Science.gov

Sample records for magnetic field probe

  1. Behavior of a Single Langmuir Probe in a Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytlinski, J. T.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to demonstrate the influence of a magnetic field on the behavior of a single Langmuir probe. The experiment introduces the student to magnetically supported plasma and particle behavior in a magnetic field. (GA)

  2. Development of transient internal probe (TIP) magnetic field diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1994-12-31

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is designed to permit measurement of internal magnetic fields, in hot, high density plasmas. The concept consists of accelerating a probe to high velocities (2.2 Km/s) in order to minimize probe exposure time to plasma. Faraday rotation within the probe is used to measure the local magnetic field. An Argon laser illuminates the probe consisting of a Faraday-rotator material with a retro-reflector that returns the incident light to the detection system. Performance results of the light gas gun and optical detection system will be shown. To date, the gas gun has been extensively tested consistently achieving velocities between 2 and 3 km/s. The probe and detection scheme have been tested by dropping the probe through a static magnetic field. Magnetic field resolution of 20 gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm has been achieved. System frequency response is 10Mhz. Work is currently being conducted to integrate the diagnostic system with laboratory plasma experiments. Specifically a gas interfaced system has been developed to prevent helium muzzle gas from entering the plasma chamber with the probe. Additionally the probe must be separated from the sabot which protects the probe during acceleration in the gas gun. Data will be presented showing the results of various separation techniques.

  3. Magnetic probe array with high sensitivity for fluctuating field.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Yuki; Gota, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Kayoko; Ikeyama, Taeko; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2007-03-01

    A magnetic probe array is constructed to measure precisely the spatial structure of a small fluctuating field included in a strong confinement field that varies with time. To exclude the effect of the confinement field, the magnetic probes consisting of figure-eight-wound coils are prepared. The spatial structure of the fluctuating field is obtained from a Fourier analysis of the probe signal. It is found that the probe array is more sensitive to the fluctuating field with a high mode number than that with a low mode number. An experimental demonstration of the present method is attempted using a field-reversed configuration plasma, where the fluctuating field with 0.1% of the confinement field is successfully detected.

  4. Magnetic field measurements using the transient internal probe (TIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge of the internal magnetic field profile in hot plasmas is fundamental to understanding the structure and behavior of the current profile. The transient internal probe (TIP) is a novel diagnostic designed to measure internal magnetic fields in hot plasmas. The diagnostic involves shooting a magneto-optic probe through the plasma at high velocities (greater than 2 km/s) using a two stage light gas gun. Local fields are obtained by illuminating the probe with an argon ion laser and measuring the amount of Faraday rotation in the reflected beam. Initial development of the diagnostic is complete. Results of magnetic field measurements conducted at 2 km/s will be presented. Helium muzzle gas introduction to the plasma chamber has been limited to less than 0.4 Torr-{ell}. Magnetic field resolution of 40 Gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm have been achieved. System frequency response is 10 MHz.

  5. Performance of field measuring probes for SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Jain, A.; Louie, W.; Marone, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    Several years of experience have been acquired on the operation of probes (``moles``) constructed for the measurement of the multipole components of the magnetic fields of SSC magnets. The field is measured by rotating coils contained in a 2.4-m long tube that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet by an external device-the transporter. In addition to the measuring coils, the tube contains motors for rotating the coil and a system for sensing local vertical using gravity sensors to provide an absolute reference for the field measurements. We describe the steps that must be taken in order to ensure accurate, repeatable measurements; the design changes that have been motivated by difficulties encountered (noise, vibration, variations in temperature); and other performance issues. The mechanical interface between the probe and the hewn tube of the magnet is also described.

  6. Analysis of magnetic field plasma interactions using microparticles as probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between a magnetic field and plasma close to a nonconductive surface is of interest for both science and technology. In space, crustal magnetic fields on celestial bodies without atmosphere can interact with the solar wind. In advanced technologies such as those used in fusion or spaceflight, magnetic fields can be used to either control a plasma or protect surfaces exposed to the high heat loads produced by plasma. In this paper, a method will be discussed for investigating magnetic field plasma interactions close to a nonconductive surface inside a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell employing dust particles as probes. To accomplish this, a magnet covered by a glass plate was exposed to a low power argon plasma. The magnetic field was strong enough to magnetize the electrons, while not directly impacting the dynamics of the ions or the dust particles used for diagnostics. In order to investigate the interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field and the nonconductive surface, micron-sized dust particles were introduced into the plasma and their trajectories were recorded with a high-speed camera. Based on the resulting particle trajectories, the accelerations of the dust particles were determined and acceleration maps over the field of view were generated which are representative of the forces acting on the particles. The results show that the magnetic field is responsible for the development of strong electric fields in the plasma, in both horizontal and vertical directions, leading to complex motion of the dust particles.

  7. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Subhashis; Sur, Sharanya; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Mangalam, Arun; Seshadri, T. R.; Chand, Hum

    2016-12-01

    Origin of magnetic fields, its structure and effects on dynamical processes in stars to galaxies are not well understood. Lack of a direct probe has remained a problem for its study. The first phase of Square Kilometre Array (SKA-I), will have almost an order of magnitude higher sensitivity than the best existing radio telescope at GHz frequencies. In this contribution, we discuss specific science cases that are of interest to the Indian community concerned with astrophysical turbulence and magnetic fields. The SKA-I will allow observations of a large number of background sources with detectable polarization and measure their Faraday depths (FDs) through the Milky Way, other galaxies and their circum-galactic mediums. This will probe line-of-sight magnetic fields in these objects well and provide field configurations. Detailed comparison of observational data (e.g., pitch angles in spirals) with models which consider various processes giving rise to field amplification and maintenance (e.g., various types of dynamo models) will then be possible. Such observations will also provide the coherence scale of the fields and its random component through RM structure function. Measuring the random component is important to characterize turbulence in the medium. Observations of FDs with redshift will provide important information on magnetic field evolution as a function of redshift. The background sources could also be used to probe magnetic fields and its coherent scale in galaxy clusters and in bridges formed between interacting galaxies. Other than FDs, sensitive observations of synchrotron emission from galaxies will provide complimentary information on their magnetic field strengths in the sky plane. The core shift measurements of AGNs can provide more precise measurements of magnetic field in the sub parsec region near the black hole and its evolution. The low band of SKA-I will also be useful to study circularly polarized emission from Sun and comparing various

  8. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2014-01-15

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure B{sub r}, B{sub θ}, and B{sub z} at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  9. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  10. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.; Turchi, Peter J.; Burton, Rodney L.; Messer, Sarah; Lovberg, Ralph H.; Hallock, Ashley K.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are often employed to perform field measurements in electric propulsion applications where there are time-varying fields. Magnetic field probes provide the means to measure these magnetic fields and can even be used to measure the plasma current density indirectly through the application of Ampere's law. Measurements of this type can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. Results of the development of a standard for B-dot probe measurements are presented, condensing the available literature on the subject into an accessible set of rules, guidelines, and techniques to standardize the performance and presentation of future measurements.

  11. Probing magnetic turbulence by synchrotron polarimetry: statistics and structure of magnetic fields from Stokes correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelkens, A. H.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2009-10-01

    We describe a novel technique for probing the statistical properties of cosmic magnetic fields based on radio polarimetry data. Second-order magnetic field statistics like the power spectrum cannot always distinguish between magnetic fields with essentially different spatial structure. Synchrotron polarimetry naturally allows certain fourth-order magnetic field statistics to be inferred from observational data, which lifts this degeneracy and can thereby help us gain a better picture of the structure of the cosmic fields and test theoretical scenarios describing magnetic turbulence. In this work we show that a fourth-order correlator of specific physical interest, the tension force spectrum, can be recovered from the polarized synchrotron emission data. We develop an estimator for this quantity based on polarized emission observations in the Faraday rotation free frequency regime. We consider two cases: a statistically isotropic field distribution, and a statistically isotropic field superimposed on a weak mean field. In both cases the tension force power spectrum is measurable; in the latter case, the magnetic power spectrum may also be obtainable. The method is exact in the idealized case of a homogeneous relativistic electron distribution that has a power-law energy spectrum with a spectral index of p = 3, and assumes statistical isotropy of the turbulent field. We carry out numerical tests of our method using synthetic polarized emission data generated from numerically simulated magnetic fields. We show that the method is valid, that it is not prohibitively sensitive to the value of the electron spectral index p, and that the observed tension force spectrum allows one to distinguish between e.g. a randomly tangled magnetic field (a default assumption in many studies) and a field organized in folded flux sheets or filaments.

  12. Probing intergalactic magnetic fields with simulations of electromagnetic cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Batista, Rafael; Saveliev, Andrey; Sigl, Günter; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2016-10-01

    We determine the effect of intergalactic magnetic fields on the distribution of high-energy gamma rays by performing three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of the development of gamma-ray-induced electromagnetic cascades in the magnetized intergalactic medium. We employ the so-called "Large Sphere Observer" method to efficiently simulate blazar gamma ray halos. We study magnetic fields with a Batchelor spectrum and with maximal left- and right-handed helicities. We also consider the case of sources whose jets are tilted with respect to the line of sight. We verify the formation of extended gamma ray halos around the source direction, and observe spiral-like patterns if the magnetic field is helical. We apply the Q -statistics to the simulated halos to extract their spiral nature and also propose an alternative method, the S -statistics. Both methods provide a quantitative way to infer the helicity of the intervening magnetic fields from the morphology of individual blazar halos for magnetic field strengths B ≳10-15 G and magnetic coherence lengths Lc≳100 Mpc . We show that the S -statistics has a better performance than the Q -statistics when assessing magnetic helicity from the simulated halos.

  13. Probing the magnetic fields in L1415 and L1389

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soam, A.; Lee, Chang Won; Maheswar, G.; Kim, Gwanjeong; Neha, S.; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2017-01-01

    We present the R-band polarimetric results towards two nebulae L1415 and L1389 containing low-luminosity stars. Aim of this study is to understand the role played by magnetic fields in formation of low-luminosity objects. Linear polarization arises due to dichroism of the background starlight projected on the cloud providing the plane-of-the sky magnetic field orientation. The offsets between mean magnetic field directions obtained towards L1415 and L1389 and the projected outflow axes are found to be 35° and 12°, respectively. The offset between cloud minor axes and mean envelope magnetic field direction in L1415 and L1389 are 50° and 87°, respectively. To estimate the magnetic field strength by using the updated Chandrasekhar-Fermi (CF) relation, we obtained the 12CO(J = 1-0) line velocity dispersion value towards L1415 cloud using the Taeduk Radio Astronomical Observatory single dish observations. The values of Bpos in L1415 and L1389 are found to be 28 and 149 μG using CF technique and 23 and 140 μG using structure function analysis, respectively. The values of Bpos in these clouds are found to be consistent using both the techniques. By combining the present results with those obtained from our previous study of magnetic fields in cores with Very Low Luminosity Objects (VeLLOs), we attempt to improve the sample of cores with low-luminosity protostars and bridge the gap between the understanding of importance of magnetic fields in cores with VeLLOs and low-luminosity protostars. The results of this work and that of our previous work show that the outflow directions are aligned with envelope magnetic fields of the clouds.

  14. Cleaning of contaminated MFM probes using a BOPP film and external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Jinyun; Meng, Qingling; Zhang, Wenxiao; Wang, Ying; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin

    2017-02-24

    When magnetic samples are tested with a magnetic force microscope (MFM), the probe tip can inevitably be contaminated and magnetic particles are often adhered to the tip surface. The probe with magnetic contamination will seriously affect the quality of morphological and magnetic imaging. In the work, a method for the cleaning of contaminated magnetic probe tips was developed by the use of a biaxially-oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film together with an external magnet field in an MFM system. In the experiments, an MFM system was used for manipulating the tip to push into the BOPP film with a depth of 50-100nm under a magnetic field and hold for 5s, and the relationships between loading forces and separating forces were studied. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images have shown that the use of the BOPP film together with an external magnet field is effective for the cleaning of contaminated MFM probes. This method can greatly improve the quality of magnetic imaging, prolong the service life of magnetic probes and reduce the experimental costs in many MFM applications.

  15. Magnification bias as a novel probe for primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Camera, S.; Fedeli, C.; Moscardini, L. E-mail: cosimo.fedeli@oabo.inaf.it

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate magnetic fields generated in the early Universe. These fields are important candidates at explaining the origin of astrophysical magnetism observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters, whose genesis is still by and large unclear. Compared to the standard inflationary power spectrum, intermediate to small scales would experience further substantial matter clustering, were a cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination. As a consequence, the bias and redshift distribution of galaxies would also be modified. Hitherto, primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) have been tested and constrained with a number of cosmological observables, e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation, galaxy clustering and, more recently, weak gravitational lensing. Here, we explore the constraining potential of the density fluctuation bias induced by gravitational lensing magnification onto the galaxy-galaxy angular power spectrum. Such an effect is known as magnification bias. Compared to the usual galaxy clustering approach, magnification bias helps in lifting the pathological degeneracy present amongst power spectrum normalisation and galaxy bias. This is because magnification bias cross-correlates galaxy number density fluctuations of nearby objects with weak lensing distortions of high-redshift sources. Thus, it takes advantage of the gravitational deflection of light, which is insensitive to galaxy bias but powerful in constraining the density fluctuation amplitude. To scrutinise the potentiality of this method, we adopt a deep and wide-field spectroscopic galaxy survey. We show that magnification bias does contain important information on primordial magnetism, which will be useful in combination with galaxy clustering and shear. We find we shall be able to rule out at 95.4% CL amplitudes of PMFs larger than 5 × 10{sup −4} nG for values of the PMF power spectral index n{sub B} ∼ 0.

  16. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using μ-distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Ganc, Jonathan; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: sloth@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2014-08-01

    The damping of a non-uniform magnetic field between the redshifts of about 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} injects energy into the photon-baryon plasma and causes the CMB to deviate from a perfect blackbody spectrum, producing a so-called μ-distortion. We can calculate the correlation (μ T) of this distortion with the temperature anisotropy T of the CMB to search for a correlation ( B{sup 2}ζ) between the magnetic field B and the curvature perturbation ζ; knowing the ( B{sup 2}ζ) correlation would help us distinguish between different models of magnetogenesis. Since the perturbations which produce the μ-distortion will be much smaller scale than the relevant density perturbations, the observation of this correlation is sensitive to the squeezed limit of ( B{sup 2}ζ), which is naturally parameterized by b{sub NL} (a parameter defined analogously to f{sub NL}). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise S/N≈ 1.0 × b{sub NL} ( B-tilde {sub μ}/10nG){sup 2}, where B-tilde {sub μ} is the magnetic field's strength on μ-distortion scales normalized to today's redshift; thus, a 10 nG field would be detectable with b{sub NL}=O(1). However, if the field is of inflationary origin, we generically expect it to be accompanied by a curvature bispectrum (ζ{sup 3}) induced by the magnetic field. For sufficiently small magnetic fields, the signal ( B{sup 2} ζ) will dominate, but for B-tilde {sub μ}∼> 1 nG, one would have to consider the specifics of the inflationary magnetogenesis model. We also discuss the potential post-magnetogenesis sources of a ( B{sup 2}ζ) correlation and explain why there will be no contribution from the evolution of the magnetic field in response to the curvature perturbation.

  17. Inductive probe to measure the Earth’s magnetic field: a short note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2014-09-01

    This experiment provides ‘hands-on’ experience of Faraday’s law. By flipping a coil of wire (the probe) in a horizontal or vertical plane the two components of the Earth’s magnetic field are determined. The signal from the probe is recorded by a Picoscope ADC100.

  18. Study on Metal Detection with an Electromagnetic Induction Probe Utilizing a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kiyoshi; Hoshikawa, Hiroshi; Sakon, Toshikazu

    The present paper describes an investigation conducted on metal detection with a scanning probe. The authors applied a rotating magnetic field probe to metal detection. The rotating magnetic field probe is composed of two vertically placed rectangular exciting coils and a circular detecting coil. The experimental results confirmed that the probe can detect metal objects and provide more information about their shape, direction, and electromagnetic characteristics than conventional metal detector probes. A two-dimensional signal display shows a blurred image of the metal object and the signal phase indicates the object's direction and electromagnetic characteristics. The experimental results showed that excellent restoration of the surface shapes of metal objects can be obtained for both magnetic and nonmagnetic metals under present conditions. There is also a possibility that the rough shape of a metal object can be estimated from the restored image.

  19. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are useful for performing measurements in electric space thrusters and various plasma accelerator applications where a time-varying magnetic field is present. Magnetic field probes have proven to be a mainstay in diagnosing plasma thrusters where changes occur rapidly with respect to time, providing the means to measure the magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents and even an indirect measure of the plasma current density through the application of Ampère's law. Examples of applications where this measurement technique has been employed include pulsed plasma thrusters and quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. The Electric Propulsion Technical Committee (EPTC) of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was asked to assemble a Committee on Standards (CoS) for Electric Propulsion Testing. The assembled CoS was tasked with developing Standards and Recommended Practices for various diagnostic techniques used in the evaluation of plasma thrusters. These include measurements that can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. This paper presents a summary of the standard, describing the preferred methods for fabrication, calibration, and usage of inductive magnetic field probes for use in diagnosing plasma thrusters. Inductive magnetic field probes (also called B-dot probes throughout this document) are commonly used in electric propulsion (EP) research and testing to measure unsteady magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents. The B-dot probe is relatively simple in construction, and requires minimal cost, making it a low-cost technique that is readily accessible to most researchers. While relatively simple, the design of a B-dot probe is not trivial and there are many opportunities for errors in

  20. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  1. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  2. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V.; Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K.; Dantelle, G.; Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S.

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  3. Internal magnetic field measurements on the Helicity Injected Tokamak (HIT) using the Transient Internal Probe (TIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is a novel diagnostic designed to measure internal magnetic fields in hot plasmas. The diagnostic involves shooting a magneto-optic probe through the plasma at high velocities (greater than 2 km/s) using a two stage light gas gun. Local fields are obtained by illuminating the probe with an argon ion laser and measuring the amount of Faraday rotation in the laser light reflected from the moving probe. Currently, internal magnetic profile measurements are being conducted on the Helicity Injected tokamak (HIT). HIT is a low aspect ratio (A = 1.5) tokamak designed to investigate steady state current drive using coaxial helicity injection. Operating parameters are T{sub e} {approx} 100, n{sub e} {approx} 5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and I{sub p} = 250 kA. Internal magnetic field profile data will be presented. The TIP diagnostic has a spatial resolution of 1 cm and 20 gauss magnetic field resolution. System frequency response is 10 MHz.

  4. Design and Application of Hybrid Magnetic Field-Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Simpson, John

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of magnetic field sensors into eddy current probes can result in novel probe designs with unique performance characteristics. One such example is a recently developed electromagnetic probe consisting of a two-channel magnetoresistive sensor with an embedded single-strand eddy current inducer. Magnetic flux leakage maps of ferrous materials are generated from the DC sensor response while high-resolution eddy current imaging is simultaneously performed at frequencies up to 5 megahertz. In this work the design and optimization of this probe will be presented, along with an application toward analysis of sensory materials with embedded ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles. The sensory material is designed to produce a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the FSMA particles under strain. Mapping of the stray magnetic field and eddy current response of the sample with the hybrid probe can thereby image locations in the structure which have experienced an overstrain condition. Numerical modeling of the probe response is performed with good agreement with experimental results.

  5. Faraday tomography: a new, three-dimensional probe of the interstellar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrière, Katia

    2016-11-01

    Much of our present observational knowledge of the interstellar magnetic field of our Galaxy comes from two different sources, both of which involve mechanisms operating at radio wavelengths: the first one is the Faraday rotation of linearly-polarized radio waves propagating through the magneto-ionic interstellar medium, and the second one is the diffuse synchrotron emission from our Galaxy. I will review what these two classical probes have taught us about the strength, the direction/orientation, and the spatial distribution of the interstellar magnetic field. I will then present a recent method, known as Faraday tomography or rotation measure synthesis, which relies on a combination of Faraday rotation and synchrotron emission and which makes it possible to probe the interstellar magnetic field in three dimensions.

  6. Continuous Magnetic Field Monitoring Using Rapid Re-Excitation of NMR Probe Sets.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Wilm, Bertram J; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-06-01

    MRI relies on static and spatially varying dynamic magnetic fields of high accuracy. NMR field probes permit the direct observation of spatiotemporal field dynamics for diverse purposes such as data correction, field control, sequence validation, and hardware characterization. However, due to probe signal decay and dephasing existing field cameras are limited in terms of readout duration and the extent of k -space that can be covered. The present work aims to overcome these limitations by the transition to short-lived NMR probes and rapid re-excitation. The proposed approach uses probes with T 2 so short that thermal relaxation dominates signal decay even in the presence of strongest gradients. They are integrated with transmit, receive and sequencing electronics that permit high-rate re-excitation with optional probe alternation as well as complementary RF pulse recording. The system is demonstrated by monitoring of sample MRI sequences with long readouts and large gradient moments. It is compared with the conventional long-lived probe concept and characterized in terms of net sensitivity and sources of systematic error. Continuous k -space trajectory mapping is demonstrated and validated by trajectory-based image reconstruction.

  7. Use of a probing pulsed magnetic field for determining plasma parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    A novel, simple, and readily usable method is proposed for measuring the electrical conductivity and temperature of a plasma. The method is based on the interaction of the test plasma with a pulsed magnetic field. The electric signals induced by the magnetic field in the circuits of two probes (miniature solenoids), one immersed in the test plasma and the other placed outside the plasma, provide data for estimating the plasma parameters. The method was verified experimentally by determining the parameters of the plasma flows generated in the cathode spots high-current pulsed vacuum arcs that were used to form cylindrical shells of bismuth Z-pinch plasma.

  8. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; ...

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore » and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  9. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-03-02

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10(-20) A m(2), respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution.

  10. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  11. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10‑20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution.

  12. High-sensitivity detection of static magnetic field in a SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Wang, Huiwu; Itozaki, Hideo

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a high-Tc SQUID probe microscope. A high permeability probe was used as a flux guide to improve its spatial resolution. The SQUID head with the probe makes it possible to measure samples with high spatial resolution in air at room temperature. To achieve a high spatial resolution, the microscope should have high signal to noise (S/N) ratio. We have investigated a modulation method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher S/N ratio. The sample stage was vibrated perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID with a frequency of 120 Hz by being mounted on a piezo stage attached to a mechanical stage. The oscillation amplitude of the sample was about 44 µm when the piezo stage was vibrated with amplitude 20 µm. The SQUID output was connected to a lock-in amplifier, and the magnetic field signal was obtained using lock-in detection. In order to evaluate the performance of this modulation method, we measured static magnetic field distributions of fine meander lines and fine patterns of a Ni thin film. Observed line scans showed that the improved S/N ratio of the SQUID microscope led to a higher spatial resolution.

  13. Analysis of Van Allen Probes Data Showing Nonlinear Electric Field Feedback During a Magnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Katus, R. M.; Smith, L. K.; Skoug, R. M.; Niehof, J. T.; Spence, H.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Smith, C. W.; Kletzing, C.; Ilie, R.; Ganushkina, N.

    2013-12-01

    Van Allen Probes data was examined to assess the role of nonlinear feedback in relationship to the spatial structure of hot ions in the inner magnetosphere. During the magnetic storm that peaked on June 1, 2013, localized electric field perturbations from the EFW instrument were observed in relationship to the plasma pressure peak (as identified by the HOPE H+ and O+ fluxes in the 1-40 keV range, as well as magnetic field perturbations from EMFISIS) with a systematic sinusoidal perturbation. Near apogee, it takes the Van Allen Probes 30-60 minutes to traverse a peak in the ion fluxes. Therefore, the electric field was averaged over several minutes to remove the higher-frequency wave oscillations, revealing the longer-baseline perturbation associated with the pressure peak. While the fluxes indicate that the satellite is passing through a pressure peak, the magnetic field perturbation reveals the spatial location of the pressure extrema relative to the spacecraft location. The pattern of these electric fields relative to the location of the plasma pressure peak is in agreement with the hypothesis based on theory and numerical simulation results that an azimuthally localized pressure peak should create a systematic and predictable small-scale reconfiguration of the electric field. This electric field modification is because the field-aligned currents near each end of the pressure crescent close via Pedersen currents, perturbing the electric field in this region, as regulated by the ionospheric conductance. The level of this reconfiguration, relative to the expected dawn-dusk electric field within the magnetosphere, indicates the intensity of the nonlinear feedback.

  14. Probing the solar magnetic field with a Sun-grazing comet.

    PubMed

    Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A; Mikií, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Schrijver, Carolus J; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2013-06-07

    On 15 and 16 December 2011, Sun-grazing comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) passed deep within the solar corona, effectively probing a region that has never been visited by spacecraft. Imaged from multiple perspectives, extreme ultraviolet observations of Lovejoy's tail showed substantial changes in direction, intensity, magnitude, and persistence. To understand this unique signature, we combined a state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona and a model for the motion of emitting cometary tail ions in an embedded plasma. The observed tail motions reveal the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the solar corona. We show how these motions constrain field and plasma properties along the trajectory, and how they can be used to meaningfully distinguish between two classes of magnetic field models.

  15. Methanol masers probing the ordered magnetic field of W75N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surcis, G.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Dodson, R.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The role of magnetic fields during the protostellar phase of high-mass star-formation is a debated topic. In particular, it is still unclear how magnetic fields influence the formation and dynamic of disks and outflows. Most current information on magnetic fields close to high-mass protostars comes from H2O and OH maser observations. Recently, the first 6.7 GHz methanol maser polarization observations were made, and they reveal strong and ordered magnetic fields. Aims: The morphology of the magnetic field during high-mass star-formation needs to be investigated on small scales, which can only be done using very long baseline interferometry observations. The massive star-forming region W75N contains three radio sources and associated masers, while a large-scale molecular bipolar outflow is also present. Polarization observations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers at high angular resolution probe the strength and structure of the magnetic field and determine its relation to the outflow. Methods: Eight of the European VLBI network antennas were used to measure the linear polarization and Zeeman-splitting of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the star-forming region W75N. Results: We detected 10 methanol maser features, 4 of which were undetected in previous work. All arise near the source VLA 1 of W75N. The linear polarization of the masers reveals a tightly ordered magnetic field over more than 2000 AU around VLA 1 that is exactly aligned with the large-scale molecular outflow. This is consistent with the twisted magnetic field model proposed for explaining dust polarization observations. The Zeeman-splitting measured on 3 of the maser features indicates a dynamically important magnetic field in the maser region of the order of 50 mG. We suggest VLA 1 is the powering sources of the bipolar outflow. Member of the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne.

  16. Theoretical Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Magnetic Molecule Systems as Probed by NMR and Pulsed Fields Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis

    2005-12-17

    The field of molecular magnetism[l-6] has become a subject of intense theoretical and experimental interest and has rapidly evolved during the last years. This inter-disciplinary field concerns magnetic systems at the molecular or "nanoscopic" level, whose realization has become feasible due to recent advances in the field of chemical synthesis. The present theoretical work provides a first step towards exploiting the possibilities that are offered by probing magnetic molecules using external magnetic fields with high sweep rates. These probes, apart for providing information specific to magnetic molecules, offer the possibility of conducting a detailed study of the relaxational behavior of interacting spin systems as a result of their coupling with a "heat bath" and in particular the excitations of the host lattice. Development of a broad theoretical framework for dealing with relaxational phenomena induced by dynamical magnetic fields is indeed a worthy goal.

  17. Probing the surface magnetic field structure in RX J1856.5-3754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Taverna, R.; Turolla, R.

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of magnetic field in isolated neutron stars is one of the most important ingredients in the attempt to build a unified description of these objects. A prediction of field evolution models is the existence of an equilibrium configuration, in which the Hall cascade vanishes. Recent calculations have explored the field structure in this stage, called the Hall attractor. We use X-ray data of near-by, cooling neutron stars to probe this prediction, as these sources are surmised to be close to or at Hall attractor phase. We show that the source RX J1856.5-3754 might be closer to the attractor than other sources of its class. Our modelling indicates that the properties of surface thermal emission, assuming that the star is in the Hall attractor, are in contradiction to the spectral data of RX J1856.5-3754.

  18. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2012-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the anisotropy properties of the extragalactic gamma-ray background, through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thus inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that the two extreme cases (zero IGMF and IGMF strong enough to completely isotropize cascade photons) would be separable by ten years of Fermi observations and reasonable model parameters for the gamma-ray background. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  19. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  20. Using the morphology and magnetic fields of tailed radio galaxies as environmental probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Dehghan, S.; Pratley, L.

    2015-03-01

    Bent-tailed (BT) radio sources have long been known to trace over densities in the Universe up to z ~ 1 and there is increasing evidence this association persists out to redshifts of 2. The morphology of the jets in BT galaxies is primarily a function of the environment that they have resided in and so BTs provide invaluable clues as to their local conditions. Thus, not only can samples of BT galaxies be used as signposts of large-scale structure, but are also valuable for obtaining a statistical measurement of properties of the intra-cluster medium including the presence of cluster accretion shocks & winds, and as historical anemometers, preserving the dynamical history of their surroundings in their jets. We discuss the use of BTs to unveil large-scale structure and provide an example in which a BT was used to unlock the dynamical history of its host cluster. In addition to their use as density and dynamical indicators, BTs are useful probes of the magnetic field on their environment on scales which are inaccessible to other methods. Here we discuss a novel way in which a particular sub-class of BTs, the so-called `corkscrew' galaxies might further elucidate the coherence lengths of the magnetic fields in their vicinity. Given that BTs are estimated to make up a large population in next generation surveys we posit that the use of jets in this way could provide a unique source of environmental information for clusters and groups up to z = 2.

  1. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  2. Probing the innermost regions of AGN jets and their magnetic fields: LBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James M.; Lobanov, Andrei; Perez Torres, Miguel Angel; Ros, Eduardo; Alberdi, Antxon; Taylor, Greg; Zensus, Anton; Cawthorne, Tim; Kovalev, Yuri; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Savolainen, Tuomas; Gomez, Jose Luis; Bach, Uwe; Bernhart, Simone; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Eilek, Jean; Fromm, Christian

    2013-10-01

    RadioAstron provides the first true full-polarization capabilities for space-VLBI. As part of our RadioAstron key science project to study magnetic fields in AGNs, we propose that the LBA participates in two global VLBI imaging observations (10 to 20 hours of total observing time) at K-band from a list of possible imaging targets (including OJ~287, 3C~273, 3C~279, and 3C~454.3 for the LBA) and sessions in the timerange 2013 October through 2014 April currently under consideration by other global VLBI stations. These measurements will exploit the unprecedented high-angular resolution polarization capabilities of RadioAstron to probe the innermost regions of AGN jets and their magnetic fields. Our initial target sample contains bright, strongly polarized AGN jets for which we confidently expect to measure polarization and be able to perform Faraday rotation synthesis analysis that will allow us to construct 3D maps of the magnetic field structure and strength in the vicinity of the central black hole. Comparison with 3D relativistic-MHD and emission simulations will allow us to obtain a better understanding of the jet formation and high-energy emission mechanisms. Perigee imaging with RadioAstron requires support from a truly global VLBI array that can co-observe for the full RadioAstron track. As very sensitive stations are required at all times to locate and track fringes to the weak RadioAstron K-band system, the LBA, including DSS-43, the ATCA, and Parkes, is crucial for the far eastern latitude region of the global array.

  3. OPEN CLUSTERS AS PROBES OF THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD. I. CLUSTER PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hoq, Sadia; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Stars in open clusters are powerful probes of the intervening Galactic magnetic field via background starlight polarimetry because they provide constraints on the magnetic field distances. We use 2MASS photometric data for a sample of 31 clusters in the outer Galaxy for which near-IR polarimetric data were obtained to determine the cluster distances, ages, and reddenings via fitting theoretical isochrones to cluster color–magnitude diagrams. The fitting approach uses an objective χ{sup 2} minimization technique to derive the cluster properties and their uncertainties. We found the ages, distances, and reddenings for 24 of the clusters, and the distances and reddenings for 6 additional clusters that were either sparse or faint in the near-IR. The derived ranges of log(age), distance, and E(B−V) were 7.25–9.63, ∼670–6160 pc, and 0.02–1.46 mag, respectively. The distance uncertainties ranged from ∼8% to 20%. The derived parameters were compared to previous studies, and most cluster parameters agree within our uncertainties. To test the accuracy of the fitting technique, synthetic clusters with 50, 100, or 200 cluster members and a wide range of ages were fit. These tests recovered the input parameters within their uncertainties for more than 90% of the individual synthetic cluster parameters. These results indicate that the fitting technique likely provides reliable estimates of cluster properties. The distances derived will be used in an upcoming study of the Galactic magnetic field in the outer Galaxy.

  4. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Positrons and Late-time IR Line Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P.

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of γ and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 μm, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M Ch) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 109 G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a γ-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 μm can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M Ch mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central 56Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M Ch. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical

  5. Test of horizontal field measurements using two-axis Hall probes at the APS Magnetic Measurement Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vasserman, I.

    1998-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will use a 400-MeV particle beam from the APS linac with RMS beam transverse size of 100 micrometers and requires very high performance of the insertion devices in order to achieve high intensity radiation. Averaged over period, the trajectory must deviate from the ideal on-axis trajectory by not more than 10% of the RMS beam size. Meaning that the second field integral should be straight within {+-}1,300 G-cm{sup 2} over the length of the device for both horizontal and vertical directions for the 400-MeV particle beam. Under such conditions, special attention should be given to the measurement technique and tuning. Two types of probes were tested to examine the possibility to measure small horizontal field in presence of strong (up to 1 T) vertical magnetic field without the distortion associated with planar Hall probe effect. They are a two-axis Sentron analog Hall transducer and a two-axis Bell probe. The Sentron probe is a new type of Hall probe, a so-called vertical Hall device, which is sensitive to the magnetic field parallel to the chip plan. The Bell probe is a conventional-type probe sensitive to the magnetic field perpendicular to the chip plane. A flipping coil and an 81-mm-long moving coil were used to make the reference measurements. Insertion device Undulator A {number_sign}3 was used for these measurements with a gap of 11 mm and a peak field of about 0.85 T.

  6. Solar Energetic Electron Probes of Magnetic Cloud Field Line Lengths (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-02

    clouds (MCs) are large interplanetary coronal mass ejections of enhanced and low‐variance fields with rotations indicative of magnetic flux ropes...published 21 January 2011. [1] Magnetic clouds (MCs) are large interplanetary coronal mass ejections of enhanced and low‐variance fields with...enhanced magnetic field strengths, and ( 3 ) low proton temperatures and low proton b. They compose about one quarter of all inter- planetary CMEs (ICMEs

  7. Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Jefferson; Castro, Matthieu; Petit, Pascal; do Nascimento, José-Dias, Jr.

    2015-08-01

    It is know that lithium is element easily destroyed in stellar interior, the existence of lithium rich stars means a great challenge in stellar evolution. In this context our observations ravels the serendipitous discovery of an unusually high lithium abundance star. This is a K0III HD 150050, which has strong deepening on lithium line (6707.8 Å) this means lithium abundance of 2.81 0.2 dex, therefore this star belong a rare group called super Li-Rich stars. A possible source of the non-standard episodes required to produce Li-rich stars were identified in magneto-thermohaline mixing accounted by models of extra-mixing induced by magnetic buoyancy. However to better understand this is necessary more observational data. In last three decades several studies has showed that late type red giant stars presents a remarkable modifications in these outer atmosphere layers when they become late type star in HR diagram. These changes are founded through X-ray, Ultraviolet, and Chromospheric activity analyses, and then we can establish the called “Dividing lines”. We made spectropalarimetric observations with ESPaDOnS@CFHT to achieve two main objectives: analyze the influence of magnetic field in the Li-rich giant stars, and understand how works the magnetic field in late type giants and supergiants across the “dividing line”.

  8. Fast Radio Bursts as Probes of Magnetic Fields in the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu; Gaensler, B. M.

    2016-06-01

    We examine the proposal that the dispersion measures (DMs) and Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of extragalactic linearly polarized fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to probe the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies. The DM through the cosmic web is dominated by contributions from the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) in filaments and from the gas in voids. On the other hand, RM is induced mostly by the hot medium in galaxy clusters, and only a fraction of it is produced in the WHIM. We show that if one excludes FRBs whose sightlines pass through galaxy clusters, the line of sight (LOS) strength of the IGMF in filaments, {B}| | , is approximately C(< 1+z> /{f}{DM})({RM}/{DM}), where C is a known constant. Here, the redshift of the FRB is not required to be known; f DM is the fraction of total DM due to the WHIM, while < 1+z> is the redshift of interevening gas weighted by the WHIM gas density, both of which can be evaluated for a given cosmology model solely from the DM of an FRB. Using data on structure formation simulations and a model IGMF, we show that C(< 1+z> /{f}{DM})({RM}/{DM}) closely reproduces the density-weighted LOS strength of the IGMF in filaments of the large-scale structure.

  9. Wave Science with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Acuna, M. H.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rpwlamd, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2008-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields of waves which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts. We discuss of the key scientific goals of the EMFISIS investigation with particular attention to the wave physics of the radiation belts.

  10. Local recording of biological magnetic fields using Giant Magneto Resistance-based micro-probes

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Francesca; Trauchessec, Vincent; Caruso, Laure; Trejo-Rosillo, Josué; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Paul, Elodie; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain; Fermon, Claude; Pannetier-Lecoeur, Myriam; Ouanounou, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    The electrical activity of brain, heart and skeletal muscles generates magnetic fields but these are recordable only macroscopically, such as in magnetoencephalography, which is used to map neuronal activity at the brain scale. At the local scale, magnetic fields recordings are still pending because of the lack of tools that can come in contact with living tissues. Here we present bio-compatible sensors based on Giant Magneto-Resistance (GMR) spin electronics. We show on a mouse muscle in vitro, using electrophysiology and computational modeling, that this technology permits simultaneous local recordings of the magnetic fields from action potentials. The sensitivity of this type of sensor is almost size independent, allowing the miniaturization and shaping required for in vivo/vitro magnetophysiology. GMR-based technology can constitute the magnetic counterpart of microelectrodes in electrophysiology, and might represent a new fundamental tool to investigate the local sources of neuronal magnetic activity. PMID:27991562

  11. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution, large area, variable height magnetic field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Gorky; Kramer, R. B. G.; Dempsey, N. M.; Hasselbach, K.

    2016-11-01

    We present a scanning Hall probe microscope operating in ambient conditions. One of the unique features of this microscope is the use of the same stepper motors for both sample positioning as well as scanning, which makes it possible to have a large scan range (few mm) in the x and y directions, with a scan resolution of 0.1 μm. Protocols have been implemented to enable scanning at different heights from the sample surface. The z range is 35 mm. Microstructured Hall probes of size 1-5 μm have been developed. A minimum probe-sample distance <2 μm has been obtained by the combination of new Hall probes and probe-sample distance regulation using a tuning fork based force detection technique. The system is also capable of recording local B(z) profiles. We discuss the application of the microscope for the study of micro-magnet arrays being developed for applications in micro-systems.

  12. A new probe of the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    Establishing the properties of magnetic fields on scales larger than galaxy clusters is critical for resolving the unknown origin and evolution of galactic and cluster magnetism. More generally, observations of magnetic fields on cosmic scales are needed for assessing the impacts of magnetism on cosmology, particle physics, and structure formation over the full history of the Universe. However, firm observational evidence for magnetic fields in large scale structure remains elusive. In an effort to address this problem, we have developed a novel statistical method to infer the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments using observation of the two-point correlation of Faraday rotation measures from a dense grid of extragalactic radio sources. Here we describe our approach, which embeds and extends the pioneering work of Kolatt (1998) within the context of Information Field Theory (a statistical theory for Bayesian inference on spatially distributed signals; Enfllin et al., 2009). We describe prospects for observation, for example with forthcoming data from the ultra-deep JVLA CHILES Con Pol survey and future surveys with the SKA.

  13. Interrupted Magnetic First Order Transitions and Kinetic Arrest probed with In-field Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siruguri, V.; Kaushik, S. D.; Rayaprol, S.; Babu, P. D.; Chaddah, P.; Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Hoser, A.; Ritter, C.

    2016-09-01

    In-field neutron diffraction studies were carried out on two compounds that exhibit magnetic first order phase transitions (FOPT). It is shown that the FOPT can be interrupted by an external magnetic field, resulting in a coexistence of kinetically arrested metastable states and equilibrium phases. Use of a novel protocol CHUF (Cooling and Heating under Unequal Fields) helps to determine the coexisting phase fractions and also to observe the devitrification of the kinetically arrested phase into the equilibrium phase, in a manner similar to that found in structural glassy systems.

  14. Probe of the Solar Magnetic Field Using the ``Cosmic-Ray Shadow'' of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenomori, M.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Chen, T. L.; Chen, W. Y.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; Hakamada, K.; He, H. H.; He, Z. T.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Jia, H. Y.; Jiang, L.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, H. J.; Li, W. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J. S.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Meng, X. R.; Mizutani, K.; Munakata, K.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Onuma, H.; Ozawa, S.; Qian, X. L.; Qu, X. B.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Shao, J.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, H.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yasue, S.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhai, L. M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun’s shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun’s shadow, using the potential field source surface model and the current sheet source surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun’s shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun’s shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun’s shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux.

  15. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) Method and Probe for Generating RF Magnetic Fields in Different Directions to Distinguish NQR from Acoustic Ringing Induced in a Sample

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    77,719 TITLE OF THE INVENTION NUCLEAR QUADRUPOLE RESONANCE ( NQR ) METHOD AND PROBE FOR GENERATING RF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS TO...DISTINGUISH NQR FROM ACOUSTIC RINGING INDUCED IN A SAMPLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a...nuclear quadrupole 15 resonance ( NQR ) method and probe for generating RF magnetic fields in different directions towards a sample. More specifically

  16. Probe of hydrogen atom in plasmas with magnetic, electric, and Aharonov-Bohm flux fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, for the first time, the combined effects of external magnetic, electric, and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by the more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential are investigated within cylindrical coordinate formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The corresponding Schrödinger equation is solved numerically in order to examine both strong and weak regimes and confinement effects of external fields. The influence of screening parameters of the MGECSC potential on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom is also studied in detail in the presence of external magnetic, electric, and AB flux fields. As it is possible to model both Debye and quantum plasmas by using screening parameters in the MGECSC potential, the effects of each plasma environment on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom are also considered in the external fields. It is observed that there are important results of external fields on the total interaction potential profile, and the most dominant one in these fields is the magnetic field. Furthermore, the effects of confinement on the physical state of the plasma environment is a subject of this study. These details would be important in experimental and theoretical investigations in plasma and atomic physics fields.

  17. Nanofabrication using near-field optical probes

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Nanofabrication using near-field optical probes is an established technique for rapid prototyping and automated maskless fabrication of nanostructured devices. In this review, we present the primary types of near-field probes and their physical processing mechanisms. Highlights of recent developments include improved resolution by optimizing the probe shape, incorporation of surface plasmonics in probe design, broader use in biological and magnetic storage applications, and increased throughput using probe arrays as well as high speed writing and patterning. PMID:22713756

  18. Magnetic field enhanced nano-tip fabrication for four-probe STM studies.

    PubMed

    McKendry, J E; Allen, C S; Critchley, K; Górzny, M L; Walton, A S; Evans, S D

    2008-02-27

    We present an improved method for fabricating tungsten STM tips for measuring nanoscale objects using a multiprobe STM. The tips were prepared by a 'drop-off' technique combined with a magnetic field. For magnetic field strengths above 150 Oe the electrolyte was seen to rotate about the tungsten anode. This rotation reduced the adhesion of bubbles and led to a reduction in the cone angle of the tips produced. This property is advantageous for multiprobe measurements as it allows one to bring multiple tips into close proximity.

  19. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, B A; Knowlton, S F; Hartwell, G J; Hanson, J D; Maurer, D A

    2014-09-01

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  20. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, B. A.; Knowlton, S. F.; Hartwell, G. J. Hanson, J. D.; Maurer, D. A.

    2014-09-15

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  1. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W.; Acuna, M.; Torbert, R.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Bounds, S.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2006-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field dynamics and time scales are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to MHz frequencies. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical, with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further our nation's space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  2. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  3. Terahertz probes of magnetic field induced spin reorientation in YFeO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xian; Jiang, Junjie; Ma, Guohong; Jin, Zuanming; Wang, Dongyang; Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2015-03-02

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, we demonstrate the spin reorientation of a canted antiferromagnetic YFeO{sub 3} single crystal, by evaluating the temperature and magnetic field dependence of resonant frequency and amplitude for the quasi-ferromagnetic (FM) and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes (AFM), a deeper insight into the dynamics of spin reorientation in rare-earth orthoferrites is established. Due to the absence of 4f-electrons in Y ion, the spin reorientation of Fe sublattices can only be induced by the applied magnetic field, rather than temperature. In agreement with the theoretical predication, the frequency of FM mode decreases with magnetic field. In addition, an obvious step of spin reorientation phase transition occurs with a relatively large applied magnetic field of 4 T. By comparison with the family members of RFeO{sub 3} (R = Y{sup 3+} or rare-earth ions), our results suggest that the chosen of R would tailor the dynamical rotation properties of Fe ions, leading to the designable spin switching in the orthoferrite antiferromagnetic systems.

  4. Probing the Interior Dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn with Gravity and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The inner working of solar system gas giant planets remain elusive after decades of exploration. One lasting debate concerns the nature of east-west zonal flows observed on the cloud level of these planets with amplitude on the order of 100 m/s: an observational fact is yet to be established about whether these flows are shallow atmospheric dynamics or surface expression of deep interior dynamics. There is a good chance that such an observational fact can be established within the next few years, given the upcoming gravity and magnetic field measurements to be carried out by the Juno mission and the Cassini Grand Finale. In this presentation, I will first describe a critical assessment of the applicability of the thermal wind equation (TWE) in calculating the gravity field associated with deep zonal flows. The TWE, which is a local diagnostic relation, captures the local density variations associated with the zonal flows while neglects the global shape change and density variations with non-local origins. Our analysis shows that the global corrections to the high degree gravity moments are small (less than a few tens of percent). Our analysis also shows that the applicability of the TWE in calculating the gravity moments does depend crucially on retaining the non-sphericity of the background density and gravity. Only when the background non-sphericity of the planet is taken into account in the calculation, the thermal wind equation (TWE) makes accurate enough prediction for the high-degree gravity moments associated with deep zonal flows (with errors less than a few tens of percent). I will then turn to the magnetic signals associated with deep zonal flows. Using mean field dynamo theory (MFDT), we show that detectable magnetic signals are expected: in the spatial domain, poloidal magnetic fields spatially correlated with deep zonal flows are expected; in the temporal domain, periodic oscillations of the poloidal magnetic field are expected. The period of the

  5. The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe: magnetic and electric field measurements during an active aurora at fine spatial and temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, R. J.; Pratt, J.; Swenson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe was a rocket campaign that launched from Poker Flat on January 28, 2015 at 10:41:01 UTC to make multi-point vector observations of the magnetic and electric fields during an active aurora. With 6 instrumented payloads deployed from the rocket in addition to the main payload, each payload making simultaneous measurements of the magnetic and electric fields, the goals of this mission are to resolve the temporal-spatial ambiguity concerning the structures of the electric and magnetic fields during an active auroral event. The vector nature of these measurements requires an accurate knowledge of attitude throughout the flight. Each payload was equipped with gyroscopes to obtain a post-processed attitude solution after the flight. While the main payload's inertial sensors functioned well, the spin axis gyroscope on the subpayloads saturated due to a design flaw. To obtain the attitude and render the vector measurements useful, a least-squares based approach to estimate the attitude history of the payloads was devised using the magnetic and electric field measurements. Once the attitude solution was applied the temporal structures seen in the magnetic and electric fields while flying through the auroral arc are strongly correlated between payloads. We present the new attitude history estimation approach and discuss its strengths and weaknesses compared to traditional attitude methods. We also present preliminary findings from the magnetic and electric field instruments.The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe was a rocket campaign that launched from Poker Flat on January 28, 2015 at 10:41:01 UTC to make multi-point vector observations of the magnetic and electric fields during an active aurora. With 6 instrumented payloads deployed from the rocket in addition to the main payload, each payload making simultaneous measurements of the magnetic and electric fields, the goals of this mission are to resolve the temporal-spatial ambiguity

  6. Parameterized least-squares attitude history estimation and magnetic field observations of the auroral spatial structures probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, Ryan J.

    Terrestrial auroras are visible-light events caused by charged particles trapped by the Earth's magnetic field precipitating into the atmosphere along magnetic field lines near the poles. Auroral events are very dynamic, changing rapidly in time and across large spatial scales. Better knowledge of the flow of energy during an aurora will improve understanding of the heating processes in the atmosphere during geomagnetic and solar storms. The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe is a sounding rocket campaign to observe the middle-atmosphere plasma and electromagnetic environment during an auroral event with multipoint simultaneous measurements for fine temporal and spatial resolution. The auroral event in question occurred on January 28, 2015, with liftoff of the rocket at 10:41:01 UTC. The goal of this thesis is to produce clear observations of the magnetic field that may be used to model the current systems of the auroral event. To achieve this, the attitude of ASSP's 7 independent payloads must be estimated, and a new attitude determination method is attempted. The new solution uses nonlinear least-squares parameter estimation with a rigid-body dynamics simulation to determine attitude with an estimated accuracy of a few degrees. Observed magnetic field perturbations found using the new attitude solution are presented, where structures of the perturbations are consistent with previous observations and electromagnetic theory.

  7. Probing the magnetic field structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan; Johnson, Michael; Doeleman, Sheperd; Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Accreting black holes (BHs) are at the core of relativistic astrophysics as messengers of the strong-field regime of General Relativity and prime targets of several observational campaigns, including imaging the black hole shadow in SagA* and M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope. I will present results from general-relativistic, polarized radiatiative transfer models for the inner accretion flow in Sgr A*. The models use time dependent, global GRMHD simulations of hot accretion flows including standard-and-normal-evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disks (MAD). I present comparisons of these synthetic data sets to the most recent observations with the Event Horizon Telescope and show how the data distinguishes the models and probes the magnetic field structure.

  8. SQUID readout and ultra-low magnetic fields for Gravity Probe-B (GP-B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, James M.

    1986-01-01

    The superconducting readout system to be used for resolving 0.001 arcsec changes in the gyroscope spin direction in the Relativity Gyroscope (GP-B) experiment is described. This system couples the London magnetic moment flux of the spinning gyro to a low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector. Resolution limits and noise performance of the detection system are discussed, and improvements obtained and expected with advanced SQUIDs are presented. Also described is the novel use of superconducting magnetic shielding techniques to obtain a 250 dB attenuation of the earth's magnetic field at the location of the gyroscopes. In this approach, expanded superconducting foil shields are coupled with fixed cylindrical superconducting shields and special geometric considerations to obtain the extremely high attenuation factor required. With these shielding techniques, it appears that the 0.5-Gauss earth field (which appears to the gyroscopes as an ac field at the satellite roll rate) can be reduced to the 10 to the -13th G level required by the experiment. Recent results concerning improvements in the performance of the superconducting foil techniques obtained with the use of a new computer-controlled cooling system are presented.

  9. ANISOTROPY AS A PROBE OF THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION AND HALO MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo; Xue, Liang

    2012-05-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays (CRs) in the solar vicinity is generally attributed to CR streaming due to the discrete distribution of CR sources or local magnetic field modulation. Recently, the two-dimensional large-scale CR anisotropy has been measured by many experiments in the TeV-PeV energy range in both hemispheres. The tail-in excess along the tangential direction of the local spiral arm and the loss cone deficit pointing to the north Galactic pole direction agree with what have been obtained in tens to hundreds of GeV. The persistence of the two large-scale anisotropy structures in such a wide energy range suggests that the anisotropy might be due to global streaming of the Galactic CRs (GCRs). This work tries to extend the observed CR anisotropy picture from the solar system to the whole galaxy. In such a case, we can find a new interesting signature, a loop of GCR streaming, of the GCR propagation. We further calculate the overall GCR streaming induced magnetic field, and find a qualitative consistency with the observed structure of the halo magnetic field.

  10. A novel method to measure 3 components of magnetic fields with submicron resolution using Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy/Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, Ahmet; Dede, Munir; Akram, Rizwan

    2009-03-01

    We present the development of a new 4-lead hall gradiometer and a novel method to measure 3 components( Bx, By & Bz) of magnetic fields on specimen surfaces with submicron resolution using Scanning Hall probe Microscope[1] and gradiometer. We used a 1μm size P-HEMT Hall sensor, operated in gradiometer configuration to image Bx, By and Bz distribution of a hard disk sample surface at 77K. The SHPM was used in Quartz Crystal AFM tracking mode[2]. This simple and quick novel method shows ˜40 better spatial resolution compared to previously developed techniques[3] and can be improved even further, down to sub 50nm resolution. 1. Chang, A.M., et al., Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy. Applied Physics Letters, 1992. 61(16): p. 1974-1976. 2. Dede, M., et al., Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback. Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 2008. 8(2): p. 619-622. 3. Gregusova, D., et al., Fabrication of a vector Hall sensor for magnetic microscopy. Applied Physics Letters, 2003. 82(21): p. 3704-3706.

  11. Nodal Structure of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Superconductors Probed by a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, A.; Vekhter, I.

    2006-06-01

    We consider a quasi-two-dimensional superconductor with line nodes in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field, and compute the dependence of the specific heat C and the in-plane heat conductivity κ on the angle between the field and the nodal direction in the vortex state. We use a variation of the microscopic Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt method that accounts for the scattering of quasiparticles off vortices, and analyze the signature of the nodes in C and κ. At low to moderate fields the specific heat anisotropy changes sign with increasing temperature. Comparison with measurements of C and κ in CeCoIn5 resolves the contradiction between the two in favor of the dx2-y2 gap.

  12. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Choi, M. K.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldstein, M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D. A.; Szabo, A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  13. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus. Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Andre, M.; Bolton, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bowen, T. A.; Burgess, D.; Cattell, C. A.; Chandran, B. D. G.; Chaston, C. C.; Chen, C. H. K.; Choi, M. K.; Connerney, J. E.; Cranmer, S.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Donakowski, W.; Drake, J. F.; Farrell, W. M.; Fergeau, P.; Fermin, J.; Fischer, J.; Fox, N.; Glaser, D.; Goldstein, M.; Gordon, D.; Hanson, E.; Harris, S. E.; Hayes, L. M.; Hinze, J. J.; Hollweg, J. V.; Horbury, T. S.; Howard, R. A.; Hoxie, V.; Jannet, G.; Karlsson, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kien, M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Krucker, S.; Lynch, J. J.; Maksimovic, M.; Malaspina, D. M.; Marker, S.; Martin, P.; Martinez-Oliveros, J.; McCauley, J.; McComas, D. J.; McDonald, T.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Moncuquet, M.; Monson, S. J.; Mozer, F. S.; Murphy, S. D.; Odom, J.; Oliverson, R.; Olson, J.; Parker, E. N.; Pankow, D.; Phan, T.; Quataert, E.; Quinn, T.; Ruplin, S. W.; Salem, C.; Seitz, D.; Sheppard, D. A.; Siy, A.; Stevens, K.; Summers, D.; Szabo, A.; Timofeeva, M.; Vaivads, A.; Velli, M.; Yehle, A.; Werthimer, D.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  14. Interaction of solar wind with Mercury and its magnetic field. [as observed by Mariner 10 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of magnetic field and solar wind electron observations by Mariner 10 spacecraft. The intrinsic magnetic field of the planet Mercury and the implications of such a field for the planetary interior are also discussed.

  15. Triaxial Probe Magnetic Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shultz, Kimberly; Whittlesey, Albert; Narvaez, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The Triaxial Magnetic Moment Analysis software uses measured magnetic field test data to compute dipole and quadrupole moment information from a hardware element. It is used to support JPL projects needing magnetic control and an understanding of the spacecraft-generated magnetic fields. Evaluation of the magnetic moment of an object consists of three steps: acquisition, conditioning, and analysis. This version of existing software was extensively rewritten for easier data acquisition, data analysis, and report presentation, including immediate feedback to the test operator during data acquisition. While prior JPL computer codes provided the same data content, this program has a better graphic display including original data overlaid with reconstructed results to show goodness of fit accuracy and better appearance of the report graphic page. Data are acquired using three magnetometers and two rotations of the device under test. A clean acquisition user interface presents required numeric data and graphic summaries, and the analysis module yields the best fit (least squares) for the magnetic dipole and/or quadrupole moment of a device. The acquisition module allows the user to record multiple data sets, selecting the best data to analyze, and is repeated three times for each of the z-axial and y-axial rotations. In this update, the y-axial rotation starting position has been changed to an option, allowing either the x- or z-axis to point towards the magnetometer. The code has been rewritten to use three simultaneous axes of magnetic data (three probes), now using two "rotations" of the device under test rather than the previous three rotations, thus reducing handling activities on the device under test. The present version of the software gathers data in one-degree increments, which permits much better accuracy of the fit ted data than the coarser data acquisition of the prior software. The data-conditioning module provides a clean data set for the analysis module

  16. Planck intermediate results. XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould belt molecular clouds we evaluate statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, NH. The selected regions, covering several degrees in size, are analysed at an effective angular resolution of 10' FWHM, thus sampling physical scales from 0.4 to 40 pc in the nearest cloud. The column densities in the selected regions range from NH≈ 1021 to1023 cm-2, and hence they correspond to the bulk of the molecular clouds. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analysed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called "histogram of relative orientations". Throughout this study, we assume that the polarized emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing NH, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation to mostly perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvénic or sub-Alfvénic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.

  17. Note: Fiber optic transport probe for Hall measurements under light and magnetic field at low temperatures: Case study of a two dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, P. P. S.; Gupta, Anurag; Kumar, Pramod; Dogra, Anjana; Budhani, R. C.

    2015-05-15

    A fiber optic based probe is designed and developed for electrical transport measurements in presence of quasi-monochromatic (360–800 nm) light, varying temperature (T = 1.8–300 K), and magnetic field (B = 0–7 T). The probe is tested for the resistivity and Hall measurements performed on a LaAlO{sub 3}–SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface system with a conducting two dimensional electron gas.

  18. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  19. Enhanced magnetic field probe array for improved excluded flux calculations on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C.; Mendoza, R.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Romero, J.; Douglass, J.

    2016-11-01

    External flux conserving coils were installed onto the exterior of the C-2U [M. W. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)] confinement vessel to increase the flux confinement time of the system. The 0.5 in. stainless steel vessel wall has a skin time of ˜5 ms. The addition of the external copper coils effectively increases this time to ˜7 ms. This led to better-confined/longer-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The fringing fields generated by the external coils have the side effect of rendering external field measurements invalid. Such measurements were key to the previous method of excluded flux calculation [M. C. Thompson et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D709 (2012)]. A new array of B-dot probes and Rogowski coils were installed to better determine the amount of flux leaked out of the system and ultimately provide a more robust measurement of plasma parameters related to pressure balance including the excluded flux radius. The B-dot probes are surface mountable chip inductors with inductance of 33 μH capable of measuring the DC magnetic field and transient field, due to resistive current decay in the wall/coils, when coupled with active integrators. The Rogowski coils measure the total change in current in each external coil (150 A/2 ms). Currents were also actively driven in the external coils. This renders the assumption of total flux conservation invalid which further complicates the analysis process. The ultimate solution to these issues and the record breaking resultant FRC lifetimes will be presented.

  20. Negative Differential Velocity in Artificial Crystals Probed by High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patanè, A.

    , for x > 0.2%, which we have attributed to the emergence of defect states with deep (~ 0.3 eV) energy levels. Electron trapping onto these states was not observed at low x (x = 0.2%). In this ultra-dilute alloy regime and at low electric fields (F < 1 kV/cm) the electrical conductivity retains the characteristic features of transport through extended states, albeit with relatively low mobility (µ ~ 0.1 m2/Vs at RT) due to scattering of electrons by N-atoms. We have focused our research on this ultra-dilute regime and exploited the admixing of the localized single N-impurity level with the extended conduction band states of GaAs to realize an unusual type of negative differential velocity (NDV) effect: at large F (> 1 kV/cm), electrons gain sufficient energy to approach the energy of the resonant N-level, where they become spatially localized.7-10 This Resonant Electron Localization in Electric Field, to which we give the acronym RELIEF, leads to NDV and strongly non-linear current-voltage characteristics. We envisage that the RELIEF-effect could be observed in other III-N-V alloys, such as InP1-xNx and InAs1-xNx. In these compounds the nature of the resonant interaction between the N-level and the conduction band states of the host-crystal is still relatively unexplored. However, it is clear that the different energy positions of the N-level relative to the conduction band minimum of different materials could offer new degrees of freedom in the design of the electronic band structure and electron dynamics. The RELIEF-effect may open up prospects for future applications in fast electronics. We have shown that the maximum response frequency, fmax, of a RELIEF-diode can be tuned by the applied electric field in the THz frequency range.7 This is of potential technological significance for the development of detectors/sources in the 0.6-1 THz region, which is not currently attainable using conventional Transferred Electron Devices and Quantum Cascade Lasers. Our recent

  1. Experimental characterization of the lower hybrid wave field on the first pass using a magnetic probe array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinya, T.; Baek, S. G.; Wallace, G. M.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Takase, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental characterization of the lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation from the launcher to the core plasma is important to validate an antenna spectrum model and to identify parasitic wave-edge plasma interactions occurring in front of the launcher. On Alcator C-Mod, the wave frequency spectrum and dominant parallel wavenumber are characterized with two probe arrays installed near the edge plasma. The first one is mounted on a radially movable structure that is about 108 deg toroidally away from the launcher. A phasing scan experiment at moderate density suggests a resonance-cone propagation of the launched slow LH wave with a finite spectral width. As plasma density is raised, the measured power decreases, correlated with the observed loss of efficiency. Recently, the second probe array with an increased number of probes has been installed on a limiter that is 54 deg. toroidally away from the launcher, which is expected to be dominantly sensitive to the wave-field directly leaving the launcher. An initial measurement shows that the probe array detects a coherent wave field. A full-wave model to evaluate the wave electric-field pattern in front of the probe array is under development. If available, further experimental and modeling results will be presented. Supported by USDoE Award(s) DE-FC02-99ER54512 and Japan/U.S. Cooperation in Fusion Research and Development.

  2. A novel magnetic field probing technique for determining state of health of sealed lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Neeta; Singh, Pritpal; Vassiliou, John K.

    2012-11-01

    State of Health (SOH) is a critical index for a Sealed Lead-Acid (SLA) battery diagnostic which provides the information about battery replacement and aging effects. SOH is a complex function of chemical parameters of a battery such as stratification in electrolyte, electrode structure (sulfation and hard sulfation) in addition to electrical parameters of a battery. This paper describes a method of online determination of stratification, electrode structure, electrode polarization and current profile within the battery under the influence of a magnetic field. An AC magnetic field is used as a noninvasive tool during battery cycles. An induced emf in a secondary coil (SCV) is used as a measure of change in the magnetic field. The H+ proton density varies with change in sulfuric acid (electrolyte) concentration during battery cycles. The magnetic flux lines are affected by the density of H+ protons whose magnetic dipole moments try to align along the magnetic flux lines. The stratification is seen by a 12% decrease in magnetic flux linking from the top to the bottom of the electrolyte in a battery. Additional experimental results demonstrate the variation in magnetic flux linking which correlates with current profile across the electrode and electrode structure.

  3. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Nie, Yi-Hang; Chen, Jingzhe; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD.

  4. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  5. Role of incoherent pumping field on absorption-dispersion properties of probe pulse in a graphene nanostructure under external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Hamedi, H. R.; Soleimani, H. Rahimpour

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of weak probe light based on quantum coherence and interference in Landau-quantized graphene nanostructure driven by two coherent fields and incoherent pumping field is investigated. The linear dynamical properties of the graphene by means of density matrix method and perturbation theory are discussed. It is found that under certain condition and for appropriate choosing the parameters of the medium, the absorption, dispersion, group index of the weak probe light can be controlled. Moreover, it is shown that by means of incoherent pumping field the superluminal light propagation in the system is accompanied by amplification to make sure that the probe field is amplified as it passes through the system. Moreover, it is observed that the probe amplification can be obtained in the presence or absence of population inversion by properly choosing of system's parameters. We hope that these results may have useful in the future quantum communicational system and networks.

  6. Evolution of the electron localization in a nonconventional alloy system GaAs1-xNx probed by high-magnetic-field photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Wei, X.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.; Xin, H. P.; Hong, Y. G.; Tu, C. W.

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate that a high magnetic field can be used effectively not only to probe the nature of the photoluminescence (PL) in a semiconductor, but also to reveal emission peaks that are unobservable at zero field since the magnetic field can alter energy relaxation processes and the statistical distribution of the photocarriers. Our systematic magneto-PL study of GaAs1-xNx (0.1%⩽x<2.5%) in fields up to 30 T indicates that the character of the low-temperature PL in this system changes drastically with varying nitrogen composition x and exhibits transitions with applying strong magnetic fields. For x<0.7%, the PL spectrum shows many discrete features whose energies remain nearly stationary up to the highest applied field. However, the magnetic confinement gives rise to a feature emerging on the higher energy side of the zero-field spectrum. This feature does show a diamagnetic shift, but it is much slower that that of the GaAs band-edge transition. For x>1%, the PL spectrum evolves into a broad band, and its diamagnetic shift resembles the band-edge transition in a conventional semiconductor, and the rate of shift is comparable to that of GaAs. From the diamagnetic shift of the band, the reduced effective masses for different composition of nitrogen have been derived for this system using the standard theory for the magneto-exciton in a three dimensional semiconductor.

  7. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  8. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-12-31

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  9. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  10. Probing current-induced magnetic fields in Au|YIG heterostructures with low-energy muon spin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqeel, A.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.; Suter, A.; van Wees, B. J.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the depth dependence of current-induced magnetic fields in a bilayer of a normal metal (Au) and a ferrimagnetic insulator (Yttrium Iron Garnet—YIG) by using low energy muon spin spectroscopy (LE-μSR). This allows us to explore how these fields vary from the Au surface down to the buried Au|YIG interface, which is relevant to study physics like the spin-Hall effect. We observed a maximum shift of 0.4 G in the internal field of muons at the surface of Au film which is in close agreement with the value expected for Oersted fields. As muons are implanted closer to the Au|YIG interface, the shift is strongly suppressed, which we attribute to the dipolar fields present at the Au|YIG interface. Combining our measurements with modeling, we show that dipolar fields caused by the finite roughness of the Au|YIG interface consistently explain our observations. Our results, therefore, gauge the limits on the spatial resolution and the sensitivity of LE-μSR to the roughness of the buried magnetic interfaces, a prerequisite for future studies addressing current induced fields caused by the spin-accumulations due to the spin-Hall effect.

  11. Probing multiferroicity and spin-spin interactions via angular dependent dielectric measurements on Y-doped HoMnO3 in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasic, R.; Zhou, H. D.; Brooks, J. S.; Wiebe, C. R.

    2007-05-01

    Dielectric measurements are used to characterize magnetic phase transitions in the doped ferroelectric oxides Ho1-xYxMnO3 (x=0.4). The focus of this experiment is on the effects of the magnetic field direction on the reentrant T-B-θ phase diagram below the Néel temperature. The Ho sublattice plays a major role in all magnetic phase transitions for Y doping (x =0.4), consistent with previous results (x=0,0.6,0.8). Two successive Mn spin rotations in the ab plane in the antiferromagnetic state are driven by the interaction with the Ho subsystem, although the Ho ordering peak in data is not pronounced. The dielectric response is a very sensitive probe for fine analysis of all aspects of spin-spin interactions in diluted Ho1-xYxMnO3. The magnetic field anisotropy study is an important step towards the understanding of magnetic and electric phase competition in the diluted 4f system by the nonmagnetic yttrium (Y) ion.

  12. Second solar spectrum of the Sr I 4607 Å line: depth probing of the turbulent magnetic field strength in a quiet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derouich, M.; Bommier, V.; Malherbe, J. M.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.This paper is devoted to an interpretation of Quiet-Sun, spatially-resolved spectropolarimetric observations of the Hanle effect in terms of turbulent weak magnetic field determination. Methods: . Observations: the slit was positioned perpendicular to the limb, and the spatial resolution along the slit was 1 arcsec, leading to a depth probing along 132 different limb distances. The new polarimeter of the Pic-du-Midi Turret Dome was used on May 14, 2004 to observe a quiet region at the East limb equator in the resonance line of neutral Strontium at 4607 Å. Results: . For each limb distance, we properly adjusted the theoretical intensity profile obtained by applying a zero-field model to the observed one. Micro- and macroturbulent velocities were thus derived (average values v{micro}=1.77 km s-1 and v{macro}=1.95 km s-1). The magnetic field was determined in a second step by interpreting the Hanle effect on the line center linear polarization degree. The depolarizing collisions with neutral hydrogen were taken fully into account through a semi-classical calculation of their rates. An average value of B=38 Gauss was thus derived. Finally, error bars on the magnetic field values were evaluated from a) the polarimetric inaccuracy, b) the limb distance determination inaccuracy, and c) the uncertainty on our theoretical collisional depolarizing rates that we evaluated. This combination leads to 10-20% as total relative error on the magnetic field determination by the Hanle effect method. Since the inaccuracy due to the model itself was hard to properly evaluate, it was ignored. An uncertainty of ±60 km on the line formation depth was, however, derived from the contribution functions. The magnetic field is found to increase slowly with height in the height range 220-300 km above τ5000=1 and then decrease in the height range 300-370 km.

  13. OH MASER SOURCES IN W49N: PROBING MAGNETIC FIELD AND DIFFERENTIAL ANISOTROPIC SCATTERING WITH ZEEMAN PAIRS USING THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Avinash A.; Goss, W. M.; Mendoza-Torres, J. E. E-mail: mgoss@aoc.nrao.edu

    2013-09-20

    Our analysis of a Very Long Baseline Array 12 hr synthesis observation of the OH masers in the well-known star-forming region W49N has yielded valuable data that enable us to probe distributions of magnetic fields in both the maser columns and the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). The data, consisting of detailed high angular resolution images (with beam width ∼20 mas) of several dozen OH maser sources, or spots, at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz, reveal anisotropic scatter broadening with typical sizes of a few tens of milliarcseconds and axial ratios between 1.5 and 3. Such anisotropies have been reported previously by Desai et al. and have been interpreted as being induced by the local magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. However, we find (1) apparent angular sizes of, on average, a factor of about 2.5 less than those reported by Desai et al., indicating significantly less scattering than inferred previously, and (2) a significant deviation in the average orientation of the scatter-broadened images (by ∼10°) from that implied by the magnetic field in the Galactic plane. More intriguingly, for a few Zeeman pairs in our set, significant differences (up to 6σ) are apparent in the scatter-broadened images for the two hands of circular polarization, even when the apparent velocity separation is less than 0.1 km s{sup –1}. This may possibly be the first example of a Faraday rotation contribution to the diffractive effects in the ISM. Using the Zeeman pairs, we also study the distribution of the magnetic field in the W49N complex, finding no significant trend in the spatial structure function. In this paper, we present the details of our observations and analysis leading to these findings, discuss implications of our results for the intervening anisotropic magneto-ionic medium, and suggest possible implications for the structure of magnetic fields within this star-forming region.

  14. Energetic secondary electrons and the nonthermal galactic radio background - A probe of the magnetic field in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Brown, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A previous analysis of the manifestations of charged-pion-decay secondary electrons in interstellar cloud material is extended to include those contributions to the Galactic radio and soft gamma-ray backgrounds that are directly attributable to energetic secondaries. The equilibrium distribution of secondary electrons in dense interstellar clouds is calculated, synchrotron emissivity from isolated interstellar clouds is examined, and it is shown how the value of the magnetic field in these clouds may be determined by observing the radio emission in their directions. The contribution that such clouds make to the integrated radio background is evaluated, and the Galactic distribution of bremsstrahlung gamma rays that arise from interactions of secondary electrons with thermal material in dense clouds is computed. The results indicate that a magnetic field of no more than 80 microgauss is characteristic of dense clouds and that the integrated synchrotron radiation from secondary electrons in interstellar clouds will contribute a significant fraction of the nonthermal brightness along the Galactic equator even if the mean cloud field is as low as 35 microgauss.

  15. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothesis passes the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale range. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small-scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magnetogeostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other

  16. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynmcal hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothes pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at lentgh-scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core- mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order l20 years is pseudo-scale-invarient. Magnetic spectra of other

  17. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    2004-05-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypotheses pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton [1992; GAFD] to scale-variant field and flow [Voorhies, 2004; JGR-SE, in press]. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field [Voorhies, Sabaka and Purucker, 2002; JGR-P], and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The

  18. Cosmological magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic fields are observed on nearly all scales in the Universe, from stars and galaxies up to galaxy clusters and even beyond. The origin of cosmic magnetic fields is still an open question, however a large class of models puts its origin in the very early Universe. A magnetic dynamo amplifying an initial seed magnetic field could explain the present day strength of the galactic magnetic field. However, it is still an open problem how and when this initial magnetic field was created. Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a window to the early Universe and might therefore be able to tell us whether cosmic magnetic fields are of a primordial cosmological origin and at the same time constrain its parameters. We will give an overview of the observational evidence of large-scale magnetic fields, describe generation mechanisms of primordial magnetic fields and possible imprints in the CMB.

  19. MTRAP: The Magnetic Transition Region Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; West, E. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Oberright, J. F.; Evans, D. C.; Wood, H. J.; Saba, J. L. R.; Alexander, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Magnetic Transition Region Probe is a space telescope designed to measure the magnetic field at several heights and temperatures in the solar atmosphere, providing observations spanning the chromospheric region where the field is expected to become force free. The primary goal is to provide an early warning system (hours to days) for solar energetic particle events that pose a serious hazard to astronauts in deep space and to understand the source regions of these particles. The required magnetic field data consist of simultaneous circular and linear polarization measurements in several spectral lines over the wavelength range from 150 to 855 nm. Because the observations are photon limited an optical telescope with a large (>18sq m) collecting area is required. To keep the heat dissipation problem manageable we have chosen to implement MTRAP with six separate Gregorian telescopes, each with approx. 3 sq m collecting area, that are brought to a common focus. The large field of view (5 x 5 arcmin(sup 2)) and angular resolution (0.025 arcsec pixels) require large detector arrays and, because of the requirements on signal to noise (10(exp 3)), pixels with large full well depths to reduce the readout time and improve the temporal resolution. The optical and engineering considerations that have gone into the development of a concept that meets MTRAP's requirements are described.

  20. Broad-band magnetic induction probe calibration using a frequency-corrected reference probe.

    PubMed

    Hill, Carrie

    2013-10-01

    Finite impedances of magnetic induction probes attenuate and shift the field fluctuations measured by the probe so that they differ from the measured signal at the digitizer. These effects vary with frequency. Traditionally, impedance effects have been accounted for in the calibration process by sweeping the frequency of the magnetic field source through a range of frequencies. Situations arise where the conventional calibration method is not feasible due to probe geometry or hardware constraints. A new calibration technique is presented in this paper which calibrates the probe in situ at a single frequency and uses impedance measurements of the probe assembly across the desired frequency range to account for broad-band effects. The in situ calibration technique requires a reference probe with a known proportionality constant NA and known impedances. Impedance effects are corrected in the probe signal using broad-band impedance measurements included in a transfer function in frequency space. The in situ calibration technique is shown to be complicated by capacitive coupling between the probes and the high voltage source coil. Circuit modeling demonstrates that this coupling introduces negligible attenuation and a small phase-delay so that the relative phase-delay between the reference and target probe signals can be corrected by shifting the signals in time. In summary, this calibration method extends traditional single-frequency calibration techniques to broad-band applications, accounting for important non-ideal effects to improve the accuracy of the magnetic field measurement.

  1. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.; Morgan, John P,.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  2. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  3. Probing protein hydration and aging of food materials by the magnetic field dependence of proton spin-lattice relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, Sophie; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Creamer, Lawrence K; Watkinson, Philip J; Callaghan, Paul T

    2003-11-15

    Most cheeses can be considered as solid emulsions of milk fat in a matrix of water and proteins. Regions of each of the phases can be liquid during processing and maturation. Identifying these regions and monitoring changes in them is important as a prelude to controlling the structure of the final cheese. We concentrate on the behavior of water in the vicinity of proteins as a function of cheese aging. Our method utilizes nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) associated with the frequency dependence of water spin-lattice relaxation rates using the field cycling NMR technique. This method provides insight into the dynamical behavior of water molecules on a very large time scale. Moreover, we can distinguish between molecular motion in bulk and motion in the vicinity of a source of relaxation, such as proteins. A fit of our dispersion data using a theory developed by J.-P. Korb and R.G. Bryant (J. Chem. Phys. 115 (2001) 23) allowed us to determine the degree of hydration of proteins as a function of aging. In particular, we find that protein hydration increases with ripening.

  4. Probing the influence of dielectric environment on excitons in monolayer WSe2: Insight from high magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Stier, Andreas V.; Wilson, Nathan P.; Clark, Genevieve; ...

    2016-11-09

    Excitons in atomically thin semiconductors necessarily lie close to a surface, and therefore their properties are expected to be strongly influenced by the surrounding dielectric environment. However, systematic studies exploring this role are challenging, in part because the most readily accessible exciton parameter—the exciton’s optical transition energy—is largely unaffected by the surrounding medium. Here we show that the role of the dielectric environment is revealed through its systematic influence on the size of the exciton, which can be directly measured via the diamagnetic shift of the exciton transition in high magnetic fields. Using exfoliated WSe2 monolayers affixed to single-mode opticalmore » fibers, we tune the surrounding dielectric environment by encapsulating the flakes with different materials and perform polarized low-temperature magneto-absorption studies to 65 T. The systematic increase of the exciton’s size with dielectric screening, and concurrent reduction in binding energy (also inferred from these measurements), is quantitatively compared with leading theoretical models. Furthermore, these results demonstrate how exciton properties can be tuned in future 2D optoelectronic devices.« less

  5. Probing the influence of dielectric environment on excitons in monolayer WSe2: Insight from high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, Andreas V.; Wilson, Nathan P.; Clark, Genevieve; Xu, Xiaodong; Crooker, Scott A.

    2016-11-09

    Excitons in atomically thin semiconductors necessarily lie close to a surface, and therefore their properties are expected to be strongly influenced by the surrounding dielectric environment. However, systematic studies exploring this role are challenging, in part because the most readily accessible exciton parameter—the exciton’s optical transition energy—is largely unaffected by the surrounding medium. Here we show that the role of the dielectric environment is revealed through its systematic influence on the size of the exciton, which can be directly measured via the diamagnetic shift of the exciton transition in high magnetic fields. Using exfoliated WSe2 monolayers affixed to single-mode optical fibers, we tune the surrounding dielectric environment by encapsulating the flakes with different materials and perform polarized low-temperature magneto-absorption studies to 65 T. The systematic increase of the exciton’s size with dielectric screening, and concurrent reduction in binding energy (also inferred from these measurements), is quantitatively compared with leading theoretical models. Furthermore, these results demonstrate how exciton properties can be tuned in future 2D optoelectronic devices.

  6. Spin-lattice coupling in uranium dioxide probed by magnetostriction measurements at high magnetic fields (P08358-E001-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary magnetostriction measurements have already shown a strong interplay of lattice dynamic and magnetism in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states, and give unambiguous evidence of strong spin- phonon coupling in uranium dioxide. Further studies are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in magnetic and paramagnetic states and details of the spin-phonon coupling.

  7. Magnetic fields during galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenbeck, Kai; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Galaxy mergers are expected to play a central role for the evolution of galaxies and may have a strong effect on their magnetic fields. We present the first grid-based 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations investigating the evolution of magnetic fields during merger events. For this purpose, we employed a simplified model considering the merger event of magnetized gaseous disks in the absence of stellar feedback and without a stellar or dark matter component. We show that our model naturally leads to the production of two peaks in the evolution of the average magnetic field strength within 5 kpc, within 25 kpc, and on scales in between 5 and 25 kpc. The latter is consistent with the peak in the magnetic field strength previously reported in a merger sequence of observed galaxies. We show that the peak on the galactic scale and in the outer regions is most likely due to geometrical effects, as the core of one galaxy enters the outskirts of the other one. In addition, the magnetic field within the central ~5 kpc is physically enhanced, which reflects the enhancement in density that is due to efficient angular momentum transport. We conclude that high-resolution observations of the central regions will be particularly relevant for probing the evolution of magnetic field structures during merger events.

  8. Probing electric and magnetic vacuum fluctuations with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tighineanu, P; Andersen, M L; Sørensen, A S; Stobbe, S; Lodahl, P

    2014-07-25

    The electromagnetic-vacuum-field fluctuations are intimately linked to the process of spontaneous emission of light. Atomic emitters cannot probe electric- and magnetic-field fluctuations simultaneously because electric and magnetic transitions correspond to different selection rules. In this Letter we show that semiconductor quantum dots are fundamentally different and are capable of mediating electric-dipole, magnetic-dipole, and electric-quadrupole transitions on a single electronic resonance. As a consequence, quantum dots can probe electric and magnetic fields simultaneously and can thus be applied for sensing the electromagnetic environment of complex photonic nanostructures. Our study opens the prospect of interfacing quantum dots with optical metamaterials for tailoring the electric and magnetic light-matter interaction at the single-emitter level.

  9. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  10. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) have been used as probes of magnetic cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  11. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise Measurements Using Tetrapole Probe Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairnay, Paul

    A magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) testing system was developed for Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) to perform MBN measurements on the Royal Canadian Navy's Victoria class submarine hulls that can be correlated with material properties, including residual stress. The DRDC system was based on the design of a MBN system developed by Steven White at Queen's University, which was capable of performing rapid angular dependent measurements through the implementation of a flux controlled tetrapole probe. In tetrapole probe designs, the magnetic excitation field is rotated in the surface plane of the sample under the assumption of linear superposition of two orthogonal magnetic fields. During the course of this work, however, the validity of flux superposition in ferromagnetic materials, for the purpose of measuring MBN, was brought into question. Consequently, a study of MBN anisotropy using tetrapole probes was performed. Results indicate that MBN anisotropy measured under flux superposition does not simulate MBN anisotropy data obtained through manual rotation of a single dipole excitation field. It is inferred that MBN anisotropy data obtained with tetrapole probes is the result of the magnetic domain structure's response to an orthogonal magnetization condition and not necessarily to any bulk superposition magnetization in the sample. A qualitative model for the domain configuration under two orthogonal magnetic fields is proposed to describe the results. An empirically derived fitting equation, that describes tetrapole MBN anisotropy data, is presented. The equation describes results in terms of two largely independent orthogonal fields, and includes interaction terms arising due to competing orthogonally magnetized domain structures and interactions with the sample's magnetic easy axis. The equation is used to fit results obtained from a number of samples and tetrapole orientations and in each case correctly identifies the samples' magnetic easy axis.

  12. Organic magnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  13. A fast procedure of stress state evaluation in magnetically anisotropic steels with the help of a probe with adjustable magnetizing field direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Marek; Piotrowski, Leszek; Augustyniak, Bolesław

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents a novel approach to the stress state evaluation issue. It deals with a strongly (magnetically) anisotropic materials for which a direct interpretation of the Barkhausen effect (BE) intensity would lead to erroneous results. In such a case one has to take into account both the measured BE intensity and the orientation of the magnetisation direction relative to the magnetic easy axis. For the in plane stress distribution evaluation one has to perform at least three measurements in the non-collinear directions. The application of an apparatus with automatically changing magnetizing field direction allows to obtain the angular distribution of the BE intensity in about 30 s (with the angular step of 10°). Thanks to the dedicated post-processing software the procedure of the measurement data processing, resulting in the full information on the stress distribution (main stress components and their orientation in all the investigated points) is almost instantaneous. Apart from the measurement results the stress determination procedure requires two additional pieces of information. The first one is the calibration data obtained for at least two applied strain directions (along easy and hard magnetisation axes)— the data for the intermediate orientations are usually interpolated. The second one is the ‘reference level’ of the BE intensity angular distribution. In the case of welded plates it is obtained by averaging the results obtained at the analysed points before welding. The way of results presentation proposed in that paper is very illustrative and shows an interesting feature of the stress distribution in welded plates—namely the appearance of a ‘vortex’ structure of main stress.

  14. Probing magnetic and electric optical responses of silicon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakov, Dmitry; Sinev, Ivan; Markovich, Dmitry; Samusev, Anton; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel; Valuckas, Vytautas; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris S.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-04-27

    We study experimentally both magnetic and electric optically induced resonances of silicon nanoparticles by combining polarization-resolved dark-field spectroscopy and near-field scanning optical microscopy measurements. We reveal that the scattering spectra exhibit strong sensitivity of electric dipole response to the probing beam polarization and attribute the characteristic asymmetry of measured near-field patterns to the excitation of a magnetic dipole mode. The proposed experimental approach can serve as a powerful tool for the study of photonic nanostructures possessing both electric and magnetic optical responses.

  15. High-Resolution and Frequency, Printed Miniature Magnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Picard, Julian

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) is developing a technique to significantly reduce the cost and development time of producing magnetic field diagnostics. EHT is designing probes that can be printed on flexible PCBs thereby allowing for extremely small coils to be produced while essentially eliminating the time to wind the coils. The coil size can be extremely small when coupled with the EHT Hybrid Integrator, which is capable of high bandwidth measurements over short and long pulse durations. This integrator is currently being commercialized with the support of a DOE SBIR. Additionally, the flexible PCBs allow probes to be attached to complex surface and/or probes that have a complex 3D structure to be designed and fabricated. During the Phase I, EHT will design and construct magnetic field probes on flexible PCBs, which will be tested at the University of Washington's HIT-SI experiment and in EHT's material science plasma reactor. Funding provided by DOE SBIR/STTR Program.

  16. Anisotropy of Skyrmion Lattice in Mn0.9Fe0.1Si probed by magnetic field orientation dependence of the topological Hall effect and magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegfried, Peter; Treglia, Andrew; Bornstein, Alexander; Wolf, Thomas; Lee, Minhyea

    We report the magnetic field orientation dependence of the topological Hall effect (THE) and magnetoresistance (MR) of Mn0.9Fe0.1Si in the A-phase within the applied magnetic field (H) - temperature (T) phase diagram. In the A-phase a two dimensional Skyrmion lattice is formed in the plane perpendicular to the direction of H, which is responsible for the observed THE signal. At a given T within the A-phase, we investigated the angular dependence of THE and MR at a fixed H to probe the boundaries of the A-phase region. We find the MR signal exhibits a unique H-direction dependence at the entering and exiting of the A-phase, whereas, in the middle H range, i.e. in the core of A-phase, the angular dependence is consistent with what is expected from a perfect 2D Skyrmion lattice. However, THE signals show extreme sensitivity upon entering the A-phase and unexpected angular dependence, yet did not leave any trace through exiting. The discrepancy between the angular dependence of MR and THE signals at the A-phase boundaries indicates a crucial role of Fe impurities as pinning centers for the Skyrmions. We will discuss further our H-orientation dependence of the THE, compared to sweeping H at a fixed angle in Fe doped MnSi. Work at the University of Colorado was supported by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0006888.

  17. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  18. Nanopatterning reconfigurable magnetic landscapes via thermally assisted scanning probe lithography.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, E; Petti, D; Pancaldi, M; Madami, M; Tacchi, S; Curtis, J; King, W P; Papp, A; Csaba, G; Porod, W; Vavassori, P; Riedo, E; Bertacco, R

    2016-06-01

    The search for novel tools to control magnetism at the nanoscale is crucial for the development of new paradigms in optics, electronics and spintronics. So far, the fabrication of magnetic nanostructures has been achieved mainly through irreversible structural or chemical modifications. Here, we propose a new concept for creating reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns by crafting, at the nanoscale, the magnetic anisotropy landscape of a ferromagnetic layer exchange-coupled to an antiferromagnetic layer. By performing localized field cooling with the hot tip of a scanning probe microscope, magnetic structures, with arbitrarily oriented magnetization and tunable unidirectional anisotropy, are reversibly patterned without modifying the film chemistry and topography. This opens unforeseen possibilities for the development of novel metamaterials with finely tuned magnetic properties, such as reconfigurable magneto-plasmonic and magnonic crystals. In this context, we experimentally demonstrate spatially controlled spin wave excitation and propagation in magnetic structures patterned with the proposed method.

  19. Comparison of magnetic probe calibration at nano and millitesla magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Ryan A; Rovey, Joshua L; Pommerenke, David J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field probes are invaluable diagnostics for pulsed inductive plasma devices where field magnitudes on the order of tenths of tesla or larger are common. Typical methods of providing a broadband calibration of [Formula: see text] probes involve either a Helmholtz coil driven by a function generator or a network analyzer. Both calibration methods typically produce field magnitudes of tens of microtesla or less, at least three and as many as six orders of magnitude lower than their intended use. This calibration factor is then assumed constant regardless of magnetic field magnitude and the effects of experimental setup are ignored. This work quantifies the variation in calibration factor observed when calibrating magnetic field probes in low field magnitudes. Calibration of two [Formula: see text] probe designs as functions of frequency and field magnitude are presented. The first [Formula: see text] probe design is the most commonly used design and is constructed from two hand-wound inductors in a differential configuration. The second probe uses surface mounted inductors in a differential configuration with balanced shielding to further reduce common mode noise. Calibration factors are determined experimentally using an 80.4 mm radius Helmholtz coil in two separate configurations over a frequency range of 100-1000 kHz. A conventional low magnitude calibration using a vector network analyzer produced a field magnitude of 158 nT and yielded calibration factors of 15 663 ± 1.7% and 4920 ± 0.6% [Formula: see text] at 457 kHz for the surface mounted and hand-wound probes, respectively. A relevant magnitude calibration using a pulsed-power setup with field magnitudes of 8.7-354 mT yielded calibration factors of 14 615 ± 0.3% and 4507 ± 0.4% [Formula: see text] at 457 kHz for the surface mounted inductor and hand-wound probe, respectively. Low-magnitude calibration resulted in a larger calibration factor, with an average difference of 9.7% for the surface

  20. Comparison of magnetic probe calibration at nano and millitesla magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, Ryan A.; Rovey, Joshua L.; Pommerenke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field probes are invaluable diagnostics for pulsed inductive plasma devices where field magnitudes on the order of tenths of tesla or larger are common. Typical methods of providing a broadband calibration of dot{{B}} probes involve either a Helmholtz coil driven by a function generator or a network analyzer. Both calibration methods typically produce field magnitudes of tens of microtesla or less, at least three and as many as six orders of magnitude lower than their intended use. This calibration factor is then assumed constant regardless of magnetic field magnitude and the effects of experimental setup are ignored. This work quantifies the variation in calibration factor observed when calibrating magnetic field probes in low field magnitudes. Calibration of two dot{{B}} probe designs as functions of frequency and field magnitude are presented. The first dot{{B}} probe design is the most commonly used design and is constructed from two hand-wound inductors in a differential configuration. The second probe uses surface mounted inductors in a differential configuration with balanced shielding to further reduce common mode noise. Calibration factors are determined experimentally using an 80.4 mm radius Helmholtz coil in two separate configurations over a frequency range of 100-1000 kHz. A conventional low magnitude calibration using a vector network analyzer produced a field magnitude of 158 nT and yielded calibration factors of 15 663 ± 1.7% and 4920 ± 0.6% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted and hand-wound probes, respectively. A relevant magnitude calibration using a pulsed-power setup with field magnitudes of 8.7-354 mT yielded calibration factors of 14 615 ± 0.3% and 4507 ± 0.4% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted inductor and hand-wound probe, respectively. Low-magnitude calibration resulted in a larger calibration factor, with an average difference of 9.7% for the surface mounted probe and 12.0% for the hand-wound probe. The

  1. Matched dipole probe for precise electron density measurements in magnetized and non-magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    We present a plasma diagnostics method based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole placed in the plasma. This allows measuring the local electron density in the range from 1012-1015 m-3 with a magnetic field of at least 0-50 mT. The magnetic field strength is not directly influencing the data analysis and requires only that the dipole probe is oriented perpendicularly to the magnetic field. As a result, the magnetic field can be non-homogeneous or even non-defined within the probe length without any effect on the final tolerance of the measurements. The method can be applied to plasmas of relatively small dimensions (< 10 cm) and doesn't require any special boundary conditions. The high sensitivity of the impedance measurements is achieved by using a miniature matching system installed close to the probe tip, which also allows to suppress sheath resonance effects. We experimentally show here that the tolerance of the electron density measurements reaches values lower than 1%, both with and without the magnetic field. The method is successfully validated by both analytical modeling and experimental comparison with Langmuir probes. The validation experiments are conducted in a low pressure (1 mTorr) Ar discharge sustained in a 10 cm size plasma chamber with and without a transversal magnetic field of about 20 mT. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships within FP7 (NEPTUNE PIIF-GA-2012-326054).

  2. A modified Katsumata probe--Ion sensitive probe for measurement in non-magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Čada, M; Hubička, Z; Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Kment, Š; Adámek, J; Stöckel, J

    2015-07-01

    A modified Katsumata probe has been developed for measurement of ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) in technological non-magnetized plasmas. A simple construction of the modified Katsumata probe consists of adding a pair of permanent Sm-Co magnets in front of Katsumata probe. A comparative study regarding IVDF measurement in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system operating in pure argon atmosphere by means of developed modified Katsumata probe and commercially available gridded retarding field analyzer (RFA) has been carried out. A time-resolved measurement of IVDF for two different pressures whilst other plasma conditions have been kept unchanged has revealed that the main advantage of the modified Katsumata probe compared to the RFA consists in significantly smaller angular aperture of entrance orifice of modified Katsumata probe being approximately 15° in comparison with a commercial RFA having angular aperture more than 160°. It leads in much better velocity resolution in measured IVDF since the transversal part of velocity vector is much more suppressed compared to RFA. Furthermore, the modified Katsumata probe less suffers from collisions of ions in the space charge sheath in front or inside of the probe compared to the RFA.

  3. Magnetosheath magnetic field variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    A case study using simulations IRM and CCE observations demonstrates that transient magnetospheric events correspond to pressure pulses in the magnetosheath, inward bow shock motion, and magnetopause compression. Statistical surveys indicate that the magnetosheath magnetic field orientation rarely remains constant during periods of magnetopause and bow shock motion (both characterized by periods of 1 to 10 min). There is no tendency for bow shock motion to occur for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations.

  4. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  5. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  6. Characteristics of magnetic force microscopy magnetics on high moment perpendicular magnetic recording writers with high coercivity probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Li, Shaoping; Bai, Daniel; Wang, James; Li, Zhanjie; Han, Dehua; Pan, Tao; Mao, Sining

    2012-04-01

    High resolution magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging with high coercivity probes on perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) writers directly characterizes magnetic field contour for the writer main pole as well as its shields' magnetic state. Evolution of write bubble and return field was analyzed by MFM imaging in dynamic phase detection scheme. Different write field components and their out of plane second order derivatives were calculated via finite element modeling. The MFM imaged write field distribution correlates well with the PMR writer out of plane write field component. Magnetic responses of the PMR writer main pole, trailing and side shields are quantified. The trailing and side shields exhibit complicated magnetic saturation behaviors comparing with the PMR writer pole. The side shield's magnetic response is dependent upon its initial equilibrium state.

  7. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and measurement of the spatial variation of magnetic field components along a line near magnets. We describe the experimental tasks, various difficulties students have throughout, and ways this lab makes even their incorrect predictions better. We suggest that developing lab activities of this nature brings a new dimension to the ways students learn and interact with field concepts.

  8. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  9. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  10. The FIELDS experiment for Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, S.; Spp/Fields Team

    2010-12-01

    Many of our basic ideas on the plasma physics of acceleration, energy flow, and dissipation, and structure of the solar wind have never been rigorously confronted by direct experimental measurements in the region where these processes are actually occurring. Although Alfven waves, shocks, and magnetic reconnection are often invoked as heating mechanisms, there have never been any direct measurements of Alfvenic waves nor the associated Poynting flux nor any measurements of ion or electron kinetic energy flux in the region from 10 R_s to 30 R_s where the final stages of wind acceleration are believed to occur. The radial profiles of both slow and fast solar wind acceleration are based on remote-sensing measurements and have been obtained for only a few selected events. Thus, the spatial radial and perpendicular scales of the acceleration process have been averaged by line-of-sight effects and the possibility of intense localized acceleration cannot be ruled out. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission calls for the high quality fields and particles measurements required to solve the coronal heating and wind acceleration problem. The SPP 'FIELDS' experiment measures the electric and magnetic fields fundamental to the plasma physics of the structured and turbulent solar wind, flux ropes, collisionless shocks, and magnetic reconnection. FIELDS will make the first-ever measurements of the DC/Low-Frequency electric field inside of 1 AU allowing for in situ, high cadence measurements of the Poynting vector, the Elsasser variables, and E/B diagnostics of the wave spectrum to fce in the solar wind. SPP/FIELDS measures the radio wave (type III and II) signatures of microflares, energized electrons, and CME propagation. SPP/ FIELDS measures the plasma electron density to ~2% accuracy and the core electron temperature to ~5-10% accuracy more than 90% of the time at perihelion. FIELDS will also measure the in situ density fluctuation spectrum and structures at a very high cadence (

  11. Magnetic Probe Construction using Thick-film Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Sakakibara, S.; Kubota, Y.; and Yamada, H.

    2001-02-02

    Thick-film technology has been successfully adapted for the design and fabrication of magnetic probes of a new type suitable for use in the simultaneous ultra-high vacuum and high-temperature environment of a nuclear fusion device. The maximum usable temperature is expected to be around 900 degrees C. This new probe has a specific sensitivity (coupling area per unit volume) an order of magnitude higher than a conventional coil. The new probe in one implementation is capable of simultaneously measuring magnetic field in three orthogonal directions about a single spatial point and in two frequency ranges. Low-frequency coils have a measured coupling area of 296-323 cm squared and a frequency response of about 300 kHz. High-frequency coils have a design coupling area of 12-15 cm squared.

  12. Magnetic fields at uranus.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Behannon, K W; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1986-07-04

    The magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft revealed a strong planetary magnetic field of Uranus and an associated magnetosphere and fully developed bipolar masnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the solar wind supersonic flow was observed upstream at 23.7 Uranus radii (1 R(U) = 25,600 km) and the magnetopause boundary at 18.0 R(U), near the planet-sun line. A miaximum magnetic field of 413 nanotesla was observed at 4.19 R(U ), just before closest approach. Initial analyses reveal that the planetary magnetic field is well represented by that of a dipole offset from the center of the planet by 0.3 R(U). The angle between Uranus' angular momentum vector and the dipole moment vector has the surprisingly large value of 60 degrees. Thus, in an astrophysical context, the field of Uranus may be described as that of an oblique rotator. The dipole moment of 0.23 gauss R(3)(U), combined with the large spatial offset, leads to minimum and maximum magnetic fields on the surface of the planet of approximately 0.1 and 1.1 gauss, respectively. The rotation period of the magnetic field and hence that of the interior of the planet is estimated to be 17.29+/- 0.10 hours; the magnetotail rotates about the planet-sun line with the same period. Thelarge offset and tilt lead to auroral zones far from the planetary rotation axis poles. The rings and the moons are embedded deep within the magnetosphere, and, because of the large dipole tilt, they will have a profound and diurnally varying influence as absorbers of the trapped radiation belt particles.

  13. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsvolf, Marina; Marmet, Louis

    2011-12-15

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  14. Mercury's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury is the only inner solar system body other than Earth to possess an active core dynamo-driven magnetic field and the only planet with a small, highly dynamic magnetosphere. Measurements made by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have provided a wealth of data on Mercury's magnetic field environment. Mercury's weak magnetic field was discovered 40 years ago by the Mariner 10 spacecraft, but its large-scale geometry, strength and origin could not be definitively established. MESSENGER data have shown that the field is dynamo-generated and can be described as an offset axisymmetric dipole field (hereafter OAD): the magnetic equator lies ~0.2 RM (RM = 2440 km) north of the geographic equator and the dipole moment is 2.8 x1019 Am2 (~0.03% that of Earth's). The weak internal field and the high, but variable, solar wind ram pressure drive vigorous magnetospheric dynamics and result in an average distance from the planet center to the sub-solar magnetopause of only 1.42 RM. Magnetospheric models developed with MESSENGER data have allowed re-analysis of the Mariner 10 observations, establishing that there has been no measureable secular variation in the internal field over 40 years. Together with spatial power spectra for the OAD, this provides critical constraints for viable dynamo models. Time-varying magnetopause fields induce secondary core fields, the magnitudes of which confirm the core radius estimated from MESSENGER gravity and Earth-based radar data. After accounting for large-scale magnetospheric fields, residual signatures are dominated by additional external fields that are organized in the local time frame and that vary with magnetospheric activity. Birkeland currents have been identified, which likely close in the planetary interior at depths below the base of the crust. Near-periapsis magnetic field measurements at altitudes greater than 200 km have tantalizing hints of crustal fields, but crustal

  15. Magnetic fields from inflation?

    SciTech Connect

    Demozzi, Vittoria; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Rubinstein, Hector E-mail: viatcheslav.mukhanov@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2009-08-01

    We consider the possibility of generation of the primordial magnetic field on inflation and show that the effect of the back reaction of this field can be very important. Assuming that the back reaction does not spoil inflation we find a rather strong restriction on the amplitude of the primordial field which could be generated on inflation. Namely, this amplitude recalculated to the present epoch cannot exceed 10{sup −32}G in Mpc scales. This field seems to be too small to be amplified to the observable values by a possible dynamo mechanism.

  16. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  17. Observations of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, R.; Heiles, C.; Troland, T.

    This article describes how interstellar magnetic fields are detected, measured, and mapped, the results of such observations, and the role played by interstellar magnetic fields in the physics of the interstellar medium. A goal of the observations is the measurement of the morphology and strengths of the uniform (Bu) and random (Br) components of magnetic fields. Observational techniques probe either the component of B parallel to the line of sight (B_parallel) or in the plane of the sky (B_⊥). Tracers of B_parallel are Faraday rotation of the position angle of linearly polarized radiation and Zeeman splitting of spectral lines. Tracers of B_⊥ are the strength of synchrotron radiation and linear polarization of syn chrotron radiation and of emission or absorption from dust and spectral lines. Starlight polarization shows that on large spatial scales the Galactic magnetic field is not heavily tangled (B_u/B_r ≈ 0.7 - 1.0), that the field is generally parallel to the Galactic plane near the plane, that the local field points approximately along the local spiral arm (pitch angle 9.4(°) , center of curvature 7.8 kpc distant towards ℓ ≈ -15.4(°) ), and that off the Galactic plane there is considerable small-scale structure to the field. Galactic synchrotron emission shows magnetic spiral arms with a total strength B_t ≈ 6 #55G and B_u ≈ 4 #55G. Pulsar data show evidence for reversals of the field direction with Galactic radius and yield B_r ≈ 5 #55G and B_u ≈ 1.5 #55G; the morphology of the large-scale mean field is consistent with dynamo generation. H I Zeeman detections for diffuse clouds yield B_parallel char 126 5 - 20 #55G with many limits B_parallel #55G. A recent survey of Galactic H I in absorption against extragalactic sources confirms the result that the fields in diffuse clouds are often quite weak. The critical parameter for evaluating the importance of magnetic fields in star formation is the ratio of the mass to the magnetic flux, M

  18. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  19. Magnetic-field propagation across a weakly conducting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, F.T.; Fuentes, N.

    1986-06-01

    Magnetic-field propagation from a plasma to a probe through a partially ionized layer of low conductivity is studied. The model includes dispersive properties of the layer and a radiation condition in the probe wall dielectric. A mixed problem of initial and boundary conditions is solved by Laplace transform techniques. The results are applied to the discussion of magnetic probe reliability in plasma focus measurements. Attenuation of the magnetic field may be severe but the effect of finite diffusion time scales on the magnetic-field profile is negligible. Distortion of the signal may nevertheless arise due to changes of the attenuation with the time evolution of the layer.

  20. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Daniel; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  1. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  2. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  3. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  4. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Martin, Adam; Hawk, Clark W.; Fimognan, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and ejecting them at high velocity. A plasmoid is a plasma with an imbedded closed magnetic field structure. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids have been measured with of an array of magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes were constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes are wound on a square G10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x l0(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is the cross-sectional area. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven by a high-voltage pulser to measure NA, and by a signal generator to determine the probe's frequency response. The plasmoid electron number density n(sub e) electron temperature T(sub e), and velocity ratio v/c(sub m), (where v is the bulk plasma flow velocity and c(sub m), is the ion thermal speed) have also been measured with a quadruple Langmuir probe. The Langmuir probe tips are 10 mm long, 20-mil diameter stainless steel wire, housed in a 6-inch long 4-bore aluminum rod. Measurements on PTX with argon and hydrogen from the magnetic field probes and quadruple Langmuir probe will be presented in this paper.

  5. Magnetic probing of the solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic field patterns in the region beneath the solar photosphere is determined. An approximate method for downward extrapolation of line of sight magnetic field measurements taken at the solar photosphere was developed. It utilizes the mean field theory of electromagnetism in a form thought to be appropriate for the solar convection zone. A way to test that theory is proposed. The straightforward application of the lowest order theory with the complete model fit to these data does not indicate the existence of any reasonable depth at which flux conservation is achieved.

  6. The fast reciprocating magnetic probe system on the J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhuang, Ge; Liu, Hai; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The fast reciprocating magnetic probe (FRMP) system is newly developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) to measure the local magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge. The magnetic probe array in the FRMP consists of four 2-dimensional magnetic probes arranged at different radial locations to detect local poloidal and radial magnetic fields. These probes are protected by a graphite and boron nitride casing to improve the frequency response of each probe; they are mounted on the head of a movable rod, which is oriented along radial direction at the top of the torus. In the experiments, multiple core diagnostics show that the insertion of the FRMP has little impact on the equilibrium of the plasma. Local magnetic fluctuations inside the last closed flux surface are successfully measured by the FRMP.

  7. The fast reciprocating magnetic probe system on the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhuang, Ge; Liu, Hai; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The fast reciprocating magnetic probe (FRMP) system is newly developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) to measure the local magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge. The magnetic probe array in the FRMP consists of four 2-dimensional magnetic probes arranged at different radial locations to detect local poloidal and radial magnetic fields. These probes are protected by a graphite and boron nitride casing to improve the frequency response of each probe; they are mounted on the head of a movable rod, which is oriented along radial direction at the top of the torus. In the experiments, multiple core diagnostics show that the insertion of the FRMP has little impact on the equilibrium of the plasma. Local magnetic fluctuations inside the last closed flux surface are successfully measured by the FRMP.

  8. The Cosmic Large-Scale Structure in X-rays (CLASSIX) Cluster Survey. I. Probing galaxy cluster magnetic fields with line of sight rotation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Kronberg, Philipp P.

    2016-11-01

    To search for a signature of an intracluster magnetic field, we compare measurements of Faraday rotation of polarised extragalactic radio sources in the line of sight of galaxy clusters with those outside. To this end, we correlated a catalogue of 1383 rotation measures of extragalactic polarised radio sources with galaxy clusters from the CLASSIX survey (combining REFLEX II and NORAS II) detected by their X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The survey covers 8.25 ster of the sky at | bII | ≥ 20°. We compared the rotation measures in the line of sight of clusters within their projected radii of r500 with those outside and found a significant excess of the dispersion of the rotation measures in the cluster regions. Since the observed rotation measure is the result of Faraday rotation in several presumably uncorrelated magnetised cells of the intracluster medium, the observations correspond to quantities averaged over several magnetic field directions and strengths. Therefore the interesting quantity is the dispersion or standard deviation of the rotation measure for an ensemble of clusters. In the analysis of the observations we found a standard deviation of the rotation measure inside r500 of about 120 (± 21) rad m-2. This compares to about 56 (± 8) rad m-2 outside. Correcting for the effect of the Galaxy with the mean rotation measure in a region of 10 deg radius in the outskirts of the clusters does not change the outcome quoted above. We show that the most X-ray luminous and thus most massive clusters contribute most to the observed excess rotation measure. Modelling the electron density distribution in the intracluster medium with a self-similar model based on the REXCESS Survey, we found that the dispersion of the rotation measure increases with the column density, and we deduce a magnetic field value of about 2-6 (l/ 10 kpc)- 1/2μG assuming a constant magnetic field strength, where l is the size of the coherently magnetised intracluster medium

  9. Probing latitudinal variations of the solar magnetic field in cycles 21-23 by Parker's Two-Layer Dynamo Model with meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E.; Zharkova, V.; Zharkov, S.

    2013-11-01

    Principle component analysis (PCA) of the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) measured from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) magnetograms revealed the following principal components (PCs) in latitudes: two main symmetric components, which are the same for all cycles 21-23, and three pairs of asymmetric components, which are unique for each cycle. These SBMF variations are assumed to be those of poloidal magnetic field travelling slightly off-phase from pole to pole while crossing the equator. They are assumed to be caused by a joint action of dipole and quadruple magnetic sources in the Sun. In the current paper, we make the first attempt to interpret these latitudinal variations in the surface magnetic field with Parker's two-layer dynamo model. The latitudinal distributions of such waves are simulated for cycles 21-23 by the modified Parker's dynamo model taking into account both α and ω effects operating simultaneously in the two (upper and lower) layers of the solar convective zone (SCZ) and having opposite directions of meridional circulation. The simulations are carried out for both dipole and quadruple magnetic sources with the dynamo parameters specifically selected to provide the curves fitting closely the PCs derived from SBMF variations in cycles 21-23. The simulations are optimised for matching the positions of maximums in latitude, the number of equator crossings and the phase difference between the two dynamo waves operating in the two layers. The dominant pair of PCs present in each cycle is found to be fully asymmetric with respect to the magnetic poles and produced by a magnetic dipole. This pair is found to account for the two main dynamo waves operating between the two magnetic poles. There are also three further pairs of waves unique to each cycle and associated with multiple magnetic sources in the Sun. For the odd cycle 21 the simulated poloidal field fits the observed PCs, only if they are produced by magnetic sources with a quadruple

  10. Magnetic fields and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.

    1993-10-01

    This letter is a response to an article by Savitz and Kaune, EHP 101:76-80. W-L wire code was applied to data from a 1988 Denver study, and an association was reported between high W-L wire code and childhood cancer. This author discusses several studies and provides explanations which weakens the argument that classification error resulted in an appreciable reduction in the association between W-L high wire code and childhood cancer. In conclusion, the fact that new wire code is only weakly correlated with magnetic field measurements (in the same manner as the original W-L wire code) suggests that the newly reported stronger association with childhood cancer is likely due to factors other than magnetic fields. Differential residential mobility and differential residential age are two possible explanations and are suggestive that the reported association may be false.

  11. Magnetic field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, W. I.

    The fundamental principles of particle acceleration by magnetic reconnection in cosmic plasmas are reviewed. The history of reconnection models is traced, and consideration is given to the Kelvin-Helmholtz theorem, the frozen-field theorem, the application of the Kelvin-Helmholtz theorem to a collisionless plasma, solutions to specific reconnection problems, and configurational instability. Diagrams and graphs are provided, and the objections raised by critics of the reconnection theory and/or its astrophysical applications are discussed.

  12. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical ( GMO ) or Faraday...Squids are those based upon the giant magneto-optical ( GMO ) effect in ferrimagnetic materials or YIG garnets and the giant magneto-resistance (GMR...effect in manganese based compounds. The development of the GMO material was mostly motivated by the need for compact, in-line fiber optical

  13. Shimming of a Magnet for Calibration of NMR Probes for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielajew, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the anomalous magnetic moment aμ ≡ (g-2)/2 of the muon to the precision of 0.14 parts per million. This experimental value of aμ can then be compared to the similarly precise theoretical predictions of the Standard Model in order to test the completeness of the model. The value of aμ is extracted from muons precessing in a magnetic field. The magnetic field will be measured with a set of 400 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes, which have the ability to measure the field to a precision of tens of parts per billion. Before the Muon g-2 Experiment can take place, new NMR probes must be designed, built, and tested using a 1.45 Tesla test magnet at the University of Washington Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics (CENPA). In order to achieve a significant signal from NMR probes, the magnetic field in which the probes are immersed must be extremely uniform. The existing magnet at CENPA has an approximately linear gradient in magnetic field of about 1 Gauss per centimeter in the smoothest direction. A pair of adjacent square Helmholtz coils was designed and built to create a linear gradient in order to cancel the existing gradient. The length of the NMR signals improved with the implementation of the coils. The results of the addition of the coils to the magnet on the signals from the NMR probes will be presented.

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE GEOMETRY OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2010-08-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique for probing the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13(RM/1 rad m{sup -2}){sup 1/4}(B/1 G){sup 1/2} MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the 'super-adiabatic regime' in which the rotation measure (RM) is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing RMs at high frequencies with those in this new regime provides direct information about the geometry of the magnetic field along the line of sight. Furthermore, the frequency defining the transition to this new regime, {nu}{sub SA}, depends directly upon the local electron density and magnetic field strength where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight, allowing the unambiguous distinction between Faraday rotation within and in front of the emission region. Typical values of {nu}{sub SA} range from 10 kHz (below the ionospheric cutoff, but above the heliospheric cutoff) to 10 GHz, depending upon the details of the Faraday rotating environment. In particular, for resolved active galactic nuclei, including the black holes at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M81, {nu}{sub SA} ranges from roughly 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and thus can be probed via existing and up-coming ground-based radio observatories.

  15. Electric field tuning of magnetic properties in FeGa films on ferroelastic Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 thin films probed by ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luykx, Arun; Lofland, Samuel; Anbusathaiah, Varatharajan; Nagarajan, Valanoor; Kartawidjaja, Fransiska; Wang, John; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of fabricating electric field tunable thin film magnetic devices using a multiferroic transduction effect, we have patterned Fe0.7Ga0.3 (FeGa) films sputter-deposited on PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3 (PZT(30/70))/PbZr0.7Ti0.3O3 (PZT(70/30)) tetragonal/rhombohedral bilayers on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si wafers. Previous piezoforce microscopy studies have shown that the PZT bilayers exhibit presence of ferroelastic domains where the fraction of the local c/a domain ratio can be tuned by an applied electric field. The FeGa top layer was patterned into 20 μm x 20 μm capacitor devices in order to apply electric field to the multilayers, and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements at 9.2 GHz were performed. Typically, a relatively sharp FMR signal observed before application of the electric field would get substantially broadened after initial application of +4 kV/cm. Angular dependent FMR indicates that magnetic anisotropy in the FeGa is indeed affected by application of electric field.

  16. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  17. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  18. Design of a dual sensor probe array for internal field measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torusa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong-hun, Yang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; An, YoungHwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Jo, Jong Gab; Hwang, Y. S.

    2012-10-01

    A dual sensor probe array is designed and constructed for internal magnetic field measurement at Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at the Seoul National University. Simultaneous use of Hall sensors and chip inductors allows cross-calibration among the measurements and compensation for each other's weaknesses while their small sizes are expected to cause only mild plasma perturbations. Calibration of the dual sensor probe array, using a Helmholtz coil, shows good sensitivity for the magnetic field measurement of the VEST. Prior to Ohmic start-up, the magnetic field structure inside the vacuum chamber is measured by using the calibrated probe array. The dual sensor probe array is expected to be useful in analyzing the temporal magnetic field structure change during the magnetic reconnection and in reconstruction of the current profile during the discharge of the VEST device.

  19. Design of a dual sensor probe array for internal field measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus.

    PubMed

    Jeong-hun, Yang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; An, YoungHwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Jo, Jong Gab; Hwang, Y S

    2012-10-01

    A dual sensor probe array is designed and constructed for internal magnetic field measurement at Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at the Seoul National University. Simultaneous use of Hall sensors and chip inductors allows cross-calibration among the measurements and compensation for each other's weaknesses while their small sizes are expected to cause only mild plasma perturbations. Calibration of the dual sensor probe array, using a Helmholtz coil, shows good sensitivity for the magnetic field measurement of the VEST. Prior to Ohmic start-up, the magnetic field structure inside the vacuum chamber is measured by using the calibrated probe array. The dual sensor probe array is expected to be useful in analyzing the temporal magnetic field structure change during the magnetic reconnection and in reconstruction of the current profile during the discharge of the VEST device.

  20. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  1. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wave number k evolves, after inflation, according to the values of k ηe , nk , and Ωk , where ηe is the conformal time at the end of inflation, nk is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and Ωk is the phase difference between the two Bogoliubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that nk-1≪|k ηe|≪1 , and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: (i) |Ωk∓π |=O (1 ) , in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum Bk(η ) is adiabatic, a2Bk(η )=const , with a being the expansion parameter; (ii) |Ωk∓π |≪|k ηe| , in which case the evolution is superadiabatic, a2Bk(η )∝η ; (iii) |k ηe|≪|Ωk∓π |≪1 or |k ηe|˜|Ωk∓π |≪1 , in which case an early phase of adiabatic evolution is followed, after a time η⋆˜|Ωk∓π |/k , by a superadiabatic evolution. Once a given mode reenters the horizon, it remains frozen into the plasma and then evolves adiabatically till today. As a corollary of our results, we find that inflation-generated magnetic fields evolve adiabatically on all scales and for all times in conformal-invariant free Maxwell theory, while they evolve superadiabatically after inflation on superhorizon scales in the nonconformal-invariant Ratra model, where the inflaton is kinematically coupled to the electromagnetic field. The latter result supports and, somehow, clarifies our recent claim that the Ratra model can account for the presence of cosmic magnetic fields without suffering from both backreaction and strong-coupling problems.

  2. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  3. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Andre, M.; Bolton, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bowen, T. A.; Burgess, D.; Cattell, C. A.; Chandran, B. D. G.; Chaston, C. C.; Chen, C. H. K.; Choi, M. K.; Connerney, J. E.; Cranmer, S.; Farrell, W. M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Odom, J.; Oliverson, R.; Sheppard, D. A.; Szabo, A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  4. Scanning Hall probe microscopy of a diluted magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Seongsoo; Samarth, Nitin; Lozanne, Alex de

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the micromagnetic properties of a diluted magnetic semiconductor as a function of temperature and applied field with a scanning Hall probe microscope built in our laboratory. The design philosophy for this microscope and some details are described. The samples analyzed in this work are Ga{sub 0.94}Mn{sub 0.06}As films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the magnetic domains are 2-4 mum wide and fairly stable with temperature. Magnetic clusters are observed above T{sub C}, which we ascribe to MnAs defects too small and sparse to be detected by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

  5. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Spacecraft observations of steady and nonsteady reconnection at the magnetopause are reviewed. Computer simulations of three-dimensional reconnection in the geomagnetic tail are discussed. Theoretical aspects of the energization of particles in current sheets and of the microprocesses in the diffusion region are presented. Terrella experiments in which magnetospheric reconnection is simulated at both the magnetopause and in the tail are described. The possible role of reconnection in the evolution of solar magnetic fields and solar flares is discussed. A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulation of turbulent reconnection is examined. Results concerning reconnection in Tokamak devices are also presented.

  6. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  7. Hyperfine magnetic fields at the nuclei of probe 119Sn atoms and exchange interactions in the CaCu3Mn3.96Sn0.04O12 manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakov, V. S.; Presnyakov, I. A.; Sobolev, A. V.; Demazeau, G.; Gubaidulina, T. V.; Matsnev, M. E.; Gapochka, A. M.; Volkova, O. S.; Vasil'ev, A. N.

    2011-04-01

    We have investigated the hyperfine magnetic interactions between the nuclei of probe 119Sn atoms in the CaCu3Mn3.96Sn0.04O12 double manganite by Mössbauer spectroscopy using magnetic measurements. A consistent description of the results obtained in terms of the Weiss molecular field model by taking into account the peculiarities of the local environment of tin atoms has allowed the indirect Cu2+-O-Mn4+ ( J CuMn ≈ -51 ± 1 K) and Mn4+-O-Mn4+ ( J MnMn ≈ -0.6 ± 0.6 K) exchange interaction integrals to be estimated. Based on the Kanamori-Goodenough-Anderson model, we show that the magnitude and sign of the intrasublattice exchange integral J MnMn correspond to both the electronic configuration of the Mn4+ cations and the geometry of their local crystallographic environment in the compound under study.

  8. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  9. The Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Mathew J.; Forsyth, Robert J.

    2013-12-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) is the extension of the coronal magnetic field carried out into the solar system by the solar wind. It is the means by which the Sun interacts with planetary magnetospheres and channels charged particles propagating through the heliosphere. As the HMF remains rooted at the solar photosphere as the Sun rotates, the large-scale HMF traces out an Archimedean spiral. This pattern is distorted by the interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams, as well as the interplanetary manifestations of transient solar eruptions called coronal mass ejections. On the smaller scale, the HMF exhibits an array of waves, discontinuities, and turbulence, which give hints to the solar wind formation process. This review aims to summarise observations and theory of the small- and large-scale structure of the HMF. Solar-cycle and cycle-to-cycle evolution of the HMF is discussed in terms of recent spacecraft observations and pre-spaceage proxies for the HMF in geomagnetic and galactic cosmic ray records.

  10. Spin Polarized Electron Probes and Magnetic Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Mills

    2003-10-15

    OAK B188 This report summarizes progress to date in our theoretical research program, for the period from July 1, 2002 to November 1, 2003. In addition, our research priorities for the coming year are set forth. The reporting period has been a most exciting and significant one. For the past several years, one of our principal thrust areas has been development of the theory of spin dynamics in magnetic nanostructures with emphasis on the use of spin polarized electrons as probes of short wavelength spin dynamics in such entities. Our program stimulated the first experiment which detected large wave vector spin waves in ultrathin films in 1999 through spin polarized electron loss spectroscopy (SPEELS); the publication which announced this discovery was a joint publication between a group in Halle (Germany) with our theory effort. The continued collaboration has led to the design and implementation of the new SPEELS spectrometer and we now have in hand the first detailed measurements of spin wave dispersion in an ultrathin film. A second such spectrometer is now operational in the laboratory of Prof. H. Hopster, at UC Irvine. We are thus entering a most exciting new era in the spectroscopy of spin excitations in magnetic nanostructures. During the reporting period, we have completed very important new analyses which predict key aspects of the spectra which will be uncovered by these new instruments, and the calculations continue to be developed and to expand our understanding. In addition, we have initiated a new series of theoretical studies directed toward spin dynamics of single magnetic adatoms on metal surfaces, with STM based studies of this area n mind. In the near future, these studies will continue, and we will expand our effort into new areas of spin dynamics in magnetic nanostructures.

  11. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  12. Seismic probes of solar interior magnetic structure.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent; Tromp, Jeroen

    2012-09-07

    Sun spots are prominent manifestations of solar magnetoconvection, and imaging their subsurface structure is an outstanding problem of wide physical importance. Travel times of seismic waves that propagate through these structures are typically used as inputs to inversions. Despite the presence of strongly anisotropic magnetic waveguides, these measurements have always been interpreted in terms of changes to isotropic wave speeds and flow-advection-related Doppler shifts. Here, we employ partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization to determine the appropriate parametrization of the structural properties of the magnetic interior. Seven different wave speeds fully characterize helioseismic wave propagation: the isotropic sound speed, a Doppler-shifting flow-advection velocity, and an anisotropic magnetic velocity. The structure of magnetic media is sensed by magnetoacoustic slow and fast modes and Alfvén waves, each of which propagates at a different wave speed. We show that even in the case of weak magnetic fields, significant errors may be incurred if these anisotropies are not accounted for in inversions. Translation invariance is demonstrably lost. These developments render plausible the accurate seismic imaging of magnetoconvection in the Sun.

  13. Analysis and measurement of the 3D magnetic field in a rotating magnetic field driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2012-10-01

    A translatable three-axis probe was installed on TCSU shortly before its shutdown. The probe has 90 windings that simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Probe measurements are used to calculate the end-shorting torque and the rotating magnetic field (RMF) torque. The torque applied to the plasma is the RMF torque reduced by the shorting torque. An estimate of the plasma resistivity is made based on the steady state balance between the applied torque and the resistive torque. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Data from even- and odd-parity experiments will be presented. The NIMROD code has been adapted to simulate the TCSU experiment using boundary conditions adjusted to match both even- and odd-parity experimental conditions. A comparison of the n=0 components of the calculated fields to the 3-axis probe measurements shows agreement in the magnetic field structure of the FRC as well as in the jet region.

  14. High sensitivity piezomagnetic force microscopy for quantitative probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ma, Feiyue; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Yuanming; Proksch, Roger; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-07-07

    Accurate scanning probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale is essential for developing and characterizing magnetic nanostructures, yet quantitative analysis is difficult using the state of the art magnetic force microscopy, and has limited spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this communication, we develop a novel piezomagnetic force microscopy (PmFM) technique, with the imaging principle based on the detection of magnetostrictive response excited by an external magnetic field. In combination with the dual AC resonance tracking (DART) technique, the contact stiffness and energy dissipation of the samples can be simultaneously mapped along with the PmFM phase and amplitude, enabling quantitative probing of magnetic materials and structures at the nanoscale with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PmFM has been applied to probe magnetic soft discs and cobalt ferrite thin films, demonstrating it as a powerful tool for a wide range of magnetic materials.

  15. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  16. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  17. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  18. Evolution of twisted magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, E.G.; Boozer, A.H.

    1985-02-01

    The magnetic field of the solar corona evolves quasistatically in response to slowly changing photospheric boundary conditions. The magnetic topology is preserved by the low resistivity of the solar atmosphere. We show that a magnetic flux coordinate system simplifies the problem of calculating field evolution with invariant topology. As an example, we calculate the equilibrium of a thin magnetic flux tube with small twist per unit length.

  19. Ultrafast precessional magnetization reversal by picosecond magnetic field pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrits, Th.; van den Berg, H. A. M.; Hohlfeld, J.; Bär, L.; Rasing, Th.

    2002-08-01

    Since the invention of the first magnetic memory disk in 1954, much effort has been put into enhancing the speed, bit density and reliability of magnetic memory devices. In the case of magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices, fast coherent magnetization rotation by precession of the entire memory cell is desired, because reversal by domain-wall motion is much too slow. In principle, the fundamental limit of the switching speed via precession is given by half of the precession period. However, under-critically damped systems exhibit severe ringing and simulations show that, as a consequence, undesired back-switching of magnetic elements of an MRAM can easily be initiated by subsequent write pulses, threatening data integrity. We present a method to reverse the magnetization in under-critically damped systems by coherent rotation of the magnetization while avoiding any ringing. This is achieved by applying specifically shaped magnetic field pulses that match the intrinsic properties of the magnetic elements. We demonstrate, by probing all three magnetization components, that reliable precessional reversal in lithographically structured micrometre-sized elliptical permalloy elements is possible at switching times of about 200ps, which is ten times faster than the natural damping time constant.

  20. Determination of hyperfine fields orientation in nuclear probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, K.; Olszewski, W.; Satuła, D.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Kalska-Szostko, B.

    2017-02-01

    One of the most popular nuclear probes, 57Fe is used for the investigation of orientations of hyperfine fields and also for the determination of other important properties. In particular, the orientation of iron magnetic moments can be unambiguously determined, including its signs. Experiments with polarized radiation are presented with regard to selected systems. Orientation of electric field gradient is used for acquiring information about the shape of the texture-free spectra. Applications on the analysis of iron-based superconductors are presented.

  1. Determination of hyperfine fields orientation in nuclear probe techniques.

    PubMed

    Szymański, K; Olszewski, W; Satuła, D; Gawryluk, D J; Krzton-Maziopa, A; Kalska-Szostko, B

    2017-02-15

    One of the most popular nuclear probes, (57)Fe is used for the investigation of orientations of hyperfine fields and also for the determination of other important properties. In particular, the orientation of iron magnetic moments can be unambiguously determined, including its signs. Experiments with polarized radiation are presented with regard to selected systems. Orientation of electric field gradient is used for acquiring information about the shape of the texture-free spectra. Applications on the analysis of iron-based superconductors are presented.

  2. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  3. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [astronomical models of interplanetary magnetics and the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review is presented of theoretical models of the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic fields. Observations of interplanetary magnetic fields by the IMP and OSO spacecraft are discussed. The causes for cosmic ray variations (Forbush decreases) by the solar wind are examined. The model of Parker is emphasized. This model shows the three dimensional magnetic field lines of the solar wind to have the form of spirals wrapped on cones. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would allow the testing and verification of the various theoretical models examined. Diagrams of the various models are shown.

  4. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  5. Probing the Innermost Regions of AGN Jets and Their Magnetic Fields with RadioAstron. I. Imaging BL Lacertae at 21 Microarcsecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, José L.; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Bruni, Gabriele; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Bach, Uwe; Sokolovsky, Kirill V.; Anderson, James M.; Galindo, Pablo; Kardashev, Nikolay S.; Lisakov, Mikhail M.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first polarimetric space very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) imaging observations at 22 GHz. BL Lacertae was observed in 2013 November 10 with the RadioAstron space VLBI mission, including a ground array of 15 radio telescopes. The instrumental polarization of the space radio telescope is found to be less than 9%, demonstrating the polarimetric imaging capabilities of RadioAstron at 22 GHz. Ground-space fringes were obtained up to a projected baseline distance of 7.9 Earth diameters in length, allowing us to image the jet in BL Lacertae with a maximum angular resolution of 21 μas, the highest achieved to date. We find evidence for emission upstream of the radio core, which may correspond to a recollimation shock at about 40 μas from the jet apex, in a pattern that includes other recollimation shocks at approximately 100 and 250 μas from the jet apex. Polarized emission is detected in two components within the innermost 0.5 mas from the core, as well as in some knots 3 mas downstream. Faraday rotation analysis, obtained from combining RadioAstron 22 GHz and ground-based 15 and 43 GHz images, shows a gradient in rotation measure and Faraday-corrected polarization vector as a function of position angle with respect to the core, suggesting that the jet in BL Lacertae is threaded by a helical magnetic field. The intrinsic de-boosted brightness temperature in the unresolved core exceeds 3× {10}12 K, suggesting, at the very least, departure from equipartition of energy between the magnetic field and radiating particles.

  6. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D.; Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A.; Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J.

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ∥} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I∝r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ∥sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  7. Suppression of probe background signals via B1 field inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jian; Reimer, Jeffrey

    2011-01-27

    A new approach combining a long pulse with the DEPTH sequence (Cory and Ritchey, Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 1988) greatly improves the efficiency for suppressing probe background signals arising from spinning modules. By applying a long initial excitation pulse in the DEPTH sequence, instead of a {pi}/2 pulse, the inhomogeneous B{sub 1} fields outside the coil can dephase the background coherence in the nutation frame. The initial long pulse and the following two consecutive EXORCYCLE {pi} pulses function complementarily and prove most effective in removing background signals from both strong and weak B{sub 1} fields. Experimentally, the length of the long pulse can be optimized around odd multiples of the {pi}/2 pulse, depending on the individual probe design, to preserve signals inside the coil while minimizing those from probe hardware. This method extends the applicability of the DEPTH sequence to probes with small differences in B{sub 1} field strength between the inside and outside of the coil, and can readily combine with well-developed double resonance experiments for quantitative measurement. In general, spin systems with weak internal interactions are required to attain efficient and uniform excitation for powder samples, and the principles to determine the applicability are discussed qualitatively in terms of the relative strength of spin interactions, r.f. power and spinning rate.

  8. INTRINSIC BISPECTRA OF COSMIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Iain A.

    2011-06-01

    Forthcoming data sets from the Planck experiment and others are in a position to probe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) non-Gaussianity with higher accuracy than has yet been possible, and potentially open a new window into the physics of the very early universe. However, a signal need not necessarily be inflationary in origin, and possible contaminants should be examined in detail. One such is provided by early universe magnetic fields, which can be produced by a variety of models including during an inflationary phase, at phase transitions, or seeded by cosmic defects. Should such fields have been extant in the early universe, they would provide a natural source of CMB non-Gaussianity. Knowledge of the CMB angular bispectrum requires the complete Fourier-space (or 'intrinsic') bispectrum. In this paper, I consider in detail the intrinsic bispectra of an early-universe magnetic field for a range of power-law magnetic spectra.

  9. Modeling and Measurements by Hall probes of Magnetic Structures of Undulators HU256

    SciTech Connect

    Batrakov, A.; Churkin, I.; Ilyin, I.; Steshov, A.; Vobly, P.; Briquez, F.; Chubar, O.; Dael, A.; Roux, G.; Valleau, M.

    2007-01-19

    The magnetic calculations of the individual dipoles and dipoles in 'undulator environment' were executed by means of Mermaid 3D Code and these results were confirmed by magnetic measurements of the individual dipoles and the assembled undulators. The magnetic parameters of all dipoles were estimated on basis of the mechanical measurement of the dipole characteristics (pole gap, yoke width, coil position) and the main dependences obtained from magnetic calculations and measurements. These parameters were used for optimal placing of the dipoles in undulators (sorting). The special Hall probe system was designed and manufactured for magnetic measurements of the undulators. It allowed us to observe the inner structure of the magnetic fields. At a magnetic field measurement accuracy of {+-} 15 {mu}T the accuracy of the 1st integral calculated on the basis of the measured magnetic fields is {approx} 50 {mu}Tm. All three undulators were magnetically measured at BINP and are being re-measured at Soleil after transportation.

  10. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  11. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  12. Double-tuned single coil probe for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    A double-tuned single coil probe for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved sensitivity is described comprising a double-tuned circuit means in which the low frequency irradiation is fed to a transmission line through an inductor means. The double-tuned circuit means of the invention may be remotely disposed from the magnetic field which results in greater sensitivity.

  13. Frequency modulation technique for wide-field imaging of magnetic field with nitrogen-vacancy ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yukihiro; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro

    2017-04-01

    We report on the application of a frequency modulation technique to wide-field magnetic field imaging of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond at room temperature. We use a scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera to collect photoluminescence images from a large number of nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles in parallel. This technique allows a significant reduction in the measurement time required to obtain a magnetic field image compared with a scanning probe approach at a comparable magnetic field sensitivity.

  14. Evidence for the Reversal of Magnetic Field Polarity in Coronal Streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Faraday rotation observations are unique amongst radio occultation measurements in that they respond to magnetic field in addition to electron density, making it possible to probe the coronal magnetic field.

  15. Solar energetic particles as probes of the structures of magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1990-01-01

    Two possible closed magnetic topologies are considered for clouds: an elongated bottle with field lines rooted at both ends in the sun and a magnetic bubble or plasmoid consisting of closed field lines. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are used as probes of the cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to clouds in many events indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun.

  16. Magnetic Classification of Meteorites and Asteroid Probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Sagnotti, L.; Chevrier, V.; Consolmagno, G.; Denise, M.; Folco, L.; Osete, M.; Pesonen, L.

    intrinsic magnetic field the only way to measure X is to use a lander able to apply a small coil on the surface to mea- sure. Existing pocket susceptometer with a 25 mm radius loop and penetration depth of 30 mm are easily adaptable to such a purpose with a payload of less than 50 g (not counting the mobile arm). Such a petrophysical tool would have the advantage of its penetration depth with respect to all other chemical and mineralogical analysers that obtain essentially surface information prone to bias by space weathering. It should allow to attribute the asteroid to a meteorite class.

  17. Utility of a baffle probe for measurements in a magnetized plasma^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Vladimir; Finnegan, Sean; Koepke, Mark; Reynolds, Eric

    2003-10-01

    A probe for measurements of space potential and its oscillations in magnetized plasmas is tested. The probe consists of a tungsten wire tip, situated perpendicular to the magnetic field, and is partially shielded by ceramic baffles. The probe works under the condition that electron Larmor radius is much smaller than the probe radius, and the ion Larmor radius is comparable to or larger than the probe radius. By rotating the baffle configuration around the probe tip, the ratio between electron and ion probe current can be adjusted. The probe uses the same principle as Katsumata probe, but has the advantage of convenient controllability of the ratio between electron and ion current. Experiments have been conducted in a fully ionized, barium plasma in the WVUniversity Q-machine. By rotating of the probe it is possible to make electron and ion contributions to the floating probe's collected current comparable within a fraction of T_e/e of the dc space potential. Measurements of ac probe potentials allow us to distinguish income of oscillations from space potentials and electron temperature fluctuations. ^*This research supported by NSF

  18. The Capacitive Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatkov, D. O.; Yurchenko, A. V.; Balashov, V. B.; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of sensitive element magnetic field sensor are represented in this paper. The sensor is based on the change of the capacitance with an active dielectric (ferrofluid) due to the magnitude of magnetic field. To prepare the ferrofluid magnetic particles are used, which have a followingdispersion equal to 50 < Ø < 56, 45 < Ø < 50, 40 < Ø < 45 and Ø < 40micron of nanocrystalline alloy of brand 5BDSR. The dependence of the sensitivity of the capacitive element from the ferrofluid with different dispersion of magnetic particles is considered. The threshold of sensitivity and sensitivity of a measuring cell with ferrofluid by a magnetic field was determined. The experimental graphs of capacitance change of the magnitude of magnetic field are presented.

  19. Solar Polarimetry - from Turbulent Magnetic Fields to Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Polarimetric measurements are essential to investigate the solar magnetic field. Scattering polarization and the Hanle effect allow us to probe the turbulent magnetic field and the still open questions of its strength and variability. Directed magnetic fields can be detected via the Zeeman effect. To derive their orientation and strength, so-called inversion codes are used, which iteratively modify a model atmosphere and calculate the resulting polarization profiles that are then compared to the observations. While photospheric polarimetry is well-established, chromospheric polarimetry is still in its infancy, especially because it requires a treatment in non-LTE, making it a complex non-linear problem. But some of the most important open questions concern the strength and geometry of the chromospheric magnetic field. In this talk, I will review different polarimetric analysis techniques and recent advances in magnetic field measurements going from the small scales of turbulent magnetic fields to changes of magnetic fields in an active region during flares.

  20. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Parametric study of a pin-plane probe in moderately magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binwal, S.; Gandhi, S.; Kabariya, H.; Karkari, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    The application of a planar Langmuir probe in magnetized plasma is found to be problematic due to significant perturbation of plasma along the magnetic field lines intercepting the probe surface. This causes the Ampere-Volts ‘I e(U)’ characteristics of the probe to deviate from its usual exponential law; in conjunction the electron saturation current I es is significantly reduced. Moreover estimating the electron temperature T e by considering the entire semi-log plot of I e(U) gives ambiguous values of T e. To address this problem, Pitts and Stangeby developed a formula for the reduction factor for I es. This formula depends on a number of uncertain parameters, namely; the ion temperature T +, electron cross-field diffusion coefficient {{D}\\bot ,\\text{e}} and the local potential hill V h estimated by applying a floating pin probe in the vicinity of the planar probe. Due to implicit dependence of these parameters on T e, the resulting analysis is not straightforward. This paper presents a parametric study of different parameters that influence the characteristics of a planar probe in magnetized plasma. For this purpose a pin-plane probe is constructed and applied in the magnetized plasma column. A comprehensive discussion is presented that highlights the practical methodology of using this technique for extracting useful information of plasma parameters in magnetized plasmas.

  2. On-tip sub-micrometer Hall probes for magnetic microscopy prepared by AFM lithography.

    PubMed

    Gregusová, D; Martaus, J; Fedor, J; Kúdela, R; Kostic, I; Cambel, V

    2009-07-01

    We developed a technology of sub-micrometer Hall probes for future application in scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). First, the Hall probes of approximately 9-mum dimensions are prepared on the top of high-aspect-ratio GaAs pyramids with an InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs active layer using wet-chemical etching and non-planar lithography. Then we show that the active area of planar Hall probes can be downsized to sub-micrometer dimensions by local anodic oxidation technique using an atomic force microscope. Such planar probes are tested and their noise and magnetic field sensitivity are evaluated. Finally, the two technologies are combined to fabricate sub-micrometer Hall probes on the top of high-aspect ratio mesa for future SHPM and MFM techniques.

  3. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  4. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  5. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  6. Anisotropic magnetic particles in a magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Martchenko, Ilya; Mihut, Adriana M.; Bialik, Erik; Hirt, Ann M.; Rufier, Chantal; Menzel, Andreas; Dietsch, Hervé; Linse, Per

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the structural properties of magnetic ellipsoidal hematite colloids with an aspect ratio ρ ≈ 2.3 using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering and computer simulations. The evolution of the phase diagram with packing fraction φ and the strength of an applied magnetic field B is described, and the coupling between orientational order of magnetic ellipsoids and the bulk magnetic behavior of their suspension addressed. We establish quantitative structural criteria for the different phase and arrest transitions and map distinct isotropic, polarized non-nematic, and nematic phases over an extended range in the φ–B coordinates. We show that upon a rotational arrest of the ellipsoids around φ = 0.59, the bulk magnetic behavior of their suspension switches from superparamagnetic to ordered weakly ferromagnetic. If densely packed and arrested, these magnetic particles thus provide persisting remanent magnetization of the suspension. By exploring structural and magnetic properties together, we extend the often used colloid-atom analogy to the case of magnetic spins. PMID:27722439

  7. THE OUTER MAGNETIC FIELD OF L183

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Dan P.

    2012-03-20

    The L183 (= L134N) dark molecular cloud has been probed using deep near-infrared imaging polarimetry of stars to beyond 14 mag in H band (1.6 {mu}m), using the Mimir instrument on the 1.83 m Perkins Telescope. Nearly 400 arcmin{sup 2} were surveyed, including the dense core in L183, as seen in WISE Band 3 (12 {mu}m) extinction, and the near surroundings, revealing 35 stars with either detected polarizations or significant upper limits. Stars with detected polarizations are reddened if closer than 8 arcmin (0.25 pc at the 110 pc cloud distance) and unreddened beyond. The polarimetric sample probes as close to the core as 3 arcmin (0.1 pc), where A{sub V} {approx} 14 mag. Compared to the relatively unextincted surrounding stars, the reddened stars show no increase in polarization with extinction, suggesting that all of the polarization is induced in the outer layers of the cloud. This 0.25 pc radius envelope magnetic field does show a strong interaction with the L183 dark cloud. The envelope field is also virtually perpendicular, on the plane of the sky, to the field seen at 850 {mu}m, though more closely aligned with the rotation axis of the dense gas core. The physical size scale at which the envelope and the core magnetic fields either decouple from each other or strongly modify their directions must be inside the 0.1 pc region probed here.

  8. The Magnetic Field in Tapia's Globule 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Carretti, Ettore; Bhat, Ramesh; Robishaw, Timothy; Crutcher, Richard; Vaillancourt, John

    2014-04-01

    We propose to measure the magnetic field in the Southern Coalsack using the Zeeman effect in OH at 1665 and 1667 MHz. This is motivated by (1) the measurement of a large magnetic field (B~90 uG) in the Coalsack region from optical and near infrared polarimetry and (2) a very low magnetic field (B~1 uG) measured ~30' from the cloud edge using pulsar Faraday rotation measurements. While the derived field strength in the cloud is significantly larger than usually seen in the interstellar medium, the existence of an X-ray emitting envelope around the cloud that contains significant amounts of O VI ions puts the magnetic pressure at approximate equipartition with the thermal pressure of such gas. A chain of observational results indicate that the Coalsack might be a unique, nearby example of externally triggered star formation. This chain starts with the passage of the Upper Centaurus-Lupus super bubble over the cloud, eventually causing triggered star formation. Probing the high magnetic field strength and providing accurate constraints for the interpretation of the observations of the cloud is therefore of great importance for testing this hypothesis.

  9. The Magnetic Field in Tapia's Globule 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Carretti, Ettore; Bhat, Ramesh; Crutcher, Richard; Vaillancourt, John

    2011-10-01

    We propose to measure the magnetic field in the Southern Coalsack using the Zeeman effect in OH at 1665 and 1667 MHz. This is motivated by (1) the measurement of a large magnetic field (B~90 uG) in the Coalsack region from optical and near infrared polarimetry and (2) a very low magnetic field (B~1 uG) measured ~30' from the cloud edge using pulsar Faraday rotation measurements. While the derived field strength in the cloud is significantly larger than usually seen in the interstellar medium, the existence of an X-ray emitting envelope around the cloud that contains significant amounts of O VI ions puts the magnetic pressure at approximate equipartition with the thermal pressure of such gas. A chain of observational results indicate that the Coalsack might be a unique, nearby example of externally triggered star formation. This chain starts with the passage of the Upper Centaurus-Lupus super bubble over the cloud, eventually causing triggered star formation. Probing the high magnetic field strength and providing accurate constraints for the interpretation of the observations of the cloud is therefore of great importance for testing this hypothesis.

  10. The Magnetic Field in Tapia's Globule 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Bhat, Ramesh; Crutcher, Richard; Vaillancourt, John

    2011-04-01

    We propose to measure the magnetic field in the Southern Coalsack using the Zeeman effect in OH at 1665 and 1667 MHz. This is motivated by (1) the measurement of a large magnetic field (B~90 uG) in the Coalsack region from optical and near infrared polarimetry and (2) a very low magnetic field (B~1 uG) measured ~30' from the cloud edge using pulsar Faraday rotation measurements. While the derived field strength in the cloud is significantly larger than usually seen in the interstellar medium, the existence of an X-ray emitting envelope around the cloud that contains significant amounts of O VI ions puts the magnetic pressure at approximate equipartition with the thermal pressure of such gas. A chain of observational results indicate that the Coalsack might be a unique, nearby example of externally triggered star formation. This chain starts with the passage of the Upper Centaurus-Lupus super bubble over the cloud, eventually causing triggered star formation. Probing the high magnetic field strength and providing accurate constraints for the interpretation of the observations of the cloud is therefore of great importance for testing this hypothesis.

  11. Magnetic field effect on spoke behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnilica, Jaroslav; Slapanska, Marta; Klein, Peter; Vasina, Petr

    2016-09-01

    The investigations of the non-reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using high-speed camera imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and electrical probes showed that plasma is not homogeneously distributed over the target surface, but it is concentrated in regions of higher local plasma density called spokes rotating above the erosion racetrack. Magnetic field effect on spoke behaviour was studied by high-speed camera imaging in HiPIMS discharge using 3 inch titanium target. An employed camera enabled us to record two successive images in the same pulse with time delay of 3 μs between them, which allowed us to determine the number of spokes, spoke rotation velocity and spoke rotation frequency. The experimental conditions covered pressure range from 0.15 to 5 Pa, discharge current up to 350 A and magnetic fields of 37, 72 and 91 mT. Increase of the magnetic field influenced the number of spokes observed at the same pressure and at the same discharge current. Moreover, the investigation revealed different characteristic spoke shapes depending on the magnetic field strength - both diffusive and triangular shapes were observed for the same target material. The spoke rotation velocity was independent on the magnetic field strength. This research has been financially supported by the Czech Science Foundation in frame of the project 15-00863S.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of nanoscale electric and magnetic optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Feber, B.; Rotenberg, N.; Beggs, D. M.; Kuipers, L.

    2014-01-01

    Control of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale has advanced fields such as quantum optics, photovoltaics and telecommunications. These advances are driven by an improved understanding of the nanoscale behaviour of light, enabled by direct observations of the local electric fields near photonic nanostructures. With the advent of metamaterials that respond to the magnetic component of light, schemes have been developed to measure the nanoscale magnetic field. However, these structures interact not only with the magnetic field, but also with the electric field of light. Here, we demonstrate the essential simultaneous detection of both electric and magnetic fields with subwavelength resolution. By explaining our measurements through reciprocal considerations, we create a route towards designing probes sensitive to specific desired combinations of electric and magnetic field components. Simultaneous access to nanoscale electric and magnetic fields will pave the way for new designs of optical nanostructures and metamaterials.

  13. ANOMALOUS COSMIC RAYS AS PROBES OF MAGNETIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Reames, D. V.; Kahler, S. W.; Tylka, A. J.

    2009-08-01

    We report, for the first time, the observation near the Earth of anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) particles throughout the interiors of interplanetary magnetic clouds (MCs) at the same intensity as outside the MCs. ACRs, accelerated in the outer heliosphere, have unique elemental abundances making their identity unambiguous as they probe these clouds from the outside. Thus, MCs, carried out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), are seen to contain no structures that are magnetically closed to the penetration of ions with energies above a few MeV amu{sup -1}. As the MCs expand outward, they must fill their increasing volume with ACRs dynamically, to the same degree as neighboring 'open' field lines. These observations cast doubt on conventional ideas about the closed field topologies of MCs and the cross-field transport of energetic particles. The ACR observations conflict with some reports of significant exclusion from MCs of solar energetic particles (SEPs) of comparable energy and rigidity. A process that allows cross-field transport of ACRs may also allow similar transport of SEPs late in events, causing the large spatial extent and uniformity of SEPs in 'invariant spectral regions' extending far behind CME-driven shock waves.

  14. Magnetic field synthesis for microwave magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1982-04-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group of the M.I.T. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science undertook a two-year research program directed at developing synthesis procedures that allow magnetostatic and/or magnetoelastic modes to be specially tailored for microwave signal processing applications that include magnetically tunable filters and limiters as well as delay lines that are either linearly dispersive or nondispersive over prescribed bandwidths. Special emphasis was given to devices employing thin films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) that are blessed with spatially nonuniform dc magnetic fields.

  15. Atomic scale structure of amorphous aluminum oxyhydroxide, oxide and oxycarbide films probed by very high field (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L; Sarou-Kanian, V; Florian, P; Gleizes, A N; Massiot, D; Vahlas, C

    2017-03-15

    The atomic scale structure of aluminum in amorphous alumina films processed by direct liquid injection chemical vapor deposition from aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) and dimethyl isopropoxide (DMAI) is investigated by solid-state (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) using a very high magnetic field of 20.0 T. This study is performed as a function of the deposition temperature in the range 300-560 °C, 150-450 °C, and 500-700 °C, for the films processed from ATI, DMAI (+H2O), and DMAI (+O2), respectively. While the majority of the films are composed of stoichiometric aluminum oxide, other samples are partially or fully hydroxylated at low temperature, or contain carbidic carbon when processed from DMAI above 500 °C. The quantitative analysis of the SSNMR experiments reveals that the local structure of these films is built from AlO4, AlO5, AlO6 and Al(O,C)4 units with minor proportions of the 6-fold aluminum coordination and significant amounts of oxycarbides in the films processed from DMAI (+O2). The aluminum coordination distribution as well as the chemical shift distribution indicate that the films processed from DMAI present a higher degree of structural disorder compared to the films processed from ATI. Hydroxylation leads to an increase of the 6-fold coordination resulting from the trend of OH groups to integrate into AlO6 units. The evidence of an additional environment in films processed from DMAI (+O2) by (27)Al SSNMR and first-principle NMR calculations on Al4C3 and Al4O4C crystal structures supports that carbon is located in Al(O,C)4 units. The concentration of this coordination environment strongly increases with increasing process temperature from 600 to 700 °C favoring a highly disordered structure and preventing from crystallizing into γ-alumina. The obtained results are a valuable guide to the selection of process conditions for the CVD of amorphous alumina films with regard to targeted applications.

  16. Measurements of Electric Field Fluctuations Using a Capacitive Probe on the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; McCollam, K. J.; Triana, J. C.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental measurements and extended MHD computation reveal that both flow and current density fluctuations are important for the magnetic relaxation of RFP plasmas via tearing fluctuations. Motivated by these results, we have developed a multi-electrode capacitive probe for radial profile measurements of the electrostatic potential deep in the plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac plasma potential via electrodes insulated from the plasma using an annular boron nitride dielectric (also the particle shield), provided the secondary emission is sufficiently large (Te>20 eV). The probe has ten sets of four capacitors with 1.5 cm radial separation. At each radius, four capacitors are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid. This probe has been inserted up to 15 cm from the wall in 200 kA deuterium plasmas. The fluctuation amplitudes increase during the sawtooth crash and the power spectrum broadens (similar to the behavior of magnetic field fluctuations). The frequency bandwidth allows measurements of the radial coherence and phase of the fluctuations associated with rotating tearing modes up to the Alfvénic range. A next-step goal is measurement of the total dynamo emf, ~ < E ~ . B ~ > /B0 , to complement ongoing measurements of the Hall dynamo emf, < J ~ × B ~ > / ne , using a deep-insertion magnetic probe. M. Tan is supported by ITER-China Program. Work is supported by US DOE.

  17. Application of a portable nuclear magnetic resonance surface probe to porous media.

    PubMed

    Marko, Andriy; Wolter, Bernd; Arnold, Walter

    2007-03-01

    A portable nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface probe was used to determine the time-dependent self-diffusion coefficient D(t) of water molecules in two fluid-filled porous media. The measuring equipment and the inhomogeneous magnetic fields in the sensitive volume of the probe are described. It is discussed how to evaluate D(t) using a surface probe from the primary and stimulated echoes generated in three-pulse experiments. Furthermore, the evaluation of D(t) allows one to determine the geometrical structure of porous materials.

  18. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Fimognari, Peter; Hawk, Clark W.; Lee, Mike; Martin, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and subsequently ejecting them at high velocity. An overview of PTX is described in a companion paper. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids will be measured with of an array of inductive magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes (for a total of twelve probes) have been constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven alternately by a high-voltage pulser or a signal generator. The probes are wound on a G-10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x 10(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is cross-sectional area. The frequency response of the probes was measured over the range from 1 kHz to 10 MHZ. The electron number density n(sub e), electron temperature T(sub e) and velocity v will be determined from measurements taken with a quadruple Langmuir probe, situated in the exhaust chamber. Three of the four probes on the quadruple probe sample the current-voltage characteristic, and from this yield measurements of T(sub e) and n(sub e). The fourth probe provides a measurement of plasma flow velocity. A 6-inch long alumina rod, hollowed with four holes to house the probe wires, is being used to construct the quadruple probe. A variety of propellants will be used, including hydrogen, nitrogen and argon. From the measurements of the plasmoid mass, density, temperature, and velocity, the basic propulsion characteristics of PTX will be evaluated.

  19. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  20. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  1. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  2. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  3. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  4. Preface: Cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in observations and modeling have opened new perspectives for the understanding of fundamental dynamical processes of cosmic magnetism, and associated magnetic activity on the Sun, stars and galaxies. The goal of the Special Issue is to discuss the progress in solar physics and astrophysics, similarities and differences in phenomenology and physics of magnetic phenomena on the Sun and other stars. Space observatories, ground-based telescopes, and new observational methods have provided tremendous amount of data that need to be analyzed and understood. The solar observations discovered multi-scale organization of solar activity, dramatically changing current paradigms of solar variability. On the other side, stellar observations discovered new regimes of dynamics and magnetism that are different from the corresponding solar phenomena, but described by the same physics. Stars represent an astrophysical laboratory for studying the dynamical, magnetic and radiation processes across a broad range of stellar masses and ages. These studies allow us to look at the origin and evolution of our Sun, whereas detailed investigations of the solar magnetism give us a fundamental basis for interpretation and understanding of unresolved stellar data.

  5. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  6. Magnetic fields from phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Everett, Allen

    1998-11-01

    The generation of primordial magnetic fields from cosmological phase transitions is discussed, paying particular attention to the electroweak transition and to the various definitions of the ``average'' field that have been put forward. It is emphasized that only the volume average has dynamical significance as a seed for galactic dynamos. On rather general grounds of causality and energy conservation, it is shown that, in the absence of MHD effects that transfer power in the magnetic field from small to large scales, processes occurring at the electroweak transition cannot generate fields stronger than 10-20 G on a scale of 0.5 Mpc. However, it is implausible that this upper bound could ever be reached, as it would require all the energy in the Universe to be turned into a magnetic field coherent at the horizon scale. Non-linear MHD effects seem therefore to be necessary if the electroweak transition is to create a primordial seed field.

  7. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  8. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Smith, E. J.

    2017-02-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to ˜20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 × 106 nT per axis) with a resolution of ˜0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (±1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through the imager field of

  9. Hyperfine magnetic fields at the nuclei of probe {sup 119}Sn atoms and exchange interactions in the CaCu{sub 3}Mn{sub 3.96}Sn{sub 0.04}O{sub 12} manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Rusakov, V. S. Presnyakov, I. A.; Sobolev, A. V.; Demazeau, G.; Gubaidulina, T. V.; Matsnev, M. E.; Gapochka, A. M.; Volkova, O. S.; Vasil'ev, A. N.

    2011-04-15

    We have investigated the hyperfine magnetic interactions between the nuclei of probe {sup 119}Sn atoms in the CaCu{sub 3}Mn{sub 3.96}Sn{sub 0.04}O{sub 12} double manganite by Moessbauer spectroscopy using magnetic measurements. A consistent description of the results obtained in terms of the Weiss molecular field model by taking into account the peculiarities of the local environment of tin atoms has allowed the indirect Cu{sup 2+}-O-Mn{sup 4+} (J{sub CuMn} Almost-Equal-To -51 {+-} 1 K) and Mn{sup 4+}-O-Mn{sup 4+} (J{sub MnMn} Almost-Equal-To -0.6 {+-} 0.6 K) exchange interaction integrals to be estimated. Based on the Kanamori-Goodenough-Anderson model, we show that the magnitude and sign of the intrasublattice exchange integral J{sub MnMn} correspond to both the electronic configuration of the Mn{sup 4+} cations and the geometry of their local crystallographic environment in the compound under study.

  10. Magnetic-Field Hazards Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Puchalska, I. B., Influence of magnetic fields on frog sciatic nerve , Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm. 91:118 (1979). 35. Fardon, 3. C., "Effect of magnetic...fields, Bioelectromagnetic 2:357 (1981). 41. Gaffey, C. T. and Tenforde, T. S., Bioelectric properties of frog sciatic nerves during exposure to...available from: U.S. Dept. of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon 97208 (1982). 29. Levy , R. H., and Jones, G. S., "Plasma

  11. Implementation of Akiyama probe in low temperature magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Paul; Wu, Weida

    Exotic phenomena often call for high sensitivity scanning probe microscopic techniques working at extremely low temperatures. Specifically, it is of great fundamental interest to detect the weak magnetic signals in a range of interesting systems such as, quantum anomalous Hall, skyrmion, heavy-fermion, and multiferroic systems. To this end, we are developing low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) using a self-sensing cantilever called Akiyama-probe (A-probe). The main advantage of this specific probe is its extremely low power-dissipation compared to other self-sensing (e.g. piezoresistive) cantilevers for low temperature application. We will present progress of the implementation of A-probe and preliminary results under various conditions. This work is supported by DOE BES under Award DE-SC0008147.

  12. Weak, Quiet Magnetic Fields Seen in the Venus Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T L; Baumjohann, W; Russell, C T; Luhmann, J G; Xiao, S D

    2016-03-24

    The existence of a strong internal magnetic field allows probing of the interior through both long term changes of and short period fluctuations in that magnetic field. Venus, while Earth's twin in many ways, lacks such a strong intrinsic magnetic field, but perhaps short period fluctuations can still be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the interior. Toward the end of the Venus Express mission, an aerobraking campaign took the spacecraft below the ionosphere into the very weakly electrically conducting atmosphere. As the spacecraft descended from 150 to 140 km altitude, the magnetic field became weaker on average and less noisy. Below 140 km, the median field strength became steady but the short period fluctuations continued to weaken. The weakness of the fluctuations indicates they might not be useful for electromagnetic sounding of the atmosphere from a high altitude platform such as a plane or balloon, but possibly could be attempted on a lander.

  13. Weak, Quiet Magnetic Fields Seen in the Venus Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T. L.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Xiao, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a strong internal magnetic field allows probing of the interior through both long term changes of and short period fluctuations in that magnetic field. Venus, while Earth’s twin in many ways, lacks such a strong intrinsic magnetic field, but perhaps short period fluctuations can still be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the interior. Toward the end of the Venus Express mission, an aerobraking campaign took the spacecraft below the ionosphere into the very weakly electrically conducting atmosphere. As the spacecraft descended from 150 to 140 km altitude, the magnetic field became weaker on average and less noisy. Below 140 km, the median field strength became steady but the short period fluctuations continued to weaken. The weakness of the fluctuations indicates they might not be useful for electromagnetic sounding of the atmosphere from a high altitude platform such as a plane or balloon, but possibly could be attempted on a lander. PMID:27009234

  14. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a paramagnetic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, G. P.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider theoretically extension of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) replacing a ferromagnetic probe on a cantilever tip (CT) with a paramagnetic one (PMRFM). The dynamics of the interaction between the paramagnetic probe and a local magnetic moment in a sample is analyzed, using a quasi-classical approach. We show that the application of a proper sequence of electromagnetic pulses provides a significant deflection of the CT from the initial equilibrium position. Periodic application of these sequences of pulses results in quasi-periodic CT deflections from the equilibrium, which can be used for detection of the magnetic moment in a sample.

  15. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a paramagnetic probe

    DOE PAGES

    Berman, G. P.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2017-04-01

    Here, we consider theoretically extension of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) replacing a ferromagnetic probe on a cantilever tip (CT) with a paramagnetic one (PMRFM). The dynamics of the interaction between the paramagnetic probe and a local magnetic moment in a sample is analyzed, using a quasi-classical approach. We show that the application of a proper sequence of electromagnetic pulses provides a significant deflection of the CT from the initial equilibrium position. Periodic application of these sequences of pulses results in quasi-periodic CT deflections from the equilibrium, which can be used for detection of the magnetic moment in a sample.

  16. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    SciTech Connect

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  17. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGES

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; ...

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  18. Quantum oscillations without magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Pikulin, D. I.; Franz, M.

    2017-01-01

    When the magnetic field B is applied to a metal, nearly all observable quantities exhibit oscillations periodic in 1 /B . Such quantum oscillations reflect the fundamental reorganization of electron states into Landau levels as a canonical response of the metal to the applied magnetic field. We predict here that, remarkably, in the recently discovered Dirac and Weyl semimetals, quantum oscillations can occur in the complete absence of magnetic field. These zero-field quantum oscillations are driven by elastic strain which, in the space of the low-energy Dirac fermions, acts as a chiral gauge potential. We propose an experimental setup in which the strain in a thin film (or nanowire) can generate a pseudomagnetic field b as large as 15 T and demonstrate the resulting de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations periodic in 1 /b .

  19. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and Faraday rotation of the polarization angle are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 \\upmu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 \\upmu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15 \\upmu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium.—Faraday rotation measures of the diffuse polarized radio emission from galaxy disks reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by mean-field dynamos. "Magnetic arms" between gaseous spiral arms may also be products of dynamo action, but need a stable spiral pattern to develop. Helically twisted field loops winding around spiral arms were found in two galaxies so far. Large-scale field reversals, like the one found in the Milky Way, could not yet be detected in external galaxies. In radio halos around edge-on galaxies, ordered magnetic fields with X-shaped patterns are observed. The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, in particular their first occurrence in young galaxies and their dynamical importance during galaxy evolution, will be studied with

  20. Strong Magnetic Field Characterisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    coils were driven by a pulsed-power system to generate the fields. All the sources were characterised through a series of measurements and modelling... generated for the coils. Options for further investigation were provided. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED This...investigation. The desired field strength was based on assessments [1] from preliminary magnetohydrodynamic ( MHD ) modelling and while not achievable by

  1. Ion beam probing of electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persson, H.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of a cylindrically symmetric, time-independent electrostatic potential V in a magnetic field B with the same symmetry by measurements of the deflection of a primary beam of ions is analyzed and substantiated by examples. Special attention is given to the requirements on canonical angular momentum and total energy set by an arbitrary, nonmonotone V, to scaling laws obtained by normalization, and to the analogy with ionospheric sounding. The inversion procedure with the Abel analysis of an equivalent problem with a one-dimensional fictitious potential is used in a numerical experiment with application to the NASA Lewis Modified Penning Discharge. The determination of V from a study of secondary beams of ions with increased charge produced by hot plasma electrons is also analyzed, both from a general point of view and with application to the NASA Lewis SUMMA experiment. Simple formulas and geometrical constructions are given for the minimum energy necessary to reach the axis, the whole plasma, and any point in the magnetic field. The common, simplifying assumption that V is a small perturbation is critically and constructively analyzed; an iteration scheme for successively correcting the orbits and points of ionization for the electrostatic potential is suggested.

  2. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  3. On Floating Potential of Emissive Probes in a Partially-Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Kraus, Brian

    2016-10-01

    We compare measurements of plasma potential in a cross-field Penning discharge from two probes: swept biased Langmuir probe and floating emissive probe. The plasma potential was deduced from the first derivative of the Langmuir probe characteristic. In previous studies, the emissive and swept biased probes were placed at the channel exit of a Hall thruster (HT). Measurements showed that the emissive probe floats below the plasma potential, in agreement with conventional theories. However, recent measurements in the Penning discharge indicate a floating potential of a strongly-emitting hot probe above the plasma potential. In both probe applications, xenon plasmas have magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions with similar plasma densities (1010 - 1011 cm-3) . Though their electron temperatures differ by an order of magnitude (Penning 5 eV, HT 50 eV), this difference cannot explain the difference in measurement values of the hot floating potential because both temperatures are much higher than the emitting wire. In this work, we investigate how the ion velocity and other plasma parameters affect this discrepancy between probe measurements of the plasma potential. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Exploring dense and cold QCD in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, E. J.; de la Incera, V.

    2016-08-01

    Strong magnetic fields are commonly generated in off-central relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab and in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and have been used to probe the topological configurations of the QCD vacua. A strong magnetic field can affect the character and location of the QCD critical point, influence the QCD phases, and lead to anomalous transport of charge. To take advantage of the magnetic field as a probe of QCD at higher baryon densities, we are going to need experiments capable to scan the lower energy region. In this context, the nuclotron-based ion collider facility (NICA) at JINR offers a unique opportunity to explore such a region and complement alternative programs at RHIC and other facilities. In this paper we discuss some relevant problems of the interplay between QCD and magnetic fields and the important role the experiments at NICA can play in tackling them.

  5. Internal magnetic field measurement on C-2 field-reversed configuration plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gota, H; Thompson, M C; Knapp, K; Van Drie, A D; Deng, B H; Mendoza, R; Guo, H Y; Tuszewski, M

    2012-10-01

    A long-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma has been produced in the C-2 device by dynamically colliding and merging two oppositely directed, highly supersonic compact toroids (CTs). The reversed-field structure of the translated CTs and final merged-FRC state have been directly verified by probing the internal magnetic field structure using a multi-channel magnetic probe array near the midplane of the C-2 confinement chamber. Each of the two translated CTs exhibits significant toroidal fields (B(t)) with opposite helicity, and a relatively large B(t) remains inside the separatrix after merging.

  6. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  7. Defect-induced magnetism in SiC probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Dmytriieva, D.; Molatta, S.; Wosnitza, J.; Wang, Yutian; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kühne, H.

    2017-02-01

    We give evidence for intrinsic defect-induced bulk paramagnetism in SiC by means of 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the internal dipole-field distribution, probed by the spin part of the NMR Knight shift and the spectral linewidth, follows the Curie law and scales very well with the macroscopic dc susceptibility. In order to quantitatively analyze the NMR spectra, a microscopic model based on dipole-dipole interactions was developed. The very good agreement between these simulations and the NMR data establishes a direct relation between the frequency distribution of the spectral intensity and the corresponding real-space volumes of nuclear spins. The presented approach by NMR can be applied to a variety of similar materials and, thus, opens a new avenue for the microscopic exploration and exploitation of diluted bulk magnetism in semiconductors.

  8. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  9. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ˜  10-16 Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  10. Galactic and Intergalactic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, U.; Fletcher, A.

    This course-tested textbook conveys the fundamentals of magnetic fields and relativistic plasma in diffuse cosmic media, with a primary focus on phenomena that have been observed at different wavelengths. Theoretical concepts are addressed wherever necessary, with derivations presented in sufficient detail to be generally accessible. In the first few chapters the authors present an introduction to various astrophysical phenomena related to cosmic magnetism, with scales ranging from molecular clouds in star-forming regions and supernova remnants in the Milky Way, to clusters of galaxies. Later chapters address the role of magnetic fields in the evolution of the interstellar medium, galaxies and galaxy clusters. The book is intended for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students in astronomy and physics and will serve as an entry point for those starting their first research projects in the field.

  11. Nanoscale Probe of Magnetism Based on Artificial Atoms in Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0165 (YIP 11) Nanoscale probe of magnetism based on artificial atoms in diamond Ania Bleszynski Jayich UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...06-30-2014 Final Report 04-01-2011 To 03-31-2014 Nanoscale probe of magnetism based on artificial atoms in diamond FA9550-11-1-0013 AFOSR-BAA-2010-3...sensing using a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond . Significant accomplishments funded by this award include 1) characterization of the surface

  12. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-08

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  13. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  14. Electric and magnetic radial diffusion coefficients using the Van Allen probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ashar F.; Malaspina, David M.; Elkington, Scot R.; Jaynes, Allison N.; Chan, Anthony A.; Wygant, John; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-10-01

    ULF waves are a common occurrence in the inner magnetosphere and they contribute to particle motion, significantly, at times. We used the magnetic and the electric field data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Sciences (EMFISIS) and the Electric Field and Waves instruments (EFW) on board the Van Allen Probes to estimate the ULF wave power in the compressional component of the magnetic field and the azimuthal component of the electric field, respectively. Using L∗, Kp, and magnetic local time (MLT) as parameters, we conclude that the noon sector contains higher ULF Pc-5 wave power compared with the other MLT sectors. The dawn, dusk, and midnight sectors have no statistically significant difference between them. The drift-averaged power spectral densities are used to derive the magnetic and the electric component of the radial diffusion coefficient. Both components exhibit little to no energy dependence, resulting in simple analytic models for both components. More importantly, the electric component is larger than the magnetic component by one to two orders of magnitude for almost all L∗ and Kp; thus, the electric field perturbations are more effective in driving radial diffusion of charged particles in the inner magnetosphere. We also present a comparison of the Van Allen Probes radial diffusion coefficients, including the error estimates, with some of the previous published results. This allows us to gauge the large amount of uncertainty present in such estimates.

  15. Analysis of the Distribution of Magnetic Fluid inside Tumors by a Giant Magnetoresistance Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42°C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. PMID:24312280

  16. Analysis of the distribution of magnetic fluid inside tumors by a giant magnetoresistance probe.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C; Kosel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42 °C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe.

  17. Helical Magnetic Fields from Sphaleron Decay and Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Copi, Craig J.; Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Achucarro, Ana

    2008-10-24

    Many models of baryogenesis rely on anomalous particle physics processes to give baryon number violation. By numerically evolving the electroweak equations on a lattice, we show that baryogenesis in these models creates helical cosmic magnetic fields, though the helicity created is smaller than earlier analytical estimates. After a transitory period, electroweak dynamics is found to conserve the Chern-Simons number and the total electromagnetic helicity. We argue that baryogenesis could lead to magnetic fields of nano-Gauss strength today on astrophysical length scales. In addition to being astrophysically relevant, such helical magnetic fields can provide an independent probe of baryogenesis and CP violation in particle physics.

  18. Aharonov-Bohm effect as a probe of interaction between magnetic impurities.

    PubMed

    Galitski, Victor M; Vavilov, Maxim G; Glazman, Leonid I

    2005-03-11

    We study the effects of the RKKY interaction between magnetic impurities on the mesoscopic conductance fluctuations of a metal ring with dilute magnetic impurities. At sufficiently low temperatures and strong magnetic fields, the loss of electron coherence occurs mainly due to the scattering off rare pairs of strongly coupled magnetic impurities. We establish a relation between the dephasing rate and the distribution function of the exchange interaction within such pairs. In the case of the RKKY exchange interaction, this rate exhibits 1/B(2) behavior in strong magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillations may be used as a probe of the distribution function of the exchange interaction between magnetic impurities in metals.

  19. Magnetically Insulated Baffled Probe Measurement of Unfiltered Fluctuating Space Potential in the Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, M. E.; Nogami, S. H.; Demidov, V. I.; Williams, C. B.; Gentle, K.

    2016-10-01

    Success is reported in employing magnetically insulated baffled (MIB) probes for the measurement of fluctuating space potential in the Texas Helimak. The combination of the MIB probe and an unbaffled probe provides the necessary ingredients for determining cross-field transport without contamination between fluctuating space potential and electron temperature. The performance of the MIB probe is quantified by its ability to produce a probe characteristic with partially reduced magnitude of electron saturation current. The baffled probe employed in the 2016 experiments performed optimally (i.e., the magnitude of the electron saturation current is equal to the magnitude of the ion saturation current), meaning there is no difference between the probe floating potential and the space potential. The performance of the baffled probe is compared to the performance of the plug probe, tested in 2015 on the Texas Helimak. Recent radial scans at the plasma edge of unfiltered fluctuating space potential are presented. Travel support from a Big XII Faculty Fellowship is gratefully acknowledged. Collaboration in probe construction with and experimental assistance by K. Carter are gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Magnetically engineered semiconductor quantum dots as multimodal imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lihong; Ding, Ke; Kershaw, Stephen V; Kempson, Ivan M; Rogach, Andrey L; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-10-08

    Light-emitting semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) combined with magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents within a single nanoparticle platform are considered to perform as multimodal imaging probes in biomedical research and related clinical applications. The principles of their rational design are outlined and contemporary synthetic strategies are reviewed (heterocrystalline growth; co-encapsulation or assembly of preformed QDs and magnetic nanoparticles; conjugation of magnetic chelates onto QDs; and doping of QDs with transition metal ions), identifying the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. Some of the opportunities and benefits that arise through in vivo imaging using these dual-mode probes are highlighted where tumor location and delineation is demonstrated in both MRI and fluorescence modality. Work on the toxicological assessments of QD/magnetic nanoparticles is also reviewed, along with progress in reducing their toxicological side effects for eventual clinical use. The review concludes with an outlook for future biomedical imaging and the identification of key challenges in reaching clinical applications.

  1. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N.R., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on small-scale and large-scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields during 1987-1990 is reviewed, focusing on observational studies. Particular attention is given to the new techniques, which include the correlation tracking of granules, the use of highly Zeeman-sensitive infrared spectral lines and multiple lines to deduce small-scale field strength, the application of long integration times coupled with good seeing conditions to study weak fields, and the use of high-resolution CCD detectors together with computer image-processing techniques to obtain images with unsurpassed spatial resolution. Synoptic observations of large-scale fields during the sunspot cycle are also discussed. 101 refs.

  2. An analysis and optimization of elliptical RF probes used in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Lawrence K.; Crozier, Stuart; Doddrell, David M.

    1996-09-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging of the entire body, it is often desirable to use an elliptical RF probe, rather than a circular one. As an ellipse more closely conforms to the anatomical cross section of the human thorax and head, better filling factors and therefore improved signal-to-noise ratios may be achieved by the use of elliptical RF coils. The probe is usually of bird-cage type, but the rungs are of finite width due to the high-frequency signals involved. This paper presents a method for computing the magnetic fields produced inside elliptical probes, and the current distributions on the rungs. A slotted shield is assumed to surround the probe, and its influence on field homogeneity is studied. In particular, the currents in a 16-runged unshielded elliptical coil of practical interest were determined optimally in one case, using simulated annealing to optimize the homogeneity of the magnetic field within the probe. The effects of a segmented shield of both elliptical and circular cross section on this coil are discussed, and the results are confirmed by experiment.

  3. Magnetic fields around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  4. Majorana neutrinos and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechter, J.; Valle, J. W. F.

    1981-10-01

    It is stressed that if neutrinos are massive they are probably of "Majorana" type. This implies that their magnetic-moment form factor vanishes identically so that the previously discussed phenomenon of spin rotation in a magnetic field would not appear to take place. We point out that Majorana neutrinos can, however, have transition moments. This enables an inhomogeneous magnetic field to rotate both spin and "flavor" of a neutrino. In this case the spin rotation changes particle to antiparticle. The spin-flavor-rotation effect is worked out in detail. We also discuss the parametrization and calculation of the electromagnetic form factors of Majorana neutrinos. Our discussion takes into account the somewhat unusual quantum theory of massive Majorana particles.

  5. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample. PMID:22003461

  6. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy-magnetic force microscopy combination.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria; Asenjo, Agustina

    2011-01-01

    The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25-50 nm such that the long range tip-sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip-sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  7. A magnetically driven reciprocating probe for tokamak scrape-off layer measurements.

    PubMed

    Gunn, J P; Pascal, J-Y

    2011-12-01

    A new in situ reciprocating probe system has been developed to provide scrape-off layer measurements in the Tore Supra tokamak. The probe motion is provided by the rotation of an energized coil in the tokamak magnetic field. Simple analytic approximations to the exact numerical model were used to identify the important parameters that govern the dynamics of the system, and optimize the coil geometry, the electrical circuit, and the stiffness of the retaining spring. The linear speed of the probe is directly proportional to the current induced by the coil's rotation; its integral gives the coil position, providing a means to implement real-time feedback control of the probe motion. Two probes were recently mounted on a movable outboard antenna protection limiter in Tore Supra and provided automatic measurements during the 2011 experimental campaign.

  8. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V I; Koepke, M E; Raitses, Y

    2010-10-01

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  9. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E.; Raitses, Y.

    2010-10-15

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  10. A new probe for measuring small electric fields in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    A dipolar double probe has been developed for in situ measurements of small electric fields in laboratory plasmas. The probe measures dc to ac electric fields (f values between 0 and 20 MHz) with high sensitivity (Emin about 10 microV/cm) and responds to both space charge electric fields and inductive electric fields. Using voltage-to-frequency conversion, the probe signal is obtained free of errors and loading effects by a transmission line. Various examples of useful applications for the new probe are presented, such as measurements of dc ambipolar fields, ac space-charge fields of ion acoustic waves, ac inductive fields of whistler waves, and mixed inductive and space-charge electric fields in current-carrying magnetoplasmas.

  11. Tracing ultrafast dynamics of strong fields at plasma-vacuum interfaces with longitudinal proton probing

    SciTech Connect

    Abicht, F.; Braenzel, J.; Koschitzki, Ch.; Schnürer, M.; Priebe, G.; Andreev, A. A.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.

    2014-07-21

    If regions of localized strong fields at plasma-vacuum interfaces are probed longitudinally with laser accelerated proton beams their velocity distribution changes sensitively and very fast. Its measured variations provide indirectly a higher temporal resolution as deduced from deflection geometries which rely on the explicit temporal resolution of the proton beam at the position of the object to probe. With help of reasonable models and comparative measurements changes of proton velocity can trace the field dynamics even at femtosecond time scale. In longitudinal probing, the very low longitudinal emittance together with a broad band kinetic energy distribution of laser accelerated protons is the essential prerequisite of the method. With a combination of energy and one-dimensional spatial resolution, we resolve fast field changes down to 100 fs. The used pump probe setup extends previous schemes and allows discriminating simultaneously between electric and magnetic fields in their temporal evolution.

  12. Practical method using superposition of individual magnetic fields for initial arrangement of undulator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Shioya, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have developed a practical method for determining an excellent initial arrangement of magnetic arrays for a pure-magnet Halbach-type undulator. In this method, the longitudinal magnetic field distribution of each magnet is measured using a moving Hall probe system along the beam axis with a high positional resolution. The initial arrangement of magnetic arrays is optimized and selected by analyzing the superposition of all distribution data in order to achieve adequate spectral quality for the undulator. We applied this method to two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), called U#16-2 and U#02-2, at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The measured field distribution of the undulator was demonstrated to be excellent for the initial arrangement of the magnet array, and this method saved a great deal of effort in adjusting the magnetic fields of EPUs.

  13. Practical method using superposition of individual magnetic fields for initial arrangement of undulator magnets.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, K; Shioya, T

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a practical method for determining an excellent initial arrangement of magnetic arrays for a pure-magnet Halbach-type undulator. In this method, the longitudinal magnetic field distribution of each magnet is measured using a moving Hall probe system along the beam axis with a high positional resolution. The initial arrangement of magnetic arrays is optimized and selected by analyzing the superposition of all distribution data in order to achieve adequate spectral quality for the undulator. We applied this method to two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), called U#16-2 and U#02-2, at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The measured field distribution of the undulator was demonstrated to be excellent for the initial arrangement of the magnet array, and this method saved a great deal of effort in adjusting the magnetic fields of EPUs.

  14. Trapping a magnetic field of 7.9 T using a bulk magnet fabricated from stack of coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamegai, T.; Hirai, T.; Sun, Y.; Pyon, S.

    2016-11-01

    We have fabricated a bulk magnet using double stack, each 130 layers, of short segments of coated conductors (CCs). The bulk magnet is magnetized by field-cooling in a magnetic field of 9 T down to 4.2 K. After reducing the magnetic field down to zero, we have successfully trapped a magnetic field of 7.9 T at the centre of the double stack. The magnetic field profile of the bulk magnet is calculated by fully considering the Jc(B) characteristics of the short segment of the CC. The trapped magnetic field values measured by Hall probes at three locations near the centre of the double stacks agree reasonably well with the calculated magnetic induction.

  15. Switchable bi-stable multilayer magnetic probes for imaging of soft magnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tom; Puttock, Robb; Gribkov, Boris; Vdovichev, Sergey; Kazakova, Olga

    2017-03-28

    We present the use of custom-made multilayer (ML) magnetic probes in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) for imaging soft magnetic structures, i.e. nickel submicron disks of different dimensions. One of the main advantages of a custom-made ML probe is that it can be controllably switched between standard (parallel) and low moment (antiparallel) states. We demonstrate that the predicted vortex and stripe domain states in the disks are observed when using the ML probes both in the antiparallel and parallel states. However, while the phase contrast is significantly larger in the parallel state, the images are dominated by strong sample - probe interactions that obscure the image. By comparison of the stripe domain width observed by MFM with the ML probe and those expected from the Kittel model, we show that the resolution of the probe in the AP and P states is ∼30-40nm, i.e. of the order of the probe geometrical apex and thus approaching the limit of spatial resolution. The ML probes are further compared to the commercial standard and low moment ones, showing that the quality of images obtained with the ML probe is superior to both commercial probes.

  16. Separation of magnetic field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-11-15

    The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

  17. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  18. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  19. Magnetic fields in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

  20. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  1. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yang; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz(1/2), which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  2. The magnetic field of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper is concerned mainly with the intrinsic planetary field which dominates the inner magnetosphere up to a distance of 10 to 12 Jovian radii where other phenomena, such as ring currents and diamagnetic effects of trapped charged particles, become significant. The main magnetic field of Jupiter as determined by in-situ observations by Pioner 10 and 11 is found to be relatively more complex than a simple offset tilted dipole. Deviations from a simple dipole geometry lead to distortions of the charged particle L shells and warping of the magnetic equator. Enhanced absorption effects associated with Io and Amalthea are predicted. The results are consistent with the conclusions derived from extensive radio observations at decimetric and decametric wavelengths for the planetary field.

  3. Sensor probes and phantoms for advanced transcranial magnetic stimulation system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Patel, Prashil; Trivedi, Sudhir; Du, Xiaoming; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become one of the most widely used noninvasive method for brain tissue stimulation and has been used as a treatment tool for various neurological and psychiatric disorders including migraine, stroke, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, tinnitus and depression. In the process of developing advanced TMS deep brain stimulation tools, we need first to develop field measurement devices like sensory probes and brain phantoms, which can be used to calibrate the TMS systems. Currently there are commercially available DC magnetic or electric filed measurement sensors, but there is no instrument to measure transient fields. In our study, we used a commercial figure-8 shaped TMS coil to generate transient magnetic field and followed induced field and current. The coil was driven by power amplified signal from a pulse generator with tunable pulse rate, amplitude, and duration. In order to obtain a 3D plot of induced vector electric field, many types of probes were designed to detect single component of electric-field vectors along x, y and z axis in the space around TMS coil. We found that resistor probes has an optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) near 3k ohm but it signal output is too weak compared with other techniques. We also found that inductor probes can have very high output for Curl E measurement, but it is not the E-field distribution we are interested in. Probes with electrical wire wrapped around iron coil can directly measure induced E-field with high sensitivity, which matched computer simulation results.

  4. X-Ray Detected Magnetic Resonance: A Unique Probe of the Precession Dynamics of Orbital Magnetization Components

    PubMed Central

    Goulon, Jośe; Rogalev, Andrei; Goujon, Gérard; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Ben Youssef, Jamal; Gros, Claude; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Guilard, Roger

    2011-01-01

    X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance (XDMR) is a novel spectroscopy in which X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) is used to probe the resonant precession of local magnetization components in a strong microwave pump field. We review the conceptual bases of XDMR and recast them in the general framework of the linear and nonlinear theories of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Emphasis is laid on the information content of XDMR spectra which offer a unique opportunity to disentangle the precession dynamics of spin and orbital magnetization components at given absorbing sites. For the sake of illustration, we focus on selected examples in which marked differences were found between FMR and XDMR spectra simultaneously recorded on ferrimagnetically ordered iron garnets. With pumping capabilities extended up to sub-THz frequencies, high-field XDMR should allow us to probe the precession of orbital magnetization components in paramagnetic organometallic complexes with large zero-field splitting. Even more challenging, we suggest that XDMR spectra might be recorded on selected antiferromagnetic crystals for which orbital magnetism is most often ignored in the absence of any supporting experimental evidence. PMID:22272105

  5. Probing magnetic microstructures with quasi-ballistic Hall crosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasbender, S.; Schluck, J.; Cerchez, M.; Heinzel, T.; Sievers, S.; Pierz, K.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2016-03-01

    Hall sensing is performed on a localized magnetic field pattern using a quasi-ballistic Hall cross device. The Hall resistance shows a pronounced peak as a function of the magnetic field amplitude which is absent in the magnetization hysteresis loop. This non-monotonic response exemplifies qualitatively the failure of conventional Hall sensing. It is demonstrated how, by using a numerical simulation based on the Landauer-Büttiker model, the amplitude of the magnetic field profile can be determined from such measurements.

  6. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of the broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  7. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  8. Local magnetism in palladium bionanomaterials probed by muon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Creamer, Neil J; Mikheenko, Iryna P; Johnson, Clive; Cottrell, Stephen P; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2011-05-01

    Palladium bionanomaterial was manufactured using the sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricansm, to reduce soluble Pd(II) ions to cell-bound Pd(0) in the presence of hydrogen. The biomaterial was examined using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to measure bulk magnetisation and by Muon Spin Rotation Spectroscopy (µSR) which is uniquely able to probe the local magnetic environment inside the sample. Results showed behaviour attributable to interaction of muons both with palladium electrons and the nuclei of hydrogen trapped in the particles during manufacture. Electronic magnetism, also suggested by SQUID, is not characteristic of bulk palladium and is consistent with the presence of nanoparticles previously seen in electron micrographs. We show the first use of μSR as a tool to probe the internal magnetic environment of a biologically-derived nanocatalyst material.

  9. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Buendía, A.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  10. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  11. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  12. The HMI Magnetic Field Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Y.; Schou, J.; Scherrer, P.; HMI Science Team

    2009-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) will provide frequent full-disk magnetic field data after launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), currently scheduled for fall 2009. 16 megapixel line-of-sight magnetograms (Blos) will be recorded every 45 seconds. A full set of polarized filtergrams needed to determine the vector magnetic field requires 90 seconds. Quick-look data will be available within a few minutes of observation. Quick-look space weather and browse products must have identified users, and the list currently includes full disk magnetograms, feature identification and movies, 12-minute disambiguated vector fields in active region patches, time evolution of AR indices, synoptic synchronic frames, potential and MHD model results, and 1 AU predictions. A more complete set of definitive science data products will be offered about a day later and come in three types. "Pipeline” products, such as full disk vector magnetograms, will be computed for all data on an appropriate cadence. A larger menu of "On Demand” products, such as Non-Linear Force Free Field snapshots of an evolving active region, will be produced whenever a user wants them. Less commonly needed "On Request” products that require significant project resources, such as a high resolution MHD simulation of the global corona, will be created subject to availability of resources. Further information can be found at the SDO Joint Science Operations Center web page, jsoc.stanford.edu

  13. Measurement of electric fields induced in a human subject due to natural movements in static magnetic fields or exposure to alternating magnetic field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, P. M.; Bowtell, R.

    2008-01-01

    A dual dipole electric field probe has been used to measure surface electric fields in vivo on a human subject over a frequency range of 0.1-800 Hz. The low-frequency electric fields were induced by natural body movements such as walking and turning in the fringe magnetic fields of a 3 T magnetic resonance whole-body scanner. The rate-of-change of magnetic field (dB/dt) was also recorded simultaneously by using three orthogonal search coils positioned near to the location of the electric field probe. Rates-of-change of magnetic field for natural body rotations were found to exceed 1 T s-1 near the end of the magnet bore. Typical electric fields measured on the upper abdomen, head and across the tongue for 1 T s-1 rate of change of magnetic field were 0.15 ± 0.02, 0.077 ± 0.003 and 0.015 ± 0.002 V m-1 respectively. Electric fields on the abdomen and chest were measured during an echo-planar sequence with the subject positioned within the scanner. With the scanner rate-of-change of gradient set to 10 T m-1 s-1 the measured rate-of-change of magnetic field was 2.2 ± 0.1 T s-1 and the peak electric field was 0.30 ± 0.01 V m-1 on the chest. The values of induced electric field can be related to dB/dt by a 'geometry factor' for a given subject and sensor position. Typical values of this factor for the abdomen or chest (for measured surface electric fields) lie in the range of 0.10-0.18 m. The measured values of electric field are consistent with currently available numerical modelling results for movement in static magnetic fields and exposure to switched magnetic field gradients.

  14. Measurement of electric fields induced in a human subject due to natural movements in static magnetic fields or exposure to alternating magnetic field gradients.

    PubMed

    Glover, P M; Bowtell, R

    2008-01-21

    A dual dipole electric field probe has been used to measure surface electric fields in vivo on a human subject over a frequency range of 0.1-800 Hz. The low-frequency electric fields were induced by natural body movements such as walking and turning in the fringe magnetic fields of a 3 T magnetic resonance whole-body scanner. The rate-of-change of magnetic field (dB/dt) was also recorded simultaneously by using three orthogonal search coils positioned near to the location of the electric field probe. Rates-of-change of magnetic field for natural body rotations were found to exceed 1 T s(-1) near the end of the magnet bore. Typical electric fields measured on the upper abdomen, head and across the tongue for 1 T s(-1) rate of change of magnetic field were 0.15+/-0.02, 0.077+/-0.003 and 0.015+/-0.002 V m(-1) respectively. Electric fields on the abdomen and chest were measured during an echo-planar sequence with the subject positioned within the scanner. With the scanner rate-of-change of gradient set to 10 T m(-1) s(-1) the measured rate-of-change of magnetic field was 2.2+/-0.1 T s(-1) and the peak electric field was 0.30+/-0.01 V m(-1) on the chest. The values of induced electric field can be related to dB/dt by a 'geometry factor' for a given subject and sensor position. Typical values of this factor for the abdomen or chest (for measured surface electric fields) lie in the range of 0.10-0.18 m. The measured values of electric field are consistent with currently available numerical modelling results for movement in static magnetic fields and exposure to switched magnetic field gradients.

  15. Matched dipole probe for magnetized low electron density laboratory plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, a diagnostic method for magnetized and unmagnetized laboratory plasma is proposed, based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole. The range of the measured electron densities is limited to low density plasmas (10{sup 12}–10{sup 15 }m{sup −3}), where other diagnostic methods have strong limitations on the magnetic field strength and topology, plasma dimensions, and boundary conditions. The method is designed for use in both large- and small-dimension plasma (<10 cm) without or with strong non-homogeneous magnetic field, which can be undefined within the probe size. The design of a matched dipole probe allows to suppress the sheath resonance effects and to reach high sensitivity at relatively small probe dimensions. Validation experiments are conducted in both magnetized (B ∼ 170 G) and unmagnetized (B = 0) low density (7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}) low pressure (1 mTorr) 10 cm scale plasmas. The experimentally measured data show very good agreement with an analytical theory both for a non-magnetized and a magnetized case. The electron density measured by the matched dipole and Langmuir probes in the range of 7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3} show less than 30% difference. An experimentally measured tolerance/uncertainty of the dipole probe method is estimated to ±1% for plasma densities above 2 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}. A spatial resolution is estimated from the experiments to be about 3d, where d is the dipole diameter. The diagnostic method is also validated by comparing the measured plasma impedance curves with results of analytical modelling.

  16. Chirality-driven orbital magnetic moments as a new probe for topological magnetic structures

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Bouaziz, Juba; Bouhassoune, Mohammed; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2016-01-01

    When electrons are driven through unconventional magnetic structures, such as skyrmions, they experience emergent electromagnetic fields that originate several Hall effects. Independently, ground-state emergent magnetic fields can also lead to orbital magnetism, even without the spin–orbit interaction. The close parallel between the geometric theories of the Hall effects and of the orbital magnetization raises the question: does a skyrmion display topological orbital magnetism? Here we first address the smallest systems with nonvanishing emergent magnetic field, trimers, characterizing the orbital magnetic properties from first-principles. Armed with this understanding, we study the orbital magnetism of skyrmions and demonstrate that the contribution driven by the emergent magnetic field is topological. This means that the topological contribution to the orbital moment does not change under continuous deformations of the magnetic structure. Furthermore, we use it to propose a new experimental protocol for the identification of topological magnetic structures, by soft X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:27995909

  17. Explaining Mercury's peculiar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Cao, Hao; Heyner, Daniel; Dietrich, Wieland; Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2014-05-01

    MESSENGER magnetometer data revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is not only particularly weak but also has a peculiar geometry. The MESSENGER team finds that the location of the magnetic equator always lies significantly north of the geographic equator, is largely independent of the distance to the planet, and also varies only weakly with longitude. The field is best described by an axial dipole that is offset to the north by about 20% of the planetary radius. In terms of classical Gauss coefficients, this translates into a low axial dipole component of g10= -190 nT but a relatively large axial quadrupole contribution that amounts to roughly 40% of this value. The axial octupole is also sizable while higher harmonic contributions are much weaker. Very remarkable is also the fact that the equatorial dipole contribution is very small, consistent with a dipole tilt below 0.8 degree, and this is also true for the other non-axisymmetic field contributions. We analyze several numerical dynamos concerning their capability of explaining Mercury's magnetic field. Classical schemes geared to model the geomagnetic field typically show a much weaker quadrupole component and thus a smaller offset. The onset only becomes larger when the dynamo operates in the multipolar regime at higher Rayleigh numbers. However, since the more complex dynamics generally promotes all higher multipole contributions the location of the magnetic equator varies strongly with longitude and distance to the planet. The situation improves when introducing a stably stratified outer layer in the dynamo region, representing either a rigid FeS layer or a sub-adiabatic core-mantle boundary heat flux. This layer filters out the higher harmonic contributions and the field not only becomes sufficiently weak but also assumes a Mercury like offset geometry during a few percent of the simulation time. To increase the likelihood for the offset configuration, the north-south symmetry must be permanently broken

  18. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Thushara

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom-made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  19. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, G. S. Thushara

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom--made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  20. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-02-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new – magnetometric – potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates.

  1. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new – magnetometric – potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  2. Probing turbulent, magnetized star formation with ALMA observations and next-generation AREPO simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Mocz, Philip; Burkhart, Blakesley K.; Miquel Girart, Josep; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Cortes, Paulo; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lai, Shih-Ping; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The first polarization data from ALMA have been delivered, and are both expanding and confounding our understanding of the role of magnetic fields in low-mass star formation. Here I will show the highest resolution and highest sensitivity polarization images ever made of a Class 0 protostellar source. These new ALMA observations of the source, known as Ser-emb 8, achieve 140 AU resolution, allowing us to probe polarization -- and thus magnetic field orientation -- in the innermost regions surrounding the protostar. The collapse of strongly magnetized dense gas is predicted to pinch the magnetic field into an hourglass shape that persists down to scales <100 AU. However, in contrast with more than 50 years of theory, the ALMA data definitively rule out an hourglass morphology and instead reveal a chaotic magnetic field that has not been inherited from the field in the interstellar medium surrounding the source. We have simulated the star formation process with cutting-edge, moving-mesh AREPO simulations on scales from a million AU (5 pc) down to 60 AU. We find that only in the case of a very strong magnetic field (~100 microgauss on 5 pc scales) is the field direction preserved from cloud to disk scales. When the field is weak, turbulence in the interstellar gas shapes the field on large scales, and the forming star system re-shapes the field again on small scales, divorcing the field from its history on larger scales. We conclude that this is what has happened in Ser-emb 8. The main distinction from the strong-field star formation model is that in the weak-field case it is turbulence -- not the magnetic field -- that shapes the material that forms the protostar.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak–Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (μw) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (γe/γl), being ∼660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (≥5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms—the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in μw and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments. PMID:18266416

  4. Field errors in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of this workshop is a discussion of the techniques for tracking particles through arbitrary accelerator field configurations to look for dynamical effects that are suggested by various theoretical models but are not amenable to detailed analysis. A major motivation for this type of study is that many of our accelerator projects are based on the use of superconducting magnets which have field imperfections that are larger and of a more complex nature than those of conventional magnets. Questions such as resonances, uncorrectable closed orbit effects, coupling between planes, and diffusion mechanisms all assume new importance. Since, simultaneously, we are trying to do sophisticated beam manipulations such as stacking, high current accelerator, long life storage, and low loss extraction, we clearly need efficient and accurate tracking programs to proceed with confidence.

  5. Wall scanning probe for high-field side plasma measurements on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Smick, Noah; LaBombard, Brian

    2009-02-01

    A new, high-field side scanning probe has been added to Alcator C-Mod's complement of edge diagnostics. The wall scanning probe is designed to provide all the benefits of a linear plunge, multielectrode scanning probe while working from the confined space of the inner tokamak wall. The drive mechanism is an embedded coil which produces a torque with the ambient toroidal magnetic field when energized, thus allowing the probe to plunge to different preprogramed depths at different times during a plasma discharge. The probe tip is designed for easy replacement and is presently configured to operate as a modified, high heat-flux "Gundestrup-type" probe with four tungsten electrodes. The probe has demonstrated the ability to obtain cross-field profiles for electron temperature, density, floating potential, and plasma flow information (parallel and perpendicular to B) up to a depth of a few millimiters inside the last-closed flux surface in standard C-Mod discharges. The tungsten-tipped probe has proved very robust and shows little or no damage though it routinely handles surface heat fluxes on the order of 100 MW/m(2) at peak insertion.

  6. The rectangular array of magnetic probes on J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhipeng; Li, Fuming; Zhuang, Ge; Jian, Xiang; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The rectangular array of magnetic probes system was newly designed and installed in the torus on J-TEXT tokamak to measure the local magnetic fields outside the last closed flux surface at a single toroidal angle. In the implementation, the experimental results agree well with the theoretical results based on the Spool model and three-dimensional numerical finite element model when the vertical field was applied. Furthermore, the measurements were successfully used as the input of EFIT code to conduct the plasma equilibrium reconstruction. The calculated Faraday rotation angle using the EFIT output is in agreement with the measured one from the three-wave polarimeter-interferometer system.

  7. The rectangular array of magnetic probes on J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Li, Fuming; Zhuang, Ge; Jian, Xiang; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The rectangular array of magnetic probes system was newly designed and installed in the torus on J-TEXT tokamak to measure the local magnetic fields outside the last closed flux surface at a single toroidal angle. In the implementation, the experimental results agree well with the theoretical results based on the Spool model and three-dimensional numerical finite element model when the vertical field was applied. Furthermore, the measurements were successfully used as the input of EFIT code to conduct the plasma equilibrium reconstruction. The calculated Faraday rotation angle using the EFIT output is in agreement with the measured one from the three-wave polarimeter-interferometer system.

  8. Comparing Magnetic Fields on Earth and Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation compares the magnetic fields on Earth and Mars. The Earth has a large-scale planetary magnetic field that can protect it from space weather and other hazards. Mars, on the other hand...

  9. Field quality aspects of CBA superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S.; Engelmann, R.; Fernow, R.; Greene, A.F.; Herrera, J.; Kirk, H.; Skaritka, J.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1983-01-01

    A series of superconducting dipole magnets for the BNL Colliding Beam Accelerator which were manufactured to have the proper field quality characteristics has been tested. This report presents the analysis of the field harmonics of these magnets.

  10. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  11. Forced Magnetic Reconnection and Field Penetration of an Externally Applied Rotating Helical Magnetic Field in the TEXTOR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Y.; Finken, K. H.; Jakubowski, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Reiser, D.; Wolf, R. C.; Zimmermann, O.; Bock, M. F. M. de; Jaspers, R.; Matsunaga, G.

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization.

  12. Minireview: Biological effects of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Mustarelli, P. ); Caprotti, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The literature about the biological effects of magnetic fields is reviewed. The authors begin by discussing the weak and/or time variable fields, responsible for subtle changes in the circadian rhythms of superior animals, which are believed to be induced by same sort of resonant mechanism. The safety issues related with the strong magnetic fields and gradients generated by clinical NMR magnets are then considered. The last portion summarizes the debate about the biological effects of strong and uniform magnetic fields.

  13. Quantum Probe and Design for a Chemical Compass with Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianming

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as Earth’s may affect the outcome of certain photochemical reactions that go through a radical pair intermediate. When the reaction environment is anisotropic, this phenomenon can form the basis of a chemical compass and has been proposed as a mechanism for animal magnetoreception. Here, we demonstrate how to optimize the design of a chemical compass with a much better directional sensitivity simply by a gradient field, e.g., from a magnetic nanostructure. We propose an experimental test of these predictions, and suggest design principles for a hybrid metallic-organic chemical compass. In addition to the practical interest in designing a biomimetic weak magnetic field sensor, our result shows that gradient fields can serve as powerful tools to probe spin correlations in radical pair reactions.

  14. Note: 3D printed spheroid for uniform magnetic field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Y.; Aktaş, B.

    2016-10-01

    This article is focused on a novel and practical production method for a uniform magnetic field generator. The method involves building of a surface coil template using a desktop 3D printer and winding of a conducting wire onto the structure using surface grooves as a guide. Groove pattern was based on the parametric spheroidal helical coil formula. The coil was driven by a current source and the magnetic field inside was measured using a Hall probe placed into the holes on the printed structure. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with our finite element analysis results and indicate a fairly uniform field inside.

  15. The fine magnetic image of a high TC SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Itozaki, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a high TC SQUID probe microscope. A high permeability probe was used as a flux guide to improve its spatial resolution. The SQUID head with the flux guide makes it possible to measure samples with high spatial resolution in air at room temperature. The end of the flux guide and the SQUID were in vacuum with a 0.1 mm separation. The tip of the flux guide was in air. The rod diameter and length of the flux guide were 0.6 and 7 mm, respectively. The sharp tip of the flux guide required for high spatial resolution was prepared by microelectropolishing. Its tip radius was less than 1 µm. The static magnetic field pattern of magnetized toner particles was detected by this system and we obtained a high-resolution magnetic image with a spatial resolution of several microns.

  16. Bats respond to very weak magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth's magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years.

  17. Parametric Harmonic Generation as a Probe of Unconstrained Spin Magnetization Precession in the Shallow Barrier Limit.

    PubMed

    Capua, Amir; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-01-29

    We study the parametric excitation of high orders of magnetization precession in ultrathin films having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We observe that for a given driving field amplitude the harmonic generation can be increased by lowering the barrier with the application of an in-plane magnetic field in the manner of the Smit-Beljers effect. In this effect, the magnetic stiffness is reduced not by lowering the magnitude of the magnetic field upon which the spins precess, but rather by effectively releasing the field's "anchoring" point. This results in a shallow energy barrier where the electrons' spin is locally unconstrained. While the observation is unveiled in the form of nonlinear high harmonic generation, we believe that the physics whereby the barrier is suppressed by an external magnetic field may apply to other phenomena associated with ultrathin films. In these cases, such unconstrained motion may serve as a sensitive probe of the torques associated with proximate spin currents. Moreover, our approach may be used as a model system for the study of phase transitions in the field of nonlinear dynamics.

  18. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  19. Magnetic field dependence of the correlation gap in SmB{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J.C.; Aronson, M.C.; Lacerda, A.; Canfield, P.C.; Fisk, Z.

    1994-06-11

    We have used magnetoresistance measurements to probe the effect of large magnetic fields on the stability of the electronic gap {delta} in SmB{sub 6}. Although the Zeeman splitting in a 18 Telsa field is comparable to the ambient pressure {delta}, and even exceeds {delta} at 56 kbar, {delta} is in both cases almost completely unaffected by the magnetic field.

  20. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  1. Magnetic Field Tailored Annular Hall Thruster with Anode Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Holak; Kim, Junbum; Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Korea Adv Inst of Sci; Tech Team; Korea Institute of Materials Science Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Plasma propulsion system is one of the key components for advanced missions of satellites as well as deep space exploration. A typical plasma propulsion system is Hall effect thruster that uses crossed electric and magnetic fields to ionize a propellant gas and to accelerate the ionized gas to generate momentum. In Hall thruster plasmas, magnetic field configuration is important due to the fact that electron confinement in the electromagnetic fields affects both plasma and ion beam characteristics as well as thruster performance parameters including thrust, specific impulse, power efficiency, and life time. In this work, development of an anode layer Hall thruster (TAL) with magnetic field tailoring has been attempted. The TAL is possible to keep discharge in 1 to 2 kilovolts of anode voltage, which is useful to obtain high specific impulse. The magnetic field tailoring is used to minimize undesirable heat dissipation and secondary electron emission from the wall surrounding the plasma. We will report 3 W and 200 W thrusters performances measured by a pendulum thrust stand according to the magnetic field configuration. Also, the measured result will be compared with the plasma diagnostics conducted by an angular Faraday probe, a retarding potential analyzer, and a ExB probe.

  2. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanuelidu, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for high resolution magnetic imaging based on its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities afforded by long spin coherence times. Although the NV center has been successfully implemented as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at room temperature, it has remained an outstanding challenge to extend this capability to cryogenic temperatures, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. In this talk, we present NV magnetic imaging at T = 6 K, first benchmarking the technique with a magnetic hard disk sample, then utilizing the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with Tc = 30 K. In addition, we discuss other candidate solid-state systems that can benefit from the high spatial resolution and field sensitivity of the scanning NV magnetometer.

  3. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  4. Static magnetic fields: animal studies.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Various experimental studies carried out over the last 30-40 years have examined the effects of the chronic or acute exposure of laboratory animals to static magnetic fields. Many of the earlier studies have been adequately reviewed elsewhere; few adverse effects were identified. This review focuses on studies carried out more recently, mostly those using vertebrates, particularly mammals. Four main areas of investigation have been covered, viz., nervous system and behavioural studies, cardiovascular system responses, reproduction and development, and genotoxicity and cancer. Work on the role of the natural geomagnetic field in animal orientation and migration has been omitted. Generally, the acute responses found during exposure to static fields above about 4 T are consistent with those found in volunteer studies, namely the induction of flow potentials around the heart and the development of aversive/avoidance behaviour resulting from body movement in such fields. No consistently demonstrable effects of exposure to fields of approximately 1T and above have been seen on other behavioural or cardiovascular endpoints. In addition, no adverse effects of such fields on reproduction and development or on the growth and development of tumours have been firmly established. Overall, however, far too few animal studies have been carried out to reach any firm conclusions.

  5. Saturn's Magnetic Field and Magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Davis, L; Jones, D E; Coleman, P J; Colburn, D S; Dyal, P; Sonett, C P

    1980-01-25

    The Pioneer Saturn vector helium magnetometer has detected a bow shock and magnetopause at Saturn and has provided an accurate characterization of the planetary field. The equatorial surface field is 0.20 gauss, a factor of 3 to 5 times smaller than anticipated on the basis of attempted scalings from Earth and Jupiter. The tilt angle between the magnetic dipole axis and Saturn's rotation axis is < 1 degrees , a surprisingly small value. Spherical harmonic analysis of the measurements shows that the ratio of quadrupole to dipole moments is < 10 percent, indicating that the field is more uniform than those of the Earth or Jupiter and consistent with Saturn having a relatively small core. The field in the outer magnetosphere shows systematic departures from the dipole field, principally a compression of the field near noon and an equatorial orientation associated with a current sheet near dawn. A hydromagnetic wake resulting from the interaction of Titan with the rotating magnetosphere appears to have been observed.

  6. Magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rodney J.; Jones, Michael E.; Grossmann, John M.; Ottinger, Paul F.

    1988-10-01

    Computer simulations demonstrate that the entrainment (or advection) of magnetic field with the flow of cathode-emitted electrons can constitute a dominant mechanism for the magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas. Cross-field drift in the accelerating electric field near the cathode starts the penetration process. Plasma erosion propagates the point for emission and magnetic field injection along the cathode toward the load-for the possibility of rapid switch opening.

  7. Harmonic undulator radiations with constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevakhan, Hussain; Mishra, G.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic undulators has been analysed in the presence of constant magnetic field along the direction of main undulator field. The spectrum modifications in harmonic undulator radiations and intensity degradation as a function of constant magnetic field magnitude at fundamental and third harmonics have been evaluated with a numerical integration method and generalised Bessel function. The role of harmonic field to overcome the intensity reduction due to constant magnetic field and energy spread in electron beam has also been demonstrated.

  8. Batch-fabrication of cantilevered magnets on attonewton-sensitivity mechanical oscillators for scanned-probe nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Steven A; Moore, Eric W; Lee, SangGap; Longenecker, Jonilyn G; Wright, Sarah J; Harrell, Lee E; Marohn, John A

    2010-12-28

    We have batch-fabricated cantilevers with ∼100 nm diameter nickel nanorod tips and force sensitivities of a few attonewtons at 4.2 K. The magnetic nanorods were engineered to overhang the leading edge of the cantilever, and consequently the cantilevers experience what we believe is the lowest surface noise ever achieved in a scanned probe experiment. Cantilever magnetometry indicated that the tips were well magnetized, with a ≤ 20 nm dead layer; the composition of the dead layer was studied by electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In what we believe is the first demonstration of scanned probe detection of electron-spin resonance from a batch-fabricated tip, the cantilevers were used to observe electron-spin resonance from nitroxide spin labels in a film via force-gradient-induced shifts in cantilever resonance frequency. The magnetic field dependence of the magnetic resonance signal suggests a nonuniform tip magnetization at an applied field near 0.6 T.

  9. Graphene in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlita, Milan; Escoffier, Walter; Plochocka, Paulina; Raquet, Bertrand; Zeitler, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-based nano-materials, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, represent a fascinating research area aiming at exploring their remarkable physical and electronic properties. These materials not only constitute a playground for physicists, they are also very promising for practical applications and are envisioned as elementary bricks of the future of the nano-electronics. As for graphene, its potential already lies in the domain of opto-electronics where its unique electronic and optical properties can be fully exploited. Indeed, recent technological advances have demonstrated its effectiveness in the fabrication of solar cells and ultra-fast lasers, as well as touch-screens and sensitive photo-detectors. Although the photo-voltaic technology is now dominated by silicon-based devices, the use of graphene could very well provide higher efficiency. However, before the applied research to take place, one must first demonstrates the operativeness of carbon-based nano-materials, and this is where the fundamental research comes into play. In this context, the use of magnetic field has been proven extremely useful for addressing their fundamental properties as it provides an external and adjustable parameter which drastically modifies their electronic band structure. In order to induce some significant changes, very high magnetic fields are required and can be provided using both DC and pulsed technology, depending of the experimental constraints. In this article, we review some of the challenging experiments on single nano-objects performed in high magnetic and low temperature. We shall mainly focus on the high-field magneto-optical and magneto-transport experiments which provided comprehensive understanding of the peculiar Landau level quantization of the Dirac-type charge carriers in graphene and thin graphite.

  10. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C.; Spencer, John E.

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  11. Imaging of electric and magnetic fields near plasmonic nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kabakova, I. V.; de Hoogh, A.; van der Wel, R. E. C.; Wulf , M.; le Feber, B.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-01-01

    Near-field imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the complex structure of light at the nanoscale. Recent advances in near-field imaging have indicated the possibility for the complete reconstruction of both electric and magnetic components of the evanescent field. Here we study the electro-magnetic field structure of surface plasmon polariton waves propagating along subwavelength gold nanowires by performing phase- and polarization-resolved near-field microscopy in collection mode. By applying the optical reciprocity theorem, we describe the signal collected by the probe as an overlap integral of the nanowire’s evanescent field and the probe’s response function. As a result, we find that the probe’s sensitivity to the magnetic field is approximately equal to its sensitivity to the electric field. Through rigorous modeling of the nanowire mode as well as the aperture probe response function, we obtain a good agreement between experimentally measured signals and a numerical model. Our findings provide a better understanding of aperture-based near-field imaging of the nanoscopic plasmonic and photonic structures and are helpful for the interpretation of future near-field experiments. PMID:26947124

  12. Muons probe magnetism and hydrogen interaction in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccò, M.; Aramini, M.; Mazzani, M.; Pontiroli, D.; Gaboardi, M.; Yazyev, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    Muon spin resonance (μSR) is a powerful technique for investigating the local magnetic fields in materials through implanted muons. Here we report a μSR study of chemically produced thermally exfoliated graphene. Our results provide an experimental answer to the many theoretical investigations of magnetic properties of graphene. The observed muon spin precession is attributed to a localized muon-hydrogen nuclear dipolar interaction rather than to a hyperfine interaction with magnetic electrons. This proves the absence of magnetism in chemically produced thermally exfoliated graphene.

  13. Lifshitz effects on vector condensate induced by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Liu, Mo-Lin; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhuo-Qun

    2014-05-01

    By numerical and analytical methods, we study in detail the effects of the Lifshitz dynamical exponent z on the vector condensate induced by an applied magnetic field in the probe limit. Concretely, in the presence of the magnetic field, we obtain the Landau level independent of z, and we also find the critical value by coupling a Maxwell complex vector field and an SU(2) field into a (3+1)-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, respectively. The research results show that for the two models with the lowest Landau level, the increasing z improves the response of the critical temperature to the applied magnetic field even without the charge density, and the analytical results uphold the numerical results. In addition, we find that, even in the Lifshitz black hole, the Maxwell complex vector model is still a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model. Furthermore, we construct the square vortex lattice and discuss the implications of these results.

  14. Magnetic field induced lattice ground states from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yan-Yan; Erdmenger, Johanna; Shock, Jonathan P.; Strydom, Migael

    2013-03-01

    We study the holographic field theory dual of a probe SU(2) Yang-Mills field in a background (4 + 1)-dimensional asymptotically Anti-de Sitter space. We find a new ground state when a magnetic component of the gauge field is larger than a critical value. The ground state forms a triangular Abrikosov lattice in the spatial directions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The lattice is composed of superconducting vortices induced by the condensation of a charged vector operator. We perform this calculation both at finite temperature and at zero temperature with a hard wall cutoff dual to a confining gauge theory. The study of this state may be of relevance to both holographic condensed matter models as well as to heavy ion physics. The results shown here provide support for the proposal that such a ground state may be found in the QCD vacuum when a large magnetic field is present.

  15. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  16. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  17. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  18. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. M.; Wu, R. G.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells. PMID:27254771

  19. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Wu, R. G.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2016-06-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells.

  20. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Justin C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons—chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)—for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron-electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands.

  1. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Song, Justin C. W.; Rudner, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons—chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)—for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron–electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands. PMID:27071090

  2. The flexible magnetic field thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The thruster is designed so that ion currents to various internal surfaces can be measured directly; these measurements facilitate calculations of the distribution of ion currents inside the discharge chamber. Experiments are described suggesting that the distribution of ion currents inside the discharge chamber is strongly dependent on the shape and strength of the magnetic field but independent of the discharge current, discharge voltage, and neutral flow rate. Measurements of the energy cost per plasma ion suggest that this cost decreases with increasing magnetic field strength as a consequence of increased anode shielding from the primary electrons. Energy costs per argon plasma ion as low as 50 eV are measured. The energy cost per beam ion is found to be a function of the energy cost per plasma ion, extracted ion fraction, and discharge voltage. Part of the energy cost per beam ion has to do with creating many ions in the plasma and then extracting only a fraction of them into the beam. The balance of the energy goes into accelerating the remaining plasma ions into the walls of the discharge chamber.

  3. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1994-01-01

    The research efforts funded by the Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP) grant to the Bartol Research Institute (BRI) involved the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. Upstream wave studies are motivated as a study of the physics of collisionless shocks. Collisionless shocks in plasmas are capable of 'reflecting' a fraction of the incoming thermal particle distribution and directing the resulting energetic particle motion back into the upstream region. Once within the upstream region, the backward streaming energetic particles convey information of the approaching shock to the supersonic flow. This particle population is responsible for the generation of upstream magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations known as 'upstream waves', for slowing the incoming wind prior to the formation of the shock ramp, and for heating of the upstream plasma. The waves produced at Uranus not only differed in several regards from the observations at other planetary bow shocks, but also gave new information regarding the nature of the reflected particle populations which were largely unmeasurable by the particle instruments. Four distinct magnetic field wave types were observed upstream of the Uranian bow shock: low-frequency Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves excited by energetic protons originating at or behind the bow shock; whistler wave bursts driven by gyrating ion distributions within the shock ramp; and two whistler wave types simultaneously observed upstream of the flanks of the shock and argued to arise from resonance with energetic electrons. In addition, observations of energetic particle distributions by the LECP experiment, thermal particle populations observed by the PLS experiment, and electron plasma oscillations recorded by the PWS experiment proved instrumental to this study and are included to some degree in the papers and presentations supported by this grant.

  4. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  5. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  6. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00-18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00-06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. These variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  7. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation in pulsed high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Strohm, C; Van der Linden, P; Rüffer, R

    2010-02-26

    We report the demonstration of nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 57Fe in ferromagnetic alpha iron in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The observed magnetic hyperfine field follows the calculated high field bulk magnetization within 1%, establishing the technique as a precise tool for the study of magnetic solids in very high magnetic fields. To perform these experiments in pulsed fields, we have developed a detection scheme for fully time resolved nuclear forward scattering applicable to other pump probe experiments.

  8. Microwave absorption studies on high-T sub c superconductors and related materials II; Electron spin resonance of DPPH coated on Y sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub y as a probe of magnetic field variations

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, K.; Baar, D.J.; Shiohara, Y.; Tanaka, S. )

    1991-05-10

    This paper reports on the ESR linewidth ({Delta}{ital H}{sub p{bar p}}) of DPPH coated on the surface of powder specimens of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} studied under various magnetic field and temperature conditions. {Delta}{ital H}{sub p{bar p}} increases substantially with decreasing temperature in the field cooled case, whereas almost no linewidth broadening was found in the zero field cooled case. {Delta}{ital H}{sub p{bar p}} was found to be sensitive to the applied magnetic field. This effect was very pronounced at temperatures lower than 40 K, but decreased strongly with increasing temperature. The broadening of the resonance lineshape has been attributed to spatial and temporal variations of the fluxon distribution in the powder particles.

  9. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  10. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  11. Baryon onset in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Alexander; Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    The critical baryon chemical potential for the onset of nuclear matter is a function of the vacuum mass and the binding energy. Both quantities are affected by an external magnetic field. We show within two relativistic mean-field models – including magnetic catalysis, but omitting the anomalous magnetic moment – that a magnetic field increases both the vacuum mass and the binding energy. For sufficiently large magnetic fields, the effect on the vacuum mass dominates and as a result the critical baryon chemical potential is increased.

  12. Developments of scanning probe microscopy with stress/strain fields.

    PubMed

    Guo, H X; Fujita, D

    2011-12-01

    An innovative stress/strain fields scanning probe microscopy in ultra high vacuum (UHV) environments is developed for the first time. This system includes scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM). Two piezo-resistive AFM cantilever probes and STM probes used in this system can move freely in XYZ directions. The nonoptical frequency shift detection of the AFM probe makes the system compact enough to be set in the UHV chambers. The samples can be bent by an anvil driven by a step motor to induce stress and strain on their surface. With a direct current (dc) power source, the sample can be observed at room and high temperatures. A long focus microscope and a monitor are used to observe the samples and the operation of STM and AFM. Silicon(111) surface in room temperature and silicon(001) surface in high temperature with stress were investigated to check the performance of the scanning probe microscope.

  13. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  14. Magnetic field gradiometer. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser-Smith, A.C.

    1983-02-01

    This report has two principal goals. First, to present a general review of magnetic field gradiometers and, second, to provide new data concerning these gradiometers, including new information about their response to magnetic dipole fields. A system of nomenclature is introduced that is consistent with the mathematical concept of gradient and which provides a basis for discussions of the different functions of magnetic field gradiometers and differential magnetometers. The distinction between component gradiometers and total field gradiometers is also stressed.

  15. Development of internal magnetic probe for current density profile measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, B. K.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    An internal magnetic probe using Hall sensors to measure a current density profile directly with perturbation of less than 10% to the plasma current is successfully operated for the first time in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). An appropriate Hall sensor is chosen to produce sufficient signals for VEST magnetic field while maintaining the small size of 10 mm in outer diameter. Temperature around the Hall sensor in a typical VEST plasma is regulated by blown air of 2 bars. First measurement of 60 kA VEST ohmic discharge shows a reasonable agreement with the total plasma current measured by Rogowski coil in VEST.

  16. Development of internal magnetic probe for current density profile measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Lee, J W; Jung, B K; Chung, K J; Hwang, Y S

    2014-11-01

    An internal magnetic probe using Hall sensors to measure a current density profile directly with perturbation of less than 10% to the plasma current is successfully operated for the first time in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). An appropriate Hall sensor is chosen to produce sufficient signals for VEST magnetic field while maintaining the small size of 10 mm in outer diameter. Temperature around the Hall sensor in a typical VEST plasma is regulated by blown air of 2 bars. First measurement of 60 kA VEST ohmic discharge shows a reasonable agreement with the total plasma current measured by Rogowski coil in VEST.

  17. Mapping magnetism with atomic resolution using aberrated electron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan; Rusz, Ján; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, we report a direct experimental real-space mapping of magnetic circular dichroism with atomic resolution in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an aberrated electron probe with customized phase distribution, we reveal with electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The aberrated probes allow the collection of EEL spectra using the transmitted beam, which results in a magnetic circular dichroic signal with intrinsically larger signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained via nanodiffraction techniques (where most of the transmitted electrons are discarded). The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution. This research was supported by DOE SUFD MSED, by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US DOE, and by the Swedish Research Council and Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (NSC center)

  18. Transient magnetic field and temperature modeling in large magnet applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gurol, H.; Hardy, G.E.; Peck, S.D.; Leung, E. . Space Systems Div.)

    1989-07-01

    This paper discusses a coupled magnetic/thermal model developed to study heat and magnetic field diffusion in conducting materials subject to time-varying external fields. There are numerous applications, both military and commercial. These include: energy storage devices, pulsed power transformers, and electromagnetic launchers. The time scales of interest may range from a magnetic field pulse of a microsecond in an electromagnetic launcher, to hundreds of seconds in an energy storage magnet. The problem can be dominated by either the magnetic field or heat diffusion, depending on the temperature and the material properties of the conductor. In general, heat diffuses much more rapidly in high electrical conductivity materials of cryogenic temperatures. The magnetic field takes longer to diffuse, since screening currents can be rapidly set up which shield the interior of the material from further magnetic field penetration. Conversely, in high resistivity materials, the magnetic field diffuses much more rapidly. A coupled two-dimensional thermal/magnetic model has been developed. The results of this model, showing the time and spatial variation of the magnetic field and temperature, are discussed for the projectile of an electromagnetic launcher.

  19. Low-frequency magnetic field effect on cytoskeleton and chromatin.

    PubMed

    Kroupová, Jana; Bártová, Eva; Fojt, Lukás; Strasák, Ludek; Kozubek, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on the living systems is studied in vivo or in vitro in very broad spectrum of organisms, cells and tissues. The mechanism of their acting is not known until now. We studied low-frequency magnetic field effect on cytoskeleton and on the structure of chromatin in human cells. We used cell line of small lung carcinoma (A549) and the effects of magnetic field on cytoskeleton and higher-order chromatin structure were analyzed 96 h of magnetic field exposure. Magnetic field generated by the cylindrical soil was homogenous and the cells were cultivated at 37 degrees C in humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO(2). Magnetic field induction was B(m)=2 mT and the net frequency f=50 Hz. In such affected and control cells the F-actin was estimated using FITC-conjugated Phalloidin and mitochondria were studied using MitoTracker (Molecular Probes). Images of cytoskeleton and genetic loci were acquired using confocal microscopy and analysis was performed by FISH 2.0 software. Slight morphological changes of F-actin filaments and mitochondria were observed in affected cells and nuclear condensation was found. These effects could be related to the process of cell death apoptosis probably induced by magnetic field. The studies aimed at centromeric heterochromatin (9cen) did not show statistically significant changes. Therefore, we suggest that magnetic field has no influence on higher order chromatin structure but certain changes could be observed on the level of cytoskeleton. However, these statements need a thorough verification. Our preliminary experiments will be extended and the effect of magnetic field on another structures of cytoskeleton and cell nuclei will be further studied.

  20. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  1. Mapping the magnetic hyperfine field in GdCo5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, V. I.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Delyagin, N. N.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic hyperfine field (Bhf) in ferrimagnetic GdCo5 compound has been investigated as a function of temperature by Mössbauer effect (ME) spectroscopy and perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy using 119Sn and 111Cd probe nuclei, respectively. Results show that the non-magnetic probe atoms 119Sn and 111Cd substitute all three non-equivalent positions in GdCo5: Gd, CoI, and CoII. For 119Sn and 111Cd probes at Gd sites, the saturation magnetic hyperfine fields are very different with values of Bhf1 = 57.0(1) T and Bhf1= 20.7(1) T, respectively. For 119Sn and 111Cd atoms localized at CoI and CoII sites the magnetic hyperfine fields are practically identical and, in saturation, reach the values of Bhf2 = 11.6(1) T and Bhf2 = 11.1(2) T, and Bhf3 = 14.8(1) T and Bhf3 = 14.4(2) T, respectively.

  2. Magnetic field distribution inside the aperture of a steerer magnet prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriţă, Ionel; Dan, Daniel; Tănase, Nicolae

    2015-11-01

    The High Energy Storage Ring (HESR), an important part of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) international project [1], which will be set up in Darmstadt in the next years, contains, among other magnets, several corrector magnets used for vertical and horizontal beam deviation. A prototype of a 2mrad vertical steerer magnet was designed by National Institute for R&D in Electrical Engineering (ICPE-CA) Romania in close cooperation with Forschungszentrum Jülich Germany [2] and then manufactured and tested by ICPE-CA [3], Romanian Institute for Electrical Engineering—Advanced Research. Magnetic field measurements using a 3D Hall probe were performed. Measured data and their analysis are presented. The system used for Hall probe positioning and data acquisition is also described.

  3. Application peculiarities of magnetic materials for protection from magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, P.; Dmitrenko, V.; Grabchikov, S.; Vlasik, K.; Novikov, A.; Petrenko, D.; Trukhanov, V.; Ulin, S.; Uteshev, Z.; Chernysheva, V.; Shustov, A.

    2016-02-01

    In different materials for magnetic shields, the maximum permeability is achieved for different values of the magnetic field. This determines the choice of material. So for protection from magnetic fields strength of 10 - 150 A/m it is advisable to apply the amorphous ribbon 84KXCP. For stronger fields (more than 400 A/m) it is recommended to use MFS based on Ni20Fe80. Use of these materials allows creating an effective shield working in a wide range of magnetic field strengths.

  4. Unique topological characterization of braided magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.

    2013-01-15

    We introduce a topological flux function to quantify the topology of magnetic braids: non-zero, line-tied magnetic fields whose field lines all connect between two boundaries. This scalar function is an ideal invariant defined on a cross-section of the magnetic field, and measures the average poloidal magnetic flux around any given field line, or the average pairwise crossing number between a given field line and all others. Moreover, its integral over the cross-section yields the relative magnetic helicity. Using the fact that the flux function is also an action in the Hamiltonian formulation of the field line equations, we prove that it uniquely characterizes the field line mapping and hence the magnetic topology.

  5. Magnetic Field Synthesis for Microwave Magnetics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Ferromianetic Spheroids," J. Appl. Pl)v, . Vol. 29, (1958), p. 318. 12. II. Suhl, "The Nonlinear Behavior of Ferrites at Hiqh Microwave Sinnal Leveis," Proc...uniformly magnetized ferrite with the effects of exchange included. Using this method , a number of solutions (both exact and approximate) to the linearized...1969). 28. D. D. Stancil, "Magnetostatic Wave Precursors in Ferrite Thin Films Part I: Theory," Memorandum to Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group

  6. Dynamics of positive probes in underdense, strongly magnetized, E×B drifting plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Cooke, David L.

    2013-09-15

    Electron trapping, electron heating, space-charge wings, wake eddies, and current collection by a positive probe in E×B drifting plasma were studied in three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. In these simulations, electrons and ions were magnetized with respect to the probe and the plasma was underdense (ω{sub pe}<ω{sub ce}). A large drift velocity (Mach 4.5 with respect to the ion acoustic speed) between the plasma and probe was created with background electric and magnetic fields. Four distinct regions developed in the presences of the positive probe: a quasi-trapped electron region, an electron-depletion wing, an ion-rich wing, and a wake region. We report on the observations of strong electron heating mechanisms, space-charge wings, ion cyclotron charge-density eddies in the wake, electron acceleration due to a magnetic presheath, and the current-voltage relationship.

  7. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, Martin S.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies.

  8. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, M.S.

    1994-10-25

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies. 2 figs.

  9. The magnetic fields of forming solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M.; Gray, C. G.; Donati, J.-F.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields play a crucial role at all stages of the formation of low-mass stars and planetary systems. In the final stages, in particular, they control the kinematics of in-falling gas from circumstellar discs, and the launching and collimation of spectacular outflows. The magnetic coupling with the disc is thought to influence the rotational evolution of the star, while magnetized stellar winds control the braking of more evolved stars and may influence the migration of planets. Magnetic reconnection events trigger energetic flares which irradiate circumstellar discs with high energy particles that influence the disc chemistry and set the initial conditions for planet formation. However, it is only in the past few years that the current generation of optical spectropolarimeters has allowed the magnetic fields of forming solar-like stars to be probed in unprecedented detail. In order to do justice to the recent extensive observational programs new theoretical models are being developed that incorporate magnetic fields with an observed degree of complexity. In this review we draw together disparate results from the classical electromagnetism, molecular physics/chemistry and the geophysics literature, and demonstrate how they can be adapted to construct models of the large scale magnetospheres of stars and planets. We conclude by examining how the incorporation of multipolar magnetic fields into new theoretical models will drive future progress in the field through the elucidation of several observational conundrums.

  10. Absolute Calibration of the Magnetic Field Measurement for Muon g-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Midhat; Chupp, Tim; Muon g-2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab (E989) investigates the >3- σ discrepancy between the standard model prediction and the current experimental measurement of the muon magnetic moment anomaly, aμ = (g-2)/2. The effort requires a precise measurement of the 1.45 T magnetic field of the muon storage ring to 70 ppb. The final measurement will employ multiple absolute calibration probes: two water probes and a 3He probe. The 3He probe offers a cross-check of the water probes with different systematic corrections, adding a level of confidence to the measurement. A low-field 3He probe was developed at the Univ. of Michigan by employing a method called MEOP for the hyper-polarization of 3He gas, followed by NMR to determine the frequency proportional to the magnetic field in which the probe is placed. A modified probe design for operation under high fields will be tested at Argonne National Lab. Future development also involves the study of the systematic uncertainties to attain the error budget of <30 ppb for the calibration. Next, the calibration from the probes will be transferred to g-2 through several steps of a calibration chain ending in the final step of calibrating the NMR probes which measure the field in the muon storage ring at Fermilab. NSF PHY-1506021.

  11. Strong intrinsic mixing in vortex magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Shea-Rohwer, Lauren; Solis, Kyle J

    2009-07-01

    We report a method of magnetic mixing wherein a "vortex" magnetic field applied to a suspension of magnetic particles creates strong homogeneous mixing throughout the fluid volume. Experiments designed to elucidate the microscopic mechanism of mixing show that the torque is quadratic in the field, decreases with field frequency, and is optimized at a vortex field angle of approximately 55 degrees . Theory and simulations indicate that the field-induced formation of volatile particle chains is responsible for these phenomena. This technique has applications in microfluidic devices and is ideally suited to applications such as accelerating the binding of target biomolecules to biofunctionalized magnetic microbeads.

  12. Probing neutrino magnetic moments at the Spallation Neutron Source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Miranda, O. G.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-07-01

    Majorana neutrino electromagnetic properties are studied through neutral current coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. We focus on the potential of the recently planned COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source to probe muon-neutrino magnetic moments. The resulting sensitivities are determined on the basis of a χ2 analysis employing realistic nuclear structure calculations in the context of the quasiparticle random phase approximation. We find that they can improve existing limits by half an order of magnitude. In addition, we show that these facilities allow for standard model precision tests in the low energy regime, with a competitive determination of the weak mixing angle. Finally, they also offer the capability to probe other electromagnetic neutrino properties, such as the neutrino charge radius. We illustrate our results for various choices of experimental setup and target material.

  13. Probing Brownian relaxation in water-glycerol mixtures using magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemala, Humeshkar; Milgie, Michael; Wadehra, Anshu; Thakur, Jagdish; Naik, Vaman; Naik, Ratna

    2013-03-01

    Generation of heat by magnetic nanoparticles in the presence of an external oscillating magnetic field is known as magnetic hyperthermia (MHT). This heat is generated by two mechanisms: the Neel relaxation and Brownian relaxation. While the internal spin relaxation of the nanoparticles known as Neel relaxation is largely dependent on the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles, the physical motion of the particle or the Brownian relaxation is largely dependent on the viscous properties of the carrier liquid. The MHT properties of dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles have been investigated at a frequency of 400KHz. To understand the influence of Brownian relaxation on heating, we probe the MHT properties of these ferrofluids in water-glycerol mixtures of varying viscosities. The heat generation is quantified using the specific absorption rate (SAR) and its maximum at a particular temperature is discussed with reference to the viscosity.

  14. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  15. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Doran D; Alexson, Dimitri A; Garbini, Joseph L

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  16. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-15

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  17. Probing electric fields within organic transistors by nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Paulo B.; Motti, Silvia G.; Gomes, Douglas J. C.

    2015-03-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are important building blocks in many organic devices, but further improvements in their performance will require a detailed knowledge of their operation mechanism. Thus mapping the electric fields in OFETs, both in the active organic layer and inside the gate dielectric, will allow a direct comparison with theoretical OFET models and guide advances in device engineering. The nonlinear optical processes of sum-frequency generation (SFG) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) may be used to probe electric fields in OFETs. With a proper choice of pump wavelength, SHG can selectively probe the field component along the OFET channel, inside the organic semiconductor. In contrast, SFG may probe the field within any organic material by selecting a specific molecular vibration and monitoring the field-enhanced SFG signal. Here we investigate OFETs fabricated with a polythiophene derivative (P3HT) on silicon substrates and with the insulating polymer PMMA for the dielectric layer. Both the strength and sign of the electric field in PMMA can be determined, yielding a direct probe of charge accumulation along the OFET channel. An extension of this technique to map the spatial distribution of accumulated charge along the channel will also be discussed. Work funded by FAPESP and CNPq (Brazil).

  18. Connecting Photospheric Magnetic Fields and Transition Temperature Plasma Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The connectivity of quiet sun magnetic fields is not well understood. One observational obstacle to probe this question has been the sparse spectral observations spanning the transition temperatures (3×104 K< T < 1×105K) between the chromosphere and corona. The Si IV lines observed by IRIS provide a rich dataset to address the structure of the cool quiet sun. We use over 900 deep exposures from IRIS to map the correlation between transition-temperature emission structures and magnetic field concentrations. Ultimately, our aim is to discern the topology and energetic equilibrium of the magnetic structures that span the quiet sun. We use both a potential field model and a snapshot of the Bifrost 3D MHD simulation to interpret our emission data. In a broad sense, we find there is a clear correlation between magnetic fields and strong Si IV emission. However, more pointed statistics suggest that the relationship is quite complex. We do not find evidence for cool loops longer than 3 Mm in length, but we see ubiquitous, smooth emission nearly everywhere in the quiet sun. Emission voids on scales larger than 8 Mm cannot be well explained by their proximity to magnetic fields. This evidence suggests that weak-field transition-temperature loops contribute significantly to quiet sun transition-temperature emission measure, and evolutionary effects likely play a role in structuring the magnetic atmosphere.

  19. Can We Probe the Conductivity of the Lithosphere and Upper Mantle Using Satellite Tidal Magnetic Signals?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnepf, N. R.; Kuvshinov, A.; Sabaka, T.

    2015-01-01

    A few studies convincingly demonstrated that the magnetic fields induced by the lunar semidiurnal (M2) ocean flow can be identified in satellite observations. This result encourages using M2 satellite magnetic data to constrain subsurface electrical conductivity in oceanic regions. Traditional satellite-based induction studies using signals of magnetospheric origin are mostly sensitive to conducting structures because of the inductive coupling between primary and induced sources. In contrast, galvanic coupling from the oceanic tidal signal allows for studying less conductive, shallower structures. We perform global 3-D electromagnetic numerical simulations to investigate the sensitivity of M2 signals to conductivity distributions at different depths. The results of our sensitivity analysis suggest it will be promising to use M2 oceanic signals detected at satellite altitude for probing lithospheric and upper mantle conductivity. Our simulations also suggest that M2 seafloor electric and magnetic field data may provide complementary details to better constrain lithospheric conductivity.

  20. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed research efforts funded by the UDAP grant to the BRI involve the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. This is a collaborative venture bringing together investigators at the BRI, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In addition, other collaborations have been formed with investigators granted UDAP funds for similar studies and with investigators affiliated with other Voyager experiments. These investigations and the corresponding collaborations are included in the report. The proposed effort as originally conceived included an examination of waves downstream from the shock within the magnetosheath. However, the observations of unexpected complexity and diversity within the upstream region have necessitated that we confine our efforts to those observations recorded upstream of the bow shock on the inbound and outbound legs of the encounter by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.

  1. Representation of magnetic fields in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Several methods by which a magnetic field in space can be represented are reviewed with particular attention to problems of the observed geomagnetic field. Time dependence is assumed to be negligible, and five main classes of representation are described by vector potential, scalar potential, orthogonal vectors, Euler potentials, and expanded magnetic field.

  2. Static uniform magnetic fields and amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Srikanth, S.; Mahajan, S.M.; Ventrice, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    Three species of potentially pathogenic amoebae were exposed to 71 and 106.5 mT from constant homogeneous magnetic fields and examined for inhibition of population growth. The number of amoebae for three species was significantly less than controls after a 72 h exposure to the magnetic fields when the temperature was 20 C or above. Axenic cultures, i.e., cultures grown without bacteria, were significantly affected after only 24 h. In 20 of 21 tests using the three species, the magnetic field significantly inhibited the growth of amoebae. In one test in which the temperature was 20 C for 48 h, exposure to the magnetic field was not inhibitory. Final numbers of magnetic field-exposed amoebae ranged from 9 to 72% lower than the final numbers of unexposed controls, depending on the species. This research may lead to disinfection strategies utilizing magnetic fields for surfaces on which pathogenic amoebae may proliferate.

  3. Long-pulse magnetic field facility at Zaragoza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algarabel, P. A.; del Moral, A.; Martín, C.; Serrate, D.; Tokarz, W.

    2006-11-01

    The long-pulse magnetic field facility of the Laboratorio de Magnetismo - Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC) produces magnetic fields up to 31, with a pulse duration of 2.2s. Experimental set-ups for measurements of magnetization, magnetostriction and magnetoresistance are available. The temperature can be controlled between 1.4 and 335 K, being the inner bore of the He cryostat of 22.5 mm. Magnetization is measured using the mutual induction technique, the magnetostriction is determined with the strain-gage and the capacitive cantilever methods, and the magnetoresistance is measured by means of the aclock-in technique in the 4-probes geometry. An overview of the facility will be presented and the presently available experimental techniques will be discussed.

  4. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  5. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  6. Electric-field and magnetic-field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieckowski, T. W.

    1993-05-01

    Analysis of double-loaded loop antennas and their properties has led to the design of new measuring sensors which enable has led to determination of both electric field strength and magnetic field strength. Sensors of the design proposed are applicable to a quasipoint measurement providing independent determination of the electric and magnetic component of the field.

  7. A novel experiment using rotating magnetic fields to study the pumping spin states in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Minguez, Alberto; Macia, Ferran; Hernandez, Joan Manel; Carbonell, Carla; Amigó, Roger; Tejada, Javier

    2008-03-01

    We report here a new experimental technique to monitor spin population dynamics in molecular magnets. This deals with a huge rotating magnetic field initially applied along the easy magnetization direction, z--axis, that rotates with components parallel and perpendicular to the z axis. This technique allows us to probe spin relaxation on reasonably fast time scales detecting the inversion of the whole spin states. The population of spin levels depends on the frequency of the rotating magnetic field. This very new technique could help to carry out new experiments in a number of different fields, broadening substantially the scope of their use until now. A Hern'andez-M'inguez et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 202502 (2007)

  8. Magnetically modified bioсells in constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, E. G.; Panina, L. K.; Kolikov, V. A.; Bogomolova, E. V.; Snetov, V. N.; Cherepkova, I. A.; Kiselev, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell' size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  9. Swarm: ESA's Magnetic Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Haagmans, R.; Floberghagen, R.; Plank, G.; Menard, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission in ESA's Living Planet Programme, and is scheduled for launch in 2012. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution using a constellation of 3 identical satellites. The Mission shall deliver data that allow access to new insights into the Earth system by improved scientific understanding of the Earth's interior and near-Earth electromagnetic environment. After launch and triple satellite release at an initial altitude of about 490 km, a pair of the satellites will fly side-by-side with slowly decaying altitude, while the third satellite will be lifted to 530 km to complete the Swarm constellation. High-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer and electric field measurements, will provide the observations required to separate and model various sources of the geomagnetic field and near-Earth current systems. The mission science goals are to provide a unique view into Earth core dynamics, mantle conductivity, crustal magnetisation, ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems and upper atmosphere dynamics - ranging from understanding the geodynamo to contributing to space weather. The scientific objectives and results from recent scientific studies will be presented. In addition the current status of the project, which is presently approaching the final stage of the development phase, will be addressed. A consortium of European scientific institutes is developing a distributed processing system to produce geophysical (Level 2) data products to the Swarm user community. The setup of Swarm ground segment and the contents of the data products will be addressed. More information on the Swarm mission can be found at the mission web site (see URL below).

  10. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-15

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10{sup -4} Pa Xe (3.3x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) to 1.1x10{sup -3} Pa Xe (8.4x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures.

  11. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S. Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-21

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  12. Free oscillations of magnetic fluid in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the esults of measuring the elastic parameters of an oscillatory system (coefficient of pondermotive elasticity, damping factor, and oscillation frequency) whose viscous inertial element is represented by a magnetic fluid confined in a tube by magnetic levitation in a strong magnetic field. The role of elasticity is played by the pondermotive force acting on thin layers at the upper and lower ends of the fluid column. It is shown that, by measuring the elastic oscillation frequencies of the magnetic fluid column, it is possible to develop a fundamentally new absolute method for determining the saturation magnetization of a magnetic colloid.

  13. Investigation of the Three-Dimensional Structure of a Rotating Magnetic Field Driven Field-Reversed Configuration using Internal Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velas, Katherine M.

    The Translation, Confinement, Sustainment Upgrade device (TCSU) used a rotating magnetic field (RMF) to form and sustain plasma in a field-reversed configuration (FRC). The physics of RMF current drive can be modeled in terms of the torque acting on the FRC. A fully translatable three-axis internal magnetic probe was built and used to generate a full r-z map of the magnetic field in the FRC and open field line region. Probe measurements are used to calculate the torques acting on the FRC formed using even-parity and odd-parity RMF antenna configurations. Odd-parity current drive was found to be more efficient and yields a plasma with lower resistivity than in even-parity current drive. An extrapolation method was developed to generate 3D magnetic field line plots which show that unlike in even-parity, field lines in odd-parity sustained FRCs make multiple transits of the FRC. Analysis using the three-axis probe data has greatly expanded our understanding of the physics of RMF driven FRCs.

  14. Numerical analysis of magnetic field in superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Y. ); Amemiya, Y. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than the other systems of electric energy storage because of larger stored energy and higher efficiency. The other systems are the battery, the flywheel, the pumped-storage power station. Some models of solenoid type SMES are designed in U.S.A. and Japan. But a high magnetic field happens by the large scale SMES in the living environment, and makes the erroneous operations of the computer display, the pacemaker of the heart and the electronic equipments. We study some fit designs of magnetic shielding of the solenoidal type SMES for reduction of the magnetic field in living environment. When some superconducting shielding coils are over the main storage coil, magnetic field reduces remarkably than the case of non shielding coil. The calculated results of the magnetic field are obtained y the finite element method.

  15. Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béché, Armand; van Boxem, Ruben; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Verbeeck, Jo

    2014-01-01

    The experimental search for magnetic monopole particles has, so far, been in vain. Nevertheless, these elusive particles of magnetic charge have fuelled a rich field of theoretical study. Here, we created an approximation of a magnetic monopole in free space at the end of a long, nanoscopically thin magnetic needle. We experimentally demonstrate that the interaction of this approximate magnetic monopole field with a beam of electrons produces an electron vortex state, as theoretically predicted for a true magnetic monopole. This fundamental quantum mechanical scattering experiment is independent of the speed of the electrons and has consequences for all situations where electrons meet such monopole magnetic fields, as, for example, in solids. The set-up not only shows an attractive way to produce electron vortex states but also provides a unique insight into monopole fields and shows that electron vortices might well occur in unexplored solid-state physics situations.

  16. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  17. Bats Respond to Very Weak Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth’s magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years. PMID:25922944

  18. Magnetic field spectrum at cosmological recombination revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-06-01

    If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, nonlinear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes, in the tight coupling regime in the radiation dominated era. Therefore, the amplitude of the magnetic fields on small scales, k ≳10 h Mpc-1 , is smaller than the previous estimates. The amplitude of the generated magnetic fields at cosmological recombination is about Brec=5.0 ×10-24 Gauss on k =5.0 ×10-1 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we discuss the reason for the discrepancies that exist in estimates of the amplitude of magnetic fields among other authors.

  19. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  20. Simulation of Magnetic Field Guided Plasma Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersohn, Frans; Sheehan, J. P.; Gallimore, Alec; Shebalin, John

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic field guided expansion of a radio-frequency plasma was simulated with a quasi-one-dimensional particle-in-cell code. Two-dimensional effects were included in a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code by varying the cross-sectional area of the one dimensional domain and including forces due to the magnetic field. Acceleration of electrons by the magnetic field forces leads to the formation of potential structures which then accelerate the ions into a beam. Density changes due to the plasma expansion only weakly affect the ion acceleration. Rapidly diverging magnetic fields lead to more rapid acceleration and the electrons cool as they expand.

  1. Flow Transitions in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    1996-01-01

    Critical Rayleigh numbers have been measured in a liquid metal cylinder of finite height in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. Several different stability regimes were observed, which were determined by the values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. For weak rotating magnetic fields and small Rayleigh numbers, the experimental observations can be explained by the existence of a single non-axisymmetric meridional roll rotating around the cylinder, driven by the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. The measured dependence of rotational velocity on magnetic field strength is consistent with the existence of laminar flow in this regime.

  2. Probing arrays of circular magnetic microdots by ferromagnetic resonance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kakazei, G. N.; Mewes, T.; Wigen, P. E.; Hammel, P. C.; Slavin, A. N.; Pogorelov, Y. G.; Costa, M. D.; Golub, V. O.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Novosad, V.

    2008-06-01

    X-band ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was used to characterize in-plane magnetic anisotropies in rectangular and square arrays of circular nickel and Permalloy microdots. In the case of a rectangular lattice, as interdot distances in one direction decrease, the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy field increases, in good agreement with a simple theory of magnetostatically interacting uniformly magnetized dots. In the case of a square lattice a four-fold anisotropy of the in-plane FMR field H(r) was found when the interdot distance a gets comparable to the dot diameter D. This anisotropy, not expected in the case of uniformly magnetized dots, was explained by a non-uniform magnetization m(r) in a dot in response to dipolar forces in the patterned magnetic structure. It is well described by an iterative solution of a continuous variation procedure. In the case of perpendicular magnetization multiple sharp resonance peaks were observed below the main FMR peak in all the samples, and the relative positions of these peaks were independent of the interdot separations. Quantitative description of the observed multiresonance FMR spectra was given using the dipole-exchange spin wave dispersion equation for a perpendicularly magnetized film where in-plane wave vector is quantized due to the finite dot radius, and the inhomogenetiy of the intradot static demagnetization field in the nonellipsoidal dot is taken into account. It was demonstrated that ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy (FMRFM) can be used to determine both local and global properties of patterned submicron ferromagnetic samples. Local spectroscopy together with the possibility to vary the tip-sample spacing enables the separation of those two contributions to a FMRFM spectrum. The global FMR properties of circular submicron dots determined using magnetic resonance force microscopy are in a good agreement with results obtained using conventional FMR and with theoretical descriptions.

  3. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  4. Magnetic field evolution in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Jurusik, W.; Wiórkiewicz, K.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: Violent gravitational interactions can change the morphologies of galaxies and, by means of merging, transform them into elliptical galaxies. We aim to investigate how they affect the evolution of galactic magnetic fields. Methods: We selected 16 systems of interacting galaxies with available VLA archive radio data at 4.86 and 1.4 GHz and compared their radio emission and estimated magnetic field strengths with their star-forming activity, far-infrared emission, and the stage of tidal interaction. Results: The estimated mean of total magnetic field strength for our sample of interacting galaxies is 14 ± 5 μG, which is larger than for the non-interacting objects. The field regularity (of 0.27 ± 0.09) is lower than in typical spirals and indicates enhanced production of random magnetic fields in the interacting objects. We find a general evolution of magnetic fields: for weak interactions the strength of magnetic field is almost constant (10-15 μG) as interaction advances, then it increases up to 2× , peaks at the nuclear coalescence (25 μG), and decreases again, down to 5-6 μG, for the post-merger remnants. The main production of magnetic fields in colliding galaxies thus terminates somewhere close to the nuclear coalescence, after which magnetic field diffuses. The magnetic field strength for whole galaxies is weakly affected by the star formation rate (SFR), while the dependence is higher for galactic centres. We show that the morphological distortions visible in the radio total and polarized emission do not depend statistically on the global or local SFRs, while they do increase (especially in the polarization) with the advance of interaction. The constructed radio-far-infrared relations for interacting and non-interacting galaxies display a similar balance between the generation of cosmic rays, magnetic fields, and the production of the thermal energy and dust radiation. Conclusions: The regular magnetic fields are much more sensitive to

  5. Magnetic field strength in solar coronal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2017-03-01

    We applied Bayesian techniques to the problem of inferring the magnetic field strength in transversely oscillating solar coronal loops from observed periods and damping times. This was done by computing the marginal posterior probability density for parameters such as the waveguide density, the density contrast, the transverse inhomogeneity length scale, and the magnetic field strength under the assumption that the observed waves can be modelled as standing or propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink modes of magnetic flux tubes. Our results indicate that the magnetic field strength can be inferred, even if the densities inside and outside the structure are largely unknown. When information on plasma density is available, the method enables to self-consistently include this knowledge to further constrain the inferred magnetic field strength. The inclusion of the observed oscillation damping enables to obtain information on the transverse density structuring and considerably alters the obtained posterior for the magnetic field strength.

  6. Design and validation of the ball-pen probe for measurements in a low-temperature magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bousselin, G.; Cavalier, J.; Pautex, J. F.; Heuraux, S.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G.

    2013-01-15

    Ball-pen probes have been used in fusion devices for direct measurements of the plasma potential. Their application in low-temperature magnetized plasma devices is still subject to studies. In this context, a ball-pen probe has been recently implemented on the linear plasma device Mirabelle. Produced by a thermionic discharge, the plasma is characterized by a low electron temperature and a low density. Plasma confinement is provided by an axial magnetic field that goes up to 100 mT. The principle of the ball-pen probe is to adjust the saturation current ratio to 1 by reducing the electron current contribution. In that case, the floating potential of the probe is close to the plasma potential. A thorough study of the ball-pen probe operation is performed for different designs of the probe over a large set of plasma conditions. Comparisons between ball-pen, Langmuir, and emissive probes are conducted in the same plasma conditions. The ball-pen probe is successfully measuring the plasma potential in these specific plasma conditions only if an adapted electronics and an adapted probe size to the plasma characteristic lengths ({lambda}{sub D}, {rho}{sub ce}) are used.

  7. Design and validation of the ball-pen probe for measurements in a low-temperature magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Bousselin, G; Cavalier, J; Pautex, J F; Heuraux, S; Lemoine, N; Bonhomme, G

    2013-01-01

    Ball-pen probes have been used in fusion devices for direct measurements of the plasma potential. Their application in low-temperature magnetized plasma devices is still subject to studies. In this context, a ball-pen probe has been recently implemented on the linear plasma device Mirabelle. Produced by a thermionic discharge, the plasma is characterized by a low electron temperature and a low density. Plasma confinement is provided by an axial magnetic field that goes up to 100 mT. The principle of the ball-pen probe is to adjust the saturation current ratio to 1 by reducing the electron current contribution. In that case, the floating potential of the probe is close to the plasma potential. A thorough study of the ball-pen probe operation is performed for different designs of the probe over a large set of plasma conditions. Comparisons between ball-pen, Langmuir, and emissive probes are conducted in the same plasma conditions. The ball-pen probe is successfully measuring the plasma potential in these specific plasma conditions only if an adapted electronics and an adapted probe size to the plasma characteristic lengths (λ(D), ρ(ce)) are used.

  8. Magnetic Field Structure in Molecular Clouds by Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Su, B. H.; Eswaraiah, C.; Pandey, A. K.; Wang, C. W.; Lai, S. P.; Tamura, M.; Sato, S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a program to delineate magnetic field structure inside molecular clouds by optical and infrared polarization observations. An ordered magnetic field inside a dense cloud may efficiently align the spinning dust grains to cause a detectable level of optical and near-infrared polarization of otherwise unpolarized background starlight due to dichroic extinction. The near-infrared polarization data were taken by SIRPOL mounted on IRSF in SAAO. Here we present the SIRPOL results in RCW 57, for which the magnetic field is oriented along the cloud filaments, and in Carina Nebula, for which no intrinsic polarization is detected in the turbulent environment. We further describe TRIPOL, a compact and efficient polarimer to acquire polarized images simultaneously at g', r', and i' bands, which is recently developed at Nagoya University for adaption to small-aperture telescopes. We show how optical observations probe the translucent outer parts of a cloud, and when combining with infrared observations probing the dense parts, and with millimeter and submillimeter observations to sutdy the central embedded protostar, if there is one, would yield the magnetic field structure on different length scales in the star-formation process.

  9. Magnetic field measurements for study of fast electron transport in magnetized HED plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Griffin, Brandon; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Interaction of megagauss magnetic fields with high energy density (HED) plasma is of great interest in the field of magnetized plasma. The field changes fundamental properties of the HED plasma such as thermal and magnetic diffusion. A coupled capability utilizing the 1.0 MA Zebra pulsed power generator and the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility enables to create such a condition for studies of magnetized plasma properties. We have conducted an experiment to measure magnetic fields generated by a 1.0 MA, 100 ns Zebra pulsed current in stainless steel coils. Using a 532 nm continuous laser from a single longitudinal mode laser system, the temporal change in the magnetic field was measured with the Faraday rotation in F2 glass. The probe laser passing through the 1.5 mm in radius and 1.75 mm thick glass placed in the vicinity of the inductive coils was split with a Glan-Taylor prism to measure vertical and horizontal polarization components with photodiodes. We will present the analysis of the experimental result and a design of a coupled experiment for study of fast electron transport in the magnetized plasma.

  10. Stable magnetic field gradient levitation of Xenopus laevis: toward low-gravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Valles, J M; Lin, K; Denegre, J M; Mowry, K L

    1997-08-01

    We have levitated, for the first time, living biological specimens, embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis, using a large inhomogeneous magnetic field. The magnetic field/field gradient product required for levitation was 1430 kG2/cm, consistent with the embryo's susceptibility being dominated by the diamagnetism of water and protein. We show that unlike any other earth-based technique, magnetic field gradient levitation of embryos reduces the body forces and gravity-induced stresses on them. We discuss the use of large inhomogeneous magnetic fields as a probe for gravitationally sensitive phenomena in biological specimens.

  11. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Supersolid phases in the magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Guo; Yang, Shi-Jie

    2017-02-01

    We study the ground state phases of the ultracold atomic condensates loaded in a two-dimensional optical lattice with the magnetic fields. Apart from uniform superfluid (SF) phase, four types of supersolid (SS) phases in the presence of the uniform magnetic fluxes and two types of SS phases in the presence of the staggered magnetic fluxes are found. For the system without magnetic flux, except for a certain unit phase factor ϕ x (y) = π, the magnetic field has no effect on the system.

  13. Magnetic Field Investigations During ROSETTA's Steins Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, K.; Auster, H.; Richter, I.; Motschmann, U.; RPC/ROMAP Teams

    2009-05-01

    During the recent Steins flyby of the ROSETTA spacecraft magnetic field measurements have been made with both, the RPC orbiter magnetometer and the ROMAP lander magnetometer. These combined magnetic field measurements allow a detailed examination of any magnetic signatures caused either directly by the asteroid or indirectly by Steins different modes of interaction with the solar wind. Comparing our measurements with simulation results show that Steins does not possess a significant remanent magnetization. The magnetization is estimated at less than 1 mAm2/kg. This is significantly different from results at Braille and Gaspra.

  14. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  15. Assembly of magnetic spheres in strong homogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, René; Stanković, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The assembly in two dimensions of spherical magnets in strong magnetic field is addressed theoretically. It is shown that the attraction and assembly of parallel magnetic chains is the result of a delicate interplay of dipole-dipole interactions and short ranged excluded volume correlations. Minimal energy structures are obtained by numerical optimization procedure as well as analytical considerations. For a small number of constitutive magnets Ntot ≤ 26, a straight chain is found to be the ground state. In the regime of larger Ntot ≥ 27, the magnets form two touching chains with equally long tails at both ends. We succeed to identify the transition from two to three touching chains at Ntot = 129. Overall, this study sheds light on the mechanisms of the recently experimentally observed ribbon formation of superparamagnetic colloids via lateral aggregation of magnetic chains in magnetic field (Darras et al., 2016).

  16. Magnetization of disclinated graphene in nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshanzamir-Nikou, M.; Goudarzi, H.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional disclinated atomic graphene layer in curved space-time is exactly discussed, and the explicit dependence of Landau levels on the topological defect and external magnetic field are obtained in the presence of nonuniform magnetic field. It is worth mentioning that the presence of topological defect reduces the degeneracy of energy levels. The persistent current, magnetization, susceptibility and the magnetoresistance of structure are investigated. It can be shown that the curvature of the conical surface affects the pattern of oscillations of persistent current and, of course, corresponding magnetoresistance. The behavior of the above physical quantities as a function of magnetic flux is explicitly found for various defects. We observe that increasing magnetic field leads to a aperiodic oscillation. The large Aharonov-Bohm flux gives rise to vanish the magnetization oscillations.

  17. Control of magnetism by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field.

  18. Near-Field Photothermal Heating with a Plasmonic Nanofocusing Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Dong, Biqing; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2016-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructures support plasmon resonances—collective oscillation of charge carriers at optical frequencies—and serve as effective tools to create bright light sources at the nanoscale. These sources are useful in broad application areas including, super-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, nanolithography, and near-field optomechanical transducers. The feasibility of these applications relies on efficient conversion of free-space propagating light to plasmons. Recently, we demonstrated a hybrid nanofocusing scheme for efficient coupling of light to plasmons at the apex of a scanning probe. In the approach, free-space light is coupled to propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the tapered shaft of the scanning probe. The SPPs propagate adiabatically towards the probe tip where they are coupled to localized plasmons (LSPs). The nanofocusing scheme was explored in a near-field scanning optical microscope for super-resolution imaging, near-field transduction of nanomechanical vibrations, and local detection of ultrasound. Owing to the strong concentration of light at the probe, significant heating of the tip and a sample positioned in the optical near-field is expected. This paper investigates the local heating produced by the plasmonic nanofocusing probe under steady-state conditions using the tip-enhanced Raman scattering approach. In addition, a finite element model is explored to study the coupling of free propagating light to LSPs, and to estimate the temperature rise expected in a halfspace heated by absorption of the LSPs. This study has implications for exploring the plasmonic nanofocusing probe in heat-assisted nanofabrication and fundamental studies of nanoscale heat transport in materials.

  19. Magnetic field evolution of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, Y. N.; Semerikov, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of a matter, accreting on to a magnetized neutron star, is accompanied by an electric current. The closing of the electric current occurs in the crust of a neutron stars in the polar region across the magnetic field. But the conductivity of the crust along the magnetic field greatly exceeds the conductivity across the field, so the current penetrates deep into the crust down up to the superconducting core. The magnetic field, generated by the accretion current, increases greatly with the depth of penetration due to the Hall conductivity of the crust is also much larger than the transverse conductivity. As a result, the current begins to flow mainly in the toroidal direction, creating a strong longitudinal magnetic field, far exceeding an initial dipole field. This field exists only in the narrow polar tube of r width, narrowing with the depth, i.e. with increasing of the crust density ρ, r ∝ ρ-1/4. Accordingly, the magnetic field B in the tube increases with the depth, B∝ρ1/2, and reaches the value of about 1017 Gauss in the core. It destroys superconducting vortices in the core of a star in the narrow region of the size of the order of 10 cm. Because of generated density gradient of vortices, they constantly flow into this dead zone and the number of vortices decreases, the magnetic field of a star decreases as well. The attenuation of the magnetic field is exponential, B = B0(1 + t/τ)-1. The characteristic time of decreasing of the magnetic field τ is equal to τ ≃ 103 yr. Thus, the magnetic field of accreted neutron stars decreases to values of 108-109 Gauss during 107-106 yr.

  20. Single-layer high field dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin and Alexander V. Zlobin

    2001-07-30

    Fermilab is developing high field dipole magnets for post-LHC hadron colliders. Several designs with a nominal field of 10-12 T, coil bore size of 40-50 mm based on both shell-type and block-type coil geometry are currently under consideration. This paper presents a new approach to magnet design, based on simple and robust single-layer coils optimized for the maximum field, good field quality and minimum number of turns.

  1. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  2. Beginning stages of local magnetic field formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.

    Based on a study of the initial stages of local magnetic field formation, the appearance of a new magnetic flux in the photosphere is studied. This magnetic flux is found to occur both under the influence of different modes of convective motion as well as under the action of Paleomagnetic fields. Waldmeier's Heliographic Maps of the Photosphere and Mt. Wilson Observatory daily magnetic maps were used in the analysis. Observed regularities could not be explained by a model of magnetic flux tubes emerging on the photospheric surface. This model can not account for the practically simultaneous development of separate active regions, belonging to different solar hemispheres and different cycles of solar activity in one, relatively narrow, 'unipolar' sector of the background field. It is also difficult to explain the different roles and velocities of negative and positive polarities during the formation of new magnetic fields. The importance of velocity measurements and maps for solving the observed phenomenon is stressed.

  3. Atom probe field ion microscopy of titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Titanium aluminides have a number of potential high temperature applications due to their good elevated-temperature mechanical properties, low density, and good creep and oxidation resistance. However, fabrication of commercial components of these materials has been impeded by their poor mechanical properties at ambient temperatures. Significant efforts with various degrees of success have been made to improve the mechanical properties of these TiAl alloys by doping them with a variety of different elements including B, C, Cr, Er, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Nb, P, Si, Ta, V and W. One of the optimum analytical tools for investigating the effects of these additions on the microstructure is the atom probe field ion micro scope. However, relatively few studies of titanium aluminides, compared to some other intermetallic compounds, have performed by atom probe field ion microscopy. This lack of attention can be attributed to the brittle nature of the material, in-situ transformations that occur during the field ion microscopy and preferential evaporation problems that were encountered in some of the early studies. The atom probe field ion microscope used for the current experiments has a low base pressure ({approximately} 2 {times} 10{sup 9} Pa) and careful attention was paid to optimizing the experimental parameters. All the examples shown were obtained from specimens prepared by standard electropolishing techniques. To demonstrate the suitability of the technique to these materials, several different titanium aluminides have been characterized in the atom probe.

  4. The measurement of geodesic acoustic mode magnetic field oscillations in J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, T.; Wu, J.; Shen, H. G.; Deng, T. J.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Sun, Y.; Liu, H.; Chen, Z. P.; Zhuang, G.

    2014-10-01

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) magnetic field oscillations have been investigated using three-dimension magnetic probe and Langmuir probe arrays in the edge of J-TEXT tokamak. The probe arrays are placed on the two top windows of tokamak, separated toroidally. Inside the LCFS, GAM shows apparent oscillations in floating potential. In contrast, GAM magnetic field oscillations are not significant in raw magnetic fields signals. Using toroidal correlation technique, the GAM magnetic field oscillations are distinguished from ambient magnetic field. The amplitudes of three dimension GAM magnetic field fluctuations, as well as the dependence with local plasma parameters such as safety factor and plasma beta, are coincident with theoretical predictions. And its toroidal symmetry mode structure, i.e. n = 0, is identified. Furthermore, the GAM current sheet, in which GAM oscillates, is firstly verified with magnetic probes arrays in different radial positions, which may help us to understand the radial structure of GAM. Supported by NNSFC (Nos. 10990210, 10990211, 10335060, 10905057 and 11375188), CPSF (No. 20080440104), YIF (No. WK2030040019) and KIPCAS (No. kjcx-yw-n28).

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic mode identification from magnetic probe signals via a matched filter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Dana H.; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bogatu, Ioan N.; Humphreys, David A.; Turnbull, Alan D.

    2002-04-01

    A matched filter analysis has been developed to identify the amplitude and phase of magnetohydrodynamic modes in DIII-D tokamak plasmas using magnetic probe signals (δBp). As opposed to conventional Fourier spatial analysis of toroidally spaced probes, this analysis includes data from both toroidally and poloidally spaced magnetic probe arrays. Using additional probes both improves the statistics of the analysis and more importantly incorporates poloidal information into the mode analysis. The matched filter is a numeric filter that matches signals from the magnetic probes with numerically predicted signals for the mode. The numerical predictions are developed using EFIT equilibrium reconstruction data as input to the stability code GATO and the vacuum field code VACUUM. Changes is the plasma equilibrium that occur on the same time scale as the mode are taken into account by modeling simple matched filter vectors corresponding to changes in total plasma current, plus vertical and horizontal plasma shifts. The matched filter method works well when there is good understanding of a mode and good modeling of its structure. Matched filter analysis results for a fast growing ideal kink mode, where equilibrium change effects are minimal, show the effectiveness of this method. A slow growing resistive-wall mode (RWM) is also analyzed using the matched filter method. The method gives good results for identifying the amplitude and phase of the RWM but the simple equilibrium vectors are insufficient for complete elimination of equilibrium changes on this time scale. An analysis of the computational requirements of the scheme indicates that real-time application of the matched filter for RWM identification will be possible.

  6. Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

  7. Initial Results of the SSPX Transient Internal Probe System for Measuring Toroidal Field Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Jarboe, T. R.; Mattick, A. T.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Cellamare, V.

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) is using a field profile diagnostic called the Transient Internal Probe (TIP). TIP consists of a verdet-glass bullet that is used to measure the magnetic field by Faraday rotation. This probe is shot through the spheromak by a light gas gun at speeds near 2 km/s. An argon laser is aligned along the path of the probe. The light passes through the probe and is retro-reflected to an ellipsometer that measures the change in polarization angle. The measurement is spatially resolved down to the probes’ 1 cm length to within 15 Gauss. Initial testing results are given. This and future data will be used to determine the field profile for equilibrium reconstruction. TIP can also be used in conjunction with wall probes to map out toroidal mode amplitudes and phases internally. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  8. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor.

    PubMed

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanouilidou, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C

    2016-08-01

    High-spatial-resolution magnetic imaging has driven important developments in fields ranging from materials science to biology. However, to uncover finer details approaching the nanoscale with greater sensitivity requires the development of a radically new sensor technology. The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for such a sensor on the basis of its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities. It has remained an outstanding challenge to implement the NV centre as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at cryogenic temperatures, however, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. Here, we present NV magnetic imaging down to 6 K with 3 μT Hz(-1/2) field sensitivity, and use the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with critical temperature Tc = 30 K. The expansion of NV-based magnetic imaging to cryogenic temperatures will enable future studies of previously inaccessible nanoscale magnetism in condensed-matter systems.

  9. Disruption of coronal magnetic field arcades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.

    1994-01-01

    The ideal and resistive properties of isolated large-scale coronal magnetic arcades are studied using axisymmetric solutions of the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in spherical geometry. We examine how flares and coronal mass ejections may be initiated by sudden disruptions of the magnetic field. The evolution of coronal arcades in response to applied shearing photospheric flows indicates that disruptive behavior can occur beyond a critical shear. The disruption can be traced to ideal MHD magnetic nonequilibrium. The magnetic field expands outward in a process that opens the field lines and produces a tangential discontinuity in the magnetic field. In the presence of plasma resistivity, the resulting current sheet is the site of rapid reconnection, leading to an impulsive release of magnetic energy, fast flows, and the ejection of a plasmoid. We relate these results to previous studies of force-free fields and to the properties of the open-field configuration. We show that the field lines in an arcade are forced open when the magnetic energy approaches (but is still below) the open-field energy, creating a partially open field in which most of the field lines extend away from the solar surface. Preliminary application of this model to helmet streamers indicates that it is relevant to the initiation of coronal mass ejections.

  10. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  11. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  12. Unsteady wandering magnetic field lines, turbulence and laboratory flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Liu, D.; Pulliam, D.; Lazarian, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe earth bound laboratory experiment investigations of patchy, unsteady, bursty, patchy magnetic field structures that are unifying features of magnetic reconnection and turbulence in helio, space and astro physics. Macroscopic field lines occupy cross sectional areas, fill up three dimensional (3D) volumes as flux tubes. They contain mass with Newtonian dynamics that follow magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) equations of motion. Flux rope geometry can be ubiquitous in laminar reconnection sheet geometries that are themselves unstable to formation of secondary "islands" that in 3D are really flux ropes. Flux ropes are ubiquitous structures on the sun and the rest of the heliosphere. Understanding the dynamics of flux ropes and their mutual interactions offers the key to many important astrophysical phenomena, including magnetic reconnection and turbulence. We describe laboratory investigations on RSX, where 3D interaction of flux ropes can be studied in great detail. We use experimental probes inside the the flux ropes to measure the magnetic and electric fields, current density, density, temperatures, pressure, and electrostatic and vector plasma potentials. Macroscopic magnetic field lines, unsteady wandering characteristics, and dynamic objects with structure down to the dissipation scale length can be traced from data sets in a 3D volume. Computational approaches are finally able to tackle simple 3D systems and we sketch some intriguing simulation results that are consistent with 3D extensions of typical 2D cartoons for magnetic reconnection and turbulence.

  13. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  14. Modeling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yar-Mukhamedov, D.

    2015-04-15

    An analytic model for evolution of galactic magnetic fields in hierarchical galaxy formation frameworks is introduced. Its major innovative components include explicit and detailed treatment of the physics of merger events, mass gains and losses, gravitational energy sources and delays associated with formation of large-scale magnetic fields. This paper describes the model, its implementation, and core results obtained by its means.

  15. Paramagnetic ellipsoidal microswimmer in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Mario; Fan, Louis; Pak, On Shun

    We study the two-dimensional Brownian dynamics of an ellipsoidal paramagnetic microswimmer moving at low-Reynolds-number and subject to a magnetic field. Its corresponding mean-square displacement tensor showing the effect of particles's shape, activity and magnetic field, on the microswimmer's diffusion is analytically obtained. A comparison among analytical and computational results is also made and we obtain excellent agreement.

  16. Solar Magnetic Field: Zeeman and Hanle Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, J.; Murdin, P.

    2001-10-01

    An external magnetic field causes the atomic energy levels to split into different sublevels, and the emitted radiation becomes polarized. This phenomenon is called the ZEEMAN EFFECT. When atoms in a magnetic field scatter radiation via bound-bound transitions, the phase relations or quantum interferences between the Zeeman-split sublevels give rise to POLARIZATION phenomena that go under the nam...

  17. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  18. In vivo heating of magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Babincová, M; Altanerová, V; Altaner, C; Cicmanec, P; Babinec, P

    2004-08-01

    We have evaluated heating capabilities of new magnetic nanoparticles. In in vitro experiments they were exposed to an alternating magnetic field with frequency 3.5 MHz and induction 1.5 mT produced in three turn pancake coil. In in vivo experiments rats with injected magnetic nanoparticles were also exposed to an ac field. An optimal increase of temperature of the tumor to 44 degrees C was achieved after 10 minutes of exposure. Obtained results showed that magnetic nanoparticles may be easily heated in vitro as well as in vivo, and may be therefore useful for hyperthermic therapy of cancer.

  19. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, Roman O.

    1997-01-01

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis.

  20. Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-13

    65 4.1 Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 4.1.1 Measurements only in the Body Frame . . . . 65 4.1.2 Changes in the Earth’s...existing information to determine position. Examples include terrain navigation, celestial navigation (astronavigation), inertial navigation, magnetic...tion when the magnetic field measurements are resolved with the body axis, high- lighting magnetic field measurements from magnetometers which do not

  1. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, R.O.

    1997-01-21

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis. 10 figs.

  2. Near-Field Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Pointed Probes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    metal nanostructure can be viewed as an optical antenna . Of course, the efficiency depends on the material composition and the geometry of the...nanostructure. A simple form of optical antenna is a single ellipsoidal particle. This particle ex- hibits a distinct resonance for which the field...Grober RD, Schoelkopf RJ, Prober DE. 1997. Optical antenna : towards a unity efficiency near-field optical probe. Appl. Phys. Lett. 70:1354 54. Farahani

  3. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  4. Tracing magnetic field orientation in starless cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswar, G.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Lee, C. W.; Dib, S.

    It is now well understood that stars are formed in the interiors of dense, gravitationally bound molecular cloud cores that are both magnetized and turbulent. But the relative role played by the magnetic field and the turbulence in cloud formation and evolution and in the subsequent star formation is a matter of debate. In a magnetically dominated scenario, the magnetic field geometry of the cores is expected to be inherited unchanged from their low-density envelope, even for an hour glass geometry of the field, unless the action of turbulence disturbs it. We carried out polarimetry of stars projected on starless molecular clouds, LDN 183 and LDN 1544, in R-filter. The comparison of these fields with those in the interiors of the cloud cores inferred from the sub-mm polarization shows that both magnetic field and turbulence are important in the cloud formation and evolution of star formation.

  5. Chaotic magnetic fields: Particle motion and energization

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Ram, Abhay K.; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaocan

    2014-02-11

    Magnetic field line equations correspond to a Hamiltonian dynamical system, so the features of a Hamiltonian systems can easily be adopted for discussing some essential features of magnetic field lines. The integrability of the magnetic field line equations are discussed by various authors and it can be shown that these equations are, in general, not integrable. We demonstrate several examples of realistic chaotic magnetic fields, produced by asymmetric current configurations. Particular examples of chaotic force-free field and non force-free fields are shown. We have studied, for the first time, the motion of a charged particle in chaotic magnetic fields. It is found that the motion of a charged particle in a chaotic magnetic field is not necessarily chaotic. We also showed that charged particles moving in a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field are energized. Such energization processes could play a dominant role in particle energization in several astrophysical environments including solar corona, solar flares and cosmic ray propagation in space.

  6. Measuring exposed magnetic fields of welders in working time.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Ojima, Jun; Sekino, Masaki; Hojo, Minoru; Saito, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of the occupational electromagnetic field exposure of welders is of great importance, especially in shielded-arc welding, which uses relatively high electric currents of up to several hundred amperes. In the present study, we measured the magnetic field exposure level of welders in the course of working. A 3-axis Hall magnetometer was attached to a subject's wrist in order to place the sensor probe at the closest position to the magnetic source (a cable from the current source). Data was acquired every 5 s from the beginning of the work time. The maximum exposed field was 0.35-3.35 mT (Mean ± SD: 1.55 ± 0.93 mT, N=17) and the average value per day was 0.04-0.12 mT (Mean ± SD: 0.07 ± 0.02 mT, N=17). We also conducted a finite element method-based analysis of human hand tissue for the electromagnetic field dosimetry. In addition, the magnetic field associated with grinders, an air hammer, and a drill using electromagnetic anchorage were measured; however, the magnetic fields were much lower than those generated in the welding process. These results agreed well with the results of the electromagnetic field dosimetry (1.49 mT at the wrist position), and the calculated eddy current (4.28 mA/m(2)) was much lower than the well-known guideline thresholds for electrical nerve or muscular stimulation.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  8. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2014-02-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity Equation. Among these approaches, image-plane off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope has acquired a prominent role thanks to its quantitative capabilities and broad range of applicability. After a brief overview of the main ideas and methods behind field mapping, we focus on theoretical models that form the basis of the quantitative interpretation of electron holographic data. We review the application of electron holography to a variety of samples (including electric fields associated with p-n junctions in semiconductors, quantized magnetic flux in superconductors and magnetization topographies in nanoparticles and other magnetic materials) and electron-optical geometries (including multiple biprism, amplitude and mixed-type set-ups). We conclude by highlighting the emerging perspectives of (i) three-dimensional field mapping using electron holographic tomography and (ii) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Bashful ballerina unveiled: Multipole analysis of the coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, I.; Mursula, K.

    2012-12-01

    Heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is the continuum of the coronal magnetic equator, dividing the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) into two sectors (polarities). Because of its wavy structure, the HCS is often called the ballerina skirt. Several studies have proven that the HCS is southward shifted during about three years in the solar declining phase. This persistent phenomenon, called the bashful ballerina, has been verified by geomagnetic indices since 1930s, by OMNI data base since 1960s, by the WSO PFSS model since mid-1970s and by the Ulysses probe measurements during the fast latitude scans in 1994-1995 and 2007. We study here the Wilcox Solar Observatory measurements of the photospheric magnetic field and the PFSS extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field. We show that the quadrupole moment of the photospheric magnetic field, which is important for the HCS asymmetry (bashful ballerina), mainly arises from the difference between northern and southern polar field strengths. According to the WSO data the minimum time quadrupole is mainly due to the difference between the highest northern and southern latitude bins. Related studies imply that the southward shift of the HCS is related to the delayed development of southern coronal holes. We also discuss the suggested connection of the HCS asymmetry to sunspot hemispheric asymmetry.

  10. Formation of magnetically anisotropic composite films at low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi Zahedi, Maryam; Ennen, Inga; Marchi, Sophie; Barthel, Markus J.; Hütten, Andreas; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Fragouli, Despina

    2017-04-01

    We present a straightforward two-step technique for the fabrication of poly (methyl methacrylate) composites with embedded aligned magnetic chains. First, ferromagnetic microwires are realized in a poly (methyl methacrylate) solution by assembling iron nanoparticles in a methyl methacrylate solution under heat in an external magnetic field of 160 mT. The simultaneous thermal polymerization of the monomer throughout the wires is responsible for their permanent linkage and stability. Next, the polymer solution containing the randomly dispersed microwires is casted on a solid substrate in the presence of a low magnetic field (20–40 mT) which induces the final alignment of the microwires into long magnetic chains upon evaporation of the solvent. We prove that the presence of the nanoparticles assembled in the form of microwires is a key factor for the formation of the anisotropic films under low magnetic fields. In fact, such low fields are not capable of driving and assembling dispersed magnetic nanoparticles in the same type of polymer solutions. Hence, this innovative approach can be utilized for the synthesis of magnetically anisotropic nanocomposite films at low magnetic fields.

  11. Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Piccinelli, Gabriella; Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia

    2013-07-23

    We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales which rises de possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger's proper time method.

  12. The magnetic field of ζ Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Rivinius, Th.

    2015-10-01

    Context. ζ Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. Aims: We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in ζ Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field. Methods: Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the least-squares deconvolution technique to extract the magnetic information. Results: We confirm that ζ Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component ζ Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a period of 6.829 d. This is the only magnetic O supergiant known as of today. With an oblique dipole field model of the Stokes V profiles, we show that the polar field strength is ~140 G. Because the magnetic field is weak and the stellar wind is strong, ζ Ori Aa does not host a centrifugally supported magnetosphere. It may host a dynamical magnetosphere. Its companion ζ Ori Ab does not show any magnetic signature, with an upper limit on the undetected field of ~300 G. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Assessing the Structure of Isotropic and Anisotropic Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Holden, Lisa; Grayson, Lindsay; Wallace, Kirk

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields permeate our universe, impacting a wide range of astronomical phenomena across all cosmic scales. A clear example is the magnetic field that threads the interstellar medium (ISM), which impacts the motion of cosmic rays through that medium. Understanding the structure of magnetic turbulence within the ISM and how it relates to the physical quantities that characterize it can thus inform our analysis of particle transport within these regions. Toward that end, we probe the structure of magentic turbulence through the use of Lyapunov exponents for a suite of isotropic and nonisotropic Alfvénic turbulence profiles. Our results provide a means of calculating a “turbulence lengthscale” that can then be connected to how cosmic rays propagate through magentically turbulent environments, and we perform such an analysis for molecular cloud environments.

  14. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985.

  15. Simultaneous poloidal measurements using new magnetically driven reciprocating probes in COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejarnac, R.; Gunn, J. P.; Dimitrova, M.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Saragosti-Chausy, C.; Tamain, P.; the COMPASS Team

    2016-03-01

    Particles and heat transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of tokamaks is not yet fully understood. COMPASS is a small-size tokamakp where the edge plasma is well diagnosed in view of studying the competition between the parallel and the cross-field transport in the SOL. In order to better characterize SOL dynamics, in particular the poloidal asymmetry of the main parameters' radial profiles, two new in-situ magnetically driven reciprocating manipulators have been recently installed in COMPASS. These manipulators, the so-called pecker probes, are two additional poloidal measurement points to the existing two (vertical and horizontal) reciprocating manipulators. The pecker probes are located at the low field side of COMPASS at ±47.5o with respect to the outer mid-plane and are equipped with identical tunnel probe heads, providing simultaneous measurements of the ion saturation current density Jsat, the electron temperature Te and the parallel Mach number M// with high temporal resolution. In this paper, a detailed description of the pecker probe system in COMPASS is described and first measurements are presented.

  16. Sensitivity of magnetic field gradients over Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykiev, Eldar; Ebbing, Jörg; Brönner, Marco; Fabian, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields from forward calculations of global crustal or lithospheric models cannot be compared easily with spherical harmonic (SH) crustal field models derived from the satellite observations. The reason for this is, that the lithospheric field has a significant part in the low-degree spherical harmonics (n<14) that are dominated by the core field. These low-degree harmonics are commonly zeroed out to retrieve the lithospheric magnetic field. In addition, at satellite height far-field effects from sources outside a regional study affect the long-wavelength part of the magnetic field. Because magnetic field gradients are less sensitive to the long wavelength anomalies, they are also less affected by the far field. However, the gradients still contain information about deep lithospheric structures. We present sensitivity tests based on a synthetic model of the Fennoscandian lithosphere to validate the influence of induced and remanent magnetization in magnetic data at the height of airborne surveys and satellite missions. The use of airborne data and satellite data is complementary because, due to their different height, they are sensitive to different depth domains. To correctly account for global and local aspects of the lithospheric field, our analysis is based on surface discretization by tesseroids (spherical prisms).

  17. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD SURROUNDING THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Whang, Y. C.

    2010-02-20

    This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical solution, in the limit of very low plasma beta-ratio, for the distortion of the interstellar magnetic field surrounding the heliopause. The solution is obtained using a line dipole method that is the integration of point dipole along a semi-infinite line; it represents the magnetic field caused by the presence of the heliopause. The solution allows the variation of the undisturbed magnetic field at any inclination angle. The heliosphere is considered as having blunt-nosed geometry on the upwind side and it asymptotically approaches a cylindrical geometry having an open exit for the continuous outflow of the solar wind on the downwind side. The heliopause is treated as a magnetohydrodynamic tangential discontinuity; the interstellar magnetic field lines at the boundary are tangential to the heliopause. The interstellar magnetic field is substantially distorted due to the presence of the heliopause. The solution shows the draping of the field lines around the heliopause. The magnetic field strength varies substantially near the surface of the heliopause. The effect on the magnetic field due to the presence of the heliopause penetrates very deep into the interstellar space; the depth of penetration is of the same order of magnitude as the scale length of the heliosphere.

  18. Dynamic Magnetic Field Applications for Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Grugel, Richard N.; Motakef, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic fields, variable in time and space, can be used to control convection in electrically conducting melts. Flow induced by these fields has been found to be beneficial for crystal growth applications. It allows increased crystal growth rates, and improves homogeneity and quality. Particularly beneficial is the natural convection damping capability of alternating magnetic fields. One well-known example is the rotating magnetic field (RMF) configuration. RMF induces liquid motion consisting of a swirling basic flow and a meridional secondary flow. In addition to crystal growth applications, RMF can also be used for mixing non-homogeneous melts in continuous metal castings. These applied aspects have stimulated increasing research on RMF-induced fluid dynamics. A novel type of magnetic field configuration consisting of an axisymmetric magnetostatic wave, designated the traveling magnetic field (TMF), has been recently proposed. It induces a basic flow in the form of a single vortex. TMF may find use in crystal growth techniques such as the vertical Bridgman (VB), float zone (FZ), and the traveling heater method. In this review, both methods, RMF and TMF are presented. Our recent theoretical and experimental results include such topics as localized TMF, natural convection dumping using TMF in a vertical Bridgman configuration, the traveling heater method, and the Lorentz force induced by TMF as a function of frequency. Experimentally, alloy mixing results, with and without applied TMF, will be presented. Finally, advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, will be discussed.

  19. Protein detection with magnetic nanoparticles in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckhoff, Jan; Lak, Aidin; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A detection scheme based on magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) dynamics in a rotating magnetic field for a quantitative and easy-to-perform detection of proteins is illustrated. For the measurements, a fluxgate-based setup was applied, which measures the MNP dynamics, while a rotating magnetic field is generated. The MNPs exhibit single iron oxide cores of 25 nm and 40 nm diameter, respectively, as well as a protein G functionalized shell. IgG antibodies were utilized as binding target molecules for the physical proof-of-concept. The measurement results were fitted with a theoretical model describing the magnetization dynamics in a rotating magnetic field. The established detection scheme allows quantitative determination of proteins even at a concentration lower than of the particles. The observed differences between the two MNP types are discussed on the basis of logistic functions.

  20. External-field-free magnetic biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanpeng; Wang, Yi; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) detection scheme without the presence of any external magnetic field. The proposed magnetic sensor uses a patterned groove structure within the sensor so that no external magnetic field is needed to magnetize the MNPs. An example is given based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing device with a spin valve structure. For this structure, the detection of MNPs located inside the groove and near the free layer is demonstrated under no external magnetic field. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to calculate the signal to noise level of this detection scheme. A maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 18.6 dB from one iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle with 8 nm radius is achieved. As proof of concept, this external-field-free GMR sensor with groove structure of 200 nm × 200 nm is fabricated using a photo and an electron beam integrated lithography process. Using this sensor, the feasibility demonstration of the detection SNR of 9.3 dB is achieved for 30 μl magnetic nanoparticles suspension (30 nm iron oxide particles, 1 mg/ml). This proposed external-field-free sensor structure is not limited to GMR devices and could be applicable to other magnetic biosensing devices.

  1. The Measurement of Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses five experimental methods used by senior high school students to provide an accurate calibration curve of magnet current against the magnetic flux density produced by an electromagnet. Compares the relative merits of the five methods, both as measurements and from an educational viewpoint. (JR)

  2. Decay of Resonaces in Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We suggest that decay properties (branching ratios) of hadronic resonances may become modified in strong external magnetic field. The behavior of K±*, K0* vector mesons as well as Λ* (1520) and Ξ0* baryonic states is considered in static fields 1013-1015 T. In particular, n = 0 Landau level energy increase of charged particles in the external magnetic field, and the interaction of hadron magnetic moments with the field is taken into account. We suggest that enhanced yield of dileptons and photons from ρ0(770) mesons may occur if strong decay channel ρ0 → π+π- is significantly suppressed. CP - violating π+π- decays of pseudoscalar ηc and η(547) mesons in the magnetic field are discussed, and superpositions of quarkonium states ηc,b and χc,b(nP) with Ψ(nS), ϒ(nS) mesons in the external field are considered.

  3. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  4. Velocity Fields in Stellar Atmospheres Probed by Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, Alain; Van Eck, Sophie; Kravchenko, Kateryna

    A tomographic method to probe velocity fields within stellar atmospheres is described. It relies on the design of spectral masks collecting lines forming at given, pre-specified ranges of optical depths. Different masks thus probe different line-formation depths in the stellar atmosphere. The masks are cross-correlated with the observed spectrum to yield cross-correlation functions (CCFs). The cross-correlation has two advantages: (i) to overcome line crowding, and (ii) to reveal minute line asymmetries by adding together many lines. In pulsating stars (long-period variables or Cepheids), the CCFs are double-peaked around maximum light, when the shock front associated with the stellar pulsation is located in the layer probed by the considered mask. Double-peaked CCFs originate in stellar layers where upward- and downward-moving matter co-exist, on each side of the shock front. The application of the tomographic method to long-period variables and supergiants is illustrated.

  5. Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-11-01

    Spatially complicated magnetic fields are frequently treated as the sum of a large, slowly varying, mean field and a small, rapidly varying, field. The primary effect of the small field is to modify the Ohm's law of the mean field. A set of plausible assumptions leads to a form of the mean field Ohm's law which is fundamentally different from the conventional alpha effect of dynamo theory.

  6. Preliminary Results of Performance Measurements on a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic configurations. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying a higher thrust efficiency. Preliminary thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 100-250 W. The thrust levels over this power range were 3.5-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 14-19% and 875- 1425 s, respectively. The magnetic field in the thruster was lower for the thrust measurements than the plasma probe measurements due to heating and weakening of the permanent magnets, reducing the maximum field strength from 2 kG to roughly 750-800 G. The discharge current levels observed during thrust stand testing were anomalously high compared to those levels measured in previous experiments with this thruster.

  7. Scattering in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Carey

    2002-08-19

    The fixed target program at Fermilab has come to an end. New projects are in the planning stage. Among them is a muon storage ring. Up to the present, all storage rings in high-energy physics have carried stable particles, namely the electron and proton and their antiparticles. The muon is unstable and decays with a mean lifetime of 2.0 x 10{sup -6} sec. Two types of cooling have been used in the past. One is stochastic cooling where an electrode is used to detect the positions of the particles and send a signal to another position across the ring. Through successive applications of this technique, the phase space is ultimately greatly reduced and beams can be made to collide with a useful event rate. The second type of cooling is electron cooling. Here protons and electrons are made to travel together for a short distance. Equipartition causes transfer of transverse energy of the protons to that of the electrons. Neither of these methods is fast enough to allow acceleration of a sufficient number of muons up to maximum energy before they decay. A new method known as ionization cooling has been proposed.[1] The muons are cooled by passing them through a container of liquid hydrogen. The energy loss reduces both transverse and longitudinal momentum. The longitudinal momentum is restored with RF cavities. The net result is to maintain the longitudinal momentum while cooling the transverse momentum. To minimize the total travel distance of the muons the liquid hydrogen is placed inside the focusing solenoids. The question arises as to whether the presence of the solenoids influences the phase space occupied by the muons. After the muon scatters it has transverse momentum. In a constant longitudinal magnetic field the trajectory wraps around the field lines and coincides in momentum and position with a particle which scatters one cycle later. Here we calculate the change in emittance for both a drift space and a solenoid. We find that the presence of the solenoid does

  8. Magnetic field homogeneity perturbations in finite Halbach dipole magnets.

    PubMed

    Turek, Krzysztof; Liszkowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Halbach hollow cylinder dipole magnets of a low or relatively low aspect ratio attract considerable attention due to their applications, among others, in compact NMR and MRI systems for investigating small objects. However, a complete mathematical framework for the analysis of magnetic fields in these magnets has been developed only for their infinitely long precursors. In such a case the analysis is reduced to two-dimensions (2D). The paper details the analysis of the 3D magnetic field in the Halbach dipole cylinders of a finite length. The analysis is based on three equations in which the components of the magnetic flux density Bx, By and Bz are expanded to infinite power series of the radial coordinate r. The zeroth term in the series corresponds to a homogeneous magnetic field Bc, which is perturbed by the higher order terms due to a finite magnet length. This set of equations is supplemented with an equation for the field profile B(z) along the magnet axis, presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the geometrical factors in the coefficients of particular powers of r, defined by intricate integrals are the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of the homogeneity profile (B(z)-Bc)/Bc. As a consequence, the components of B can be easily calculated with an arbitrary accuracy. In order to describe perturbations of the field due to segmentation, two additional equations are borrowed from the 2D theory. It is shown that the 2D approach to the perturbations generated by the segmentation can be applied to the 3D Halbach structures unless r is not too close to the inner radius of the cylinder ri. The mathematical framework presented in the paper was verified with great precision by computations of B by a highly accurate integration of the magnetostatic Coulomb law and utilized to analyze the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the magnet with the accuracy better than 1 ppm.

  9. Biological effects of high DC magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-06-01

    The principal focus of the program is the analysis of magnetic field effects on physiological functions in experimental animals and selected organ and tissue systems. A major research effort has involved the use of electrical recording techniques to detect functional alterations in the cardiovascular, neural, and visual systems during the application of DC magnetic fields. These systems involve ionic conduction processes, and are therefore potentially sensitive to electrodynamic interactions with an applied magnetic field. In the specific case of the visual system, magnetic interactions could also arise through orientational effects on the magnetically anisotropic photopigment molecules within retinal photoreceptor cells. In addition to studies with potentially sensitive target tissues, an evaluation is being made of magnetic field effects on a broad range of other physiological functions in laboratory mammals, including the measurement of circadian rhythms using noninvasive recording techniques. Results of investigations of magnetic field effects on the conformation of DNA, and on the growth and development of plants and insects are also reported. Figures and tables provide a brief summary of some representative observations in each of the research areas described. No significant alterations were observed in any of the physiological parameters examined to date, with the exception of major changes that occur in the electrocardiogram during magnetic field exposure. Studies with several species of animals have provided evidence that this phenomenon is attributable to electrical potentials that are induced during pulsatile blood flow in the aorta and in other major vessels of the circulatory system.

  10. Vector Magnetic Field in Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Pariat, E.

    A crucial phase in magnetic flux emergence is the rise of magnetic flux tubes through the solar photosphere, which represents a severe transition between the very different environments of the solar interior and corona. Multi-wavelength observations with Flare Genesis, TRACE, SoHO, and more recently with the vector magnetographs at THEMIS and Hida (DST) led to the following conclusions. The fragmented magnetic field in the emergence region - with dipped field lines or bald patches - is directly related with Ellerman bombs, arch filament systems, and overlying coronal loops. Measurements of vector magnetic fields have given evidence that undulating "serpentine" fields are present while magnetic flux tubes cross the photosphere. See the sketch below, and for more detail see Pariat et al. (2004, 2007); Watanabe et al. (2008):

  11. Write field asymmetry in perpendicular magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanjie; Bai, Daniel Z.; Lin, Ed; Mao, Sining

    2012-04-01

    We present a systematic study of write field asymmetry by using micromagnetic modeling for a perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) writer structure. Parameters investigated include initial magnetization condition, write current amplitude, write current frequency, and initial write current polarity. It is found that the write current amplitude and frequency (data rate) are the dominant factors that impact the field asymmetry. Lower write current amplitude and higher write current frequency will deteriorate the write field asymmetry, causing recording performance (such as bit error rate) degradation.

  12. Surface magnetic fields across the HR Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstreet, John D.

    2015-10-01

    The past 20 years have seen remarkable advances in spectropolarimetric instrumentation that have allowed us, for the first time, to identify some magnetic stars in most major stages of stellar evolution. We are beginning to see the broad outline of how such fields change during stellar evolution, to confront theoretical hypotheses and models of magnetic field structure and evolution with detailed data, and to understand more of the ways in which the presence of a field in turn affects stellar structure and evolution.

  13. Hyperfine magnetic fields in substituted Finemet alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzózka, K.; Sovák, P.; Szumiata, T.; Gawroński, M.; Górka, B.

    2016-12-01

    Transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to determine the hyperfine fields of Finemet-type alloys in form of ribbons, substituted alternatively by Mn, Ni, Co, Al, Zn, V or Ge of various concentration. The comparative analysis of magnetic hyperfine fields was carried out which enabled to understand the role of added elements in as-quenched as well as annealed samples. Moreover, the influence of the substitution on the mean direction of the local hyperfine magnetic field was examined.

  14. Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    The magnetic fields associated with plasmas frequently exhibit small amplitude MHD fluctuations. It is useful to have equations for the magnetic field averaged over these fluctuations, the so-called mean field equations. Under very general assumptions it is shown that the effect of MHD fluctuations on a force-free plasma can be represented by one parameter in Ohm's law, which is effectively the coefficient of electric current viscosity.

  15. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  16. Magnetic fields near Mars - First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Moehlmann, D.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Eroshenko, E.; Slavin, J.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Mars have been measured from Phobos 2 with high temporal resolution in the tail and down to an 850-km altitude. During four successive highly elliptical orbits, the position of the bow shock as well as that of a transition layer, the 'planetopause', were identified. Subsequent circular orbits at 6000-km altitude provided the first high-resolution data in the planetary tail and indicate that the interplanetary magnetic field mainly controls the magnetic tail. Magnetic turbulence was also detected when the spacecraft crossed the orbit of Phobos, indicating the possible existence of a torus near the orbit of this moon.

  17. Soil gas carbon dioxide probe: laboratory testing and field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, B M; Furness, A J; Bastow, T P

    2013-05-01

    An automated semi-continuous on-line instrument has been developed to measure CO2 gas concentrations in the vadose zone. The instrument uses semi-permeable polymer tubing (CO2 probe) for diffusion based sampling, coupled to an infra red sensor. The system operated automatically by intermittently purging the CO2 probe, which was installed in the vadose zone, with a non-CO2 gas at a low flow rate. The gas exiting the CO2 probe was monitored at the ground surface using a miniature infra red sensor and the response related to the vadose zone soil gas CO2 concentration. The in situ CO2 probes provided a reliable monitoring technique under long-term (18 months) aggressive and dynamic field conditions, with no interference observed from non-CO2 gases and volatile organic compounds. The probes provided data that were comparable to conventional grab sampling techniques without the labour-intensive sample collection and processing associated with these conventional techniques. Also, disturbance to vadose zone CO2 profiles from repeated grab samples during long-term semi-continuous monitoring could potential be reduced by using the diffusion based sampling technique.

  18. Probing magnetic and gold nanoparticles by using MAClevers® as ultrasensitive sensors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Marcelo; Araki, Koiti; Toma, Henrique E

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic AFM probes known as MAClevers® were employed for sensing picogram amounts of magnetic nanoparticles, based on the cantilever frequency shifts resulting from the magnetically induced adsorption of mass. By using organothiol functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, this analytical strategy was successfully extended to the detection of gold nanoparticles, as confirmed by confocal Raman microscopy.

  19. Magnetic field reconstruction based on sunspot oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, J.; Bello González, N.; Schmidt, W.

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic field of a sunspot guides magnetohydrodynamic waves toward higher atmospheric layers. In the upper photosphere and lower chromosphere, wave modes with periods longer than the acoustic cut-off period become evanescent. The cut-off period essentially changes due to the atmospheric properties, e.g., increases for larger zenith inclinations of the magnetic field. In this work, we aim at introducing a novel technique of reconstructing the magnetic field inclination on the basis of the dominating wave periods in the sunspot chromosphere and upper photosphere. On 2013 August 21, we observed an isolated, circular sunspot (NOAA11823) for 58 min in a purely spectroscopic multi-wavelength mode with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectro-polarimeter (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope. By means of a wavelet power analysis, we retrieved the dominating wave periods and reconstructed the zenith inclinations in the chromosphere and upper photosphere. The results are in good agreement with the lower photospheric HMI magnetograms. The sunspot's magnetic field in the chromosphere inclines from almost vertical (0°) in the umbra to around 60° in the outer penumbra. With increasing altitude in the sunspot atmosphere, the magnetic field of the penumbra becomes less inclined. We conclude that the reconstruction of the magnetic field topology on the basis of sunspot oscillations yields consistent and conclusive results. The technique opens up a new possibility to infer the magnetic field inclination in the solar chromosphere.

  20. Polarized Radiation Observables for Probing the Magnetism of the Outer Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2014-10-01

    The basic idea of optical pumping, for which Alfred Kastler received the 1966 Nobel Prize in Physics, is that the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation can produce population imbalances and quantum coherence among the magnetic substates of atomic levels. The degree of this radiatively-induced atomic level polarization, which is very sensitive to the presence of magnetic fields, can be determined by observing the polarization of the scattered or transmitted spectral line radiation. The most important point for solar physics is that the outer solar atmosphere is an optically pumped vapor and that the polarization of the emergent spectral line radiation can be exploited to obtain quantitative information on the strength and/or geometry of magnetic fields within the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. Here we review some recent investigations of the polarization produced by optical pumping in selected IR, FUV, and EUV spectral lines, showing that their magnetic sensitivity is suitable for probing the magnetism of the outer solar atmosphere.

  1. Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions with Seeded Magnetic Fields on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments applying laser-driven magnetic-flux compression to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to enhance the fuel-assembly performance are described. Spherical CH targets filled with 10 atm of deuterium gas were imploded by the OMEGA laser in polar-drive geometry. The targets were embedded with an 80-kG magnetic seed field. Upon laser irradiation, the high-implosion velocities and ionization of the target fill lead to trapping of the magnetic field inside the capsule and its amplification through flux compression to up to tens of megagauss. At such strong magnetic fields, the hot spot inside a spherical target becomes strongly magnetized, reducing the heat losses through electron confinement. The experimentally observed ion temperature was enhanced by 15% and the neutron yield was increased by 30%, compared to nonmagnetized implosions. This represents the first experimental verification of performance enhancement resulting from embedding a strong magnetic field into an ICF capsule. The compressed field was probed via proton deflectometry using the 14.7-MeV protons generated in the D+3He fusion reactions from a laser-imploded glass microballoon. Experimental data for the fuel-assembly performance and magnetic field are compared to numerical results from combining the 1-D hydrodynamics code LILAC with a 2-D, azimuthal symmetry MHD postprocessor. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-04ER54789 and DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with P.-Y. Chang, G. Fiksel, J. P. Knauer, R. Betti, F. J. Marshall, and D. D. Meyerhofer (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester), and F. H. Séguin and R. D. Petrasso (PSFC, MIT).

  2. Investigation of the Arcjet near Field Plume Using Electrostatic Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plume of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in.) and 15 cm (5.9 in.) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in.) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in.) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  3. Investigation of the arcjet plume near field using electrostatic probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plum of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in) and 15 cm (5.9 in) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  4. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Kitaoka, H.

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30 eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  5. Behavior of multi-component magnetic colloidal systems in tunable magnetic fields and applications in biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye; Li, Zhengcao; Ko, Pil Ju; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2012-03-01

    A system consisting of multiple-component beads, such as superparamagnetic beads, nonmagnetic beads and magnetorheological (MR) fluid, can display some very amazing and special properties when subjected to an external magnetic field because the MR fluid can act on both types of beads synchronously as a magnetic medium. Some novel structures and phenomena were discovered and are discussed in our work, including 'ring-structures', 'small-ring' and 'ring-chains' in static or rotational magnetic fields. If both probe and target molecules are attached consisting of functionalized superparamagnetic beads and non-magnetic beads, respectively, the ring-structure could be maintained due to biomolecular bonding, even after removing the external magnetic field. Using these remnant rings, we raised two protocols for biosensing: a two-dimensional biosensor using a magnetic self-assembled colloidal ring-structure, and an improved magneto-optical transmittance (MT) method. In the former protocol, we define the small nonmagnetic particles as "petals" because the whole structure looks like a flower. It was proved that the number of remnant ring petals was a function of the concentration of the target molecules', with a concentration range from 0.0768 ng/mL ~ 3.8419 ng/mL, making it a promising technology for applications involving biosensing. In the latter protocol, the use of larger individual units made the magnetic particle chain longer, which was considered to be a promising way of improving the sensitivity of the MT method.

  6. Using Jupiter’s gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection. PMID:27005472

  7. Low Energy Plasma Measurements of the Van Allen Probes Crossing Open Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, B.; MacDonald, E.; Skoug, R. M.; Dixon, P.; Henderson, M. G.; Chaston, C. C.; Grande, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Thomsen, M.; Wygant, J. R.; Reeves, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes encountered unusual low-latitude flank-side open field lines during the Nov. 14 2012 geomagnetic storm. Both spacecraft entered the lobes five times over several hours in the main phase of the storm. Four of the ~ five minute events were seen by both probes nearly simultaneously despite being 45 minutes apart in orbit (less than one L shell). The more tailward satellite always saw the boundary crossing first. We present the HOPE low energy plasma observations during these encounters. Adjacent to the lobe intervals, HOPE observed a hot electron plasma sheet leading to significant spacecraft charging. The electron and ion fluxes were significantly diminished during the lobe crossings coincident with a stronger, more highly stretched magnetic field. Significant accelerated field aligned oxygen signatures were measured on both closed and apparently open field lines, along with strong Alfvenic waves. Using the multipoint measurements we will examine the source of this acceleration and its role in inner magnetosphere ion dynamics. This event also represents the chance to constrain and assess magnetic field models and we will examine the topological location of the field lobes relative to the spacecraft for multiple models.

  8. Magnetism of gold nanorods probed using electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Y.; Yonemura, H.; Sakai, N.; Makihara, Y.; Kawae, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-08-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been performed for gold nanorods (AuNRs) of four different sizes covered with a diamagnetic stabilizing component, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. ESR signals were detected in AuNRs except the largest one. Two smallest AuNRs showed an abrupt change in the temperature dependence of resonance field and line width at around 60 K, indicating ferromagnetic phase transition. In medium-size AuNRs, the resonance with a large shift was observed below 100 K. The resonance field shifts at the lowest temperature exhibit systematic variation with the system size, which is explained by considering magnetic anisotropy for the ferromagnetic resonance.

  9. Magnetic field aberration induced by cycle stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Yang; luming, Li; Xing, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Magneto-mechanical effect has been causing people's growing interest because of its relevance to several technology problems. One of them is the variation of surface magnetic field induced by stress concentration under the geomagnetic field. It can be used as an innovative, simple and convenient potential NDE method, called as magnetic memory method. However, whether and how this can be used as a quantitative measurement method, is still a virginal research field where nobody sets foot in. In this paper, circle tensile stress within the elastic region was applied to ferromagnetic sample under geomagnetic field. Experiment results on the relation between surface magnetic field and elastic stress were presented, and a simple model was derived. Simulation of the model was reconciled with the experimental results. This can be of great importance for it provides a brighter future for the promising Magnetic Memory NDE method—the potential possibility of quantitative measurement.

  10. Generation of solar magnetic fields. I. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. N.

    Attention is given to those magnetic field properties which allow the fields to destroy themselves rapidly, thereby producing solar, stellar and geomagnetic activity. Magnetic fields actively figure in the production of flares, plages, eruptions and streamers. The existence of magnetic fields in other stars is inferred from the X-rays that can be observed to radiate from them. In the second part of this paper, the discussion in the first part of the generation of magnetic fields from the motion of conducting fluids is further developed through the proposal of the 'short, sudden' idealization, and quick bursts of turbulence during which any degree of twisting and rotation can be accomplished are introduced. After these quick bursts of motion, the fluid is held motionless so that small scale irregularities subside, leaving a smooth, average and large scale state. This cycle is repeated at time intervals tau, producing the dynamo equations for the mean vector potential.

  11. How are static magnetic fields detected biologically?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2009-03-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that life, from bacteria to birds to bats, detects magnetic fields, using the fields for orientation or navigation. Indeed there are recent reports (based on Google Earth imagery) that cattle and deer align themselves with the earth's magnetic field. [1]. The development of frog and insect eggs are changed by high magnetic fields, probably through known physical mechanisms. However, the mechanisms for eukaryotic navigation and alignment are not clear. Persuasive published models will be discussed. Evidence, that static magnetic fields might produce therapeutic effects, will be updated [2]. [4pt] [1] S. Begall, et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 105:13451 (2008). [0pt] [2] L. Finegold and B.L. Flamm, BMJ, 332:4 (2006).

  12. The Magnetic Field Geometry of Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Victor; Jardine, Moira; Vidotto, Aline; Donati, Jean-Francois; Folsom, Colin; Boro Saikia, Sudeshna; Bouvier, Jerome; Fares, Rim; Gregory, Scott; Hussain, Gaitee; Jeffers, Sandra; Marsden, Stephen; Morin, Julien; Moutou, Claire; do Nascimento, Jose-Dias, Jr.; Petit, Pascal; Rosen, Lisa; Waite, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Zeeman-Doppler imaging has been used to map the large-scale surface magnetic fields of cool stars across a wide range of stellar masses and rotation periods. The derived field geometries are surprising, with many stars showing strong azimuthal fields that are not observed on the Sun. In this poster, using 100 magnetic maps of over 50 stars, we present results showing how the magnetic field geometry of cool stars varies as a function of fundamental parameters. The stellar mass, and hence internal structure, critically influences the field geometry, although this is modified by the stellar rotation rate. We discuss the implications of these results for dynamo theory and the nature of stellar magnetic activity.

  13. ASYMMETRIC DIFFUSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2013-04-20

    Stochasticity of magnetic field lines is important for particle transport properties. Magnetic field lines separate faster than diffusively in turbulent plasma, which is called superdiffusion. We discovered that this superdiffusion is pronouncedly asymmetric, so that the separation of field lines along the magnetic field direction is different from the separation in the opposite direction. While the symmetry of the flow is broken by the so-called imbalance or cross-helicity, the difference between forward and backward diffusion is not directly due to imbalance, but a non-trivial consequence of both imbalance and non-reversibility of turbulence. The asymmetric diffusion perpendicular to the mean magnetic field entails a variety of new physical phenomena, such as the production of parallel particle streaming in the presence of perpendicular particle gradients. Such streaming and associated instabilities could be significant for particle transport in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  14. Electric-field guiding of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically study equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanosized magnetic skyrmions in thin magnetic films with broken inversion symmetry, where an electric field couples to magnetization via spin-orbit coupling. Based on a symmetry-based phenomenology and micromagnetic simulations we show that this electric-field coupling, via renormalizing the micromagnetic energy, modifies the equilibrium properties of the skyrmion. This change, in turn, results in a significant alteration of the current-induced skyrmion motion. Particularly, the speed and direction of the skyrmion can be manipulated by designing a desired energy landscape electrically, which we describe within Thiele's analytical model and demonstrate in micromagnetic simulations including electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy. We additionally use this electric-field control to construct gates for controlling skyrmion motion exhibiting a transistorlike and multiplexerlike function. The proposed electric-field effect can thus provide a low-energy electrical knob to extend the reach of information processing with skyrmions.

  15. The magnetic field of Mercury, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1974-01-01

    An updated analysis and interpretation is presented of the magnetic field observations obtained during the Mariner 10 encounter with the planet Mercury. The combination of data relating to position of the detached bow shock wave and magnetopause, and the geometry and magnitude of the magnetic field within the magnetosphere-like region surrounding Mercury, lead to the conclusion that an internal planetary field exists with dipole moment approximately 5.1 x 10 the 22nd power Gauss sq cm. The dipole axis has a polarity sense similar to earth's and is tilted 7 deg from the normal to Mercury's orbital plane. The magnetic field observations reveal a significant distortion of the modest Hermean field (350 Gamma at the equator) by the solar wind flow and the formation of a magnetic tail and neutral sheet which begins close to the planet on the night side. The composite data is not consistent with a complex induction process driven by the solar wind flow.

  16. Magnetic field quality analysis using ANSYS

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Orco, D.; Chen, Y.

    1991-03-01

    The design of superconducting magnets for particles accelerators requires a high quality of the magnetic field. This paper presents an ANSYS 4.4A Post 1 macro that computes the field quality performing a Fourier analysis of the magnetic field. The results show that the ANSYS solution converges toward the analytical solution and that the error on the multipole coefficients depends linearly on the square of the mesh size. This shows the good accuracy of ANSYS in computing the multipole coefficients. 2 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Ultracold atoms in strong synthetic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The Harper Hofstadter Hamiltonian describes charged particles in the lowest band of a lattice at high magnetic fields. This Hamiltonian can be realized with ultracold atoms using laser assisted tunneling which imprints the same phase into the wavefunction of neutral atoms as a magnetic field dose for electrons. I will describe our observation of a bosonic superfluid in a magnetic field with half a flux quantum per lattice unit cell, and discuss new possibilities for implementing spin-orbit coupling. Work done in collaboration with C.J. Kennedy, G.A. Siviloglou, H. Miyake, W.C. Burton, and Woo Chang Chung.

  18. Relativistic electron in curved magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, S.

    1985-01-01

    Making use of the perturbation method based on the nonlinear differential equation theory, the author investigates the classical motion of a relativistic electron in a class of curved magnetic fields which may be written as B=B(O,B sub phi, O) in cylindrical coordinates (R. phi, Z). Under general astrophysical conditions the author derives the analytical expressions of the motion orbit, pitch angle, etc., of the electron in their dependence upon parameters characterizing the magnetic field and electron. The effects of non-zero curvature of magnetic field lines on the motion of electrons and applicabilities of these results to astrophysics are also discussed.

  19. Magnetic-field induced critical endpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechenberger, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The phase diagram of strong interaction matter is analyzed utilizing the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Special emphasis is placed on its dependence on an external magnetic field and isospin chemical potential. Using flavor mixing induced by instanton effects the influence of isospin breaking due to the magnetic field and the isospin chemical potential is compared. It is found that at low temperatures and large quark chemical potential the magnetic field, depending on its strength, induces a new critical endpoint or a triple point.

  20. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…