Francois; Beaugnon, Eric

    2018-06-01

    Solidification of Bi-4.5 wt pct Mn alloy was investigated in the presence and absence of a strong static magnetic field (SSMF). A cooling rate ( R) of 60 K/min caused MnBi to orient with the SSMF, owing to the force moment and attractive force. The attractive force and magnetic gradient force induced formation of multilayered MnBi when R was 5 K/min. The magnetic gradient force was damped when R was 60 K/min. Low cooling rates favored the aggregation process.

  20. Interaction of MRI field gradients with the human body.

    PubMed

    Glover, P M

    2009-11-07

    In this review, the effects of low-frequency electromagnetic fields encountered specifically during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are examined. The primary biological effect at frequencies of between 100 and 5000 Hz (typical of MRI magnetic field gradient switching) is peripheral nerve stimulation, the result of which can be a mild tingling and muscle twitching to a sensation of pain. The models for nerve stimulation and how they are related to the rate of change of magnetic field are examined. The experimental measurements, and analytic and computational modelling work in this area are reviewed. The review concludes with a discussion of current regulation in this area and current practice as both are applied to MRI.

  1. Pumping Liquid Oxygen by Use of Pulsed Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Lane, John; Immer, Christopher; Simpson, James

    2004-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop a method of pumping small amounts of liquid oxygen by use of pulsed magnetic fields. This development is motivated by a desire to reduce corrosion and hazards of explosion and combustion by eliminating all moving pump parts in contact with the pumped oxygen. The method exploits the known paramagnetism of liquid oxygen. Since they both behave similarly, the existing theory of ferrofluids (liquids with colloidally suspended magnetic particles) is directly applicable to paramagnetic liquid oxygen. In general, the force density of the paramagnetic interaction is proportional to the magnetic susceptibility multiplied by the gradient of the square of the magnitude of the magnetic field. The local force is in the direction of intensifying magnetic field. In the case of liquid oxygen, the magnetic susceptibility is large enough that a strong magnetic-field gradient can lift the liquid in normal Earth gravitation.

  2. Finite element analysis of gradient z-coil induced eddy currents in a permanent MRI magnet.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Xia, Ling; Chen, Wufan; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart; Xie, Dexin

    2011-01-01

    In permanent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, pulsed gradient fields induce strong eddy currents in the conducting structures of the magnet body. The gradient field for image encoding is perturbed by these eddy currents leading to MR image distortions. This paper presents a comprehensive finite element (FE) analysis of the eddy current generation in the magnet conductors. In the proposed FE model, the hysteretic characteristics of ferromagnetic materials are considered and a scalar Preisach hysteresis model is employed. The developed FE model was applied to study gradient z-coil induced eddy currents in a 0.5 T permanent MRI device. The simulation results demonstrate that the approach could be effectively used to investigate eddy current problems involving ferromagnetic materials. With the knowledge gained from this eddy current model, our next step is to design a passive magnet structure and active gradient coils to reduce the eddy current effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms.

    PubMed

    Voigt, J; Knappe-Grüneberg, S; Gutkelch, D; Haueisen, J; Neuber, S; Schnabel, A; Burghoff, M

    2015-05-01

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  4. Hygrothermal wave propagation in viscoelastic graphene under in-plane magnetic field based on nonlocal strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Behrouz; Shahsavari, Davood; Li, Li

    2018-03-01

    A size-dependent model is developed for the hygrothermal wave propagation analysis of an embedded viscoelastic single layer graphene sheet (SLGS) under the influence of in-plane magnetic field. The bi-Helmholtz nonlocal strain gradient theory involving three small scale parameters is introduced to account for the size-dependent effects. The size-dependent model is deduced based on Hamilton's principle. The closed-form solution of eigenfrequency relation between wave number and phase velocity is achieved. By studying the size-dependent effects on the flexural wave of SLGS, the dispersion relation predicted by the developed size-dependent model can show a good match with experimental data. The influence of in-plane magnetic field, temperature and moisture of environs, structural damping, damped substrate, lower and higher order nonlocal parameters and the material characteristic parameter on the phase velocity of SLGS is explored.

  5. Delta-configurations - Flare activity and magnetic-field structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patty, S. R.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Complex sunspots in four active regions of April and May 1980, all exhibiting regions of magnetic classification delta, were studied using data from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph. The vector magnetic field structure in the vicinity of each delta was determined, and the location of the deltas in each active region was correlated with the locations and types of flare activity for the regions. Two types of delta-configuration were found to exist, active and inactive, as defined by the relationships between magnetic field structure and activity. The active delta exhibited high flare activity, strong horizontal gradients of the longitudinal (line-of-sight) magnetic field component, a strong transverse (perpendicular to line-of-sight) component, and a highly nonpotential orientation of the photospheric magnetic field, all indications of a highly sheared magnetic field. The inactive delta, on the other hand, exhibited little or no flare production, weaker horizontal gradients of the longitudinal component, weaker transverse components, and a nearly potential, nonsheared orientation of the magnetic field. It is concluded that the presence of such sheared fields is the primary signature by which the active delta may be distinguished, and that it is this shear which produces the flare activity of the active delta.

  6. Coherent radar estimates of high latitude field-aligned currents: the importance of conductance gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, M.; Nielsen, E.

    Two bi-static VHF radar systems STARE and SABRE have been employed to estimate ionospheric electric field distributions in the geomagnetic latitude range 61 1 - 69 3 degrees over Scandinavia corresponding to the global Region 2 current system 173 days of data from all four radars have been analysed during the period 1982 to 1986 The average magnetic field-aligned currents have been computed as a function of the Kp and Ae indices using an empirical model of ionospheric Pedersen and Hall conductance taking into account conductance gradients The divergence of horizontal Pedersen currents and Hall conductance gradients have approximately the same importance for generating the Region 2 field-aligned currents Pedersen conductance gradients have a significant modifying effect A case study of field-aligned currents has been performed using the STARE radar system to obtain the instantaneous ionospheric electric field distribution in the vicinity of an auroral arc The instantaneous Hall conductance was estimated from the Scandinavian Magnetometer Array This study clearly shows that even for quiet steady state geomagnetic conditions conductance gradients are important modifiers of magnetic field-aligned currents

  7. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  8. Combining Step Gradients and Linear Gradients in Density.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok A; Walz, Jenna A; Gonidec, Mathieu; Mace, Charles R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-06-16

    Combining aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS) and magnetic levitation (MagLev) provides a method to produce hybrid gradients in apparent density. AMPS—solutions of different polymers, salts, or surfactants that spontaneously separate into immiscible but predominantly aqueous phases—offer thermodynamically stable steps in density that can be tuned by the concentration of solutes. MagLev—the levitation of diamagnetic objects in a paramagnetic fluid within a magnetic field gradient—can be arranged to provide a near-linear gradient in effective density where the height of a levitating object above the surface of the magnet corresponds to its density; the strength of the gradient in effective density can be tuned by the choice of paramagnetic salt and its concentrations and by the strength and gradient in the magnetic field. Including paramagnetic salts (e.g., MnSO4 or MnCl2) in AMPS, and placing them in a magnetic field gradient, enables their use as media for MagLev. The potential to create large steps in density with AMPS allows separations of objects across a range of densities. The gradients produced by MagLev provide resolution over a continuous range of densities. By combining these approaches, mixtures of objects with large differences in density can be separated and analyzed simultaneously. Using MagLev to add an effective gradient in density also enables tuning the range of densities captured at an interface of an AMPS by simply changing the position of the container in the magnetic field. Further, by creating AMPS in which phases have different concentrations of paramagnetic ions, the phases can provide different resolutions in density. These results suggest that combining steps in density with gradients in density can enable new classes of separations based on density.

  9. Numerically simulated exposure of children and adults to pulsed gradient fields in MRI.

    PubMed

    Samoudi, Amine M; Vermeeren, Gunter; Tanghe, Emmeric; Van Holen, Roel; Martens, Luc; Josephs, Wout

    2016-11-01

    To determine exposure to gradient switching fields of adults and children in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner by evaluating internal electric fields within realistic models of adult male, adult female, and child inside transverse and longitudinal gradient coils, and to compare these results with compliance guidelines. Patients inside x-, y-, and z-gradient coils were simulated using anatomically realistic models of adult male, adult female, and child. The induced electric fields were computed for 1 kHz sinusoidal current with a magnitude of 1 A in the gradient coils. Rheobase electric fields were then calculated and compared to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) 2004 and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 2010 guidelines. The effect of the human body, coil type, and skin conductivity on the induced electric field was also investigated. The internal electric fields are within the first level controlled operating mode of the guidelines and range from 2.7V m -1 to 4.5V m -1 , except for the adult male inside the y-gradient coil (induced field reaches 5.4V m -1 ).The induced electric field is sensitive to the coil type (electric field in the skin of adult male: 4V m -1 , 4.6V m -1 , and 3.8V m -1 for x-, y-, and z-gradient coils, respectively), the human body model (electric field in the skin inside y-gradient coil: 4.6V m -1 , 4.2V m -1 , and 3V m -1 for adult male, adult female, and child, respectively), and the skin conductivity (electric field 2.35-4.29% higher for 0.1S m -1 skin conductivity compared to 0.2S m -1 ). The y-gradient coil induced the largest fields in the patients. The highest levels of internal electric fields occurred for the adult male model. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1360-1367. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23more » pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.« less

  11. Magnetic field shift due to mechanical vibration in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Bernd U; Tomasi, Dardo; Caparelli, Elisabeth C

    2005-11-01

    Mechanical vibrations of the gradient coil system during readout in echo-planar imaging (EPI) can increase the temperature of the gradient system and alter the magnetic field distribution during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This effect is enhanced by resonant modes of vibrations and results in apparent motion along the phase encoding direction in fMRI studies. The magnetic field drift was quantified during EPI by monitoring the resonance frequency interleaved with the EPI acquisition, and a novel method is proposed to correct the apparent motion. The knowledge on the frequency drift over time was used to correct the phase of the k-space EPI dataset. Since the resonance frequency changes very slowly over time, two measurements of the resonance frequency, immediately before and after the EPI acquisition, are sufficient to remove the field drift effects from fMRI time series. The frequency drift correction method was tested "in vivo" and compared to the standard image realignment method. The proposed method efficiently corrects spurious motion due to magnetic field drifts during fMRI. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Magnetic fringe field interference between the quadrupole and corrector magnets in the CSNS/RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Kang, Wen; Deng, Changdong; Sun, Xianjing; Li, Li; Wu, Xi; Gong, Lingling; Cheng, Da; Zhu, Yingshun; Chen, Fusan

    2017-03-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) employs large aperture quadrupole and corrector magnets with small aspect ratios and relatively short iron to iron separations; so the fringe field interference becomes serious which results in integral field strength reduction and extra field harmonics. We have performed 3D magnetic field simulations to investigate the magnetic field interference in the magnet assemblies and made some adjustments on the magnet arrangement. The Fourier analysis is used to quantify the integral gradient reduction and field harmonic changes of the quadrupole magnets. Some magnetic field measurements are undertaken to verify the simulation results. The simulation details and the major results are presented in this paper.

  13. Self-diffusion of electrolyte species in model battery electrodes using Magic Angle Spinning and Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambio, Sacris Jeru; Deschamps, Michaël; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Etiemble, Aurélien; Douillard, Thierry; Maire, Eric; Lestriez, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are electrochemical storage devices using the electrochemical activity of the lithium ion in relation to intercalation compounds owing to mass transport phenomena through diffusion. Diffusion of the lithium ion in the electrode pores has been poorly understood due to the lack of experimental techniques for measuring its self-diffusion coefficient in porous media. Magic-Angle Spinning, Pulsed Field Gradient, Stimulated-Echo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-PFG-STE NMR) was used here for the first time to measure the self-diffusion coefficients of the electrolyte species in the LP30 battery electrolyte (i.e. a 1 M solution of LiPF6 dissolved in 1:1 Ethylene Carbonate - Dimethyl Carbonate) in model composites. These composite electrodes were made of alumina, carbon black and PVdF-HFP. Alumina's magnetic susceptibility is close to the measured magnetic susceptibility of the LP30 electrolyte thereby limiting undesirable internal field gradients. Interestingly, the self-diffusion coefficient of lithium ions decreases with increasing carbon content. FIB-SEM was used to describe the 3D geometry of the samples. The comparison between the reduction of self-diffusion coefficients as measured by PFG-NMR and as geometrically derived from FIB/SEM tortuosity values highlights the contribution of specific interactions at the material/electrolyte interface on the lithium transport properties.

  14. A new multi-line cusp magnetic field plasma device (MPD) with variable magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Patel, A D; Sharma, M; Ramasubramanian, N; Ganesh, R; Chattopadhyay, P K

    2018-04-01

    A new multi-line cusp magnetic field plasma device consisting of electromagnets with core material has been constructed with a capability to experimentally control the relative volume fractions of magnetized to unmagnetized plasma volume as well as accurate control on the gradient length scales of mean density and temperature profiles. Argon plasma has been produced using a hot tungsten cathode over a wide range of pressures 5 × 10 -5 -1 × 10 -3 mbar, achieving plasma densities ranging from 10 9 to 10 11 cm -3 and the electron temperature in the range 1-8 eV. The radial profiles of plasma parameters measured along the non-cusp region (in between two consecutive magnets) show a finite region with uniform and quiescent plasma, where the magnetic field is very low such that the ions are unmagnetized. Beyond that region, both plasma species are magnetized and the profiles show gradients both in temperature and density. The electrostatic fluctuation measured using a Langmuir probe radially along the non-cusp region shows less than 1% (δI isat /I isat < 1%). The plasma thus produced will be used to study new and hitherto unexplored physics parameter space relevant to both laboratory multi-scale plasmas and astrophysical plasmas.

  15. A new multi-line cusp magnetic field plasma device (MPD) with variable magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A. D.; Sharma, M.; Ramasubramanian, N.; Ganesh, R.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.

    2018-04-01

    A new multi-line cusp magnetic field plasma device consisting of electromagnets with core material has been constructed with a capability to experimentally control the relative volume fractions of magnetized to unmagnetized plasma volume as well as accurate control on the gradient length scales of mean density and temperature profiles. Argon plasma has been produced using a hot tungsten cathode over a wide range of pressures 5 × 10-5 -1 × 10-3 mbar, achieving plasma densities ranging from 109 to 1011 cm-3 and the electron temperature in the range 1-8 eV. The radial profiles of plasma parameters measured along the non-cusp region (in between two consecutive magnets) show a finite region with uniform and quiescent plasma, where the magnetic field is very low such that the ions are unmagnetized. Beyond that region, both plasma species are magnetized and the profiles show gradients both in temperature and density. The electrostatic fluctuation measured using a Langmuir probe radially along the non-cusp region shows less than 1% (δIisat/Iisat < 1%). The plasma thus produced will be used to study new and hitherto unexplored physics parameter space relevant to both laboratory multi-scale plasmas and astrophysical plasmas.

  16. In Situ Magnetic Field Measurement using the Hanle Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a simple method of in situ magnetic field mapping near zero points in magnetic fields. It is ideal for measuring trapping parameters such the field gradient and curvature, and should be applicable in most experiments with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or similar setup. This method works by probing atomic transitions in a vacuum, and is based on the Hanle effect, which alters the polarization of spontaneous emission in the presence of a magnetic field. Unlike most techniques based on the Hanle effect, however, we look only at intensity. Instead of measuring polarization we use the change in directional radiation patterns caused by a magnetic field. Using one of the cooling beams for our MOT, along with a linear polarizer, a narrow slit, and an inexpensive webcam, we measure the three dimensional position of a magnetic field zero point within our vacuum to within +/-1 mm and the gradient through the zero point to an accuracy of 4%. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  17. Gravitropic mechanisms derived from space experiments and magnetic gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.; Park, Myoung Ryoul

    2016-07-01

    Gravitropism is the result of a complex sequence of events that begins with the movement of dense particles, typically starch-filled amyloplasts in response to reorientation. Although these organelles change positions, it is not clear whether the critical signal is derived from sedimentation or dynamic interactions of amyloplasts with relevant membranes. Substituting gravity by high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) provides a localized stimulus for diamagnetic starch that is specific for amyloplasts and comparable to gravity without affecting other organelles. Experiments with Brassica rapa showed induction of root curvature by HGMF when roots moved sufficiently close to the magnetic gradient-inducing foci. The focused and short-range effectiveness of HGMFs provided a gravity-like stimulus and affected related gene expression. Root curvature was sensitive to the mutual alignment between roots and HGMF direction. Unrelated to any HGMF effects, the size of amyloplasts in space-grown roots increased by 30% compared to ground controls and suggests enhanced sensitivity in a gravity-reduced environment. Accompanying gene transcription studies showed greater differences between HGMF-exposed and space controls than between space and ground controls. This observation may lead to the identification of gravitropism-relevant genes. However, space grown roots showed stronger transcription of common reference genes such as actin and ubiquitin in magnetic fields than in non-magnetic conditions. In contrast, α-amylase, glucokinase and PIN encoding genes were transcribed stronger under non-magnetic conditions than under HGMF. The large number of comparisons between space, ground, and HGMF prompted the assessment of transcription differences between root segments, root-shoot junction, and seeds. Because presumed transcription of reference genes varied more than genes of interest, changes in gene expression cannot be based on reference genes. The data provide an example of complex

  18. Self-diffusion imaging by spin echo in Earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Mohoric, A; Stepisnik, J; Kos, M; Planinsi

    1999-01-01

    The NMR of the Earth's magnetic field is used for diffusion-weighted imaging of phantoms. Due to a weak Larmor field, care needs to be taken regarding the use of the usual high field assumption in calculating the effect of the applied inhomogeneous magnetic field. The usual definition of the magnetic field gradient must be replaced by a generalized formula valid when the strength of a nonuniform magnetic field and a Larmor field are comparable (J. Stepisnik, Z. Phys. Chem. 190, 51-62 (1995)). It turns out that the expression for spin echo attenuation is identical to the well-known Torrey formula only when the applied nonuniform field has a proper symmetry. This kind of problem may occur in a strong Larmor field as well as when the slow diffusion rate of particles needs an extremely strong gradient to be applied. The measurements of the geomagnetic field NMR demonstrate the usefulness of the method for diffusion and flow-weighted imaging. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Reactions of the nervous system to magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kholodov, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    This magnetobiological survey considers sensory, nervous, stress and genetic effects of magnetic fields on man and animals. It is shown that the nervous system plays an important role in the reactions of the organism to magnetic fields; the final biological effect is a function of the strength of the magnetic fields, the gradient, direction of the lines of force, duration and location of the action, and the functional status of the organism.

  20. Longitudinal Gradient Dipole Magnet Prototype for APS at ANL

    DOE PAGES

    Kashikhin, V. S.; Borland, M.; Chlachidze, G.; ...

    2016-01-26

    We planned an upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The main goal of the upgrade is to improve the storage ring performance based on more advanced optics. One of the key magnet system elements is bending dipole magnets having a field strength change along the electron beam path. Moreover, a prototype of one such longitudinal gradient dipole magnet has been designed, built, and measured in a collaborative effort of ANL and Fermilab. Our paper discusses various magnetic design options, the selected magnet design, and the fabrication technology. The prototype magnet has been measured by rotationalmore » coils, a stretched wire, and a Hall probe. Measurement results are discussed and compared with simulations.« less

  1. ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T₂) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T₂(⁎)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Variable high gradient permanent magnet quadrupole (QUAPEVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteau, F.; Ghaith, A.; N'Gotta, P.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Valléau, M.; Kitegi, C.; Loulergue, A.; Vétéran, J.; Sebdaoui, M.; André, T.; Le Bec, G.; Chavanne, J.; Vallerand, C.; Oumbarek, D.; Cosson, O.; Forest, F.; Jivkov, P.; Lancelot, J. L.; Couprie, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Different applications such as laser plasma acceleration, colliders, and diffraction limited light sources require high gradient quadrupoles, with strength that can reach up to 200 T/m for a typical 10 mm bore diameter. We present here a permanent magnet based quadrupole (so-called QUAPEVA) composed of a Halbach ring and surrounded by four permanent magnet cylinders. Its design including magnetic simulation modeling enabling us to reach 201 T/m with a gradient variability of 45% and mechanical issues are reported. Magnetic measurements of seven systems of different lengths are presented and confirmed the theoretical expectations. The variation of the magnetic center while changing the gradient strength is ±10 μm. A triplet of QUAPEVA magnets is used to efficiently focus a beam with large energy spread and high divergence that is generated by a Laser Plasma Acceleration source for a free electron laser demonstration and has enabled us to perform beam based alignment and control the dispersion of the beam.

  3. Spatial encoding using the nonlinear field perturbations from magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hirad; Dominguez-Viqueira, William; Cunningham, Charles H

    2014-08-01

    A proof-of-concept study was performed to assess the technical feasibility of using magnetic materials to generate spatial encoding fields. Spatially varying magnetic fields were generated by the placement of markers with different volume susceptibilities within the imaging volume. No linear gradients were used for spatial encoding during the signal acquisition. A signal-encoding model is described for reconstructing the images encoded with these field perturbations. Simulation and proof-of-concept experimental results are presented. Experiments were performed using field perturbations from a cylindrical marker as an example of the new encoding fields. Based on this experimental setup, annular rings were reconstructed from signals encoded with the new fields. Simulation results were presented for different acquisition parameters. Proof-of-concept was supported by the correspondence of regions in an image reconstructed from experimental data compared to those in a conventional gradient-echo image. Experimental results showed that inclusions of dimensions 1.5 mm in size could be resolved with the experimental setup. This study shows the technical feasibility of using magnetic markers to produce encoding fields. Magnetic materials will allow generating spatial encoding fields, which can be tailored to an imaging application with less complexity and at lower cost compared to the use of gradient inserts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Changes in the topography of cellular components in pea root statocytes exposed to high gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, Ninel A.; Polishchuk, Olexandr V.; Kondrachuk, Alexander V.

    2005-08-01

    High-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) is one of methods, by which gravitropism in plants is studied. The aim of our study was elucidation of HGMF effects on topography of cellular components in root statocytes of 4- day Pisum sativum L. seedlings in comparison to gravistimulation. Under gravistimulation during 5, 30 and 60 min seedlings were rotated 45o; magnetostimulation was carried out along gap between two NdFeB magnets (0.7 T). Morphometric measurements were made from images of whole statocytes, for upper, middle and lower thirds of cells, and proximal and distal halves of cells. Morphometric analysis revealed that HGMF resulted in the redistribution of all cellular components in statocytes. The correlation in the amyloplast distribution between gravistimulation and magnetostimulation was established.

  5. Influence of Magnetic Fields on Magneto-Aerotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Mathieu; McCarthy, Aongus; Fix, Dmitri; Edwards, Matthew R.; Repp, Felix; Vach, Peter; Dunlop, John W. C.; Sitti, Metin; Buller, Gerald S.; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The response of cells to changes in their physico-chemical micro-environment is essential to their survival. For example, bacterial magnetotaxis uses the Earth's magnetic field together with chemical sensing to help microorganisms move towards favoured habitats. The studies of such complex responses are lacking a method that permits the simultaneous mapping of the chemical environment and the response of the organisms, and the ability to generate a controlled physiological magnetic field. We have thus developed a multi-modal microscopy platform that fulfils these requirements. Using simultaneous fluorescence and high-speed imaging in conjunction with diffusion and aerotactic models, we characterized the magneto- aerotaxis of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. We assessed the influence of the magnetic field (orientation; strength) on the formation and the dynamic of a micro-aerotactic band (size, dynamic, position). As previously described by models of magnetotaxis, the application of a magnetic field pointing towards the anoxic zone of an oxygen gradient results in an enhanced aerotaxis even down to Earth's magnetic field strength. We found that neither a ten-fold increase of the field strength nor a tilt of 45° resulted in a significant change of the aerotactic efficiency. However, when the field strength is zeroed or when the field angle is tilted to 90°, the magneto-aerotaxis efficiency is drastically reduced. The classical model of magneto-aerotaxis assumes a response proportional to the cosine of the angle difference between the directions of the oxygen gradient and that of the magnetic field. Our experimental evidence however shows that this behaviour is more complex than assumed in this model, thus opening up new avenues for research. PMID:24983865

  6. Minimizing Environmental Magnetic Field Sources for nEDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinson, Alex; Filippone, Bradley; Slutsky, Simon; Osthelder, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Measurement of the neutron's Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) could potentially explain the Baryon Asymmetry Problem, and would suggest plausible extensions to the Standard Model. We will attempt to detect the nEDM by measuring the electric-field-dependent neutron precession frequency, which is highly sensitive to magnetic field gradients. In order to produce fields with sufficiently low gradients for our experiment, we eliminate environmental effects by offsetting the ambient field with a Field Compensation System (FCS), then magnetically shielding the reduced field with a Mu-Metal cylinder. We discovered that the strongest environmental effect in our lab came from iron rebar embedded in the floor beneath the proposed experiment location. The large extent and strength of the floor's magnetization made the effect too large to offset with the FCS, forcing us to relocate our apparatus. The floor's magnetic field was mapped with a Hall probe in order to determine the most viable experiment locations. A 3-axis Fluxgate magnetometer was then used to determine the floor field's drop-off and shape at these locations, and a final apparatus position was determined which minimized the floor's effect such that it could be effectively offset and shielded by our experiment. Caltech SFP Office.

  7. Gradient nonlinearity calibration and correction for a compact, asymmetric magnetic resonance imaging gradient system.

    PubMed

    Tao, S; Trzasko, J D; Gunter, J L; Weavers, P T; Shu, Y; Huston, J; Lee, S K; Tan, E T; Bernstein, M A

    2017-01-21

    Due to engineering limitations, the spatial encoding gradient fields in conventional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be perfectly linear and always contain higher-order, nonlinear components. If ignored during image reconstruction, gradient nonlinearity (GNL) manifests as image geometric distortion. Given an estimate of the GNL field, this distortion can be corrected to a degree proportional to the accuracy of the field estimate. The GNL of a gradient system is typically characterized using a spherical harmonic polynomial model with model coefficients obtained from electromagnetic simulation. Conventional whole-body gradient systems are symmetric in design; typically, only odd-order terms up to the 5th-order are required for GNL modeling. Recently, a high-performance, asymmetric gradient system was developed, which exhibits more complex GNL that requires higher-order terms including both odd- and even-orders for accurate modeling. This work characterizes the GNL of this system using an iterative calibration method and a fiducial phantom used in ADNI (Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative). The phantom was scanned at different locations inside the 26 cm diameter-spherical-volume of this gradient, and the positions of fiducials in the phantom were estimated. An iterative calibration procedure was utilized to identify the model coefficients that minimize the mean-squared-error between the true fiducial positions and the positions estimated from images corrected using these coefficients. To examine the effect of higher-order and even-order terms, this calibration was performed using spherical harmonic polynomial of different orders up to the 10th-order including even- and odd-order terms, or odd-order only. The results showed that the model coefficients of this gradient can be successfully estimated. The residual root-mean-squared-error after correction using up to the 10th-order coefficients was reduced to 0.36 mm, yielding spatial accuracy comparable to

  8. Gradient nonlinearity calibration and correction for a compact, asymmetric magnetic resonance imaging gradient system

    PubMed Central

    Tao, S; Trzasko, J D; Gunter, J L; Weavers, P T; Shu, Y; Huston, J; Lee, S K; Tan, E T; Bernstein, M A

    2017-01-01

    Due to engineering limitations, the spatial encoding gradient fields in conventional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be perfectly linear and always contain higher-order, nonlinear components. If ignored during image reconstruction, gradient nonlinearity (GNL) manifests as image geometric distortion. Given an estimate of the GNL field, this distortion can be corrected to a degree proportional to the accuracy of the field estimate. The GNL of a gradient system is typically characterized using a spherical harmonic polynomial model with model coefficients obtained from electromagnetic simulation. Conventional whole-body gradient systems are symmetric in design; typically, only odd-order terms up to the 5th-order are required for GNL modeling. Recently, a high-performance, asymmetric gradient system was developed, which exhibits more complex GNL that requires higher-order terms including both odd- and even-orders for accurate modeling. This work characterizes the GNL of this system using an iterative calibration method and a fiducial phantom used in ADNI (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative). The phantom was scanned at different locations inside the 26-cm diameter-spherical-volume of this gradient, and the positions of fiducials in the phantom were estimated. An iterative calibration procedure was utilized to identify the model coefficients that minimize the mean-squared-error between the true fiducial positions and the positions estimated from images corrected using these coefficients. To examine the effect of higher-order and even-order terms, this calibration was performed using spherical harmonic polynomial of different orders up to the 10th-order including even- and odd-order terms, or odd-order only. The results showed that the model coefficients of this gradient can be successfully estimated. The residual root-mean-squared-error after correction using up to the 10th-order coefficients was reduced to 0.36 mm, yielding spatial accuracy comparable to

  9. B0 concomitant field compensation for MRI systems employing asymmetric transverse gradient coils.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Paul T; Tao, Shengzhen; Trzasko, Joshua D; Frigo, Louis M; Shu, Yunhong; Frick, Matthew A; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Foo, Thomas K-F; Bernstein, Matt A

    2018-03-01

    Imaging gradients result in the generation of concomitant fields, or Maxwell fields, which are of increasing importance at higher gradient amplitudes. These time-varying fields cause additional phase accumulation, which must be compensated for to avoid image artifacts. In the case of gradient systems employing symmetric design, the concomitant fields are well described with second-order spatial variation. Gradient systems employing asymmetric design additionally generate concomitant fields with global (zeroth-order or B 0 ) and linear (first-order) spatial dependence. This work demonstrates a general solution to eliminate the zeroth-order concomitant field by applying the correct B 0 frequency shift in real time to counteract the concomitant fields. Results are demonstrated for phase contrast, spiral, echo-planar imaging (EPI), and fast spin-echo imaging. A global phase offset is reduced in the phase-contrast exam, and blurring is virtually eliminated in spiral images. The bulk image shift in the phase-encode direction is compensated for in EPI, whereas signal loss, ghosting, and blurring are corrected in the fast-spin echo images. A user-transparent method to compensate the zeroth-order concomitant field term by center frequency shifting is proposed and implemented. This solution allows all the existing pulse sequences-both product and research-to be retained without any modifications. Magn Reson Med 79:1538-1544, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Magnetic core shell nanoparticles trapping in a microdevice generating high magnetic gradient.

    PubMed

    Teste, Bruno; Malloggi, Florent; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Georgelin, Thomas; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Varenne, Anne; Girault, Hubert; Descroix, Stéphanie

    2011-03-07

    Magnetic core shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) 30 nm diameter with a magnetic weight of 10% are usually much too small to be trapped in microfluidic systems using classical external magnets. Here, a simple microchip for efficient MCSNPs trapping and release is presented. It comprises a bed of micrometric iron beads (6-8 μm diameter) packed in a microchannel against a physical restriction and presenting a low dead volume of 0.8 nL. These beads of high magnetic permeability are used to focus magnetic field lines from an external permanent magnet and generate local high magnetic gradients. The nanoparticles magnetic trap has been characterised both by numerical simulations and fluorescent MCSNPs imaging. Numerical simulations have been performed to map both the magnetic flux density and the magnetic force, and showed that MCSNPs are preferentially trapped at the iron bead magnetic poles where the magnetic force is increased by 3 orders of magnitude. The trapping efficiency was experimentally determined using fluorescent MCSNPs for different flow rates, different iron beads and permanent magnet positions. At a flow rate of 100 μL h(-1), the nanoparticles trapping/release can be achieved within 20 s with a preconcentration factor of 4000.

  11. Dynamo magnetic-field generation in turbulent accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic fields can play important roles in the dynamics and evolution of accretion disks. The presence of strong differential rotation and vertical density gradients in turbulent disks allows the alpha-omega dynamo mechanism to offset the turbulent dissipation and maintain strong magnetic fields. It is found that MHD dynamo magnetic-field normal modes in an accretion disk are highly localized to restricted regions of a disk. Implications for the character of real, dynamically constrained magnetic fields in accretion disks are discussed. The magnetic stress due to the mean magnetic field is found to be of the order of a viscous stress. The dominant stress, however, is likely to come from small-scale fluctuating magnetic fields. These fields may also give rise to energetic flares above the disk surface, providing a possible explanation for the highly variable hard X-ray emission from objects like Cyg X-l.

  12. Magnetic-field gradiometer based on ultracold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasak, Tomasz; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Calarco, Tommaso; Negretti, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the usefulness of ultracold atomic collisions for sensing the strength of an external magnetic field as well as its spatial gradient. The core idea of the sensor, which we recently proposed in Jachymski et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 120, 013401 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.013401], is to probe the transmission of the atoms through a set of quasi-one-dimensional waveguides that contain an impurity. Magnetic-field-dependent interactions between the incoming atoms and the impurity naturally lead to narrow resonances that can act as sensitive field probes since they strongly affect the transmission. We illustrate our findings with concrete examples of experimental relevance, demonstrating that for large atom fluences N a sensitivity of the order of 1 nT/√{N } for the field strength and 100 nT/(mm √{N }) for the gradient can be reached with our scheme.

  13. Climatology of the Auroral Electrojets Derived From the Along-Track Gradient of Magnetic Field Intensity Measured by POGO, Magsat, CHAMP, and Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R. A.; Beggan, C. D.; Macmillan, S.; Whaler, K. A.

    2017-10-01

    The auroral electrojets (AEJs) are complex and dynamic horizontal ionospheric electric currents which form ovals around Earth's poles, being controlled by the morphology of the main magnetic field and the energy input from the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere. The strength and location of the AEJ varies with solar wind conditions and the solar cycle but should also be controlled on decadal timescales by main field secular variation. To determine the AEJ climatology, we use data from four polar Low Earth Orbit magnetic satellite missions: POGO, Magsat, CHAMP, and Swarm. A simple estimation of the AEJ strength and latitude is made from each pass of the satellites, from peaks in the along-track gradient of the magnetic field intensity after subtracting a core and crustal magnetic field model. This measure of the AEJ activity is used to study the response in different sectors of magnetic local time (MLT) during different seasons and directions of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We find a season-dependent hemispherical asymmetry in the AEJ response to IMF By, with a tendency toward stronger (weaker) AEJ currents in the north than the south during By>0 (By<0) around local winter. This effect disappears during local summer when we find a tendency toward stronger currents in the south than the north. The solar cycle modulation of the AEJ and the long-term shifting of its position and strength due to the core field variation are presented as challenges to internal field modeling.

  14. Shape and fission instabilities of ferrofluids in non-uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieu, Thibault; Walter, Clément

    2018-04-01

    We study static distributions of ferrofluid submitted to non-uniform magnetic fields. We show how the normal-field instability is modified in the presence of a weak magnetic field gradient. Then we consider a ferrofluid droplet and show how the gradient affects its shape. A rich phase transitions phenomenology is found. We also investigate the creation of droplets by successive splits when a magnet is vertically approached from below and derive theoretical expressions which are solved numerically to obtain the number of droplets and their aspect ratio as function of the field configuration. A quantitative comparison is performed with previous experimental results, as well as with our own experiments, and yields good agreement with the theoretical modeling.

  15. MAGNETIC BRAIDING AND PARALLEL ELECTRIC FIELDS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wilmot-Smith, A. L.; Hornig, G.; Pontin, D. I.

    2009-05-10

    The braiding of the solar coronal magnetic field via photospheric motions-with subsequent relaxation and magnetic reconnection-is one of the most widely debated ideas of solar physics. We readdress the theory in light of developments in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection theory. It is known that the integrated parallel electric field along field lines is the key quantity determining the rate of reconnection, in contrast with the two-dimensional case where the electric field itself is the important quantity. We demonstrate that this difference becomes crucial for sufficiently complex magnetic field structures. A numerical method is used to relax a braided magnetic field towardmore » an ideal force-free equilibrium; the field is found to remain smooth throughout the relaxation, with only large-scale current structures. However, a highly filamentary integrated parallel current structure with extremely short length-scales is found in the field, with the associated gradients intensifying during the relaxation process. An analytical model is developed to show that, in a coronal situation, the length scales associated with the integrated parallel current structures will rapidly decrease with increasing complexity, or degree of braiding, of the magnetic field. Analysis shows the decrease in these length scales will, for any finite resistivity, eventually become inconsistent with the stability of the coronal field. Thus the inevitable consequence of the magnetic braiding process is a loss of equilibrium of the magnetic field, probably via magnetic reconnection events.« less

  16. Particle-Based Microfluidic Device for Providing High Magnetic Field Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Tak S. (Inventor); Lin, Adam Y. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device for manipulating particles in a fluid has a device body that defines a main channel therein, in which the main channel has an inlet and an outlet. The device body further defines a particulate diverting channel therein, the particulate diverting channel being in fluid connection with the main channel between the inlet and the outlet of the main channel and having a particulate outlet. The microfluidic device also has a plurality of microparticles arranged proximate or in the main channel between the inlet of the main channel and the fluid connection of the particulate diverting channel to the main channel. The plurality of microparticles each comprises a material in a composition thereof having a magnetic susceptibility suitable to cause concentration of magnetic field lines of an applied magnetic field while in operation. A microfluidic particle-manipulation system has a microfluidic particle-manipulation device and a magnet disposed proximate the microfluidic particle-manipulation device.

  17. Non-singular spherical harmonic expressions of geomagnetic vector and gradient tensor fields in the local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Lesur, V.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    General expressions of magnetic vector (MV) and magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of spherical harmonics at different degrees and orders, are relatively complicated and singular at the poles. In this paper, we derived alternative non-singular expressions for the MV, the MGT and also the higher-order partial derivatives of the magnetic field in local north-oriented reference frame. Using our newly derived formulae, the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields at an altitude of 300 km are calculated based on a global lithospheric magnetic field model GRIMM_L120 (version 0.0) and the main magnetic field model of IGRF11. The corresponding results at the poles are discussed and the validity of the derived formulas is verified using the Laplace equation of the potential field.

  18. Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an Axially Symmetric Solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.

  19. Non-singular spherical harmonic expressions of geomagnetic vector and gradient tensor fields in the local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Lesur, V.; Wang, L.

    2015-07-01

    General expressions of magnetic vector (MV) and magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of spherical harmonics at different degrees/orders are relatively complicated and singular at the poles. In this paper, we derived alternative non-singular expressions for the MV, the MGT and also the third-order partial derivatives of the magnetic potential field in the local north-oriented reference frame. Using our newly derived formulae, the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields and also the third-order partial derivatives of the magnetic potential field at an altitude of 300 km are calculated based on a global lithospheric magnetic field model GRIMM_L120 (GFZ Reference Internal Magnetic Model, version 0.0) with spherical harmonic degrees 16-90. The corresponding results at the poles are discussed and the validity of the derived formulas is verified using the Laplace equation of the magnetic potential field.

  20. Shear-induced inflation of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Using numerical models of force-free magnetic fields, the shearing of footprints in arcade geometries leading to an inflation of the coronal magnetic field was examined. For each of the shear profiles considered, all of the field lines become elevated compared with the potential field. This includes cases where the shear is concentrated well away from the arcade axis, such that B(sub z), the component of field parallel to the axis, increases outward to produce an inward B(sub z)squared/8 pi magnetic pressure gradient force. These results contrast with an earlier claim, shown to be incorrect, that field lines can sometimes become depressed as a result of shear. It is conjectured that an inflation of the entire field will always result from the shearing of simple arcade configurations. These results have implications for prominence formation, the interplanetary magnetic flux, and possibly also coronal holes.

  1. Shear-induced inflation of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Using numerical models of force-free magnetic fields, the shearing of footprints in arcade geometries leading to an inflation of the coronal magnetic field was examined. For each of the shear profiles considered, all of the field lines become elevated compared with the potential field. This includes cases where the shear is concentrated well away from the arcade axis, such that B(sub z), the component of field parallel to the axis, increases outward to produce an inward B(sub z) squared/8 pi magnetic pressure gradient force. These results contrast with an earlier claim, shown to be incorrect, that field lines can sometimes become depressed as a result of shear. It is conjectured that an inflation of the entire field will always result from the shearing of simple arcade configurations. These results have implications for prominence formation, the interplanetary magnetic flux, and possibly also coronal holes.

  2. Impact of a high magnetic field on the orientation of gravitactic unicellular organisms--a critical consideration about the application of magnetic fields to mimic functional weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach, Ruth; Simon, Anja; Waßer, Kai; Hauslage, Jens; Christianen, Peter C M; Albers, Peter W; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Alt, Wolfgang; Anken, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The gravity-dependent behavior of Paramecium biaurelia and Euglena gracilis have previously been studied on ground and in real microgravity. To validate whether high magnetic field exposure indeed provides a ground-based facility to mimic functional weightlessness, as has been suggested earlier, both cell types were observed during exposure in a strong homogeneous magnetic field (up to 30 T) and a strong magnetic field gradient. While swimming, Paramecium cells were aligned along the magnetic field lines; orientation of Euglena was perpendicular, demonstrating that the magnetic field determines the orientation and thus prevents the organisms from the random swimming known to occur in real microgravity. Exposing Astasia longa, a flagellate that is closely related to Euglena but lacks chloroplasts and the photoreceptor, as well as the chloroplast-free mutant E. gracilis 1F, to a high magnetic field revealed no reorientation to the perpendicular direction as in the case of wild-type E. gracilis, indicating the existence of an anisotropic structure (chloroplasts) that determines the direction of passive orientation. Immobilized Euglena and Paramecium cells could not be levitated even in the highest available magnetic field gradient as sedimentation persisted with little impact of the field on the sedimentation velocities. We conclude that magnetic fields are not suited as a microgravity simulation for gravitactic unicellular organisms due to the strong effect of the magnetic field itself, which masks the effects known from experiments in real microgravity.

  3. Novel concepts in near-field optics: from magnetic near-field to optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Honghua

    Driven by the progress in nanotechnology, imaging and spectroscopy tools with nanometer spatial resolution are needed for in situ material characterizations. Near-field optics provides a unique way to selectively excite and detect elementary electronic and vibrational interactions at the nanometer scale, through interactions of light with matter in the near-field region. This dissertation discusses the development and applications of near-field optical imaging techniques, including plasmonic material characterization, optical spectral nano-imaging and magnetic field detection using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), and exploring new modalities of optical spectroscopy based on optical gradient force detection. Firstly, the optical dielectric functions of one of the most common plasmonic materials---silver is measured with ellipsometry, and analyzed with the Drude model over a broad spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. This work was motivated by the conflicting results of previous measurements, and the need for accurate values for a wide range of applications of silver in plasmonics, optical antennas, and metamaterials. This measurement provides a reference for dielectric functions of silver used in metamaterials, plasmonics, and nanophotonics. Secondly, I implemented an infrared s-SNOM instrument for spectroscopic nano-imaging at both room temperature and low temperature. As one of the first cryogenic s-SNOM instruments, the novel design concept and key specifications are discussed. Initial low-temperature and high-temperature performances of the instrument are examined by imaging of optical conductivity of vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O 3) across their phase transitions. The spectroscopic imaging capability is demonstrated on chemical vibrational resonances of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and other samples. The third part of this dissertation explores imaging of optical magnetic fields. As a proof-of-principle, the magnetic

  4. Design Method of Digital Optimal Control Scheme and Multiple Paralleled Bridge Type Current Amplifier for Generating Gradient Magnetic Fields in MRI Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shuji; Takano, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Hiroya; Hiraki, Eiji; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper deals with a digital control scheme of multiple paralleled high frequency switching current amplifier with four-quadrant chopper for generating gradient magnetic fields in MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) systems. In order to track high precise current pattern in Gradient Coils (GC), the proposal current amplifier cancels the switching current ripples in GC with each other and designed optimum switching gate pulse patterns without influences of the large filter current ripple amplitude. The optimal control implementation and the linear control theory in GC current amplifiers have affinity to each other with excellent characteristics. The digital control system can be realized easily through the digital control implementation, DSPs or microprocessors. Multiple-parallel operational microprocessors realize two or higher paralleled GC current pattern tracking amplifier with optimal control design and excellent results are given for improving the image quality of MRI systems.

  5. Whistler mode refraction in highly nonuniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R.

    2016-12-01

    In a large laboratory plasma the propagation of whistler modes is measured in highly nonuniform magnetic fields created by a current-carrying wires. Ray tracing is not applicable since the wavelength and gradient scale length are comparable. The waves are excited with a loop antenna near the wire. The antenna launches an m=1 helicon mode in a uniform plasma. The total magnetic field consists of a weak uniform background field and a nearly circular field of a straight wire across the background field. A circular loop produces 3D null points and a 2D null line. The whistler wave propagation will be shown. It is relevant to whistler mode propagation in space plasmas near magnetic null-points, small flux ropes, lunar crustal magnetic fields and active wave injection experiments.

  6. Magnetic tracking for TomoTherapy systems: gradiometer based methods to filter eddy-current magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    McGary, John E; Xiong, Zubiao; Chen, Ji

    2013-07-01

    TomoTherapy systems lack real-time, tumor tracking. A possible solution is to use electromagnetic markers; however, eddy-current magnetic fields generated in response to a magnetic source can be comparable to the signal, thus degrading the localization accuracy. Therefore, the tracking system must be designed to account for the eddy fields created along the inner bore conducting surfaces. The aim of this work is to investigate localization accuracy using magnetic field gradients to determine feasibility toward TomoTherapy applications. Electromagnetic models are used to simulate magnetic fields created by a source and its simultaneous generation of eddy currents within a conducting cylinder. The source position is calculated using a least-squares fit of simulated sensor data using the dipole equation as the model equation. To account for field gradients across the sensor area (≈ 25 cm(2)), an iterative method is used to estimate the magnetic field at the sensor center. Spatial gradients are calculated with two arrays of uniaxial, paired sensors that form a gradiometer array, where the sensors are considered ideal. Experimental measurements of magnetic fields within the TomoTherapy bore are shown to be 1%-10% less than calculated with the electromagnetic model. Localization results using a 5 × 5 array of gradiometers are, in general, 2-4 times more accurate than a planar array of sensors, depending on the solenoid orientation and position. Simulation results show that the localization accuracy using a gradiometer array is within 1.3 mm over a distance of 20 cm from the array plane. In comparison, localization errors using single array are within 5 mm. The results indicate that the gradiometer method merits further studies and work due to the accuracy achieved with ideal sensors. Future studies should include realistic sensor models and extensive numerical studies to estimate the expected magnetic tracking accuracy within a TomoTherapy system before proceeding

  7. Magnetic attitude control torque generation of a gravity gradient stabilized satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhadis, N. M.; Salleh, M. B.; Rajendran, P.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic torquer is used to generate a magnetic dipole moment onboard satellites whereby a control torque for attitude control purposes is generated when it couples with the geomagnetic field. This technique has been considered very attractive for satellites operated in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) as the strength of the geomagnetic field is relatively high below the altitude of 1000 km. This paper presents the algorithm used to generate required magnetic dipole moment by 3 magnetic torquers mounted onboard a gravity gradient stabilized satellite operated at an altitude of 540 km with nadir pointing mission. As the geomagnetic field cannot be altered and its magnitude and direction vary with respect to the orbit altitude and inclination, a comparison study of attitude control torque generation performance with various orbit inclination is performed where the structured control algorithm is simulated for 13°, 33° and 53° orbit inclinations to see how the variation of the satellite orbit affects the satellite's attitude control torque generation. Results from simulation show that the higher orbit inclination generates optimum magnetic attitude control torque for accurate nadir pointing mission.

  8. Impact of a High Magnetic Field on the Orientation of Gravitactic Unicellular Organisms—A Critical Consideration about the Application of Magnetic Fields to Mimic Functional Weightlessness

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Anja; Waßer, Kai; Hauslage, Jens; Christianen, Peter C.M.; Albers, Peter W.; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Alt, Wolfgang; Anken, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The gravity-dependent behavior of Paramecium biaurelia and Euglena gracilis have previously been studied on ground and in real microgravity. To validate whether high magnetic field exposure indeed provides a ground-based facility to mimic functional weightlessness, as has been suggested earlier, both cell types were observed during exposure in a strong homogeneous magnetic field (up to 30 T) and a strong magnetic field gradient. While swimming, Paramecium cells were aligned along the magnetic field lines; orientation of Euglena was perpendicular, demonstrating that the magnetic field determines the orientation and thus prevents the organisms from the random swimming known to occur in real microgravity. Exposing Astasia longa, a flagellate that is closely related to Euglena but lacks chloroplasts and the photoreceptor, as well as the chloroplast-free mutant E. gracilis 1F, to a high magnetic field revealed no reorientation to the perpendicular direction as in the case of wild-type E. gracilis, indicating the existence of an anisotropic structure (chloroplasts) that determines the direction of passive orientation. Immobilized Euglena and Paramecium cells could not be levitated even in the highest available magnetic field gradient as sedimentation persisted with little impact of the field on the sedimentation velocities. We conclude that magnetic fields are not suited as a microgravity simulation for gravitactic unicellular organisms due to the strong effect of the magnetic field itself, which masks the effects known from experiments in real microgravity. Key Words: Levitation—Microgravity—Gravitaxis—Gravikinesis—Gravity. Astrobiology 14, 205–215. PMID:24621307

  9. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Raul; Larkin, Oliver J; Dijkstra, Camelia E; Hill, Richard J A; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R; Eaves, Laurence; van Loon, Jack J W A; Medina, F Javier; Marco, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  10. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. Results We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Conclusions Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression. PMID:22296880

  11. Tune-stabilized, non-scaling, fixed-field, alternating gradient accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, Carol J [Warrenville, IL

    2011-02-01

    A FFAG is a particle accelerator having turning magnets with a linear field gradient for confinement and a large edge angle to compensate for acceleration. FODO cells contain focus magnets and defocus magnets that are specified by a number of parameters. A set of seven equations, called the FFAG equations relate the parameters to one another. A set of constraints, call the FFAG constraints, constrain the FFAG equations. Selecting a few parameters, such as injection momentum, extraction momentum, and drift distance reduces the number of unknown parameters to seven. Seven equations with seven unknowns can be solved to yield the values for all the parameters and to thereby fully specify a FFAG.

  12. Composite pulsed field gradients with refocused chemical shifts and short recovery time.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Shaka, A J

    1999-01-01

    An improved self-compensating pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique that combines antiphase gradient pairs with broadband frequency-modulated 180 degrees pulses is proposed. The antiphase gradient pairs lead to superb system recovery. In addition, evolution under chemical shift and heteronuclear J coupling are refocused during the PFG, making it appear effectively instantaneous. This new approach makes it possible to obtain high-resolution phase-sensitive 2D spectra for the PFG version of many experiments such as COSY, DQF-COSY, and HSQC without adding extra compensating delays or pulses. While reasonable suppression of unwanted magnetization is achieved, this method also gives satisfactory retention of desired signals. As a bonus, the field-frequency lock is not perturbed during the experiments. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Evaluation of asymmetric quadrupoles for a non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2017-12-01

    A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (NS-FFAG) accelerator was constructed, which employs conventional quadrupoles. The possible demerit is the beam instability caused by the variable focusing strength when the orbit radius of the beam changes. To overcome this instability, it was suggested that the asymmetric quadrupole has different current flows in each coil. The magnetic field of the asymmetric quadrupole was found to be more similar to the magnetic field required for the FFAG accelerator than the constructed NS-FFAG accelerator. In this study, a simulation of the beam dynamics was carried out to evaluate the improvement to the beam stability for the NS-FFAG accelerator using the SIMION program. The beam dynamics simulation was conducted with the `hard edge' model; it ignored the fringe field at the end of the magnet. The magnetic field map of the suggested magnet was created using the SIMION program. The lattices for the simulation combined the suggested magnets. The magnets were evaluated for beam stability in the lattices through the SIMION program.

  14. A lithospheric magnetic field model derived from the Swarm satellite magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, G.; Thebault, E.; Vigneron, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Swarm constellation of satellites was launched in November 2013 and has since then delivered high quality scalar and vector magnetic field measurements. A consortium of several research institutions was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) to provide a number of scientific products which will be made available to the scientific community. Within this framework, specific tools were tailor-made to better extract the magnetic signal emanating from Earth's the lithospheric. These tools rely on the scalar gradient measured by the lower pair of Swarm satellites and rely on a regional modeling scheme that is more sensitive to small spatial scales and weak signals than the standard spherical harmonic modeling. In this presentation, we report on various activities related to data analysis and processing. We assess the efficiency of this dedicated chain for modeling the lithospheric magnetic field using more than one year of measurements, and finally discuss refinements that are continuously implemented in order to further improve the robustness and the spatial resolution of the lithospheric field model.

  15. INSTABILITY OF NON-UNIFORM TOROIDAL MAGNETIC FIELDS IN ACCRETION DISKS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro, E-mail: hirabayashi-k@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    We present a new type of instability that is expected to drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence from a purely toroidal magnetic field in an accretion disk. It is already known that in a differentially rotating system, the uniform toroidal magnetic field is unstable due to magnetorotational instability (MRI) under a non-axisymmetric and vertical perturbation, while it is stable under a purely vertical perturbation. Contrary to the previous study, this paper proposes an unstable mode completely confined to the equatorial plane, driven by the expansive nature of the magnetic pressure gradient force under a non-uniform toroidal field. The basic nature of thismore » growing eigenmode, which we name “magneto-gradient driven instability,” is studied using linear analysis, and the corresponding nonlinear evolution is then investigated using two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations. Although a single localized magnetic field channel alone cannot provide sufficient Maxwell stress to contribute significantly to the angular momentum transport, we find that the mode coupling between neighboring toroidal fields under multiple localized magnetic field channels drastically generates a highly turbulent state and leads to the enhanced transport of angular momentum, which is comparable to the efficiency seen in previous studies on MRIs. This horizontally confined mode may play an important role in the saturation of an MRI through complementray growth with the toroidal MRIs and coupling with magnetic reconnection.« less

  16. Instability of Non-uniform Toroidal Magnetic Fields in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    We present a new type of instability that is expected to drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence from a purely toroidal magnetic field in an accretion disk. It is already known that in a differentially rotating system, the uniform toroidal magnetic field is unstable due to magnetorotational instability (MRI) under a non-axisymmetric and vertical perturbation, while it is stable under a purely vertical perturbation. Contrary to the previous study, this paper proposes an unstable mode completely confined to the equatorial plane, driven by the expansive nature of the magnetic pressure gradient force under a non-uniform toroidal field. The basic nature of this growing eigenmode, which we name “magneto-gradient driven instability,” is studied using linear analysis, and the corresponding nonlinear evolution is then investigated using two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations. Although a single localized magnetic field channel alone cannot provide sufficient Maxwell stress to contribute significantly to the angular momentum transport, we find that the mode coupling between neighboring toroidal fields under multiple localized magnetic field channels drastically generates a highly turbulent state and leads to the enhanced transport of angular momentum, which is comparable to the efficiency seen in previous studies on MRIs. This horizontally confined mode may play an important role in the saturation of an MRI through complementray growth with the toroidal MRIs and coupling with magnetic reconnection.

  17. Virtual special issue: Magnetic resonance at low fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    It appears to be a common understanding that low magnetic fields need to be avoided in magnetic resonance, as sensitivity and the frequency dispersion of the chemical shift increase with increasing field strength. But there many reasons to explore magnetic resonance at low fields. The instrumentation tends to be far less expensive than high-field equipment, magnets are smaller and lighter, internal gradients in heterogeneous media are smaller, conductive media and even metals become transparent at low frequencies to electromagnetic fields, and new physics and phenomena await to be discovered. On account of an increasing attention of the scientific community to magnetic resonance at low field, we have decided to launch JMR's Virtual Special Issue Series with this compilation about Low-Field Magnetic Resonance. This topic, for which we have chosen to focus on articles reporting measurements at fields lower than 2 T, is of widespread interest to our readership. We are therefore happy to offer to this constituency a selected outlook based on papers published during the last five years (volumes 214-270) in the pages of The Journal of Magnetic Resonance. A brief survey of the topics covered in this Virtual Special Issue follows.

  18. Novel gradient-diameter magnetic nanowire arrays with unconventional magnetic anisotropy behaviors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zuo, Zhili; Huang, Liang; Warsi, Muhammad Asif; Xiao, John Q; Hu, Jun

    2018-06-21

    Fe-Co-Ni gradient-diameter magnetic nanowire arrays were fabricated via direct-current electrodeposition into a tapered anodic aluminium oxide template. In contrast to the magnetic behaviors of uniform-diameter nanowire arrays, these arrays exhibited tailorable magnetic anisotropy that can be used to switch magnetic nanowires easily and unconventional temperature-dependent coercivity with much better thermal stability.

  19. Ultra-fine-scale filamentary structures in the Outer Corona and the Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Filamentary structures following magnetic field lines pervade the Sun's atmosphere and offer us insight into the solar magnetic field. Radio propagation measurements have shown that the smallest filamentary structures in the solar corona are more than 2 orders of magnitude finer than those seen in solar imaging. Here we use radio Doppler measurements to characterize their transverse density gradient and determine their finest scale in the outer corona at 20-30 R(circled dot operator), where open magnetic fields prevail. Filamentary structures overly active regions have the steepest gradient and finest scale, while those overlying coronal holes have the shallowest gradient and least finest scale. Their organization by the underlying corona implies that these subresolution structures extend radially from the entire Sun, confirming that they trace the coronal magnetic field responsible for the radial expansion of the solar wind. That they are rooted all over the Sun elucidates the association between the magnetic field of the photosphere and that of the corona, as revealed by the similarity between the power spectra of the photospheric field and the coronal density fluctuations. This association along with the persistence of filamentary structures far from the Sun demonstrate that subresolution magnetic fields must play an important role not only in magnetic coupling of the photosphere and corona, but also in coronal heating and solar wind acceleration through the process of small-scale magnetic reconnection. They also explain why current widely used theoretical models that extrapolate photospheric magnetic fields into the corona do not predict the correct source of the solar wind.

  20. In-vitro mapping of E-fields induced near pacemaker leads by simulated MR gradient fields

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers is generally contraindicated but some clinicians condone scanning certain patients. We assessed the risk of inducing unintended cardiac stimulation by measuring electric fields (E) induced near lead tips by a simulated MRI gradient system. The objectives of this study are to map magnetically induced E near distal tips of leads in a saline tank to determine the spatial distribution and magnitude of E and compare them with E induced by a pacemaker pulse generator (PG). Methods We mapped magnetically induced E with 0.1 mm resolution as close as 1 mm from lead tips. We used probes with two straight electrodes (e.g. wire diameter of 0.2 mm separated by 0.9 mm). We generated magnetic flux density (B) with a Helmholtz coil throughout 0.6% saline in a 24 cm diameter tank with (dB/dt) of 1 T/sec (1 kHz sinusoidal waveform). Separately, we measured E near the tip of leads when connected to a PG set to a unipolar mode. Measurements were non-invasive (not altering the leads or PG under study). Results When scaled to 30 T/s (a clinically relevant value), magnetically-induced E exceeded the E produced by a PG. The magnetically-induced E only occurred when B was coincident with or within 15 msec of implantable pacemaker's pulse. Conclusions Potentially hazardous situations are possible during an MR scan due to gradient fields. Unintended stimulation can be induced via abandoned leads and leads connected to a pulse generator with loss of hermetic seal at the connector. Also, pacemaker-dependent patients can receive drastically altered pacing pulses. PMID:20003479

  1. Critical Magnetic Field in CeCoIn5 Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Je Huan; Gill, Doh-Hyun; Cho, Guangsup

    We investigate the superconducting transition temperature, Tc in the presence of the magnetic field, H in CeCoIn5. It is shown that phonon-enhanced spin fluctuations drive this superconductivity once more as suggested by us (Phys. Rev. B61, 4289). We know the magnetic dependence of our transition temperature is in good correspondence with experimental data. It is elucidated that the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) superconducting states are closely related to the temperature gradient contributed by the external magnetic field.

  2. Computational studies of steering nanoparticles with magnetic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylak, Sultan Suleyman

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided nanorobotic systems that could perform diagnostic, curative, and reconstructive treatments in the human body at the cellular and subcellular level in a controllable manner have recently been proposed. The concept of a MRI-guided nanorobotic system is based on the use of a MRI scanner to induce the required external driving forces to guide magnetic nanocapsules to a specific target. However, the maximum magnetic gradient specifications of existing clinical MRI systems are not capable of driving magnetic nanocapsules against the blood flow. This thesis presents the visualization of nanoparticles inside blood vessel, Graphical User Interface (GUI) for updating file including initial parameters and demonstrating the simulation of particles and C++ code for computing magnetic forces and fluidic forces. The visualization and GUI were designed using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML), MATLAB and C#. The addition of software for MRI-guided nanorobotic system provides simulation results. Preliminary simulation results demonstrate that external magnetic field causes aggregation of nanoparticles while they flow in the vessel. This is a promising result --in accordance with similar experimental results- and encourages further investigation on the nanoparticle-based self-assembly structures for use in nanorobotic drug delivery.

  3. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-01

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. We report a quantitative magnetic separation technology using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micro-pillars with gradient spacing, and use the system to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micro-pillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic-field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miro-pillar array at larger pitches. We develop a semi-analytical model that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells were separated based on the bound quantity of 1μm anti-EpCAM particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system was able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof of concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood were isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential towards a quantitative magnetic separation instrument. PMID:26890496

  4. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells Using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-04-13

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting, are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. A quantitative magnetic separation technology is reported using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micropillars with gradient spacing, and the system is used to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micropillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miropillar array at larger pitches. A semi-analytical model is developed that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells are separated based on the bound quantity of 1 μm anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system is able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof-of-concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood are isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential toward a quantitative magnetic separation instrument. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Transverse flow induced by inhomogeneous magnetic fields in the Bjorken expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Shi; Yang, Di-Lun

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the magnetohydrodynamics in the presence of an external magnetic field following the power-law decay in proper time and having spatial inhomogeneity characterized by a Gaussian distribution in one of transverse coordinates under the Bjorken expansion. The leading-order solution is obtained in the weak-field approximation, where both energy density and fluid velocity are modified. It is found that the spatial gradient of the magnetic field results in transverse flow, where the flow direction depends on the decay exponents of the magnetic field. We suggest that such a magnetic-field-induced effect might influence anisotropic flow in heavy ion collisions.

  6. Cholesteric-nematic transitions induced by a shear flow and a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Makarov, D. V.; Novikov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The untwisting of the helical structure of a cholesteric liquid crystal under the action of a magnetic field and a shear flow has been studied theoretically. Both factors can induce the cholesteric-nematic transition independently; however, the difference in the orienting actions of the magnetic field and the shear flow leads to competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic mechanisms of influence on the cholesteric liquid crystal. We have analyzed different orientations of the magnetic field relative to the direction of the flow in the shear plane. In a number of limiting cases, the analytic dependences are obtained for the pitch of the cholesteric helix deformed by the shear flow. The phase diagrams of the cholesteric-nematic transitions and the pitch of the cholesteric helix are calculated for different values of the magnetic field strength and the angle of orientation, the flow velocity gradient, and the reactive parameter. It is shown that the magnetic field stabilizes the orientation of the director in the shear flow and expands the boundaries of orientability of cholesterics. It has been established that the shear flow shifts the critical magnetic field strength of the transition. It is shown that a sequence of reentrant orientational cholesteric-nematic-cholesteric transitions can be induced by rotating the magnetic field in certain intervals of its strength and shear flow velocity gradients.

  7. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Dinescu, Maria; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo

    2018-02-07

    We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20-40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase) production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  8. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Dinescu, Maria; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo

    2018-01-01

    We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20–40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase) production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field. PMID:29414875

  9. Total Magnetic Field Signatures over Submarine HVDC Power Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Tchernychev, M.; Johnston, J. M.; Tryggestad, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mikhail Tchernychev, Geometrics, Inc. Ross Johnson, Geometrics, Inc. Jeff Johnston, Geometrics, Inc. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) technology is widely used to transmit electrical power over considerable distances using submarine cables. The most commonly known examples are the HVDC cable between Italy and Greece (160 km), Victoria-Tasmania (300 km), New Jersey - Long Island (82 km) and the Transbay cable (Pittsburg, California - San-Francisco). These cables are inspected periodically and their location and burial depth verified. This inspection applies to live and idle cables; in particular a survey company could be required to locate pieces of a dead cable for subsequent removal from the sea floor. Most HVDC cables produce a constant magnetic field; therefore one of the possible survey tools would be Marine Total Field Magnetometer. We present mathematical expressions of the expected magnetic fields and compare them with fields observed during actual surveys. We also compare these anomalies fields with magnetic fields produced by other long objects, such as submarine pipelines The data processing techniques are discussed. There include the use of Analytic Signal and direct modeling of Total Magnetic Field. The Analytic Signal analysis can be adapted using ground truth where available, but the total field allows better discrimination of the cable parameters, in particular to distinguish between live and idle cable. Use of a Transverse Gradiometer (TVG) allows for easy discrimination between cable and pipe line objects. Considerable magnetic gradient is present in the case of a pipeline whereas there is less gradient for the DC power cable. Thus the TVG is used to validate assumptions made during the data interpretation process. Data obtained during the TVG surveys suggest that the magnetic field of a live HVDC cable is described by an expression for two infinite long wires carrying current in opposite directions.

  10. Selection of suitable reference genes from bone cells in large gradient high magnetic field based on GeNorm algorithm.

    PubMed

    Di, Shengmeng; Tian, Zongcheng; Qian, Airong; Gao, Xiang; Yu, Dan; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Shang, Peng

    2011-12-01

    Studies of animals and humans subjected to spaceflight demonstrate that weightlessness negatively affects the mass and mechanical properties of bone tissue. Bone cells could sense and respond to the gravity unloading, and genes sensitive to gravity change were considered to play a critical role in the mechanotransduction of bone cells. To evaluate the fold-change of gene expression, appropriate reference genes should be identified because there is no housekeeping gene having stable expression in all experimental conditions. Consequently, expression stability of ten candidate housekeeping genes were examined in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1, osteocyte-like MLO-Y4, and preosteoclast-like FLG29.1 cells under different apparent gravities (μg, 1 g, and 2 g) in the high-intensity gradient magnetic field produced by a superconducting magnet. The results showed that the relative expression of these ten candidate housekeeping genes was different in different bone cells; Moreover, the most suitable reference genes of the same cells in altered gravity conditions were also different from that in strong magnetic field. It demonstrated the importance of selecting suitable reference genes in experimental set-ups. Furthermore, it provides an alternative choice to the traditionally accepted housekeeping genes used so far about studies of gravitational biology and magneto biology.

  11. Computational modeling of magnetic nanoparticle targeting to stent surface under high gradient field

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunqiang; Zhou, Yihua; Tan, Jifu; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Jie; Liu, Yaling

    2014-01-01

    A multi-physics model was developed to study the delivery of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to the stent-implanted region under an external magnetic field. The model is firstly validated by experimental work in literature. Then, effects of external magnetic field strength, magnetic particle size, and flow velocity on MNPs’ targeting and binding have been analyzed through a parametric study. Two new dimensionless numbers were introduced to characterize relative effects of Brownian motion (BM), magnetic force induced particle motion, and convective blood flow on MNPs motion. It was found that larger magnetic field strength, bigger MNP size, and slower flow velocity increase the capture efficiency of MNPs. The distribution of captured MNPs on the vessel along axial and azimuthal directions was also discussed. Results showed that the MNPs density decreased exponentially along axial direction after one-dose injection while it was uniform along azimuthal direction in the whole stented region (averaged over all sections). For the beginning section of the stented region, the density ratio distribution of captured MNPs along azimuthal direction is center-symmetrical, corresponding to the center-symmetrical distribution of magnetic force in that section. Two different generation mechanisms are revealed to form four main attraction regions. These results could serve as guidelines to design a better magnetic drug delivery system. PMID:24653546

  12. Magnetic field design for selecting and aligning immunomagnetic labeled cells.

    PubMed

    Tibbe, Arjan G J; de Grooth, Bart G; Greve, Jan; Dolan, Gerald J; Rao, Chandra; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2002-03-01

    Recently we introduced the CellTracks cell analysis system, in which samples are prepared based on a combination of immunomagnetic selection, separation, and alignment of cells along ferromagnetic lines. Here we describe the underlying magnetic principles and considerations made in the magnetic field design to achieve the best possible cell selection and alignment of magnetically labeled cells. Materials and Methods Computer simulations, in combination with experimental data, were used to optimize the design of the magnets and Ni lines to obtain the optimal magnetic configuration. A homogeneous cell distribution on the upper surface of the sample chamber was obtained with a magnet where the pole faces were tilted towards each other. The spatial distribution of magnetically aligned objects in between the Ni lines was dependent on the ratio of the diameter of the aligned object and the line spacing, which was tested with magnetically and fluorescently labeled 6 microm polystyrene beads. The best result was obtained when the line spacing was equal to or smaller than the diameter of the aligned object. The magnetic gradient of the designed permanent magnet extracts magnetically labeled cells from any cell suspension to a desired plane, providing a homogeneous cell distribution. In addition, it magnetizes ferro-magnetic Ni lines in this plane whose additional local gradient adds to the gradient of the permanent magnet. The resultant gradient aligns the magnetically labeled cells first brought to this plane. This combination makes it possible, in a single step, to extract and align cells on a surface from any cell suspension. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Three-dimensional cross-gradient joint inversion of gravity and normalized magnetic source strength data in the presence of remanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junjie; Meng, Xiaohong; Guo, Lianghui; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional cross-gradient joint inversion of gravity and magnetic data has the potential to acquire improved density and magnetization distribution information. This method usually adopts the commonly held assumption that remanent magnetization can be ignored and all anomalies present are the result of induced magnetization. Accordingly, this method might fail to produce accurate results where significant remanent magnetization is present. In such a case, the simplification brings about unwanted and unknown deviations in the inverted magnetization model. Furthermore, because of the information transfer mechanism of the joint inversion framework, the inverted density results may also be influenced by the effect of remanent magnetization. The normalized magnetic source strength (NSS) is a transformed quantity that is insensitive to the magnetization direction. Thus, it has been applied in the standard magnetic inversion scheme to mitigate the remanence effects, especially in the case of varying remanence directions. In this paper, NSS data were employed along with gravity data for three-dimensional cross-gradient joint inversion, which can significantly reduce the remanence effects and enhance the reliability of both density and magnetization models. Meanwhile, depth-weightings and bound constraints were also incorporated in this joint algorithm to improve the inversion quality. Synthetic and field examples show that the proposed combination of cross-gradient constraints and the NSS transform produce better results in terms of the data resolution, compatibility, and reliability than that of separate inversions and that of joint inversions with the total magnetization intensity (TMI) data. Thus, this method was found to be very useful and is recommended for applications in the presence of strong remanent magnetization.

  14. Emergent kink stability of a magnetized plasma jet injected into a transverse background magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott C.; Fisher, Dustin M.; Lynn, Alan G.

    2017-11-01

    We report experimental results on the injection of a magnetized plasma jet into a transverse background magnetic field in the HelCat linear plasma device at the University of New Mexico [M. Gilmore et al., J. Plasma Phys. 81(1), 345810104 (2015)]. After the plasma jet leaves the plasma-gun muzzle, a tension force arising from an increasing curvature of the background magnetic field induces in the jet a sheared axial-flow gradient above the theoretical kink-stabilization threshold. We observe that this emergent sheared axial flow stabilizes the n = 1 kink mode in the jet, whereas a kink instability is observed in the jet when there is no background magnetic field present.

  15. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    DOE PAGES

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; ...

    2015-10-23

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equationsmore » of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.« less

  16. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; Prestemon, Soren; Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Robin, David

    2015-10-01

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equations of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.

  17. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR INJECTING AND TRAPPING ELECTRONS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.

    1962-05-29

    An apparatus is designed for the manipulation of electrons in an exially symmetric magnetic field region and may be employed to trap electrons in such a field by directing an electron beam into a gradientially intensified field region therein to form an annular electron moving axially in the field and along a decreasing field gradient. Dissipative loop circuits such as resistive loops are disposed along at least the decreasing field gradient so as to be inductively coupled to the electron bunch so as to extract energy of the electron bunch and provide a braking force effective to reduce the velocity of the bunch. Accordingly, the electron bunch upon entering a lower intensity magnetic field region is retained therein since the electrons no longer possess sufficient energy to escape. (AEC)

  18. Relationship between magnetic field strength and magnetic-resonance-related acoustic noise levels.

    PubMed

    Moelker, Adriaan; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Pattynama, Peter M T

    2003-02-01

    The need for better signal-to-noise ratios and resolution has pushed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) towards high-field MR-scanners for which only little data on MR-related acoustic noise production have been published. The purpose of this study was to validate the theoretical relationship of sound pressure level (SPL) and static magnetic field strength. This is relevant for allowing adequate comparisons of acoustic data of MR systems at various magnetic field strengths. Acoustic data were acquired during various pulse sequences at field strengths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Tesla using the same MRI unit by means of a Helicon rampable magnet. Continuous-equivalent, i.e. time-averaged, linear SPLs and 1/3-octave band frequencies were recorded. Ramping from 0.5 to 1.0 Tesla and from 1.0 to 2.0 Tesla resulted in an SPL increase of 5.7 and 5.2 dB(L), respectively, when averaged over the various pulse sequences. Most of the acoustic energy was in the 1-kHz frequency band, irrespective of magnetic field strength. The relation between field strength and SPL was slightly non-linear, i.e. a slightly less increase at higher field strengths, presumably caused by the elastic properties of the gradient coil encasings.

  19. Adiabatic theory in regions of strong field gradients. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C.; Northrop, T. G.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    The theory for the generalized first invariant for adiabatic motion of charged particles in regions where there are large gradients in magnetic or electric fields is developed. The general condition for an invariant to exist in such regions is that the potential well in which the particle oscillates change its shape slowly as the particle drifts. It is shown how the Kruskal (1962) procedure can be applied to obtain expressions for the invariant and for drift velocities that are asymptotic in a smallness parameter epsilon. The procedure is illustrated by obtaining the invariant and drift velocities for particles traversing a perpendicular shock, and the generalized invariant is compared with the magnetic moment, and the drift orbits with the actual orbits, for a particular case. In contrast to the magnetic moment, the generalized first invariant is better for large gyroradii (large kinetic energies) than for small gyroradii. Expressions for the invariant when an electrostatic potential jump is imposed across the perpendicular shock, and when the particle traverses a rotational shear layer with a small normal component of the magnetic field are given.

  20. Novel Techniques for Pulsed Field Gradient NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, William Wallace

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) techniques now find application in multiple quantum filtering and diffusion experiments as well as in magnetic resonance imaging and spatially selective spectroscopy. Conventionally, the gradient fields are produced by azimuthal and longitudinal currents on the surfaces of one or two cylinders. Using a series of planar units consisting of azimuthal and radial current elements spaced along the longitudinal axis, we have designed gradient coils having linear regions that extend axially nearly to the ends of the coil and to more than 80% of the inner radius. These designs locate the current return paths on a concentric cylinder, so the coils are called Concentric Return Path (CRP) coils. Coils having extended linear regions can be made smaller for a given sample size. Among the advantages that can accrue from using smaller coils are improved gradient strength and switching time, reduced eddy currents in the absence of shielding, and improved use of bore space. We used an approximation technique to predict the remaining eddy currents and a time-domain model of coil performance to simulate the electrical performance of the CRP coil and several reduced volume coils of more conventional design. One of the conventional coils was designed based on the time-domain performance model. A single-point acquisition technique was developed to measure the remaining eddy currents of the reduced volume coils. Adaptive sampling increases the dynamic range of the measurement. Measuring only the center of the stimulated echo removes chemical shift and B_0 inhomogeneity effects. The technique was also used to design an inverse filter to remove the eddy current effects in a larger coil set. We added pulsed field gradient and imaging capability to a 7 T commercial spectrometer to perform neuroscience and embryology research and used it in preliminary studies of binary liquid mixtures separating near a critical point. These techniques and coil designs will find

  1. Periodic magnetic field as a polarized and focusing thermal neutron spectrometer and monochromator.

    PubMed

    Cremer, J T; Williams, D L; Fuller, M J; Gary, C K; Piestrup, M A; Pantell, R H; Feinstein, J; Flocchini, R G; Boussoufi, M; Egbert, H P; Kloh, M D; Walker, R B

    2010-01-01

    A novel periodic magnetic field (PMF) optic is shown to act as a prism, lens, and polarizer for neutrons and particles with a magnetic dipole moment. The PMF has a two-dimensional field in the axial direction of neutron propagation. The PMF alternating magnetic field polarity provides strong gradients that cause separation of neutrons by wavelength axially and by spin state transversely. The spin-up neutrons exit the PMF with their magnetic spins aligned parallel to the PMF magnetic field, and are deflected upward and line focus at a fixed vertical height, proportional to the PMF period, at a downstream focal distance that increases with neutron energy. The PMF has no attenuation by absorption or scatter, as with material prisms or crystal monochromators. Embodiments of the PMF include neutron spectrometer or monochromator, and applications include neutron small angle scattering, crystallography, residual stress analysis, cross section measurements, and reflectometry. Presented are theory, experimental results, computer simulation, applications of the PMF, and comparison of its performance to Stern-Gerlach gradient devices and compound material and magnetic refractive prisms.

  2. Periodic magnetic field as a polarized and focusing thermal neutron spectrometer and monochromator

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, J. T.; Williams, D. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Gary, C. K.; Piestrup, M. A.; Pantell, R. H.; Feinstein, J.; Flocchini, R. G.; Boussoufi, M.; Egbert, H. P.; Kloh, M. D.; Walker, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    A novel periodic magnetic field (PMF) optic is shown to act as a prism, lens, and polarizer for neutrons and particles with a magnetic dipole moment. The PMF has a two-dimensional field in the axial direction of neutron propagation. The PMF alternating magnetic field polarity provides strong gradients that cause separation of neutrons by wavelength axially and by spin state transversely. The spin-up neutrons exit the PMF with their magnetic spins aligned parallel to the PMF magnetic field, and are deflected upward and line focus at a fixed vertical height, proportional to the PMF period, at a downstream focal distance that increases with neutron energy. The PMF has no attenuation by absorption or scatter, as with material prisms or crystal monochromators. Embodiments of the PMF include neutron spectrometer or monochromator, and applications include neutron small angle scattering, crystallography, residual stress analysis, cross section measurements, and reflectometry. Presented are theory, experimental results, computer simulation, applications of the PMF, and comparison of its performance to Stern–Gerlach gradient devices and compound material and magnetic refractive prisms. PMID:20113108

  3. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-11-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  4. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  5. Demonstration of current drive by a rotating magnetic dipole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giersch, L.; Slough, J. T.; Winglee, R.

    2007-04-01

    Abstract.A dipole-like rotating magnetic field was produced by a pair of circular, orthogonal coils inside a metal vacuum chamber. When these coils were immersed in plasma, large currents were driven outside the coils: the currents in the plasma were generated and sustained by the rotating magnetic dipole (RMD) field. The peak RMD-driven current was at roughly two RMD coil radii, and this current (60 kA m-) was sufficient to reverse the ambient magnetic field (33 G). Plasma density, electron temperature, magnetic field and current probes indicated that plasma formed inside the coils, then expanded outward until the plasma reached equilibrium. This equilibrium configuration was adequately described by single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium, wherein the cross product of the driven current and magnetic filed was approximately equal to the pressure gradient. The ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure, β, was locally greater than unity.

  6. Using Magnetic Field Gradients to Simulate Variable Gravity in Fluids and Materials Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2006-01-01

    Fluid flow due to a gravitational field is caused by sedimentation, thermal buoyancy, or solutal buoyancy induced convection. During crystal growth, for example, these flows are undesirable and can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid(weak1y paramagnetic) in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments. Extension of the technique can also be applied to study artificial gravity requirements for long duration exploration missions. Discussion of this application with preliminary experiments and application of the technique to crystal growth will be provided.

  7. Wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic carbon nanotubes under longitudinal magnetic field with thermal and surface effect via nonlocal strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Yaxin; Zhou, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Based on nonlocal strain gradient theory, wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied in this paper. With consideration of thermal effect and surface effect, wave equation is derived for fluid-conveying viscoelastic SWCNTs under longitudinal magnetic field utilizing Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The closed-form expressions are derived for the frequency and phase velocity of the wave motion. The influences of fluid flow velocity, structural damping coefficient, temperature change, magnetic flux and surface effect are discussed in detail. SWCNTs’ viscoelasticity reduces the wave frequency of the system and the influence gets remarkable with the increase of wave number. The fluid in SWCNTs decreases the frequency of wave propagation to a certain extent. The frequency (phase velocity) gets larger due to the existence of surface effect, especially when the diameters of SWCNTs and the wave number decrease. The wave frequency increases with the increase of the longitudinal magnetic field, while decreases with the increase of the temperature change. The results may be helpful for better understanding the potential applications of SWCNTs in nanotechnology.

  8. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned.

  9. Vlasov simulations of electron hole dynamics in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Vasko, Ivan; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Electron holes (EHs) or phase space vortices are solitary electrostatic waves existing due to electrons trapped within EH electrostatic potential. Since the first direct observation [1], EHs have been widely observed in the Earth's magnetosphere: in reconnecting current sheets [2], injection fronts [3], auroral region [4], and many other space plasma systems. EHs have typical spatial scales up to tens of Debye lengths, electric field amplitudes up to hundreds of mV/m and propagate along magnetic field lines with velocities of about electron thermal velocity [5]. The role of EHs in energy dissipation and supporting of large-scale potential drops is under active investigation. The accurate interpretation of spacecraft observations requires understanding of EH evolution in inhomogeneous plasma. The critical role of plasma density gradients in EH evolution was demonstrated in [6] using PIC simulations. Interestingly, up to date no studies have addressed a role of magnetic field gradients in EH evolution. In this report, we use 1.5D gyrokinetic Vlasov code to demonstrate the critical role of magnetic field gradients in EH dynamics. We show that EHs propagating into stronger (weaker) magnetic field are decelerated (accelerated) with deceleration (acceleration) rate dependent on the magnetic field gradient. Remarkably, the reflection points of decelerating EHs are independent of the average magnetic field gradient in the system and depend only on the EH parameters. EHs are decelerated (accelerated) faster than would follow from the "quasi-particle" concept assuming that EH is decelerated (accelerated) entirely due to the mirror force acting on electrons trapped within EH. We demonstrate that EH propagation in inhomogeneous magnetic fields results in development of a net potential drop along an EH, which depends on the magnetic field gradient. The revealed features will be helpful for interpreting spacecraft observations and results of advanced particle simulations. In

  10. Measuring diffusion-relaxation correlation maps using non-uniform field gradients of single-sided NMR devices.

    PubMed

    Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-11-01

    Single-sided NMR systems are becoming a relevant tool in industry and laboratory environments due to their low cost, low maintenance and capacity to evaluate quantity and quality of hydrogen based materials. The performance of such devices has improved significantly over the last decade, providing increased field homogeneity, field strength and even controlled static field gradients. For a class of these devices, the configuration of the permanent magnets provides a linear variation of the magnetic field and can be used in diffusion measurements. However, magnet design depends directly on its application and, according to the purpose, the field homogeneity may significantly be compromised. This may prevent the determination of diffusion properties of fluids based on the natural inhomogeneity of the field using known techniques. This work introduces a new approach that extends the applicability of diffusion-editing CPMG experiments to NMR devices with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields, which do not vary linearly in space. Herein, we propose a method to determine a custom diffusion kernel based on the gradient distribution, which can be seen as a signature of each NMR device. This new diffusion kernel is then utilised in the 2D inverse Laplace transform (2D ILT) in order to determine diffusion-relaxation correlation maps of homogeneous multi-phasic fluids. The experiments were performed using NMR MObile Lateral Explore (MOLE), which is a single-sided NMR device designed to maximise the volume at the sweet spot with enhanced depth penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Life on magnets: stem cell networking on micro-magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field's value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  12. Experimental verification of the role of electron pressure in fast magnetic reconnection with a guide field

    DOE PAGES

    Fox, W.; Sciortino, F.; v. Stechow, A.; ...

    2017-03-21

    We report detailed laboratory observations of the structure of a reconnection current sheet in a two-fluid plasma regime with a guide magnetic field. We observe and quantitatively analyze the quadrupolar electron pressure variation in the ion-diffusion region, as originally predicted by extended magnetohydrodynamics simulations. The projection of the electron pressure gradient parallel to the magnetic field contributes significantly to balancing the parallel electric field, and the resulting cross-field electron jets in the reconnection layer are diamagnetic in origin. Furthermore, these results demonstrate how parallel and perpendicular force balance are coupled in guide field reconnection and confirm basic theoretical models ofmore » the importance of electron pressure gradients for obtaining fast magnetic reconnection.« less

  13. High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization

    DOEpatents

    Eissenberg, David M.; Liu, Yin-An

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

  14. Effect of self-consistent magnetic field on plasma sheet penetration to the inner magnetosphere: Rice convection model simulations combined with modified Dungey force-balanced magnetic field solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Wang, Chih-Ping; Lyons, Larry R.

    2011-12-01

    Transport of plasma sheet particles into the inner magnetosphere is crucial to the development of the region 2 (R2) field-aligned current system (FAC), which results in the shielding of the penetration electric field and the formation of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and the Harang reversal, phenomena closely associated with storms and substorms. In addition to the electric field, this transport is also strongly affected by the magnetic field, which changes with plasma pressure and is distinctly different from the dipole field in the inner plasma sheet. To determine the feedback of force-balanced magnetic field to the transport, we have integrated the Rice convection model (RCM) with a modified Dungey magnetic field solver to obtain the required force balance in the equatorial plane. Comparing our results with those from a RCM run using a T96 magnetic field, we find that transport under a force-balanced magnetic field results in weaker pressure gradients and thus weaker R2 FAC in the near-Earth region and weaker shielding of the penetration electric field. As a result, plasma sheet protons and electrons penetrate farther earthward, and their inner edges become closer together and more azimuthally symmetric than in the T96 case. The Harang reversal extends farther dawnward, and the SAPS become more confined in radial and latitudinal extents. The magnitudes of azimuthal pressure gradient, the inner edges of thermal protons and electrons, the latitudinal range of the Harang reversal, and the radial and latitudinal widths of the SAPS from the force-balanced run are found to be more consistent with observations.

  15. The spatial distribution and time evolution of impact-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    The production of magnetic fields was revealed by laboratory hypervelocity impacts in easily vaporized targets. As quantified by pressure measurements, high frame-rate photography, and electrostatic probes, these impacts tend to produce large quantities of slightly ionized vapor, which is referred to as impact-generated plasma. Nonaligned electron density and temperature gradients within this plasma may lead to production of the observed magnetic fields. Past experiments were limited to measuring a single component of the impact-generated magnetic fields at only a few locations about the developing impact crater and consequently gave little information about the field production mechanism. To understand this mechanism, the techniques were extended to map the three components of the magnetic field both in space and time. By conducting many otherwise identical experiments with arrayed magnetic detectors, a preliminary 3-D picture was produced of impact-generated magnetic fields as they develop through time.

  16. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4–30.6 V/(T/m), a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of <−14.5 dB, a small input-output nonlinearity of <10 ppm, and a low gradient noise of 0.16–620 nT/m/Hz in a broad frequency range of 1 Hz–170 kHz under a small baseline of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/f) noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs. PMID:29068428

  17. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-10-25

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4-30.6 V/(T/m), a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of <-14.5 dB, a small input-output nonlinearity of <10 ppm, and a low gradient noise of 0.16-620 nT/m/ Hz in a broad frequency range of 1 Hz-170 kHz under a small baseline of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/ f ) noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  18. SU-G-JeP2-15: Proton Beam Behavior in the Presence of Realistic Magnet Fields

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Santos, D M; Wachowicz, K; Fallone, B G

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of magnetic fields on proton therapy beams for integration with MRI. Methods: 3D magnetic fields from an open-bore superconducting MRI model (previously developed by our group) and 3D magnetic fields from an in-house gradient coil design were applied to various mono energetic proton pencil beam (80MeV to 250MeV) simulations. In all simulations, the z-axis of the simulation geometry coincided with the direction of the B0 field and magnet isocentre. In each simulation, the initial beam trajectory was varied. The first set of simulations performed was based on analytic magnetic force equations (analytic simulations), which couldmore » be rapidly calculated yet were limited to propagating proton beams in vacuum. The second set is full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, which used GEANT4 MC toolkit. Metrics such as the beam position and dose profiles were extracted. Comparisons between the cases with and without magnetic fields present were made. Results: The analytic simulations served as verification checks for the MC simulations when the same simulation geometries were used. The results of the analytic simulations agreed with the MC simulations performed in vacuum. The presence of the MRI’s static magnetic field causes proton pencil beams to follow a slight helical trajectory when there were some initial off-axis components. The 80MeV, 150MeV, and 250MeV proton beams rotated by 4.9o, 3.6o, and 2.8o, respectively, when they reached z=0cm. The deflections caused by gradient coils’ magnetic fields show spatially invariant patterns with a maximum range of 0.5mm at z=0cm. Conclusion: This investigation reveals that both the MRI’s B0 and gradient magnetic fields can cause small but observable deflections of proton beams at energies studied. The MRI’s static field caused a rotation of the beam while the gradient coils’ fields effects were spatially invariant. Dr. B Gino Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions

  19. High-gradient permanent magnet apparatus and its use in particle collection

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Avens, Larry R.

    A high-gradient permanent magnet apparatus for capturing paramagnetic particles, the apparatus comprising: (i) at least two permanent magnets positioned with like poles facing each other; (ii) a ferromagnetic spacer separating the like poles; and (iii) a magnetizable porous filling material in close proximity to the at least two permanent magnets. Also described is a method for capturing paramagnetic particles in which a gas or liquid sample containing the paramagnetic particles is contacted with the high-gradient permanent magnet apparatus described above; wherein, during the contacting step, the gas or liquid sample contacts the magnetizable porous filling material of the high-gradient permanentmore » magnet apparatus, and at least a portion of the paramagnetic particles in the gas or liquid sample is captured on the magnetizable porous filling material.« less

  20. Gradient Pre-Emphasis to Counteract First-Order Concomitant Fields on Asymmetric MRI Gradient Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shengzhen; Weavers, Paul T.; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Shu, Yunhong; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Frigo, Louis M.; Bernstein, Matt A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop a gradient pre-emphasis scheme that prospectively counteracts the effects of the first-order concomitant fields for any arbitrary gradient waveform played on asymmetric gradient systems, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach using a real-time implementation on a compact gradient system. METHODS After reviewing the first-order concomitant fields that are present on asymmetric gradients, a generalized gradient pre-emphasis model assuming arbitrary gradient waveforms is developed to counteract their effects. A numerically straightforward, simple to implement approximate solution to this pre-emphasis problem is derived, which is compatible with the current hardware infrastructure used on conventional MRI scanners for eddy current compensation. The proposed method was implemented on the gradient driver sub-system, and its real-time use was tested using a series of phantom and in vivo data acquired from 2D Cartesian phase-difference, echo-planar imaging (EPI) and spiral acquisitions. RESULTS The phantom and in vivo results demonstrate that unless accounted for, first-order concomitant fields introduce considerable phase estimation error into the measured data and result in images exhibiting spatially dependent blurring/distortion. The resulting artifacts are effectively prevented using the proposed gradient pre-emphasis. CONCLUSION An efficient and effective gradient pre-emphasis framework is developed to counteract the effects of first-order concomitant fields of asymmetric gradient systems. PMID:27373901

  1. Steering of aggregating magnetic microparticles using propulsion gradients coils in an MRI Scanner.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-05-01

    Upgraded gradient coils can effectively enhance the MRI steering of magnetic microparticles in a branching channel. Applications of this method include MRI targeting of magnetic embolization agents for oncologic therapy. A magnetic suspension of Fe(3)O(4) magnetic particles was injected inside a y-shaped microfluidic channel. Magnetic gradients of 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mT/m were applied to the magnetic particles perpendicularly to the flow by a custom-built gradient coil inside a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Measurement of the steering ratio was performed both by video analyses and quantification of the mass of the particles collected at each outlet of the microfluidic channel, using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Magnetic particles steering ratios of 0.99 and 0.75 were reached with 400 mT/m gradient amplitude and measured by video analyses and atomic absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Experimental data shows that the steering ratio increases with higher magnetic gradients. Moreover, theory suggests that larger particles (or aggregates), higher magnetizations, and lower flows can also be used to improve the steering ratio. The technological limitation of the approach is that an MRI gradient amplitude increase to a few hundred milliteslas per meter is needed. A simple analytical method based on magnetophoretic velocity predictions and geometric considerations is proposed for steering ratio calculation. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Solitary plasma rings and magnetic field generation involving gravity and differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.

    2012-12-01

    A new theoretical framework for describing how magnetic fields are generated and amplified is provided by finding magneto-gravitational modes that involve gravity, density gradients, and differential rotation in an essential way. Other factors, such as the presence of a high temperature particle population or of a temperature gradient, can contribute to their excitation. These modes identified by a linearized analysis are shown to be important for the evolution of plasma disks surrounding black holes toward different configurations. Since the nonlinear development of these modes can lead to radially localized regions with a relatively small differential rotation, new stationary structures have been identified, in the (fully) nonlinear limit, which are localized radially over regions with negligible gradients of the rotation frequency. These structures, characterized by solitary plasma rings, do not involve a pre-existing "seed" magnetic field, unlike other configurations found previously. The relevant magnetic energy density is comparable to the gravitationally confined plasma pressure. The "source" of these configurations is the combination of the gravitational force and of the plasma density gradient orthogonal to it that is an important factor in the theory of magneto-gravitational modes, another important factor being an anisotropy of the plasma pressure.

  3. ptchg: A FORTRAN program for point-charge calculations of electric field gradients (EFGs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearing, Dane R.

    1994-05-01

    ptchg, a FORTRAN program, has been developed to calculate electric field gradients (EFG) around an atomic site in crystalline solids using the point-charge direct-lattice summation method. It uses output from the crystal structure generation program Atoms as its input. As an application of ptchg, a point-charge calculation of the EFG quadrupolar parameters around the oxygen site in SiO 2 cristobalite is demonstrated. Although point-charge calculations of electric field gradients generally are limited to ionic compounds, the computed quadrupolar parameters around the oxygen site in SiO 2 cristobalite, a highly covalent material, are in good agreement with the experimentally determined values from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

  4. Delayed demagnetization jumps in (NdDy)(FeCo)B magnets in a steady-state magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vova, G. L.; Kirman, M. V.; Koplak, O. V.; Kucheryaev, V. V.; Valeev, R. A.; Piskorskii, V. P.; Morgunov, R. B.

    2017-11-01

    Spontaneous demagnetization jumps are observed in sintered magnets (Nd0.6Dy0.4)16(Fe0.77Co0.23)78B6 in a constant magnetic field after a sharp decrease in an external magnetic field from the value corresponding to the saturation to a value close to the coercive force. It is shown that the number of the magnetization jumps is proportional to their amplitudes. A low value of the autocorrelation coefficient between the jump amplitude and the time of its appearance ( R < 0.1) demonstrate the stochasticity of the jumps. It is found that the spectral jump density is independent of the frequency, i.e., a white magnetic noise is observed. The distribution of the magnetic field gradient has been obtained near the sample surface that makes it possible to distinguish domains and the grain magnetization in the dependence on the direction of the texturing of the sintered magnet.

  5. Using Strong Magnetic Fields to Control Solutal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity , we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  6. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  7. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Nao; Kose, Katsumi

    2016-10-11

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (~54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach.

  8. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil

    PubMed Central

    KODAMA, Nao; KOSE, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (∼54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach. PMID:27001398

  9. Direct magnetic field estimation based on echo planar raw data.

    PubMed

    Testud, Frederik; Splitthoff, Daniel Nicolas; Speck, Oliver; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2010-07-01

    Gradient recalled echo echo planar imaging is widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging. The fast data acquisition is, however, very sensitive to field inhomogeneities which manifest themselves as artifacts in the images. Typically used correction methods have the common deficit that the data for the correction are acquired only once at the beginning of the experiment, assuming the field inhomogeneity distribution B(0) does not change over the course of the experiment. In this paper, methods to extract the magnetic field distribution from the acquired k-space data or from the reconstructed phase image of a gradient echo planar sequence are compared and extended. A common derivation for the presented approaches provides a solid theoretical basis, enables a fair comparison and demonstrates the equivalence of the k-space and the image phase based approaches. The image phase analysis is extended here to calculate the local gradient in the readout direction and improvements are introduced to the echo shift analysis, referred to here as "k-space filtering analysis." The described methods are compared to experimentally acquired B(0) maps in phantoms and in vivo. The k-space filtering analysis presented in this work demonstrated to be the most sensitive method to detect field inhomogeneities.

  10. An Analytical Model for Non-Uniform Magnetic Field Effects on Two-Dimensional Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, M. E.; Baker, J.; Saito, K.; VanderWal, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    In 1846, Michael Faraday found that permanent magnets could cause candle flames to deform into equatorial disks. He believed that the change in flame shape was caused by the presence of charged particles within the flames interacting with the magnetic fields. Later researchers found that the interaction between the flame ions and the magnetic fields were much too small to cause the flame deflection. Through a force analysis, von Engel and Cozens showed that the change in the flame shape could be attributed to the diamagnetic flame gases in the paramagnetic atmosphere. Paramagnetism occurs in materials composed of atoms with permanent magnetic dipole moments. In the presence of magnetic field gradients, the atoms align with the magnetic field and are drawn into the direction of increasing magnetic field. Diamagnetism occurs when atoms have no net magnetic dipole moment. In the presence of magnetic gradient fields, diamagnetic substances are repelled towards areas of decreasing magnetism. Oxygen is an example of a paramagnetic substance. Nitrogen, carbon monoxide and dioxide, and most hydrocarbon fuels are examples of diamagnetic substances. In order to evaluate the usefulness of these magnets in altering flame behavior, a study has been undertaken to develop an analytical model to describe the change in the flame length of a laminar diffusion jet in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field.

  11. Stochastic field-line wandering in magnetic turbulence with shear. II. Decorrelation trajectory method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, M.; Petrisor, I.; Shalchi, A.

    2017-11-01

    We study the diffusion of magnetic field lines in turbulence with magnetic shear. In the first part of the series, we developed a quasi-linear theory for this type of scenario. In this article, we employ the so-called DeCorrelation Trajectory method in order to compute the diffusion coefficients of stochastic magnetic field lines. The magnetic field configuration used here contains fluctuating terms which are described by the dimensionless functions bi(X, Y, Z), i = (x, y) and they are assumed to be Gaussian processes and are perpendicular with respect to the main magnetic field B0. Furthermore, there is also a z-component of the magnetic field depending on radial coordinate x (representing the gradient of the magnetic field) and a poloidal average component. We calculate the diffusion coefficients for magnetic field lines for different values of the magnetic Kubo number K, the dimensionless inhomogeneous magnetic parallel and perpendicular Kubo numbers KB∥, KB⊥ , as well as Ka v=bya vKB∥/KB⊥ .

  12. An abnormal periventricular magnetization transfer ratio gradient occurs early in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J William L; Pardini, Matteo; Brownlee, Wallace J; Fernando, Kryshani; Samson, Rebecca S; Prados Carrasco, Ferran; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In established multiple sclerosis, tissue abnormality—as assessed using magnetization transfer ratio—increases close to the lateral ventricles. We aimed to determine whether or not (i) these changes are present from the earliest clinical stages of multiple sclerosis; (ii) they occur independent of white matter lesions; and (iii) they are associated with subsequent conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis and disability. Seventy-one subjects had MRI scanning a median of 4.6 months after a clinically isolated optic neuritis (49 females, mean age 33.5 years) and were followed up clinically 2 and 5 years later. Thirty-seven healthy controls (25 females, mean age 34.4 years) were also scanned. In normal-appearing white matter, magnetization transfer ratio gradients were measured 1–5 mm and 6–10 mm from the lateral ventricles. In control subjects, magnetization transfer ratio was highest adjacent to the ventricles and decreased with distance from them; in optic neuritis, normal-appearing white matter magnetization transfer ratio was lowest adjacent to the ventricles, increased over the first 5 mm, and then paralleled control values. The magnetization transfer ratio gradient over 1–5 mm differed significantly between the optic neuritis and control groups [+0.059 percentage units/mm (pu/mm) versus −0.033 pu/mm, P = 0.010], and was significantly steeper in those developing clinically definite multiple sclerosis within 2 years compared to those who did not (0.132 pu/mm versus 0.016 pu/mm, P = 0.020). In multivariate binary logistic regression the magnetization transfer ratio gradient was independently associated with the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis within 2 years (magnetization transfer ratio gradient odds ratio 61.708, P = 0.023; presence of T2 lesions odds ratio 8.500, P = 0.071). At 5 years, lesional measures overtook magnetization transfer ratio gradients as significant predictors of conversion to multiple

  13. Analysis of the vector magnetic fields of complex sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patty, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of the vector magnetic field in the delta-configurations of two complex sunspot groups is presented, noting several characteristics identified in the delta-configurations. The observations of regions 2469 (S12E80) and 2470 (S21E83) took place in May, 1980 with a vector magnetograph, verified by optical viewing. Longitudinal magnetic field plots located the delta-configurations in relation to the transverse field neutral line. It is shown that data on the polarization yields qualitative information on the magnetic field strengths, while the azimuth of the transverse field can be obtained from the relative intensities of linear polarization measurements aligned with respect to the magnetograph analyses axis at 0 and 90 deg, and at the plus and minus 45 deg positions. Details of the longitudinal fields are discussed. A strong, sheared transverse field component is found to be a signature of strong delta. A weak delta is accompanied by a weak longitudinal gradient with an unsheared transverse component of variable strength.

  14. The Electron Drift Technique for Measuring Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschmann, G.; McIlwain, C. E.; Quinn, J. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Whipple, E. C.; Christensen, John (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The electron drift technique is based on sensing the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that is caused by electric fields and/or gradients in the magnetic field. These quantities can, by use of different electron energies, in principle be determined separately. Depending on the ratio of drift speed to magnetic field strength, the drift velocity can be determined either from the two emission directions that cause the electrons to gyrate back to detectors placed some distance from the emitting guns, or from measurements of the time of flight of the electrons. As a by-product of the time-of-flight measurements, the magnetic field strength is also determined. The paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the method as well as technical constraints.

  15. Detection of ferromagnetic target based on mobile magnetic gradient tensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Y. I. N.; Yingtang, Zhang; Zhining, Li; Hongbo, Fan; Guoquan, Ren

    2016-03-01

    Attitude change of mobile magnetic gradient tensor system critically affects the precision of gradient measurements, thereby increasing ambiguity in target detection. This paper presents a rotational invariant-based method for locating and identifying ferromagnetic targets. Firstly, unit magnetic moment vector was derived based on the geometrical invariant, such that the intermediate eigenvector of the magnetic gradient tensor is perpendicular to the magnetic moment vector and the source-sensor displacement vector. Secondly, unit source-sensor displacement vector was derived based on the characteristic that the angle between magnetic moment vector and source-sensor displacement is a rotational invariant. By introducing a displacement vector between two measurement points, the magnetic moment vector and the source-sensor displacement vector were theoretically derived. To resolve the problem of measurement noises existing in the realistic detection applications, linear equations were formulated using invariants corresponding to several distinct measurement points and least square solution of magnetic moment vector and source-sensor displacement vector were obtained. Results of simulation and principal verification experiment showed the correctness of the analytical method, along with the practicability of the least square method.

  16. Performance analysis of a microfluidic mixer based on high gradient magnetic separation principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyu; Han, Xiaotao; Cao, Quanliang; Li, Liang

    2017-09-01

    To achieve a rapid mixing between a water-based ferrofluid and DI water in a microfluidic environment, a magnetically actuated mixing system based on high gradient magnetic separation principles is proposed in this work. The microfluidic system consists of a T-shaped mirochannel and an array of integrated soft-magnetic elements at the sidewall of the channel. With the aid of an external magnetic bias field, these elements are magnetized to produce a magnetic volume force acting on the fluids containing magnetic nanoparticles, and then to induce additional flows for improving the mixing performance. The mixing process is numerically investigated through analyzing the concentration distribution of magnetic nanoparticles using a coupled particle-fluid transport model, and mixing performances under different parametrical conditions are investigated in detail. Numerical results show that a high mixing efficiency around 97.5% can be achieved within 2 s under an inlet flow rate of 1 mm s-1 and a relatively low magnetic bias field of 50 mT. Meanwhile, it has been found that there is an optimum number of magnetic elements used for obtaining the best mixing performance. These results show the potential of the proposed mixing method in lab-on-a-chip system and could be helpful in designing and optimizing system performance.

  17. Effects of a static inhomogeneous magnetic field acting on a laser-produced carbon plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, M.; Ruiz, H. M.; Bendixsen, L. S. Caballero; Reyes, S.; Veloso, F.; Wyndham, E.; Bhuyan, H.

    2017-08-01

    We present time- and space-resolved observations of the dynamics of a laser-produced carbon plasma, propagating in a sub-Tesla inhomogeneous magnetic field, with both, axial and radial field gradients. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μ m, with a fluence of 7 J/cm2, is used to generate the plasma from a solid graphite target, in vacuum. The magnetic field is produced using two coaxial sets of two NeFeB ring magnets, parallel to the laser target surface. The diagnostics include plasma imaging with 50 ns time resolution, spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy and Faraday cup. Based on our observations, evidence of radial and axial plasma confinement due to magnetic field gradients is presented. Formation of C2 molecules, previously observed in the presence of a low pressure neutral gas background, and enhanced on-axis ion flux, are ascribed to finite Larmor radius effects and reduced radial transport due to the presence of the magnetic field.

  18. Progress with High-Field Superconducting Magnets for High-Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ˜10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb3Sn superconductors. Nb3Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ˜15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. This review discusses the status and main results of Nb3Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  19. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nbmore » $$_3$$Sn superconductors. Nb$$_3$$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$$_3$$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.« less

  20. Evidence for Helical Magnetic fields in Kiloparsec-Scale AGN Jets and the Action of a Cosmic Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabuzda, D. C.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Contopulos, I.; Kazanas, D.

    2012-01-01

    A search for transverse kiloparsec-scale gradients in Faraday rotation-measure (RM) maps of extragalactic radio sources in the literature has yielded 6 AGNs displaying continuous, monotonic RM gradients across their jets, oriented roughly orthogonal to the local jet direction. The most natural interpretation of such transverse RM gradients is that they are caused by the systematic change in the line-of-sight components of helical magnetic fields associated with these jets. All the identified transverse RM gradients increase in the counterclockwise (CCW) direction on the sky relative to the centers of these AGNs. Taken together with the results of Contopoulos et al. who found evidence for a predominance of clockwise (CW) transverse RM gradients across parsec-scale (VLBI) jets, this provides new evidence for preferred orientations of RM gradients due to helical jet magnetic fields, with a reversal from CW in the inner jets to CCW farther from the centers of activity. This can be explained by the "Poynting-Robertson cosmic-battery" mechanism, which can generate helical magnetic fields with a. characteristic "twist," which are expelled with the jet outflows. If the Poynting-Robertson battery mechanism is not operating, an alternative mechanism must be identified, which is able to explain the 'predominance of CW /CCW RM gradients on parsec/kiloparsec scales.

  1. Scaling of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection Rate with Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Cassak, P.; Swisdak, M.; Hartke, T.; Oieroset, M.; Phan, T.; Liu, Y. H.; Hesse, M.; Shay, M.; Beidler, M.

    2017-12-01

    An out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field in asymmetric magnetic reconnection with an in-plane gas pressure gradient can lead to diamagnetic effects in the plane of reconnection. Simulations showed that such effects can make the X-line convect in the outflow direction and reduce the reconnection rate. They can even suppress the reconnection completely under certain upstream conditions. The complete suppression of reconnection due to these effects has been observed in the solar wind and Earth's magnetopause, and it has also been discussed as being important in the outer heliosphere, the magnetospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Mercury, and in magnetically confined fusion devices. Recent studies showed that diamagnetic effects set up by a density gradient are different from those set up by a temperature gradient. Although it is known that reconnection can be significantly slowed down and even suppressed by diamagnetic effects, there is neither a comprehensive understanding of the impact of the guide field and the diamagnetic effects on asymmetric reconnection nor quantitative scaling prediction for the reconnection rate as a function of arbitrary upstream conditions including guide fields. The purpose of this work is a first step towards these goals. We investigate the scaling of the reconnection rate using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. This study will be important for asymmetric reconnections in many settings, including those in the solar wind and those at planetary magnetospheres in reference to solar wind-magnetospheric coupling at the dayside magnetopause. It will also be useful for gaining perspective and making comparisons to Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observations of dayside reconnection.

  2. Life on Magnets: Stem Cell Networking on Micro-Magnet Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M.; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field’s value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:23936425

  3. Current Collection in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivorutsky, E. N.

    1997-01-01

    It is found that the upper-bound limit for current collection in the case of strong magnetic field from the current is close to that given by the Parker-Murphy formula. This conclusion is consistent with the results obtained in laboratory experiments. This limit weakly depends on the shape of the wire. The adiabatic limit in this case will be easily surpassed due to strong magnetic field gradients near the separatrix. The calculations can be done using the kinetic equation in the drift approximation. Analytical results are obtained for the region where the Earth's magnetic field is dominant. The current collection can be calculated (neglecting scattering) using a particle simulation code. Dr. Singh has agreed to collaborate, allowing the use of his particle code. The code can be adapted for the case when the current magnetic field is strong. The needed dm for these modifications is 3-4 months. The analytical description and essential part of the program is prepared for the calculation of the current in the region where the adiabatic description can be used. This was completed with the collaboration of Drs. Khazanov and Liemohn. A scheme of measuring the end body position is also proposed. The scheme was discussed in the laboratory (with Dr. Stone) and it was concluded that it can be proposed for engineering analysis.

  4. Effects of internal structure on equilibrium of field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by rotating magnetic field

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Inomoto, Michiaki; Okada, Shigefumi

    The effects of an internal structure on the equilibrium of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma sustained by rotating magnetic field is investigated by using detailed electrostatic probe measurements in the FRC Injection Experiment apparatus [S. Okada, et al., Nucl. Fusion. 45, 1094 (2005)]. An internal structure installed axially on the geometrical axis, which simulates Ohmic transformer or external toroidal field coils on the FRC device, brings about substantial changes in plasma density profile. The internal structure generates steep density-gradients not only on the inner side but on the outer side of the torus. The radial electric field is observed tomore » sustain the ion thermal pressure-gradient in the FRC without the internal structure; however, the radial electric field is not sufficient to sustain the increased ion thermal pressure-gradient in the FRC with the internal structure. Spontaneously driven azimuthal ion flow will be accountable for the imbalance of the radial pressure which is modified by the internal structure.« less

  5. Magnetic and velocity fields in a dynamo operating at extremely small Ekman and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimkanin, Ján; Kyselica, Juraj

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo are becoming more realistic because of advances in computer technology. Here, the geodynamo model is investigated numerically at the extremely low Ekman and magnetic Prandtl numbers using the PARODY dynamo code. These parameters are more realistic than those used in previous numerical studies of the geodynamo. Our model is based on the Boussinesq approximation and the temperature gradient between upper and lower boundaries is a source of convection. This study attempts to answer the question how realistic the geodynamo models are. Numerical results show that our dynamo belongs to the strong-field dynamos. The generated magnetic field is dipolar and large-scale while convection is small-scale and sheet-like flows (plumes) are preferred to a columnar convection. Scales of magnetic and velocity fields are separated, which enables hydromagnetic dynamos to maintain the magnetic field at the low magnetic Prandtl numbers. The inner core rotation rate is lower than that in previous geodynamo models. On the other hand, dimensional magnitudes of velocity and magnetic fields and those of the magnetic and viscous dissipation are larger than those expected in the Earth's core due to our parameter range chosen.

  6. Lagrangian model for the evolution of turbulent magnetic and passive scalar fields

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hater, T.; Grauer, R.; Homann, H.

    2011-01-15

    In this Brief Report we present an extension of the recent fluid deformation (RFD) closure introduced by Chevillard and Meneveau [L. Chevillard and C. Meneveau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 174501 (2006)] which was developed for modeling the time evolution of Lagrangian fluctuations in incompressible Navier-Stokes turbulence. We apply the RFD closure to study the evolution of magnetic and passive scalar fluctuations. This comparison is especially interesting since the stretching term for the magnetic field and for the gradient of the passive scalar are similar but differ by a sign such that the effect of stretching and compression by the turbulentmore » velocity field is reversed. Probability density functions (PDFs) of magnetic fluctuations and fluctuations of the gradient of the passive scalar obtained from the RFD closure are compared against PDFs obtained from direct numerical simulations.« less

  7. Simulation and analysis of the interactions between split gradient coils and a split magnet cryostat in an MRI-PET system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Sanchez-Lopez, Hector; Poole, Michael; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-09-01

    Splitting a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet into two halves can provide a central region to accommodate other modalities, such as positron emission tomography (PET). This approach, however, produces challenges in the design of the gradient coils in terms of gradient performance and fabrication. In this paper, the impact of a central gap in a split MRI system was theoretically studied by analysing the performance of split, actively-shielded transverse gradient coils. In addition, the effects of the eddy currents induced in the cryostat on power loss, mechanical vibration and magnetic field harmonics were also investigated. It was found, as expected, that the gradient performance tended to decrease as the central gap increased. Furthermore, the effects of the eddy currents were heightened as a consequence of splitting the gradient assembly into two halves. An optimal central gap size was found, such that the split gradient coils designed with this central gap size could produce an engineering solution with an acceptable trade-off between gradient performance and eddy current effects. These investigations provide useful information on the inherent trade-offs in hybrid MRI imaging systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stable Computation of the Vertical Gradient of Potential Field Data Based on Incorporating the Smoothing Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniamerian, Jamaledin; Liu, Shuang; Abbas, Mahmoud Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    The vertical gradient is an essential tool in interpretation algorithms. It is also the primary enhancement technique to improve the resolution of measured gravity and magnetic field data, since it has higher sensitivity to changes in physical properties (density or susceptibility) of the subsurface structures than the measured field. If the field derivatives are not directly measured with the gradiometers, they can be calculated from the collected gravity or magnetic data using numerical methods such as those based on fast Fourier transform technique. The gradients behave similar to high-pass filters and enhance the short-wavelength anomalies which may be associated with either small-shallow sources or high-frequency noise content in data, and their numerical computation is susceptible to suffer from amplification of noise. This behaviour can adversely affect the stability of the derivatives in the presence of even a small level of the noise and consequently limit their application to interpretation methods. Adding a smoothing term to the conventional formulation of calculating the vertical gradient in Fourier domain can improve the stability of numerical differentiation of the field. In this paper, we propose a strategy in which the overall efficiency of the classical algorithm in Fourier domain is improved by incorporating two different smoothing filters. For smoothing term, a simple qualitative procedure based on the upward continuation of the field to a higher altitude is introduced to estimate the related parameters which are called regularization parameter and cut-off wavenumber in the corresponding filters. The efficiency of these new approaches is validated by computing the first- and second-order derivatives of noise-corrupted synthetic data sets and then comparing the results with the true ones. The filtered and unfiltered vertical gradients are incorporated into the extended Euler deconvolution to estimate the depth and structural index of a magnetic

  9. Experimental study of effect of magnetic field on anode temperature distribution in an ATON-type Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinwen; Li, Hong; Mao, Wei; Ding, Yongjie; Wei, Liqiu; Li, Jianzhi; Yu, Daren; Wang, Xiaogang

    2018-05-01

    The energy deposition caused by the absorption of electrons by the anode is an important cause of power loss in a Hall thruster. The resulting anode heating is dangerous, as it can potentially reduce the thruster lifetime. In this study, by considering the ring shape of the anode of an ATON-type Hall thruster, the effects of the magnetic field strength and gradient on the anode ring temperature distribution are studied via experimental measurement. The results show that the temperature distribution is not affected by changes in the magnetic field strength and that the position of the peak temperature is essentially unchanged; however, the overall temperature does not change monotonically with the increase of the magnetic field strength and is positively correlated with the change in the discharge current. Moreover, as the magnetic field gradient increases, the position of the peak temperature gradually moves toward the channel exit and the temperature tends to decrease as a whole, regardless of the discharge current magnitude; in any case, the position of the peak temperature corresponds exactly to the intersection of the magnetic field cusp with the anode ring. Further theoretical analysis shows that the electrons, coming from the ionization region, travel along two characteristic paths to reach the anode under the guidance of the cusped magnetic field configuration. The change of the magnetic field strength or gradient changes the transfer of momentum and energy of the electrons in these two paths, which is the main reason for the changes in the temperature and distribution. This study is instructive for matching the design of the ring-shaped anode and the cusp magnetic field of an ATON-type Hall thruster.

  10. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ospelkaus, C; Langer, C E; Amini, J M; Brown, K R; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2008-08-29

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP). With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ion crystal and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates.

  11. Magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Lesur, Vincent; Lane, Richard; Wang, Huilin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the mathematical and computational aspects of the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system (SCS). This work is relevant for 3-D modelling that is performed with lithospheric vertical scales and global, continent or large regional horizontal scales. The curvature of the Earth is significant at these scales and hence, a SCS is more appropriate than the usual Cartesian coordinate system (CCS). The 3-D arrays of spherical prisms (SP; `tesseroids') can be used to model the response of volumes with variable magnetic properties. Analytical solutions do not exist for these model elements and numerical or mixed numerical and analytical solutions must be employed. We compared various methods for calculating the response in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The methods were (1) the spherical coordinate magnetic dipole method (MD), (2) variants of the 3-D Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration method (3-D GLQI) with (i) different numbers of nodes in each of the three directions, and (ii) models where we subdivided each SP into a number of smaller tesseroid volume elements, (3) a procedure that we term revised Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration (3-D RGLQI) where the magnetization direction which is constant in a SCS is assumed to be constant in a CCS and equal to the direction at the geometric centre of each tesseroid, (4) the Taylor's series expansion method (TSE) and (5) the rectangular prism method (RP). In any realistic application, both the accuracy and the computational efficiency factors must be considered to determine the optimum approach to employ. In all instances, accuracy improves with increasing distance from the source. It is higher in the percentage terms for potential than the vector or tensor response. The tensor errors are the largest, but they decrease more quickly with distance from the source. In our comparisons of relative computational efficiency, we found

  12. Gradient magnetometer system balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Tsvetkov, Yury

    2005-08-01

    Earth's magnetic field study still remains one of the leading edges of experimental geophysics. Thus study is executed on the Earth surface, including ocean bottom, and on satellite heights using component, mostly flux-gate magnetometers. But balloon experiments with component magnetometers are very seldom, first of all because of great complexity of data interpretation. This niche still waits for new experimental ideology, which will allow to get the measurements results with high accuracy, especially in gradient mode. The great importance of precise balloon-borne component magnetic field gradient study is obvious. Its technical realization is based both on the available at the marked high-precision non-magnetic tiltmeters and on recent achievements of flux-gate magnetometry. The scientific goals of balloon-borne magnetic gradiometric experiment are discussed and its practical realization is proposed.

  13. An abnormal periventricular magnetization transfer ratio gradient occurs early in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, J William L; Pardini, Matteo; Brownlee, Wallace J; Fernando, Kryshani; Samson, Rebecca S; Prados Carrasco, Ferran; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2017-02-01

    In established multiple sclerosis, tissue abnormality-as assessed using magnetization transfer ratio-increases close to the lateral ventricles. We aimed to determine whether or not (i) these changes are present from the earliest clinical stages of multiple sclerosis; (ii) they occur independent of white matter lesions; and (iii) they are associated with subsequent conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis and disability. Seventy-one subjects had MRI scanning a median of 4.6 months after a clinically isolated optic neuritis (49 females, mean age 33.5 years) and were followed up clinically 2 and 5 years later. Thirty-seven healthy controls (25 females, mean age 34.4 years) were also scanned. In normal-appearing white matter, magnetization transfer ratio gradients were measured 1-5 mm and 6-10 mm from the lateral ventricles. In control subjects, magnetization transfer ratio was highest adjacent to the ventricles and decreased with distance from them; in optic neuritis, normal-appearing white matter magnetization transfer ratio was lowest adjacent to the ventricles, increased over the first 5 mm, and then paralleled control values. The magnetization transfer ratio gradient over 1-5 mm differed significantly between the optic neuritis and control groups [+0.059 percentage units/mm (pu/mm) versus -0.033 pu/mm, P = 0.010], and was significantly steeper in those developing clinically definite multiple sclerosis within 2 years compared to those who did not (0.132 pu/mm versus 0.016 pu/mm, P = 0.020). In multivariate binary logistic regression the magnetization transfer ratio gradient was independently associated with the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis within 2 years (magnetization transfer ratio gradient odds ratio 61.708, P = 0.023; presence of T 2 lesions odds ratio 8.500, P = 0.071). At 5 years, lesional measures overtook magnetization transfer ratio gradients as significant predictors of conversion to multiple sclerosis. The

  14. Phase gradient imaging for positive contrast generation to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled targets in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haitao; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Sekino, Masaki

    2011-09-01

    Positive contrast imaging methods produce enhanced signal at large magnetic field gradient in magnetic resonance imaging. Several postprocessing algorithms, such as susceptibility gradient mapping and phase gradient mapping methods, have been applied for positive contrast generation to detect the cells targeted by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. In the phase gradient mapping methods, smoothness condition has to be satisfied to keep the phase gradient unwrapped. Moreover, there has been no discussion about the truncation artifact associated with the algorithm of differentiation that is performed in k-space by the multiplication with frequency value. In this work, phase gradient methods are discussed by considering the wrapping problem when the smoothness condition is not satisfied. A region-growing unwrapping algorithm is used in the phase gradient image to solve the problem. In order to reduce the truncation artifact, a cosine function is multiplied in the k-space to eliminate the abrupt change at the boundaries. Simulation, phantom and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that the modified phase gradient mapping methods may produce improved positive contrast effects by reducing truncation or wrapping artifacts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance optimization in electric field gradient focusing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefei; Farnsworth, Paul B; Tolley, H Dennis; Warnick, Karl F; Woolley, Adam T; Lee, Milton L

    2009-01-02

    Electric field gradient focusing (EFGF) is a technique used to simultaneously separate and concentrate biomacromolecules, such as proteins, based on the opposing forces of an electric field gradient and a hydrodynamic flow. Recently, we reported EFGF devices fabricated completely from copolymers functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol), which display excellent resistance to protein adsorption. However, the previous devices did not provide the predicted linear electric field gradient and stable current. To improve performance, Tris-HCl buffer that was previously doped in the hydrogel was replaced with a phosphate buffer containing a salt (i.e., potassium chloride, KCl) with high mobility ions. The new devices exhibited stable current, good reproducibility, and a linear electric field distribution in agreement with the shaped gradient region design due to improved ion transport in the hydrogel. The field gradient was calculated based on theory to be approximately 5.76 V/cm(2) for R-phycoerythrin when the applied voltage was 500 V. The effect of EFGF separation channel dimensions was also investigated; a narrower focused band was achieved in a smaller diameter channel. The relationship between the bandwidth and channel diameter is consistent with theory. Three model proteins were resolved in an EFGF channel of this design. The improved device demonstrated 14,000-fold concentration of a protein sample (from 2 ng/mL to 27 microg/mL).

  16. The role of the density gradient on intermittent cross-field transport events in a simple magnetized toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, C.; Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Podestà, M.; Poli, F. M.; Ricci, P.

    2008-04-01

    Intermittent cross-field particle transport events (ITEs) are studied in the basic toroidal device TORPEX [TORoidal Plasma EXperiment, A. Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)], with focus on the role of the density gradient. ITEs are due to the intermittent radial elongation of an interchange mode. The elongating positive wave crests can break apart and form blobs. This is not necessary, however, for plasma particles to be convected a considerable distance across the magnetic field lines. Conditionally sampled data reveal two different scenarios leading to ITEs. In the first case, the interchange mode grows radially from a slab-like density profile and leads to the ITE. A novel analysis technique reveals a monotonic dependence between the vertically averaged inverse radial density scale length and the probability for a subsequent ITE. In the second case, the mode is already observed before the start of the ITE. It does not elongate radially in a first stage, but at a later time. It is shown that this elongation is preceded by a steepening of the density profile as well.

  17. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  18. Lightning Magnetic Field Measurements around Langmuir Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Aulich, G. D.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the absence of artificial conductors, underground lightning transients are produced by diffusion of the horizontal surface magnetic field of a return stroke vertically downward into the conducting earth. The changing magnetic flux produces an orthogonal horizontal electric field, generating a dispersive, lossy transverse electromagnetic wave that penetrates a hundred meters or more into the ground according to the skin depth of the medium. In turn, the electric field produces currents that flow toward or away from the channel to ground depending on the stroke polarity. The underground transients can produce large radial horizontal potential gradients depending on the distance from the discharge and depth below the surface. In this study we focus on the surface excitation field. The goal of the work is to compare measurements of surface magnetic field waveforms B(t) at different distances from natural lightning discharges with simple and detailed models of the return stroke fields. In addition to providing input to the diffusion mechanism, the results should aid in further understanding return stroke field generation processes. The observational data are to be obtained using orthogonal sets of straightened Rogowski coils to measure magnetic field waveforms in N-S and E-W directions. The waveforms are sampled at 500 kS/s over 1.024 second time intervals and recorded directly onto secure digital cards. The instrument operates off of battery power for several days or weeks at a time in remote, unattended locations and measures magnetic field strengths of up to several tens of amperes/meter. The observations are being made in conjunction with collocated slow electric field change measurements and under good 3-D lightning mapping array (LMA) and fast electric field change coverage.

  19. Countering Solutal Buoyant Convection with High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemist, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitant, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity, we have been able to dramatically effect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  20. Equilibrium and initial linear stability analysis of liquid metal falling film flows in a varying spanwise magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D.; Morley, N. B.

    2002-12-01

    A 2D model for MHD free surface flow in a spanwise field is developed. The model, designed to simulate film flows of liquid metals in future thermo­nuclear fusion reactors, considers an applied spanwise magnetic field with spatial and temporal variation and an applied streamwise external current. A special case - a thin falling film flow in spanwise magnetic field with constant gradient and constant applied external streamwise current, is here investigated in depth to gain insight into the behavior of the MHD film flow. The fully developed flow solution is derived and initial linear stability analysis is performed for this special case. It is seen that the velocity profile is significantly changed due to the presence of the MHD effect, resulting in the free surface analog of the classic M-shape velocity profile seen in developing pipe flows in a field gradient. The field gradient is also seen to destabilize the film flow under most conditions. The effect of external current depends on the relative direction of the field gradient to the current direction. By controlling the magnitude of an external current, it is possible to obtain a linearly stable falling film under these magnetic field conditions. Tables 1, Figs 12, Refs 20.

  1. Observation of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance in a homogeneous field

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, L. A.; Leskowitz, G. M.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2004-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of BOOMERANG (better observation of magnetization, enhanced resolution, and no gradient), a sensitive and general method of magnetic resonance. The prototype millimeter-scale NMR spectrometer shows signal and noise levels in agreement with the design principles. We present 1H and 19F NMR in both solid and liquid samples, including time-domain Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy, multiple-pulse echoes, and heteronuclear J spectroscopy. By measuring a 1H-19F J coupling, this last experiment accomplishes chemically specific spectroscopy with force-detected NMR. In BOOMERANG, an assembly of permanent magnets provides a homogeneous field throughout the sample, while a harmonically suspended part of the assembly, a detector, is mechanically driven by spin-dependent forces. By placing the sample in a homogeneous field, signal dephasing by diffusion in a field gradient is made negligible, enabling application to liquids, in contrast to other force-detection methods. The design appears readily scalable to μm-scale samples where it should have sensitivity advantages over inductive detection with microcoils and where it holds great promise for application of magnetic resonance in biology, chemistry, physics, and surface science. We briefly discuss extensions of the BOOMERANG method to the μm and nm scales. PMID:15326302

  2. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-04-10

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans.

  3. WE-DE-206-02: MRI Hardware - Magnet, Gradient, RF Coils

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kocharian, A.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner,more » and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.« less

  4. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly chal- lenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), , and the perpendicular, , conductivities ( / may exceed 1010 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green s function method to solve themore » local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geom- etry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island chain), weakly chaotic (devil s staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the appropriateness of the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.« less

  5. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sangram K.; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L.; Dediu, V. Alek

    2016-01-01

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial–magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  6. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-10-21

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial-magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications.

  7. MAVEN Observations of the Effects of Crustal Magnetic Fields on the Mars Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M. F.; Flynn, C. L.; Withers, P.; Andersson, L.; Girazian, Z.; Mitchell, D. L.; Xu, S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Mars lacks a global intrinsic magnetic field but possesses regions of strong crustal magnetic field that influence the planetary interaction with the solar wind and affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere. Since entering Mars orbit in 2014, the MAVEN spacecraft has collected comprehensive measurements of the local plasma and magnetic field properties in the Martian dayside ionosphere. Here we discuss how crustal magnetic fields affect the structure, composition, and electrodynamics of the Martian ionosphere as seen by MAVEN. We present a survey of 17 months of MAVEN LPW measurements of the electron density and temperature in the dayside ionosphere and show that, above 200 km altitude, regions of strong crustal magnetic fields feature cooler electron temperatures and enhanced electron densities compared to regions with little or no crustal magnetic field. We also report on the influence of the magnetic field direction and topology on MAVEN electron density measurements in the southern crustal field areas, particularly in magnetic cusp regions. Finally, we discuss the effects of crustal magnetic fields on plasma boundaries like the ionopause, located at the top of the ionosphere and marked by a sharp and substantial gradient in the electron density.

  8. Non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient permanent magnet cancer therapy accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2017-05-23

    A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator includes a racetrack shape including a first straight section connected to a first arc section, the first arc section connected to a second straight section, the second straight section connected to a second arc section, and the second arc section connected to the first straight section; an matching cells configured to match particle orbits between the first straight section, the first arc section, the second straight section, and the second arc section. The accelerator includes the matching cells and an associated matching procedure enabling the particle orbits at varying energies between an arc section and a straight section in the racetrack shape.

  9. Diffusion of water in the endosperm tissue of wheat grains as studied by pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, P T; Jolley, K W; Lelievre, J

    1979-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to measure water self-diffusion coefficients in the endosperm tissue of wheat grains as a function of the tissue water content. A model that confines the water molecules to a randomly oriented array of capillaries with both transverse dimension less than 100 nm has been used to fit the data and give a unique diffusion coefficient at each water content. The diffusion rates vary from 1.8 x 10(-10) m2s-1 at the lowest to 1.2 x 10(-9) m2s-1 at the highest moisture content. This variation can be explained in terms of an increase in water film thickness from approximately 0.5 to approximately 2.5 nm over the moisture range investigated (200-360 mg g-1).

  10. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicatemore » that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.« less

  11. A practical and flexible implementation of 3D MRI in the Earth’s magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halse, Meghan E.; Coy, Andrew; Dykstra, Robin; Eccles, Craig; Hunter, Mark; Ward, Rob; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2006-09-01

    The Earth's magnetic field, though weak, is appealing for NMR applications because it is highly homogeneous, globally available and free. However, the practicality of Earth's field NMR (EFNMR) has long been limited by the need to perform experiments in outdoor locations where the local field homogeneity is not disrupted by ferrous or magnetic objects and where ultra-low frequency (ULF) noise sources are at a minimum. Herein we present a flexible and practical implementation of MRI in the Earth's magnetic field that demonstrates that EFNMR is not as difficult as it was previously thought to be. In this implementation, pre-polarization and ULF noise shielding, achieved using a crude electromagnet, are used to significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) even in relatively noisy environments. A three axis gradient coil set, in addition to providing imaging gradients, is used to provide first-order shims such that sub-hertz linewidths can routinely be achieved, even in locations of significant local field inhomogeneity such as indoor scientific laboratories. Temporal fluctuations in the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic field are measured and a regime found within which these variations in Larmor frequency produce no observable artefacts in reconstructed images.

  12. Simple method for the generation of multiple homogeneous field volumes inside the bore of superconducting magnets.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ching-Yu; Ferrage, Fabien; Aubert, Guy; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2015-07-17

    Standard Magnetic Resonance magnets produce a single homogeneous field volume, where the analysis is performed. Nonetheless, several modern applications could benefit from the generation of multiple homogeneous field volumes along the axis and inside the bore of the magnet. In this communication, we propose a straightforward method using a combination of ring structures of permanent magnets in order to cancel the gradient of the stray field in a series of distinct volumes. These concepts were demonstrated numerically on an experimentally measured magnetic field profile. We discuss advantages and limitations of our method and present the key steps required for an experimental validation.

  13. Toward an improved determination of Earth's lithospheric magnetic field from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsiaros, S.

    2016-12-01

    An analytical and numerical analysis of the spectral properties of the gradient tensor, initially performed by Rummel and van Gelderen (1992) for the gravity potential, shows that when the tensor elements are grouped into sets of semi-tangential and pure-tangential parts, they produce almost identical signal content as the normal element. Moreover, simple eigenvalue relations can be derived between these sets and the spherical harmonic expansion of the potential. This theoretical development generally applies to any potential field. First, the analysis of Rummel and van Gelderen (1992) is adapted to the magnetic field case and then the elements of the magnetic gradient tensor are estimated by 2 years of Swarm data and grouped into Γ(1) = {[∇B]rθ,[∇B]rφ} resp. Γ(2) = {[∇B]θθ-[∇B]φφ, 2[∇B]θφ}. It is shown that the estimated combinations Γ(1) and Γ(2) produce similar signal content as the theoretical radial gradient [∇B]rr. These results demonstrate the ability of multi-satellite missions such as Swarm, which cannot directly measure the radial gradient, to retrieve similar signal content by means of the horizontal gradients. Finally, lithospheric field models are derived using the gradient combinations Γ(1) and Γ(2) and compared with models derived from traditional vector and gradient data. The model resulting from Γ(1) leads to a very similar, and in particular cases improved, model compared to models retrieved by using approximately three times more data, i.e. a full set of vector, North-South and East-West gradients. ReferencesRummel, R., and M. van Gelderen (1992), Spectral analysis of the full gravity tensor, Geophysical Journal International, 111 (1), 159-169.

  14. Comparison Of The Global Analytic Models Of The Main Geomagnetic Field With The Stratospheric Balloon Magnetic Data 335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu.; Filippov, S.; Frunze, A.

    2013-12-01

    Three global analytical models of a main geomagnetic field constructed by satellite data are used: model IGRF, Daily Mean Spherical Harmonic Models (DMSHM), and model EMM/2010, and also scalar data of geomagnetic field and its gradients, received in stratospheric balloon gradient magnetic surveys at altitudes of ~30 km. At these altitudes the regional magnetic field is formed from all sources of the Earth's crust. It enables to receive along lengthy routes of surveys the fullest data on regional and longwave-lenght magnetic anomalies. Model DMSHM is used at extracting of magnetic anomalies for elimination of a secular variation up to significant value 0,2 nT. The model can be constructed within the limits of ± 1 months from the moment stratospheric balloon surveys with beneficial day terms with magnetic activity up to Kp <20, that leads to an error of representation of main MFE equal ±5 нТл. It is possible at presence acting for the period of stratospheric balloon magnetic survey of the satellite, for example, Swarm. On stratospheric balloon data it is shown, that model EMM/2010 unsatisfactorily displays MFE at altitude of 30 km. Hence, the qualitative model of the constant (main and anomaly) magnetic field cannot be constructed only with use of satellite and ground data. The improved model constant MFE, constructed according to satellite and stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys, developed up to a degree and the order m=n=720, will have a reliable data about regional crust magnetic field, hence, and about deep magnetic structure of the Earth's crust. The use gradient magnetic surveys aboard stratospheric balloons allows to find the places alternating approximately through 3000 km in which there are no magnetic anomalies. In these places probably to supervise satellite magnetic models for a range of altitude of 20-40 km, timed to stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys.

  15. Application and experimental validation of an integral method for simulation of gradient-induced eddy currents on conducting surfaces during magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, C. T.; Haw, D. W.; Handler, W. B.; Chronik, B. A.

    2013-06-01

    The time-varying magnetic fields created by the gradient coils in magnetic resonance imaging can produce negative effects on image quality and the system itself. Additionally, they can be a limiting factor to the introduction of non-MR devices such as cardiac pacemakers, orthopedic implants, and surgical robotics. The ability to model the induced currents produced by the switching gradient fields is key to developing methods for reducing these unwanted interactions. In this work, a framework for the calculation of induced currents on conducting surface geometries is summarized. This procedure is then compared to two separate experiments: (1) the analysis of the decay of currents induced upon a conducting cylinder by an insert gradient set within a head only 7 T MR scanner; and (2) analysis of the heat deposited into a small conductor by a uniform switching magnetic field at multiple frequencies and two distinct conductor thicknesses. The method was shown to allow the accurate modeling of the induced time-varying field decay in the first case, and was able to provide accurate estimation of the rise in temperature in the second experiment to within 30% when the skin depth was greater than or equal to the thickness of the conductor.

  16. Suppression of electron temperature gradient turbulence via negative magnetic shear in NSTX.

    PubMed

    Yuh, H Y; Kaye, S M; Levinton, F M; Mazzucato, E; Mikkelsen, D R; Smith, D R; Bell, R E; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Peterson, J L; Park, H K; Lee, W

    2011-02-04

    Negative magnetic shear is found to suppress electron turbulence and improve electron thermal transport for plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Sufficiently negative magnetic shear results in a transition out of a stiff profile regime. Density fluctuation measurements from high-k microwave scattering are verified to be the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode by matching measured rest frequency and linear growth rate to gyrokinetic calculations. Fluctuation suppression under negligible E×B shear conditions confirm that negative magnetic shear alone is sufficient for ETG suppression. Measured electron temperature gradients can significantly exceed ETG critical gradients with ETG mode activity reduced to intermittent bursts, while electron thermal diffusivity improves to below 0.1 electron gyro-Bohms.

  17. The instrument for investigating magnetic fields of isochronous cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avreline, N. V.

    2017-12-01

    A new instrument was designed and implemented in order to increase the measurement accuracy of magnetic field maps for isochronous Cyclotrons manufactured by Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc. This instrument uses the Hall Probe (HP) from New Zealand manufacturer Group3. The specific probe used is MPT-141 HP and can measure magnetic field in the range from 2G to 21kG. Use of a fast ADC NI9239 module and error reduction algorithms, based on a polynomial regression method, allowed to reduce the noise to 0.2G. The design of this instrument allows to measure high gradient magnetic fields, as the resolution of the HP arm angle is within 0.0005° and the radial position resolution is within 25μm. A set of National Instrument interfaces connected to a desktop computer through a network are used as base control and data acquisition systems.

  18. Single-shot imaging with higher-dimensional encoding using magnetic field monitoring and concomitant field correction.

    PubMed

    Testud, Frederik; Gallichan, Daniel; Layton, Kelvin J; Barmet, Christoph; Welz, Anna M; Dewdney, Andrew; Cocosco, Chris A; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    PatLoc (Parallel Imaging Technique using Localized Gradients) accelerates imaging and introduces a resolution variation across the field-of-view. Higher-dimensional encoding employs more spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs) than the corresponding image dimensionality requires, e.g. by applying two quadratic and two linear spatial encoding magnetic fields to reconstruct a 2D image. Images acquired with higher-dimensional single-shot trajectories can exhibit strong artifacts and geometric distortions. In this work, the source of these artifacts is analyzed and a reliable correction strategy is derived. A dynamic field camera was built for encoding field calibration. Concomitant fields of linear and nonlinear spatial encoding magnetic fields were analyzed. A combined basis consisting of spherical harmonics and concomitant terms was proposed and used for encoding field calibration and image reconstruction. A good agreement between the analytical solution for the concomitant fields and the magnetic field simulations of the custom-built PatLoc SEM coil was observed. Substantial image quality improvements were obtained using a dynamic field camera for encoding field calibration combined with the proposed combined basis. The importance of trajectory calibration for single-shot higher-dimensional encoding is demonstrated using the combined basis including spherical harmonics and concomitant terms, which treats the concomitant fields as an integral part of the encoding. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  20. Directional solidification of Bi-Mn alloys using an applied magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. L.; Pirich, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Off-eutectic compositions of Bi-Mn were directionally solidified in applied transverse magnetic fields up to 3 kG, to determine the effects on thermal and solutal convection. Plane front directional solidification of eutectic and near-eutectic Bi-Mn results in a two-phase rodlike morphology consisting of ferromagnetic MnBi rods in a Bi solid solution matrix. Compositions of either side of the eutectic were studied in growth orientations vertically up and down. Temperature gradient was monitored during growth by means of an in-situ thermocouple. For Bi-rich compositions, the magnetic field appeared to increase mixing as determined from thermal, morphological, chemical, and magnetic analyses. For Mn-rich compositions, morphological and chemical analyses suggest some reduction in mixing due to application of the magnetic force. The capability for carrying out directional solidification of Bi-Mn in high longitudinal magnetic fields was established.

  1. ELM suppression in helium plasmas with 3D magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.; Loarte, A.; Orlov, D. M.; ...

    2017-06-21

    Experiments in DIII-D, using non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields in high-purity low toroidal rotation, 4He plasmas have resulted in Type-I edge localized mode (ELM) suppression and mitigation. Suppression is obtained in plasmas with zero net input torque near the L–H power threshold using either electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) or balanced co- and counter-I p neutral beam injection (NBI) resulting in conditions equivalent to those expected in ITER's non-active operating phase. In low-power ECRH H-modes, periods with uncontrolled density and impurity radiation excursions are prevented by applying n = 3 non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields. ELM suppression results from a reduction andmore » an outward shift of the electron pressure gradient peak compared to that in the high-power ELMing phase. Here, the change in the electron pressure gradient peak is primarily due to a drop in the pedestal temperature rather than the pedestal density.« less

  2. ELM suppression in helium plasmas with 3D magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.; Loarte, A.; Orlov, D. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Knölker, M. M.; Lyons, B. C.; Cui, L.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments in DIII-D, using non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields in high-purity low toroidal rotation, 4He plasmas have resulted in Type-I edge localized mode (ELM) suppression and mitigation. Suppression is obtained in plasmas with zero net input torque near the L-H power threshold using either electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) or balanced co- and counter-I p neutral beam injection (NBI) resulting in conditions equivalent to those expected in ITER’s non-active operating phase. In low-power ECRH H-modes, periods with uncontrolled density and impurity radiation excursions are prevented by applying n  =  3 non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields. ELM suppression results from a reduction and an outward shift of the electron pressure gradient peak compared to that in the high-power ELMing phase. The change in the electron pressure gradient peak is primarily due to a drop in the pedestal temperature rather than the pedestal density.

  3. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-01-01

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans. PMID:28367906

  4. Parallel Electric Field on Auroral Magnetic Field Lines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Huey-Ching Betty

    1982-03-01

    lines to maintain current continuity. In a steady state, this model of simple electrostatic acceleration without anomalous resistivity also predicts observable relations between global parallel currents and parallel potential drops and between global energy deposition and parallel potential drops. The temperature, density, and species of the unaccelerated charge carriers are the relevant parameters of the model. The dusk-dawn -noon asymmetry of the global (phi)(,(PARLL)) distribution can be explained by the above steady-state (phi)(,(PARLL)) process if we associate the source regions of upward Birkeland current carriers in Region 1, Region 2, and the cusp region with the plasma sheet boundary layer, the near-Earth plasma sheet, and the magnetosheath, respectively. The results of this study provide observational information on the global distribution of parallel potential drops and the prevailing process of generating and maintaining potential gradients (parallel electric fields) along auroral magnetic field lines.

  5. Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation: A novel technique for the characterization of magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpino, Francesca

    In the last few decades, the development and use of nanotechnology has become of increasing importance. Magnetic nanoparticles, because of their unique properties, have been employed in many different areas of application. They are generally made of a core of magnetic material coated with some other material to stabilize them and to help disperse them in suspension. The unique feature of magnetic nanoparticles is their response to a magnetic field. They are generally superparamagnetic, in which case they become magnetized only in a magnetic field and lose their magnetization when the field is removed. It is this feature that makes them so useful for drug targeting, hyperthermia and bioseparation. For many of these applications, the synthesis of uniformly sized magnetic nanoparticles is of key importance because their magnetic properties depend strongly on their dimensions. Because of the difficulty of synthesizing monodisperse particulate materials, a technique capable of characterizing the magnetic properties of polydisperse samples is of great importance. Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) is a technique capable of fractionating magnetic particles based on their content of magnetite or other magnetic material. In MgFFF, the interplay of hydrodynamic and magnetic forces separates the particles as they are carried along a separation channel. Since the magnetic field and the gradient in magnetic field acting on the particles during their migration are known, it is possible to calculate the quantity of magnetic material in the particles according to their time of emergence at the channel outlet. Knowing the magnetic properties of the core material, MgFFF can be used to determine both the size distribution and the mean size of the magnetic cores of polydisperse samples. When magnetic material is distributed throughout the volume of the particles, the derived data corresponds to a distribution in equivalent spherical diameters of magnetic material in

  6. Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Martínez González, M. J.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in many astrophysical processes. They are difficult to detect and characterize since often their properties have to be inferred through interpreting the polarization of the light. Magnetic fields are also challenging to model and understand. Magnetized plasmas behave following highly non-linear differential equations having no general solution, so that every astrophysical problem represents a special case to be studied independently. Hence, magnetic fields are often an inconvenient subject which is overlooked or simply neglected (the elephant in the room, as they are dubbed in poster of the school). Such difficulty burdens the research on magnetic fields, which has evolved to become a very technical subject, with many small disconnected communities studying specific aspects and details. The school tried to amend the situation by providing a unifying view of the subject. The students had a chance to understand the behavior of magnetic fields in all astrophysical contexts, from cosmology to the Sun, and from starbursts to AGNs. The school was planed to present a balanced yet complete review of our knowledge, with excursions into the unknown to point out present and future lines of research. The subject of Cosmic Magnetic Fields was split into seven different topics: cosmic magnetic field essentials, solar magnetic fields, stellar magnetic fields, the role of magnetic fields on AGN feedback, magnetic fields in galaxies, magnetic fields in galaxy clusters and at larger scales, and primordial magnetic fields and magnetic fields in the early Universe. The corresponding lectures were delivered by seven well known and experienced scientists that have played key roles in the major advances of the field during the last years: F. Cattaneo, P. Judge, O. Kochukhov, R. Keppens, R. Beck, K. Dolag, and F. Finelli. Their lectures were recorded and are freely available at the IAC website: http://iactalks.iac.es/talks/serie/19.

  7. Large, nonsaturating thermopower in a quantizing magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liang

    2018-01-01

    The thermoelectric effect is the generation of an electrical voltage from a temperature gradient in a solid material due to the diffusion of free charge carriers from hot to cold. Identifying materials with a large thermoelectric response is crucial for the development of novel electric generators and coolers. We theoretically consider the thermopower of Dirac/Weyl semimetals subjected to a quantizing magnetic field. We contrast their thermoelectric properties with those of traditional heavily doped semiconductors and show that, under a sufficiently large magnetic field, the thermopower of Dirac/Weyl semimetals grows linearly with the field without saturation and can reach extremely high values. Our results suggest an immediate pathway for achieving record-high thermopower and thermoelectric figure of merit, and they compare well with a recent experiment on Pb1–xSnxSe. PMID:29806031

  8. Molecular diffusion in disordered interfacial media as probed by pulsed field gradients and nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, P.; Korb, J.-P.; Bryant, R. G.

    1999-10-01

    We address the question of probing the fluid dynamics in disordered interfacial media by Pulsed field gradient (PFG) and Magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) techniques. We show that the PFG method is useful to separate the effects of morphology from the connectivity in disordered macroporous media. We propose simulations of molecular dynamics and spectral density functions, J(ω), in a reconstructed mesoporous medium for different limiting conditions at the pore surface. An algebraic form is found for J(ω) in presence of a surface diffusion and a local exploration of the pore network. A logarithmic form of J(ω) is found in presence of a pure surface diffusion. We present magnetic relaxation dispersion experiments (MRD) for water and acetone in calibrated mesoporous media to support the main results of our simulations and theories. Nous présentons les avantages respectifs des méthodes de gradients de champs pulsés (PFG) et de relaxation magnétique nucléaire en champs cyclés (MRD) pour sonder la dynamique moléculaire dans les milieux interfaciaux désordonnés. La méthode PFG est utile pour séparer la morphologie et la connectivité dans des milieux macroporeux. Des simulations de diffusion moléculaire et de densité spectrale J(ω) en milieux mésoporeux sont présentées dans différentes conditions limites aux interfaces des pores. Nous trouvons une forme de dispersion algébrique de J(ω) pour une diffusion de surface assistée d'une exploration locale du réseau de pores et une forme logarithmique dans le cas d'une simple diffusion de surface. Les résultats expérimentaux de la méthode MRD pour de l'eau et de l'acétone dans des milieux mésoporeux calibrés supportent les résultats principaux de nos simulations et théories.

  9. Application and Prospect of Superconducting High Gradient Magnetic Separation in Disposal of Micro-fine Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changqiao; Li, Suqin; Guo, Zijie; Kong, Jiawei

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic separation technology is playing an increasingly important role in the field of environmental protection such as waste gas, waste water and solid waste treatment. As a new type of solid waste treatment technology, superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is mainly applied in the separation of micro-fine weakly magnetic particles because of the advantages of high separation efficiency, energy saving, simple equipment and easy automation. In this paper, the basic principle of superconducting HGMS was firstly introduced, then the research status of scholars at home and aboard on the disposal of micro-fine tailings were summarized. Finally, the direction of development for HGMS was put forward.

  10. The equivalent magnetizing method applied to the design of gradient coils for MRI.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Hector Sanchez; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the design of gradient coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems. The method is based on the equivalence between a magnetized volume surrounded by a conducting surface and its equivalent representation in surface current/charge density. We demonstrate that the curl of the vertical magnetization induces a surface current density whose stream line defines the coil current pattern. This method can be applied for coils wounds on arbitrary surface shapes. A single layer unshielded transverse gradient coil is designed and compared, with the designs obtained using two conventional methods. Through the presented example we demonstrate that the generated unconventional current patterns obtained using the magnetizing current method produces a superior gradient coil performance than coils designed by applying conventional methods.

  11. Magnetic field and electric current structure in the chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dravins, D.

    1974-01-01

    The three-dimensional vector magnetic field structure in the chromosphere above an active region is deduced by using high-resolution H-alpha filtergrams together with a simultaneous digital magnetogram. An analog model of the field is made with 400 metal wires representing field lines that outline the H-alpha structure. The height extent of the field is determined from vertical field-gradient observations around sunspots, from observed fibril heights, and from an assumption that the sources of the field are largely local. The computed electric currents (typically 10 mA/sq m) are found to flow in patterns not similar to observed features and not parallel to magnetic fields. Force structures correspond to observed solar features; the dynamics to be expected include: downward motion in bipolar areas in the lower chromosphere, an outflow of the outer chromosphere into the corona with radially outward flow above bipolar plage regions, and motion of arch filament systems.

  12. Magnetothermal Convection of Water with the Presence or Absence of a Magnetic Force Acting on the Susceptibility Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Syou

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer of magnetothermal convection with the presence or absence of the magnetic force acting on the susceptibility gradient (fsc) was examined by three-dimensional numerical computations. Thermal convection of water enclosed in a shallow cylindrical vessel (diameter over vessel height = 6.0) with the Rayleigh-Benard model was adopted as the model, under the conditions of Prandtl number 6.0 and Ra number 7000, respectively. The momentum equations of convection were nondimensionalized, which involved the term of fsc and the term of magnetic force acting on the magnetic field gradient (fb). All the computations resulted in axisymmetric steady rolls. The values of the averaged Nu, the averaged velocity components U, V, and W, and the isothermal distributions and flow patterns were almost completely the same, regardless of the presence or absence of the term of fsc. As a result, we found that the effect of fsc was extremely small, although much previous research emphasized the effect with paramagnetic solutions under an unsteady state. The magnitude of fsc depends not only on magnetic conditions (magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic flux density), but also on the thermal properties of the solution (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity). Therefore the effect of fb becomes dominant on the magnetothermal convection. Active control over the density gradient with temperature will be required to advance heat transfer with the effect of fsc. PMID:27606823

  13. Magnetothermal Convection of Water with the Presence or Absence of a Magnetic Force Acting on the Susceptibility Gradient.

    PubMed

    Maki, Syou

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer of magnetothermal convection with the presence or absence of the magnetic force acting on the susceptibility gradient (fsc) was examined by three-dimensional numerical computations. Thermal convection of water enclosed in a shallow cylindrical vessel (diameter over vessel height = 6.0) with the Rayleigh-Benard model was adopted as the model, under the conditions of Prandtl number 6.0 and Ra number 7000, respectively. The momentum equations of convection were nondimensionalized, which involved the term of fsc and the term of magnetic force acting on the magnetic field gradient (fb). All the computations resulted in axisymmetric steady rolls. The values of the averaged Nu, the averaged velocity components U, V, and W, and the isothermal distributions and flow patterns were almost completely the same, regardless of the presence or absence of the term of fsc. As a result, we found that the effect of fsc was extremely small, although much previous research emphasized the effect with paramagnetic solutions under an unsteady state. The magnitude of fsc depends not only on magnetic conditions (magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic flux density), but also on the thermal properties of the solution (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity). Therefore the effect of fb becomes dominant on the magnetothermal convection. Active control over the density gradient with temperature will be required to advance heat transfer with the effect of fsc.

  14. The mechanisms of the effects of magnetic fields on cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A.

    The evolution of organisms in conditions of the Earth magnetism results in close dependence of their functioning on the properties of the Earth magnetic field. The magnetic conditions in space flight differ from those on the Earth (e.g. much smaller values of magnetic filed) that effect various processes in living organisms. Meanwhile the mechanisms of interaction of magnetic fields with cell structures are poorly understood and systemized. The goal of the present work is to analyze and estimate the main established mechanisms of "magnetic fields - cell" interaction. Due to variety and complexity of the effects the analysis is mainly restricted to biological effects of the static magnetic field at a cellular level. 1) Magnetic induction. Static magnetic fields exert forces on moving ions in solution (e.g., electrolytes), giving rise to induced electric fields and currents. This effect may be especially important when the currents changed due to the magnetic field application are participating in some receptor functions of cells (e.g. plant cells). 2) Magneto-mechanical effect of reorientation. Uniform static magnetic fields produce torques on certain molecules with anisotropic magnetic properties, which results in their reorientation and spatial ordering. Since the structures of biological cells are magnetically and mechanically inhomogeneous, the application of a homogeneous magnetic field may cause redistribution of stresses within cells, deformation of intracellular structures, change of membrane permeability, etc. 3) Ponderomotive effects. Spatially non-uniform magnetic field exerts ponderomotive force on magnetically non-uniform cell structures. This force is proportional to the gradient of the square of magnetic field and the difference of magnetic susceptibilities of the component of the cell and its environment. 4) Biomagnetic effects. Magnetic fields can exert torques and translational forces on ferromagnetic structures, such as magnetite and ferritins

  15. Simple method for the generation of multiple homogeneous field volumes inside the bore of superconducting magnets

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ching-Yu; Ferrage, Fabien; Aubert, Guy; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Standard Magnetic Resonance magnets produce a single homogeneous field volume, where the analysis is performed. Nonetheless, several modern applications could benefit from the generation of multiple homogeneous field volumes along the axis and inside the bore of the magnet. In this communication, we propose a straightforward method using a combination of ring structures of permanent magnets in order to cancel the gradient of the stray field in a series of distinct volumes. These concepts were demonstrated numerically on an experimentally measured magnetic field profile. We discuss advantages and limitations of our method and present the key steps required for an experimental validation. PMID:26182891

  16. Electric Field Feature of Moving Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, You Jun

    2001-05-01

    A new fundamental relationship of electric field with magnetic field has been inferred from the fundamental experimental laws and theories of classical electromagnetics. It can be described as moving magnetic field has or gives electric feature. When a field with magnetic induction of B moves in the velocity of V, it will show electric field character, the electric field intensity E is E = B x V and the direction of E is in the direction of the vector B x V. It is improper to use the time-varying electromagnetics theories as the fundamental theory of the electromagnetics and group the electromagnetic field into static kind and time-varying kind for the static is relative to motional not only time-varying. The relationship of time variation of magnetic field induction or magnetic flux with electric field caused by magnetic field is fellowship not causality. Thus time-varying magnetic field can cause electric field is not a nature principle. Sometime the time variation of magnetic flux is equal to the negative electromotive force or the time variation of magnetic field induction is equal to the negative curl of electric field caused by magnetic field motion, but not always. And not all motion of magnetic field can cause time variation of magnetic field. Therefore Faraday-Lenz`s law can only be used as mathematics tool to calculate the quantity relation of the electricity with the magnetism in some case like the magnetic field moving in uniform medium. Faraday-Lenz`s law is unsuitable to be used in moving uniform magnetic field or there is magnetic shield. Key word: Motional magnetic field, Magnetic induction, Electric field intensity, Velocity, Faraday-Lenz’s law

  17. Effect of low frequency magnetic fields on the growth of MNP-treated HT29 colon cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyridopoulou, K.; Makridis, A.; Maniotis, N.; Karypidou, N.; Myrovali, E.; Samaras, T.; Angelakeris, M.; Chlichlia, K.; Kalogirou, O.

    2018-04-01

    Recent investigations have attempted to understand and exploit the impact of magnetic field-actuated internalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on the proliferation rate of cancer cells. Due to the complexity of the parameters governing magnetic field-exposure though, individual studies to date have raised contradictory results. In our approach we performed a comparative analysis of key parameters related to the cell exposure of cancer cells to magnetic field-actuated MNPs, and to the magnetic field, in order to better understand the factors affecting cellular responses to magnetic field-stimulated MNPs. We used magnetite MNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm and studied the proliferation rate of MNPs-treated versus untreated HT29 human colon cancer cells, exposed to either static or alternating low frequency magnetic fields with varying intensity (40-200 mT), frequency (0-8 Hz) and field gradient. All three parameters, field intensity, frequency, and field gradient affected the growth rate of cells, with or without internalized MNPs, as compared to control MNPs-untreated and magnetic field-untreated cells. We observed that the growth inhibitory effects induced by static and rotating magnetic fields were enhanced by pre-treating the cells with MNPs, while the growth promoting effects observed in alternating field-treated cells were weakened by MNPs. Compared to static, rotating magnetic fields of the same intensity induced a similar extend of cell growth inhibition, while alternating fields of varying intensity (70 or 100 mT) and frequency (0, 4 or 8 Hz) induced cell proliferation in a frequency-dependent manner. These results, highlighting the diverse effects of mode, intensity, and frequency of the magnetic field on cell growth, indicate that consistent and reproducible results can be achieved by controlling the complexity of the exposure of biological samples to MNPs and external magnetic fields, through monitoring crucial experimental parameters. We

  18. Reconstruction of the static magnetic field of a magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Dennis; Köhn, Kevin; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2018-06-01

    The simulation of magnetron discharges requires a quantitatively correct mathematical model of the magnetic field structure. This study presents a method to construct such a model on the basis of a spatially restricted set of experimental data and a plausible a priori assumption on the magnetic field configuration. The example in focus is that of a planar circular magnetron. The experimental data are Hall probe measurements of the magnetic flux density in an accessible region above the magnetron plane [P. D. Machura et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 23, 065043 (2014)]. The a priori assumption reflects the actual design of the device, and it takes the magnetic field emerging from a center magnet of strength m C and vertical position d C and a ring magnet of strength m R , vertical position d R , and radius R. An analytical representation of the assumed field configuration can be formulated in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions. Fitting the ansatz to the experimental data with a least square method results in a fully specified analytical field model that agrees well with the data inside the accessible region and, moreover, is physically plausible in the regions outside of it. The outcome proves superior to the result of an alternative approach which starts from a multimode solution of the vacuum field problem formulated in terms of polar Bessel functions and vertical exponentials. As a first application of the obtained field model, typical electron and ion Larmor radii and the gradient and curvature drift velocities of the electron guiding center are calculated.

  19. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    PubMed

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Comment on "Effects of Magnetic Field Gradient on Ion Beam Current in Cylindrical Hall Ion Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Raitses, Y.; Smirnov A.; Fisch, N.J.

    It is argued that the key difference of the cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) as compared to the end-Hall ion source cannot be exclusively attributed to the magnetic field topology [Tang et al. J. Appl. Phys., 102, 123305 (2007)]. With a similar mirror-type topology, the CHT configuration provides the electric field with nearly equipotential magnetic field surfaces and a better suppression of the electron cross-field transport, as compared to both the end-Hall ion source and the cylindrical Hall ion source of Tang et al.

  1. Analysis of high gradient magnetic field effects on distribution of nanoparticles injected into pulsatile blood stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza Habibi, Mohammad; Ghassemi, Majid; Hossien Hamedi, Mohammad

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely used in a wide range of applications including data storage materials, pharmaceutical industries as magnetic separation tools, anti-cancer drug carriers and micro valve applications. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the effect of a non-uniform magnetic field on bio-fluid (blood) with magnetic nanoparticles. The effect of particles as well as mass fraction on flow field and volume concentration is investigated. The governing non-linear differential equations, concentration and Navier-stokes are coupled with the magnetic field. To solve these equations, a finite volume based code is developed and utilized. A real pulsatile velocity is utilized as inlet boundary condition. This velocity is extracted from an actual experimental data. Three percent nanoparticles volume concentration, as drug carrier, is steadily injected in an unsteady, pulsatile and non-Newtonian flow. A power law model is considered for the blood viscosity. The results show that during the systole section of the heartbeat when the blood velocity increases, the magnetic nanoparticles near the magnetic source are washed away. This is due to the sudden increase of the hydrodynamic force, which overcomes the magnetic force. The probability of vein blockage increases when the blood velocity reduces during the diastole time. As nanoparticles velocity injection decreases (longer injection time) the wall shear stress (especially near the injection area) decreases and the retention time of the magnetic nanoparticles in the blood flow increases.

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticle Drug Carriers and their Study by Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancers and other pathological conditions. The efficient delivery of therapeutic levels of drug to a target site while limiting nonspecific, systemic toxicity requires optimization of the drug delivery materials, the applied magnetic field, and the treatment protocol. The history and current state of magnetic drug targeting is reviewed. While initial studies involved micron-sized and larger carriers, and work with these microcarriers continues, it is the sub-micron carriers or nanocarriers that are of increasing interest. An aspect of magnetic drug targeting using nanoparticle carriers that has not been considered is then addressed. This aspect involves the variation in the magnetic properties of the nanocarriers. Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a relatively new technique for characterizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is unique in its capability of determining the distribution in magnetic properties of a nanoparticle sample in suspension. The development and current state of this technique is also reviewed. Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers have been found by QMgFFF analysis to be highly polydisperse in their magnetic properties, and the strength of response of the particles to magnetic field gradients is predicted to vary by orders of magnitude. It is expected that the least magnetic fraction of a formulation will contribute the most to systemic toxicity, and the depletion of this fraction will result in a more effective drug carrying material. A material that has a reduced systemic toxicity will allow higher doses of cytotoxic drugs to be delivered to the tumor with reduced side effects. Preliminary experiments involving a novel method of refining a magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier to achieve this result are described. QMgFFF is used to characterize the refined and unrefined material. PMID:19591456

  3. Effect of Interface Shape and Magnetic Field on the Microstructure of Bulk Ge:Ga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal and compositional gradients induced during the growth process contribute significantly to the development of defects in the solidified boule. Thermal gradients and the solid-liquid interface shape can be greatly effected by ampoule material. Compositional gradients are strongly influenced by interface curvature and convective flow in the liquid. Results of this investigation illustrate the combined influences of interface shape and convective fluid flow. An applied magnetic field was used to reduce the effects of convective fluid flow in the electrically conductive melt during directional solidification. Several 8 mm diameter boules of Ga-doped Ge were grown at different field strengths, up to 5 Tesla, in four different ampoule materials. Compositional profiles indicate mass transfer conditions ranged from completely mixed to diffusion controlled. The influence of convection in the melt on the developing crystal microstructure and defect density was investigated as a function of field strength and ampoule material. Chemical etching and electron backscattered electron diffraction were used to map the crystal structure of each boule along the center plane. Dislocation etch pit densities were measured for each boule. Results show the influence of magnetic field strength and ampoule material on overall crystal quality.

  4. Using Magnetic Fields to Control Convection during Protein Crystallization: Analysis and Validation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of convection during the crystallization of proteins is not very well understood. In a gravitational field, convection is caused by crystal sedimentation and by solutal buoyancy induced flow and these can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, we develop the analysis for magnetic flow control and test the predictions using analog experiments. Specifically, experiments on solutal convection in a paramagnetic fluid were conducted in a strong magnetic field gradient using a dilute solution of Manganese Chloride. The observed flows indicate that the magnetic field can completely counter the settling effects of gravity locally and are consistent with the theoretical predictions presented. This phenomenon suggests that magnetic fields may be useful in mimicking the microgravity environment of space for some crystal growth ana biological applications where fluid convection is undesirable.

  5. Open-Access, Low-Magnetic-Field MRI System for Lung Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Tsai, Leo L.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Patz, Samuel; Ruset, Iullian C.; Hersman, F. William

    2009-01-01

    An open-access magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system is being developed for use in research on orientational/gravitational effects on lung physiology and function. The open-access geometry enables study of human subjects in diverse orientations. This system operates at a magnetic flux density, considerably smaller than the flux densities of typical other MRI systems, that can be generated by resistive electromagnet coils (instead of the more-expensive superconducting coils of the other systems). The human subject inhales air containing He-3 or Xe-129 atoms, the nuclear spins of which have been polarized by use of a laser beam to obtain a magnetic resonance that enables high-resolution gas space imaging at the low applied magnetic field. The system includes a bi-planar, constant-current, four-coil electromagnet assembly and associated electronic circuitry to apply a static magnetic field of 6.5 mT throughout the lung volume; planar coils and associated circuitry to apply a pulsed magnetic-field-gradient for each spatial dimension; a single, detachable radio-frequency coil and associated circuitry for inducing and detecting MRI signals; a table for supporting a horizontal subject; and electromagnetic shielding surrounding the electromagnet coils.

  6. Magnetoelectrets prepared by using temperature gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Pragya; Qureshi, M. S.; Malik, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    A novel Temperature Gradient method for preparation of magnetoelectret is proposed. Non uniform magnetic field and temperature gradient are expected to be the main cause for the formation of magnetoelectrets (MEs). Being bad conductors of heat, during their formation, there is a possibility for the existence of a temperature gradient along the dielectric electrode interface. In this condition, the motion of, molecules and charge carriers are dependent on Temperature Gradient in a preferred direction. To increase this temperature gradient on both sides of the sample novel method for the preparation of MEs is developed for the first time. For this method the special sample holders are designed in our laboratory. MEs are prepared in such a way that one surface is cooled and the other is heated, during the process. With the help of XRD analysis using Type-E orientation pattern and surface charge studies on magnetoelectrets, the two main causes Non uniform magnetic field and temperature gradient for the formation of magnetoelectrets (MEs), are authenticated experimentally.

  7. Motion of charged particles normal to an irregular magnetic field. [astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The motion is analyzed of charged particles in a fluctuating magnetic field which varies only in directions normal to its mean direction, such as that which would be generated by an ensemble of magnetosonic waves propagating normal to an ambient magnetic field. The appropriate generalization of gradient-drift motion is derived in terms of the power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations, and an effective spatial diffusion coefficient is obtained. Several special cases are considered, including a Gaussian power spectrum, a power-law spectrum with a cutoff, and a general power-law spectrum. A possible magnitude is calculated for the spatial diffusion coefficient of the solar wind.

  8. Dynamics of Mesoscale Magnetic Field in Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a theory for the generation of mesoscale (krg<<1, where rg is the cosmic-ray gyroradius) magnetic fields during diffusive shock acceleration. The decay or modulational instability of resonantly excited Alfvén waves scattering off ambient density perturbations in the shock environment naturally generates larger scale fields. For a broad spectrum of perturbations, the physical mechanism of energy transfer is random refraction, represented by the diffusion of Alfvén wave packets in k-space. The scattering field can be produced directly by the decay instability or by the Drury instability, a hydrodynamic instability driven by the cosmic-ray pressure gradient. This process is of interest to acceleration since it generates waves of longer wavelength, and so enables the confinement and acceleration of higher energy particles. This process also limits the intensity of resonantly generated turbulent magnetic fields on rg scales.

  9. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  10. On the Electron Diffusion Region in Asymmetric Reconnection with a Guide Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Li-Jen; Bessho, Naoki; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim; Burch, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations in a 2.5-D geometry and analytical theory are employed to study the electron diffusion region in asymmetric reconnection with a guide magnetic field. The analysis presented here demonstrates that similar to the case without guide field, in-plane flow stagnation and null of the in-plane magnetic field are well separated. In addition, it is shown that the electric field at the local magnetic X point is again dominated by inertial effects, whereas it remains dominated by nongyrotropic pressure effects at the in-plane flow stagnation point. A comparison between local electron Larmor radii and the magnetic gradient scale lengths predicts that distribution should become nongyrotropic in a region enveloping both field reversal and flow stagnation points. This prediction is verified by an analysis of modeled electron distributions, which show clear evidence of mixing in the critical region.

  11. Correlation between solar flare productivity and photospheric vector magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yanmei; Wang, Huaning

    2008-11-01

    Studying the statistical correlation between the solar flare productivity and photospheric magnetic fields is very important and necessary. It is helpful to set up a practical flare forecast model based on magnetic properties and improve the physical understanding of solar flare eruptions. In the previous study ([Cui, Y.M., Li, R., Zhang, L.Y., He, Y.L., Wang, H.N. Correlation between solar flare productivity and photospheric magnetic field properties 1. Maximum horizontal gradient, length of neutral line, number of singular points. Sol. Phys. 237, 45 59, 2006]; from now on we refer to this paper as ‘Paper I’), three measures of the maximum horizontal gradient, the length of the neutral line, and the number of singular points are computed from 23990 SOHO/MDI longitudinal magnetograms. The statistical relationship between the solar flare productivity and these three measures is well fitted with sigmoid functions. In the current work, the three measures of the length of strong-shear neutral line, total unsigned current, and total unsigned current helicity are computed from 1353 vector magnetograms observed at Huairou Solar Observing Station. The relationship between the solar flare productivity and the current three measures can also be well fitted with sigmoid functions. These results are expected to be beneficial to future operational flare forecasting models.

  12. The Swarm Initial Field Model for the 2014 Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Nils; Hulot, Gauthier; Lesur, Vincent; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciaran; Chulliat, Arnaud; Sabaka, Terence J.; Floberghagen, Rune; Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Haagmans, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Data from the first year of ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive the Swarm Initial Field Model (SIFM), a new model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. In addition to the conventional magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites, explicit advantage is taken of the constellation aspect by including east-west magnetic intensity gradient information from the lower satellite pair. Along-track differences in magnetic intensity provide further information concerning the north-south gradient. The SIFM static field shows excellent agreement (up to at least degree 60) with recent field models derived from CHAMP data, providing an initial validation of the quality of the Swarm magnetic measurements. Use of gradient data improves the determination of both the static field and its secular variation, with the mean misfit for east-west intensity differences between the lower satellite pair being only 0.12 nT.

  13. The Study of Spherical Cores with a Toroidal Magnetic Field Configuration

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gholipour, Mahmoud

    Observational studies of the magnetic fields in molecular clouds have significantly improved the theoretical models developed for the structure and evolution of dense clouds and for the star formation process as well. The recent observational analyses on some cores indicate that there is a power-law relationship between magnetic field and density in the molecular clouds. In this study, we consider the stability of spherical cores with a toroidal magnetic field configuration in the molecular clouds. For this purpose, we model a spherical core that is in magnetostatic equilibrium. Herein, we propose an equation of density structure, which is a modifiedmore » form of the isothermal Lane–Emden equation in the presence of the toroidal magnetic field. The proposed equation describes the effect of the toroidal magnetic field on the cloud structure and the mass cloud. Furthermore, we found an upper limit for this configuration of magnetic field in the molecular clouds. Then, the virial theorem is used to consider the cloud evolution leading to an equation in order to obtain the lower limit of the field strength in the molecular cloud. However, the results show that the field strength of the toroidal configuration has an important effect on the cloud structure, whose upper limit is related to the central density and field gradient. The obtained results address some regions of clouds where the cloud decomposition or star formation can be seen.« less

  14. Effects of microgravity modeled by large gradient high magnetic field on the osteogenic initiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongyan; Meng, Rui; Deng, Wanglong; Ding, Wenchao; Zheng, Qiang; Yuan, Wenji; Liu, Liyue; Zong, Chen; Shang, Peng; Wang, Jinfu

    2010-12-01

    Microgravity (MG) leads to a decrease in osteogenic potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In the present study, we used large gradient high magnetic field (LGHMF) produced by a superconducting magnet to model MG (LGHMF-MG) and analyzed the effects of LGHMF-MG on survival, cytoskeleton and osteogenic potential of hMSCs. Results showed that the LGHMF-MG treatment for 6 h disrupted the cytoskeleton of hMSCs, and the LGHMF-MG treatment for 24 h led to cell death. LGHMF-MG treatments for 6 h in early stages of osteogenic induction (the pre-treatment before osteogenic induction, the beginning-treatment in the beginning-stage of osteogenic induction and the middle-treatment in the middle-stage of osteogenic induction) resulted in suppression on osteogenesis of hMSCs. The suppression intensity was reduced gradually as the treatment stage of LGHMF-MG was postponed. The LGHMF-MG treatment for 6 h in the ending-stage of osteogenic induction (the ending-treatment) had no obvious effect on osteogenesis of hMSCs. These results indicated that LGHMF-MG should affect the initiation of osteogenesis. Finally, the possible mechanism for the inhibition effect of LGHMF-MG on osteogenesis of hMSCs is discussed.

  15. Operation of A Sunpower M87 Cryocooler In A Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, S. R.; Shirey, K. A.; Banks, I. S.; Warner, B. A.; Boyle, R. F.; Mustafi, S.; Krebs,Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) is an experiment that will be flown as an attached payload on the International Space Station to detect dark matter and antimatter. It uses large superconducting magnets cooled with superfluid helium to bend the path of cosmic particles through a series of detectors, which then measure the mass, speed, charge, and direction of the particles. Four Sunpower M87N Stirling-cycle cryocoolers are used to extend the mission life by cooling the outer vapor-cooled shield of the dewar. The main magnet coils are separated by a distance of approximately 1 m and the coolers are located approximately 1.5 m from the center line of the magnet, where the field is as high as 925 gauss perpendicular to the cryocooler axis and 400 gauss along the cryocooler axis. Interactions between the applied magnetic field and the linear motor may result in additional forces and torques on the compressor piston. Motion of the compressor arid displacer pistons through the magnetic field spatial gradients will generate eddy currents. Additional eddy currents are created during magnet charge, discharge, and quench by the time-varying magnetic field. The results of tests to determine the magnitude of the forces, torques, and heating effects, as well as the need for additional magnetic shielding, are presented.

  16. Ultra-high quality factors in superconducting niobium cavities in ambient magnetic fields up to 190 mG

    DOE PAGES

    Romanenko, A.; Grassellino, A.; Crawford, A. C.; ...

    2014-12-10

    Ambient magnetic field, if trapped in the penetration depth, leads to the residual resistance and therefore sets the limit for the achievable quality factors in superconducting niobium resonators for particle accelerators. Here, we show that a complete expulsion of the magnetic flux can be performed and leads to: (1) record quality factors Q > 2 x 10¹¹ up to accelerating gradient of 22 MV/m; (2) Q ~ 3 x 10¹⁰ at 2 K and 16 MV/m in up to 190 mG magnetic fields. This is achieved by large thermal gradients at the normal/superconducting phase front during the cooldown. Our findingsmore » open up a way to ultra-high quality factors at low temperatures and show an alternative to the sophisticated magnetic shielding implemented in modern superconducting accelerators.« less

  17. Tuning Bacterial Hydrodynamics with Magnetic Fields: A Path to Bacterial Robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Christopher; Mumper, Eric; Brangham, Jack; Wijesinghe, Hiran; Lower, Stephen; Lower, Brian; Yang, Fengyuan; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    Magnetotactic Bacteria (MTB) are a group of motile prokaryotes that synthesize chains of lipid-bound, magnetic nano-particles. In this study, the innate magnetism of these flagellated swimmers is exploited to explore their hydrodynamics near confining surfaces, using the magnetic field as a tuning parameter. With weak (Gauss), uniform, external, magnetic ?elds and the field gradients arising from micro-magnetic surface patterns, the relative strength of hydrodynamic, magnetic and ?agellar force components is tuned through magnetic control of the bacteria's orientation and position. In addition to direct measurement of several hydrodynamic quantities related to the motility of individual cells, their tunable dynamics reveal a number of novel, highly controllable swimming behaviors with potential value in micro-robotics applications. Specifically, the experiments permit the MTB cells to be directed along parallel or divergent trajectories, suppress their flagellar forces through magnetic means, and induce transitions between planar, circulating trajectories and drifting, vertically oriented ``top-like'' motion. The implications of the work for fundamental hydrodynamics research as well as bacterially driven robotics applications will be discussed.

  18. Effects of Low-Field Magnetic Stimulation on Brain Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, Nora D.; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Wang, Ruiliang; Alexoff, Dave; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher; Pradhan, Kith; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Ma, Yeming; Jayne, Millard

    2010-01-01

    Echo Planar imaging (EPI), the gold standard technique for functional MRI (fMRI), is based on fast magnetic field gradient switching. These time-varying magnetic fields induce electric (E) fields in the brain that could influence neuronal activity; but this has not been tested. Here we assessed the effects of EPI on brain glucose metabolism (marker of brain function) using PET and 18F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG). Fifteen healthy subjects were in a 4 T magnet during the 18FDG uptake period twice: with (ON) and without (OFF) EPI gradients pulses along the z-axis (Gz: 23 mT/m; 250 microsecond rise-time; 920 Hz). The E-field from these EPI pulses is non-homogeneous, increasing linearly from the gradient’s isocenter (radial and z directions), which allowed us to assess the correlation between local strength of the E-field and the regional metabolic differences between ON and OFF sessions. Metabolic images were normalized to metabolic activity in the plane positioned at the gradient’s isocenter where E=0 for both ON and OFF conditions. Statistical parametric analyses used to identify regions that differed between ON versus OFF (p<0.05, corrected) showed that the relative metabolism was lower in areas at the poles of the brain (inferior occipital and frontal and superior parietal cortices) for ON than for OFF, which was also documented with individual region of interest analysis. Moreover the magnitude of the metabolic decrements was significantly correlated with the estimated strength of E (r=0.68, p<0.0001); the stronger the E-field the larger the decreases. However, we did not detect differences between ON versus OFF conditions on mood ratings nor on absolute whole brain metabolism. This data provides preliminary evidence that EPI sequences may affect neuronal activity and merits further investigation. PMID:20156571

  19. On the Role of Global Magnetic Field Configuration in Affecting Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Y.; Zaharia, S. G.; Fok, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma and field interaction is one important aspect of inner magnetospheric physics. The magnetic field controls particle motion through gradient, curvature drifts and E cross B drift. In this presentation, we show how the global magnetic field affects dynamics of the ring current through simulations of two moderate geomagnetic storms (20 November 2007 and 8-9 March 2008). Preliminary results of coupling the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with a three-dimensional plasma force balance code (to achieve self-consistency in both E and B fields) indicate that inclusion of self-consistency in B tends to mitigate the intensification of the ring current as other similar coupling efforts have shown. In our approach, self-consistency in the electric field is already an existing capability of the CRCM. The magnetic self-consistency is achieved by computing the three-dimensional magnetic field in force balance with anisotropic ring current ion distributions. We discuss the coupling methodology and its further improvement. In addition, comparative studies by using various magnetic field models will be shown. Simulation results will be put into a global context by analyzing the morphology of the ring current, its anisotropy and characteristics ofthe interconnected region 2 field-aligned currents.

  20. Real-time positioning technology in horizontal directional drilling based on magnetic gradient tensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guoqing; Yao, Aiguo

    2017-04-01

    Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) technology has been widely used in Civil Engineering. The dynamic position of the drill bit during construction is one of significant facts determining the accuracy of the trajectory of HDD. A new method now has been proposed to detecting the position of drill bit by measuring the magnetic gradient tensor of the ground solenoid magnetic beacon. Compared with traditional HDD positioning technologies, this new model is much easier to apply with lower request for construction sites and higher positioning efficiency. A direct current (DC) solenoid as a magnetic dipole is placed on ground near the drill bit, and related sensors array which contains four Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS ) tri-axial magnetometers, one MEMS tri-axial accelerometer and one MEMS tri-axial gyroscope is set up for measuring the magnetic gradient tensor of the magnetic dipole. The related HDD positioning model has been established and simulation experiments have been carried out to verify the feasibility and reliability of the proposed method. The experiments show that this method has good positioning accuracy in horizontal and vertical direction, and totally avoid the impact of the environmental magnetic field. It can be found that the posture of the magnetic beacon will impact the remote positioning precision within valid positioning range, and the positioning accuracy is higher with longer baseline for limited space in drilling tools. The results prove that the relative error can be limited in 2% by adjusting position of the magnetic beacon, the layers of the enameled coil, the sensitive of magnetometers and the baseline distance. Conclusion can be made that this new method can be applied in HDD positioning with better effect and wider application range than traditional method.

  1. Magnetic Field Generation Processes Involving Gravity and Differential Rotation. Solitary Plasma Rings Formation around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Bruno

    2012-10-01

    A clear theoretical framework to describe how magnetic fields are generated and amplified is provided by the magneto-gravitational modes that involve both differential rotation and gravity and for which other factors such as temperature gradients can contribute to their excitation. These modes are shown to be important for the evolution of plasma disks surrounding black holes.footnotetextB. Coppi, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032901 (2011) Non-linear and axi-symmetric plasmas and associated field configurations are found under stationary conditions that do not involve the presence of a pre-existing ``seed'' magnetic field unlike other configurations found previously.footnotetextIbid. The relevant magnetic energy density is of the order of the gravitationally confined plasma pressure. The solitary plasma rings that characterize these configurations are localized radially over regions with vanishing differential rotation and can be envisioned as the saturated state of magneto-gravitational modes. The ``source'' of these configurations is the combination of the gravitational force and of the plasma density gradient orthogonal to it.

  2. Mercury's Internal Magnetic Field: Results from MESSENGER's Search for Remanent Crustal Magnetization Associated with Impact Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, M. E.; Johnson, C. L.; Nicholas, J. B.; Philpott, L. C.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Head, J. W., III; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field measurements obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft in orbit around Mercury have entered a new phase since April 2014, with periapsis altitudes below 200 km. MESSENGER is now obtaining magnetic profiles across large impact features at altitudes less than the horizontal scale of those features. We use data from this latest phase to investigate evidence for remanent crustal magnetization specifically associated with impact basins and large craters. The spatial resolution of magnetic field measurements for investigating crustal magnetization is approximately equal to the altitude of the observations. We focus on large impact features because their relative ages provide a powerful chronological tool for interpreting any associated magnetic signatures. We examine profiles across large impact basins such as Caloris, Shakespeare, Budh-Sobkou and Goethe. For example, coverage over Caloris during the last year of the mission will be largely at night and will comprise 18 profiles with altitudes between 125 and 200 km and 12 profiles with altitudes between 50 and 125 km over the northern part of the basin. We use large-scale magnetospheric models developed with MESSENGER data to remove contributions from the offset axial dipole, magnetopause, and magnetotail. The residual magnetic fields above 200 km are still dominated by poorly understood magnetospheric fields such as those from the cusp and from Birkeland currents. We empirically average, or exclude observations from these local times, in order to search for repeatable internal field signals. We use local basis functions such as equivalent source dipoles, applied with regularization tools, in order to map the altitude-normalized magnetic field from internal sources. These internal sources may comprise both crustal and core contributions, and we use the information from the along-track magnetic gradient in order to separate these contributions.

  3. Dynamics of a Finite Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Column in a Pulsed Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Simpson, James; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient paramagnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic field gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. The movement of liquid oxygen is vital to the space program since it one of the primary oxidizers used for propulsion. Transport of liquid oxygen (LOX) via direct interaction of the magnetic fields (B field) with the fluid is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. This method of transporting (i.e. pumping) LOX may have particular advantages on Mars and other reduced gravitational environments, namely safety and reliability. This paper will address transport of a magnetic fluid, LOX, via phased-pulsed electromagnets acting on the edge of the column of fluid. The authors have developed a physical model from first-principles for the motion of a magnetic fluid in a particular U-tube geometry subjected to a pulsed magnetic field from an arbitrary solenoidal electromagnet. Experimental data that have been collected from the analogous geometry correlate well to that of the ab-initio calculations.

  4. External-Field-Induced Gradient Wetting for Controllable Liquid Transport: From Movement on the Surface to Penetration into the Surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; He, Linlin; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Na; Tian, Dongliang

    2017-12-01

    External-field-responsive liquid transport has received extensive research interest owing to its important applications in microfluidic devices, biological medical, liquid printing, separation, and so forth. To realize different levels of liquid transport on surfaces, the balance of the dynamic competing processes of gradient wetting and dewetting should be controlled to achieve good directionality, confined range, and selectivity of liquid wetting. Here, the recent progress in external-field-induced gradient wetting is summarized for controllable liquid transport from movement on the surface to penetration into the surface, particularly for liquid motion on, patterned wetting into, and permeation through films on superwetting surfaces with external field cooperation (e.g., light, electric fields, magnetic fields, temperature, pH, gas, solvent, and their combinations). The selected topics of external-field-induced liquid transport on the different levels of surfaces include directional liquid motion on the surface based on the wettability gradient under an external field, partial entry of a liquid into the surface to achieve patterned surface wettability for printing, and liquid-selective permeation of the film for separation. The future prospects of external-field-responsive liquid transport are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  6. Passive shimming of the fringe field of a superconducting magnet for ultra-low field hyperpolarized noble gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Parra-Robles, Juan; Cross, Albert R; Santyr, Giles E

    2005-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs) provide exciting possibilities for MR imaging at ultra-low magnetic field strengths (<0.15 T) due to the extremely high polarizations available from optical pumping. The fringe field of many superconductive magnets used in clinical MR imaging can provide a stable magnetic field for this purpose. In addition to offering the benefit of HNG MR imaging alongside conventional high field proton MRI, this approach offers the other useful advantage of providing different field strengths at different distances from the magnet. However, the extremely strong field gradients associated with the fringe field present a major challenge for imaging since impractically high active shim currents would be required to achieve the necessary homogeneity. In this work, a simple passive shimming method based on the placement of a small number of ferromagnetic pieces is proposed to reduce the fringe field inhomogeneities to a level that can be corrected using standard active shims. The method explicitly takes into account the strong variations of the field over the volume of the ferromagnetic pieces used to shim. The method is used to obtain spectra in the fringe field of a high-field (1.89 T) superconducting magnet from hyperpolarized 129Xe gas samples at two different ultra-low field strengths (8.5 and 17 mT). The linewidths of spectra measured from imaging phantoms (30 Hz) indicate a homogeneity sufficient for MRI of the rat lung.

  7. Longitudinal gradient coil optimization in the presence of transient eddy currents.

    PubMed

    Trakic, A; Liu, F; Lopez, H Sanchez; Wang, H; Crozier, S

    2007-06-01

    The switching of magnetic field gradient coils in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inevitably induces transient eddy currents in conducting system components, such as the cryostat vessel. These secondary currents degrade the spatial and temporal performance of the gradient coils, and compensation methods are commonly employed to correct for these distortions. This theoretical study shows that by incorporating the eddy currents into the coil optimization process, it is possible to modify a gradient coil design so that the fields created by the coil and the eddy currents combine together to generate a spatially homogeneous gradient that follows the input pulse. Shielded and unshielded longitudinal gradient coils are used to exemplify this novel approach. To assist in the evaluation of transient eddy currents induced within a realistic cryostat vessel, a low-frequency finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method using the total-field scattered-field (TFSF) scheme was performed. The simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for optimizing longitudinal gradient fields while taking into account the spatial and temporal behavior of the eddy currents.

  8. Precision bounds for gradient magnetometry with atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apellaniz, Iagoba; Urizar-Lanz, Iñigo; Zimborás, Zoltán; Hyllus, Philipp; Tóth, Géza

    2018-05-01

    We study gradient magnetometry with an ensemble of atoms with arbitrary spin. We calculate precision bounds for estimating the gradient of the magnetic field based on the quantum Fisher information. For quantum states that are invariant under homogeneous magnetic fields, we need to measure a single observable to estimate the gradient. On the other hand, for states that are sensitive to homogeneous fields, a simultaneous measurement is needed, as the homogeneous field must also be estimated. We prove that for the cases studied in this paper, such a measurement is feasible. We present a method to calculate precision bounds for gradient estimation with a chain of atoms or with two spatially separated atomic ensembles. We also consider a single atomic ensemble with an arbitrary density profile, where the atoms cannot be addressed individually, and which is a very relevant case for experiments. Our model can take into account even correlations between particle positions. While in most of the discussion we consider an ensemble of localized particles that are classical with respect to their spatial degree of freedom, we also discuss the case of gradient metrology with a single Bose-Einstein condensate.

  9. A method for real time detecting of non-uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusenkov, Andriy

    2015-04-01

    The principle of measuring magnetic signatures for observing diverse objects is widely used in Near Surface work (unexploded ordnance (UXO); engineering & environmental; archaeology) and security and vehicle detection systems as well. As a rule, the magnitude of the signals to be measured is much lower than that of the quasi-uniform Earth magnetic field. Usually magnetometers for these purposes contain two or more spatially separated sensors to estimate the full tensor gradient of the magnetic field or, more frequently, only partial gradient components. The both types (scalar and vector) of magnetic sensors could be used. The identity of the scale factors and proper alignment of the sensitivity axes of the vector sensors are very important for deep suppression of the ambient field and detection of weak target signals. As a rule, the periodical calibration procedure is used to keep matching sensors' parameters as close as possible. In the present report we propose the technique for detection magnetic anomalies, which is almost insensitive to imperfect matching of the sensors. This method based on the idea that the difference signals between two sensors are considerably different when the instrument is rotated or moved in uniform and non-uniform fields. Due to the misfit of calibration parameters the difference signal observed at the rotation in the uniform field is similar to the total signal - the sum of the signals of both sensors. Zero change of the difference and total signals is expected, if the instrument moves in the uniform field along a straight line. In contrast, the same move in the non-uniform field produces some response of each of the sensors. In case one measures dB/dx and moves along x direction, the sensors signals is shifted in time with the lag proportional to the distance between sensors and the speed of move. It means that the difference signal looks like derivative of the total signal at move in the non-uniform field. So, using quite simple

  10. Can We Predict CME Deflections Based on Solar Magnetic Field Configuration Alone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), including predicting CME deflections close to the Sun and through interplanetary space. Deflections of CMEs occur due to variations in the background magnetic field or solar wind speed, magnetic reconnection, and interactions with other CMEs. Using our newly developed model of CME deflections due to gradients in the background solar magnetic field, ForeCAT (Kay et al. 2013), we explore the questions: (a) do all simulated CMEs ultimately deflect to the minimum in the background solar magnetic field? (b) does the majority of the deflection occur in the lower corona below 4 Rs? ForeCAT does not include temporal variations in the magnetic field of active regions (ARs), spatial variations in the background solar wind speed, magnetic reconnection, or interactions with other CMEs. Therefore we focus on the effects of the steady state solar magnetic field. We explore two different Carrington Rotations (CRs): CR 2029 (April-May 2005) and CR 2077 (November-December 2008). Little is known about how the density and magnetic field fall with distance in the lower corona. We consider four density models derived from observations (Chen 1996, Mann et al. 2003, Guhathakurta et al. 2006, Leblanc et al. 1996) and two magnetic field models (PFSS and a scaled model). ForeCAT includes drag resulting from both CME propagation and deflection through the background solar wind. We vary the drag coefficient to explore the effect of drag on the deflection at 1 AU.

  11. Earlier Detection of Tumor Treatment Response Using Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Imaging with Oscillating Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Daniel C.; Loveless, Mary E.; Does, Mark D.; Yue, Zou; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Gore, John C.

    2011-01-01

    An improved method for detecting early changes in tumors in response to treatment, based on a modification of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, has been demonstrated in an animal model. Early detection of therapeutic response in tumors is important both clinically and in pre-clinical assessments of novel treatments. Non-invasive imaging methods that can detect and assess tumor response early in the course of treatment, and before frank changes in tumor morphology are evident, are of considerable interest as potential biomarkers of treatment efficacy. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive to changes in water diffusion rates in tissues that result from structural variations in the local cellular environment, but conventional methods mainly reflect changes in tissue cellularity and do not convey information specific to micro-structural variations at sub-cellular scales. We implemented a modified imaging technique using oscillating gradients of the magnetic field for evaluating water diffusion rates over very short spatial scales that are more specific for detecting changes in intracellular structure that may precede changes in cellularity. Results from a study of orthotopic 9L gliomas in rat brains indicate that this method can detect changes as early as 24 hours following treatment with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), when conventional approaches do not find significant effects. These studies suggest that diffusion imaging using oscillating gradients may be used to obtain an earlier indication of treatment efficacy than previous magnetic resonance imaging methods. PMID:21190804

  12. Thermal generation of the magnetic field in the surface layers of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpin, V.

    2017-11-01

    A new magnetic field-generation mechanism based on the Nernst effect is considered in hot massive stars. This mechanism can operate in the upper atmospheres of O and B stars where departures from the LTE form a region with the inverse temperature gradient.

  13. A Modified Magnetic Gradient Contraction Based Method for Ferromagnetic Target Localization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Qu, Xiaodong; Pan, Xiao; Fang, Guangyou; Chen, Luzhao

    2016-01-01

    The Scalar Triangulation and Ranging (STAR) method, which is based upon the unique properties of magnetic gradient contraction, is a high real-time ferromagnetic target localization method. Only one measurement point is required in the STAR method and it is not sensitive to changes in sensing platform orientation. However, the localization accuracy of the method is limited by the asphericity errors and the inaccurate value of position leads to larger errors in the estimation of magnetic moment. To improve the localization accuracy, a modified STAR method is proposed. In the proposed method, the asphericity errors of the traditional STAR method are compensated with an iterative algorithm. The proposed method has a fast convergence rate which meets the requirement of high real-time localization. Simulations and field experiments have been done to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results indicate that target parameters estimated by the modified STAR method are more accurate than the traditional STAR method. PMID:27999322

  14. New Methods For Interpretation Of Magnetic Gradient Tensor Data Using Eigenalysis And The Normalized Source Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the future, acquisition of magnetic gradient tensor data is likely to become routine. New methods developed for analysis of magnetic gradient tensor data can also be applied to high quality conventional TMI surveys that have been processed using Fourier filtering techniques, or otherwise, to calculate magnetic vector and tensor components. This approach is, in fact, the only practical way at present to analyze vector component data, as measurements of vector components are seriously afflicted by motion noise, which is not as serious a problem for gradient components. In many circumstances, an optimal approach to extracting maximum information from magnetic surveys would be to combine analysis of measured gradient tensor data with vector components calculated from TMI measurements. New methods for inverting gradient tensor surveys to obtain source parameters have been developed for a number of elementary, but useful, models. These include point dipole (sphere), vertical line of dipoles (narrow vertical pipe), line of dipoles (horizontal cylinder), thin dipping sheet, horizontal line current and contact models. A key simplification is the use of eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors of the tensor. The normalized source strength (NSS), calculated from the eigenvalues, is a particularly useful rotational invariant that peaks directly over 3D compact sources, 2D compact sources, thin sheets and contacts, and is independent of magnetization direction for these sources (and only very weakly dependent on magnetization direction in general). In combination the NSS and its vector gradient enable estimation of the Euler structural index, thereby constraining source geometry, and determine source locations uniquely. NSS analysis can be extended to other useful models, such as vertical pipes, by calculating eigenvalues of the vertical derivative of the gradient tensor. Once source locations are determined, information of source magnetizations can be obtained by simple

  15. Planetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2017-06-01

    The Earth's magnetic field has been known for centuries. Since the mid-20th century space missions carrying vector magnetometers showed that most, but not all, solar system planets have a global magnetic field of internal origin. They also revealed a surprising diversity in terms of field strength and morphology. While Jupiter's field, like that of Earth, is dominated by a dipole moderately tilted relative to the planet's spin axis, with multipole components being subordinate but not negligible, the fields of Uranus and Neptune are multipole-dominated, whereas those of Saturn und Mercury are highly symmetric relative to the rotation axis. Planetary magnetism originates from a dynamo process, which requires a fluid and electrically conducting region in the interior with sufficiently rapid and complex flow. The magnetic fields are of interest for three reasons: (1) They provide ground truth for dynamo theory, which is a fundamental and not completely solved physical problem; (2) the magnetic field controls how the planet interacts with its space environment, for example, the solar wind; and (3) the existence (or nonexistence) and the properties of the field allow us to draw inferences on the constitution, dynamics, and thermal evolution of the planet's interior. For example, the lack of global magnetic fields at Mars and Venus can be explained if their iron cores, although liquid, are stably stratified. Numerical simulations of the geodynamo—in which convective flow in a rapidly rotating spherical shell representing the outer liquid iron core of the Earth leads to induction of electric currents and the associated magnetic field—have successfully reproduced many observed properties of the geomagnetic field. They have also provided guidelines on the factors controlling magnetic field strength and, tentatively, their morphology. For numerical reasons the simulations must employ viscosities far greater than those inside planets, and it is debatable whether they truly

  16. Development and implementation of an 84-channel matrix gradient coil.

    PubMed

    Littin, Sebastian; Jia, Feng; Layton, Kelvin J; Kroboth, Stefan; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2018-02-01

    Design, implement, integrate, and characterize a customized coil system that allows for generating spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs) in a highly-flexible fashion. A gradient coil with a high number of individual elements was designed. Dimensions of the coil were chosen to mimic a whole-body gradient system, scaled down to a head insert. Mechanical shape and wire layout of each element were optimized to increase the local gradient strength while minimizing eddy current effects and simultaneously considering manufacturing constraints. Resulting wire layout and mechanical design is presented. A prototype matrix gradient coil with 12 × 7 = 84 elements consisting of two element types was realized and characterized. Measured eddy currents are <1% of the original field. The coil is shown to be capable of creating nonlinear, and linear SEMs. In a DSV of 0.22 m gradient strengths between 24 mT∕m and 78 mT∕m could be realized locally with maximum currents of 150 A. Initial proof-of-concept imaging experiments using linear and nonlinear encoding fields are demonstrated. A shielded matrix gradient coil setup capable of generating encoding fields in a highly-flexible manner was designed and implemented. The presented setup is expected to serve as a basis for validating novel imaging techniques that rely on nonlinear spatial encoding fields. Magn Reson Med 79:1181-1191, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Contributions of Spherical Harmonics to Magnetic and Gravitational Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2004-01-01

    Gravitational forces are of cardinal importance in the dynamics of spacecraft; magnetic attractions sometime play a significant role also, as was the case with the Long Duration Exposure Facility, and as is now true for the first segment of Space Station Freedom. Both satellites depend on gravitational moment and a device known as a magnetic damper to stabilize their orientation. Magnetic fields are mathematically similar to gravitational fields in one important respect: each can be regarded as a gradient of a potential function that, in turn, can be described as an infinite series of spherical harmonics. Consequently, the two fields can be computed, in part, with quantities that need only be evaluated once, resulting in a savings of time when both fields are needed. The objective of this material is to present magnetic field and gravitational force expressions, and point out the terms that belong to both this is accomplished in Section 1 and 2. Section 3 contains the deductive reasoning with which one obtains the expressions of interest. Finally, examples in Section 4 show these equations can be used to reproduce others that arise in connection with special cases such as the magnetic field produced by a tilted dipole, and gravitational force exerted by an oblate spheroid. The mathematics are discussed in the context of terrestrial fields; however, by substituting appropriate constants, the results can be made applicable to fields belonging to other celestial bodies. The expressions presented here share the characteristics of algorithms set forth for computing gravitational force. In particular, computation is performed speedily by means of recursion formulae, and the expressions do not suffer from the shortcoming of a singularity when evaluated at points that lie on the polar axis.

  18. Rates of change of the earth's magnetic field measured by recent analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Huang, Qilin

    1990-01-01

    Typical rates of change of the earth's magnetic field are presented as a function of the earth's spherical harmonics. Harmonics up to the eight degree are analyzed. With the increase in the degree of the harmonics an increase in the relative rate of change can be observed. For higher degrees, the rate of change can be predicted. This enables a differentiation between harmonics originating in the core and harmonics caused by crustal magnetization. The westward drift of the magnetic field depends on the longitudinal gradient of the field. In order to determine the longitudinal motions, harmonics up to degree 20 can be utilized. The average rate of secular acceleration increases with the degree of harmonics from 0.001 deg/sq yr for a dipole term to an average of 0.05 deg/sq yr for degree eight harmonics.

  19. Pulsed magnetic field generation suited for low-field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunkar, Neelam Prabhu; Selvaraj, Jayaprakash; Theh, Wei-Shen; Weber, Robert; Mina, Mani

    2018-05-01

    Pulsed magnetic fields can be used to provide instantaneous localized magnetic field variations. In presence of static fields, pulsed field variations are often used to apply torques and in-effect to measure behavior of magnetic moments in different states. In this work, the design and experimental performance of a pulsed magnetic field generator suited for low static field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications is presented. One of the challenges of low bias field NMR measurements is low signal to noise ratio due to the comparable nature of the bias field and the pulsed field. Therefore, a circuit is designed to apply pulsed currents through an inductive load, leading to generation of pulsed magnetic fields which can temporarily overpower the effect of the bias field on magnetic moments. The designed circuit will be tuned to operate at the precession frequency of 1H (protons) placed in a bias field produced by permanent magnets. The designed circuit parameters may be tuned to operate under different bias conditions. Therefore, low field NMR measurements can be performed for different bias fields. Circuit simulations were used to determine design parameters, corresponding experimental measurements will be presented in this work.

  20. Low-dose magnetic-field-immune biplanar fluoroscopy for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, P. A.; Lawson, Michael A.; Wika, Kevin G.; Allison, Stephen W.; Quate, E. G.; Molloy, J. A.; Ritter, Rogers C.; Gilles, George T.

    1991-07-01

    The imaging chain of a bi-planar fluoroscopic system is described for a new neurosurgical technique: the Video Tumor Fighter (VTF). The VTF manipulates a small intracranially implanted magnet, called a thermoseed, by a large external magnetic field gradient. The thermoseed is heated by rf-induction to kill proximal tumor cells. For accurately guiding the seed through the brain, the x-ray tubes are alternately pulsed up to four times per second, each for as much as two hours. Radio-opaque reference markers, attached to the skull, enable the thermoseed's three dimensional position to be determined and then projected onto a displayed MRI brain scan. The imaging approach, similar to systems at the University of Arizona and the Mayo Clinic, includes a 20 cm diameter phosphor screen viewed by a proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifier coupled via fiberoptic taper to a solid state camera. The most important performance specifications are magnetic field immunity and, due to the procedure duration, low dosage per image. A preliminary arrangement designed in the laboratories yielded usable images at approximately 100 (mu) R exposure per frame. In this paper, the results of a series of studies of the effects of magnetic fields on microchannel plate image intensifiers used in the image detection chain are presented.

  1. Effect of self-consistent magnetic field on plasma sheet penetration to the inner magnetosphere under enhanced convection: RCM simulations combined with force-balance magnetic field solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulidou, M.; Wang, C.; Lyons, L. R.; Wolf, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Transport of plasma sheet particles into the inner magnetosphere is strongly affected by the penetration of the convection electric field, which is the result of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere electromagnetic coupling. This transport, on the other hand, results in plasma heating and magnetic field stretching, which become very significant in the inner plasma sheet (inside 20 RE). We have previously run simulations with the Rice Convection Model (RCM) to investigate how the earthward penetration of convection electric field, and therefore plasma sheet population, depends on plasma sheet boundary conditions. Outer boundary conditions at r ~20 RE are a function of MLT and interplanetary conditions based on 11 years of Geotail data. In the previous simulations, Tsyganenko 96 magnetic field model (T96) was used so force balance between plasma pressure and magnetic fields was not maintained. We have now integrated the RCM with a magnetic field solver (Liu et al., 2006) to obtain the required force balance in the equatorial plane. We have run the self-consistent simulations under enhanced convection with different boundary conditions in which we kept different parameters (flux tube particle content, plasma pressure, plasma beta, or magnetic fields) at the outer boundary to be MLT-dependent but time independent. Different boundary conditions result in qualitatively similar plasma sheet profiles. The results show that magnetic field has a dawn dusk asymmetry with field lines being more stretched in the pre-midnight sector, due to relatively higher plasma pressure there. The asymmetry in the magnetic fields in turn affects the radial distance and MLT of plasma sheet penetration into the inner magnetosphere. In comparison with results using the T96, plasma transport under self-consistent magnetic field results in proton and electron plasma sheet inner edges that are located in higher latitudes, weaker pressure gradients, and more efficient shielding of the near

  2. Interferometric study on the mass transfer in cryogenic distillation under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, S. R.; Zhang, R. P.; Y Rong, Y.; Zhi, X. Q.; Qiu, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    Cryogenic distillation has long been used for the mass production of industrial gases because of its features of high efficiency, high purity, and capability to produce noble gases. It is of great theoretical and practical significance to explore methods to improve the mass transfer efficiency in cryogenic distillation. The negative correlation between the susceptibility of paramagnetic oxygen and temperature provides a new possibility of comprehensive utilization of boiling point and susceptibility differences in cryogenic distillation. Starting from this concept, we proposed a novel distillation intensifying method by using gradient magnetic field, in which the magnetic forces enhance the transport of the oxygen molecules to the liquid phase in the distillation. In this study, a cryogenic testbed was designed and fabricated to study the diffusion between oxygen and nitrogen under magnetic field. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used to visualize the concentration distribution during the diffusion process. The mass transfer characteristics with and without magnetic field, in the chamber filled with the magnetized medium, were systematically studied. The concentration redistribution of oxygen was observed, and the stable stratified diffusion between liquid oxygen and nitrogen was prolonged by the non-uniform magnetic field. The experimental results show that the magnetic field can efficiently influence the mass transfer in cryogenic distillation, which can provide a new mechanism for the optimization of air separation process.

  3. Investigation of the magnetic properties of Si-gradient steel sheet by comparison with 6.5%Si steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratani, T.; Zaizen, Y.; Oda, Y.; Yoshizaki, S.; Senda, K.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the magnetic properties of Si-gradient steel sheet produced by CVD (chemical vapor deposition) siliconizing process, comparing with 6.5% Si steel sheet. The Si-gradient steel sheet having silicon concentration gradient in the thickness direction, has larger hysteresis loss and smaller eddy current loss than the 6.5% Si steel sheet. In such a loss configuration, the iron loss of the Si-gradient steel sheet becomes lower than that of the 6.5% Si steel sheet at high frequencies. The experiment suggests that tensile stress is formed at the surface layer and compressive stress is formed at the inner layer in the Si gradient steel sheet. The magnetic anisotropy is induced by the internal stress and it is considered to affect the magnetization behavior of the Si-gradient steel sheet. The small eddy current loss of Si-gradient steel sheet can be explained as an effect of magnetic flux concentration on the surface layer.

  4. Energy dissipation of Alfven wave packets deformed by irregular magnetic fields in solar-coronal arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, Philippe L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of field line geometry for shear Alfven wave dissipation in coronal arches is demonstrated. An eikonal formulation makes it possible to account for the complicated magnetic geometry typical in coronal loops. An interpretation of Alfven wave resonance is given in terms of gradient steepening, and dissipation efficiencies are studied for two configurations: the well-known slab model with a straight magnetic field, and a new model with stochastic field lines. It is shown that a large fraction of the Alfven wave energy flux can be effectively dissipated in the corona.

  5. Analysis of eddy currents induced by transverse and longitudinal gradient coils in different tungsten collimators geometries for SPECT/MRI integration.

    PubMed

    Samoudi, Amine M; Van Audenhaege, Karen; Vermeeren, Günter; Poole, Michael; Tanghe, Emmeric; Martens, Luc; Van Holen, Roel; Joseph, Wout

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the temporal variation of the induced magnetic field due to the transverse and the longitudinal gradient coils in tungsten collimators arranged in hexagonal and pentagonal geometries with and without gaps between the collimators. We modeled x-, y-, and z-gradient coils and different arrangements of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) collimators using FEKO, a three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation tool. A time analysis approach was used to generate the pulsed magnetic field gradient. The approach was validated with measurements using a 7T MRI scanner. Simulations showed an induced magnetic field representing 4.66% and 0.87% of the applied gradient field (gradient strength = 500 mT/m) for longitudinal and transverse gradient coils, respectively. These values can be reduced by 75% by adding gaps between the collimators for the pentagonal arrangement, bringing the maximum induced magnetic field to less than 2% of the applied gradient for all of the gradient coils. Characterization of the maximum induced magnetic field shows that by adding gaps between the collimators for an integrated SPECT/MRI system, eddy currents can be corrected by the MRI system to avoid artifact. The numerical model was validated and was proposed as a tool for studying the effect of a SPECT collimator within the MRI gradient coils. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bridgman Growth of GeSi Alloys in a Static Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Szofran, F. R.; Vujisic, L.; Motakef, S.

    1998-01-01

    Ge(0.95)Si(0.050 alloy crystals have been grown by the vertical Bridgman technique, both with and without an axial 5 Tesla magnetic field. The crystals were processed in a constant axial thermal gradient and the effects of graphite, hot pressed boron nitride, and pyrolitic boron nitride ampoule materials on interface shapes and macrosegregation profiles were investigated. The sample grown in a graphite ampoule at 5 Tesla exhibited a macroscopic axial concentration profile close to that of complete mixing and strong striation patterns. In samples grown in boron nitride ampoules, both with and without a 5 Tesla magnetic field applied, measured macroscopic axial concentration profiles were intermediate between those expected for a completely mixed melt and diffusion-controlled growth, and striation patterns were also observed. Possible explanations for the apparent inability of the magnetic field to reduce the flow velocities to below the growth velocities are discussed, and results of growth experiments in pyrolitic boron nitride ampoules are also described.

  7. On the vertigo due to static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mian, Omar S; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M; Day, Brian L

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC) cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25) deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence) with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05). Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient vestibular stimulation

  8. Ultrastructure of pea and cress root statocytes exposed to high gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.; Chernishov, V. I.; Polishchuk, O. V.; Kondrachuk, A. V.

    As it was demonstrated by Kuznetsov & Hasenstein (1996) the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) can produce a ponderomotive force that results in displacements of amyloplasts and causes the root response similar to the graviresponse. It was suggested that the HGMF could allow to imitate the effects of gravity in microgravity and/or change them in laboratory conditions correspondingly, as well as to study statolith-related processes in graviperception. Therefore, the correlation between the direction of the ponderomotive force resulting in statolith displacements and the direction of the HGMF-induced plant curvature can be the serious argument to support this suggestion and needs the detailed ultrastructural analysis. Seeds of dicotyledon Pisum sativum L. cv. Damir-2 and monocotyledon Lepidium sativum L. cv. P896 were soaked and grown in a vertical position on moist filter paper in chambers at room temperature. Tips of primary roots of vertical control, gravistimulated and exposed to HGMF seedlings were fixed for electron microscopy using conventional techniques. At ultrastructural level, we observed no significant changes in the volume of the individual statocytes or amyloplasts, relative volumes of cellular organelles (except vacuoles), number of amyloplasts per statocyte or surface area of endoplasmic reticulum. No consistent contacts between amyloplasts and any cellular structures, including plasma membrane, were revealed at any stage of magneto- and gravistimulation. By 5 min after onset of magnetostimulation, amyloplasts were located along cell wall distant from magnets. In HGMF, the locations of amyloplasts in columella cells were similar to those in horizontally-oriented roots up to 1 h stimulation. In the latter case, there were sometimes cytoplasmic spherical bodies with a dense vesicle-rich cytoplasm in pea statocytes, which were absent in seedlings exposed to HGMF. In cress root statocytes, both gravi- and magnetostimulation were found to cause the

  9. Experimental Determination of Ultra-Sharp Stray Field Distribution from a Magnetic Vortex Core Structure

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Huang, L.; Zhu, Y.; Zhong, H.

    2009-08-01

    The fine magnetic stray field from a vortex structure of micron-sized permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) elements has been studied by high-resolution magnetic force microscopy. By systematically studying the width of the stray field gradient distribution at different tip-to-sample distances, we show that the half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) of the signal from vortex core can be as narrow as {approx}21 nm at a closest tip-to-sample distance of 23 nm, even including the convolution effect of the finite size of the magnetic tip. A weak circular reverse component is found around the center of the magnetic vortex in the measured magnetic forcemore » microscope (MFM) signals, which can be attributed to the reverse magnetization around the vortex core. Successive micromagnetic and MFM imaging simulations show good agreements with our experimental results on the width of the stray field distribution.« less

  10. Steady hydromagnetic flows in open magnetic fields. II - Global flows with static zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K.; Low, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of an axisymmetric steady stellar wind with a static zone is presented, with emphasis on the situation where the global magnetic field is symmetrical about the stellar equator and is partially open. In this scenario, the wind escapes in open magnetic fluxes originating from a region at the star pole and a region at an equatorial belt of closed magnetic field in static equilibrium. The two-dimensional balance of the pressure gradient and the inertial, gravitational, and Lorentz forces in different parts of the flow are studied, along with the static interplay between external sources of energy (heating and/or cooling) distributed in the flow and the pressure distribution.

  11. Motion Driven by Strain Gradient Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    A new driving mechanism for direction-controlled motion of nano-scale objects is proposed, based on a model of stretching a graphene strip linked to a rigid base with linear springs of identical stiffness. We find that the potential energy difference induced by the strain gradient field in the graphene strip substrate can generate sufficient force to overcome the static and kinetic friction forces between the nano-flake and the strip substrate, resulting in the nanoscale flake motion in the direction of gradient reduction. The dynamics of the nano-flake can be manipulated by tuning the stiffness of linear springs, stretching velocity and the flake size. This fundamental law of directional motion induced by strain gradient could be very useful for promising designs of nanoscale manipulation, transportation and smart surfaces. PMID:26323603

  12. Influence of nonuniform magnetic fields on orientation of plant seedlings in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, G. S.; Mashinsky, A. L.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Chikov, V. M.; Kuznetsov, O. A.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on the spatial behavior of the flax ( Linum usitatissimum, L.) seedlings in a nonuniform magnetic field were conducted on the orbital space stations «Salutå and «Mirå. This field can displace sensory organelles (statoliths) inside receptor cells and such displacement should cause a physiological reaction of the plant - tropistic curvature. Experiments were conducted in the custom-built «Magnetogravistatå facility, where seeds were germinated and grown for 3-4 days in a magnetic field with the dynamic factor grad(H 2/2)≈ 10 7 Oe 2/cm, then fixed on orbit and returned to Earth for analysis. It was found, that 93% of the seedlings were oriented in the field consistently with curvature in response to displacement of statoliths along the field gradient by ponderomotive magnetic forces, while control seedlings grew in the direction of the initial orientation of the seed. This suggests, that gravity receptors of plants recognized magnetic forces on statoliths as gravity, and that gravity stimulus can be substituted for plants by a force of a different physical nature.

  13. Measurement of the adhesion force between particles for high gradient magnetic separation of pneumatic conveyed powder products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkawa, K.; Nakai, Y.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2011-11-01

    In the industrial plants such as foods, medicines or industrial materials, there are big amount of issues on contamination by metallic wear debris originated from pipes of manufacturing lines. In this study, we developed a high gradient magnetic separation system (HGMS) under the dry process by using superconducting magnet to remove the ferromagnetic particles. One of the major problems of dry HGMS systems is, however, the blockage of magnetic filter caused by particle coagulation or deposition. In order to actualize the magnetic separation without blockage, we introduced pneumatic conveyance system as a new method to feed the powder. It is important to increase the drag force acting on the sufficiently dispersed particles, which require strong magnetic fields. To generate the strong magnetic fields, HGMS technique was examined which consists of a magnetic filter and a superconducting solenoid magnet. As a result of the magnetic separation experiment, it was shown that the separation efficiency changes due to the difference of the cohesive property of the particles. On the basis of the result, the adhesion force which acts between the ferromagnetic particles and the medium particles used for the magnetic separation was measured by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and cohesion of particles was studied from the aspect of interparticle interaction. We assessed a suitable flow velocity for magnetic separation according to the cohesive property of each particle based on the result.

  14. Influence of the magnetic field configuration on the plasma flow in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, T.; Giannetti, V.; Leporini, A.; Saravia, M. M.; Andrenucci, M.

    2018-01-01

    In Hall propulsion, the thrust is provided by the acceleration of ions in a plasma generated in a cross-field configuration. Standard thruster configurations have annular channels with an almost radial magnetic field at the channel exit. A potential difference is imposed in the axial direction and the intensity of the magnetic field is calibrated in order to hinder the electron motion, while leaving the ions non-magnetised. Magnetic field lines can be assumed, as a first approximation, as lines of constant electron temperature and of thermalized potential. In typical thruster configurations, the discharge occurs inside a ceramic channel and, due to plasma-wall interactions, the electron temperature is typically low, less than few tens of eV. Hence, the magnetic field lines can be effectively used to tailor the distribution of the electrostatic potential. However, the erosion of the ceramic walls caused by the ion bombardment represents the main limiting factor of the thruster lifetime and new thruster configurations are currently under development. For these configurations, classical first order models of the plasma dynamics fail to grasp the influence of the magnetic topology on the plasma flow. In the present paper, a novel approach to investigate the correlation between magnetic field topology and thruster performance is presented. Due to the anisotropy induced by the magnetic field, the gradients of the plasma properties are assumed to be mainly in the direction orthogonal to the local magnetic field, thus enabling a quasi-one-dimensional description in magnetic coordinates. Theoretical and experimental investigations performed on a 5 kW class Hall thruster with different magnetic field configurations are then presented and discussed.

  15. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  16. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Field in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Tiwari, S. K.; Winebarger, A. R.; Moore, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    A strong dependence of active-region (AR) coronal heating on the magnetic field is demonstrated by the strong correlation of AR X-ray luminosity with AR total magnetic flux (Fisher et al 1998 ApJ). AR X-ray luminosity is also correlated with AR length of strong-shear neutral line in the photospheric magnetic field (Falconer 1997). These two whole-AR magnetic parameters are also correlated with each other. From 150 ARs observed within 30 heliocentric degrees from disk center by AIA and HMI on SDO, using AR luminosity measured from the hot component of the AIA 94 Å band (Warren et al 2012, ApJ) near the time of each of 3600 measured HMI vector magnetograms of these ARs and a wide selection of whole-AR magnetic parameters from each vector magnetogram after it was deprojected to disk center, we find: (1) The single magnetic parameter having the strongest correlation with AR 94-hot luminosity is the length of strong-field neutral line. (2) The two-parameter combination having the strongest still-stronger correlation with AR 94-hot luminosity is a combination of AR total magnetic flux and AR neutral-line length weighted by the vertical-field gradient across the neutral line. We interpret these results to be consistent with the results of both Fisher et al (1998) and Falconer (1997), and with the correlation of AR coronal loop heating with loop field strength recently found by Tiwari et al (2017, ApJ Letters). Our interpretation is that, in addition to depending strongly on coronal loop field strength, AR coronal heating has a strong secondary positive dependence on the rate of flux cancelation at neutral lines at coronal loop feet. This work was funded by the Living With a Star Science and Heliophysics Guest Investigators programs of NASA's Heliophysics Division.

  17. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Castillo-Negrete, Diego del; Blazevski, Daniel

    2016-04-15

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands andmore » remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across magnetic islands are also presented. In qualitative agreement with recent experiments in large helical device and DIII-D, it is shown that the elliptic (O) and hyperbolic (X) points of magnetic islands have a direct impact on the spatio-temporal dependence of the amplitude of modulated heat pulses.« less

  18. Superelliptical insert gradient coil with a field-modifying layer for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung M; Goodrich, K Craig; Hadley, J Rock; Kim, Seong-Eun; Zeng, Gengsheng L; Morrell, Glen R; McAlpine, Matthew A; Chronik, Blaine A; Parker, Dennis L

    2011-03-01

    Many MRI applications such as dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast require high spatial and temporal resolution and can benefit from improved gradient performance, e.g., increased gradient strength and reduced gradient rise time. The improved gradient performance required to achieve high spatial and temporal resolution for this application may be achieved by using local insert gradients specifically designed for a target anatomy. Current flat gradient systems cannot create an imaging volume large enough to accommodate both breasts; further, their gradient fields are not homogeneous, dropping off rapidly with distance from the gradient coil surface. To attain an imaging volume adequate for bilateral breast MRI, a planar local gradient system design has been modified into a superellipse shape, creating homogeneous gradient volumes that are 182% (Gx), 57% (Gy), and 75% (Gz) wider (left/right direction) than those of the corresponding standard planar gradient. Adding an additional field-modifying gradient winding results in an additional improvement of the homogeneous gradient field near the gradient coil surface over the already enlarged homogeneous gradient volumes of the superelliptical gradients (67%, 89%, and 214% for Gx, Gy, and Gz respectively). A prototype y-gradient insert has been built to demonstrate imaging and implementation characteristics of the superellipse gradient in a 3 T MRI system. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Magnetic Fields Versus Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-04-01

    Deep within giant molecular clouds, hidden by dense gas and dust, stars form. Unprecedented data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the intricate magnetic structureswoven throughout one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way.How Stars Are BornThe Horsehead Nebulasdense column of gas and dust is opaque to visible light, but this infrared image reveals the young stars hidden in the dust. [NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team]Simple theory dictates that when a dense clump of molecular gas becomes massive enough that its self-gravity overwhelms the thermal pressure of the cloud, the gas collapses and forms a star. In reality, however, star formation is more complicated than a simple give and take between gravity and pressure. Thedusty molecular gas in stellar nurseries is permeated with magnetic fields, which are thought to impede the inward pull of gravity and slow the rate of star formation.How can we learn about the magnetic fields of distant objects? One way is by measuring dust polarization. An elongated dust grain will tend to align itself with its short axis parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. This systematic alignment of the dust grains along the magnetic field lines polarizes the dust grains emission perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This allows us to infer the direction of the magnetic field from the direction of polarization.Magnetic field orientations for protostars e2 and e8 derived from Submillimeter Array observations (panels a through c) and ALMA observations (panels d and e). Click to enlarge. [Adapted from Koch et al. 2018]Tracing Magnetic FieldsPatrick Koch (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) and collaborators used high-sensitivity ALMA observations of dust polarization to learn more about the magnetic field morphology of Milky Way star-forming region W51. W51 is one of the largest star-forming regions in our galaxy, home to high-mass protostars e2, e8, and North.The ALMA observations reveal

  20. 2D joint inversion of CSAMT and magnetic data based on cross-gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun-Peng; Tan, Han-Dong; Wang, Tao

    2017-06-01

    A two-dimensional forward and backward algorithm for the controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) method is developed to invert data in the entire region (near, transition, and far) and deal with the effects of artificial sources. First, a regularization factor is introduced in the 2D magnetic inversion, and the magnetic susceptibility is updated in logarithmic form so that the inversion magnetic susceptibility is always positive. Second, the joint inversion of the CSAMT and magnetic methods is completed with the introduction of the cross gradient. By searching for the weight of the cross-gradient term in the objective function, the mutual influence between two different physical properties at different locations are avoided. Model tests show that the joint inversion based on cross-gradient theory offers better results than the single-method inversion. The 2D forward and inverse algorithm for CSAMT with source can effectively deal with artificial sources and ensures the reliability of the final joint inversion algorithm.

  1. Influence of demagnetization coil configuration on residual field in an extremely magnetically shielded room: Model and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe-Grueneberg, Silvia; Schnabel, Allard; Wuebbeler, Gerd; Burghoff, Martin

    2008-04-01

    The Berlin magnetically shielded room 2 (BMSR-2) features a magnetic residual field below 500pT and a field gradient level less than 0.5pT/mm, which are needed for very sensitive human biomagnetic recordings or low field NMR. Nevertheless, below 15Hz, signals are compromised by an additional noise contribution due to vibration forced sensor movements in the field gradient. Due to extreme shielding, the residual field and its homogeneity are determined mainly by the demagnetization results of the mumetal shells. Eight different demagnetization coil configurations can be realized, each results in a characteristic field pattern. The spatial dc flux density inside BMSR-2 is measured with a movable superconducting quantum interference device system with an accuracy better than 50pT. Residual field and field distribution of the current-driven coils fit well to an air-core coil model, if the high permeable core and the return lines outside of the shells are neglected. Finally, we homogenize the residual field by selecting a proper coil configuration.

  2. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  3. Selective isolation of magnetic nanoparticle-mediated heterogeneity subpopulation of circulating tumor cells using magnetic gradient based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Bongseop; Lee, Jaehun; Lee, Dongkyu; Lee, Kangho; Kwon, Ohwon; Kang, Shinwon; Kim, Youngwoo

    2017-02-15

    Relocation mechanisms of the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the primary site to the secondary site through the blood vessel network cause tumor metastasis. Despite of the importance to diagnose the cancer metastasis by CTCs, still it is formidable challenge to use in the clinical purpose because of the rarity and the heterogeneity of CTCs in the cancer patient's peripheral blood sample. In this study we have developed magnetic force gradient based microfluidic chip (Mag-Gradient Chip) for isolating the total number of CTCs in the sample and characterizing the state of CTCs simultaneously with respect to the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression level. We have synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using hydrothermal method and functionalized anti-EpCAM on their surface for the specific binding with CTCs. The Mag-Gradient Chip designed to isolate and classify the CTCs by isolating at the different location in the chip using magnetic force differences depending on the EpCAM expression level. We observed 95.7% of EpCAM positive and 79.3% of EpCAM negative CTCs isolated in the Mag-Gradient Chip. At the same time, the 71.3% of isolated EpCAM positive CTCs were isolated at the first half area whereas the 76.9% of EpCAM negative CTCs were collected at the latter half area. The Mag-Gradient Chip can isolate the 3ml of heterogeneous CTCs sample in 1h with high isolating yield. The EpCAM expression level dose not means essential condition of the metastatic CTCs, but the Mag-Gradient Chip can shorten the date to diagnose the cancer metastasis in clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Observation of Landau levels in potassium-intercalated graphite under a zero magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghui; Kondo, Takahiro; Machida, Takahiro; Iwatake, Keigo; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The charge carriers in graphene are massless Dirac fermions and exhibit a relativistic Landau-level quantization in a magnetic field. Recently, it has been reported that, without any external magnetic field, quantized energy levels have been also observed from strained graphene nanobubbles on a platinum surface, which were attributed to the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions in graphene formed by a strain-induced pseudomagnetic field. Here we show the generation of the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions on a partially potassium-intercalated graphite surface without applying external magnetic field. Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions indicate the graphene character in partially potassium-intercalated graphite. The generation of the Landau levels is ascribed to a vector potential induced by the perturbation of nearest-neighbour hopping, which may originate from a strain or a gradient of on-site potentials at the perimeters of potassium-free domains. PMID:22990864

  5. Source-Free Exchange-Correlation Magnetic Fields in Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Gross, E K U; Sanna, A; Dewhurst, J K

    2018-03-13

    Spin-dependent exchange-correlation energy functionals in use today depend on the charge density and the magnetization density: E xc [ρ, m]. However, it is also correct to define the functional in terms of the curl of m for physical external fields: E xc [ρ,∇ × m]. The exchange-correlation magnetic field, B xc , then becomes source-free. We study this variation of the theory by uniquely removing the source term from local and generalized gradient approximations to the functional. By doing so, the total Kohn-Sham moments are improved for a wide range of materials for both functionals. Significantly, the moments for the pnictides are now in good agreement with experiment. This source-free method is simple to implement in all existing density functional theory codes.

  6. Near field plasmonic gradient effects on high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Chen, Li; Sun, Mengtao

    2015-01-14

    Near field gradient effects in high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) are a recent developing ultra-sensitive optical and spectral analysis technology on the nanoscale, based on the plasmons and plasmonic gradient enhancement in the near field and under high vacuum. HV-TERS can not only be used to detect ultra-sensitive Raman spectra enhanced by surface plasmon, but also to detect clear molecular IR-active modes enhanced by strongly plasmonic gradient. Furthermore, the molecular overtone modes and combinational modes can also be experimentally measured, where the Fermi resonance and Darling-Dennison resonance were successfully observed in HV-TERS. Theoretical calculations using electromagnetic field theory firmly supported experimental observation. The intensity ratio of the plasmon gradient term over the linear plasmon term can reach values greater than 1. Theoretical calculations also revealed that with the increase in gap distance between tip and substrate, the decrease in the plasmon gradient was more significant than the decrease in plasmon intensity, which is the reason that the gradient Raman can be only observed in the near field. Recent experimental results of near field gradient effects on HV-TERS were summarized, following the section of the theoretical analysis.

  7. Effect of a High Magnetic Field on γ' Phase for Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Lan, Jian; Zhao, Dengke; Li, Chuanjun; Shang, Xingfu; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Ren, Zhongming

    2018-05-01

    The effect of a high magnetic field on the γ' phase of Ni-based single crystal superalloy during directional solidification is investigated experimentally. The results clearly indicate that the magnetic field significantly reduces the γ' phase size. Further, the quenching experiment is carried out, and the results found that the length of mushy zone is obviously decreased under a high magnetic field. Based on both experimental results and nucleation mechanism, it is found that the decrease of γ' phase size should be attributed to the fact that a high magnetic field causes the increase of temperature gradient in front of solid/liquid interface and leads to the increase of undercooling of γ' phase.

  8. Effect of steady and time-harmonic magnetic fields on macrosegragation in alloy solidification

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Incropera, F.P.; Prescott, P.J.

    Buoyancy-induced convection during the solidification of alloys can contribute significantly to the redistribution of alloy constituents, thereby creating large composition gradients in the final ingot. Termed macrosegregation, the condition diminishes the quality of the casting and, in the extreme, may require that the casting be remelted. The deleterious effects of buoyancy-driven flows may be suppressed through application of an external magnetic field, and in this study the effects of both steady and time-harmonic fields have been considered. For a steady magnetic field, extremely large field strengths would be required to effectively dampen convection patterns that contribute to macrosegregation. However, bymore » reducing spatial variations in temperature and composition, turbulent mixing induced by a time-harmonic field reduces the number and severity of segregates in the final casting.« less

  9. BLIPPED (BLIpped Pure Phase EncoDing) high resolution MRI with low amplitude gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    MRI image resolution is proportional to the maximum k-space value, i.e. the temporal integral of the magnetic field gradient. High resolution imaging usually requires high gradient amplitudes and/or long spatial encoding times. Special gradient hardware is often required for high amplitudes and fast switching. We propose a high resolution imaging sequence that employs low amplitude gradients. This method was inspired by the previously proposed PEPI (π Echo Planar Imaging) sequence, which replaced EPI gradient reversals with multiple RF refocusing pulses. It has been shown that when the refocusing RF pulse is of high quality, i.e. sufficiently close to 180°, the magnetization phase introduced by the spatial encoding magnetic field gradient can be preserved and transferred to the following echo signal without phase rewinding. This phase encoding scheme requires blipped gradients that are identical for each echo, with low and constant amplitude, providing opportunities for high resolution imaging. We now extend the sequence to 3D pure phase encoding with low amplitude gradients. The method is compared with the Hybrid-SESPI (Spin Echo Single Point Imaging) technique to demonstrate the advantages in terms of low gradient duty cycle, compensation of concomitant magnetic field effects and minimal echo spacing, which lead to superior image quality and high resolution. The 3D imaging method was then applied with a parallel plate resonator RF probe, achieving a nominal spatial resolution of 17 μm in one dimension in the 3D image, requiring a maximum gradient amplitude of only 5.8 Gauss/cm.

  10. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, W.D.

    1999-06-15

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions. 4 figs.

  11. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions.

  12. Test of Shi et al. Method to Infer the Magnetic Reconnection Geometry from Spacecraft Data: MHD Simulation with Guide Field and Antiparallel Kinetic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, R.; Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Swisdak, M.; Birn, J.; Drake, J. F.; Heese, M.

    2012-01-01

    When analyzing data from an array of spacecraft (such as Cluster or MMS) crossing a site of magnetic reconnection, it is desirable to be able to accurately determine the orientation of the reconnection site. If the reconnection is quasi-two dimensional, there are three key directions, the direction of maximum inhomogeneity (the direction across the reconnection site), the direction of the reconnecting component of the magnetic field, and the direction of rough invariance (the "out of plane" direction). Using simulated spacecraft observations of magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, we extend our previous tests of the direction-finding method developed by Shi et al. (2005) and the method to determine the structure velocity relative to the spacecraft Vstr. These methods require data from four proximate spacecraft. We add artificial noise and calibration errors to the simulation fields, and then use the perturbed gradient of the magnetic field B and perturbed time derivative dB/dt, as described by Denton et al. (2010). Three new simulations are examined: a weakly three-dimensional, i.e., quasi-two-dimensional, MHD simulation without a guide field, a quasi-two-dimensional MHD simulation with a guide field, and a two-dimensional full dynamics kinetic simulation with inherent noise so that the apparent minimum gradient was not exactly zero, even without added artificial errors. We also examined variations of the spacecraft trajectory for the kinetic simulation. The accuracy of the directions found varied depending on the simulation and spacecraft trajectory, but all the directions could be found within about 10 for all cases. Various aspects of the method were examined, including how to choose averaging intervals and the best intervals for determining the directions and velocity. For the kinetic simulation, we also investigated in detail how the errors in the inferred gradient directions from the unmodified Shi et al. method (using the unperturbed gradient

  13. Strong Magnetic Field Characterisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    an advertised surface field of approximately 0.5 T were used to supply the static magnetic field source. The disc magnet had a diameter of 50 mm and... colour bar indicates the magnetic field strength set to an arbitrary 0.25 T. The white area has a field >0.25 T. The size of the arrow is proportional...9 shows the magnetic field strength along a slice in the XZ plane. The colours represent the total UNCLASSIFIED 10 UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-TR-2699

  14. Effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cyclotron motion coherence at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Gleb; Kostyukevich, Yury; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Blakney, Greg T; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional code based on the particle-in-cell algorithm modified to account for the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field was applied to determine the effect of Z(1), Z(2), Z(3), Z(4), X, Y, ZX, ZY, XZ(2) YZ(2), XY and X(2)-Y(2) components of an orthogonal magnetic field expansion on ion motion during detection in an FT-ICR cell. Simulations were performed for magnetic field strengths of 4.7, 7, 14.5 and 21 Tesla, including experimentally determined magnetic field spatial distributions for existing 4.7 T and 14.5 T magnets. The effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cloud stabilization ("ion condensation") at high numbers of ions was investigated by direct simulations of individual ion trajectories. Z(1), Z(2), Z(3) and Z(4) components have the largest effect (especially Z(1)) on ion cloud stability. Higher magnetic field strength and lower m/z demand higher relative magnetic field homogeneity to maintain cloud coherence for a fixed time period. The dependence of mass resolving power upper limit on Z(1) inhomogeneity is evaluated for different magnetic fields and m/z. The results serve to set the homogeneity requirements for various orthogonal magnetic field components (shims) for future FT-ICR magnet design.

  15. Effects of in-plane magnetic field on the transport of 2D electron vortices in non-uniform plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Richardson, Andrew; Schumer, Joseph; Pulsed Power Team

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electron vortices in current-carrying plasmas is observed in 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the plasma-opening switch. In the presence of a background density gradient in Cartesian systems, vortices drift in the direction found by crossing the magnetic field with the background density gradient as a result of the Hall effect. However, most of the 2D simulations where electron vortices are seen and studied only allow for in-plane currents and thus only an out-of-plane magnetic field. Here we present results of numerical simulations of 2D, seeded electron vortices in an inhomogeneous background using the generalized 2D electron-magneto-hydrodynamic model that additionally allows for in-plane components of the magnetic field. By seeding vortices with a varying axial component of the velocity field, so that the vortex becomes a corkscrew, it is found that a pitch angle of around 20 degrees is sufficient to completely prevent the vortex from propagating due to the Hall effect for typical plasma parameters. This work is supported by the NRL Base Program.

  16. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  17. Role Stratospheric Balloon Magnetic Surveys in Development of Analytical Global Models of the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekhov, O. M.; Tsvetkov, Yu. P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Filippov, S. V.; Tsvetkova, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    The results of stratospheric balloon gradient geomagnetic surveys at an altitude of ‘-~3O km with the use of the long (6 km) measuring base oriented along the vertical line are considered. The purposes of these surveys are the study of the magnetic field formed by deep sources, and the estimation of errors in modern analytical models of the geomagnetic field. The independent method of determination of errors in global analytical models of the normal magnetic field of the Earth (MFE) is substantiated. The new technique of identification of magnetic anomalies from surveys on long routes is considered. The analysis of gradient magnetic surveys on board the balloon, revealed the previously unknown features of the geomagnetic field. Using the balloon data, the EMM/720 model of the geomagnetic field (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/geomag/EMM) is investigated, and it is shown that this model unsatisfactorily represents the anomalous MFE, at least, at an altitude of 30 km, in the area our surveys. The unsatisfactory quality of aeromagnetic (ground-based) data is also revealed by the method of wavelet analysis of the ground-based and balloon magnetic profiles. It is shown, that the ground-based profiles do not contain inhomogeneities more than 1 30 km in size, whereas the balloon profiles (1000 km in the strike extent) contain inhomogeneities up to 600 km in size an the location of the latte coincides with the location of the satellite magnetic anomaly. On the basis of balloon data is shown, it that low-altitude aeromagnetic surveys, due to fundamental reasons, incorrectly reproduce the magnetic field of deep sources. This prevents the reliable conversion of ground-based magnetic anomalies upward from the surface of the Earth. It is shown, that an adequate global model of magnetic anomalies in the circumterrestrial space, developed up to 720 spherical harmonics, must be constructed only in accordance with the data obtained at satellite and stratospheric altitudes. Such a model

  18. Magnon localization and Bloch oscillations in finite Heisenberg spin chains in an inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kosevich, Yuriy A; Gann, Vladimir V

    2013-06-19

    We study the localization of magnon states in finite defect-free Heisenberg spin-1/2 ferromagnetic chains placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field with a constant spatial gradient. Continuous transformation from the extended magnon states to the localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a finite spin chain placed in an inhomogeneous field is described both analytically and numerically. We describe for the first time the non-monotonic dependence of the energy levels of magnons, both long and short wavelength, on the magnetic field gradient, which is a consequence of magnon localization in a finite spin chain. We show that, in contrast to the destruction of the magnon band and the establishment of the Wannier-Stark ladder in a vanishingly small field gradient in an infinite chain, the localization of magnon states at the chain ends preserves the memory of the magnon band. Essentially, the localization at the lower- or higher-field chain end resembles the localization of the positive- or negative-effective-mass band quasiparticles. We also show how the beat dynamics of coherent superposition of extended spin waves in a finite chain in a homogeneous or weakly inhomogeneous field transforms into magnon Bloch oscillations of the superposition of localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a strongly inhomogeneous field. We provide a semiclassical description of the magnon Bloch oscillations and show that the correspondence between the quantum and semiclassical descriptions is most accurate for Bloch oscillations of the magnon coherent states, which are built from a coherent superposition of a large number of the nearest-neighbour Wannier-Zeeman states.

  19. Fugacity and concentration gradients in a gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Equations are reviewed which show that at equilibrium fugacity and concentration gradients can exist in gravitational fields. At equilibrium, the logarithm of the ratio of the fugacities of a species at two different locations in a gravitational field is proportional to the difference in the heights of the two locations and the molecular weight of the species. An analogous relation holds for the concentration ratios in a multicomponent system. The ratio is calculated for a variety of examples. The kinetics for the general process are derived, and the time required to approach equilibrium is calculated for several systems. The following special topics are discussed: ionic solutions, polymers, multiphase systems, hydrostatic pressure, osmotic pressure, and solubility gradients in a gravity field.

  20. Anomalous variations of lithosphere magnetic field before several earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Z.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the geomagnetic vector data measured each year since 2011 at more than 500 sites with a mean spatial interval of ~70km.we observed anomalous variations of lithospheric magnetic field before and after over 15 earthquakes having magnitude > 5. We find that the field in near proximity (about 50km) to the epicenter of large earthquakes shows high spatial and temporal gradients before the earthquake. Due to the low frequency of repeat measurements it is unclear when these variations occurred and how do them evolve. We point out anomalous magnetic filed using some circles with radius of 50km usually in June of each year, and then we would check whether quake will locat in our circles during one year after that time (June to next June). Now we caught 10 earthquakes of 15 main shocks having magnitude > 5, most of them located at less than10km away from our circles and some of them were in our circles. Most results show that the variations of lithosphere magnetic filed at the epicenter are different with surrending backgroud usually. When we figure out horizontal variations (vector) of lithosphere magnetic field and epicenter during one year after each June, we found half of them show that the earthquakes will locat at "the inlands in a flowing river", that means earthquakes may occur at "quiet"regions while the backgroud show character as"flow" as liquid. When we compared with GPS results, it appears that these variations of lithospere magnetic field may also correlate with displacement of earth's surface. However we do not compared with GPS results for each earthquake, we are not clear whether these anomalous variations of lithospere magnetic field may also correlate with anomalous displacement of earth's surface. Future work will include developing an automated method for identifying this type of anomalous field behavior and trying to short repeat measurement period to 6 month to try to find when these variations occur.

  1. Investigating Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations of Nanocolloids in a Magnetic Field Using Direct Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Ashley; Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel; Rice-Oprisan College of Charleston Team

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide have a high surface area and can be controlled by an external magnetic field. Since they have a fast response to the applied magnetic field, these systems have been used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and cell separation. We performed three direct imaging experiments in order to investigate the concentration-driven fluctuations using magnetic nanoparticles in the absence and in the presence of magnetic field. Our direct imaging experimental setup involved a glass cell filled with magnetic nanocolloidal suspension and water with the concentration gradient oriented against the gravitational field and a superluminescent diode (SLD) as the light source. Nonequilibrium concentration-driven fluctuations were recorded using a direct imaging technique. We used a dynamic structure factor algorithm for image processing in order to compute the structure factor and to find the power law exponents. We saw evidence of large concentration fluctuations and permanent magnetism. Further research will use the correlation time to approximate the diffusion coefficient for the free diffusion experiment. Funded by College of Charleston Department of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities SURF grant.

  2. Gradient Sun [still

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    To view a video of the Gradient Sun go to: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/8103212817 Looking at a particularly beautiful image of the sun helps show how the lines between science and art can sometimes blur. But there is more to the connection between the two disciplines: science and art techniques are often quite similar, indeed one may inform the other or be improved based on lessons from the other arena. One such case is a technique known as a "gradient filter" – recognizable to many people as an option available on a photo-editing program. Gradients are, in fact, a mathematical description that highlights the places of greatest physical change in space. A gradient filter, in turn, enhances places of contrast, making them all the more obviously different, a useful tool when adjusting photos. Scientists, too, use gradient filters to enhance contrast, using them to accentuate fine structures that might otherwise be lost in the background noise. On the sun, for example, scientists wish to study a phenomenon known as coronal loops, which are giant arcs of solar material constrained to travel along that particular path by the magnetic fields in the sun's atmosphere. Observations of the loops, which can be more or less tangled and complex during different phases of the sun's 11-year activity cycle, can help researchers understand what's happening with the sun's complex magnetic fields, fields that can also power great eruptions on the sun such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections. The still here shows an unfiltered image from the sun next to one that has been processed using a gradient filter. Note how the coronal loops are sharp and defined, making them all the more easy to study. On the other hand, gradients also make great art. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center To download this video go to: svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11112 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics

  3. Effects of reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy boundary measurements on localization of active neural source.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-min; Lee, Kok-Meng; Hu, Liang; Foong, Shaohui; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Localization of active neural source (ANS) from measurements on head surface is vital in magnetoencephalography. As neuron-generated magnetic fields are extremely weak, significant uncertainties caused by stochastic measurement interference complicate its localization. This paper presents a novel computational method based on reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy measurements for enhanced ANS localization by suppressing effects of unrelated noise. In this approach, the magnetic flux density (MFD) in the nearby current-free space outside the head is reconstructed from measurements through formulating the infinite series solution of the Laplace's equation, where boundary condition (BC) integrals over the entire measurements provide "smooth" reconstructed MFD with the decrease in unrelated noise. Using a gradient-based method, reconstructed MFDs with good fidelity are selected for enhanced ANS localization. The reconstruction model, spatial interpolation of BC, parametric equivalent current dipole-based inverse estimation algorithm using reconstruction, and gradient-based selection are detailed and validated. The influences of various source depths and measurement signal-to-noise ratio levels on the estimated ANS location are analyzed numerically and compared with a traditional method (where measurements are directly used), and it was demonstrated that gradient-selected high-fidelity reconstructed data can effectively improve the accuracy of ANS localization.

  4. BTA Magnet Field Map Archive and MAD Model

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Glenn,J.W.

    2008-04-01

    This note publishes some and information that has resided in private files. The attached tables were provided by Joseph Skelly from his archives. They show magnetic field measurements versus excitation current for the Booster to AGS transfer line quadrupoles and dipoles based on field measurements [we believe] were done by the Magnet Division. Also given are Ed Blesser's fifth order fits of field versus current. The results are given in 'Tesla' or T-M/M. These tables are attached to provide an archive of this data. The MAD model of the BTA line does have the same values as shown in themore » attached fits so the transfer was correct. MAD uses as its 'gradient' for quads Tesla per meter normalized to rigidity [B-rho]. The model of the BTA line in use uses the T-M/M given in the tables divided by the length to give T M which is then normalized by Brho. Thus, the input to the model appears to be correct. The original model is also attached as part of a memo by Skelly describing it.« less

  5. Gradient waveform pre-emphasis based on the gradient system transfer function.

    PubMed

    Stich, Manuel; Wech, Tobias; Slawig, Anne; Ringler, Ralf; Dewdney, Andrew; Greiser, Andreas; Ruyters, Gudrun; Bley, Thorsten A; Köstler, Herbert

    2018-02-25

    The gradient system transfer function (GSTF) has been used to describe the distorted k-space trajectory for image reconstruction. The purpose of this work was to use the GSTF to determine the pre-emphasis for an undistorted gradient output and intended k-space trajectory. The GSTF of the MR system was determined using only standard MR hardware without special equipment such as field probes or a field camera. The GSTF was used for trajectory prediction in image reconstruction and for a gradient waveform pre-emphasis. As test sequences, a gradient-echo sequence with phase-encoding gradient modulation and a gradient-echo sequence with a spiral read-out trajectory were implemented and subsequently applied on a structural phantom and in vivo head measurements. Image artifacts were successfully suppressed by applying the GSTF-based pre-emphasis. Equivalent results are achieved with images acquired using GSTF-based post-correction of the trajectory as a part of image reconstruction. In contrast, the pre-emphasis approach allows reconstruction using the initially intended trajectory. The artifact suppression shown for two sequences demonstrates that the GSTF can serve for a novel pre-emphasis. A pre-emphasis based on the GSTF information can be applied to any arbitrary sequence type. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    PubMed

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF.

  7. Electrical conductivity of the Earth's mantle from the first Swarm magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civet, F.; Thébault, E.; Verhoeven, O.; Langlais, B.; Saturnino, D.

    2015-05-01

    We present a 1-D electrical conductivity profile of the Earth's mantle down to 2000 km derived from L1b Swarm satellite magnetic field measurements from November 2013 to September 2014. We first derive a model for the main magnetic field, correct the data for a lithospheric field model, and additionally select the data to reduce the contributions of the ionospheric field. We then model the primary and induced magnetospheric fields for periods between 2 and 256 days and perform a Bayesian inversion to obtain the probability density function for the electrical conductivity as function of depth. The conductivity increases by 3 orders of magnitude in the 400-900 km depth range. Assuming a pyrolitic mantle composition, this profile is interpreted in terms of temperature variations leading to a temperature gradient in the lower mantle that is close to adiabatic.

  8. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  9. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  10. Chemotactic cell trapping in controlled alternating gradient fields

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Börn; Zielinski, Alejandro; Weber, Christoph; Arcizet, Delphine; Youssef, Simon; Franosch, Thomas; Rädler, Joachim O.; Heinrich, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Directed cell migration toward spatio-temporally varying chemotactic stimuli requires rapid cytoskeletal reorganization. Numerous studies provide evidence that actin reorganization is controlled by intracellular redistribution of signaling molecules, such as the PI4,5P2/PI3,4,5P3 gradient. However, exploring underlying mechanisms is difficult and requires careful spatio-temporal control of external chemotactic stimuli. We designed a microfluidic setup to generate alternating chemotactic gradient fields for simultaneous multicell exposure, greatly facilitating statistical analysis. For a quantitative description of intracellular response dynamics, we apply alternating time sequences of spatially homogeneous concentration gradients across 300 μm, reorienting on timescales down to a few seconds. Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae respond to gradient switching rates below 0.02 Hz by readapting their migration direction. For faster switching, cellular repolarization ceases and is completely stalled at 0.1 Hz. In this “chemotactically trapped” cell state, external stimuli alternate faster than intracellular feedback is capable to respond by onset of directed migration. To investigate intracellular actin cortex rearrangement during gradient switching, we correlate migratory cell response with actin repolymerization dynamics, quantified by a fluorescence distribution moment of the GFP fusion protein LimEΔcc. We find two fundamentally different cell polarization types and we could reveal the role of PI3-Kinase for cellular repolarization. In the early aggregation phase, PI3-Kinase enhances the capability of D. discoideum cells to readjust their polarity in response to spatially alternating gradient fields, whereas in aggregation competent cells the effect of PI3-Kinase perturbation becomes less relevant. PMID:21709255

  11. Gradient parameter and axial and field rays in the gradient-index crystalline lens model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M. V.; Bao, C.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Rama, M. A.; Gómez-Reino, C.

    2003-09-01

    Gradient-index models of the human lens have received wide attention in optometry and vision sciences for considering how changes in the refractive index profile with age and accommodation may affect refractive power. This paper uses the continuous asymmetric bi-elliptical model to determine gradient parameter and axial and field rays of the human lens in order to study the paraxial propagation of light through the crystalline lens of the eye.

  12. On the Vertigo Due to Static Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Omar S.; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M.; Day, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC) cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25) deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence) with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05). Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient vestibular stimulation

  13. Integral Field Spectroscopy Surveys: Oxygen Abundance Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present here the recent results on our understanding of oxygen abundance gradients derived using Integral Field Spectroscopic surveys. In particular we analyzed more than 2124 datacubes corresponding to individual objects observed by the CALIFA (˜ 734 objects) and the public data by MaNGA (˜ 1390 objects), deriving the oxygen abundance gradient for each galaxy. We confirm previous results that indicate that the shape of this gradient is very similar for all galaxies with masses above 109.5M⊙, presenting in average a very similar slope of ˜ -0.04 dex within 0.5-2.0 re, with a possible drop in the inner regions (r<0.5re) and a flattennig in the outer regions. For lower masses (>109.5M⊙) the gradient seems to be flatter than for more massive ones. All these results agree with an inside-out growth of massive galaxies and indicate that low mass ones may still be growing in an outside in phase.

  14. Investigating spin-transfer torques induced by thermal gradients in magnetic tunnel junctions by using micro-cavity ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansever, H.; Narkowicz, R.; Lenz, K.; Fowley, C.; Ramasubramanian, L.; Yildirim, O.; Niesen, A.; Huebner, T.; Reiss, G.; Lindner, J.; Fassbender, J.; Deac, A. M.

    2018-06-01

    Similar to electrical currents flowing through magnetic multilayers, thermal gradients applied across the barrier of a magnetic tunnel junction may induce pure spin-currents and generate ‘thermal’ spin-transfer torques large enough to induce magnetization dynamics in the free layer. In this study, we describe a novel experimental approach to observe spin-transfer torques induced by thermal gradients in magnetic multilayers by studying their ferromagnetic resonance response in microwave cavities. Utilizing this approach allows for measuring the magnetization dynamics on micron/nano-sized samples in open-circuit conditions, i.e. without the need of electrical contacts. We performed first experiments on magnetic tunnel junctions patterned into 6  ×  9 µm2 ellipses from Co2FeAl/MgO/CoFeB stacks. We conducted microresonator ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) under focused laser illumination to induce thermal gradients in the layer stack and compared them to measurements in which the sample was globally heated from the backside of the substrate. Moreover, we carried out broadband FMR measurements under global heating conditions on the same extended films the microstructures were later on prepared from. The results clearly demonstrate the effect of thermal spin-torque on the FMR response and thus show that the microresonator approach is well suited to investigate thermal spin-transfer-driven processes for small temperatures gradients, far below the gradients required for magnetic switching.

  15. Analysis of field errors for LARP Nb 3Sn HQ03 quadrupole magnet

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xiaorong; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Guram; ...

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program, in close collaboration with CERN, has developed three generations of high-gradient quadrupole (HQ) Nb 3Sn model magnets, to support the development of the 150 mm aperture Nb 3Sn quadrupole magnets for the High-Luminosity LHC. The latest generation, HQ03, featured coils with better uniformity of coil dimensions and properties than the earlier generations. We tested the HQ03 magnet at FNAL, including the field quality study. The profiles of low-order harmonics along the magnet aperture observed at 15 kA, 1.9 K can be traced back to the assembled coil pack before the magnet assembly. Based onmore » the measured harmonics in the magnet center region, the coil block positioning tolerance was analyzed and compared with earlier HQ01 and HQ02 magnets to correlate with coil and magnet fabrication. Our study the capability of correcting the low-order non-allowed field errors, magnetic shims were installed in HQ03. Furthermore, the expected shim contribution agreed well with the calculation. For the persistent-current effect, the measured a4 can be related to 4% higher in the strand magnetization of one coil with respect to the other three coils. Lastly, we compare the field errors due to the inter-strand coupling currents between HQ03 and HQ02.« less

  16. Strain-gradient-induced magnetic anisotropy in straight-stripe mixed-phase bismuth ferrites: Insight into flexomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Hong; Kim, Kwang-Eun; Jang, Byung-Kweon; Ünal, Ahmet A.; Valencia, Sergio; Kronast, Florian; Ko, Kyung-Tae; Kowarik, Stefan; Seidel, Jan; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2017-08-01

    Implementation of antiferromagnetic compounds as active elements in spintronics has been hindered by their insensitive nature against external perturbations which causes difficulties in switching among different antiferromagnetic spin configurations. Electrically controllable strain gradient can become a key parameter to tune the antiferromagnetic states of multiferroic materials. We have discovered a correlation between an electrically written straight-stripe mixed-phase boundary and an in-plane antiferromagnetic spin axis in highly elongated La-5%-doped BiFe O3 thin films by performing polarization-dependent photoemission electron microscopy in conjunction with cluster model calculations. A model Hamiltonian calculation for the single-ion anisotropy including the spin-orbit interaction has been performed to figure out the physical origin of the link between the strain gradient present in the mixed-phase area and its antiferromagnetic spin axis. Our findings enable estimation of the strain-gradient-induced magnetic anisotropy energy per Fe ion at around 5 ×10-12eV m , and provide a pathway toward an electric-field-induced 90° rotation of antiferromagnetic spin axis at room temperature by flexomagnetism.

  17. Solar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Alan W.; Hughes, David W.

    2011-08-01

    This review provides an introduction to the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field, summarising both observational evidence and theoretical models. The eleven year solar cycle, which is well known from a variety of observed quantities, strongly supports the idea of a large-scale solar dynamo. Current theoretical ideas on the location and mechanism of this dynamo are presented. The solar cycle influences the behaviour of the global coronal magnetic field and it is the eruptions of this field that can impact on the Earth's environment. These global coronal variations can be modelled to a surprising degree of accuracy. Recent high resolution observations of the Sun's magnetic field in quiet regions, away from sunspots, show that there is a continual evolution of a small-scale magnetic field, presumably produced by small-scale dynamo action in the solar interior. Sunspots, a natural consequence of the large-scale dynamo, emerge, evolve and disperse over a period of several days. Numerical simulations can help to determine the physical processes governing the emergence of sunspots. We discuss the interaction of these emerging fields with the pre-existing coronal field, resulting in a variety of dynamic phenomena.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-01

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π / 2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  19. Magnetic Gradient Horizontal Operator (MHGO) useful for detecting objects buried at shallow depth: cultural heritage (Villa degli Antonini, Rota Rio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Filippo, Michele; Di Nezza, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Several factors were taken into consideration in order to appropriately tailor the geophysical explorations at the cultural heritage. Given the fact that each site has been neglected for a long time and in recent times used as an illegal dumping area, we thoroughly evaluated for this investigation the advantages and limitations of each specific technique, and the general conditions and history of the site. We took into account the extension of the areas to be investigated and the need for rapid data acquisition and processing. Furthermore, the survey required instrumentation with sensitivity to small background contrasts and as little as possible affected by background noise sources. In order to ascertain the existence and location of underground buried walls, a magnetic gradiometer survey (MAG) was planned. The map of the magnetic anomalies is not computed to reduction at the pole (RTP), but with a magnetic horizontal gradient operator (MHGO). The magnetic horizontal gradient operator (MHGO) generates from a grid of vertical gradient a grid of steepest slopes (i.e. the magnitude of the gradient) at any point on the surface. The MHGO is reported as a number (rise over run) rather than degrees, and the direction is opposite to that of the slope. The MHGO is zero for a horizontal surface, and approaches infinity as the slope approaches the vertical. The gradient data are especially useful for detecting objects buried at shallow depth. The map reveals some details of the anomalies of the geomagnetic field. Magnetic anomalies due to walls are more evident than in the total intensity map, whereas anomalies due to concentrations of debris are very weak. In this work we describe the results of an investigation obtained with magnetometry investigation for two archaeological sites: "Villa degli Antonini" (Genzano, Rome) and Rota Ria (Mugnano in Teverina, Viterbo). Since the main goal of the investigation was to understand the nature of magnetic anomalies with cost

  20. Recurrent Cosmic-ray Variations as a Probe of the Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, R. A.; Engelbrecht, E. E.

    2006-12-01

    A linear relationship between the observed 26-day recurrent cosmic-ray intensity variations and the global latitudinal gradient was first reported by Zhang (1997, ApJ, 488), who made extensive use of Ulysses data. This relationship is seen for all species considered and at all latitudes covered by the spacecraft. Burger and Hitge (2004, ApJL, 617) used a three-dimensional steady-state numerical modulation model and showed that a Fisk-type (Fisk 1996, JGR, 101) heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) can in principle explain these observations, at least at high latitudes. In this progress report we use a refinement of the Fisk-Parker hybrid HMF model of Burger and Hitge (2004) by Kruger (2006, MSc dissertation, NWU University) (see also Kruger, Burger and Hitge 2005, AGU Fall meeting abstracts SH23B-0341) to study these 26-day recurrent variations in more detail with the same modulation code. In Kruger's model the HMF is Parker-like at the highest latitudes, becomes Fisk- like at intermediate latitudes, and becomes Parker-like again in the region swept out by the wavy current sheet. By using an almost continuous range of latitudinal gradients for both solar magnetic polarity cycles and for both protons and electrons - in contrast to the limited number of values used by Burger and Hitge (2004) - the structure of the graphs of amplitude of the recurrent cosmic-ray intensity variations as function of global latitudinal gradient can be studied in detail. This was performed in a 100 AU model heliosphere for solar minimum conditions with the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet at 10 degrees. In all cases drift effects are included. We find that these curves for amplitude vs. latitudinal gradient are similar for protons and for electrons. By switching the sign of the modeled amplitudes when the latitudinal gradient becomes negative, the existence of a single relationship between the two quantities can be studied for the whole range of modeled latitudinal gradients. This

  1. Study on signal intensity of low field nuclear magnetic resonance via an indirect coupling measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feng-Ying; Wang, Ning; Jin, Yi-Rong; Deng, Hui; Tian, Ye; Lang, Pei-Lin; Li, Jie; Chen, Ying-Fei; Zheng, Dong-Ning

    2013-04-01

    We carry out an ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment based on high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The measurement field is in a micro-tesla range (~10 μT-100 μT) and the experiment is conducted in a home-made magnetically-shielded-room (MSR). The measurements are performed by the indirect coupling method in which the signal of nuclei precession is indirectly coupled to the SQUID through a tuned copper coil transformer. In such an arrangement, the interferences of applied measurement and polarization field to the SQUID sensor are avoided and the performance of the SQUID is not destroyed. In order to compare the detection sensitivity obtained by using the SQUID with that achieved using a conventional low-noise-amplifier, we perform the measurements using a commercial room temperature amplifier. The results show that in a wide frequency range (~1 kHz-10 kHz) the measurements with the SQUID sensor exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Further, we discuss the dependence of NMR peak magnitude on measurement frequency. We attribute the reduction of the peak magnitude at high frequency to the increased field inhomogeneity as the measurement field increases. This is verified by compensating the field gradient using three sets of gradient coils.

  2. Mass and Magnetic Field Dependence of Electrostatic Particle Transport and Turbulence in LAPD-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, N. A.; Gilmore, M.; Peebles, W. A.; Will, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Carter, T. A.

    2003-10-01

    The scaling of particle transport with ion mass and magnetic field strength remains an open question in plasma research. Direct comparison of experiment with theory is often complicated by inability to significantly vary critical parameters such as ion mass, pressure gradient, ion gyro-radius, etc. The LAPD-U magnetized, linear plasma at UCLA provides the ideal platform for such studies, allowing large parameter variation. The magnetic field in LAPD-U can be varied over a range of 500 - 1500 G, while ion species can be varied to change mass by a factor of at least 10. In addition, ion gyro-radii are small compared to the plasma diameter ( 1 m). Cross-field transport in LAPD-U is thought to be caused by electrostatic turbulence, also a leading candidate for transport in fusion plasmas. It is planned, therefore, to investigate turbulence and transport characteristics as a function of parameter space. In particular, measurement of the mass and magnetic field dependence of electrostatic particle transport and turbulence characteristics in LAPD-U will be presented.

  3. Controlled morphology and optical properties of n-type porous silicon: effect of magnetic field and electrode-assisted LEF.

    PubMed

    Antunez, Edgar E; Campos, Jose; Basurto, Miguel A; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2014-01-01

    Fabrication of photoluminescent n-type porous silicon (nPS), using electrode-assisted lateral electric field accompanied with a perpendicular magnetic field, is reported. The results have been compared with the porous structures fabricated by means of conventional anodization and electrode-assisted lateral electric field without magnetic field. The lateral electric field (LEF) applied across the silicon substrate leads to the formation of structural gradient in terms of density, dimension, and depth of the etched pores. Apart from the pore shape tunability, the simultaneous application of LEF and magnetic field (MF) contributes to a reduction of the dimension of the pores and promotes relatively more defined pore tips as well as a decreased side-branching in the pore walls of the macroporous structure. Additionally, when using magnetic field-assisted etching, within a certain range of LEF, an enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) response was obtained.

  4. Controlled morphology and optical properties of n-type porous silicon: effect of magnetic field and electrode-assisted LEF

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fabrication of photoluminescent n-type porous silicon (nPS), using electrode-assisted lateral electric field accompanied with a perpendicular magnetic field, is reported. The results have been compared with the porous structures fabricated by means of conventional anodization and electrode-assisted lateral electric field without magnetic field. The lateral electric field (LEF) applied across the silicon substrate leads to the formation of structural gradient in terms of density, dimension, and depth of the etched pores. Apart from the pore shape tunability, the simultaneous application of LEF and magnetic field (MF) contributes to a reduction of the dimension of the pores and promotes relatively more defined pore tips as well as a decreased side-branching in the pore walls of the macroporous structure. Additionally, when using magnetic field-assisted etching, within a certain range of LEF, an enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) response was obtained. PMID:25313298

  5. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. The key parameter ismore » $$\\gamma=\\sqrt{\\omega/2 \\chi_\\parallel}$$ that determines the length scale, $$1/\\gamma$$, of the heat wave penetration along the magnetic field line. For large perturbation frequencies, $$\\omega \\gg 1$$, or small parallel thermal conductivities, $$\\chi_\\parallel \\ll 1$$, parallel heat transport is strongly damped and the magnetic field partial barriers act as robust barriers where the heat wave amplitude vanishes and its phase speed slows down to a halt. On the other hand, in the limit of small $$\\gamma$$, parallel heat transport is largely unimpeded, global transport is observed and the radial amplitude and phase speed of the heat wave remain finite. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across magnetic islands are also presented. In qualitative agreement with recent experiments in LHD and DIII-D, it is shown that the elliptic (O) and hyperbolic (X) points of magnetic islands have a direct impact on the spatio-temporal dependence of the amplitude and the time delay

  6. Artificial Vector Calibration Method for Differencing Magnetic Gradient Tensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhining; Zhang, Yingtang; Yin, Gang

    2018-01-01

    The measurement error of the differencing (i.e., using two homogenous field sensors at a known baseline distance) magnetic gradient tensor system includes the biases, scale factors, nonorthogonality of the single magnetic sensor, and the misalignment error between the sensor arrays, all of which can severely affect the measurement accuracy. In this paper, we propose a low-cost artificial vector calibration method for the tensor system. Firstly, the error parameter linear equations are constructed based on the single-sensor’s system error model to obtain the artificial ideal vector output of the platform, with the total magnetic intensity (TMI) scalar as a reference by two nonlinear conversions, without any mathematical simplification. Secondly, the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm is used to compute the integrated model of the 12 error parameters by nonlinear least-squares fitting method with the artificial vector output as a reference, and a total of 48 parameters of the system is estimated simultaneously. The calibrated system outputs along the reference platform-orthogonal coordinate system. The analysis results show that the artificial vector calibrated output can track the orientation fluctuations of TMI accurately, effectively avoiding the “overcalibration” problem. The accuracy of the error parameters’ estimation in the simulation is close to 100%. The experimental root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the TMI and tensor components is less than 3 nT and 20 nT/m, respectively, and the estimation of the parameters is highly robust. PMID:29373544

  7. Question of the change in thermal conductivity of semiconductors in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanov, Kh. I.; Daibov, A. Z.; Zhuze, V. P.

    1986-09-01

    The Maggi-Righi-Leduc effect consists in the appearance of an additional longitudinal difference in temperatures delta T in the plate of a conductor placed in a transverse magnetic field H perpendicular if there is a temperature gradient along the plate. The appearance of this difference in temperature leads to an increase in the effective part of thermal conductivity.

  8. Electrical conductivity imaging using gradient B, decomposition algorithm in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT).

    PubMed

    Park, Chunjae; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je; Seo, Jin Keun

    2004-03-01

    In magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), we try to visualize cross-sectional conductivity (or resistivity) images of a subject. We inject electrical currents into the subject through surface electrodes and measure the z component Bz of the induced internal magnetic flux density using an MRI scanner. Here, z is the direction of the main magnetic field of the MRI scanner. We formulate the conductivity image reconstruction problem in MREIT from a careful analysis of the relationship between the injection current and the induced magnetic flux density Bz. Based on the novel mathematical formulation, we propose the gradient Bz decomposition algorithm to reconstruct conductivity images. This new algorithm needs to differentiate Bz only once in contrast to the previously developed harmonic Bz algorithm where the numerical computation of (inverted delta)2Bz is required. The new algorithm, therefore, has the important advantage of much improved noise tolerance. Numerical simulations with added random noise of realistic amounts show the feasibility of the algorithm in practical applications and also its robustness against measurement noise.

  9. Reexamination of relaxation of spins due to a magnetic field gradient: Identity of the Redfield and Torrey theories

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Golub, R.; Rohm, Ryan M.; Swank, C. M.

    2011-02-15

    There is an extensive literature on magnetic-gradient-induced spin relaxation. Cates, Schaefer, and Happer, in a seminal publication, have solved the problem in the regime where diffusion theory (the Torrey equation) is applicable using an expansion of the density matrix in diffusion equation eigenfunctions and angular momentum tensors. McGregor has solved the problem in the same regime using a slightly more general formulation using the Redfield theory formulated in terms of the autocorrelation function of the fluctuating field seen by the spins and calculating the correlation functions using the diffusion-theory Green's function. The results of both calculations were shown to agreemore » for a special case. In the present work, we show that the eigenfunction expansion of the Torrey equation yields the expansion of the Green's function for the diffusion equation, thus showing the identity of this approach with that of the Redfield theory. The general solution can also be obtained directly from the Torrey equation for the density matrix. Thus, the physical content of the Redfield and Torrey approaches are identical. We then introduce a more general expression for the position autocorrelation function of particles moving in a closed cell, extending the range of applicability of the theory.« less

  10. Front dynamics and entanglement in the XXZ chain with a gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, Viktor; Bauernfeind, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    We consider the XXZ spin chain with a magnetic field gradient and study the profiles of the magnetization as well as the entanglement entropy. For a slowly varying field, it is shown that, by means of a local density approximation, the ground-state magnetization profile can be obtained with standard Bethe ansatz techniques. Furthermore, it is argued that the low-energy description of the theory is given by a Luttinger liquid with slowly varying parameters. This allows us to obtain a very good approximation of the entanglement profile using a recently introduced technique of conformal field theory in curved spacetime. Finally, the front dynamics is also studied after the gradient field has been switched off, following arguments of generalized hydrodynamics for integrable systems. While for the XX chain the hydrodynamic solution can be found analytically, the XXZ case appears to be more complicated and the magnetization profiles are recovered only around the edge of the front via an approximate numerical solution.

  11. GeneChip Expression Profiling Reveals the Alterations of Energy Metabolism Related Genes in Osteocytes under Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  12. GeneChip expression profiling reveals the alterations of energy metabolism related genes in osteocytes under large gradient high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  13. 2D data-space cross-gradient joint inversion of MT, gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Yong-Chol; Li, Tonglin; Kim, Gang-Sop

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a data-space multiple cross-gradient joint inversion algorithm, and validated it through synthetic tests and applied it to magnetotelluric (MT), gravity and magnetic datasets acquired along a 95 km profile in Benxi-Ji'an area of northeastern China. To begin, we discuss a generalized cross-gradient joint inversion for multiple datasets and model parameters sets, and formulate it in data space. The Lagrange multiplier required for the structural coupling in the data-space method is determined using an iterative solver to avoid calculation of the inverse matrix in solving the large system of equations. Next, using model-space and data-space methods, we inverted the synthetic data and field data. Based on our result, the joint inversion in data-space not only delineates geological bodies more clearly than the separate inversion, but also yields nearly equal results with the one in model-space while consuming much less memory.

  14. Dynamics of Plasma Jets and Bubbles Launched into a Transverse Background Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue

    2017-10-01

    A coaxial magnetized plasma gun has been utilized to launch both plasma jets (open B-field) and plasma bubbles (closed B-field) into a transverse background magnetic field in the HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) linear device at the University of New Mexico. These situations may have bearing on fusion plasmas (e.g. plasma injection for tokamak fueling, ELM pacing, or disruption mitigation) and astrophysical settings (e.g. astrophysical jet stability, coronal mass ejections, etc.). The magnetic Reynolds number of the gun plasma is 100 , so that magnetic advection dominates over magnetic diffusion. The gun plasma ram pressure, ρjetVjet2 >B02 / 2μ0 , the background magnetic pressure, so that the jet or bubble can easily penetrate the background B-field, B0. When the gun axial B-field is weak compared to the gun azimuthal field, a current-driven jet is formed with a global helical magnetic configuration. Applying the transverse background magnetic field, it is observed that the n = 1 kink mode is stabilized, while magnetic probe measurements show contrarily that the safety factor q(a) drops below unity. At the same time, a sheared axial jet velocity is measured. We conclude that the tension force arising from increasing curvature of the background magnetic field induces the measured sheared flow gradient above the theoretical kink-stabilization threshold, resulting in the emergent kink stabilization of the injected plasma jet. In the case of injected bubbles, spheromak-like plasma formation is verified. However, when the spheromak plasma propagates into the transverse background magnetic field, the typical self-closed global symmetry magnetic configuration does not hold any more. In the region where the bubble toroidal field opposed the background B-field, the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability has been observed. Details of the experiment setup, diagnostics, experimental results and theoretical analysis will be presented. Supported by the National Science Foundation

  15. Assessment of extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure from GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carolina; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Findlay, Richard; Maslanyj, Myron; Conil, Emmanuelle; Kromhout, Hans; Lee, Ae-kyoung; Sim, Malcolm R; Taki, Masao; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    Although radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones have received much attention, relatively little is known about the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields emitted by phones. This paper summarises ELF magnetic flux density measurements on global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones, conducted as part of the MOBI-KIDS epidemiological study. The main challenge is to identify a small number of generic phone models that can be used to classify the ELF exposure for the different phones reported in the study. Two-dimensional magnetic flux density measurements were performed on 47 GSM mobile phones at a distance of 25 mm. Maximum resultant magnetic flux density values at 217 Hz had a geometric mean of 221 (+198/-104) nT. Taking into account harmonic data, measurements suggest that mobile phones could make a substantial contribution to ELF exposure in the general population. The maximum values and easily available variables were poorly correlated. However, three groups could be defined on the basis of field pattern indicating that manufacturers and shapes of mobile phones may be the important parameters linked to the spatial characteristics of the magnetic field, and the categorization of ELF magnetic field exposure for GSM phones in the MOBI-KIDS study may be achievable on the basis of a small number of representative phones. Such categorization would result in a twofold exposure gradient between high and low exposure based on type of phone used, although there was overlap in the grouping. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  17. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  18. Study of Fluid Flow Control In Protein Crystallization Using Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F.; Ciszak, E.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in 'microgravity', researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  19. Thermal structure of Sikhote Alin and adjacent areas based on spectral analysis of the anomalous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, A. N.; Nosyrev, M. Yu.; Shevchenko, B. F.; Gilmanova, G. Z.

    2017-11-01

    The depth of the base of the magnetoactive layer and the geothermal gradient in the Sikhote Alin crust are estimated based on a method determining the Curie depth point of magnetoactive masses by using spectral analysis of the anomalous magnetic field. A detailed map of the geothermal gradient is constructed for the first time for the Sikhote Alin and adjacent areas of the Central Asian belt. Analysis of this map shows that the zones with a higher geothermal gradient geographically fit the areas with a higher level of seismicity.

  20. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  1. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  2. Investigation of the Crust of the Pannonian Basin, Hungary Using Low-Altitude CHAMP Horizontal Gradient Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Kis, Karoly I.; Puszta, Sandor; Wittmann, Geza; Kim, Hyung Rae; Toronyi, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Pannonian Basin is a deep intra-continental basin that formed as part of the Alpine orogeny. It is some 600 by 500 km in area and centered on Hungary. This area was chosen since it has one of the thinnest continental crusts in Europe and is the region of complex tectonic structures. In order to study the nature of the crustal basement we used the long-wavelength magnetic anomalies acquired by the CHAMP satellite. The SWARM constellation, scheduled to be launched next year, will have two lower altitude satellites flying abreast, with a separation of between ca. 150 to 200 km. to record the horizontal magnetic gradient. Since the CHAMP satellite has been in orbit for eight years and has obtained an extensive range of data, both vertically and horizontally there is a large enough data base to compute the horizontal magnetic gradients over the Pannonian Basin region using these many CHAMP orbits. We recomputed a satellite magnetic anomaly map, using the spherical-cap method of Haines (1985), the technique of Alsdorf et al. (1994) and from spherical harmonic coefficients of MF6 (Maus et aI., 2008) employing the latest and lowest altitude CHAMP data. We then computed the horizontal magnetic anomaly gradients (Kis and Puszta, 2006) in order to determine how these component data will improve our interpretation and to preview what the SW ARM mission will reveal with reference to the horizontal gradient anomalies. The gradient amplitude of an 1000 km northeast-southwest profile through our horizontal component anomaly map varied from 0 to 0.025 nT/km with twin positive anomalies (0.025 and 0.023 nT/km) separated by a sharp anomaly negative at o nT/km. Horizontal gradient indicate major magnetization boundaries in the crust (Dole and Jordan, 1978 and Cordell and Grauch, 1985). Our gradient anomaly was modeled with a twodimensional body and the anomaly, of some 200 km, correlates with a 200 km area of crustal thinning in the southwestern Pannonian Basin.

  3. Cryogenic magnetic coil and superconducting magnetic shield for neutron electric dipole moment searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, S.; Swank, C. M.; Biswas, A.; Carr, R.; Escribano, J.; Filippone, B. W.; Griffith, W. C.; Mendenhall, M.; Nouri, N.; Osthelder, C.; Pérez Galván, A.; Picker, R.; Plaster, B.

    2017-08-01

    A magnetic coil operated at cryogenic temperatures is used to produce spatial, relative field gradients below 6 ppm/cm, stable for several hours. The apparatus is a prototype of the magnetic components for a neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) search, which will take place at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). That search requires a uniform magnetic field to mitigate systematic effects and obtain long polarization lifetimes for neutron spin precession measurements. This paper details upgrades to a previously described apparatus [1], particularly the introduction of super-conducting magnetic shielding and the associated cryogenic apparatus. The magnetic gradients observed are sufficiently low for the nEDM search at SNS.

  4. Effects of head field and AC field on magnetization reversal for microwave assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Aina; Akagi, Fumiko; Yoshida, Kazuetsu

    2018-05-01

    Microwave assisted magnetic recording (MAMR) is a promising recording method for achieving high recording densities in hard disk drives. In MAMR, the AC field from a spin-torque oscillator (STO) assists the head field with magnetization reversal in a medium. Therefore, the relationship between the head field and the AC field is very important. In this study, the effects of the head field and the AC field on magnetization reversal were analyzed using a micromagnetic simulator that takes the magnetic interactions between a single-pole type (SPT) write-head, an exchange coupled composite (ECC) medium, and the STO into account. As a result, the magnetization reversal was assisted not just by the y-component of the AC field (Hstoy) but also by the y-component of the head field (Hhy) in the medium. The Hhy over 100 kA/m with a frequency of about 15.5 GHz induced the magnetic resonance. The large Hhy was produced by the field from the STO to the SPT head.

  5. Anisotropic thermal conduction with magnetic fields in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arth, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander; Petkova, Margarita; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role for the propagation and diffusion of charged particles, which are responsible for thermal conduction. In this poster, we present an implementation of thermal conduction including the anisotropic effects of magnetic fields for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The anisotropic thermal conduction is mainly proceeding parallel to magnetic fields and suppressed perpendicular to the fields. We derive the SPH formalism for the anisotropic heat transport and solve the corresponding equation with an implicit conjugate gradient scheme. We discuss several issues of unphysical heat transport in the cases of extreme ansiotropies or unmagnetized regions and present possible numerical workarounds. We implement our algorithm into the cosmological simulation code GADGET and study its behaviour in several test cases. In general, we reproduce the analytical solutions of our idealised test problems, and obtain good results in cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formations. Within galaxy clusters, the anisotropic conduction produces a net heat transport similar to an isotropic Spitzer conduction model with low efficiency. In contrast to isotropic conduction our new formalism allows small-scale structure in the temperature distribution to remain stable, because of their decoupling caused by magnetic field lines. Compared to observations, strong isotropic conduction leads to an oversmoothed temperature distribution within clusters, while the results obtained with anisotropic thermal conduction reproduce the observed temperature fluctuations well. A proper treatment of heat transport is crucial especially in the outskirts of clusters and also in high density regions. It's connection to the local dynamical state of the cluster also might contribute to the observed bimodal distribution of cool core and non cool core clusters. Our new scheme significantly advances the modelling of thermal conduction in numerical simulations and overall gives

  6. Formation mechanism of axial macrosegregation of primary phases induced by a static magnetic field during directional solidification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the macrosegregation formed by applying magnetic fields is of high commercial importance. This work investigates how static magnetic fields control the solute and primary phase distributions in four directionally solidified alloys (i.e., Al-Cu, Al-Si, Al-Ni and Zn-Cu alloys). Experimental results demonstrate that significant axial macrosegregation of the solute and primary phases (i.e., Al2Cu, Si, Al3Ni and Zn5Cu phases) occurs at the initial solidification stage of the samples. This finding is accompanied by two interface transitions in the mushy zone: quasi planar → sloping → quasi planar. The amplitude of the macrosegregation of the primary phases under the magnetic field is related to the magnetic field intensity, temperature gradient and growth speed. The corresponding numerical simulations present a unidirectional thermoelectric (TE) magnetic convection pattern in the mushy zone as a consequence of the interaction between the magnetic field and TE current. Furthermore, a model is proposed to explain the peculiar macrosegregation phenomenon by considering the effect of the forced TE magnetic convection on the solute distribution. The present study not only offers a new approach to control the solute distribution by applying a static magnetic field but also facilitates the understanding of crystal growth in the solute that is controlled by the static magnetic field during directional solidification. PMID:28367991

  7. Kink Waves in Non-isothermal Stratified Solar Waveguides: Effect of the External Magnetic Field

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I., E-mail: lopin78@mail.ru

    We study the effect of an external magnetic field on the properties of kink waves, propagating along a thin non-isothermal stratified and diverging magnetic flux tube. A wave equation, governing the propagation of kink waves under the adopted model is derived. It is shown that the vertical gradient of temperature introduces a spatially local cut-off frequency ω {sub c}. The vertical distribution of the cut-off frequency is calculated for the reference VAL-C model of the solar atmosphere and for different values of a ratio of external to internal magnetic fields. The results show that the cut-off frequency is negative belowmore » the temperature minimum due to the negative temperature gradient. In the chromosphere the cut-off frequency at a given height is smaller for a stronger external magnetic field. For the appropriate range of a ratio B{sub e} / B{sub i}  ≈ 0–0.8, the cutoff lies in the range ω{sub c}  ≈ 0.003–0.010 s{sup −1} (periods 600 < P{sub c} < 2000 s). The estimate of the cut-off frequency in the transition region is provided as well. In the propagating wave regime, the effective wave energy flux in the non-isothermal diverging flux tubes is the same as in the straight and homogeneous cylindrical waveguides. The obtained wave equation in the limit β  = 0 is used to study the kink oscillations of non-isothermal coronal loops. It is found that the gradient of temperature along the coronal loops reduces the frequency ratio of the first overtone to the fundamental mode, i.e., ω{sub 2}/ ω{sub 1} < 2. This reduction grows for a larger ratio of temperature at the loop top to the temperature at the footpoints. Moreover, the effect of reduction is most pronounced for the steeper temperature profiles.« less

  8. Generation of scaled protogalactic seed magnetic fields in laser-produced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gregori, G; Ravasio, A; Murphy, C D; Schaar, K; Baird, A; Bell, A R; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Bingham, R; Constantin, C; Drake, R P; Edwards, M; Everson, E T; Gregory, C D; Kuramitsu, Y; Lau, W; Mithen, J; Niemann, C; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Reville, B; Robinson, A P L; Ryutov, D D; Sakawa, Y; Yang, S; Woolsey, N C; Koenig, M; Miniati, F

    2012-01-25

    The standard model for the origin of galactic magnetic fields is through the amplification of seed fields via dynamo or turbulent processes to the level consistent with present observations. Although other mechanisms may also operate, currents from misaligned pressure and temperature gradients (the Biermann battery process) inevitably accompany the formation of galaxies in the absence of a primordial field. Driven by geometrical asymmetries in shocks associated with the collapse of protogalactic structures, the Biermann battery is believed to generate tiny seed fields to a level of about 10(-21) gauss (refs 7, 8). With the advent of high-power laser systems in the past two decades, a new area of research has opened in which, using simple scaling relations, astrophysical environments can effectively be reproduced in the laboratory. Here we report the results of an experiment that produced seed magnetic fields by the Biermann battery effect. We show that these results can be scaled to the intergalactic medium, where turbulence, acting on timescales of around 700 million years, can amplify the seed fields sufficiently to affect galaxy evolution.

  9. Enabling automated magnetic resonance imaging-based targeting assessment during dipole field navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latulippe, Maxime; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Dupont, Pierre E.; Martel, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic navigation of drugs in the vascular network promises to increase the efficacy and reduce the secondary toxicity of cancer treatments by targeting tumors directly. Recently, dipole field navigation (DFN) was proposed as the first method achieving both high field and high navigation gradient strengths for whole-body interventions in deep tissues. This is achieved by introducing large ferromagnetic cores around the patient inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. However, doing so distorts the static field inside the scanner, which prevents imaging during the intervention. This limitation constrains DFN to open-loop navigation, thus exposing the risk of a harmful toxicity in case of a navigation failure. Here, we are interested in periodically assessing drug targeting efficiency using MRI even in the presence of a core. We demonstrate, using a clinical scanner, that it is in fact possible to acquire, in specific regions around a core, images of sufficient quality to perform this task. We show that the core can be moved inside the scanner to a position minimizing the distortion effect in the region of interest for imaging. Moving the core can be done automatically using the gradient coils of the scanner, which then also enables the core to be repositioned to perform navigation to additional targets. The feasibility and potential of the approach are validated in an in vitro experiment demonstrating navigation and assessment at two targets.

  10. Theranostic multimodal potential of magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field in the new-generation nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The scope of this review involves one of the most promising branches of new-generation biomedicine, namely magnetic nanotheranostics using remote control of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by means of alternating magnetic fields (AMFs). The review is mainly focused on new approach which utilizes non-heating low frequency magnetic fields (LFMFs) for nanomechanical actuation of f-MNPs. This approach is compared to such traditional ones as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radio-frequency (RF) magnetic hyperthermia (MH) which utilize high frequency heating AMF. The innovative principles and specific models of non-thermal magnetomechanical actuation of biostructures by MNP rotational oscillations in LFMF are described. The discussed strategy allows biodistribution monitoring in situ, delivering drugs to target tissues and releasing them with controlled rate, controlling biocatalytic reaction kinetics, inducing malignant cell apoptosis, and more. Optimization of both LFMF and f-MNP parameters may lead to dramatic improvement of treatment efficiency, locality, and selectivity on molecular or cellular levels and allow implementing both drug and drugless, i.e., pure nanomechanical therapy, in particular cancer therapy. The optimal parameters within this approach differ significantly from those used in MH or MRI because of the principal difference in the f-MNP actuation modes. It is shown that specifically designed high gradient, steady magnetic field enables diagnostic and therapeutic LFMF impact localization in the deep tissues within the area ranging from a millimeter to a few centimeters and 3D scanning of affected region, if necessary.

  11. Numerical Calculation of Non-uniform Magnetization Using Experimental Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhun, Bukyoung; Jhun, Youngseok; Kim, Seung-wook; Han, JungHyun

    2018-05-01

    A relation between the distance from the surface of a magnet and the number of cells required for a numerical calculation in order to secure the error below a certain threshold is derived. We also developed a method to obtain the magnetization at each part of the magnet from the experimentally measured magnetic field. This method is applied to three magnets with distinct patterns on magnetic-field-viewing film. Each magnet showed a unique pattern of magnetization. We found that the magnet that shows symmetric magnetization on the magnetic-field-viewing film is not uniformly magnetized. This method can be useful comparing the magnetization between magnets that yield typical magnetic field and those that yield atypical magnetic field.

  12. Magnetic fields for transporting charged beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Parzen, G.

    1976-01-01

    The transport of charged particle beams requires magnetic fields that must be shaped correctly and very accurately. During the last 20 years or so, many studies have been made, both analytically and through the use of computer programs, of various magnetic shapes that have proved to be useful. Many of the results for magnetic field shapes can be applied equally well to electric field shapes. A report is given which gathers together the results that have more general significance and would be useful in designing a configuration to produce a desired magnetic field shape. The field shapes studied include themore » fields in dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, octupoles, septum magnets, combined-function magnets, and electrostatic septums. Where possible, empirical formulas are proposed, based on computer and analytical studies and on magnetic field measurements. These empirical formulas are often easier to use than analytical formulas and often include effects that are difficult to compute analytically. In addition, results given in the form of tables and graphs serve as illustrative examples. The field shapes studied include uniform fields produced by window-frame magnets, C-magnets, H-magnets, and cosine magnets; linear fields produced by various types of quadrupoles; quadratic and cubic fields produced by sextupoles and octupoles; combinations of uniform and linear fields; and septum fields with sharp boundaries.« less

  13. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  14. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  15. A z-gradient array for simultaneous multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Koray; Taraghinia, Soheil; Sadeghi, Alireza; Atalar, Ergin

    2018-07-01

    Multi-slice radiofrequency (RF) pulses have higher specific absorption rates, more peak RF power, and longer pulse durations than single-slice RF pulses. Gradient field design techniques using a z-gradient array are investigated for exciting multiple slices with a single-band RF pulse. Two different field design methods are formulated to solve for the required current values of the gradient array elements for the given slice locations. The method requirements are specified, optimization problems are formulated for the minimum current norm and an analytical solution is provided. A 9-channel z-gradient coil array driven by independent, custom-designed gradient amplifiers is used to validate the theory. Performance measures such as normalized slice thickness error, gradient strength per unit norm current, power dissipation, and maximum amplitude of the magnetic field are provided for various slice locations and numbers of slices. Two and 3 slices are excited by a single-band RF pulse in simulations and phantom experiments. The possibility of multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse using a z-gradient array is validated in simulations and phantom experiments. Magn Reson Med 80:400-412, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. A new gradient shimming method based on undistorted field map of B0 inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qingjia; Chen, Fang; Chen, Li; Song, Kan; Liu, Zao; Liu, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Most existing gradient shimming methods for NMR spectrometers estimate field maps that resolve B0 inhomogeneity spatially from dual gradient-echo (GRE) images acquired at different echo times. However, the distortions induced by B0 inhomogeneity that always exists in the GRE images can result in estimated field maps that are distorted in both geometry and intensity, leading to inaccurate shimming. This work proposes a new gradient shimming method based on undistorted field map of B0 inhomogeneity obtained by a more accurate field map estimation technique. Compared to the traditional field map estimation method, this new method exploits both the positive and negative polarities of the frequency encoded gradients to eliminate the distortions caused by B0 inhomogeneity in the