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Sample records for magnetic force control

  1. Magnetic force control technique in industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, S.

    2010-11-01

    Techniques of the magnetic force control have been examined for industrial application. The problems and the technique are different in dispersion medium of gas and that of liquid. In addition, the method is different depending on the magnetic characteristic of the target objects. In case of the liquid, the dispersion medium having different viscosity was examined. The separation speed is decided with the magnitude of the magnetic force because a drag force increases with the viscosity. When the water is the dispersion medium, magnetic seeding is possible and hence the nonmagnetic materials can be separated and even the dissolved material could be separated. The separation technique has been used for purifying the waste water form paper mill or wash water of drum. On the other hand when the water is not dispersion medium, mainly the ferromagnetism particle becomes the target object because the magnetic seeding becomes difficult. The iron fragments have been separated from the slurry of slicing machine of solar battery. It has been clarified high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) can be applied for the viscous fluid of which viscosity was as high as 10 Pa s. When the dispersion medium is gaseous material, the air is important. The drag force from air depends greatly on Reynolds number. When speed of the air is small, the Reynolds number is small, and the drag force is calculated by the Stokes' law of resistance. The study with gaseous dispersion medium is not carried out much. The magnetic separation will discuss the possibility of the industrial application of this technique.

  2. Force analysis of magnetic bearings with power-saving controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. For most operating conditions, the existence of the bias current requires more power than alternative methods that do not use conventional bias. Two such methods are examined which diminish or eliminate bias current. In the typical bias control scheme it is found that for a harmonic control force command into a voltage limited transconductance amplifier, the desired force output is obtained only up to certain combinations of force amplitude and frequency. Above these values, the force amplitude is reduced and a phase lag occurs. The power saving alternative control schemes typically exhibit such deficiencies at even lower command frequencies and amplitudes. To assess the severity of these effects, a time history analysis of the force output is performed for the bias method and the alternative methods. Results of the analysis show that the alternative approaches may be viable. The various control methods examined were mathematically modeled using nondimensionalized variables to facilitate comparison of the various methods.

  3. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  4. Characteristics of magnetic force control device with magnetostrictive and piezoelectric laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Toshiyuki; Qiu, Jinhao; Tani, Junji

    2003-08-01

    A magnetic force control device with laminate composite of giant magnetostrictive material (GMM) and piezo-electric material (PZT) is proposed. This magnetic force control is based on inverse magnetostrictive effect of a magnetic material, whereby the variation of stress applied on the material is converted to that of magnetic force via magnetic circuits. For the purpose of realizing the method in practical applications, disks of GMM and PZT are laminated to control the stress of GMM by electric field on PZT. Due to the capacitive properties of PZT, the device requires little electric energy hence generates no heat to maintain constant force. Furthermore compared with conventional electromagnetics, the device can be fabricated easily and in small size to be suitable for microactuators. This paper presents the principle of the magnetic force control by the lamination of GMM and PZT and investigates the static and dynamic characteristics of several devices to demonstrate their capabilities of the magnetic force control.

  5. Measurement of the nonmagnetic coating thickness of core-shell magnetic nanoparticles by controlled magnetization magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloni, L.; Passeri, D.; Scaramuzzo, F. A.; Di Iorio, D.; Barteri, M.; Mantovani, D.; Rossi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent an interesting tool for several biomedical applications. In order to improve the dispersion stability, the biocompatibility and bio-functionality, MNPs need to be coated with non-magnetic films. The optimization of these systems requires the deep characterization not only of the magnetic core, but also of the coating features. Beside the chemical and physical properties of the coating, its thickness is another important property which can influence the size, the shape and the overall magnetic behavior of the NPs system. In this work we propose a possible method to measure the thickness of the non-magnetic coating of core-shell MNPs through the use of controlled magnetization-magnetic force microscopy (CM-MFM). A preliminary study on the applicability of the proposed method has been performed on Fe3O4 NPs coated with a Cu film.

  6. Suspension force control of bearingless permanent magnet slice motor based on flux linkage identification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suming; Zhu, Huangqiu

    2015-07-01

    The control accuracy and dynamic performance of suspension force are confined in the traditional bearingless permanent magnet slice motor (BPMSM) control strategies because the suspension force control is indirectly achieved by adopting a closed loop of displacement only. Besides, the phase information in suspension force control relies on accurate measurement of rotor position, making the control system more complex. In this paper, a new suspension force control strategy with displacement and radial suspension force double closed loops is proposed, the flux linkage of motor windings is identified based on voltage-current model and the flexibility of motor control can be improved greatly. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed suspension force control strategy is effective to realize the stable operation of the BPMSM.

  7. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-05-19

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed.

  8. Towards an on-chip platform for the controlled application of forces via magnetic particles: A novel device for mechanobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticelli, M.; Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.; Conca, D. V.; Falcone, M.; Sharma, P. P.; Bertacco, R.

    2015-05-01

    In-vitro tests and analyses are of fundamental importance for investigating biological mechanisms in cells and bio-molecules. The controlled application of forces to activate specific bio-pathways and investigate their effects, mimicking the role of the cellular environment, is becoming a prominent approach in this field. In this work, we present a non-invasive magnetic on-chip platform which allows for the manipulation of magnetic particles, through micrometric magnetic conduits of Permalloy patterned on-chip. We show, from simulations and experiments, that this technology permits to exert a finely controlled force on magnetic beads along the chip surface. This force can be tuned from few to hundreds pN by applying a variable external magnetic field.

  9. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  10. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  11. The Radiation Magnetic Force (FmR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The detection of Circular Magnetic Field (CMF), associated with electrons movement, not incorporated in theoretical works; is introduced as elements of attraction and repulsion for magnetic force between two conductors carrying electric currents; it also created magnetic force between charged particles and magnetic field, or Lorentz force; CMF contain energy of Electromagnetic Radiation (EM-R); a relationship has been established between the magnetic part of the EM-R, and radiation force, showing the magnetic force as a frequency controlled entity, in which a Radiation Magnetic Force formula is derived, the force embedded EM-Wave, similar to Electromagnetic Radiation Energy given by Planck's formula; the force is accountable for electron removal from atom in the Photoelectric Effects, stabilizing orbital atoms, excitation and ionization atoms, initiating production of secondary EM-R in Compton Effect mechanism; the paper aimed at reviving the wave nature of EM-R, which could reflects in a better understanding of the microscopic-world.

  12. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  13. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis.

  14. Elimination of Harmonic Force and Torque in Active Magnetic Bearing Systems with Repetitive Control and Notch Filters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangbo; Chen, Shao; Liu, Jinhao

    2017-04-04

    Harmonic force and torque, which are caused by rotor imbalance and sensor runout, are the dominant disturbances in active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems. To eliminate the harmonic force and torque, a novel control method based on repetitive control and notch filters is proposed. Firstly, the dynamics of a four radial degrees of freedom AMB system is described, and the AMB model can be described in terms of the translational and rotational motions, respectively. Next, a closed-loop generalized notch filter is utilized to identify the synchronous displacement resulting from the rotor imbalance, and a feed-forward compensation of the synchronous force and torque related to the AMB displacement stiffness is formulated by using the identified synchronous displacement. Then, a plug-in repetitive controller is designed to track the synchronous feed-forward compensation adaptively and to suppress the harmonic vibrations due to the sensor runout. Finally, the proposed control method is verified by simulations and experiments. The control algorithm is insensitive to the parameter variations of the power amplifiers and can precisely suppress the harmonic force and torque. Its practicality stems from its low computational load.

  15. Subpiconewton dynamic force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kruithof, M; Chien, F; de Jager, M; van Noort, J

    2008-03-15

    We introduce a simple method for dynamic force spectroscopy with magnetic tweezers. This method allows application of subpiconewton force and twist control by calibration of the applied force from the height of the magnets. Initial dynamic force spectroscopy experiments on DNA molecules revealed a large hysteresis that is caused by viscous drag on the magnetic bead and will conceal weak interactions. When smaller beads are used, this hysteresis is sufficiently reduced to reveal intramolecular interactions at subpiconewton forces. Compared with typical quasistatic force spectroscopy, a significant reduction of measurement time is achieved, allowing the real-time study of transient structures and reaction intermediates. As a proof of principle, nucleosome-nucleosome interactions on a subsaturated chromatin fiber were analyzed.

  16. Force decomposition in robot force control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Steve H.; Wen, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The unit inconsistency in force decomposition has motivated an investigation into the force control problem in multiple-arm manipulation. Based on physical considerations, it is argued that the force that should be controlled is the internal force at the specified frame in the payload. This force contains contributions due to both applied forces from the arms and the inertial force from the payload and the arms. A least-squares scheme free of unit inconsistency for finding this internal force is presented. The force control issue is analyzed, and an integral force feedback controller is proposed.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  18. Magnetic force microscopy of superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sharon; Savla, Mayur; Pelekhov, Denis V; Iscru, Daniel F; Selcu, Camelia; Hammel, P Chris; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2008-02-01

    The use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to detect probe-sample interactions from superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vitro in ambient atmospheric conditions is reported here. By using both magnetic and nonmagnetic probes in dynamic lift-mode imaging and by controlling the direction and magnitude of the external magnetic field applied to the samples, it is possible to detect and identify the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The experimental results shown here are in agreement with the estimated sensitivity of the MFM technique. The potential and challenges for localizing nanoscale magnetic domains in biological samples is discussed.

  19. Forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1984-11-01

    By studying a simple model problem, we examine the time evolution of magnetic field islands which are induced by perturbing the boundary surrounding an incompressible plasma with a resonant surface inside. We find that for sufficiently small boundary perturbations, the reconnection and island formation process occurs on the tearing mode time scale defined by Furth, Killeen, and Rosenbluth. For larger perturbations the time scale is that defined by Rutherford. The resulting asymptotic equilibrium is such that surface currents in the resonant region vanish. A detailed analytical picture of this reconnection process is presented.

  20. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    DOEpatents

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  1. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  2. Magnetic forces produced by rectangular permanent magnets in static microsystems.

    PubMed

    Gassner, Anne-Laure; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Chen, Hong-Xu; Morandini, Jacques; Josserand, Jacques; Rossier, Joel S; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-08-21

    Finite element numerical simulations were carried out in 2D geometries to map the magnetic field and force distribution produced by rectangular permanent magnets as a function of their size and position with respect to a microchannel. A single magnet, two magnets placed in attraction and in repulsion have been considered. The goal of this work is to show where magnetic beads are preferentially captured in a microchannel. These simulations were qualitatively corroborated, in one geometrical case, by microscopic visualizations of magnetic bead plug formation in a capillary. The results show that the number of plugs is configuration dependent with: in attraction, one plug in the middle of the magnets; in repulsion, two plugs near the edges of the magnets; and with a single magnet, a plug close to the center of the magnet. The geometry of the magnets (h and l are the height and length of the magnets respectively) and their relative spacing s has a significant impact on the magnetic flux density. Its value inside a magnet increases with the h/l ratio. Consequently, bar magnets produce larger and more uniform values than flat magnets. The l/s ratio also influences the magnetic force value in the microchannel, both increasing concomitantly for all the configurations. In addition, a zero force zone in the middle appears in the attraction configuration as the l/s ratio increases, while with a single magnet, the number of maxima and minima goes from one to two, producing two focusing zones instead of only one.

  3. A force calibration standard for magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dulin, David; Cnossen, Jelmer; Köber, Mariana; van Oene, Maarten M.; Ordu, Orkide; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Hensgens, Toivo; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    To study the behavior of biological macromolecules and enzymatic reactions under force, advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have proven instrumental. Magnetic tweezers form one of the most powerful of these techniques, due to their overall simplicity, non-invasive character, potential for high throughput measurements, and large force range. Drawbacks of magnetic tweezers, however, are that accurate determination of the applied forces can be challenging for short biomolecules at high forces and very time-consuming for long tethers at low forces below ˜1 piconewton. Here, we address these drawbacks by presenting a calibration standard for magnetic tweezers consisting of measured forces for four magnet configurations. Each such configuration is calibrated for two commonly employed commercially available magnetic microspheres. We calculate forces in both time and spectral domains by analyzing bead fluctuations. The resulting calibration curves, validated through the use of different algorithms that yield close agreement in their determination of the applied forces, span a range from 100 piconewtons down to tens of femtonewtons. These generalized force calibrations will serve as a convenient resource for magnetic tweezers users and diminish variations between different experimental configurations or laboratories.

  4. Magnetically controlled ferromagnetic swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Joshua K.; Petrov, Peter G.; Winlove, C. Peter; Gilbert, Andrew D.; Bryan, Matthew T.; Ogrin, Feodor Y.

    2017-01-01

    Microscopic swimming devices hold promise for radically new applications in lab-on-a-chip and microfluidic technology, diagnostics and drug delivery etc. In this paper, we demonstrate the experimental verification of a new class of autonomous ferromagnetic swimming devices, actuated and controlled solely by an oscillating magnetic field. These devices are based on a pair of interacting ferromagnetic particles of different size and different anisotropic properties joined by an elastic link and actuated by an external time-dependent magnetic field. The net motion is generated through a combination of dipolar interparticle gradient forces, time-dependent torque and hydrodynamic coupling. We investigate the dynamic performance of a prototype (3.6 mm) of the ferromagnetic swimmer in fluids of different viscosity as a function of the external field parameters (frequency and amplitude) and demonstrate stable propulsion over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. We show that the direction of swimming has a dependence on both the frequency and amplitude of the applied external magnetic field, resulting in robust control over the speed and direction of propulsion. This paves the way to fabricating microscale devices for a variety of technological applications requiring reliable actuation and high degree of control. PMID:28276490

  5. Magnetically controlled ferromagnetic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joshua K.; Petrov, Peter G.; Winlove, C. Peter; Gilbert, Andrew D.; Bryan, Matthew T.; Ogrin, Feodor Y.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic swimming devices hold promise for radically new applications in lab-on-a-chip and microfluidic technology, diagnostics and drug delivery etc. In this paper, we demonstrate the experimental verification of a new class of autonomous ferromagnetic swimming devices, actuated and controlled solely by an oscillating magnetic field. These devices are based on a pair of interacting ferromagnetic particles of different size and different anisotropic properties joined by an elastic link and actuated by an external time-dependent magnetic field. The net motion is generated through a combination of dipolar interparticle gradient forces, time-dependent torque and hydrodynamic coupling. We investigate the dynamic performance of a prototype (3.6 mm) of the ferromagnetic swimmer in fluids of different viscosity as a function of the external field parameters (frequency and amplitude) and demonstrate stable propulsion over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. We show that the direction of swimming has a dependence on both the frequency and amplitude of the applied external magnetic field, resulting in robust control over the speed and direction of propulsion. This paves the way to fabricating microscale devices for a variety of technological applications requiring reliable actuation and high degree of control.

  6. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  7. Verifying Magnetic Force on a Conductor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory measurement of the magnetic force acting on a straight wire of length "l" carrying a current of intensity "i" in a magnetic field "B" is usually made using current balances, which are offered by various physics apparatus suppliers' catalogues. These balances require an adequate magnet and commonly allow only the measurement of the…

  8. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-27

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  9. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  10. Magnetic exchange force microscopy with atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Uwe; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2007-03-29

    The ordering of neighbouring atomic magnetic moments (spins) leads to important collective phenomena such as ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism. A full understanding of magnetism on the nanometre scale therefore calls for information on the arrangement of spins in real space and with atomic resolution. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy accomplishes this but can probe only conducting materials. Force microscopy can be used on any sample independent of its conductivity. In particular, magnetic force microscopy is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Magnetic exchange force microscopy has been proposed for overcoming this limitation: by using an atomic force microscope with a magnetic tip, it should be possible to detect the short-range magnetic exchange force between tip and sample spins. Here we show for a prototypical antiferromagnetic insulator, the (001) surface of nickel oxide, that magnetic exchange force microscopy can indeed reveal the arrangement of both surface atoms and their spins simultaneously. In contrast with previous attempts to implement this method, we use an external magnetic field to align the magnetic polarization at the tip apex so as to optimize the interaction between tip and sample spins. This allows us to observe the direct magnetic exchange coupling between the spins of the tip atom and sample atom that are closest to each other, and thereby demonstrate the potential of magnetic exchange force microscopy for investigations of inter-spin interactions at the atomic level.

  11. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  12. Iron in the Fire: Searching for Fire's Magnetic Fingerprint using Controlled Heating Experiments, High-Resolution FORCs, IRM Coercivity Spectra, and Low-Temperature Remanence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, P. C.; Reiners, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for recent climate-wildfire linkages underscores the need for better understanding of relationships between wildfire and major climate shifts in Earth history, which in turn offers the potential for prognoses for wildfire and human adaptations to it. In particular, what are the links between seasonality and wildfire frequency and severity, and what are the feedbacks between wildfire, landscape evolution, and biogeochemical cycles, particularly the carbon and iron cycles? A key first step in addressing these questions is recovering well-described wildfire records from a variety of paleolandscapes and paleoclimate regimes. Although charcoal and organic biomarkers are commonly used indicators of fire, taphonomic processes and time-consuming analytical preparations often preclude their routine use in some environments and in high-stratigraphic resolution paleowildfire surveying. The phenomenological relationship between fire and magnetic susceptibility can make it a useful surveying tool, but increased magnetic susceptibility in sediments is not unique to fire, and thus limits its diagnostic power. Here we utilize component-specific rock magnetic methods and analytical techniques to identify the rock magnetic fingerprint of wildfire. We use a custom-designed air furnace, a series of iron-free laboratory soils, natural saprolites and soils, and fuels from Arizona Ponderosa pine forests and grasslands to simulate wildfire in a controlled and monitored environment. Soil-ash residues and soil and fuel controls were then characterized using First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) patterns, DC backfield IRM coercivity spectra, low-temperature SIRM demagnetization behavior, and low-temperature cycling of room-temperature SIRM behavior. We will complement these magnetic analyses with high-resolution TEM of magnetic extracts. Here we summarize the systematic changes to sediment magnetism as pyrolitized organic matter is incorporated into artificial and natural soils. These

  13. Contactless Magnetic Gear for Robot Control Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Hiroki; Uchimura, Yutaka

    This paper describes the application of a magnetic gear to a robot by fulfilling the essential requirements for a robot control, which are velocity control, position control, and force control. A magnetic gear is a transmission device that realizes contactless torque transmission by applying a magnetic force. When using a magnetic gear, cogging torque and spring characteristics need to be considered. In this paper, we introduce an approximate model of cogging torque. This model is used for velocity control to attenuate the disturbance due to cogging torque. In the case of position control, the oscillations due to the spring effect of the magnetic attractive force become a problem. To reduce the adverse effect due to these oscillations, resonance ratio control is applied. We also propose to use a magnetic gear for realizing the force sensorless bilateral control of teleoperation. Thanks to the frictionless transmission of a magnetic gear, the force sensorless estimation of a reaction force can be realized using a reaction force observer.

  14. Forces between permanent magnets: experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Manuel I.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes a very simple, low-cost experimental setup designed for measuring the force between permanent magnets. The experiment consists of placing one of the magnets on a balance, attaching the other magnet to a vertical height gauge, aligning carefully both magnets and measuring the load on the balance as a function of the gauge reading. A theoretical model is proposed to compute the force, assuming uniform magnetisation and based on laws and techniques accessible to undergraduate students. A comparison between the model and the experimental results is made, and good agreement is found at all distances investigated. In particular, it is also found that the force behaves as r -4 at large distances, as expected.

  15. On the unsteady-motion theory of magnetic forces for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1993-11-01

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. In the past, most maglev-system designs were based on a quasisteady-motion theory of magnetic forces. This report presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique provides a useful tool to measure motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  16. Forced Magnetic Reconnection In A Tokamak Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of forced magnetic field reconnection induced by an externally imposed resonant magnetic perturbation usually uses a sheared slab or cylindrical magnetic field model and often focuses on the potential time-asymptotic induced magnetic island state. However, tokamak plasmas have significant magnetic geometry and dynamical plasma toroidal rotation screening effects. Also, finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) and banana width (FBW) effects can damp and thus limit the width of a nascent magnetic island. A theory that is more applicable for tokamak plasmas is being developed. This new model of the dynamics of forced magnetic reconnection considers a single helicity magnetic perturbation in the tokamak magnetic field geometry, uses a kinetically-derived collisional parallel electron flow response, and employs a comprehensive dynamical equation for the plasma toroidal rotation frequency. It is being used to explore the dynamics of bifurcation into a magnetically reconnected state in the thin singular layer around the rational surface, evolution into a generalized Rutherford regime where the island width exceeds the singular layer width, and assess the island width limiting effects of FLR and FBW polarization currents. Support by DoE grants DE-FG02-86ER53218, DE-FG02-92ER54139.

  17. Magnetic force microscopy: quantitative issues in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel Wce; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells.

  18. Grasp force control in telemanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Steven F.; Duffie, Neil A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two experiments which focus upon the issue of grasp force control in telemanipulation. The first experiment examines the ability to control and stabilize master-controller grasp force during a 30-s compensatory tracking task under different levels of master controller digit mass, friction, and backlash. The second experiment explores the potential for substituting tactile feedback in lieu of direct force-feedback to gage and control remote grasp force. Results show that subjects were better able to control force when mass and friction levels were increased. Even when perceptual gains between tactile and direct force feedback displays were matched, force reflection produced better grasp control. The lack of backlash effects and improvements in performance with direct force reflection in comparison to tactile feedback are attributable to reflexive short-loop adjustment of grasp tension afforded by the muscle's length-tension control system. The criterion of acceptable operator performance, dependent upon both the quality of the transmission of control commands and feedback, and the response of the remote device, is discussed.

  19. Magnetic Force Microscopy Images of Magnetic Garnet With Thin-Film Magnetic Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadas, A.; Moreland, J.; Rice, P.; Katti, R.

    1993-01-01

    We present magnetic force microscopy images of YGdTmGa/YSmTmGa magnetic garnet, usinga thin Fe film deposited on Si_3N_5 tips. We have found correlations between the topography andthe magnetic domain structure. We have observed the domain wall contrast with a iron thin-film tip. We report on domain wall imaging of garnet with magnetic force microscopy.

  20. Levitation forces in bearingless permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, W.; Silber, S.; Nenninger, K.

    1999-09-01

    Bearingless motors combine brushless AC-motors with active magnetic bearings by the integration of two separate winding systems (torque and radial levitation force windings with different pole pairs) in one housing. This paper gives an insight into the influences of the motor design on the levitation force and torque generation. It is shown that especially for machines with small air gaps it can be very important to choose the right design parameters. Increasing the permanent magnet height in order to increase the motor torque can result in a remarkable reduction of radial forces. The interrelationships are discussed on the basis of Maxwell and Lorentz forces acting upon the stator surface. The investigations are presented for a bearingless low cost motor, suited for pump, fan or blower applications. The presented motor needs only four coils for operation.

  1. Magnetic forces in high-Tc superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    In September 1987, researchers at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearings at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989, a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu307. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  2. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials.

  3. Magnetic forces in high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1987 research at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearing at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989 a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu3O7. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic drag forces of a magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the drag force reaches a constant value, independent of the speed. Dampling of lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  4. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  5. Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

  6. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  7. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  8. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  9. Manipulation and identification of objects by magnetic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the results of research and engineering design activities over the past 20 years in the area of identification and manipulation of objects by magnetic forces. The relationship is discussed between the properties of objects and the parameters of magnetic fields, with the view toward being able to create forces for efficient manipulation and identification of different kinds of parts. Some of this information, particularly regarding nonferromagnetic materials, is relatively new and can be used to solve a variety of engineering problems by creating new types of automation systems. Topics covered include identification and orientation of bodies by magnetostatic and electrodynamic forces, electromagnetic recognition and orientation of nonsymmetric parts, and assembly and position control of parts by electromagnetic forces.

  10. Experimental studies of the magnetized friction force

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Gaalnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-06-15

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as an essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires an accurate description of the friction force which ions experience by passing through an electron beam. Present low-energy electron coolers can be used for a detailed study of the friction force. In addition, parameters of a low-energy cooler can be chosen in a manner to reproduce regimes expected in future high-energy operation. Here, we report a set of dedicated experiments in CELSIUS aimed at a detailed study of the magnetized friction force. Some results of the accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Detected Long-Lived Spin Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G; Moore, Eric W; Marohn, John A

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which combines magnetic resonance imaging with scanning probe microscopy together, is capable of performing ultra-sensitive detection of spin magnetization. In an attempt to observe dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in an MRFM experiment, which could possibly further improve its sensitivity towards a single proton spin, a film of perdeuterated polystyrene doped with a nitroxide electron-spin probe was prepared. A high-compliance cantilever with a 4 μm diameter magnetic tip was brought near the film at a temperature of 7.3 K and in a background magnetic field of ~0.6 T. The film was irradiated with 16.7 GHz microwaves while the resulting transient change in cantilever frequency was recorded in real time. In addition to observing the expected prompt change in cantilever frequency due to saturation of the nitroxide's electron-spin magnetization, we observed a persistent cantilever frequency change. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute the persistent signal to polarized deuteron magnetization created via transfer of magnetization from electron spins. Further measurements of the persistent signal's dependence on the cantilever amplitude and tip-sample separation are presented and explained by the cross-effect DNP mechanism in high magnetic field gradients.

  12. Novel magnetic tips developed for the switching magnetization magnetic force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Cambel, V.; Elias, P.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Martaus, J.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Kostic, I.; Materials Science Division; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Using micromagnetic calculations we search for optimal magnetic properties of novel magnetic tips to be used for a Switching Magnetization Magnetic Force Microscopy (SM-MFM), a novel technique based on two-pass scanning with reversed tip magnetization. Within the technique the sum of two scans images local atomic forces and their difference maps the local magnetic forces. The tip magnetization is switched during the scanning by a small magnetic field. The technology of novel low-coercitive magnetic tips is proposed. For best performance the tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching field, and single-domain state at remanence. Such tips are equipped with Permalloy objects of a precise shape that are defined on their tilted sides. We calculate switching fields of such tips by solving the micromagnetic problem to find the optimum shape and dimensions of the Permalloy objects located on the tips. Among them, hexagon was found as the best shape for the tips.

  13. Lumbo-pelvic joint protection against antigravity forces: motor control and segmental stiffness assessed with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C A; Hides, J A; Wilson, S; Stanton, W; Snijders, C J

    2004-07-01

    The antigravity muscles of the lumbo-pelvic region, especially transversus abdominis (TrA), are important for the protection and support of the weightbearing joints. Measures of TrA function (the response to the postural cue of drawing in the abdominal wall) have been developed and quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cross-sections through the trunk allowed muscle contraction as well as the large fascial attachments of the TrA to be visualized. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the deep musculo-fascial system was measured at rest and in the contracted state, using static images as well as a cine sequence. In this developmental study, MRI measures were undertaken on a small sample of low back pain (LBP) and non LBP subjects. Results demonstrated that, in non LBP subjects, the draw in action produced a symmetrical deep musculo-fascial "corset" which encircles the abdomen. This study demonstrated a difference in this "corset" measure between subjects with and without LBP. These measures may also prove useful to quantify the effect of unloading in bedrest and microgravity exposure.

  14. Quantitative measurement of the magnetic moment of individual magnetic nanoparticles by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Sibylle; Braun, Kai-Felix; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva; Schumacher, Hans Werner; Siegner, Uwe

    2012-09-10

    The quantitative measurement of the magnetization of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is described. Quantitative measurement is realized by calibration of the MFM signal using an MNP reference sample with traceably determined magnetization. A resolution of the magnetic moment of the order of 10(-18) A m(2) under ambient conditions is demonstrated, which is presently limited by the tip's magnetic moment and the noise level of the instrument. The calibration scheme can be applied to practically any magnetic force microscope and tip, thus allowing a wide range of future applications, for example in nanomagnetism and biotechnology.

  15. Magnetoelectric force microscopy based on magnetic force microscopy with modulated electric field.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Wu, Weida

    2014-05-01

    We present the realization of a mesoscopic imaging technique, namely, the Magnetoelectric Force Microscopy (MeFM), for visualization of local magnetoelectric effect. The basic principle of MeFM is the lock-in detection of local magnetoelectric response, i.e., the electric field-induced magnetization, using magnetic force microscopy. We demonstrate MeFM capability by visualizing magnetoelectric domains on single crystals of multiferroic hexagonal manganites. Results of several control experiments exclude artifacts or extrinsic origins of the MeFM signal. The parameters are tuned to optimize the signal to noise ratio.

  16. Magnet polepiece design for uniform magnetic force on superparamagnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Fallesen, Todd; Hill, David B; Steen, Matthew; Macosko, Jed C; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2010-07-01

    Here we report construction of a simple electromagnet with novel polepieces which apply a spatially uniform force to superparamagnetic beads in an optical microscope. The wedge-shaped gap was designed to keep partial differential B(x)/ partial differential y constant and B large enough to saturate the bead. We achieved fields of 300-600 mT and constant gradients of 67 T/m over a sample space of 0.5x4 mm(2) in the focal plane of the microscope and 0.05 mm along the microscope optic axis. Within this space the maximum force on a 2.8 microm diameter Dynabead was 12 pN with a spatial variation of approximately 10%. Use of the magnet in a biophysical experiment is illustrated by showing that gliding microtubules propelled by the molecular motor kinesin can be stopped by the force of an attached magnetic bead.

  17. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  18. Nonlinear regimes of forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Vekstein, G.; Kusano, K.

    2015-09-15

    This letter presents a self-consistent description of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection in Taylor's model of this process. If external boundary perturbation is strong enough, nonlinearity in the current sheet evolution becomes important before resistive effects come into play. This terminates the current sheet shrinking that takes place at the linear stage and brings about its nonlinear equilibrium with a finite thickness. Then, in theory, this equilibrium is destroyed by a finite plasma resistivity during the skin-time, and further reconnection proceeds in the Rutherford regime. However, realization of such a scenario is unlikely because of the plasmoid instability, which is fast enough to develop before the transition to the Rutherford phase occurs. The suggested analytical theory is entirely different from all previous studies and provides proper interpretation of the presently available numerical simulations of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection.

  19. Are the photospheric sunspots magnetically force-free in nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2011-08-01

    In a force-free magnetic field, there is no interaction of field and the plasma in the surrounding atmosphere i.e., electric currents are aligned with the magnetic field, giving rise to zero Lorentz force. The computation of many magnetic parameters like magnetic energy, gradient of twist of sunspot magnetic fields (computed from the force-free parameter α), including any kind of extrapolations heavily hinge on the force-free approximation of the photospheric magnetic fields. The force-free magnetic behaviour of the photospheric sunspot fields has been examined by Metcalf et al. (1995) and Moon et al. (2002) ending with inconsistent results. Metcalf et al. (1995) concluded that the photospheric magnetic fields are far from the force-free nature whereas Moon et al. (2002) found the that the photospheric magnetic fields are not so far from the force-free nature as conventionally regarded. The accurate photospheric vector field measurements with high resolution are needed to examine the force-free nature of sunspots. We use high resolution vector magnetograms obtained from the Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro-Polarimeter (SOT/SP) aboard Hinode to inspect the force-free behaviour of the photospheric sunspot magnetic fields. Both the necessary and sufficient conditions for force-freeness are examined by checking global as well as as local nature of sunspot magnetic fields. We find that the sunspot magnetic fields are very close to the force-free approximation, although they are not completely force-free on the photosphere.

  20. Boosting oncolytic adenovirus potency with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    PubMed

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Holm, Per Sonne; Holzmüller, Regina; Anton, Martina; Thalhammer, Stefan; Adigüzel, Denis; Döblinger, Markus; Plank, Christian

    2010-08-02

    Oncolytic adenoviruses rank among the most promising innovative agents in cancer therapy. We examined the potential of boosting the efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl520 by associating it with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic-field-guided infection in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo. The virus was complexed by self-assembly with core-shell nanoparticles having a magnetite core of about 10 nm and stabilized by a shell containing 68 mass % lithium 3-[2-(perfluoroalkyl)ethylthio]propionate) and 32 mass % 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine. Optimized virus binding, sufficiently stable in 50% fetal calf serum, was found at nanoparticle-to-virus ratios of 5 fg of Fe per physical virus particle (VP) and above. As estimated from magnetophoretic mobility measurements, 3,600 to 4,500 magnetite nanocrystallites were associated per virus particle. Ultrastructural analysis by electron and atomic force microscopy showed structurally intact viruses surrounded by magnetic particles that occasionally bridged several virus particles. Viral uptake into cells at a given virus dose was enhanced 10-fold compared to nonmagnetic virus when infections were carried out under the influence of a magnetic field. Increased virus internalization resulted in a 10-fold enhancement of the oncolytic potency in terms of the dose required for killing 50% of the target cells (IC(50) value) and an enhancement of 4 orders of magnitude in virus progeny formation at equal input virus doses compared to nonmagnetic viruses. Furthermore, the full oncolytic effect developed within two days postinfection compared with six days in a nonmagnetic virus as a reference. Plotting target cell viability versus internalized virus particles for magnetic and nonmagnetic virus showed that the inherent oncolytic productivity of the virus remained unchanged upon association with magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, we conclude that the mechanism of boosting the

  1. Ferritin protein imaging and detection by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Zheng, Bin; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-03-14

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to image and detect ferritin proteins and the strength of the magnetic signal is discussed, revealing a large workable lift height between the magnetic tip and the ferritin sample.

  2. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-07

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm.

  3. Nonlinear Force-free Coronal Magnetic Stereoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chifu, Iulia; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2017-03-01

    Insights into the 3D structure of the solar coronal magnetic field have been obtained in the past by two completely different approaches. The first approach are nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolations, which use photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The second approach uses stereoscopy of coronal magnetic loops observed in EUV coronal images from different vantage points. Both approaches have their strengths and weaknesses. Extrapolation methods are sensitive to noise and inconsistencies in the boundary data, and the accuracy of stereoscopy is affected by the ability of identifying the same structure in different images and by the separation angle between the view directions. As a consequence, for the same observational data, the 3D coronal magnetic fields computed with the two methods do not necessarily coincide. In an earlier work (Paper I) we extended our NLFFF optimization code by including stereoscopic constrains. The method was successfully tested with synthetic data, and within this work, we apply the newly developed code to a combined data set from SDO/HMI, SDO/AIA, and the two STEREO spacecraft. The extended method (called S-NLFFF) contains an additional term that monitors and minimizes the angle between the local magnetic field direction and the orientation of the 3D coronal loops reconstructed by stereoscopy. We find that when we prescribe the shape of the 3D stereoscopically reconstructed loops, the S-NLFFF method leads to a much better agreement between the modeled field and the stereoscopically reconstructed loops. We also find an appreciable decrease by a factor of two in the angle between the current and the magnetic field. This indicates the improved quality of the force-free solution obtained by S-NLFFF.

  4. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  5. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample. PMID:22003461

  6. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy-magnetic force microscopy combination.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria; Asenjo, Agustina

    2011-01-01

    The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25-50 nm such that the long range tip-sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip-sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  7. Magnetic versus mechanical expansion with different force thresholds and points of force application.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Verrusio, E

    1987-12-01

    The effects of force magnitude (high versus low) and point of force application (teeth versus direct palatal endosseous pins) on palatal expansion treatment were studied on four juvenile female Macaca fascicularis monkeys. Three subjects received one of the following appliances: (1) conventional type jackscrew maxillary plate bonded to the posterior teeth with a high force magnitude of 2033 g, (2) a similar tooth-borne appliance but with rare earth repulsive magnets having a low force of 258 g, or (3) a specially designed palatal acrylic appliance pinned directly to the palatal shelves also utilizing rare earth repulsive magnets with a low force of 258 g. A fourth animal, the control, received a passive sham appliance bonded to the abutment teeth. Spatial changes of dental markers and facial implants were studied radiographically. In the low force, magnetically induced appliances, treatment was longer (95 days for the palatally pinned appliance and 135 days for the bonded tooth-borne appliance). The force radiated superolaterally, dissipating in the zygomaticofrontal suture, and the overjet significantly increased because of the marked widening of the incisive and transverse sutures. With the conventional jackscrew high-force appliance bonded to the teeth, the treatment lasted 33 days. A diastema developed between the incisors and the force was transmitted superolaterally and then transmedially, thus causing fractures in the nasal complex and other iatrogenic sequelae. The palatally pinned magnetic appliance induced bodily tooth movement, the greatest increase in intermolar distance, and a superior repositioning of the maxillopalatine region. The latter two effects were caused by selective excitation of the transverse suture over the premaxillary suture. Symmetry decreased with remoteness from the point of application. These results suggest reduction of the conventional force by up to eightfold--a level supplied by the rare earth magnets. Extrapolating from these

  8. Forced magnetic reconnection in Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Andrew Joseph

    This dissertation addresses two related problems in the study of forced magnetic reconnection in Tokamak plasmas. First, a recent controversy concerning a model forced magnetic reconnection problem, the Taylor problem, has been resolved. The criticisms of Ishizawa and Tokuda [21] concerning the original analysis of Hahm and Kulsrud [17] are shown to be unwarranted, both analytically and numerically. Second, one possible reason for the discrepancy between recent experimental [29] and previous theoretical [13] scaling of the critical error-field penetration threshold with device parameters is addressed. The theory in question is entirely based on a single-fluid MHD (magnetohydrodynamical) treatment of the plasma. As is well-known, high temperature plasmas are far better modeled using the drift-MHD ordering.[18] Hence we develop a drift-MHD theory of error-field penetration. Although two new drift-MHD plasma response regimes are identified, the overall threshold scaling with device parameters is not altogether different from that predicted by single-fluid MHD.

  9. Application of magnetic force microscopy in nanomaterials characterization.

    PubMed

    de Lozanne, Alex

    2006-07-01

    This review describes the basic technical aspects of magnetic force microscopy and how this technique has been applied to the study of colossal magnetoresistance materials, superconductors, and patterned magnetic materials. Recently, current distribution in a patterned aluminum strip has been measured by magnetic force microscopy, opening the possibility of measuring currents in buried interconnects in integrated circuits.

  10. Force and torque characteristics for magnetically driven blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pan; Haik, Yousef; Kilani, Mohammad; Chen, Ching-Jen

    2002-03-01

    Magnetically driven screw pumps were designed and fabricated for pumping biological fluids. The magnetic field simulations for three different magnetic coupling arrangements were obtained numerically. The force and torque for the three arrangements were computed. The effect of the separation gap between poles and the rotational angle on the force and torque is also presented. The pump characteristics were obtained experimentally.

  11. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  12. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking.

  13. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  14. A magnetic force sensor on a catheter tip for minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Chatzipirpiridis, G; Erne, P; Ergeneman, O; Pane, S; Nelson, B J

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a magnetically guided catheter for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) with a magnetic force sensing tip. The force sensing element utilizes a magnetic Hall sensor and a miniature permanent magnet mounted on a flexible encapsulation acting as the sensing membrane. It is capable of high sensitivity and robust force measurements suitable for in-vivo applications. A second larger magnet placed on the catheter allows the catheter to be guided by applying magnetic fields. Precise orientation control can be achieved with an external magnetic manipulation system. The proposed device can be used in many applications of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) to detect forces applied on tissue during procedures or to characterize different types of tissue for diagnosis.

  15. Science in a Box. Magnets III: Force Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents ideas to help elementary school educators teach their students about magnetic force fields by observing how iron filings line up around magnets. The article lists materials needed and offers a student page with suggested student activities. (SM)

  16. May the Magnetic Force Be with You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Jesse; Richey, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Although most elementary students have had experiences with magnets, they generally have misconceptions about magnetism (Driver et al. 1994; Burgoon, Heddle, and Duran 2010). For example, students may think magnets can attract all metals or that larger magnets are stronger than smaller magnets. Students often confuse magnets with magnetic…

  17. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  18. Nonlinear control of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradeep, A. K.; Gurumoorthy, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a variety of nonlinear controllers for the magnetic bearing that ensure both stability and robustness. We utilize techniques of discontinuous control to design novel control laws for the magnetic bearing. We present in particular sliding mode controllers, time optimal controllers, winding algorithm based controllers, nested switching controllers, fractional controllers, and synchronous switching controllers for the magnetic bearing. We show existence of solutions to systems governed by discontinuous control laws, and prove stability and robustness of the chosen control laws in a rigorous setting. We design sliding mode observers for the magnetic bearing and prove the convergence of the state estimates to their true values. We present simulation results of the performance of the magnetic bearing subject to the aforementioned control laws, and conclude with comments on design.

  19. Experiments with a Magnetically Controlled Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A magnetically controlled pendulum is used for observing free and forced oscillations, including nonlinear oscillations and chaotic motion. A data-acquisition system stores the data and displays time series of the oscillations and related phase plane plots, Poincare maps, Fourier spectra and histograms. The decay constant of the pendulum can be…

  20. Shear-mode magnetic force microscopy using a quartz tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yongho; Kim, Kyungho; Jhe, Wonho

    2003-03-01

    In conventional magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the cantilever is employed as a force sensor and optical deflection detection is used to measure its vibration. Micro-fabricated cantilever has such a small spring constant order of 10 N/m. The cantilever has some weak points; unexpected crash occurs because of its low stiffness, high resolution MFM is difficult because the dithering amplitude is large ( ˜ 10 nm), and laser light should be exposed, which is undesirable for low temperature or dark environment. We demonstrate shear-mode magnetic force microscopy using a quartz tuning fork with a spring constant of 1300 N/m. A sharpened cobalt tip is attached to the prong of the tuning fork so that it can be controlled in shear mode. We have obtained high resolution images of recorded magnetization patterns of hard disks with a spatial resolution of 50 nm. The minimum detectable force gradient is an order of 10-4 N/m. There are important advantages in tuning fork based MFM; (i) Because the tuning fork sensor is stiff, the tip will not be pulled by the attractive van der Waals force. So, unexpected crash can be avoided. (ii) Its minimum detectable dithering amplitude is much smaller than that of cantilever, (The spectral noise density of the tuning fork is ˜ 100 fm/ Hz) which supports the high resolution imaging. (iii) As the tuning fork is self-dithering and self-sensing device, one can avoid optical deflection detection and the scanning head is simple and small. (iv) Tuning fork based MFM can be operated in dark and low temperature condition, because no optical source is necessary and dissipated power can be reduced ˜ 1 pW.

  1. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  2. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Keir C; Nagy, Attila

    2008-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Here we describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  3. Multiple magnetic microrobot control using electrostatic anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawashe, Chytra; Floyd, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    Addressing power and control to individual untethered microrobots is a challenge for small-scale robotics. We present a 250×130×100 μm3 magnetic robot wirelessly driven by pulsed external magnetic fields. An induced stick-slip motion results in translation speeds over 8 mm/s. Control of multiple robots is achieved by an array of addressable electrostatic anchoring pads on the surface, which selectively fixes microrobots, preventing translation. We demonstrate control of two microrobots in both uncoupled individual motion and coupled symmetric motion. An estimated anchoring force of 23.0 μN is necessary to effectively fix each microrobot.

  4. Adaptive Force And Position Control For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1989-01-01

    Control system causes end effector of robot manipulator to follow prescribed trajectory and applies desired force or torque to object manipulating or in contact. Characterized by hybrid control architecture, where positions and orientations along unconstrained coordinate axes controlled by position-control subsystem, while forces and torques along constrained coordinate axes controlled by force-control subsystem. Compensates for dynamic cross-coupling between force-and position-control loops and does not require knowledge of complicated model of dynamics of manipulator and environment.

  5. Lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor is calculated as a function of displacement from its original position at rest using Bean's critical-state model to describe flux pinning. The force is linear for small displacements and saturates at large displacements. In the absence of edge effects the force always attracts the magnet to its original position. Thus it is a restoring force that contributes to the stability of the levitated magnet. In the case of a thick superconductor slab, the origin of the force is a magnetic dipole layer consisting of positive and negative supercurrents induced on the trailing side of the magnet. The qualitative behavior is consistent with experiments reported to date. Effects due to the finite thickness of the superconductor slab and the granular nature of high-Tc materials are also considered.

  6. Distortion of magnetic field and magnetic force of a brushless dc motor due to deformed rubber magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. J.; Jang, G. H.

    2008-04-01

    This paper investigates the distortion of magnetic field of a brushless dc (BLDC) motor due to deformed rubber magnet. Global or local deformation of rubber magnet in the BLDC motor is mathematically modeled by using the Fourier series. Distorted magnetic field is calculated by using the finite element method, and unbalanced magnetic force is calculated by using the Maxwell stress tensor. When the rubber magnet is globally or locally deformed, the unbalanced magnetic force has the frequencies with the first harmonic and the harmonics of slot number ±1. However, the harmonic deformation with multiple of common divisor of pole and slot does not generate unbalanced magnetic force due to the rotational symmetry.

  7. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-06-01

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a non-negligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analogue of Earnshaw's theorem, in which the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffness at the field-cooling position, independent of the angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  8. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  9. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  10. Magnetic force microscopy of nano-size magnetic domain ordering in heavy ion irradiated fullerene films.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D K; Pivin, J C; Papaléo, R M; Tripathi, A; Singh, F; Sulania, I

    2007-06-01

    In the present work, magnetic force microscopy is employed to investigate the magnetic ordering in ion irradiated fullerene films. It is observed that magnetic domain size is approximately 100-200 nm and magnetic signal is stronger at the domain boundaries. Magnetic signal arise in irradiated films is confirmed by magnetic measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device which increases with the ion fluence. The induced magnetism is possibly due to structural defects in the amorphous carbon phase formed by ion irradiation.

  11. Relativity and electromagnetism: The force on a magnetic monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler, Wolfgang

    1989-11-01

    On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the first publication, by Oliver Heaviside, of what is now known as the Lorentz force law in electromagnetic theory, the analogous force law for magnetic monopoles is examined. Its relevance and limitations in calculating the force and torque on small current loops are discussed, and both its heuristic and practical uses are demonstrated.

  12. Adaptive Variable Bias Magnetic Bearing Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. With the existence of the bias current, even in no load conditions, there is always some power consumption. In aerospace applications, power consumption becomes an important concern. In response to this concern, an alternative magnetic bearing control method, called Adaptive Variable Bias Control (AVBC), has been developed and its performance examined. The AVBC operates primarily as a proportional-derivative controller with a relatively slow, bias current dependent, time-varying gain. The AVBC is shown to reduce electrical power loss, be nominally stable, and provide control performance similar to conventional bias control. Analytical, computer simulation, and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  13. Magnetic domain imaging of nano-magnetic films using magnetic force microscopy with polar and longitudinally magnetized tips.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sy-Hann; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Su, Chiung-Wu; Tsay, Jyh-Shen

    2016-10-01

    Perpendicular or parallel magnetic fields are used to magnetize the tips used in magnetic force microscopy (MFM). In this process, perpendicular or parallel magnetic dipole moments are produced on the tip plane, thus leading to the formation of polar magnetized tips (PM-tips) or longitudinally magnetized tips (LM-tips), respectively. The resolution of an MFM image of a magneto-optic disk is used for calibration of these tips, and the saturated magnetic fields of the PM- and LM-tips are found to be 2720 Oe and 680 Oe, respectively. Because both tips can simultaneously magnetize the sample during the scanning process when measuring a Co thin film, clear MFM images are captured, which enable the identification of magnetizable regions and the distribution of the magnetic domains on the sample surface. These results will be useful for improving the manufacturing processes required for soft nano-magnetic film production.

  14. System for Controlling a Magnetically Levitated Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    In a rotor assembly having a rotor supported for rotation by magnetic bearings, a processor controlled by software or firmware controls the generation of force vectors that position the rotor relative to its bearings in a "bounce" mode in which the rotor axis is displaced from the principal axis defined between the bearings and a "tilt" mode in which the rotor axis is tilted or inclined relative to the principal axis. Waveform driven perturbations are introduced to generate force vectors that excite the rotor in either the "bounce" or "tilt" modes.

  15. Force reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    A force reflecting hand controller based upon a six degree of freedom fully parallel mechanism, often termed a Stewart Platform, has been designed, constructed, and tested as an integrated system with a slave robot manipulator test bed. A force reflecting hand controller comprises a kinesthetic device capable of transmitting position and orientation commands to a slave robot manipulator while simultaneously representing the environmental interaction forces of the slave manipulator back to the operator through actuators driving the hand controller mechanism. The Stewart Platform was chosen as a novel approach to improve force reflecting teleoperation because of its inherently high ratio of load generation capability to system mass content and the correspondingly high dynamic bandwidth. An additional novelty of the program was to implement closed loop force and torque control about the hand controller mechanism by equipping the handgrip with a six degree of freedom force and torque measuring cell. The mechanical, electrical, computer, and control systems are discussed and system tests are presented.

  16. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a ferromagnetic tip mounted on the force detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Hammel, P C

    1998-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) presents the opportunity for a magnetic resonance imaging probe with ultra-high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The successful application of this technique in detection of nuclear magnetic, electron-spin and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) highlights its significant potential. We discuss the capabilities of the MRFM with particular emphasis on the detection of FMR using MRFM techniques. A crucial remaining challenge in the development of the magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) is to place the magnetic probe on the mechanical resonator. We address the problem of spurious detector response arising from interactions between the magnetic tip and various external applied fields. We show that miniature, magnetically-polarized Nd2Fe14B particles show promise as magnetic probe tips. Our experience indicates it will be important to minimize the total polarized moment of the magnetic tip and to ensure that the applied fields are as uniform as possible.

  17. Overview of magnetic bearing control and linearization approaches for annular magnetically suspended devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of magnetic bearing control and linearization approaches which have been considered for annular magnetically suspended devices is presented. These devices include the Annular Momentum Control Device and the Annular Suspension and Pointing System. Two approaches were investigated for controlling the magnetic actuator. One approach involves controlling the upper and lower electromagnets differentially about a bias flux. The bias flux can either be supplied by permanent magnets in the magnetic circuit or by bias currents. In the other approach, either the upper electromagnet or the lower electromagnet is controlled depending on the direction of force required. One advantage of the bias flux is that for small gap perturbations about a fixed operating point, the force-current characteristic is linear. Linearization approaches investigated for individual element control include an analog solution of the nonlinear electromagnet force equation and a microprocessor-based table lookup method.

  18. Measured force/current relations in solid magnetic thrust bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.; Wakefield, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    When magnetic bearings are employed in a pump, compressor, turbine, or other rotating machine, measurement of the current in the bearing coils provides knowledge of the forces imposed on the bearings. This can be a significant indicator of machine problems. Additionally, magnetic bearings can be utilized as a load cell for measuring impeller forces in test rigs. The forces supported by magnetic bearings are directly related to the currents, air gaps, and other parameters in the bearings. This paper discusses the current/force relation for magnetic thrust bearings. Force versus current measurements were made on a particular magnetic bearing in a test rig as the bearing coil currents were cycled at various time rates of change.d the quasi-static force versus current relations were measured for a variety of air gaps and currents. The thrust bearing exhibits a hysteresis effect, which creates a significant difference between the measured force when the current is increasing as compared to that when the current is decreasing. For design current loops, 0.95 A to 2.55 A, at the time rate of change of 0.1 A/s, the difference between increasing and decreasing current curves due to hysteresis ranged from 4 to 8%. If the bearing is operated in small trajectories about a fixed (nonzero) operation point on the F/I (force/current) curve, the scatter in the measurement error could be expected to be on the order of 4%. A quasi-static nonlinear current/force equation was developed to model the data and curve-fit parameters established for the measured data. The effects of coercive force and iron reluctance, obtained from conventional magnetic materials tests, were included to improve the model, but theoretically calculated values from simple magnetic circuit theory do not produce accurate results. Magnetic fringing, leakage, and other effects must be included.

  19. Robot vibration control using inertial damping forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Han; Book, Wayne J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper concerns the suppression of the vibration of a large flexible robot by inertial forces of a small robot which is located at the tip of the large robot. A controller for generating damping forces to a large robot is designed based on the two time scale model. The controller does not need to calculate the quasi-steady variables and is efficient in computation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the inertial forces and the controller designed.

  20. Robot vibration control using inertial damping forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Han; Book, Wayne J.

    1989-01-01

    The suppression is examined of the vibration of a large flexible robot by inertial forces of a small robot which is located at the tip of the large robot. A controller for generating damping forces to a large robot is designed based on the two time scale mode. The controller does not need to calculate the quasi-steady state variables and is efficient in computation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the inertial forces and the controller designed.

  1. Optical fibre bragg gratings based magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa; Zhou, Jianhua

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic bearings are typical electromechanical systems of high performance. Current-displacement-force relationship between stator and rotor is an important research topic of magnetic bearings. The critical issue is to realize magnetic force online dynamic measurement. This paper presents a novel method on magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings with optical fibre bragg gratings (FBG), which realizes a non-contact and online force measurement with simple configuration, good noise immunity even when the rotor is running. A novel micro force transducer is designed and fabricated, which is mounted within the stator magnetic pole. To obtain current-displacement-force relationship a FBG based magnetic force measurement test rig is setup to simulate magnetic bearing working states as the stator coils currents, air gap between stator and rotor, rotor speed is adjustable. Magnetic force is measured under three classifications of test conditions and test results are presented. The measurement data show good consistency with the theory analysis and calculation, which means that the FBG based magnetic force measurement is available and of good accuracy.

  2. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  3. Effective force control by muscle synergies.

    PubMed

    Berger, Denise J; d'Avella, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Muscle synergies have been proposed as a way for the central nervous system (CNS) to simplify the generation of motor commands and they have been shown to explain a large fraction of the variation in the muscle patterns across a variety of conditions. However, whether human subjects are able to control forces and movements effectively with a small set of synergies has not been tested directly. Here we show that muscle synergies can be used to generate target forces in multiple directions with the same accuracy achieved using individual muscles. We recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity from 13 arm muscles and isometric hand forces during a force reaching task in a virtual environment. From these data we estimated the force associated to each muscle by linear regression and we identified muscle synergies by non-negative matrix factorization. We compared trajectories of a virtual mass displaced by the force estimated using the entire set of recorded EMGs to trajectories obtained using 4-5 muscle synergies. While trajectories were similar, when feedback was provided according to force estimated from recorded EMGs (EMG-control) on average trajectories generated with the synergies were less accurate. However, when feedback was provided according to recorded force (force-control) we did not find significant differences in initial angle error and endpoint error. We then tested whether synergies could be used as effectively as individual muscles to control cursor movement in the force reaching task by providing feedback according to force estimated from the projection of the recorded EMGs into synergy space (synergy-control). Human subjects were able to perform the task immediately after switching from force-control to EMG-control and synergy-control and we found no differences between initial movement direction errors and endpoint errors in all control modes. These results indicate that muscle synergies provide an effective strategy for motor coordination.

  4. Electromotive force and huge magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam Hai; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki; Barnes, Stewart E; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2009-03-26

    The electromotive force (e.m.f.) predicted by Faraday's law reflects the forces acting on the charge, -e, of an electron moving through a device or circuit, and is proportional to the time derivative of the magnetic field. This conventional e.m.f. is usually absent for stationary circuits and static magnetic fields. There are also forces that act on the spin of an electron; it has been recently predicted that, for circuits that are in part composed of ferromagnetic materials, there arises an e.m.f. of spin origin even for a static magnetic field. This e.m.f. can be attributed to a time-varying magnetization of the host material, such as the motion of magnetic domains in a static magnetic field, and reflects the conversion of magnetic to electrical energy. Here we show that such an e.m.f. can indeed be induced by a static magnetic field in magnetic tunnel junctions containing zinc-blende-structured MnAs quantum nanomagnets. The observed e.m.f. operates on a timescale of approximately 10(2)-10(3) seconds and results from the conversion of the magnetic energy of the superparamagnetic MnAs nanomagnets into electrical energy when these magnets undergo magnetic quantum tunnelling. As a consequence, a huge magnetoresistance of up to 100,000 per cent is observed for certain bias voltages. Our results strongly support the contention that, in magnetic nanostructures, Faraday's law of induction must be generalized to account for forces of purely spin origin. The huge magnetoresistance and e.m.f. may find potential applications in high sensitivity magnetic sensors, as well as in new active devices such as 'spin batteries'.

  5. Hybrid position/force control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raibert, M. H.; Craig, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A new conceptually simple approach to controlling compliant motions of a robot manipulator is presented. The 'hybrid' technique described combines force and torque information with positional data to satisfy simultaneous position and force trajectory constraints specified in a convenient task related coordinate system. Analysis, simulation, and experiments are used to evaluate the controller's ability to execute trajectories using feedback from a force sensing wrist and from position sensors found in the manipulator joints. The results show that the method achieves stable, accurate control of force and position trajectories for a variety of test conditions.

  6. Dual-tip magnetic force microscopy with suppressed influence on magnetically soft samples.

    PubMed

    Precner, Marián; Fedor, Ján; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír

    2015-02-06

    Standard magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is considered as a powerful tool used for magnetic field imaging at nanoscale. The method consists of two passes realized by the magnetic tip. Within the first one, the topography pass, the magnetic tip directly touches the magnetic sample. Such contact perturbs the magnetization of the sample explored. To avoid the sample touching the magnetic tip, we present a new approach to magnetic field scanning by segregating the topological and magnetic scans with two different tips located on a cut cantilever. The approach minimizes the disturbance of sample magnetization, which could be a major problem in conventional MFM images of soft magnetic samples. By cutting the cantilever in half using the focused ion beam technique, we create one sensor with two different tips--one tip is magnetized, and the other one is left non-magnetized. The non-magnetized tip is used for topography and the magnetized one for the magnetic field imaging. The method developed we call dual-tip magnetic force microscopy (DT-MFM). We describe in detail the dual-tip fabrication process. In the experiments, we show that the DT-MFM method reduces significantly the perturbations of the magnetic tip as compared to the standard MFM method. The present technique can be used to investigate microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic samples and is relevant in a wide range of applications, e.g., data storage and biomedicine.

  7. Optimal ferromagnetically-coated carbon nanotube tips for ultra-high resolution magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lisunova, Y; Heidler, J; Levkivskyi, I; Gaponenko, I; Weber, A; Caillier, Ch; Heyderman, L J; Kläui, M; Paruch, P

    2013-03-15

    Using single-walled carbon nanotubes homogeneously coated with ferromagnetic metal as ultra-high resolution magnetic force microscopy probes, we investigate the key image formation parameters and their dependence on coating thickness. The crucial step of introducing molecular beam epitaxy for deposition of the magnetic coating allows highly controlled fabrication of tips with small magnetic volume, while retaining high magnetic anisotropy and prolonged lifetime characteristics. Calculating the interaction between the tips and a magnetic sample, including hitherto neglected thermal noise effects, we show that optimal imaging is achieved for a finite, intermediate-thickness magnetic coating, in excellent agreement with experimental observations. With such optimal tips, we demonstrate outstanding resolution, revealing sub-10 nm domains in hard magnetic samples, and non-perturbative imaging of nanoscale spin structures in soft magnetic materials, all at ambient conditions with no special vacuum, temperature or humidity controls.

  8. Magnetic microswimmers: Controlling particle approach through magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We investigate magnetic microswimmers actuated by a rotating magnetic field that may be useful for drug delivery, micro-surgery, or diagnostics in human body. For modular swimmers, assembly and disassembly requires understanding the interactions between the swimmer and other modules in the fluid. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms for a frequency-dependent attraction/repulsion between a three-bead, achiral swimmer and other magnetic particles, which represent modular assembly elements. We first investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a swimmer and nearby particle by studying the Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the swimmer. Then we show that the magnetic forces can be attractive or repulsive depending on the spatial arrangement of the swimmer and particle, with a magnitude that decreases with increasing frequency. Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic effects allows us to understand the overall behavior of magnetic particles near the swimmer. Interestingly, we find that the frequency of rotation can be used to control when the particle can closely approach the swimmer, with potential application to assembly.

  9. A new scheme of force reflecting control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.

    1992-01-01

    A new scheme of force reflecting control has been developed that incorporates position-error-based force reflection and robot compliance control. The operator is provided with a kinesthetic force feedback which is proportional to the position error between the operator-commanded and the actual position of the robot arm. Robot compliance control, which increases the effective compliance of the robot, is implemented by low pass filtering the outputs of the force/torque sensor mounted on the base of robot hand and using these signals to alter the operator's position command. This position-error-based force reflection scheme combined with shared compliance control has been implemented successfully to the Advanced Teleoperation system consisting of dissimilar master-slave arms. Stability measurements have demonstrated unprecedentedly high force reflection gains of up to 2 or 3, even though the slave arm is much stiffer than operator's hand holding the force reflecting hand controller. Peg-in-hole experiments were performed with eight different operating modes to evaluate the new force-reflecting control scheme. Best task performance resulted with this new control scheme.

  10. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  11. Magnetic Control of Solutal Buoyancy Driven Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric forces resulting from local density variations and gravitational acceleration cause buoyancy induced convective motion in melts and solutions. Solutal buoyancy is a result of concentration differences in an otherwise isothermal fluid. If the fluid also exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility with concentration then convection control by external magnetic fields can be hypothesized. Magnetic control of thermal buoyancy induced convection in ferrofluids (dispersions of ferromagnetic particles in a carrier fluid) and paramagnetic fluids have been demonstrated. Here we show the nature of magnetic control of solutal buoyancy driven convection of a paramagnetic fluid, an aqueous solution of Manganese Chloride hydrate. We predict the critical magnetic field required for balancing gravitational solutal buoyancy driven convection and validate it through a simple experiment. We demonstrate that gravity driven flow can be completely reversed by a magnetic field but the exact cancellation of the flow is not possible. This is because the phenomenon is unstable. The technique can be applied to crystal growth processes in order to reduce convection and to heat exchanger devices for enhancing convection. The method can also be applied to impose a desired g-level in reduced gravity applications.

  12. Quantitative guidelines for force calibration through spectral analysis of magnetic tweezers data.

    PubMed

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-08-09

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools that can be used to study the kinetics and mechanics of a variety of enzymes and their complexes. Force spectroscopy, for example, can be used to control the force applied to a single molecule and thereby facilitate the investigation of real-time nucleic acid-protein interactions. In magnetic tweezers, which offer straightforward control and compatibility with fluorescence measurements or parallel tracking modes, force-measurement typically relies on the analysis of positional fluctuations through video microscopy. Significant errors in force estimates, however, may arise from incorrect spectral analysis of the Brownian motion in the magnetic tweezers. Here we investigated physical and analytical optimization procedures that can be used to improve the range over which forces can be reliably measured. To systematically probe the limitations of magnetic tweezers spectral analysis, we have developed a magnetic tweezers simulator, whose outcome was validated with experimental data. Using this simulator, we evaluate methods to correctly perform force experiments and provide guidelines for correct force calibration under configurations that can be encountered in typical magnetic tweezers experiments.

  13. Magnetic resonance force microscopy and a solid state quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelekhov, D. V.; Martin, I.; Suter, A.; Reagor, D. W.; Hammel, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Quantum Computer (QC) is a device that utilizes the principles of Quantum Mechanics to perform computations. Such a machine would be capable of accomplishing tasks not achievable by means of any conventional digital computer, for instance factoring large numbers. Currently it appears that the QC architecture based on an array of spin quantum bits (qubits) embedded in a solid-state matrix is one of the most promising approaches to fabrication of a scalable QC. However, the fabrication and operation of a Solid State Quantum Computer (SSQC) presents very formidable challenges; primary amongst these are: (1) the characterization and control of the fabrication process of the device during its construction and (2) the readout of the computational result. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM)--a novel scanning probe technique based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance-provides an attractive means of addressing these requirements. The sensitivity of the MRFM significantly exceeds that of conventional magnetic resonance measurement methods, and it has the potential for single electron spin detection. Moreover, the MRFM is capable of true 3D subsurface imaging. These features will make MRFM an invaluable tool for the implementation of a spin-based QC. Here we present the general principles of MRFM operation, the current status of its development and indicate future directions for its improvement.

  14. Modeling Robot Flexibility for Endpoint Force Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    SIDM 19. KE9Y WORDS fCntknu. OnPVOO&O 0401 It 00041000111O ed 0000#uF 6P 1111411 amA.w) robot force control * robot control / robot dynamics flexible...no. 3, pp. 62-75. [2] Eppinger, S.D. and Seering, W.P. On Dynamic Models of Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on...W.P. Understanding Bandwidth Limitations in Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on Robotics and Automation. IEEE, April 1987

  15. Extending the Range for Force Calibration in Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J.; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  16. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates.

  17. Single Nuclear Spin Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-02

    Lab. In work not directly supported by this grant, these projects advanced MRFM detected Ferromagnetic Resonance ( FMR ) to enable studies of...directly supported by this grant, these projects advanced MRFM detected Ferromagnetic Resonance ( FMR ) to enable studies of submicron magnetic structures...our earlier NMR detection of 19F spins in CaF2 we have conducted 65Cu, 63Cu NMR stud- ies for studies of interface phenomena in multilayered magnetic

  18. Construction robot force control in cleaning operations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.; Skibniewski, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Basic surface treatment tasks on construction sites that can be performed by robots include the spraying, cleaning, and finishing of surfaces. In the present paper, a construction robot is proposed for accomplishing a variety of cleaning tasks in construction. Specifically, the force-control problem in cleaning a surface is studied. The paper shows that a force sensor can be used not only to monitor the force acting at the contact points, but also to identify the uncertainties of the unstructured construction environment. A different formulation for the external force is presented. With this formulation, the external force on the end-effector is presented as a function of the contact force, contact torque, and constraint conditions, but not the actuated torque in the joint space. Therefore, the force-control problem is simplified to compensate for the external force and to exert a desired force. One advantage fo this approach is that the original PID position control loop of an industrial robot is retained so that the time-consuming computed torque method is avoided. The proposed control scheme can be applied to numerous cleaning tasks with hard contact regardless of the different nature of the surface.

  19. Ball lightning as a force-free magnetic knot

    PubMed

    Ranada; Soler; Trueba

    2000-11-01

    The stability of fireballs in a recent model of ball lightning is studied. It is shown that the balls shine while relaxing in an almost quiescent expansion, and that three effects contribute to their stability: (i) the formation in each one during a process of Taylor relaxation of a force-free magnetic field, a concept introduced in 1954 in order to explain the existence of large magnetic fields and currents in stable configurations of astrophysical plasmas; (ii) the so called Alfven conditions in magnetohydrodynamics; and (iii) the approximate conservation of the helicity integral. The force-free fields that appear are termed "knots" because their magnetic lines are closed and linked.

  20. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  1. Experimental Benchmarking of the Magnetized Friction Force

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Galnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; GALNANDER, B.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LOFNES, T.; SIDORIN, A.O.; SMIRNOV, A.V.; ZIEMANN, V.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  3. Interaction Forces Between Multiple Bodies in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Some of the results from experiments to determine the interaction forces between multiple bodies in a magnetic field are presented in this paper. It is shown how the force values and the force directions depend on the configuration of the bodies, their relative positions to each other, and the vector of the primary magnetic field. A number of efficient new automatic loading and assembly machines, as well as manipulators and robots, have been created based on the relationship between bodies and magnetic fields. A few of these patented magnetic devices are presented. The concepts involved open a new way to design universal grippers for robot and other kinds of mechanisms for the manipulation of objects. Some of these concepts can be used for space applications.

  4. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  5. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-08-07

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results.

  6. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, G.A.; Williamson, M.M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

  7. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, Gill A.; Williamson, Matthew M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.

  8. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  9. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  10. Closed Loop Control of a Tethered Magnetic Capsule Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Taddese, Addisu Z.; Slawinski, Piotr R.; Obstein, Keith L.; Valdastri, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients have repeatedly been shown to be the most feasible mechanism for gastrointestinal capsule endoscope actuation. An inverse quartic magnetic force variation with distance results in large force gradients induced by small movements of a driving magnet; this necessitates robotic actuation of magnets to implement stable control of the device. A typical system consists of a serial robot with a permanent magnet at its end effector that actuates a capsule with an embedded permanent magnet. We present a tethered capsule system where a capsule with an embedded magnet is closed loop controlled in 2 degree-of-freedom in position and 2 degree-of-freedom in orientation. Capitalizing on the magnetic field of the external driving permanent magnet, the capsule is localized in 6-D allowing for both position and orientation feedback to be used in a control scheme. We developed a relationship between the serial robot's joint parameters and the magnetic force and torque that is exerted onto the capsule. Our methodology was validated both in a dynamic simulation environment where a custom plug-in for magnetic interaction was written, as well as on an experimental platform. The tethered capsule was demonstrated to follow desired trajectories in both position and orientation with accuracy that is acceptable for colonoscopy. PMID:28286886

  11. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter β that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient. PMID:25365971

  12. Acceleration-augmented LQG control of an active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  13. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  14. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response.

  15. Configurations and control of magnetic fields for manipulating magnetic particles in microfluidic applications: magnet systems and manipulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Quanliang; Han, Xiaotao; Li, Liang

    2014-08-07

    The use of a magnetic field for manipulating the motion of magnetic particles in microchannels has attracted increasing attention in microfluidic applications. Generation of a flexible and controllable magnetic field plays a crucial role in making better use of the particle manipulation technology. Recent advances in the development of magnet systems and magnetic field control methods have shown that it has great potential for effective and accurate manipulation of particles in microfluidic systems. Starting with the analysis of magnetic forces acting on the particles, this review gives the configurations and evaluations of three main types of magnet system proposed in microfluidic applications. The interaction mechanisms of magnetic particles with magnetic fields are also discussed.

  16. Calculation of forces on magnetized bodies using COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, John

    1987-01-01

    The methods described may be used with a high degree of confidence for calculations of magnetic traction forces normal to a surface. In this circumstance all models agree, and test cases have resulted in theoretically correct results. It is shown that the tangential forces are in practice negligible. The surface pole method is preferable to the virtual work method because of the necessity for more than one NASTRAN run in the latter case, and because distributed forces are obtained. The derivation of local forces from the Maxwell stress method involves an undesirable degree of manipulation of the problem and produces a result in contradiction of the surface pole method.

  17. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A.; Wiener, Diane M.; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level.

  18. Magnetic fluid readily controlled in zero gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1965-01-01

    Colloid composed of finely ground iron oxide in a fluid such as heptane, is controlled and directed magnetically in a zero gravity environment. It will not separate on standing for long periods or after exposure to magnetic or centrifugal forces. Because of its low density and low viscosity, it is easily pumped.

  19. Characterization of the magnetic micro- and nanostructure in unalloyed steels by magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, L.; Rabe, U.; Hirsekorn, S.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of a cementite phase influences significantly the macroscopic mechanical and magnetic properties of steels. Based on a correlation between mechanical and magnetic properties, mechanical properties as well as the morphology and content of the cementite phase can be inspected by electromagnetic non-destructive testing methods. The influence of the carbon content on bulk magnetic properties of unalloyed steels is studied on a macroscopic scale by hysteresis loop and Barkhausen noise measurements. The micro- and nanostructure is investigated by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Surface topography images and magnetic images of globular cementite precipitates embedded in a ferrite matrix are presented. The size, shape, and orientation of the precipitates influence the domain configuration. Applied external magnetic fields cause magnetization processes mainly in the ferrite matrix: Bloch walls move and are pinned by the cementite precipitates. The correlation between the microscopic observations and macroscopic magnetic properties of the material is discussed.

  20. Comparison Of Force-Control Schemes For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard A.; Khosla, Pradeep

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments in which several explicit force-control strategies for robotic manipulators were compared. Explicit force control involves direct command and measurement of forces, with goal of making robotic manipulator follow commanded force trajectory as closely as possible.

  1. Prediction and analysis of magnetic forces in permanent magnet brushless dc motor with rotor eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Li, J. T.; Jabbar, M. A.

    2006-04-01

    In design of permanent magnet motors for high-precision applications, it is sometimes necessary, early in the design stage, to have a detailed analysis of the effect of rotor eccentricity that may result from manufacturing imperfectness or use of fluid dynamic or aerodynamic bearings. This paper presents an analytical model for electromagnetic torque and forces in permanent magnet motors with rotor eccentricity. The model gives an insight to the relationship between the effect of the eccentricity and the other motor design parameters on the electromagnetic forces. It is shown that the calculated magnetic forces obtained from this model agree well with those obtained from numerical simulations that are very computationally demanding.

  2. Measuring colloidal forces with the magnetic chaining technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, R.; Lacoste, D.; Bibette, J.; Baudry, J.

    2009-02-01

    In 1994 Leal Calderon et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2959 (1994)) introduced the magnetic chaining technique to directly probe the force-distance profile between colloidal particles. In this paper, we revisit this approach in two ways. First, we describe a new experimental design which allows us to utilize sample volumes as low as a few microliters, involving femtomoles of surface active macromolecules. Secondly, we extensively describe the characterization and preparation of the magnetic colloids, and we give a quantitative evaluation of performance and resolution of the technique in terms of force and interparticle separation.

  3. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, N.; Ruchotzke, W.; Belding, A.; Cardellino, J.; Blomberg, E. C.; McCullian, B. A.; Bhallamudi, V. P.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Hammel, P. C.

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q ∼106 [1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300 K is 4 fN/√{Hz } , indicating a potential low temperature (4 K) sensitivity of 25 aN/√{Hz } . Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches.

  4. Magnetic bearings for vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweitzer, G.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is presented on the research of the Institute of Mechanics of the ETH in the field of vibration control with magnetic bearings. It shows a method for modelling an elastic rotor so that it can be represented by a low order model amenable to control techniques. It deals with the control law and spill-over effects, and it also discusses experimental results for an active resonance damper.

  5. Principle and Basic Characteristics of Variable-Magnetic-Force Memory Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kazuto; Yuki, Kazuaki; Hashiba, Yutaka; Takahashi, Norio; Yasui, Kazuya; Kovudhikulrungsri, Lilit

    A reduction in the power consumed by motors is required for energy saving in the case of electrical appliances and electric vehicles (EV). The motors used for operating these apparatus operate at variable speeds. Further, the motors operate with small load in stationary mode and with large load in start-up mode. A permanent magnet motor can operate at the rated power with a high efficiency. However, the efficiency is lower at small load or high speed because the large constant magnetic force results in substantial core loss. Furthermore, the flux-weakening current that depresses voltage at high speed leads to significant copper loss. Therefore, we have developed a new technique for controlling the magnetic force of permanent magnet on the basis of the load or speed of the motor. In this paper, we propose the novel motor that can vary magnetic flux and we clarify the principle.

  6. Velocity-Controlled Magnetic Bearings with Solid Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming; Walton, James

    1996-01-01

    A methodology for designing velocity-controlled magnetic bearings with laminated cores has been extended to those with solid cores. The eddy-current effect of the solid cores is modeled as an opposing magnetomotive force. The bearing control dynamics is formulated in a dimensionless fashion which can be readily reviewed on a root-locus plot for stability. This facilitates the controller design and tuning process for solid core magnetic bearings using no displacement sensors.

  7. Pose control of the chain composed of magnetic particles using external uniform and gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. F.; Shao, C. L.; Gu, B. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are known to respond to a magnetic field and can be moved by magnetic force, which make them good carriers in bioengineering and pharmaceutical engineering. In this paper, a pose control method for the straight chain composed of MPs is proposed, and the chain with one pose can be moved to another position with another pose using alternately employed uniform and gradient magnetic fields. Based on computer simulations, it is revealed that in the uniform magnetic field, the MPs form a straight chain with the same separation space along the field lines, and once the uniform magnetic field rotates, the chain also rotates with the field. In the gradient magnetic field, the MPs move toward the higher field so that the translation of the chain can be realized. The simulation results indicate that while the uniform magnetic field is rotating, there exists certain hysteresis between the chain and the field, and the chain is not straight anymore. So the uniform magnetic field should rest at the target angle for a period to make the chain fully relax to be straight. For nanoMP, its magnetic moment directly determines the gradient magnetic force which is much smaller than the dipole-dipole force among MPs. Therefore, the translation of the chain is much more time-consuming than rotation. To enlarge the translational velocity, it is suggested to increase the size of MPs or the magnetic field gradient.

  8. Artificial bacterial flagella: Fabrication and magnetic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Abbott, Jake J.; Dong, Lixin; Kratochvil, Bradley E.; Bell, Dominik; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2009-02-01

    Inspired by the natural design of bacterial flagella, we report artificial bacterial flagella (ABF) that have a comparable shape and size to their organic counterparts and can swim in a controllable fashion using weak applied magnetic fields. The helical swimmer consists of a helical tail resembling the dimensions of a natural flagellum and a thin soft-magnetic "head" on one end. The swimming locomotion of ABF is precisely controlled by three orthogonal electromagnetic coil pairs. Microsphere manipulation is performed, and the thrust force generated by an ABF is analyzed. ABF swimmers represent the first demonstration of microscopic artificial swimmers that use helical propulsion. Self-propelled devices such as these are of interest in fundamental research and for biomedical applications.

  9. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  10. Experimental verification of radial magnetic levitation force on the cylindrical magnets in ferrofluid dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenming; Wang, Pengkai; Hao, Ruican; Ma, Buchuan

    2017-03-01

    Analytical and numerical calculation methods of the radial magnetic levitation force on the cylindrical magnets in cylindrical vessels filled with ferrofluid was reviewed. An experimental apparatus to measure this force was designed and tailored, which could measure the forces in a range of 0-2.0 N with an accuracy of 0.001 N. After calibrated, this apparatus was used to study the radial magnetic levitation force experimentally. The results showed that the numerical method overestimates this force, while the analytical ones underestimate it. The maximum deviation between the numerical results and the experimental ones was 18.5%, while that between the experimental results with the analytical ones attained 68.5%. The latter deviation narrowed with the lengthening of the magnets. With the aids of the experimental verification of the radial magnetic levitation force, the effect of eccentric distance of magnets on the viscous energy dissipation in ferrofluid dampers could be assessed. It was shown that ignorance of the eccentricity of magnets during the estimation could overestimate the viscous dissipation in ferrofluid dampers.

  11. Magnetic bearing stiffness control using frequency band filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming

    1989-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings can be implemented with frequency band-reject filtering that decreases the bearing stiffness and damping at a small bandwidth around a chosen frequency. The control scheme was used for reducing a rotor dynamic force, such as an imbalance force, transmitted to the bearing stator. The scheme creates additional system vibration modes at the same frequency. It also shows that the amount of force reduction is limited by the stability requirement of these modes.

  12. Waveform control pulse magnetization for HTS bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Shigeuchi, Koji; Okuda, Sayo; Watasaki, Masahiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-01

    For the past 10 years, we have studied high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnets for use in electromagnetic rotating machines. If the magnetic field effectively magnetizes the HTS bulk, then the size of the motor and generator can be reduced without a reduction in output. We showed that the melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O HTS bulk effectively traps a high magnetic field using waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM). WCPM makes it possible to generate any pulsed magnetic field waveform by appropriately changing the duty ratio of the pulse width modulation. By chopping so that the pulsed magnetic field has a period of about 1ms, the WCPM technology enables active control of the rise time and suppresses magnetic flux motion that decreases magnetization efficiency. This method is also useful for any HTS bulk magnet, and the high magnetic flux density is trapped in the HTS bulk by a single pulse magnetic field. We developed a magnetizer that has a feedback system from the penetrated magnetic flux density to realize WCPM. In this research, using only a single pulse magnetic field of WCPM method at 77K, an HTS bulk with a 45mm diameter and 19mm thickness trapped a maximum magnetic field of 1.63T, which is more than 90% of the trapped magnetic flux density by FC magnetization. This result suggests that the pulse magnetizing method can replace the conventional field-cooled method and promote the practical use of HTS magnets for electromagnetic power applications.

  13. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a paramagnetic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, G. P.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider theoretically extension of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) replacing a ferromagnetic probe on a cantilever tip (CT) with a paramagnetic one (PMRFM). The dynamics of the interaction between the paramagnetic probe and a local magnetic moment in a sample is analyzed, using a quasi-classical approach. We show that the application of a proper sequence of electromagnetic pulses provides a significant deflection of the CT from the initial equilibrium position. Periodic application of these sequences of pulses results in quasi-periodic CT deflections from the equilibrium, which can be used for detection of the magnetic moment in a sample.

  14. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a paramagnetic probe

    DOE PAGES

    Berman, G. P.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2017-04-01

    Here, we consider theoretically extension of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) replacing a ferromagnetic probe on a cantilever tip (CT) with a paramagnetic one (PMRFM). The dynamics of the interaction between the paramagnetic probe and a local magnetic moment in a sample is analyzed, using a quasi-classical approach. We show that the application of a proper sequence of electromagnetic pulses provides a significant deflection of the CT from the initial equilibrium position. Periodic application of these sequences of pulses results in quasi-periodic CT deflections from the equilibrium, which can be used for detection of the magnetic moment in a sample.

  15. Principle and Basic Characteristics of a Hybrid Variable-Magnetic-Force Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kazuto; Kuramochi, Satoru

    Reduction in the power consumed by motors is important for energy saving in the case of electrical appliances and electric vehicles (EVs). The motors used for operating these devices operate at variable speeds. Further, the motors operate with a small load in the stationary mode and a large load in the starting mode. A permanent magnet motor can be operated at the rated power with a high efficiency. However, the efficiency is low at a small load or at a high speed because the large constant magnetic force results in substantial core loss. Furthermore, the flux-weakening current that decreases the voltage at a high speed leads to significant copper loss and core loss. Therefore, we have developed a new technique for controlling the magnetic force of a permanent magnet on the basis of the load or speed of the motor. In this paper, we propose a novel motor that can vary the magnetic flux of a permanent magnet and clarify the principle and basic characteristics of the motor. The new motor has a permanent magnet that is magnetized by the magnetizing coil of the stator. The analysis results show that the magnetic flux linkage of the motor can be changed from 37% to 100% that a high torque can be produced.

  16. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft using geomagnetic Lorentz force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia A.; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Attitude stabilization of a charged rigid spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit using torques due to Lorentz force in pitch and roll directions is considered. A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth's magnetic field will be subject to perturbations from the Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft's orientation. We assume that the spacecraft is moving in the Earth's magnetic field in an elliptical orbit under the effects of gravitational, geomagnetic and Lorentz torques. The magnetic field of the Earth is modeled as a non-tilted dipole. A model incorporating all Lorentz torques as a function of orbital elements has been developed on the basis of electric and magnetic fields. The stability of the spacecraft orientation is investigated both analytically and numerically. The existence and stability of equilibrium positions is investigated for different values of the charge to mass ratio (α*). Stable orbits are identified for various values of α*. The main parameters for stabilization of the spacecraft are α* and the difference between the components of the moment of inertia for the spacecraft.

  17. Control of heat transfer in engine coolers by Lorentz forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcher, C.; Kühndel, J.

    2016-09-01

    In engine coolers of off-highway vehicles convective heat transfer at the coolant side is a limiting factor of both efficiency and performance density of the cooler. Here, due to design restrictions, backwater areas and stagnation regions appear that are caused by flow deflections and cross-sectional expansions. As appropriate coolants, mixtures of water and glysantine are commonly used. Such coolants are characterized by their electrical conductivity of some S/m. This gives rise to control coolant flow and therefore convective heat transfer by means of Lorentz forces. These body forces are generated within the weakly conducting fluid by the interactions of an electrical current density and a localized magnetic field both of which being externally superimposed. In application this may be achieved by inserting electrodes in the cooler wall and a corresponding arrangement of permanent magnets. In this paper we perform numerical simulations of such magnetohydrodynamic flow in three model geometries that are frequently apparent in engine cooling applications: Carnot-Borda diffusor, 90° bend, and 180° bend. The simulations are carried out using the software package ANSYS Fluent. The present study demonstrates that, depending on the electromagnetic interaction parameter and the specific geometric arrangement of electrodes and magnetic field, Lorentz forces are suitable to break up eddy waters and separation zones and are thus significantly increasing convective heat transfer in these areas. Furthermore, the results show that due to the action of the Lorentz forces the hydraulic pressure losses can be reduced.

  18. Quasi-static and dynamic magnetic tension forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2017-01-01

    Solar eruptions are often driven by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as the torus and kink instabilities that act on line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Recent laboratory experiments designed to study these eruptive instabilities have demonstrated the key role of both dynamic (Myers et al 2015 Nature 528 526) and quasi-static (Myers et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 112102) magnetic tension forces in contributing to the equilibrium and stability of line-tied magnetic flux ropes. In this paper, we synthesize these laboratory results and explore the relationship between the dynamic and quasi-static tension forces. While the quasi-static tension force is found to contribute to the flux rope equilibrium in a number of regimes, the dynamic tension force is substantial mostly in the so-called failed torus regime where magnetic self-organization events prevent the flux rope from erupting.

  19. Quasi-static and dynamic magnetic tension forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2016-11-22

    Solar eruptions are often driven by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as the torus and kink instabilities that act on line-tied magnetic flux ropes. We designed our recent laboratory experiments to study these eruptive instabilities which have demonstrated the key role of both dynamic (Myers et al 2015 Nature 528 526) and quasi-static (Myers et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 112102) magnetic tension forces in contributing to the equilibrium and stability of line-tied magnetic flux ropes. In our paper, we synthesize these laboratory results and explore the relationship between the dynamic and quasi-static tension forces. And while the quasi-static tension force is found to contribute to the flux rope equilibrium in a number of regimes, the dynamic tension force is substantial mostly in the so-called failed torus regime where magnetic self-organization events prevent the flux rope from erupting.

  20. Quasi-static and dynamic magnetic tension forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Solar eruptions are often driven by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as the torus and kink instabilities that act on line-tied magnetic flux ropes. We designed our recent laboratory experiments to study these eruptive instabilities which have demonstrated the key role of both dynamic (Myers et al 2015 Nature 528 526) and quasi-static (Myers et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 112102) magnetic tension forces in contributing to the equilibrium and stability of line-tied magnetic flux ropes. In our paper, we synthesize these laboratory results and explore the relationship between the dynamic and quasi-static tension forces. And while the quasi-static tension force ismore » found to contribute to the flux rope equilibrium in a number of regimes, the dynamic tension force is substantial mostly in the so-called failed torus regime where magnetic self-organization events prevent the flux rope from erupting.« less

  1. Vertically polarizing undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, N.; Vasserman, I.; Xu, J.; Jensen, D.; Schmidt, O.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Suthar, K.; Moog, E. R.; Pile, G.; Gluskin, E.

    2017-01-01

    As part of the R&D program of the LCLS-II project, a novel 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype with horizontal magnetic field and dynamic force compensation has recently been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Previous steps in this development were the shorter 0.8-meter-long and 2.8-meter-long prototypes. Extensive mechanical and magnetic testing were carried out for each prototype, and each prototype was magnetically tuned using magnetic shims. The resulting performance of the 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype meets all requirements for the LCLS-II insertion device, including limits on the field integrals, phase errors, higher-order magnetic moments, and electron-beam trajectory for all operational gaps, as well as the reproducibility and accuracy of the gap settings.

  2. THE MEAN ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE RESULTING FROM MAGNETIC BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W. E-mail: d.w.hughes@leeds.ac.uk

    2011-02-01

    Motivated both by considerations of the generation of large-scale astrophysical magnetic fields and by potential problems with mean magnetic field generation by turbulent convection, we investigate the mean electromotive force (emf) resulting from the magnetic buoyancy instability of a rotating layer of stratified magnetic field, considering both unidirectional and sheared fields. We discuss why the traditional decomposition into {alpha} and {beta} effects is inappropriate in this case, and that it is only consideration of the entire mean emf that is meaningful. By considering a weighted average of the unstable linear eigenmodes, and averaging over the horizontal plane, we obtain depth-dependent emfs. For the simplified case of isothermal, ideal MHD, we are able to obtain an analytic expression for the emf; more generally, the emf has to be determined numerically. We calculate how the emf depends on the various parameters of the problem, particularly the rotation rate and the latitude of the magnetic layer.

  3. Local nonlinear rf forces in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2014-06-15

    The local nonlinear forces induced by radio frequency (rf) waves are derived in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, where the inhomogeneity exists in the rf fields, in the static magnetic field as well as in the equilibrium density and temperature. The local parallel force is completely resonant, but a novel component dependent on those inhomogeneities is obtained as the result of the inhomogeneous transport of parallel resonant-absorbed momentum by the nonlinear perpendicular drift flux. In the local poloidal force, the component induced by the inhomogeneity of rf power absorption is also confirmed and it can be recognized as the residual effect from the incomplete cancellation between the rate of the diamagnetic poloidal momentum gain and the Lorentz force due to the radial diffusion-like flux. The compact expression for radial force is also obtained for the first time, whose nonresonant component is expressed as the sum of the ponderomotive force on particles and the gradients of the nonresonant perpendicular pressure and of the nonresonant momentum flux due to the finite temperature effect. Numerical calculations in a 1-D slab model show that the resonant component dependent on the inhomogeneities may be significant when the ion absorption dominates the resonant wave-particle interaction. A quantitative estimation shows that the novel component in the parallel force is important to understand the experiments of the ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive.

  4. Multiplexed single-molecule force proteolysis measurements using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Arjun S; Chai, Jack; Dunn, Alexander R

    2012-07-25

    The generation and detection of mechanical forces is a ubiquitous aspect of cell physiology, with direct relevance to cancer metastasis(1), atherogenesis(2) and wound healing(3). In each of these examples, cells both exert force on their surroundings and simultaneously enzymatically remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). The effect of forces on ECM has thus become an area of considerable interest due to its likely biological and medical importance(4-7). Single molecule techniques such as optical trapping(8), atomic force microscopy(9), and magnetic tweezers(10,11) allow researchers to probe the function of enzymes at a molecular level by exerting forces on individual proteins. Of these techniques, magnetic tweezers (MT) are notable for their low cost and high throughput. MT exert forces in the range of ~1-100 pN and can provide millisecond temporal resolution, qualities that are well matched to the study of enzyme mechanism at the single-molecule level(12). Here we report a highly parallelizable MT assay to study the effect of force on the proteolysis of single protein molecules. We present the specific example of the proteolysis of a trimeric collagen peptide by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1); however, this assay can be easily adapted to study other substrates and proteases.

  5. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  6. Single Molecule Magnetic Force Detection with a Carbon Nanotube Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willick, Kyle; Walker, Sean; Baugh, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Single molecule magnets (SMMs) sit at the boundary between macroscopic magnetic behaviour and quantum phenomena. Detecting the magnetic moment of an individual SMM would allow exploration of this boundary, and could enable technological applications based on SMMs such as quantum information processing. Detection of these magnetic moments remains an experimental challenge, particularly at the time scales of relaxation and decoherence. We present a technique for sensitive magnetic force detection that should permit such measurements. A suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) mechanical resonator is combined with a magnetic field gradient generated by a ferromagnetic gate electrode, which couples the magnetic moment of a nanomagnet to the resonant motion of the CNT. Numerical calculations of the mechanical resonance show that resonant frequency shifts on the order of a few kHz arise due to single Bohr magneton changes in magnetic moment. A signal-to-noise analysis based on thermomechanical noise shows that magnetic switching at the level of a Bohr magneton can be measured in a single shot on timescales as short as 10 μs. This sensitivity should enable studies of the spin dynamics of an isolated SMM, within the spin relaxation timescales for many available SMMs. Supported by NSERC.

  7. Disentangling the magnetic force noise contribution in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetically-induced forces on the inertial masses on-board LISA Pathfinder are expected to be one of the dominant contributions to the mission noise budget, accounting for up to 40%. The origin of this disturbance is the coupling of the residual magnetization and susceptibility of the test masses with the environmental magnetic field. In order to fully understand this important part of the noise model, a set of coils and magnetometers are integrated as a part of the diagnostics subsystem. During operations a sequence of magnetic excitations will be applied to precisely determine the coupling of the magnetic environment to the test mass displacement using the on-board magnetometers. Since no direct measurement of the magnetic field in the test mass position will be available, an extrapolation of the magnetic measurements to the test mass position will be carried out as a part of the data analysis activities. In this paper we show the first results on the magnetic experiments during an end- to-end LISA Pathfinder simulation, and we describe the methods under development to map the magnetic field on-board.

  8. Teleoperations with shared explicit contact force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiti, Andrea; Cannata, Giorgio; Casalino, Giuseppe; Reto, Simone

    1997-12-01

    In this paper the development of a master-slave robotics system is presented. This development is part of a research project devoted to the intelligent automation of in-service inspection of welded seams in nuclear plants using non- destructive ultrasonic based techniques. The main feature of the system is a shared explicit control scheme of the contact force during the interaction of the end-effector with the remote environment. This unilateral master-slave operational scheme does not suffer from the drawbacks of the bilateral force reflection based implementation. Moreover it avoids the operator from damaging the remote manipulator during wrong maneuvers due to imperfect video feedback. The paper describes the control structure applied (belonging to the class of explicit force control) and the hardware-software architecture of the system. Experimental results are given on the Ansaldo Olasand manipulator.

  9. Fractionation of Magnetic Microspheres in a Microfluidic Spiral: Interplay between Magnetic and Hydrodynamic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, M. E.; Häfeli, U. O.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic forces and curvature-induced hydrodynamic drag have both been studied and employed in continuous microfluidic particle separation and enrichment schemes. Here we combine the two. We investigate consequences of applying an outwardly directed magnetic force to a dilute suspension of magnetic microspheres circulating in a spiral microfluidic channel. This force is realized with an array of permanent magnets arranged to produce a magnetic field with octupolar symmetry about the spiral axis. At low flow rates particles cluster around an apparent streamline of the flow near the outer wall of the turn. At high flow rates this equilibrium is disrupted by the induced secondary (Dean) flow and a new equilibrium is established near the inner wall of the turn. A model incorporating key forces involved in establishing these equilibria is described, and is used to extract quantitative information about the magnitude of local Dean drag forces from experimental data. Steady-state fractionation of suspensions by particle size under the combined influence of magnetic and hydrodynamic forces is demonstrated. Extensions of this work could lead to new continuous microscale particle sorting and enrichment processes with improved fidelity and specificity. PMID:28107472

  10. The magnetic mirror force in plasma fluid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been several attempts to include the magnetic mirror force in the equation of motion for a plasma in a fluid formalism. In the process, some confusion has been evident regarding when and how this should be done. This problem has been addressed in the literature, but these treatments appear to have been forgotten or misunderstood. The mathematical arguments are summarized so that the physical consequences are readily perceived. It is shown that for an isotropic plasma fluid, in the direction parallel or anti-parallel to a magnetic field, the forces associated with a diverging magnetic field cancel out. Only for anisotropies in the fluid properties does the diverging field influence the plasma dynamics.

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-07

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  12. Edge effects on forces and magnetic fields produced by a conductor moving past a magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.; Almer, J. D.; Rossing, T. D.

    Experiments were performed to further investigate the forces acting on magnets moving along and over the edge of a continuous conducting sheet and to produce a comprehensive data set for the validation of analysis methods. Mapping the magnetic field gives information about the eddy currents induced in the conductor, which agrees with numerical calculations.

  13. The Pioneer Jupiter magnetic control program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, N. L.; Broce, R. D.; Inouye, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The Pioneer Jupiter spacecraft was required to have a sufficiently small magnetic field that accurate interplanetary-magnetic field measurements would not be compromised. In order to control the magnetic field throughout the program a running account of spacecraft magnetic fields was maintained by means of a periodically updated magnetic model. This model was used to make economic tradeoffs in subsystem magnetic moments within the allowed magnetic budget. The program was culminated with a measurement of the magnetic field of the spacecraft. A description of the magnetic tests and a comparison with estimates made with the magnetic model are also presented.

  14. Novel detection system for biomolecules using nano-sized bacterial magnetic particles and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Yosuke; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Yoza, Brandon; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2005-11-21

    A system for streptavidin detection using biotin conjugated to nano-sized bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) has been developed. BMPs, isolated from magnetic bacteria, were used as magnetic markers for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging. The magnetic signal was obtained from a single particle using MFM without application of an external magnetic field. The number of biotin conjugated BMPs (biotin-BMPs) bound to streptavidin immobilized on the glass slides increased with streptavidin concentrations up to 100 pg/ml. The minimum streptavidin detection limit using this technique is 1 pg/ml, which is 100 times more sensitive than a conventional fluorescent detection system. This is the first report using single domain nano-sized magnetic particles as magnetic markers for biosensing. This assay system can be used for immunoassay and DNA detection with high sensitivities.

  15. Effect of horizontal magnetization reversal of the tips on magnetic force microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Alexander; Popkov, Anatoliy; Shubin, Andrey; Pudonin, Feodor; Djuzhev, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    The effect of magnetization reversal of magnetic force microscope (MFM) tips based on low coercive thin-films on MFM images has been studied both experimentally and theoretically. By analyzing the MFM images obtained on structures with high magnetic stray fields we show that during the imaging process the magnetic state of the probe is modified anisotropically: the horizontal component of the magnetization follows the external field, whereas the vertical component of the magnetization stays almost constant. The observed complex magnetic behavior of the tip is explained theoretically based on the shape anisotropy of the tip. The obtained results are important for interpretation of MFM images of structures with high magnetic moment. Moreover, these results can be used for characterization of both laboratory-made and commercially available MFM tips.

  16. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  17. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... limit pilot forces and torques are as follows: Control Maximum forces or torques for design...

  18. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... limit pilot forces and torques are as follows: Control Maximum forces or torques for design...

  19. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... limit pilot forces and torques are as follows: Control Maximum forces or torques for design...

  20. Nanoaperture optical tweezer with magnetic force characterization of magnetic nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haitian; Jones, Steven; Choi, Byoung-Chul; Gordon, Reuven

    2016-09-01

    Double nanohole optical tweezers allow for trapping of nanoparticles down to single digit nanometer range, including individual proteins, viruses, DNA fragments and quantum dots. Here we demonstrate dual magnetic force / optical force analysis for the characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. From this single platform we can isolate individual nanoparticles and determine their size, permeability, remanence and permittivity. This is of interest for characterizing magnetic nanoparticles in mixtures, isolating ones of desired characteristics and pick-and-place assembly of magnetic nanoparticles in nanoscale magnetic devices. The magnetic nanoparticle is characterized by analysis of the optical transmission through a double-nanohole aperture with an applied magnetic gradient force. The optical transmission step at trapping, autocorrelation of transmission intensity, distribution of transmission values and variations with applied magnetic field amplitude provide information of individual magnetic nanoparticles that allows for determining their individual material characteristics. The values obtained agree well with past published values for iron oxide, and the size distribution over repeated measurements matches well with scanning electron microscope characterization (and manufacturer specifications).

  1. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  2. Fine-tuning of magnetic and microfluidic viscous forces for specific magnetic bead-based immunocomplex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, M.; Tekin, H. C.; Lehnert, T.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the working principle of a novel type of microfluidic sandwich immunoassay, as used for the detection of biomarkers. The heterogeneous assay is based on the specific interactions between an array of functionalized superparamagnetic beads and a flow of secondary superparamagnetic beads that carry the antigens and are simultaneously used as detection labels. We identify the main forces governing the immunoassay performance and develop a combined finite element method/analytical model to predict and control these forces. The clue for the improved assay specificity is in the fine-tuning of inter-bead magnetic dipolar and microfluidic viscous forces, which allows strongly reducing non-specific interactions, while enhancing the specific formation of immunocomplexes. We exploit our theoretical model to explain the enhanced sensitivity of magnetic bead-based immunoassay experiments performed in microfluidic chips.

  3. Magnetic Control of Convection during Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    force counteract terrestrial gravity. The genera1 objective is to test the hypothesis of convective control using a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient and to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play. Specifically we aim to delineate causative factors and to quantify them through experiments, analysis and numerical modeling. The paper will report on the experimental results using paramagentic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analyticalprctions.

  4. Controlling photonic structures using optical forces.

    PubMed

    Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Chen, Long; Gondarenko, Alexander; Lipson, Michal

    2009-12-03

    The use of optical forces to manipulate small objects is well known. Applications include the manipulation of living cells by optical tweezers and optical cooling in atomic physics. The miniaturization of optical systems (to the micro and nanoscale) has resulted in very compliant systems with masses of the order of nanograms, rendering them susceptible to optical forces. Optical forces have been exploited to demonstrate chaotic quivering of microcavities, optical cooling of mechanical modes, actuation of a tapered-fibre waveguide and excitation of the mechanical modes of silicon nano-beams. Despite recent progress in this field, it is challenging to manipulate the optical response of photonic structures using optical forces; this is because of the large forces that are required to induce appreciable changes in the geometry of the structure. Here we implement a resonant structure whose optical response can be efficiently statically controlled using relatively weak attractive and repulsive optical forces. We demonstrate a static mechanical deformation of up to 20 nanometres in a silicon nitride structure, using three milliwatts of continuous optical power. Because of the sensitivity of the optical response to this deformation, such optically induced static displacement introduces resonance shifts spanning 80 times the intrinsic resonance linewidth.

  5. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles.

  6. Remote Robot Control With High Force-Feedback Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.

    1993-01-01

    Improved scheme for force-reflecting hand control of remote robotic manipulator provides unprecedently high force-reflection gain, even when dissimilar master and slave arms used. Three feedback loops contained in remote robot control system exerting position-error-based force feedback and compliance control. Outputs of force and torque sensors on robot not used directly for force reflection, but for compliance control, while errors in position used to generate reflected forces.

  7. Magnetic tweezers force calibration for molecules that exhibit conformational switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, David R.; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution magnetic tweezers experiments allow for the direct calibration of pulling forces applied to short biomolecules. In one class of experiments, a force is applied to a structured RNA or protein to induce an unfolding transition; when the force is maintained at particular values, the molecule can exhibit conformational switching between the folded and unfolded states or between intermediate states. Here, we analyze the degree to which common force calibration approaches, involving the fitting of model functions to the Allan variance or power spectral density of the bead trajectory, are biased by this conformational switching. We find significant effects in two limits: that of large molecular extension changes between the two states, in which alternative fitting functions must be used, and that of very fast switching kinetics, in which the force calibration cannot be recovered due to the slow diffusion time of the magnetic bead. We use simulations and high-resolution RNA hairpin data to show that most biophysical experiments do not occur in either of these limits.

  8. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-08

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  9. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  10. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Tanya M; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-21

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  11. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Tanya M.; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  12. Visualization of the Barkhausen effect by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Alexander; Liebmann, Marcus; Kaiser, Uwe; Wiesendanger, Roland; Noh, Tae Won; Kim, Dong Wook

    2004-02-20

    By visualization of the Barkhausen effect using magnetic force microscopy we are able to provide detailed information about the physical principles that govern the magnetization reversal of a granular ferromagnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy. Individual Barkhausen volumes are localized and distinguished as either newly nucleated or grown by domain wall propagation. The Gaussian size distribution of nucleated Barkhausen volumes indicates an uncorrelated random process, while grown Barkhausen volumes exhibit an inverse power law distribution, which points towards a critical behavior during domain wall motion.

  13. Feedback Control of Floor Reaction Force Based on Force-Reflecting-Type Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kazuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Real-world haptics is being studied not only for improving feedback on real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also for developing key technologies for future human support. For the remote operating of systems at distant places, haptic information is required in addition to visual information. The haptic information around a work environment can be the floor reaction force, which can be obtained using a movement-type haptic device. The floor reaction force from the environment that the mobile haptic device touches is fed back accurately to the operator. First, this paper proposes a general force-reflecting-type multilateral control. Second, this paper extends the control to feedback control of the floor reaction force by using force-reflecting-type multilateral control and a novel haptic device employing a biped robot with a slave system. The position response of a master system is transformed to a leg tip position command for the biped-type haptic device. In addition, the floor reaction force determined by the biped-type haptic device is fed back to the master system. The proposed method can determine the force feedback to the sole of the foot, which is not possible with a conventional stationary system. As a result, the floor reaction force from a large area can be obtained, and the operability of the control system is improved by using the proposed system.

  14. Time-optimal control of the magnetically levitated photolithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Tucker, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes two approaches to time-optimal control of a nonlinear magnetically levitated platen. The system of interest is a candidate technology for next-generation photolithography machines used in the manufacture of integrated circuits. The dynamics and the variable peak control force of the electro-magnetic actuators preclude the direct application of classical time-optimal control methodologies for determining optimal rest-to-rest maneuver strategies. Therefore, this study explores alternate approaches using a previously developed computer simulation. In the first approach, conservative estimates of the available control forces are used to generate suboptimal switching curves. In the second approach, exact solutions are determined iteratively and used as a training set for an artificial neural network. The trained network provides optimal actuator switching times that incorporate the full nonlinearities of the magnetic levitation actuators. Sample problems illustrate the effectiveness of these techniques as compared to traditional proportional-derivative control.

  15. Force override rate control for robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driels, Morris

    1994-01-01

    The work reported deals with the problem of operating a robot manipulator under a rate control mode while the end effector is not in contact with the external environment, and then switching to a force control mode when contact is made. The paper details how the modal changeover may be accomplished in a manner transparent to the operator, and will allow operator applied forces to be reflected at the robot end effector. A one degree of freedom demonstration system is used to illustrate the concept, which is then applied to a PUMA manipulator. Sample code for the implementation of the control is provided, experimental results show that the optimum setting for the gain is a function of the compliance of the end effector, and the compliance of the external constraint.

  16. A microfabricated magnetic force transducer-microaspiration system for studying membrane mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, D. J.; Killian, T. C.; Raphael, R. M.

    2011-10-01

    The application of forces to cell membranes is a powerful method for studying membrane mechanics. To apply controlled dynamic forces on the piconewton scale, we designed and characterized a microfabricated magnetic force transducer (MMFT) consisting of current-carrying gold wires patterned on a sapphire substrate. The experimentally measured forces applied to paramagnetic and ferromagnetic beads as a function of applied current agree well with theoretical models. We used this device to pull tethers from microaspirated giant unilamellar vesicles and measure the threshold force for tether formation. In addition, the interlayer drag coefficient of the membrane was determined from the tether-return velocity under magnetic force-free conditions. At high levels of current, vesicles expanded as a result of local temperature changes. A finite element thermal model of the MMFT provided absolute temperature calibration, allowing determination of the thermal expansivity coefficient of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidycholine vesicles (1.7 ± 0.4 × 10-3 K-1) and characterization of the Joule heating associated with current passing through the device. This effect can be used as a sensitive probe of temperature changes on the microscale. These studies establish the MMFT as an effective tool for applying precise forces to membranes at controlled rates and quantitatively studying membrane mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties.

  17. Line-Tied Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Laboratory: Equilibrium Force Balance and Eruptive Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, M.; Belova, E. V.

    2013-07-01

    Flux-rope-based models of solar eruptions rely on the formation of a line-tied flux rope equilibrium that persists until an ideal instability or a breakdown in force balance triggers an eruption. In this paper, we present a quantitative study of equilibrium force balance in solar-relevant flux ropes, focusing primarily on the role of the potential magnetic field in controlling the flux rope behavior. This study was conducted using a newly constructed laboratory experiment in conjunction with supporting three-dimensional MHD simulations that directly model the experimental geometry. The flux ropes studied here, which are produced in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX), evolve quasi-statically over many Alfvén times and have footpoints that are line-tied to two fixed electrodes [E. Oz, C. E. Myers, M. Yamada, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 102107 (2011)]. They are formed within a solar-relevant potential magnetic field configuration that can be systematically modified between discharges. Detailed in situ magnetic measurements from the experiments are compared directly to results from the simulations in order to quantitatively evaluate the various contributions to the equilibrium force balance. We find that forces derived from the applied toroidal guide field contribute significantly to the equilibrium—so much so that the flux ropes are often well confined even in the absence of a "strapping" arcade. These observed guide field forces arise from changes in the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension that result from a combination of effects within the expanding flux rope. With regard to eruptions, the aforementioned guide field forces supplement the well-known strapping field forces to largely prevent the flux ropes from erupting. In particular, many regimes were explored where the strapping field configuration is predicted to be "torus unstable" and yet the flux ropes do not erupt. Eruptions are observed in some regimes, however, and we will discuss the physical

  18. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  19. Robot force control for hazardous drilling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, Gursel; Daniel, R. W.

    The use of robot manipulators for tasks which are inherently risky for human beings, specifically hazardous drilling operations, is investigated. Although drilling is one of the simplest and most basic metal cutting processes, robot drilling is problematic and has resulted in extreme operator fatigue and shorter drill life under telemanipulator control due to a number of possible causes such as dynamic and static effects. Both originate from differences between a robot and a drilling machine. A detailed study of the task highlighted the fact that it is necessary to regulate the distance dependent force by closed loop force control. How the robot type force could be controlled together with the robot position to allow fast drilling but without too much drill wear was considered. The answer was found in further exploration of the tasks which generated a set of specifications and problems that were addressed using novel strategies rather than those usually adopted for robots. The possible solutions are given in terms of a new control strategy and the correct choice of coordinate system to be used within that strategy.

  20. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  1. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  2. Magnetic tweezers: micromanipulation and force measurement at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Gosse, Charlie; Croquette, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Cantilevers and optical tweezers are widely used for micromanipulating cells or biomolecules for measuring their mechanical properties. However, they do not allow easy rotary motion and can sometimes damage the handled material. We present here a system of magnetic tweezers that overcomes those drawbacks while retaining most of the previous dynamometers properties. Electromagnets are coupled to a microscope-based particle tracking system through a digital feedback loop. Magnetic beads are first trapped in a potential well of stiffness approximately 10(-7) N/m. Thus, they can be manipulated in three dimensions at a speed of approximately 10 microm/s and rotated along the optical axis at a frequency of 10 Hz. In addition, our apparatus can work as a dynamometer relying on either usual calibration against the viscous drag or complete calibration using Brownian fluctuations. By stretching a DNA molecule between a magnetic particle and a glass surface, we applied and measured vertical forces ranging from 50 fN to 20 pN. Similarly, nearly horizontal forces up to 5 pN were obtained. From those experiments, we conclude that magnetic tweezers represent a low-cost and biocompatible setup that could become a suitable alternative to the other available micromanipulators. PMID:12023254

  3. Visco-Resistive MHD Modeling Benchmark of Forced Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidler, M. T.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.; Callen, J. D.; Ferraro, N. M.

    2016-10-01

    The presence of externally-applied 3D magnetic fields can affect important phenomena in tokamaks, including mode locking, disruptions, and edge localized modes. External fields penetrate into the plasma and can lead to forced magnetic reconnection (FMR), and hence magnetic islands, on resonant surfaces if the local plasma rotation relative to the external field is slow. Preliminary visco-resistive MHD simulations of FMR in a slab geometry are consistent with theory. Specifically, linear simulations exhibit proper scaling of the penetrated field with resistivity, viscosity, and flow, and nonlinear simulations exhibit a bifurcation from a flow-screened to a field-penetrated, magnetic island state as the external field is increased, due to the 3D electromagnetic force. These results will be compared to simulations of FMR in a circular cross-section, cylindrical geometry by way of a benchmark between the NIMROD and M3D-C1 extended-MHD codes. Because neither this geometry nor the MHD model has the physics of poloidal flow damping, the theory of will be expanded to include poloidal flow effects. The resulting theory will be tested with linear and nonlinear simulations that vary the resistivity, viscosity, flow, and external field. Supported by OFES DoE Grants DE-FG02-92ER54139, DE-FG02-86ER53218, DE-AC02-09CH11466, and the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling.

  4. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, William; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy; Blomberg, Erick; McCullian, Brendan; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Pelekhov, Denis; Hammel, P. Chris

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes are commercially-available, versatile structures that have a variety of applications. Although most commonly used as the support structure for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, membranes are also ultrasensitive high-frequency mechanical oscillators. The sensitivity stems from the high quality factor Q 106 , which has led to applications in sensitive quantum optomechanical experiments. The high sensitivity also opens the door to ultrasensitive force detection applications. We report force detection of electron spin magnetic resonance at 300 K using a Si3N4 membrane with a force sensitivity of 4 fN/√{ Hz}, and a potential low temperature sensitivity of 25 aN/√{ Hz}. Given membranes' sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiN membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument that has superior spatial resolution to conventional NMR.

  5. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10−16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  6. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10(-16) emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications.

  7. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10-16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications.

  8. A magnetic force microscopy study of the magnetic reversal of a single Fe nanowire.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Wang, Y; Fu, Y; Hasegawa, T; Li, F S; Saito, H; Ishio, S

    2009-03-11

    The magnetization reversal properties of a single 60 nm diameter Fe nanowire were investigated with an in-field magnetic force microscope (MFM). MFM images were observed in a successively decreasing applied field, at various angles between the applied field and the nanowire axis. The results show that the magnetization undergoes a sharp reversal at various angles. When the applied field deviates from the nanowire axis, before complete magnetization reversal, a coherent rotation of magnetic moments inside the nanowire and a stable vortex state at the end of the nanowire are exhibited. The angle dependence of the switching field can be closely described by a curling model, despite the fact the magnetization reversal process is not identical to this model.

  9. Magnetic force microscopy reveals meta-stable magnetic domain states that prevent reliable absolute palaeointensity experiments.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Lennart V; Fabian, Karl; Bakelaar, Iman A; Dekkers, Mark J

    2014-08-22

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the absolute palaeointensity of the Earth's magnetic field is notoriously difficult. The heating of samples in most methods induces magnetic alteration--a process that is still poorly understood, but prevents obtaining correct field values. Here we show induced changes in magnetic domain state directly by imaging the domain configurations of titanomagnetite particles in samples that systematically fail to produce truthful estimates. Magnetic force microscope images were taken before and after a heating step typically used in absolute palaeointensity experiments. For a critical temperature (250 °C), we observe major changes: distinct, blocky domains before heating change into curvier, wavy domains thereafter. These structures appeared unstable over time: after 1-year of storage in a magnetic-field-free environment, the domain states evolved into a viscous remanent magnetization state. Our observations qualitatively explain reported underestimates from otherwise (technically) successful experiments and therefore have major implications for all palaeointensity methods involving heating.

  10. Magnetic force micropiston: An integrated force/microfluidic device for the application of compressive forces in a confined environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. K.; Kleckner, N.

    2014-02-01

    Cellular biology takes place inside confining spaces. For example, bacteria grow in crevices, red blood cells squeeze through capillaries, and chromosomes replicate inside the nucleus. Frequently, the extent of this confinement varies. Bacteria grow longer and divide, red blood cells move through smaller and smaller passages as they travel to capillary beds, and replication doubles the amount of DNA inside the nucleus. This increase in confinement, either due to a decrease in the available space or an increase in the amount of material contained in a constant volume, has the potential to squeeze and stress objects in ways that may lead to changes in morphology, dynamics, and ultimately biological function. Here, we describe a device developed to probe the interplay between confinement and the mechanical properties of cells and cellular structures, and forces that arise due to changes in a structure's state. In this system, the manipulation of a magnetic bead exerts a compressive force upon a target contained in the confining space of a microfluidic channel. This magnetic force microfluidic piston is constructed in such a way that we can measure (a) target compliance and changes in compliance as induced by changes in buffer, extract, or biochemical composition, (b) target expansion force generated by changes in the same parameters, and (c) the effects of compression stress on a target's structure and function. Beyond these issues, our system has general applicability to a variety of questions requiring the combination of mechanical forces, confinement, and optical imaging.

  11. Magnetic anisotropy considerations in magnetic force microscopy studies of single superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Tanya M; Chen, Jun; Murray, Christopher B; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2012-12-14

    In recent years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in applications ranging from solid state memory devices to biomedical diagnostic and therapeutic tools. However, detection and characterization of the small and unstable magnetic moment of an SPN at the single particle level remains a challenge. Further, depending on their physical shape, crystalline structure or orientation, SPNs may also possess magnetic anisotropy, which can govern the extent to which their magnetic moments can align with an externally applied magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate how we can exploit the magnetic anisotropy of SPNs to enable uniform, highly-sensitive detection of single SPNs using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) in ambient air. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques are utilized to characterize the collective magnetic behavior, morphology and composition of the SPNs. Our results show how the consideration of magnetic anisotropy can enhance the ability of MFM to detect single SPNs at ambient room temperature with high force sensitivity and spatial resolution.

  12. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a permanent magnet on the cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P.C.

    1997-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) is a microscopic 3-D imaging instrument based on a recent proposal to detect magnetic resonance signals mechanically using a micro-mechanical resonator. MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in various magnetic resonance experiments including electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonances and nuclear magnetic resonance. In order to apply this ultra-high, 3-D spatial resolution technique to samples of arbitrary size and shape, the magnetic particle which generates the field gradient {del}{bold B}, (and, therefore, the force {bold F = (m {center_dot} {del}B)} between itself and the spin magnetization {bold m} of the sample) will need to be mounted on the mechanical resonator. Up to the present, all experiments have been performed with the sample mounted on the resonator. This is done, in part, to avoid the spurious response of the mechanical resonator which is generated by the variation of the magnetization of the magnetic particle as the external field is varied.

  13. Characteristics of magnetic force microscopy magnetics on high moment perpendicular magnetic recording writers with high coercivity probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Li, Shaoping; Bai, Daniel; Wang, James; Li, Zhanjie; Han, Dehua; Pan, Tao; Mao, Sining

    2012-04-01

    High resolution magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging with high coercivity probes on perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) writers directly characterizes magnetic field contour for the writer main pole as well as its shields' magnetic state. Evolution of write bubble and return field was analyzed by MFM imaging in dynamic phase detection scheme. Different write field components and their out of plane second order derivatives were calculated via finite element modeling. The MFM imaged write field distribution correlates well with the PMR writer out of plane write field component. Magnetic responses of the PMR writer main pole, trailing and side shields are quantified. The trailing and side shields exhibit complicated magnetic saturation behaviors comparing with the PMR writer pole. The side shield's magnetic response is dependent upon its initial equilibrium state.

  14. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  15. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  16. Grasp Force Feedback Control of Robot Hand Using Stepping Motors, Gears and Plate Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Han, Ping

    In this paper, a grasp force feedback control method of a robot hand attached to a single-link robot arm is proposed, and the usefulness of the grasp force feedback control method is confirmed theoretically and experimentally. The robot hand consists of two permanent-magnet-type stepping motors, reduction gears and plate springs. In the design of the grasp force feedback control system, the start-stop performance without missing steps concerning stepping motors is effectively utilized. For the shock reduction of the robot hand mechanism using stepping motors, the stepping motors should be stopped at a lower pulse rate. Therefore, the grasp force feedback control system is designed to finish the grasp force feedback control at a lower pulse rate of the stepping motors. For this purpose, the control method of the stepping motors using the angular velocity pattern of trapezoidal shape with a constant-velocity time and an estimated finish-time determined by the grasp force feedback control is devised. Then, numerical simulations using the equations of motion of the robot and the grasp force feedback control law have been carried out, and it is ascertained theoretically that the grasping force can be precisely controlled by the present grasp force feedback control method. Furthermore, experiments have been carried out, and the excellent performance of the grasp force feedback control is confirmed experimentally.

  17. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  18. Wireless control and selection of forces and torques - towards wireless engines

    PubMed Central

    Boyvat, M.; Hafner, C.; Leuthold, J.

    2014-01-01

    Powering and manipulating translational and rotational motions of objects wirelessly, and controlling several objects independently is of significant importance in numerous fields such as robotics, medicine, biology, fluid dynamics, optics. We propose a method based on coupled LC resonators, to control objects selectively by steering the frequency of an external magnetic field. This concept does not need any magnetic materials and it brings a rich variety of features concerning forces and torques. We theoretically and experimentally show that the forces can be enhanced by the interaction of resonators and that both direction and magnitude of forces can be controlled by the frequency of the applied external magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate interesting rotational effects, such as bi-directionally controllable torques, controllable stable orientations, and spinning, which leads to a wirelessly powered motor. PMID:25034467

  19. Wireless control and selection of forces and torques - towards wireless engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyvat, M.; Hafner, C.; Leuthold, J.

    2014-07-01

    Powering and manipulating translational and rotational motions of objects wirelessly, and controlling several objects independently is of significant importance in numerous fields such as robotics, medicine, biology, fluid dynamics, optics. We propose a method based on coupled LC resonators, to control objects selectively by steering the frequency of an external magnetic field. This concept does not need any magnetic materials and it brings a rich variety of features concerning forces and torques. We theoretically and experimentally show that the forces can be enhanced by the interaction of resonators and that both direction and magnitude of forces can be controlled by the frequency of the applied external magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate interesting rotational effects, such as bi-directionally controllable torques, controllable stable orientations, and spinning, which leads to a wirelessly powered motor.

  20. Capaciflector-based virtual force control and centering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a novel concept of force control, called virtual force control. The virtual force concept avoids sudden step transition of position control to contact force control resulting in contact force disturbance when a robot end-effector makes contact with the environment. A virtual force/position control scheme consists of two loops: the force control loop and the position control loop. While the position control loop regulates the free motion, the force control loop regulates the contact force after making contact with the environment and the virtual force measured by a range sensor called capaciflector in the virtual environment. After presenting the concept of virtual force control, the report introduces a centering scheme in which the virtual force controller is employed to measure three points on a cone so that its center can be located. Experimental results of a one-degree-of-freedom virtual force control scheme applied in berthing an orbital replaceable unit are reported and compared with those of conventional pure contact force control cases.

  1. Particle energization in a chaotic force-free magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaocan; Li, Gang; Dasgupta, Brahmananda

    2015-04-01

    A force-free field (FFF) is believed to be a reasonable description of the solar corona and in general a good approximation for low-beta plasma. The equations describing the magnetic field of FFF is similar to the ABC fluid equations which has been demonstrated to be chaotic. This implies that charged particles will experience chaotic magnetic field in the corona. Here, we study particle energization in a time-dependent FFF using a test particle approach. An inductive electric field is introduced by turbulent motions of plasma parcels. We find efficient particle acceleration with power-law like particle energy spectra. The power-law indices depend on the amplitude of plasma parcel velocity field and the spatial scales of the magnetic field fluctuation. The spectra are similar for different particle species. This model provide a possible mechanism for seed population generation for particle acceleration by, e.g., CME-driven shocks. Generalization of our results to certain non-force-free-field (NFFF) is straightforward as the sum of two or multiple FFFs naturally yield NFFF.

  2. Magnetic Forces Simulation of Bulk HTS over Permanent Magnetic Railway with Numerical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiyun; Zhuang, Shujun

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic levitation forces of bulk high temperature superconductor (HTS) above two types permanent magnet railway (PMR) is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The models are formulated by H-formulation and resolving codes is developed using Finite Element Program Generator (FEPG). The E- J power law is used to describe the electrical field vs. current density nonlinear characteristic of HTS. The applied magnetic fields induced by the PMR are calculated by the standard analysis method with the equivalent surface current model. By the method, the calculation formulation of magnetic fields generated by Halbach PMR and symmetrical PMR is derived respectively. The simulation results show that the finite element dynamic mesh rebuilding problem of HTS magnetic levitation transportation system comprised of bulk HTS and PMR can be easily avoided by the methods.

  3. Natural transition from rate to force control of a manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, F. W.; Soloway, Don; Williams, Robert L.; Hogge, Edward F.

    1992-01-01

    A method for teleoperator control which offers advantages over previous techniques is demonstrated. In the new method, a fundamental variable exchanged between the master and slave is the rate of change in position and force. An inherent capability of the control scheme is demonstrated for transition between control methods based on environmental constraints in a manner natural to the operator. Specifically, rate control of a manipulator makes the transition to force-force control when a force-reflecting hand controller is used with a local force accommodation algorithm running on the remote manipulator. The transition from rate to force occurs when contact is made with the environment.

  4. Experimental analysis of retention forces of different magnetic devices for bone-anchored auricular facial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Voigt, A; Christ, S; Klein, M

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which combination of differently designed magnetic abutments provides the best retention for an auricular prosthesis. The withdrawal forces of eight combinations of abutments were measured and results compared. There was a significantly higher withdrawal force in arrangements containing three magnets over only two. The highest withdrawal force was found in the combination of one telescopic magnet and two large spherical magnets (median: 7.69 N), whereas two telescopic magnets alone showed the lowest withdrawal force (3.41 N). The use of two conical magnets increased retention slightly, but the median retention force remained the same (3.41 N). The commonly used combination of two small spherical magnets and one telescopic magnet showed the lowest retention of combinations consisting of three magnets (4.94 N). There seems to be no difference in median withdrawal force if a conical magnet instead of a telescopic magnet is used. The withdrawal force at a 45 degrees angle was about 10% higher than the vertical force but the difference was not significant. The rupture force needed to tear the magnet completely out of the silicone was 240.6-519.7 N (mean 331.74 N) and therefore over 10 times higher than magnetic retention.

  5. Magnetic Control of Concentration Gradient in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2005-01-01

    A report describes a technique for rapidly establishing a fluid-concentration gradient that can serve as an initial condition for an experiment on solutal instabilities associated with crystal growth in microgravity. The technique involves exploitation of the slight attractive or repulsive forces exerted on most fluids by a magnetic-field gradient. Although small, these forces can dominate in microgravity and therefore can be used to hold fluids in position in preparation for an experiment. The magnetic field is applied to a test cell, while a fluid mixture containing a concentration gradient is prepared by introducing an undiluted solution into a diluting solution in a mixing chamber. The test cell is then filled with the fluid mixture. Given the magnetic susceptibilities of the undiluted and diluting solutions, the magnetic-field gradient must be large enough that the magnetic force exceeds both (1) forces associated with the flow of the fluid mixture during filling of the test cell and (2) forces imposed by any residual gravitation and fluctuations thereof. Once the test cell has been filled with the fluid mixture, the magnetic field is switched off so that the experiment can proceed, starting from the proper initial conditions.

  6. The Physical Connection and Magnetic Coupling of the MICE CoolingChannel Magnets and the Magnet Forces for Various MICE OperatingModes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Baynham, D.E.; Fabricatore, Pasquale; Farinon, Stefania; Green, Michael A.; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Lau, Wing W.; Maldavi, S.M.; Virostek, Steve P.; Witte, Holger

    2006-08-20

    A key issue in the construction of the MICE cooling channel is the magnetic forces between various elements in the cooling channel and the detector magnets. This report describes how the MICE cooling channel magnets are hooked to together so that the longitudinal magnetic forces within the cooling channel can be effectively connected to the base of the experiment. This report presents a magnetic force and stress analysis for the MICE cooling channel magnets, even when longitudinal magnetic forces as large as 700 kN (70 tons) are applied to the vacuum vessel of various magnets within the MICE channel. This report also shows that the detector magnets can be effectively separated from the central MICE cooling channel magnets without damage to either type of magnet component.

  7. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  8. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  9. Alternating Magnetic Field Forces for Satellite Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stnaley O.

    2012-01-01

    Selected future space missions, such as large aperture telescopes and multi-component interferometers, will require the precise positioning of a number of isolated satellites, yet many of the suggested approaches for providing satellites positioning forces have serious limitations. In this paper we propose a new approach, capable of providing both position and orientation forces, that resolves or alleviates many of these problems. We show that by using alternating fields and currents that finely-controlled forces can be induced on the satellites, which can be individually selected through frequency allocation. We also show, through analysis and experiment, that near field operation is feasible and can provide sufficient force and the necessary degrees of freedom to accurately position and orient small satellites relative to one another. In particular, the case of a telescope with a large number of free mirrors is developed to provide an example of the concept. We. also discuss the far field extension of this concept.

  10. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  11. Malaria control strategies in French armed forces.

    PubMed

    Migliani, R; Pradines, B; Michel, R; Aoun, O; Dia, A; Deparis, X; Rapp, C

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 40,000 French soldiers deploy or travel through malaria-endemic areas. Despite the effective control measures that were successively implemented, malaria remains a public health concern in French armed forces with several important outbreaks and one lethal case every two years. This article describes the malaria control strategy in French armed forces which is based on three combined strategies: i) Anopheles vector control to prevent infection with the implementation of personal protection against vectors (PPAV) adapted to the field living conditions of the troops. ii) Chemoprophylaxis (CP) to prevent the disease based on prescription of effective and well tolerated doxycycline. iii) Management of cases through early diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent death. In isolated conditions in endemic areas, rapid diagnosis tests (RDT) are used as first-line tests by military doctors. Treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria is based either on the piperaquine tetraphosphate-dihydroartemisinin association since 2013, or on the atovaquone-proguanil association. First-line treatment of severe P. falciparum malaria is based on IV artesunate. These measures are associated with constant education of the military, epidemiological surveillance of malaria cases and monitoring of parasite chemosensitivity.

  12. Variable force, eddy-current or magnetic damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An object of the invention is to provide variable damping for resonant vibrations which may occur at different rotational speeds in the range of rpms in which a rotating machine is operated. A variable force damper in accordance with the invention includes a rotating mass carried on a shaft which is supported by a bearing in a resilient cage. The cage is attached to a support plate whose rim extends into an annular groove in a housing. Variable damping is effected by tabs of electrically conducting nonmagnetic material which extend radially from the cage. The tabs at an index position lie between the pole face of respective C shaped magnets. The magnets are attached by cantilever spring members to the housing.

  13. Implementation of Akiyama probe in low temperature magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Paul; Wu, Weida

    Exotic phenomena often call for high sensitivity scanning probe microscopic techniques working at extremely low temperatures. Specifically, it is of great fundamental interest to detect the weak magnetic signals in a range of interesting systems such as, quantum anomalous Hall, skyrmion, heavy-fermion, and multiferroic systems. To this end, we are developing low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) using a self-sensing cantilever called Akiyama-probe (A-probe). The main advantage of this specific probe is its extremely low power-dissipation compared to other self-sensing (e.g. piezoresistive) cantilevers for low temperature application. We will present progress of the implementation of A-probe and preliminary results under various conditions. This work is supported by DOE BES under Award DE-SC0008147.

  14. Resonantly Detecting Axion-Mediated Forces with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 109 and 1012 GeV or axion masses between 10-6 and 10-3 eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  15. An analysis of magnetization patterns measured using a magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; Gomez, R. D.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    1994-05-01

    In a previous paper, we made a complete analysis of the interaction between the probe tip of a magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope (MFSTM) and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded pattern. In this paper we show how the magnetization distribution in the recorded media can be determined from the measurements by obtaining expressions for the magnetic fields from a Fourier series expansion for the recorded magnetizations. We have used these techniques to find the magnetic fields from many different distributions, including all those we could find in the literature. The probe tip displacement, which is the quantity measured using the MFSTM, can be calculated using these magnetic fields. The results can then be compared to the experimental data. For one set of experiments on high density recording we have found that the best fit is with a magnetization that has a modified arctan transition. The modification eliminates the discontinuity in the slope of the transitions as they are joined together, giving a more realistic representation of the magnetic distribution. The transition width can then be used as an adjustable parameter to find the best fit to the data. The MFSTM can, therefore, be used as a quantitative tool to find the magnetic recording transition widths. These theoretical techniques are not necessarily restricted to the use of a MFSTM, but can be applied to other problems in magnetic recording. For instance, we show how the probe tip displacement corresponds to the flux picked up by a conventional read head. The response of the head as a function of different magnetization patterns can then be studied and compared to experimental results. The measurable quantities are expressed in Fourier series but we show how these series can be easily evaluated with a PC and the appropriate software.

  16. Robot arm force control through system linearization by nonlinear feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Bejczy, A. K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1988-01-01

    Based on a differential geometric feedback linearization technique for nonlinear time-varying systems, a dynamic force control method for robot arms is developed. It uses active force-moment measurements at the robot wrist. The controller design fully incorporate the robot-arm dynamics and is so general that it can be reduced to pure position control, hybrid position/force control, pure force control. The controller design is independent of the tasks to be performed. Computer simulations show that the controller improves the position error by a factor of ten in cases in which position errors generate force measurements. A theorem on linearization of time-varying system is also presented.

  17. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rawls, J.M.; Peuron, A.U.

    1980-07-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma and a toroidal field coil. A mechanism for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  18. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, John M.; Peuron, Unto A.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors (30a, 30b, etc.) formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma (12) and a toroidal field coil (18). A mechanism (60) for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  19. Optogenetic control of cellular forces and mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Valon, Léo; Marín-Llauradó, Ariadna; Wyatt, Thomas; Charras, Guillaume; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Contractile forces are the end effectors of cell migration, division, morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer invasion. Here we report optogenetic tools to upregulate and downregulate such forces with high spatiotemporal accuracy. The technology relies on controlling the subcellular activation of RhoA using the CRY2/CIBN light-gated dimerizer system. We fused the catalytic domain (DHPH domain) of the RhoA activator ARHGEF11 to CRY2-mCherry (optoGEF-RhoA) and engineered its binding partner CIBN to bind either to the plasma membrane or to the mitochondrial membrane. Translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to the plasma membrane causes a rapid and local increase in cellular traction, intercellular tension and tissue compaction. By contrast, translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to mitochondria results in opposite changes in these physical properties. Cellular changes in contractility are paralleled by modifications in the nuclear localization of the transcriptional regulator YAP, thus showing the ability of our approach to control mechanotransductory signalling pathways in time and space. PMID:28186127

  20. Optogenetic control of cellular forces and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Valon, Léo; Marín-Llauradó, Ariadna; Wyatt, Thomas; Charras, Guillaume; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-02-10

    Contractile forces are the end effectors of cell migration, division, morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer invasion. Here we report optogenetic tools to upregulate and downregulate such forces with high spatiotemporal accuracy. The technology relies on controlling the subcellular activation of RhoA using the CRY2/CIBN light-gated dimerizer system. We fused the catalytic domain (DHPH domain) of the RhoA activator ARHGEF11 to CRY2-mCherry (optoGEF-RhoA) and engineered its binding partner CIBN to bind either to the plasma membrane or to the mitochondrial membrane. Translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to the plasma membrane causes a rapid and local increase in cellular traction, intercellular tension and tissue compaction. By contrast, translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to mitochondria results in opposite changes in these physical properties. Cellular changes in contractility are paralleled by modifications in the nuclear localization of the transcriptional regulator YAP, thus showing the ability of our approach to control mechanotransductory signalling pathways in time and space.

  1. Expanded Equations for Torque and Force on a Cylindrical Permanent Magnet Core in a Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1997-01-01

    The expanded equations for torque and force on a cylindrical permanent magnet core in a large-gap magnetic suspension system are presented. The core is assumed to be uniformly magnetized, and equations are developed for two orientations of the magnetization vector. One orientation is parallel to the axis of symmetry, and the other is perpendicular to this axis. Fields and gradients produced by suspension system electromagnets are assumed to be calculated at a point in inertial space which coincides with the origin of the core axis system in its initial alignment. Fields at a given point in the core are defined by expanding the fields produced at the origin as a Taylor series. The assumption is made that the fields can be adequately defined by expansion up to second-order terms. Examination of the expanded equations for the case where the magnetization vector is perpendicular to the axis of symmetry reveals that some of the second-order gradient terms provide a method of generating torque about the axis of magnetization and therefore provide the ability to produce six-degree-of-freedom control.

  2. Design, implementation and control of a magnetic levitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shameli, Ehsan

    Magnetic levitation technology has shown a great deal of promise for micromanipulation tasks. Due to the lack of mechanical contact, magnetic levitation systems are free of problems caused by friction, wear, sealing and lubrication. These advantages have made magnetic levitation systems a great candidate for clean room applications. In this thesis, a new large gap magnetic levitation system is designed, developed and successfully tested. The system is capable of levitating a 6.5(gr) permanent magnet in 3D space with an air gap of approximately 50(cm) with the traveling range of 20x20x30 mm3. The overall positioning accuracy of the system is 60mum. With the aid of finite elements method, an optimal geometry for the magnetic stator is proposed. Also, an energy optimization approach is utilized in the design of the electromagnets. In order to facilitate the design of various controllers for the system, a mathematical model of the magnetic force experienced by the levitated object is obtained. The dynamic magnetic force model is determined experimentally using frequency response system identification. The response of the system components including the power amplifiers, and position measurement system are also considered in the development of the force model. The force model is then employed in the controller design for the magnetic levitation device. Through a modular approach, the controller design for the 3D positioning system is started with the controller design for the vertical direction, i.e. z, and then followed by the controller design in the horizontal directions, i.e. x and y. For the vertical direction, several controllers such as PID, feed forward and feedback linearization are designed and their performances are compared. Also a control command conditioning method is introduced as a solution to increase the control performance and the results of the proposed controller are compared with the other designs. Experimental results showed that for the magnetic

  3. Optimal magnetic attitude control of small spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinsong

    Spacecraft attitude control, using only magnetic coils, suffers from being unable to apply a torque about the axis defined by the magnetic field of the earth. This lack of controllability results in marginal stability, slow slew maneuvering and convergence to equilibrium positions. Currently available control schemes typically require one or more orbits to finish a large angle attitude maneuver, which severely restricts the application of magnetic control in projects requiring fast attitude maneuvers. In this dissertation, the open-loop time-optimal magnetic control is first presented to show the potential performance increase of the magnetic attitude control method. Nonlinear time-varying models with constrained inputs are considered instead of the linearized model generally used. The results show that time-optimal magnetic attitude control can be considerably faster, than the current available control schemes. The inherent weakness of the open-loop method is its lack of robustness; specifically, its response is sensitive to small changes in the system. Two methods, model predictive control and continuous optimization approach, are presented as closed-loop control strategies to increase the robustness of the time-optimal approach. Simulation results show that these two feedback control schemes effectively improve the robustness of the control system. Finally, magnetic attitude regulation after the time-optimal magnetic control is discussed. The main contribution of this work shows that magnetic attitude control is not necessarily slow, as commonly believed, as long as an appropriate control algorithm is applied. The different time-optimal controllers presented show considerable convergence time reduction for large angle attitude maneuvers; which enables magnetic attitude control to be applied to more time-critical applications.

  4. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.; Morgan, John P,.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  5. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  6. Construction of a 3He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a 3He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization.

  7. How Can Magnetic Forces Do Work? Investigating the Problem with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students' reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been…

  8. Relation between the alignment dependence of coercive force decrease ratio and the angular dependence of coercive force of ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yutaka; Kitai, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Seiichi; Hoshijima, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The relation of the coercive force decrease ratio (CFDR) and the angular dependence of the coercive force (ADCF) of ferrite magnets and their temperature properties were investigated. When we compared that against the angle of the magnetization reverse area obtained from these calculation results, which was obtained from the Gaussian distribution of the grain alignment and the postulation that every grain follows the Kondorskii law or the 1/cos θ law, and against the angle of the reverse magnetization area calculated from the experiment CFDR data of these magnets, it was found that this latter expanded at room temperature, to 36° from the calculated angle, for magnet with α=0.96. It was also found that, as temperature increased from room temperature to 413 K, the angle of the reverse magnetization area of ferrite magnets obtained from the experiment data expanded from 36° to 41°. When we apply these results to the temperature properties of ADCF, it seems that the calculated ADCF could qualitatively and reasonably explain these temperature properties, even though the difference between the calculated angular dependence and the experimental data still exists in the high angle range. These results strongly suggest that the coercive force of these magnets is determined by the magnetic domain wall motion. The magnetic domain walls are strongly pinned at tilted grains, and when the domain walls are de-pinned from their pinning sites, the coercive force is determined.

  9. Modeling and vector control of planar magnetic levitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.; Trumper, D.L.; Lang, J.H.

    1998-11-01

    The authors designed and implemented a magnetically levitated stage with large planar motion capability. This planar magnetic levitator employs four novel permanent-magnet linear motors. Each motor generates vertical force for suspension against gravity, as well as horizontal force for drive. These linear levitation motors can be used as building blocks in the general class of multi-degree-of-freedom motion stages. In this paper, the authors discuss electromechanical modeling and real-time vector control of such a permanent-magnet levitator. They describe the dynamics in a dq frame introduced to decouple the forces acting on the magnetically levitated moving part, namely, the platen. A transformation similar to the Blondel-Park transformation is derived for commutation of the stator phase currents. The authors provide test results on step responses of the magnetically levitated stage. It shows 5-nm rms positioning noise in x and y, which demonstrates the applicability of such stages in the next-generation photolithography in semiconductor manufacturing.

  10. Microrheology of growing Escherichia coli biofilms investigated by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gan, Tiansheng; Gong, Xiangjun; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2016-12-01

    Microrheology of growing biofilms provides insightful information about its structural evolution and properties. In this study, the authors have investigated the microrheology of Escherichia coli (strain HCB1) biofilms at different indentation depth (δ) by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy as a function of disturbing frequency (f). As δ increases, the dynamic stiffness (ks) for the biofilms in the early stage significantly increases. However, it levels off when the biofilms are matured. The facts indicate that the biofilms change from inhomogeneous to homogeneous in structure. Moreover, ks is scaled to f, which coincides with the rheology of soft glasses. The exponent increases with the incubation time, indicating the fluidization of biofilms. In contrast, the upper layer of the matured biofilms is solidlike in that the storage modulus is always larger than the loss modulus, and its viscoelasticity is slightly influenced by the shear stress.

  11. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Tanya M.

    In recent years, both synthetic as well as naturally occurring superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in biomedicine. For instance, iron deposits in many pathological tissues are known to contain an accumulation of the superparamagnetic protein, ferritin. Additionally, man-made SPNs have found biomedical applications ranging from cell-tagging in vitro to contrast agents for in vivo diagnostic imaging. Despite the widespread use and occurrence of SPNs, detection and characterization of their magnetic properties, especially at the single-particle level and/or in biological samples, remains a challenge. Magnetic signals arising from SPNs can be complicated by factors such as spatial distribution, magnetic anisotropy, particle aggregation and magnetic dipolar interaction, thereby confounding their analysis. Techniques that can detect SPNs at the single particle level are therefore highly desirable. The goal of this thesis was to develop an analytical microscopy technique, namely magnetic force microscopy (MFM), to detect and spatially localize synthetic and natural SPNs for biomedical applications. We aimed to (1) increase MFM sensitivity to detect SPNs at the single-particle level and (2) quantify and spatially localize iron-ligated proteins (ferritin) in vitro and in biological samples using MFM. Two approaches were employed to improve MFM sensitivity. First, we showed how exploitation of magnetic anisotropy could produce a higher, more uniform MFM signal from single SPNs. Second, we showed how an increase in probe magnetic moment increased both the magnitude and range up to which the MFM signal could be detected from a single SPN. We further showed how MFM could enable accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin-apoferritin mixtures. Finally, we demonstrated how MFM could be used to detect iron/ferritin in serum and animal tissue with spatial resolution and sensitivity surpassing that obtained using

  12. Magnetic Control of Convection in Electrically Nonconducting Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jie; Gray, Donald D.; Edwards, Boyd F.

    1999-01-01

    Inhomogeneous magnetic fields exert a body force on electrically nonconducting, magnetically permeable fluids. This force can be used to compensate for gravity and to control convection. The effects of uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields on a laterally unbounded fluid layer heated from below or above are studied using a linear stability analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations supplemented by Maxwell's equations and the appropriate magnetic body force. For a uniform oblique field, the analysis shows that longitudinal rolls with axes parallel to the horizontal component of the field are the rolls most unstable to convection. The corresponding critical Rayleigh number and critical wavelength for the onset of such rolls are less than the well-known Rayleigh-Benard values in the absence of magnetic fields. Vertical fields maximize these deviations, which vanish for horizontal fields. Horizontal fields increase the critical Rayleigh number and the critical wavelength for all rolls except longitudinal rolls. For a nonuniform field, our analysis shows that the magnetic effect on convection is represented by a dimensionless vector parameter which measures the relative strength of the induced magnetic buoyancy force due to the applied field gradient. The vertical component of this parameter competes with the gravitational buoyancy effect, and a critical relationship between this component and the Rayleigh number is identified for the onset of convection. Therefore, Rayleigh-Benard convection in such fluids can be enhanced or suppressed by the field. It also shows that magnetothermal convection is possible in both paramagnetic and diamagnetic fluids. Our theoretical predictions for paramagnetic fluids agree with experiments. Magnetically driven convection in diamagnetic fluids should be observable even in pure water using current technology.

  13. Low-Temperature Magnetic Force Microscopy on Single Molecule Magnet-Based Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serri, Michele; Mannini, Matteo; Poggini, Lorenzo; Vélez-Fort, Emilio; Cortigiani, Brunetto; Sainctavit, Philippe; Rovai, Donella; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2017-03-08

    The magnetic properties of some single molecule magnets (SMM) on surfaces can be strongly modified by the molecular packing in nanometric films/aggregates or by interactions with the substrate, which affect the molecular orientation and geometry. Detailed investigations of the magnetism of thin SMM films and nanostructures are necessary for the development of spin-based molecular devices, however this task is challenged by the limited sensitivity of laboratory-based magnetometric techniques and often requires access to synchrotron light sources to perform surface sensitive X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) investigations. Here we show that low-temperature magnetic force microscopy is an alternative powerful laboratory tool able to extract the field dependence of the magnetization and to identify areas of in-plane and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in microarrays of the SMM terbium(III) bis-phthalocyaninato (TbPc2) neutral complex grown as nanosized films on SiO2 and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), and this is in agreement with data extracted from nonlocal XMCD measurements performed on homogeneous TbPc2/PTCDA films.

  14. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-07-18

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique.

  15. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

    1991-04-09

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

  16. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  17. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique. PMID:27426442

  18. Preparation of artificial skeletal muscle tissues by a magnetic force-based tissue engineering technique.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Ito, Akira; Kato, Masahiro; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagamori, Eiji; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2009-12-01

    Artificial muscle tissues composed of mouse myoblast C2C12 cells were prepared using a magnetic force-based tissue engineering technique. C2C12 cells labeled with magnetite nanoparticles were seeded into the wells of 24-well ultralow-attachment culture plates. When a magnet was positioned underneath each plate, the cells accumulated evenly on the culture surface and formed multilayered cell sheets. Since the shapes of artificial tissue constructs can be controlled by magnetic force, cellular string-like assemblies were formed by using a linear magnetic field concentrator with a magnet. However, the resulting cellular sheets and strings shrank considerably and did not retain their shapes during additional culture periods for myogenic differentiation. On the other hand, when a silicone plug was positioned at the center of the well during the fabrication of a cell sheet, the cell sheet shrank drastically and formed a ring-like assembly around the plug. A histological examination revealed that the cells in the cellular ring were highly oriented in the direction of the circumference by the tension generated within the structure. Individual cellular rings were hooked around two pins separated by 10 mm, and successfully cultured for 6 d without breakage. After a 6-d culture in differentiation medium, the C2C12 cells differentiated to form myogenin-positive multinucleated myotubes. Highly dense and oriented skeletal muscle tissues were obtained using this technique, suggesting that this procedure may represent a novel strategy for muscle tissue engineering.

  19. Modelling and control of a rotor supported by magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Pradeep, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dynamical model of a rotor and the active magnetic bearings used to support the rotor. We use this model to develop a stable state feedback control of the magnetic bearing system. We present the development of a rigid body model of the rotor, utilizing both Rotation Matrices (Euler Angles) and Euler Parameters (Quaternions). In the latter half of the paper we develop a stable state feedback control of the actively controlled magnetic bearing to control the rotor position under inbalances. The control law developed takes into account the variation of the model with rotational speed. We show stability over the whole operating range of speeds for the magnetic bearing system. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the closed loop system performance. We develop the model of the magnetic bearing, and present two schemes for the excitation of the poles of the actively controlled magnetic bearing. We also present a scheme for averaging multiple sensor measurements and splitting the actuation forces amongst redundant actuators.

  20. Multivariable current control for electrically and magnetically coupled superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1985-02-08

    Superconducting magnet systems under construction and projected for the future contain magnets that are magnetically coupled and electrically connected with shared power supplies. A change in one power supply voltage affects all of the magnet currents. A current controller for these systems must be designed as a multivariable system. The paper describes a method, based on decoupling control, for the rational design of these systems. Dynamic decoupling is achieved by cross-feedback of the measured currents. A network of gains at the input decouples the system statically and eliminates the steady-state error. Errors are then due to component variations. The method has been applied to the magnet system of the MFTF-B, at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Modeling Robot Dynamic Performance for Endpoint Force Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    we consider is robot endpoint force control, also known as manipulator compliant motion control. Force control research has been quite popular...manipulator through a programmed trajectory consisting of a sequence of joint positions and velocities. Position and velocity sensors located at the robot ...may be located. 1.1 Force Control Research Background Research in robot compliant motion control has been in these areas: " Passive compliance schemes

  2. Rob Hargraves and the External Force in Lamellar Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P.; McEnroe, S. A.; Harrison, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    The strong remanence and extreme coercivity of slowly cooled rocks rich in hemo-ilmenite or ilmeno-hematite, poor in or lacking magnetite, was recognized and puzzled over by Rob for 44 years and highlighted in recent studies. Together these are properties neither of paramagnetic (PM) ilmenite nor spin-canted antiferromagnetic (CAF) hematite. The minerals contain fine exsolution lamellae, now shown by TEM to go down to unit-cell scale, suggesting lamellar interfaces as the key. Atomic simulations of PM ilmenite lamellae in CAF hematite show formation of "contact layers" on (001) coherent interfaces that have a hybrid composition between hematite Fe3+ layers and ilmenite Fe2+ layers. These reduce interface charge imbalance, and, more important, have a magnetic moment coupled anti-parallel to but weaker than adjacent hematite layers. Each ilmenite lamella has an odd number of non-magnetic layers plus two contact layers coupled to hematite. The hematite host has an odd number of layers so magnetic moments of all but one cancel. This, combined with two opposite moments of contact layers (2MC-1MH), gives the moment of one lamella, about 4 Bohr magnetons. The maximum moment per formula unit is the moment per lamella times number of lamellae divided by formula units. One key to achieving a high moment is abundant lamellae. Rob's discussion of etched Allard Lake samples brought attention to the 3-phase cooling reaction in the ilmenite-hematite system, where R3c PM titanohematite transforms to about 20% PM R3 ilmenite and 80% CAF hematite, producing instantaneously the required coupled contact layers and a CRM. Lamellar yields up to 33% are obtained by undercooling below the 3-phase reaction, with eventual very fine nucleation. Long-term heating indicates major loss of the high-coercivity component due to lamellar resorption. A second key to strong remanence is that lamellae be magnetically "in-phase". This is optimized in crystals with (001) parallel to the external force

  3. Magnetic bearings give new meaning to spin control

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, R.

    1996-09-01

    In the past, their large size, high cost, and complicated controls ruled out practical application. But the last magnetic bearings are making commercial inroads in the natural-gas industry. Demonstration projects, limited in duration and results, may secure acceptance by powerplants, too. Alternatives to conventional oil-lubricated bearings have appeared from time to time. Steam- and gas-lubricated varieties are examples. But except for a few niche applications, no alternatives have garnered commercial acceptance. A relatively recent development, magnetic bearings, may finally break the mold. Potential benefits are enticing: A shaft suspended in air and positioned against end thrust by magnetic forces suffers negligible friction, thereby lowering starting torque and power losses; bearing wear, and in some cases, shaft seals, are eliminated, extending service life and reducing maintenance; repairs largely consist of a technician replacing a card in the control system, as opposed to a mechanical crew tearing down and replacing a conventional bearing; imbalance forces are canceled or controlled without transmitting large forces to the foundation; lubricants, which can contaminate process fluids and pose fire hazards, are eliminated or substantially reduced. These benefits have been realized for years in centrifuges, machine tools, and space applications. Now magnetic bearings are making substantial inroads in large-scale, industrial turbo-machinery, led by commercial use in gas pipeline compressors, along with demonstration projects on powerplant pumps and fans.

  4. Magnetic force microscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and their cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Mo; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy has the capability to detect magnetic domains from a close distance, which can provide the magnetic force gradient image of the scanned samples and also simultaneously obtain atomic force microscope (AFM) topography image as well as AFM phase image. In this work, we demonstrate the use of magnetic force microscopy together with AFM topography and phase imaging for the characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their cellular uptake behavior with the MCF7 carcinoma breast epithelial cells. This method can provide useful information such as the magnetic responses of nanoparticles, nanoparticle spatial localization, cell morphology, and cell surface domains at the same time for better understanding magnetic nanoparticle-cell interaction. It would help to design magnetic-related new imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  5. Design of force/position controllers for manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents simple methods for the design of adaptive force and position controllers for robot manipulators within the hybrid control architecture. The force controller is composed of an adaptive PID feedback controller, an auxiliary signal and a force feedforward term, and achieves tracking of desired force setpoints in the constraint directions. The position controller consists of adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers and an auxiliary signal; and accomplishes tracking of desired position trajectories in the free directions. The controllers are capable of compensating for dynamic cross-couplings that exist between the position and force control loops in the hybrid control architecture. The adaptive controllers do not require knowledge of the complex dynamic model or parameter values of the manipulator or the environment. The proposed control schemes are computationally fast and suitable for implementation in on-line control with high sampling rates.

  6. The magnetic resonance force microscope: A new microscopic probe of magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Midzor, M.; Roukes, M.L.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1997-08-06

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) marries the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), to produce a three-dimensional imaging instrument with high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The principle of the MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in numerous experiments. By virtue of its unique capabilities the MRFM shows promise to make important contributions in fields ranging from three-dimensional materials characterization to bio-molecular structure determination. Here the authors focus on its application to the characterization and study of layered magnetic materials; the ability to illuminate the properties of buried interfaces in such materials is a particularly important goal. While sensitivity and spatial resolution are currently still far from their theoretical limits, they are nonetheless comparable to or superior to that achievable in conventional MRI. Further improvement of the MRFM will involve operation at lower temperature, application of larger field gradients, introduction of advanced mechanical resonators and improved reduction of the spurious coupling when the magnet is on the resonator.

  7. Levitation force on a permanent magnet over a superconducting plane: Modified critical-state model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.J.

    1997-08-01

    The authors consider a model system of a permanent magnet above a semi-infinite superconductor. They introduce a modified critical-state model, and carry out derivations of the levitation force acting on the magnet. A key feature of the modification allows the current density to be less than the critical value. The theoretical results show an exponential relationship between the force and the distance. Analytical expressions are developed for permanent magnets in the form of a point dipole, a tip of a magnetic force microscope, and a cylindrical magnet. In the latter case, the exponential relationship has been observed in numerous experiments but without previous interpretation.

  8. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  10. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  11. The vectorial control of magnetization by light.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Natsuki; Higuchi, Takuya; Shimizu, Hirokatsu; Konishi, Kuniaki; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2011-06-21

    Application of coherent light-matter interactions has recently been extended to the ultrafast control of magnetization. An important but unrealized technique is the manipulation of magnetization vector motion to make it follow an arbitrarily designed multidimensional trajectory. Here we demonstrate a full manipulation of two-dimensional magnetic oscillations in antiferromagnetic NiO with a pair of polarization-twisted femtosecond laser pulses. We employ Raman-type nonlinear optical processes, wherein magnetic oscillations are impulsively induced with a controlled initial phase. Their azimuthal angle follows well-defined selection rules that have been determined by the symmetries of the materials. We emphasize that the temporal variation of the laser-pulse polarization angle enables us to control the phase and amplitude of the two degenerate modes, independently. These results lead to a new concept of the vectorial control of magnetization by light.

  12. Canine retraction with rare earth magnets: an investigation into the validity of the constant force hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Daskalogiannakis, J; McLachlan, K R

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a prolonged constant force provides more effective tooth movement than an impulsive force of short duration. Six human subjects were selected, the main criterion being a need for extraction of their upper first premolars. Canine retraction on these subjects was executed on one side with the application of a force rapidly declining in magnitude, produced by a vertical loop, and on the other side with the application of a relatively constant force. This type of force was achieved by a similar vertical loop which was constantly activated by three parylene-coated neodymium-iron-boron (Nd2Fe14P) block magnets. The vertical loop on the control side was reactivated 6 weeks after the initial activation. No reactivation was necessary on the experimental side for the duration of the experiment. The rate of tooth movement on the two sides was compared over a period of 3 months, on the basis of maxillary impressions taken at frequent intervals during the course of the study. The canines retracted with a constant force moved statistically significantly more than the control canines (p < 0.05) during the experimental period. The average differences in the mean rates of tooth movement between the two sides were in the order of 2:1 in favor of the experimental side. There were no statistically significant differences in the changes of angulation (tipping) or rotation about the y axis between the two sides. The duration of force application seems to be a critical factor in regulating rate of tooth movement. Conversely, magnitude of the applied force did not appear to be of primary significance.

  13. Motion and force control for multiple cooperative manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The motion and force control of multiple robot arms manipulating a commonly held object is addressed. A general control paradigm that decouples the motion and force control problems is introduced. For motion control, there are three natural choices: (1) joint torques, (2) arm-tip force vectors, and (3) the acceleration of a generalized coordinate. Choice (1) allows a class of relatively model-independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open-loop system; (2) and (3) require the full model information but produce simpler problems. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, the allocation of the desired end-effector control force to the joint actuators can be optimized; otherwise the internal force can be controlled about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  14. Magnetically controllable silicon microring with ferrofluid cladding.

    PubMed

    El Amili, A; Souza, M C M M; Vallini, F; Frateschi, N C; Fainman, Y

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally investigate the application of magnetic fluids (MFs) on integrated silicon photonics. Using a ferrofluid-clad silicon microring resonator, we demonstrate active control of resonances by applying an external magnetic field. Relatively high loaded quality factors on the order of 6000 are achieved, despite the optical losses introduced by the magnetic nanoparticles. We demonstrate resonance shifts of 185 pm in response to a 110 Oe strong magnetic field, corresponding to an overall refractive index change of -3.2×10-3 for the cladding MF. The combination of MFs and integrated photonics could potentially lead to the development of magnetically controllable optical devices and ultra-compact cost-effective magnetic field sensors.

  15. Levitation and lateral forces between a point magnetic dipole and a superconducting sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, M. Al-Khateeb; M, K. Alqadi; F, Y. Alzoubi; B, Albiss; M, K. Hasan (Qaseer; N, Y. Ayoub

    2016-05-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction model is employed to investigate the angular dependence of the levitation and lateral forces acting on a small magnet in an anti-symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system. Breaking the symmetry of the system enables us to study the lateral force which is important in the stability of the magnet above a superconducting sphere in the Meissner state. Under the assumption that the lateral displacement of the magnet is small compared to the physical dimensions of our proposed system, analytical expressions are obtained for the levitation and lateral forces as a function of the geometrical parameters of the superconductor as well as the height, the lateral displacement, and the orientation of the magnetic moment of the magnet. The dependence of the levitation force on the height of the levitating magnet is similar to that in the symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system within the range of proposed lateral displacements. It is found that the levitation force is linearly dependent on the lateral displacement whereas the lateral force is independent of this displacement. A sinusoidal variation of both forces as a function of the polar and azimuthal angles specifying the orientation of the magnetic moment is observed. The relationship between the stability and the orientation of the magnetic moment is discussed for different orientations.

  16. Role of external magnetic field and current closure in the force balance mechanism of a magnetically stabilized plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Ravi; Goyal, Vidhi

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigations on the role of applied external magnetic field and return current closure in the force balance mechanism of a plasma torch are reported. The plasma torch is of low power and has wall, gas and magnetic stabilization mechanisms incorporated in it. Gas flow is divided into two parts: axial-central and peripheral-shroud, applied magnetic field is axial and return current is co-axial. Results indicate that application of large external magnetic field gives rise to not only J x B force but also, coupled with gas flow, to a new drag-cum-centrifugal force that acts on the plasma arc root and column. The magnetic field also plays a role in the return current closure dynamics and thus in the overall force balance mechanism. This in turn affects the electro-thermal efficiency of the plasma torch. Detailed experimental results, analytical calculations and physical model representing the processes will be presented and discussed.

  17. Novel concepts in near-field optics: from magnetic near-field to optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Honghua

    near-field response of a linear rod antenna is studied with Babinet's principle. Babinet's principle connects the magnetic field of a structure to the electric field of its complement structure. Using combined far- and near-field spectroscopy, imaging, and theory, I identify magnetic dipole and higher order bright and dark magnetic resonances at mid-infrared frequencies. From resonant length scaling and spatial field distributions, I confirm that the theoretical requirement of Babinet's principle for a structure to be infinitely thin and perfectly conducting is still fulfilled to a good approximation in the mid-infrared. Thus Babinet's principle provides access to spatial and spectral magnetic field properties, leading to targeted design and control of magnetic optical antennas. Lastly, a novel form of nanoscale optical spectroscopy based on mechanical detection of optical gradient force is explored. It is to measure the optical gradient force between induced dipole moments of a sample and an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. My study provides the theoretical basis in terms of spectral behavior, resonant enhancement, and distance dependence of the optical gradient force from numerical simulations for a coupled nanoparticle model geometry. I show that the optical gradient force is dispersive for local electronic and vibrational resonances, yet can be absorptive for collective polaronic excitations. This spectral behavior together with the distance dependence scaling provides the key characteristics for its measurement and distinction from competing processes such as thermal expansion. Furthermore, I provide a perspective for resonant enhancement and control of optical forces in general.

  18. Motion and force controlled vibration testing. [of aerospace hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.; Boatman, David J.; Kern, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for controlling both the input acceleration and force in vibration tests is proposed to alleviate the overtesting risks and the problems associated with response limiting in conventional vibration tests of aerospace hardware. Previous research on impedance and force controlled vibration tests is reviewed and a simple equation governing the dual control of acceleration and force is derived. A practical method for implementing the dual control technique in random vibration tests has been demonstrated in JPL's environmental test facility using a conventional digital controller operating in the extremal mode. The dual control technique provides appropriate real-time notching of the input acceleration and a corresponding reduction of the test item response at resonances. Issues concerning the need for force and acceleration phase information, the adequacy of specifying the blocked force, and the derivation of the total force for multipoint supports are discussed.

  19. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  20. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-05-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  1. Comparison of digital controllers used in magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic systems that were once controlled by analog circuits are now controlled by digital computers. Presented is a comparison of the digital controllers presently used with magnetic suspension and balance systems. The overall responses of the systems are compared using a computer simulation of the magnetic suspension and balance system and the digital controllers. The comparisons include responses to both simulated force and position inputs. A preferred digital controller is determined from the simulated responses.

  2. Pressure transducer for measuring acoustic radiation force based on a magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, H. A. S.; Pavan, T. Z.; Almeida, T. W. J.; Pádua, M. L. A.; Baggio, A. L.; Fatemi, M.; Carneiro, A. A. O.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a pressure transducer based on a magnetic sensor to measure acoustic radiation force (ARF) and small displacements. The methodology presented in this paper allowed this transducer to be calibrated for use as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter. It can control the acoustic intensity emitted by ultrasound used, for example, in ARF impulse imaging, vibro-acoustography and high-intensity focused ultrasound techniques. The device comprises a magnet, a membrane, a magnetoresistive sensor and a coil to cancel the external magnetic field. When ARF is applied to the membrane, the magnetic field on the sensor changes due to the magnetic target displacement. The variation of the output signal from the magnetic transducer is proportional to the acoustic pressure applied to the membrane. A focused ultrasound transducer with a central frequency of 3 MHz was used to apply a continuous ARF. The sensitivities of the magnetic transducer as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter, evaluated in water, were respectively 0.597 µV MPa-1 and 0.073 µV (W cm-2)-1/2, while those of the needle hydrophone (Onda model HNP-0400) used in the magnetic transducer calibration were respectively, 0.5024 mV MPa-1 and 6.153 mV (W cm-2)-1/2. The transducer resolution to displacement is 5 nm and 6 dB of signal attenuation occurs for 7° of misalignment. The transducer responded well to acoustic pressure in water above 200 kPa.

  3. Measurement and calculation of forces in a magnetic journal bearing actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah; Mccaul, Edward; Xia, Zule

    1991-01-01

    Numerical calculations and experimental measurements of forces from an actuator of the type used in active magnetic journal bearings are presented. The calculations are based on solution of the scalar magnetic potential field in and near the gap regions. The predicted forces from single magnet with steady current are compared with experimental measurements in the same geometry. The measured forces are smaller than calculated ones in the principal direction but are larger than calculated in the normal direction. This combination of results indicate that material and spatial effects other than saturation play roles in determining the force available from an actuator.

  4. Magnetic levitation force measurement on high [Tc] superconducting ceramic/polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Unsworth, J.; Du, Jia; Crosby, B.J. ); Macfarlane, J.C. )

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of magnetic levitation force for 0--3 and 3--3 superconducting ceramic/polymer composites is presented. A simple, inexpensive force versus distance measurement technique is described. The measurements of force against distance or magnetic field show strong hysteretic behavior, which is similar to the sintered superconductor ceramics and is consistent with the hysteresis in magnetization of superconductor. The volume fraction dependence and sample thickness dependence of the levitation forces are also studied for 0--3 composites. Results suggest that the new composite materials are most suitable for levitation applications.

  5. Visualization and quantification of magnetic nanoparticles into vesicular systems by combined atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, C.; Corsetti, S.; Passeri, D.; Rossi, M.; Carafa, M.; Marianecci, C.; Pantanella, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Ingallina, C.; Sorbo, A.

    2015-06-23

    We report a phenomenological approach for the quantification of the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) incorporated in non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). After a simple specimen preparation, i.e., by putting a drop of solution containing MNPs-loaded niosomes on flat substrates, topography and MFM phase images are collected. To attempt the quantification of the diameter of entrapped MNPs, the method is calibrated on the sole MNPs deposited on the same substrates by analyzing the MFM signal as a function of the MNP diameter (at fixed tip-sample distance) and of the tip-sample distance (for selected MNPs). After calibration, the effective diameter of the MNPs entrapped in some niosomes is quantitatively deduced from MFM images.

  6. Axial force imparted by a current-free magnetically expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W.

    2012-08-15

    The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding, current-free, radiofrequency plasma is directly measured. For an argon gas flow rate of 25 sccm and an effective rf input power of {approx}800W, a maximum force of {approx}6mN is obtained; {approx}3mN of which is transmitted via the expanding magnetic field. The measured forces are reasonably compared with a simple fluid model associated with the measured electron pressure. The model suggests that the total force is the sum of an electron pressure inside the source and a Lorentz force due to the electron diamagnetic drift current and the applied radial magnetic field. It is shown that the Lorentz force is greatest near the magnetic nozzle surface where the radial pressure gradient is largest.

  7. Adaptive Force Control For Compliant Motion Of A Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1995-01-01

    Two adaptive control schemes offer robust solutions to problem of stable control of forces of contact between robotic manipulator and objects in its environment. They are called "adaptive admittance control" and "adaptive compliance control." Both schemes involve use of force-and torque sensors that indicate contact forces. These schemes performed well when tested in computational simulations in which they were used to control seven-degree-of-freedom robot arm in executing contact tasks. Choice between admittance or compliance control is dictated by requirements of the application at hand.

  8. High Cable Forces Deteriorate Pinch Force Control in Voluntary-Closing Body-Powered Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Abbink, David A.; Kyberd, Peter J.; Plettenburg, Dick H.

    2017-01-01

    Background It is generally asserted that reliable and intuitive control of upper-limb prostheses requires adequate feedback of prosthetic finger positions and pinch forces applied to objects. Body-powered prostheses (BPPs) provide the user with direct proprioceptive feedback. Currently available BPPs often require high cable operation forces, which complicates control of the forces at the terminal device. The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of high cable forces on object manipulation with voluntary-closing prostheses. Method Able-bodied male subjects were fitted with a bypass-prosthesis with low and high cable force settings for the prehensor. Subjects were requested to grasp and transfer a collapsible object as fast as they could without dropping or breaking it. The object had a low and a high breaking force setting. Results Subjects conducted significantly more successful manipulations with the low cable force setting, both for the low (33% more) and high (50%) object’s breaking force. The time to complete the task was not different between settings during successful manipulation trials. Conclusion High cable forces lead to reduced pinch force control during object manipulation. This implies that low cable operation forces should be a key design requirement for voluntary-closing BPPs. PMID:28099454

  9. Nanomagnets with high shape anisotropy and strong crystalline anisotropy: perspectives on magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Campanella, H; Jaafar, M; Llobet, J; Esteve, J; Vázquez, M; Asenjo, A; del Real, R P; Plaza, J A

    2011-12-16

    We report on a new approach for magnetic imaging, highly sensitive even in the presence of external, strong magnetic fields. Based on FIB-assisted fabricated high-aspect-ratio rare-earth nanomagnets, we produce groundbreaking magnetic force tips with hard magnetic character where we combine a high aspect ratio (shape anisotropy) together with strong crystalline anisotropy (rare-earth-based alloys). Rare-earth hard nanomagnets are then FIB-integrated to silicon microcantilevers as highly sharpened tips for high-field magnetic imaging applications. Force resolution and domain reversing and recovery capabilities are at least one order of magnitude better than for conventional magnetic tips. This work opens new, pioneering research fields on the surface magnetization process of nanostructures based either on relatively hard magnetic materials-used in magnetic storage media-or on materials like superparamagnetic particles, ferro/antiferromagnetic structures or paramagnetic materials.

  10. Decoupling suspension controller based on magnetic flux feedback.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced.

  11. Diamagnetically stabilized levitation control of an intraluminal magnetic capsule.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michael; Mintchev, Martin

    2009-08-01

    Controlled navigation promotes full utilization of capsule endoscopy for reliable real-time diagnosis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but intermittent natural peristalsis can disturb the navigational control, destabilize the capsule and take it out of levitation. The focus of the present work was to develop an economical and effective real-time magnetic capsule-guiding system that can operate in the presence of naturally existing peristalsis while retaining navigational control. A real-size magnetic navigation system that can handle peristaltic forces of up to 1.5 N was designed utilizing the computer-aided design (CAD) system Maxwell 3D (Ansoft, Pittsburg, PA) and was verified using a small-size physical experimental setup. The proposed system contains a pair of 50 cm diameter, 10,000-turn copper electromagnets with a 10 cm x 10 cm ferrous core driven by currents of up to 300 A and can successfully maintain position control over the levitating capsule during peristalsis. The addition of bismuth diamagnetic casing for stabilizing the levitating capsule was also studied. A modeled magnetic field around the diamagnetically cased permanent magnet was shown to be redistributed aligning its interaction with the external electromagnets, thus stabilizing the levitating capsule. In summary, a custom-designed diamagnetically facilitated capsule navigation system can successfully steer an intraluminal magnet-carrying capsule.

  12. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  13. Vertically polarizing undulator with the dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for the next generation of light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Strelnikov, N.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Xu, J.; Gluskin, E.

    2014-11-15

    A short prototype (847-mm-long) of an Insertion Device (ID) with the dynamic compensation of ID magnetic forces has been designed, built, and tested at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of the Argonne National Laboratory. The ID magnetic forces were compensated by the set of conical springs placed along the ID strongback. Well-controlled exponential characteristics of conical springs permitted a very close fit to the ID magnetic forces. Several effects related to the imperfections of actual springs, their mounting and tuning, and how these factors affect the prototype performance has been studied. Finally, series of tests to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of the ID magnetic gap settings have been carried out. Based on the magnetic measurements of the ID B{sub eff}, it has been demonstrated that the magnetic gaps within an operating range were controlled accurately and reproducibly within ±1 μm. Successful tests of this ID prototype led to the design of a 3-m long device based on the same concept. The 3-m long prototype is currently under construction. It represents R and D efforts by the APS toward APS Upgrade Project goals as well as the future generation of IDs for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

  14. Cellular effects of magnetic nanoparticles explored by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hongli; Li, Jingchao; Dulińska-Molak, Ida; Kawazoe, Naoki; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Mamiya, Hiroaki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-09-01

    The investigation of subtle change of cells exposed to nanomaterials is extremely essential but also challenging for nanomaterial-based biological applications. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to investigate the effects of iron-iron oxide core-shell magnetic nanoparticles on the mechanical properties of bovine articular chondrocytes (BACs). After being exposed to the nanoparticles even at a high nanoparticle-concentration (50 μg mL(-1)), no obvious difference was observed by using conventional methods, including the WST-1 assay and live/dead staining. However a significant difference of Young's modulus of the cells was detected by AFM even when the concentration of nanoparticles applied in the cell culture medium was low (10 μg mL(-1)). The difference of cellular Young's modulus increased with the increase of nanoparticle concentration. AFM was demonstrated to be a useful tool to identify the subtle change of cells when they were exposed to nanomaterials even at a low concentration.

  15. GravitoMagnetic force in modified Newtonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2013-08-01

    We introduce the Gauge Vector-Tensor (GVT) theory by extending the AQUAL's approach to the GravitoElectroMagnetism (GEM) approximation of gravity. GVT is a generally covariant theory of gravity composed of a pseudo Riemannian metric and two U(1) gauge connections that reproduces MOND in the limit of very weak gravitational fields while remains consistent with the Einstein-Hilbert gravity in the limit of strong and Newtonian gravitational fields. GVT also provides a simple framework to study the GEM approximation to gravity. We illustrate that the gravitomagnetic force at the edge of a galaxy can be in accord with either GVT or ΛCDM but not both. We also study the physics of the GVT theory around the gravitational saddle point of the Sun and Jupiter system. We notice that the conclusive refusal of the GVT theory demands measuring either both of the gravitoelectric and gravitomagnetic fields inside the Sun-Jupiter MOND window, or the gravitoelectric field inside two different solar GVT MOND windows. The GVT theory, however, will be favored by observing an anomaly in the gravitoelectric field inside a single MOND window.

  16. Preliminary investigation of force-reduced superconducting magnet configurations for advanced technology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-12-01

    The feasibility of new high-field low specific weight superconducting magnet designs using force-free fields is being explored analytically and numerically. This report attempts to assess the technical viability of force-free field concepts to produce high-field, low specific weight and large bore volume magnets, which could promote the use of high temperature superconductors. Several force-free/force-reduced magnet configurations are first reviewed, then discussed and assessed. Force-free magnetic fields, fields for which the current flows parallel to the field, have well-known mathematical solutions extending upon infinite domains. These solutions, however, are no longer force-free everywhere for finite geometries. In this preliminary study, force-free solutions such as the Lundquist solutions truncated to a size where the internal field of the coil matches an externally cylindrical magnetic field (also called a Lundquist coil) are numerically modeled and explored. Significant force-reduction for such coils was calculated, which may have some importance for the design of lighter toroidal magnets used in thermonuclear fusion power generation, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), and mobile MHD power generation and propulsion.

  17. Shape-Grinding by Direct Position/Force Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanghua; Xu, Weiwei; Minami, Mamoru

    Based on the analysis of the interaction between a manipulator's hand and a working object, a model representing the constrained dynamics of the robot is first discussed. The constrained forces are expressed by an algebraic function of states, input generalized forces, and the constraint condition, and then a direct position/force controller without force sensor is proposed based on the algebraic relation. To give a grinding system the ability to adapt to any object shape being changed by the grinding, we add a function estimating the constraint condition in real time for the adaptive position/force control. Evaluations through simulations, by fitting the changing constraint surface with spline functions, indicate that reliable position/force control and shape-grinding can be achieved by the proposed controller.

  18. Magnetic control of ferroelectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussan, S.; Kumar, A.; Katiyar, R. S.; Priya, S.; Scott, J. F.

    2011-05-01

    We report the strong magnetic field dependence of ferroelectric PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) films on half-metallic oxide La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) electrodes. As the field H is increased, the hysteresis loop first broadens (becomes lossy) and then disappears at approximately H = 0.34 T and ambient temperatures. The data are compared with the theories of Pirč et al (2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 214114), Parish and Littlewood (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 166602) and Catalan (2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 102902). The results are interpreted as due not to magnetocapacitance but to the sharp negative magnetoresistance in LSMO at low magnetic fields (Hwang et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 2041), which causes a dramatic increase in leakage current through the PZT.

  19. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O(2-) migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm(-2) at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  20. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  1. Fully Suspended, Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig With Forced Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew; Kurkov, Anatole; Montague, Gerald; Duffy, Kirsten; Mehmed, Oral; Johnson, Dexter; Jansen, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig, a significant advancement in the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR), is used to perform vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under rotating and nonrotating conditions in a vacuum. The rig has as its critical components three magnetic bearings: two heteropolar radial active magnetic bearings and a magnetic thrust bearing. The bearing configuration allows full vertical rotor magnetic suspension along with a feed-forward control feature, which will enable the excitation of various natural blade modes in bladed disk test articles. The theoretical, mechanical, electrical, and electronic aspects of the rig are discussed. Also presented are the forced-excitation results of a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, unbladed rotor and a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, bladed rotor in which a pair of blades was arranged 180 degrees apart from each other. These tests include the bounce mode excitation of the rotor in which the rotor was excited at the blade natural frequency of 144 Hz. The rotor natural mode frequency of 355 Hz was discerned from the plot of acceleration versus frequency. For nonrotating blades, a blade-tip excitation amplitude of approximately 100 g/A was achieved at the first-bending critical (approximately 144 Hz) and at the first-torsional and second-bending blade modes. A blade-tip displacement of 70 mils was achieved at the first-bending critical by exciting the blades at a forced-excitation phase angle of 908 relative to the vertical plane containing the blades while simultaneously rotating the shaft at 3000 rpm.

  2. A Method for Implementing Force-Limited Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel B.

    1997-01-01

    NASA/GSFC has implemented force-limited vibration control on a controller which can only accept one profile. The method uses a personal computer based digital signal processing board to convert force and/or moment signals into what appears to he an acceleration signal to the controller. This technique allows test centers with older controllers to use the latest force-limited control techniques for random vibration testing. The paper describes the method, hardware, and test procedures used. An example from a test performed at NASA/GSFC is used as a guide.

  3. Adaptive hybrid position/force control of robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourboghrat, F.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of position and force control for the compliant motion of the manipulators is considered. The external force and the position of the end-effector are related by a second order impedance function. The force control problem is then translated into a position control problem. For that, an adaptive controller is designed to achieve the compliant motion. The design uses the Liapunov's direct method to derive the adaptation law. The stability of the process is guaranteed from the Liapunov's stability theory. The controller does not require the knowledge of the system parameters for the implementation, and hence is easy for applications.

  4. A shared position/force control methodology for teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jin S.

    1987-01-01

    A flexible and computationally efficient shared position/force control concept and its implementation in the Robot Control C Library (RCCL) are presented form the point of teleoperation. This methodology enables certain degrees of freedom to be position-controlled through real time manual inputs and the remaining degrees of freedom to be force-controlled by computer. Functionally, it is a hybrid control scheme in that certain degrees of freedom are designated to be under position control, and the remaining degrees of freedom to be under force control. However, the methodology is also a shared control scheme because some degrees of freedom can be put under manual control and the other degrees of freedom put under computer control. Unlike other hybrid control schemes, which process position and force commands independently, this scheme provides a force control loop built on top of a position control inner loop. This feature minimizes the computational burden and increases disturbance rejection. A simple implementation is achieved partly because the joint control servos that are part of most robots can be used to provide the position control inner loop. Along with this control scheme, several menus were implemented for the convenience of the user. The implemented control scheme was successfully demonstrated for the tasks of hinged-panel opening and peg-in-hole insertion.

  5. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Magnetic Control in Crystal Growth from a Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yue

    Control of bulk melt crystal growth techniques is desirable for producing semiconductors with the highest purity and ternary alloys with tunable electrical properties. Because these molten materials are electrically conducting, external magnetic fields are often employed to regulate the flow in the melt. However, complicated by the coupled flow, thermal, electromagnetic and chemical physics, such magnetic control is typically empirical or even an educated guess. Two magnetic flow control mechanisms: flow damping by steady magnetic fields, and flow stirring by alternating magnetic fields, are investigated numerically. Magnetic damping during optically-heated float-zone crystal growth is modeled using a spectral collocation method. The Marangoni convection at the free melt-gas interface is suppressed when exposed to a steady axial magnetic field, measured by the Hartmann number Ha. As a result, detrimental flow instabilities are suppressed, and an almost quiescent region forms in the interior, ideal for single crystal growth. Using normal mode linear stability analyses, dominant flow instabilities are determined in a range applicable to experiments (up to Ha = 300 for Pr = 0.02, and up to Ha = 500 for Pr = 0.001). The hydrodynamic nature of the instability for small Prandtl number Pr liquid bridges is confirmed by energy analyses. Magnetic stirring is modeled for melt crystal growth in an ampule exposed to a transverse rotating magnetic field. Decoupled from the flow field at small magnetic Reynolds number, the electromagnetic field is first solved via finite element analysis. The flow field is then solved using the spectral element method. At low to moderate AC frequencies (up to a few kHz), the electromagnetic body force is dominant in the azimuthal direction, which stirs a steady axisymmetric flow primarily in the azimuthal direction. A weaker secondary flow develops in the meridional plane. However, at high AC frequencies (on the order of 10 kHz and higher), only

  7. Hybrid Position/Force Control of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raibert, M. H.; Craig, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    In proposed method for task-oriented control of robot manipulator, position and force error signals for each task degree of freedom are used to calculate appropriate control parameters in task coordinates. Position and force error signals are transformed and summed to create drive signal for each actuator. New hybrid control technique does not require operator to supply complex transform matrices. Control trajectories are easily visualized in terms of task to be performed.

  8. MAGNETICALLY CONTROLLED CIRCULATION ON HOT EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Stanley, Sabine; Stevenson, David J.

    2013-10-10

    Through the process of thermal ionization, intense stellar irradiation renders hot Jupiter atmospheres electrically conductive. Simultaneously, lateral variability in the irradiation drives the global circulation with peak wind speeds of the order of ∼km s{sup –1}. In turn, the interactions between the atmospheric flows and the background magnetic field give rise to Lorentz forces that can act to perturb the flow away from its purely hydrodynamical counterpart. Using analytical theory and numerical simulations, we show here that significant deviations away from axisymmetric circulation are unstable in presence of a non-negligible axisymmetric magnetic field. Specifically, our results suggest that dayside-to-nightside flows, often obtained within the context of three-dimensional circulation models, only exist on objects with anomalously low magnetic fields, while the majority of highly irradiated exoplanetary atmospheres are entirely dominated by zonal jets.

  9. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  10. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo(2)Ti(2)Fe(8)O(19), large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them.

  11. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  12. Motion and force control of multiple robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the motion and force control problem of multiple robot arms manipulating a cooperatively held object. A general control paradigm is introduced which decouples the motion and force control problems. For motion control, different control strategies are constructed based on the variables used as the control input in the controller design. There are three natural choices; acceleration of a generalized coordinate, arm tip force vectors, and the joint torques. The first two choices require full model information but produce simple models for the control design problem. The last choice results in a class of relatively model independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open loop system. The motion control only determines the joint torque to within a manifold, due to the multiple-arm kinematic constraint. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, an optimization can be performed to best allocate the desired and effector control force to the joint actuators. The other possibility is to control the internal force about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  13. Control of Coupling Phenomena in Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Yang

    The search for non-volatile, non-dissipative computing devices (memory and logic) beyond current transistor technology has encouraged the scientific community to develop new nanoscale magnetic control mechanisms. In the present work, the control of magnets by magnetoelastic anisotropy is investigated within the context of nanoscale magnetoelectric composite systems. These magnetoelectric composites are artificial multiferroic materials which exhibit both a coexistence and coupling of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric ordering. This device architecture provides a route to control magnetism with electric fields via the application of mechanical stress. In the present work, magnetization behavior under mechanical stress of various magnetically coupled systems is investigated using both advanced computer simulations and experimental work. The application of voltage-controlled strain is shown to influence dipole coupled nanomagnet arrays and antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic (AFM-FM) spontaneous exchange bias systems, which present pathways to engineered systems. Furthermore, the repeatable nature of these experiments presents unambiguous deterministic voltage control for both dipole-coupled systems and spontaneous exchange bias systems. The experimental results are confirmed by multiple characterization techniques, including superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry (SQUID) and magneto optic Kerr effect magnetometry (MOKE). This work thus provides significant evidence of the viability of magnetoelastic anisotropy as a means to control magnetoelectric heterostructures in future computing devices.

  14. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; ...

    2016-05-09

    We develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Also, 3 G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to traditional heterodyne based MFM on model systems including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) and electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstratemore » its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode coupling phenomena. Finally we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any AFM platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties as well as their mutual interactions.« less

  15. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-09

    We develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Also, 3 G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to traditional heterodyne based MFM on model systems including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) and electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode coupling phenomena. Finally we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any AFM platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties as well as their mutual interactions.

  16. Reduction of the unbalanced magnetic force of a transverse flux machine by using symmetric multipair cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, G. H.; Park, N. K.; Lee, C. I.; Chang, J. H.; Jeong, S. W.; Kang, D. H.

    2008-04-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of the magnetic force and the torque in the conventional rotatory two-phase transverse flux machine (TFM) by using the three-dimensional finite element method. This research shows that the unbalanced magnetic force is one of the dominant excitation forces in this machine, and it proposes a TFM with symmetric multipair cores in which each stator core of phases A and B is divided into two and the divided cores are disposed symmetrically to cancel the unbalanced magnetic force of each phase of a TFM. However, symmetric multipair cores of a TFM may reduce the winding space of coil which results in the reduction of torque and power. This research performs the optimization of teeth-slot configuration of the stator to overcome this shortcoming. It shows that the unbalance magnetic force of a TFM can be effectively eliminated without sacrificing torque or power by introducing symmetric multipair cores.

  17. Magnetic force microscopy studies of the domain structure of Co/Pd multilayers in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.; Main, P. C.; Gallagher, B. L.; Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.; Dahlberg, E. D.; Eames, P.

    2001-06-01

    We have measured the magnetic domain patterns in Co/Pd multilayers of varying thickness using magnetic force microscopy in the presence of an external magnetic field applied perpendicular to the multilayers. We find that the domain patterns evolution is in qualitative agreement with existing theories for single layer thin films. Our results are in reasonable agreement with a theoretical model of domains appropriate to multilayer films. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Torsional resonance mode magnetic force microscopy: enabling higher lateral resolution magnetic imaging without topography-related effects.

    PubMed

    Kaidatzis, A; García-Martín, J M

    2013-04-26

    We present experimental work that reveals the benefits of performing magnetic force microscopy measurements employing the torsional resonance mode of cantilever oscillation. This approach provides two clear advantages: the ability of performing magnetic imaging without topography-related interference and the significant lateral resolution improvement (approximately 15%). We believe that this work demonstrates a significant improvement to a versatile magnetic imaging technique widely used in academia and in industry.

  19. Control of Magnetic Properties Across Metal to Insulator Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Venta, Jose

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic (FM) thin films without magnetic fields is an on-going challenge in condensed matter physics with multiple technological implications. External stimuli and proximity effects are the most used methods to control the magnetic properties. An interesting possibility arises when ferromagnets are in proximity to materials that undergo a metal-insulator (MIT) and structural phase transition (SPT). The stress associated with the structural changes produces a magnetoelastic anisotropy in proximity coupled ferromagnetic films that allows controlling the magnetic properties without magnetic fields. Canonical examples of materials that undergo MIT and SPT are the vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O3) . VO2 undergoes a metal/rutile to an insulator/monoclinic phase transition at 340 K. In V2O3 the transition at 160 K is from a metallic/rhombohedral to an insulating/ monoclinic phase. We have investigated the magnetic properties of different combinations of ferromagnetic (Ni, Co and Fe) and vanadium oxide thin films. The (0.32%) volume expansion in VO2 or the (1.4%) volume decrease in V2O3 across the MIT produces an interfacial stress in the FM overlayer. We show that the coercivities and magnetizations of the ferromagnetic films grown on vanadium oxides are strongly affected by the phase transition. The changes in coercivity can be as large as 168% and occur in a very narrow temperature interval. These effects can be controlled by the thickness and deposition conditions of the different ferromagnetic films. For VO2/Ni bilayers the large change in the coercivity occurring above room temperature opens the possibilities for technological applications. Work done in collaboration with Siming Wang, J. G. Ramirez, and Ivan K. Schuller. Funded by the US DoE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award FG03-87ER-45332 and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research No. FA9550-12-1-0381.

  20. Contact position sensor using constant contact force control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Jay (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A force control system (50) and method are provided for controlling a position contact sensor (10) so as to produce a constant controlled contact force therewith. The system (50) includes a contact position sensor (10) which has a contact probe (12) for contacting the surface of a target to be measured and an output signal (V.sub.o) for providing a position indication thereof. An actuator (30) is provided for controllably driving the contact position sensor (10) in response to an actuation control signal (I). A controller (52) receives the position indication signal (V.sub.o) and generates in response thereto the actuation control signal (I) so as to provide a substantially constant selective force (F) exerted by the contact probe (12). The actuation drive signal (I) is generated further in response to substantially linear approximation curves based on predetermined force and position data attained from the sensor (10) and the actuator (30).

  1. Spatiotemporal control of microtubule nucleation and assembly using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Céline; Mazari, Elsa; Lallet, Sylvie; Le Borgne, Roland; Marchi, Valérie; Gosse, Charlie; Gueroui, Zoher

    2013-03-01

    Decisions on the fate of cells and their functions are dictated by the spatiotemporal dynamics of molecular signalling networks. However, techniques to examine the dynamics of these intracellular processes remain limited. Here, we show that magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with key regulatory proteins can artificially control, in time and space, the Ran/RCC1 signalling pathway that regulates the cell cytoskeleton. In the presence of a magnetic field, RanGTP proteins conjugated to superparamagnetic nanoparticles can induce microtubule fibres to assemble into asymmetric arrays of polarized fibres in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. The orientation of the fibres is dictated by the direction of the magnetic force. When we locally concentrated nanoparticles conjugated with the upstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, the assembly of microtubule fibres could be induced over a greater range of distances than RanGTP particles. The method shows how bioactive nanoparticles can be used to engineer signalling networks and spatial self-organization inside a cell environment.

  2. Measurement of time series variation of thermal diffusivity of magnetic fluid under magnetic field by forced Rayleigh scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motozawa, Masaaki; Muraoka, Takashi; Motosuke, Masahiro; Fukuta, Mitsuhiro

    2017-04-01

    It can be expected that the thermal diffusivity of a magnetic fluid varies from time to time after applying a magnetic field because of the growth of the inner structure of a magnetic fluid such as chain-like clusters. In this study, time series variation of the thermal diffusivity of a magnetic fluid caused by applying a magnetic field was investigated experimentally. For the measurement of time series variation of thermal diffusivity, we attempted to apply the forced Rayleigh scattering method (FRSM), which has high temporal and high spatial resolution. We set up an optical system for the FRSM and measured the thermal diffusivity. A magnetic field was applied to a magnetic fluid in parallel and perpendicular to the heat flux direction, and the magnetic field intensity was 70 mT. The FRSM was successfully applied to measurement of the time series variation of the magnetic fluid from applying a magnetic field. The results show that a characteristic configuration in the time series variation of the thermal diffusivity of magnetic fluid was obtained in the case of applying a magnetic field parallel to the heat flux direction. In contrast, in the case of applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the heat flux, the thermal diffusivity of the magnetic fluid hardly changed during measurement.

  3. Adaptive Force Control in Compliant Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a manipulator in compliant motion while in contact with an environment having an unknown stiffness. Two classes of solutions are discussed: adaptive admittance control and adaptive compliance control. In both admittance and compliance control schemes, compensator adaptation is used to ensure a stable and uniform system performance.

  4. Molecular imprinted magnetic nanoparticles for controlled delivery of mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Deniz; Bereli, Nilay; Çorman, M Emin; Shaikh, Huma; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2014-10-01

    Controlled drug delivery system is a technique which has considerable recent potential in the fields of pharmacy and medicine. Mitomycin C is commonly used drug in the treatment of superficial bladder and breast cancers. In the present study, mitomycin C-imprinted magnetic poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-based nanoparticles (MIMNs) were prepared using surfactant free emulsion polymerization for controlled delivery of mitomycin C. The MIMNs were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron spin resonance, and elemental analysis. The average particle diameter of MIMNs was about 200 nm.

  5. Relationships between magnetization and dynamic stress for Galfenol rod alloy and its application in force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ling; Wang, Bowen; Dapino, M. J.; Sun, Ying; Wang, Li; Cui, Baozhi

    2013-05-01

    Magnetization versus dynamic stress of Fe81.6Ga18.4 is measured at 4.0 kA/m bias magnetic field and -7.0 MPa compressive pre-stress. The magnetization and stress curves show that magnetization decreases with increasing compressive stress. Magnetization increases with increasing stress frequency at -20 MPa compounded stress. The output voltage from the pickup coil of a Galfenol force sensor is measured when the frequency and amplitude of dynamic force vary. The measurements show that the output voltage increases proportionally with increasing force frequency and amplitude. When the bias magnetic field is 4.0 kA/m, a maximum output voltage of 57 mV is measured at -7.0 MPa compressive pre-stress.

  6. Multiparameter magnetic inspection system with magnetic field control and plural magnetic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, D.C.

    1991-04-16

    A multiparameter magnetic inspection system is disclosed for providing an efficient and economical way to derive a plurality of independent measurements regarding magnetic properties of the magnetic material under investigation. The plurality of transducers for a plurality of different types of measurements operatively connected to the specimen. The transducers are in turn connected to analytical circuits for converting transducer signals to meaningful measurement signals of the magnetic properties of the specimen. The measurement signals are processed and can be simultaneously communicated to a control component. The measurement signals can also be selectively plotted against one another. The control component operates the functioning of the analytical circuits and operates and controls components to impose magnetic fields of desired characteristics upon the specimen. The system therefore allows contemporaneous or simultaneous derivation of the plurality of different independent magnetic properties of the material which can then be processed to derive characteristics of the material. 1 figure.

  7. Multiparameter magnetic inspection system with magnetic field control and plural magnetic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, David C.

    1991-04-16

    A multiparameter magnetic inspection system for providing an efficient and economical way to derive a plurality of independent measurements regarding magnetic properties of the magnetic material under investigation. The plurality of transducers for a plurality of different types of measurements operatively connected to the specimen. The transducers are in turn connected to analytical circuits for converting transducer signals to meaningful measurement signals of the magnetic properties of the specimen. The measurement signals are processed and can be simultaneously communicated to a control component. The measurement signals can also be selectively plotted against one another. The control component operates the functioning of the analytical circuits and operates and controls components to impose magnetic fields of desired characteristics upon the specimen. The system therefore allows contemporaneous or simultaneous derivation of the plurality of different independent magnetic properties of the material which can then be processed to derive characteristics of the material.

  8. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  9. Force-controlled lifting of molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, N.; Wagner, C.; Weiss, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Lifting a single molecular wire off the surface with a combined frequency-modulated atomic force and tunneling microscope it is possible to monitor the evolution of both the wire configuration and the contacts simultaneously with the transport conductance experiment. In particular, critical points where individual bonds to the surface are broken and instabilities where the wire is prone to change its contact configuration can be identified in the force gradient and dissipation responses of the junction. This additional mechanical information can be used to unambiguously determine the conductance of a true molecular wire, that is, of a molecule that is contacted via a pointlike “crocodile clip” to each of the electrodes but is otherwise free.

  10. Magnetic levitation force of semi-infinite type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    The levitation force acting on a point magnetic dipole above a semi-infinite type-II superconductor in both the Meissner and mixed states is studied. A formalism is developed for axisymmetric problems using London theory. The magnetostatic interaction energy and corresponding force can be put into closed form for such problems for arbitrary height of the magnetic point source. The results for stray fields have ready application to magnetic-force microscopy (MFM) with point probes. The results are useful for a range of experiments including the low-temperature MFM imaging of vortices and decoration measurements. Special cases include earlier results and previous approximations are obviated.

  11. Dynamic control of spin states in interacting magnetic elements

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn

    2014-10-07

    A method for the control of the magnetic states of interacting magnetic elements comprising providing a magnetic structure with a plurality of interacting magnetic elements. The magnetic structure comprises a plurality of magnetic states based on the state of each interacting magnetic element. The desired magnetic state of the magnetic structure is determined. The active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the desired magnetic state is determined. Each magnetic element of the magnetic structure is then subjected to an alternating magnetic field or electrical current having a frequency and amplitude below the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of said desired magnetic state and above the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the current state of the magnetic structure until the magnetic state of the magnetic structure is at the desired magnetic state.

  12. Relative dynamics and control of spacecraft formations subject to lorentz force perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia; Shoaib, Muhammad

    A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth magnetic field will be subject to a perturbative Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft’s orbit. We develop Lorentz force as a function of the orbital elements. The orbital perturbations of a charged spacecraft by Lorentz force in the Earth’s magnetic field are investigated using the Gauss variation of the Lagrange planetary Equations. The Earth’s magnetic field is modeled as a tilted dipole. The perturbations in the orbital elements depend on the value of the charge to mass ratio (q/m). The dynamical model of relative motion developed leads to approximate analytical solutions for the motion of a charged spacecraft subject to Lorentz force. The chief spacecraft’s reference orbit is taken to be either circular or elliptical. The deputy spacecraft is capable of accumulating electrostatic charge. The numerical results show that Lorentz force can be used to change the in-track position and plane orbit of the spacecraft. The numerical analysis shows that the target trajectory of the Lorentz spacecraft can be reached by varying the ratio (q/m) in different Low Earth Orbits.

  13. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force-extension experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Kornyshev, A. A.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data.

  14. Investigation of the behavior of a magnetic fluid in displacement and force transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Bashtovoi, V.G.; Mikhalev, V.P.; Reks, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of a drop of magnetic fluid in a capillary tube was investigated with reference to displacement and force transducers. The design of the sensing element of a magnetic fluid transducer was examined to investigate the shape of the meniscus of the column of magnetic fluid in a glass capillary tube under a longitudinal uniform magnetic field stress, the effect of magnetization of the fluid on drop elongation in the tube, the dependence of magnetic field strength and gradient on the current of the electromagnet for various points of the magnetic system gap, and the relation between the displacement of the magnetic fluid and the measurable force of the field stress. Experiments showed that the shape of the cylindrical column of magnetic fluid in the capillary tube depended substantially not only on the longitudinal uniform magnetic field stress but also on orientation of the column relative to the field. Fluid MMT-52 was used (magnetic phase-magnetite, stabilizer-oleic acid). One of the conditions necessary for its reliable operation was a convex shape of the magnetic fluid meniscus. It was found that transducer magnetic systems with a transverse field with respect to the sensing element were preferable since the magnetic fluid in the column retains its shape.

  15. Voltage-Controlled Magnetic Dynamics in Nanoscale Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate Vinasco, Juan Guillermo

    Spintronic devices, i.e., those utilizing the interaction of magnetic moments with electric voltages and currents in magnetic nanostructures, offer an exceptionally promising set of candidates for future electronic memory needs. Recently, the possibility of reversing the magnetization of nanoscale magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices using the spin transfer torque (STT) effect has attracted the attention of industry and academia, since STT-MRAM has been demonstrated to be a strong candidate for a high speed, high density, and high endurance nonvolatile memory. Further, by replacing the current-driven (e.g., STT) switching mechanism for a voltage-controlled effect, a novel magnetoelectric RAM (MeRAM) architecture could result in considerable improvements in terms of density and dissipated energy during switching, both factors which are limited in STT-MRAM by the large currents required. In this dissertation, the possibility of exploiting the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect on nanoscale MTJ devices as the driving mechanism for MeRAM will be introduced. Experimental results on the demonstration of current-assisted and purely voltage-controlled switching in the thermally-activated and precessional regimes are presented. The write energies in VCMA-driven switching of nanoscale MTJs are shown to be at least one order of magnitude smaller compared to STT-based schemes. The advantages and challenges in terms of scalability and energy-efficiency of this voltage-driven approach are discussed. Further, a compact model for co-simulation of VCMA-driven MTJs with CMOS is established and validated against experimental data. The compact model is refined by the parameters extracted from a detailed characterization of the voltage-driven dynamics in these devices. This includes experimental results on the accurate characterization of the temperature dependence of the perpendicular anisotropy and the VCMA effect in MTJs, as well as on the influence of higher

  16. Multimodal chemo-magnetic control of self-propelling microbots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Dey, Krishna Kanti; Chattopadhyay, Arun; Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    We report a controlled migration of an iron nanoparticle (FeNP) coated polymer micromotor. The otherwise diffusive motion of the motor was meticulously directed through an in situ pH-gradient and an external magnetic field. The self-propulsion owing to the asymmetric catalytic decomposition of peroxide fuel was directed through a pH gradient imposed across the motor-surface, while the magnetic field induced an external control on the movement and the speed of the motor. Interestingly, the sole influence of the pH gradient could move the motor as high as ∼25 body lengths per second, which was further magnified by the external assistance from the magnetic field. Applying a magnetic field against the pH directed motion helped in the quantitative experimental estimation of the force-field required to arrest the chemotactic migration. The influence of the coupled internal and external fields could halt, steer or reverse the direction the motor inside a microchannel, rotate the motor around a target, and deliver the motor to a cluster of cells. This study showcases a multimodal chemical-magnetic field regulated migration of micro-machines for sensing, transport, and delivery inside a fluidic environment.

  17. Active Control of Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY, PATRICK S.; LAUFFER, JAMES P.; REDMOND, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, WILLIAM N.

    2001-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental and test results from a two year LDRD project entitled Real Time Error Correction Using Electromagnetic Bearing Spindles. This project was designed to explore various control schemes for levitating magnetic bearings with the goal of obtaining high precision location of the spindle and exceptionally high rotational speeds. As part of this work, several adaptive control schemes were devised, analyzed, and implemented on an experimental magnetic bearing system. Measured results, which indicated precision positional control of the spindle was possible, agreed reasonably well with simulations. Testing also indicated that the magnetic bearing systems were capable of very high rotational speeds but were still not immune to traditional structural dynamic limitations caused by spindle flexibility effects.

  18. Electrical control of magnetism in oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Song; Bin, Cui; Jingjing, Peng; Haijun, Mao; Feng, Pan

    2016-06-01

    Recent progress in the electrical control of magnetism in oxides, with profound physics and enormous potential applications, is reviewed and illustrated. In the first part, we provide a comprehensive summary of the electrical control of magnetism in the classic multiferroic heterostructures and clarify the various mechanisms lying behind them. The second part focuses on the novel technique of electric double layer gating for driving a significant electronic phase transition in magnetic oxides by a small voltage. In the third part, electric field applied on ordinary dielectric oxide is used to control the magnetic phenomenon originating from charge transfer and orbital reconstruction at the interface between dissimilar correlated oxides. At the end, we analyze the challenges in electrical control of magnetism in oxides, both the mechanisms and practical applications, which will inspire more in-depth research and advance the development in this field. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51322101, 51202125, and 51231004) and the National Hi-tech Research and Development Project of China (Grant Nos. 2014AA032904 and 2014AA032901).

  19. A novel adaptive force control method for IPMC manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lina; Sun, Zhiyong; Li, Zhi; Su, Yunquan; Gao, Jianchao

    2012-07-01

    IPMC is a type of electro-active polymer material, also called artificial muscle, which can generate a relatively large deformation under a relatively low input voltage (generally speaking, less than 5 V), and can be implemented in a water environment. Due to these advantages, IPMC can be used in many fields such as biomimetics, service robots, bio-manipulation, etc. Until now, most existing methods for IPMC manipulation are displacement control not directly force control, however, under most conditions, the success rate of manipulations for tiny fragile objects is limited by the contact force, such as using an IPMC gripper to fix cells. Like most EAPs, a creep phenomenon exists in IPMC, of which the generated force will change with time and the creep model will be influenced by the change of the water content or other environmental factors, so a proper force control method is urgently needed. This paper presents a novel adaptive force control method (AIPOF control—adaptive integral periodic output feedback control), based on employing a creep model of which parameters are obtained by using the FRLS on-line identification method. The AIPOF control method can achieve an arbitrary pole configuration as long as the plant is controllable and observable. This paper also designs the POF and IPOF controller to compare their test results. Simulation and experiments of micro-force-tracking tests are carried out, with results confirming that the proposed control method is viable.

  20. High sensitivity piezomagnetic force microscopy for quantitative probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ma, Feiyue; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Yuanming; Proksch, Roger; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-07-07

    Accurate scanning probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale is essential for developing and characterizing magnetic nanostructures, yet quantitative analysis is difficult using the state of the art magnetic force microscopy, and has limited spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this communication, we develop a novel piezomagnetic force microscopy (PmFM) technique, with the imaging principle based on the detection of magnetostrictive response excited by an external magnetic field. In combination with the dual AC resonance tracking (DART) technique, the contact stiffness and energy dissipation of the samples can be simultaneously mapped along with the PmFM phase and amplitude, enabling quantitative probing of magnetic materials and structures at the nanoscale with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PmFM has been applied to probe magnetic soft discs and cobalt ferrite thin films, demonstrating it as a powerful tool for a wide range of magnetic materials.

  1. MAGNETIC HELICITY OF SELF-SIMILAR AXISYMMETRIC FORCE-FREE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Mei; Flyer, Natasha; Low, Boon Chye

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, we continue our theoretical studies addressing the possible consequences of magnetic helicity accumulation in the solar corona. Our previous studies suggest that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are natural products of coronal evolution as a consequence of magnetic helicity accumulation and that the triggering of CMEs by surface processes such as flux emergence also have their origin in magnetic helicity accumulation. Here, we use the same mathematical approach to study the magnetic helicity of axisymmetric power-law force-free fields but focus on a family whose surface flux distributions are defined by self-similar force-free fields. The semi-analytical solutions of the axisymmetric self-similar force-free fields enable us to discuss the properties of force-free fields possessing a huge amount of accumulated magnetic helicity. Our study suggests that there may be an absolute upper bound on the total magnetic helicity of all bipolar axisymmetric force-free fields. With the increase of accumulated magnetic helicity, the force-free field approaches being fully opened up with Parker-spiral-like structures present around a current-sheet layer as evidence of magnetic helicity in the interplanetary space. It is also found that among the axisymmetric force-free fields having the same boundary flux distribution, the one that is self-similar is the one possessing the maximum amount of total magnetic helicity. This gives a possible physical reason why self-similar fields are often found in astrophysical bodies, where magnetic helicity accumulation is presumably also taking place.

  2. Noninvasive detection of unevenly magnetized permanent magnet of a brushless dc motor by characterizing back electromotive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. I.; Jang, G. H.

    2009-04-01

    Uneven magnetization of permanent magnets (PMs) is one of the major sources of unbalanced magnetic force and torque ripple, which excite a brushless dc (BLDC) motor. This paper investigates the frequency contents of the back electromotive force (BEMF) due to the unevenly magnetized PMs in a BLDC motor. The magnetic field of a BLDC motor is solved by using the finite element method, and the BEMF is calculated by differentiating the flux linkage with respect to time. The characteristics of BEMF are investigated by using the spectral analysis. Magnetic flux density of the ideally magnetized PMs has the harmonics of the pole-pair number, but unevenly magnetized PMs generate the additional harmonics. This research shows numerically and experimentally that the frequency components of the BEMF are determined by the least common multiple between the frequency contents of magnetic flux density from the PMs and the slot number per phase. It also shows that the magnetized status of the PMs of a BLDC can be noninvasively identified by monitoring the frequencies and the amplitudes of BEMF.

  3. Gravitoinertial force level influences arm movement control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, J.; Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The ability to move the forearm between remembered elbow joint angles immediately after rapid increases or decreases of the background gravitoinertial force (G) level was measured. The movements had been well-practiced in a normal 1G environment before the measurements in high-(1.8G) and low-force (0G) environments. The forearm and upper arm were always unsupported to maximize the influence of altered G-loading and to minimize extraneous cues about arm position. 2. Horizontal and vertical movement planes were studied to measure the effects of varying the G load in the movement plane within a given G background. Rapid and slow movements were studied to assess the role of proprioceptive feedback. 3. G level did not affect the amplitude of rapid movements, indicating that subjects were able to plan and to generate appropriate motor commands for the new G loading of the arm. The amplitude of slow movements was affected by G level, indicating that proprioceptive feedback is influenced by G level. 4. The effects of G level were similar for horizontal and vertical movements, indicating that proprioceptive information from supporting structures, such as the shoulder joint and muscles, had a role in allowing generation of the appropriate motor commands. 5. The incidence and size of dynamic overshoots were greater in 0G and for rapid movements. This G-related change in damping suggests a decrease in muscle spindle activity in 0G. A decrease in muscle spindle activity in 0G and an increase in 1.8G are consistent with the results of our prior studies on the tonic vibration reflex, locomotion, and perception of head movement trajectory in varying force backgrounds.

  4. Novel Applications of Magnetic Fields for Fluid Flow Control and for Simulating Variable Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    Static and dynamic magnetic fields have been used to control convection in many materials processing applications. In most of the applications, convection control (damping or enhancement) is achieved through the Lorentz force that can be tailored to counteract/assist dominant system flows. This technique has been successfully applied to liquids that are electrically conducting, such as high temperature melts of semiconductors, metals and alloys, etc. In liquids with low electrical conductivity such as ionic solutions of salts in water, the Lorentz force is weak and hence not very effective and alternate ways of flow control are necessary. If the salt in solution is paramagnetic then the variation of magnetic susceptibility with temperature and/or concentration can be used for flow control. For thermal buoyancy driven flows this can be accomplished in a temperature range below the Curie point of the salt. The magnetic force is proportional to the magnetic susceptibility and the product of the magnetic field and its gradient. By suitably positioning the experiment cell in the magnet, system flows can be assisted or countered, as desired. A similar approach can be extended to diamagnetic substances and fluids but the required magnetic force is considerably larger than that required for paramagnetic substances. The presentation will provide an overview of work to date on a NASA fluid physics sponsored project that aims to test the hypothesis of convective flow control using strong magnetic fields in protein crystal growth. The objective is to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play, delineate causative factors for fluid flow and to quantify them through experiments, analysis, and numerical modeling. The seminar will report specifically on the experimental results using paramagnetic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analytical predictions. Applications of the concept to protein crystallization studies will be discussed

  5. Charge and Strain Control of Interface Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Dumesnil, K.; Jaouen, N.; Maroutian, T.; Agnus, G.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Kirby, B.; Fohtung, E.; Holladay, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O.; Sinha, S. K.; Wang, Q.; Chen, A.; Jia, Q. X.

    2015-03-01

    We studied the influence of an electric field applied to an La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) layer in a LSMO/Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8) O3 (PZT)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STO) heterostructure by measuring its magnetization depth profile using resonant x-ray magnetic reflectivity. The saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetically-ordered LSMO was not affected by the direction of the polarization of the PZT. However, the ferromagnetic thickness and magnetization of the LSMO film at remanence were reduced for hole-charge accumulation at the LSMO/PZT interface. To understand the independent roles of strain and hole-doping, we performed neutron scattering experiments of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 films grown on Nb-doped STO in which bending strain (via 4-point bending jig) or electric field (via parallel plate capacitor) was applied to the films. We observed that bending strain affects the saturation magnetization of the LSMO film, whereas electric field affects the remanent magnetization of the film. These observations suggest strain may be a more effective means to control magnetism than charge. This work has benefited from use of CINT(LANL), NIST Center for Neutron Research and the Synchrotron SOLEIL and funding from LANL/LDRD program, DOE-BES (UCSD) and DOD (NMSU).

  6. Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical tuning of magnetism is of great fundamental and technical importance for fast, compact and ultra-low power electronic devices. Multiferroics, simultaneously exhibiting ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, have attracted much interest owing to the capability of controlling magnetism by an electric field through magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. In particular, strong strain-mediated ME interaction observed in layered multiferroic heterostructures makes it practically possible for realizing electrically reconfigurable microwave devices, ultra-low power electronics and magnetoelectric random access memories (MERAMs). In this review, we demonstrate this remarkable E-field manipulation of magnetism in various multiferroic composite systems, aiming at the creation of novel compact, lightweight, energy-efficient and tunable electronic and microwave devices. First of all, tunable microwave devices are demonstrated based on ferrite/ferroelectric and magnetic-metal/ferroelectric composites, showing giant ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) tunability with narrow FMR linewidth. Then, E-field manipulation of magnetoresistance in multiferroic anisotropic magnetoresistance and giant magnetoresistance devices for achieving low-power electronic devices is discussed. Finally, E-field control of exchange-bias and deterministic magnetization switching is demonstrated in exchange-coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic/ferroelectric multiferroic hetero-structures at room temperature, indicating an important step towards MERAMs. In addition, recent progress in electrically non-volatile tuning of magnetic states is also presented. These tunable multiferroic heterostructures and devices provide great opportunities for next-generation reconfigurable radio frequency/microwave communication systems and radars, spintronics, sensors and memories. PMID:24421373

  7. Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X

    2014-02-28

    Electrical tuning of magnetism is of great fundamental and technical importance for fast, compact and ultra-low power electronic devices. Multiferroics, simultaneously exhibiting ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, have attracted much interest owing to the capability of controlling magnetism by an electric field through magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. In particular, strong strain-mediated ME interaction observed in layered multiferroic heterostructures makes it practically possible for realizing electrically reconfigurable microwave devices, ultra-low power electronics and magnetoelectric random access memories (MERAMs). In this review, we demonstrate this remarkable E-field manipulation of magnetism in various multiferroic composite systems, aiming at the creation of novel compact, lightweight, energy-efficient and tunable electronic and microwave devices. First of all, tunable microwave devices are demonstrated based on ferrite/ferroelectric and magnetic-metal/ferroelectric composites, showing giant ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) tunability with narrow FMR linewidth. Then, E-field manipulation of magnetoresistance in multiferroic anisotropic magnetoresistance and giant magnetoresistance devices for achieving low-power electronic devices is discussed. Finally, E-field control of exchange-bias and deterministic magnetization switching is demonstrated in exchange-coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic/ferroelectric multiferroic hetero-structures at room temperature, indicating an important step towards MERAMs. In addition, recent progress in electrically non-volatile tuning of magnetic states is also presented. These tunable multiferroic heterostructures and devices provide great opportunities for next-generation reconfigurable radio frequency/microwave communication systems and radars, spintronics, sensors and memories.

  8. Spin-selective Imaging by Magnetic Exchange Force Microscopy Using Ferromagnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yasuhiro; Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun

    2014-11-01

    Techniques to analyze the surface of magnetic memory devices with high spatial resolution are very important to develop today's information technology. The magnetic exchange force is an interaction between spins and is very important for analyzing magnetic properties. Magnetic exchange force microscopy (MExFM), which can detect the magnetic exchange force between the magnetic tip and the magnetic surface, has achieved the atomic-resolution imaging of the spin state on anti-ferromagnetic surface of NiO(001) [1]. In MExFM, however, the separation between a structure and a magnetic state on the surface has not been performed.Here, we propose a new MExFM using ferromagnetic resonance to separate the magnetic and non-magnetic tip-sample interaction. In this method, magnetic tip apex is irradiated by the frequency-modulated microwave with the frequency of ferromagnetic resonance. The magnetization of magnetic tip apex is modulated from on resonance to off resonance. Tip-sample interaction is measured with frequency modulation method. Magnetic images are obtained by detecting the modulation component of the frequency shift of the oscillating cantilever using a lock-in amplifier. Topographic images are obtained by the feedback signal for the constant tip-sample interaction. As a magnetic tip, magnetic cantilever tip coated with FePt with a high coercivity was used to detect the magnetic exchange force without an external magnetic field [2]. We performed imaging on antiferromagnetic material NiO(001) surface (Fig. 1(a)) by MExFM using ferromagnetic resonance. We obtained spin selective image in atomic resolution (Fig. 1(b)). This is the first demonstration of magnetization modulation of the magnetic tip apex using ferromagnetic resonance as well as the separation of the magnetic and non-magnetic tip-sample interaction in MExFM.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i11-a/DFU053F1F1DFU053F1Fig. 1.(a) Structure of NiO(001) surface and (b) its image (phase) obtained with MExFM using

  9. Magnetic Control of Low Pressure Discharges.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    electrodes. The discharge is driven by a 50 Ohm, 10 microsecond pulse forming network (PFN) through a spark gap switch. A matching load resistance of 50...controlled discharge with transient current- voltage curve that follows the load line of the dis- charge system. 19 -- v 0 -) 0~0 -o a c D 4 C) - c C CL 4-C...of magnetically controlled opening switch can be defined as the ratio of power delivered by the switch to the load divided by the magnetic power

  10. Force characteristics in continuous path controlled crankpin grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Manchao; Yao, Zhenqiang

    2015-03-01

    Recent research on the grinding force involved in cylindrical plunge grinding has focused mainly on steady-state conditions. Unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the conditions between the grinding wheel and the crankpin change periodically in path controlled grinding because of the eccentricity of the crankpin and the constant rotational speed of the crankshaft. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of various grinding conditions on the characteristics of the grinding force during continuous path controlled grinding. Path controlled plunge grinding is conducted at a constant rotational speed using a cubic boron nitride (CBN) wheel. The grinding force is determined by measuring the torque. The experimental results show that the force and torque vary sinusoidally during dry grinding and load grinding. The variations in the results reveal that the resultant grinding force and torque decrease with higher grinding speeds and increase with higher peripheral speeds of the pin and higher grinding depths. In path controlled grinding, unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the axial grinding force cannot be disregarded. The speeds and speed ratios of the workpiece and wheel are also analyzed, and the analysis results show that up-grinding and down-grinding occur during the grinding process. This paper proposes a method for describing the force behavior under varied process conditions during continuous path controlled grinding, which provides a beneficial reference for describing the material removal mechanism and for optimizing continuous controlled crankpin grinding.

  11. Force reflecting teleoperation with adaptive impedance control.

    PubMed

    Love, Lonnie J; Book, Wayne J

    2004-02-01

    Experimentation and a survey of the literature clearly show that contact stability in a force reflecting teleoperation system requires high levels of damping on the master robot. However, excessive damping increases the energy required by an operator for commanding motion. The objective of this paper is to describe a new force reflecting teleoperation methodology that reduces operator energy requirements without sacrificing stability. We begin by describing a new approach to modeling and identifying the remote environment of the teleoperation system. We combine a conventional multi-input, multi-output recursive least squares (MIMO-RLS) system identification, identifying in real-time the remote environment impedance, with a discretized representation of the remote environment. This methodology generates a time-varying, position-dependent representation of the remote environment dynamics. Next, we adapt the target impedance of the master robot with respect to the dynamic model of the remote environment. The environment estimation and impedance adaptation are executed simultaneously and in real time. We demonstrate, through experimentation, that this approach significantly reduces the energy required by an operator to execute remote tasks while simultaneously providing sufficient damping to ensure contact stability.

  12. Understanding Bandwidth Limitations in Robot Force Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    we have the root locus plot shape (for varying kf) drawn in Figure 17. The PI controller adds a pole at the origin and * adds a zero at s-k...implementation analysis are: w. * Digital effects are significant, but should not present a problem in modem computer-based systems. *Low-pass filtering and PI ... control add destabilizing poles, which introduce phase lag and limit closed-loop bandwidth. 6 * PD control and lead compensation add zeros which

  13. Magnetic control of the DNA synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-10-01

    By using polymerases β loaded with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ magnetic isotope effect was detected: 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nuclei 25Mg suppress enzymatic activity by 2-3 times with respect to that of polymerases β loaded by 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. No difference in enzymatic activity of polymerases β with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions exists. The rate of DNA synthesis strongly depends on the magnetic field. The polymerase chain reaction is also suppressed by 25Mg2+ ions with respect to the ions with nonmagnetic nuclei. Magnetic control of the DNA synthesis may be used for medical purposes.

  14. Flow-controlled magnetic particle manipulation

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA; Holman, David A [Las Vegas, NV

    2011-02-22

    Inventive methods and apparatus are useful for collecting magnetic materials in one or more magnetic fields and resuspending the particles into a dispersion medium, and optionally repeating collection/resuspension one or more times in the same or a different medium, by controlling the direction and rate of fluid flow through a fluid flow path. The methods provide for contacting derivatized particles with test samples and reagents, removal of excess reagent, washing of magnetic material, and resuspension for analysis, among other uses. The methods are applicable to a wide variety of chemical and biological materials that are susceptible to magnetic labeling, including, for example, cells, viruses, oligonucleotides, proteins, hormones, receptor-ligand complexes, environmental contaminants and the like.

  15. Position And Force Control For Multiple-Arm Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, Samad A.

    1988-01-01

    Number of arms increased without introducing undue complexity. Strategy and computer architecture developed for simultaneous control of positions of number of robot arms manipulating same object and of forces and torques that arms exert on object. Scheme enables coordinated manipulation of object, causing it to move along assigned trajectory and be subjected to assigned internal forces and torques.

  16. Magnetic force Optical Coherence Elastography at 1.5 million a-lines per second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Singh, Manmohan; Liu, Chih-Hao; Li, Jiasong; Schill, Alexander; Raghunathan, Raksha; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) has been widely used to characterize tissue elasticity. In this paper we introduce a new excitation method using magnetic force to induce shear waves in phantoms and tissues. The shear waves were imaged using an Optical Coherence Tomography system with an A-scan rate of ~1.5 million a-lines per second and the speed of the waves were used to quantify elasticity of different concentrations of agar sampled and porcine liver. The OCE results acquired from this magnetic force excitation were compared with the mechanical compressional tests for validation. The results showed that magnetic force OCE and mechanical testing results were in good agreement, demonstrating the ability of magnetic force OCE to accurately quantify the Young's modulus of tissue.

  17. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  18. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  19. Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

  20. Controlling Force and Depth in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Glynn; Loftus, Zachary; McCormac, Nathan; Venable, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control of the penetration force applied to a pin tool in friction stir welding has been found to be a robust and reliable means for controlling the depth of penetration of the tool. This discovery has made it possible to simplify depth control and to weld with greater repeatability, even on workpieces with long weld joints. Prior to this discovery, depths of penetration in friction stir welding were controlled by hard-tooled roller assemblies or by depth actuators controlled by feedback from such external sensors as linear variable-differential transformers or laser-based devices. These means of control are limited: A hard-tooled roller assembly confines a pin tool to a preset depth that cannot be changed easily during the welding process. A measurement by an external sensor is only an indirect indicative of the depth of penetration, and computations to correlate such a measurement with a depth of penetration are vulnerable to error. The present force-feedback approach exploits the proportionality between the depth and the force of penetration Unlike a depth measurement taken by an external sensor, a force measurement can be direct because it can be taken by a sensor coupled directly to the pin tool. The reading can be processed through a modern electronic servo control system to control an actuator to keep the applied penetration force at the desired level. In comparison with the older depth-control methods described above, this method offers greater sensitivity to plasticizing of the workpiece metal and is less sensitive to process noise, resulting in a more consistent process. In an experiment, a tapered panel was friction stir welded while controlling the force of penetration according to this method. The figure is a plot of measurements taken during the experiment, showing that force was controlled with a variation of 200 lb (890 N), resulting in control of the depth of penetration with a variation of 0.004 in. (0.1 mm).

  1. Tunneling stabilized magnetic force microscopy; Prospects for low temperature applications to superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, J.; Rice, P. , Boulder, CO . Electromagnetic Technology Div.)

    1991-03-01

    The authors of this paper demonstrate an imaging technique referred to as tunneling stabilized magnetic force microscopy or TSMFM. TSMFM is performed using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a flexible magnetic, tunneling tip in place of the usual rigid tunneling tip. TSMFM images are therefore combinations of topography and the magnetic forces between the tip and the sample. Room temperature TSMFM images of magnetic bit tracks on a hard disk have 100 nm resolution and are comparable to Bitter patterns made using a ferrofluid. We have built a low temperature STM with the hope of getting TSMFM images of the flux lattice in superconductors. Preliminary TSMFM images of a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub c}O{sub x} (YBCO) film (T{sub c} {minus} 88 K) in a 5Q mT field show that relatively large magnetic forces are acting on the flexible tip while scanning at 48 K.

  2. Separation of binary granular mixtures under vibration and differential magnetic levitation force.

    PubMed

    Catherall, A T; López-Alcaraz, P; Sánchez, P; Swift, Michael R; King, P J

    2005-02-01

    The application of both a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient to a diamagnetic or paramagnetic material can produce a vertical force that acts in concert with the force of gravity. We consider a binary granular mixture in which the two components have different magnetic susceptibilities and therefore experience different effective forces of gravity when subjected to an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Under vertical vibration, such a mixture may rapidly separate into regions almost pure in the two components. We investigate the conditions for this behavior, studying the speed and completeness of separation as a function of differential effective gravity and the frequency and amplitude of vibration. The influence of the cohesive magnetic dipole-dipole interactions on the separation process is also investigated. In our studies insight is gained through the use of a molecular dynamics simulation model.

  3. Voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weigang

    2013-03-01

    Recently, voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) in 3d transitional ferromagnets (FM) has attracted a great deal of attentions. VCMA has traditionally been explored in multiferroic materials and diluted magnetic semiconductors, but not in metals because of the anticipated negligible effects since the electric field would be screened within 1-2 Å at the metal surface. However, a voltage may exert marked effects if the magnetic properties of ultrathin films are dominated by interfacial magnetic anisotropy. Here we demonstrate a large VCMA effect in perpendicular MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs) with very thin CoFeB layers. The p-MTJs have the key structure of Co40Fe40B20(1.2-1.3nm)/MgO(1.2-2nm)/Co40Fe40B20(1.6nm) exhibiting at room temperature tunneling magnetoresistance in excess of 100%. The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in this system is believed to be stabilized by hybridization between the out-of-plane 3d orbitals of the FM and oxygen 2p orbitals. We show that both the magnitude and the direction of the electric field can systematically alter the PMA of the thin CoFeB layers interfaced with the MgO barrier. Furthermore, under a given electric field, the two CoFeB layers on either side of the MgO barrier respond in the opposite manner as expected. By exploiting the combined effect of spin transfer torque and VCMA in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB nanopillars, we have accomplished voltage controlled spintronic devices, where the MTJ can be manipulated by a unipolar switching process using consecutive negative voltages less than 1.5 V in magnitude. In this manner, voltage can access the high resistance or the low resistance state of an MTJ with very small current densities. Wang, W.-G., Li, M., Hageman, S. & Chien, C. L. Electric-field-assisted switching in magnetic tunnel junctions. Nature Materials 11, 64 (2012). This work is done in collaboration with Mingen Li, Stephen Hageman and C. L. Chien. Research is supported by the NSF grant DMR 05-20491.

  4. Force Control of Flexible Catheter Robots for Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Samuel B.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in cardiac catheter technology promise to allow physicians to perform most cardiac interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, current cardiac devices, including newly developed catheter robots, are unable to accurately track and interact with the fast moving cardiac tissue without applying potentially damaging forces. This paper examines the challenges of implementing force control on a flexible robotic catheter. In particular, catheter friction and backlash must be compensated when controlling tissue interaction forces. Force controller designs are introduced and evaluated experimentally in a number of configurations. The controllers are based on the inner position loop force control approach where the position trajectory is adjusted to achieve a desired force on the target. Friction and backlash compensation improved force tracking up to 86% with residual RMS errors of 0.11 N while following a prerecorded cardiac tissue trajectory with accelerations of up to 3800 mm/s2. This performance provides sufficient accuracy to enable a wide range of beating heart surgical procedures. PMID:21874164

  5. The size effect on the magnetic levitation force of MgB2 bulk superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaskan, B.; Koparan, E. T.; Güner, S. B.; Celik, S.; Yanmaz, E.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the size effect on the magnetic levitation performance of disk-shaped MgB2 bulk superconductors and permanent magnets was investigated. MgB2 samples with varying diameters of 13 mm, 15 mm and 18 mm, each of which were 2 g in mass, were prepared by two-step solid state reaction method. Vertical levitation force measurements under both zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) regimes were carried out at different temperatures of 20, 24 and 28 K. It was determined that the levitation force of the MgB2 strongly depends on both the diameters of the sample and the permanent magnet. In ZFC regime, the maximum levitation force value for the permanent magnet and the sample 18 mm in diameters reached to the 8.41 N at 20 K. In addition, in FC regime, attractive and repulsive force increased with increasing diameters of the sample and the permanent magnet. In that, the sample with 18 mm in diameter showed the highest attractive force value -3.46 N at 20 K and FC regime. The results obtained in this study are very useful in magnetic levitation devices as there is no detailed study on the size of superconductors and permanent magnets.

  6. In Silico Magnetic Nanocontainers Navigation in Blood Vessels: A Feedback Control Approach.

    PubMed

    Do, Ton Duc; Noh, Yeongil; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are recently used in a drug delivery system to pass the blood brain barrier. However, because the magnetic force acting on particles is proportional to their volumes, as the size of particles is small, the large magnetic field is required to produce enough magnetic force for overcoming the hydrodynamic drag force as well as other forces in blood vessels. Other difficulties for controlling MNPs are the complicated behavior of hydrodynamic drag force and uncertain factors in their dynamics. Therefore, open-loop control methods cannot guarantee guiding every MNP to the correct location. Considering these challenges, this paper introduces a feedback control approach for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in blood vessels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time feedback controller that is designed for MNPs without aggregation. Simulation studies in MATLAB and real-time verifications on a physical model in COMSOL-MATLAB interface are performed to prove the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is shown that the proposed control scheme can accurately and effectively navigate the MNP to the correct path with feasible hardware supports.

  7. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures.

  8. Measurements of human force control during a constrained arm motion using a force-actuated joystick.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J; Gurfinkel, E V; Lipshits, M I; Droulez, J; Gurfinkel, V S

    1995-03-01

    1. When interacting with the environment, human arm movements may be prevented in certain directions (i.e., when sliding the hand along a surface) resulting in what is called a "constrained motion." In the directions that the movement is restricted, the subject is instead free to control the forces against the constraint. 2. Control strategies for constrained motion may be characterized by two extreme models. Under the active compliance model, an essentially feedback-based approach, measurements of contact force may be used in real time to modify the motor command and precisely control the forces generated against the constraint. Under the passive compliance model the motion would be executed in a feedforward manner, using an internal model of the constraint geometry. The feedforward model relies on the compliant behavior of the passive mechanical system to maintain contact while avoiding excessive contact forces. 3. Subjects performed a task in which they were required to slide the hand along a rigid surface. This task was performed in a virtual force environment in which contact forces were simulated by a two-dimensional force-actuated joystick. Unknown to the subject, the orientation of the surface constraint was varied from trial to trial, and contact force changes induced by these perturbations were measured. 4. Subjects showed variations in contact force correlated with the direction of the orientation perturbation. "Upward" tilts resulted in higher contact forces, whereas "downward" tilts resulted in lower contact forces. This result is consistent with a feedforward-based control of a passively compliant system. 5. Subject responses did not, however, correspond exactly to the predictions of a static analysis of a passive, feedforward-controlled system. A dynamic analysis reveals a much closer resemblance between a passive, feedforward model and the observed data. Numerical simulations demonstrate that a passive, dynamic system model of the movement captures

  9. Magnetic suspension controls for a new continuous flow ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Hilton, E F; Allaire, P E; Baloh, M J; Maslen, E; Bearnson, G; Khanwilkar, P; Olsen, D

    1997-01-01

    A new continuous flow ventricular assist device (CFVAD III) using a full magnetic suspension has been constructed. The magnetic suspension centers the centrifugal impeller within the clearance passages in the pump, thus avoiding any contact. This noncontact operation gives very high expected mechanical reliability, large clearances, low hemolysis, low thrombosis, and relatively small size compared with current pulsatile devices. A unique configuration of a system of magnetic actuators on the inlet side and exit sides of the impeller gives full five axis control and suspension of the impeller. The bearing system is divided into segments that allow for three displacement axes and two angular control axes. For the first suspension tests, a decentralized set of proportional, derivative, and integral (PID) controllers acting along the modal coordinates are used to suspend the impeller. The controller design takes into account the blood forces acting on the magnetically suspended impeller, the unbalance forces on the impeller and gravitational loads during various body motions. In the final design, the bearing control axes will be coupled together through fluidic forces so the electronic feedback controller is a centralized multiple input, multiple output controller. The control system design must be robust against these types of externally imposed loads to keep the impeller centered and avoid blood damage. This article discusses the dynamic model, controller, and controller implementation for the magnetic suspension controller of CFVAD III.

  10. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1995-11-07

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

  11. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Ann. N.; Anderson, Richard E.; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  12. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  13. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, E; Camunas-Soler, J; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Seifert, U; Ritort, F

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  14. Digital control of magnetic bearings in a cryogenic cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, J.; Law, A.; Lind, F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a digital control system for control of magnetic bearings used in a spaceborne cryogenic cooler. The cooler was developed by Philips Laboratories for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Six magnetic bearing assemblies are used to levitate the piston, displacer, and counter-balance of the cooler. The piston and displacer are driven by linear motors in accordance with Stirling cycle thermodynamic principles to produce the desired cooling effect. The counter-balance is driven by a third linear motor to cancel motion induced forces that would otherwise be transmitted to the spacecraft. An analog control system is currently used for bearing control. The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities for improved performance using digital control. Areas for potential improvement include transient and steady state control characteristics, robustness, reliability, adaptability, alternate control modes, size, weight, and cost. The present control system is targeted for the Intel 80196 microcontroller family. The eventual introduction of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology to this problem may produce a unique and elegant solution both here and in related industrial problems.

  15. Magnetic Amplifier for Power Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-24

    GENI Project: ORNL is developing an electromagnet-based, amplifier-like device that will allow for complete control over the flow of power within the electric grid. To date, complete control of power flow within the grid has been prohibitively expensive. ORNL’s controller could provide a reliable, cost-effective solution to this problem. The team is combining two types of pre-existing technologies to assist in flow control, culminating in a prototype iron-based magnetic amplifier. Ordinarily, such a device would require expensive superconductive wire, but the magnetic iron core of ORNL’s device could serve as a low-cost alternative that is equally adept at regulating power flow.

  16. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This is the first phase of a project that has the objective to develop a method of spraying materials on a substrate in a controlled manner to eliminate the waste and hazardous material generation inherent in present plating processes. The project is considering plasma spraying of metal on a substrate using magneto-hydrodynamics to control the plasma/metal stream. The process being developed is considering the use of commercially available plasma torches to generate the plasma/metal stream. The plasma stream is collimated, and directed using magnetic forces to the extent required for precise control of the deposition material. The project will be completed in phases. Phase one of the project, the subject of this grant, is the development of an analytical model that can be used to determine the feasibility of the process and to design a laboratory scale demonstration unit. The contracted time is complete, and the research is still continuing. This report provides the results obtained to date. As the model and calculations are completed those results will also be provided. This report contains the results of the computer code that have been completed to date. Results from a ASMEE Benchmark problem, flow over a backward step with heat transfer, Couette flow with magnetic forces, free jet flow are presented along with several other check calculations that are representative of the cases that were calculated in the course of the development process. The final cases that define a velocity field in the exit of a plasma spray torch with and without a magnetic field are in process. A separate program (SPRAY) has been developed that can track the plating material to the substrate and describe the distribution of the material on the substrate. When the jet calculations are complete SPRAY will be used to compare the distribution of material on the substrate with and without the effect of the magnetic focus.

  17. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general

  18. Direct visualization and identification of biofunctionalized nanoparticles using a magnetic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Block, Stephan; Glöckl, Gunnar; Weitschies, Werner; Helm, Christiane A

    2011-09-14

    Because of its outstanding ability to image and manipulate single molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) established itself as a fundamental technique in nanobiotechnology. (1) We present a new modality that distinguishes single nanoparticles by the surrounding magnetic field gradient. Diamagnetic gold and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles become discernible under ambient conditions. Images of proteins, magnetolabeled with nanoparticles, demonstrate the first steps toward a magnetic analogue to fluorescence microscopy, which combines nanoscale lateral resolution of AFM with unambiguous detection of magnetic markers.

  19. Direct Measurements of the Penetration Depth in a Superconducting Film using Magnetic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    E Nazaretski; J Thibodaux; I Vekhter; L Civale; J Thompson; R Movshovich

    2011-12-31

    We report the local measurements of the magnetic penetration depth in a superconducting Nb film using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We developed a method for quantitative extraction of the penetration depth from single-parameter simultaneous fits to the lateral and height profiles of the MFM signal, and demonstrate that the obtained value is in excellent agreement with that obtained from the bulk magnetization measurements.

  20. A long-lived coronal X-ray arcade. [force-free magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, J. P.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Krall, K. R.; Wu, S. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Speich, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A large, long-lived, soft X-ray emitting arch system observed during a Skylab mission is analyzed. The supposition is that these arches owe their stability to the stable coronal magnetic-field configuration. A global constant alpha force-free magnetic field analysis, is used to describe the arches which stayed in the same approximate position for several solar rotations. A marked resemblance is noted between the theoretical magnetic field configuration and the observed X-ray emmitting feature.

  1. Magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems, focusing on the Holloman maglev rocket system. The paper also discusses simulating the damping plate, which is attached to the superconducting magnet by two short-circuited loop coils in the guideway. Closed-form formulas for the magnetic damping coefficient as functions of heave-and-sway displacements are derived by using a dynamic circuit model. These formulas are useful for dynamic stability studies.

  2. Magnetothermal Convection of Water with the Presence or Absence of a Magnetic Force Acting on the Susceptibility Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Syou

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer of magnetothermal convection with the presence or absence of the magnetic force acting on the susceptibility gradient (fsc) was examined by three-dimensional numerical computations. Thermal convection of water enclosed in a shallow cylindrical vessel (diameter over vessel height = 6.0) with the Rayleigh-Benard model was adopted as the model, under the conditions of Prandtl number 6.0 and Ra number 7000, respectively. The momentum equations of convection were nondimensionalized, which involved the term of fsc and the term of magnetic force acting on the magnetic field gradient (fb). All the computations resulted in axisymmetric steady rolls. The values of the averaged Nu, the averaged velocity components U, V, and W, and the isothermal distributions and flow patterns were almost completely the same, regardless of the presence or absence of the term of fsc. As a result, we found that the effect of fsc was extremely small, although much previous research emphasized the effect with paramagnetic solutions under an unsteady state. The magnitude of fsc depends not only on magnetic conditions (magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic flux density), but also on the thermal properties of the solution (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity). Therefore the effect of fb becomes dominant on the magnetothermal convection. Active control over the density gradient with temperature will be required to advance heat transfer with the effect of fsc. PMID:27606823

  3. Magnetic Signals of High-Temperature Superconductor Bulk During the Levitation Force Measurement Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Qian, Nan; Che, Tong; Zheng, Botian; Jin, Liwei; Deng, Zigang

    2017-02-01

    In order to study the commonly neglected magnetic field information in the course of levitation force measurement process in a superconducting maglev system, a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire magnetic signals of a bulk high-Tc superconductor on both the top and the bottom surface. Working conditions including field cooling (FC) and zero field cooling were investigated for these vertical down and up motions above a permanent magnet guideway performed on a HTS maglev measurement system. We have discussed the magnetic flux variation process based on the Bean model. A magnetic hysteresis effect similar to the levitation force hysteresis loop of the bulk superconductor was displayed and analyzed in this paper. What is more valuable, there exists some available magnetic flux on the top surface of the bulk superconductor, and the proportion is as high as 62.42% in the FC condition, which provides an experimental hint to design the superconductor bulk and the applied field for practical use in a more efficient way. In particular, this work reveals real-time magnetic flux variation of the bulk superconductor in the levitation application, which is the other important information in contrast to the macroscopic levitation and guidance force investigations in previous studies, and it enriches the existing research methods. The results are significant for understanding the magnetic characteristic of superconductors, and they can contribute to optimize the present HTS maglev system design.

  4. A magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure utilizing magnetic force interaction to optimize the sensitivity of current sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan; Lai, Chen-Hung; Wang, Chieh-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure using a novel magnetic-force-interaction approach to optimize the sensitivity of conventional piezoelectric current sensing technologies. The smart material-structure comprises a CuBe-alloy cantilever beam, a piezoelectric PZT sheet clamped to the fixed end of the beam, and an NdFeB permanent magnet mounted on the free end of the beam. When the smart material-structure is placed close to an AC conductor, the magnet on the beam of the smart structure experiences an alternating magnetic attractive and repulsive force produced by the conductor. Thus, the beam vibrates and subsequently generates a strain in the PZT sheet. The strain produces a voltage output because of the piezoelectric effect. The magnetic force interaction is specifically enhanced through the optimization approach (i.e., achieved by using SQUID and machining method to reorient the magnetization to different directions to maximize the magnetic force interaction). After optimizing, the beam's vibration amplitude is significantly enlarged and, consequently, the voltage output is substantially increased. The experimental results indicated that the smart material-structure optimized by the proposed approach produced a voltage output of 4.01 Vrms with a sensitivity of 501 m Vrms/A when it was placed close to a conductor with a current of 8 A at 60 Hz. The optimized voltage output and sensitivity of the proposed smart structure were approximately 316 % higher than those (1.27 Vrms with 159 m Vrms/A) of representative piezoelectric-based current sensing technologies presented in other studies. These improvements can significantly enable the development of more self-powered wireless current sensing applications in the future.

  5. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  6. On some properties of force-free magnetic fields in infinite regions of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for solving boundary value problems (BVP) for a force free magnetic field (FFF) in infinite space are presented. A priori inequalities are defined which must be satisfied by the force-free equations. It is shown that upper bounds may be calculated for the magnetic energy of the region provided the value of the magnetic normal component at the boundary of the region can be shown to decay sufficiently fast at infinity. The results are employed to prove a nonexistence theorem for the BVP for the FFF in the spatial region. The implications of the theory for modeling the origins of solar flares are discussed.

  7. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng-Tao; Yang, Wan-Min; Wang, Miao; Li, Jia-Wei; Guo, Yu-Xia

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51342001 and 50872079), the Key-grant Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 311033), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120202110003), the Innovation Team in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014KTC-18), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. GK201101001 and GK201305014), and the Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Foundation Project of Shaanxi Normal University, China (Grant Nos. X2011YB08 and X2012YB05).

  8. Controlled levitation of a large magnet above superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Takamori, T.; Boland, J.J.; Dove, D.B. )

    1990-07-01

    The levitation of a permanent magnet over a type-II superconductor may be modified and controlled by the addition of a variable magnetic field to the magnet-superconductor system. Using this scheme, levitation of a magnet of significantly larger mass was established by the direct interaction of the additonal field with the levitating magnet.

  9. Electromagnetic Forces in a Hybrid Magnetic-Bearing Switched-Reluctance Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel hybrid magnetic-bearing switched-reluctance motor (MBSRM) have been performed. A MBSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The MBSRM discussed in this report has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of four stator poles, while a second set of four stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Static torque and radial force analysis were done for rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and the theoretical radial force loads predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  10. DNA Micromanipulation Using Novel High-Force, In-Plane Magnetic Tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Christopher; Mehl, Patrick; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2010-03-01

    We report the development of a magnetic force transducer that can apply piconewton forces on single DNA molecules in the focus plane allowing continuous high precision tethered-bead tracking. The DNA constructs, proteins, and buffer are introduced into a 200μL closed cell created using two glass slides separated by rigid spacers interspersed within a thin viscoelastic perimeter wall. This closed cell configuration isolates our sample and produces low-noise force-extension measurements. Specially-drawn micropipettes are used for capturing the polystyrene bead, pulling on the magnetic sphere, introducing proteins of interest, and maintaining flow. Various high-precision micromanipulators allow us to move pipettes and stage as required. The polystyrene bead is first grabbed, and held using suction; then the magnetic particle at the other end of the DNA is pulled by a force created by either two small (1mm x 2mm x 4mm) bar magnets or a micro magnet-tipped pipette. Changes in the end-to-end length of the DNA are observable in real time. We will present force extension data obtained using the magnetic tweezer.

  11. Control of asymmetric magnetic perturbations in tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Schaffer, Michael J; Menard, Jonathan E; Boozer, Allen H

    2007-11-09

    The sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to very small deviations from the axisymmetry of the magnetic field |deltaB/B| approximately 10{-4} is well known. What was not understood until very recently is the importance of the perturbation to the plasma equilibrium in assessing the effects of externally produced asymmetries in the magnetic field, even far from a stability limit. DIII-D and NSTX experiments find that when the deleterious effects of asymmetries are mitigated, the external asymmetric field was often made stronger and had an increased interaction with the magnetic field of the unperturbed equilibrium. This Letter explains these counterintuitive results. The explanation using ideal perturbed equilibria has important implications for the control of field errors in all toroidal plasmas.

  12. Dynamic analysis of a magnetic bearing system with flux control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah; Walsh, Thomas; Virgin, Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    Using measured values of two-dimensional forces in a magnetic actuator, equations of motion for an active magnetic bearing are presented. The presence of geometric coupling between coordinate directions causes the equations of motion to be nonlinear. Two methods are used to examine the unbalance response of the system: simulation by direct integration in time; and determination of approximate steady state solutions by harmonic balance. For relatively large values of the derivative control coefficient, the system behaves in an essentially linear manner, but for lower values of this parameter, or for higher values of the coupling coefficient, the response shows a split of amplitudes in the two principal directions. This bifurcation is sensitive to initial conditions. The harmonic balance solution shows that the separation of amplitudes actually corresponds to a change in stability of multiple coexisting solutions.

  13. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  14. qPlus magnetic force microscopy in frequency-modulation mode with millihertz resolution.

    PubMed

    Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Wastl, Daniel; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) allows one to image the domain structure of ferromagnetic samples by probing the dipole forces between a magnetic probe tip and a magnetic sample. The magnetic domain structure of the sample depends on the alignment of the individual atomic magnetic moments. It is desirable to be able to image both individual atoms and domain structures with a single probe. However, the force gradients of the interactions responsible for atomic contrast and those causing domain contrast are orders of magnitude apart, ranging from up to 100 Nm(-1) for atomic interactions down to 0.0001 Nm(-1) for magnetic dipole interactions. Here, we show that this gap can be bridged with a qPlus sensor, with a stiffness of 1800 Nm(-1) (optimized for atomic interaction), which is sensitive enough to measure millihertz frequency contrast caused by magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. Thus we have succeeded in establishing a sensing technique that performs scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy and MFM with a single probe.

  15. qPlus magnetic force microscopy in frequency-modulation mode with millihertz resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wastl, Daniel; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) allows one to image the domain structure of ferromagnetic samples by probing the dipole forces between a magnetic probe tip and a magnetic sample. The magnetic domain structure of the sample depends on the alignment of the individual atomic magnetic moments. It is desirable to be able to image both individual atoms and domain structures with a single probe. However, the force gradients of the interactions responsible for atomic contrast and those causing domain contrast are orders of magnitude apart, ranging from up to 100 Nm−1 for atomic interactions down to 0.0001 Nm−1 for magnetic dipole interactions. Here, we show that this gap can be bridged with a qPlus sensor, with a stiffness of 1800 Nm−1 (optimized for atomic interaction), which is sensitive enough to measure millihertz frequency contrast caused by magnetic dipole–dipole interactions. Thus we have succeeded in establishing a sensing technique that performs scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy and MFM with a single probe. PMID:22428108

  16. A Miniature Magnetic-Force-Based Three-Axis AC Magnetic Sensor with Piezoelectric/Vibrational Energy-Harvesting Functions.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chiao-Fang; Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan

    2017-02-08

    In this paper, we demonstrate a miniature magnetic-force-based, three-axis, AC magnetic sensor with piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. For magnetic sensing, the sensor employs a magnetic-mechanical-piezoelectric configuration (which uses magnetic force and torque, a compact, single, mechanical mechanism, and the piezoelectric effect) to convert x-axis and y-axis in-plane and z-axis magnetic fields into piezoelectric voltage outputs. Under the x-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 0.2-3.2 gauss) and the z-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 0.2-3.2 gauss), the voltage output with the sensitivity of the sensor are 1.13-26.15 mV with 8.79 mV/gauss and 1.31-8.92 mV with 2.63 mV/gauss, respectively. In addition, through this configuration, the sensor can harness ambient vibrational energy, i.e., possessing piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. Under x-axis vibration (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 3.5 g) and z-axis vibration (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 3.8 g), the root-mean-square voltage output with power output of the sensor is 439 mV with 0.333 μW and 138 mV with 0.051 μW, respectively. These results show that the sensor, using this configuration, successfully achieves three-axis magnetic field sensing and three-axis vibration energy-harvesting. Due to these features, the three-axis AC magnetic sensor could be an important design reference in order to develop future three-axis AC magnetic sensors, which possess energy-harvesting functions, for practical industrial applications, such as intelligent vehicle/traffic monitoring, processes monitoring, security systems, and so on.

  17. Performance enhancement of a Lorentz force velocimeter using a buoyancy-compensated magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Leineweber, J.; Resagk, C.

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or a duct. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for electrolytes such as saltwater. A decrease in electrical conductivity of the medium causes a decrease of the Lorentz force which needs to be resolved, affecting the accuracy of the measurement. We use an electrical force compensation (EFC) balance for the determination of the tiny force signals in a test channel filled with electrolyte solution. It is used in a 90°-rotated orientation with a magnet system hanging vertically on its load bar. The thin coupling elements of its parallel guiding system limit the mass of the magnets to 1 kg. To overcome this restriction, which limits the magnetic flux density and hence the Lorentz forces, a weight force compensation mechanism is developed. Therefore, different methods such as air bearing are conceivable, but for the elimination of additional horizontal force components which would disturb the force signal, only compensation by lift force provided by buoyancy is reasonable. We present a swimming body setup that will allow larger magnet systems than before, because a large amount of the weight force will be compensated by this lift force. Thus the implementation of this concept has to be made with respect to hydrodynamical and mechanical stability. This is necessary to avoid overturning of the swimming body setup and to prevent inelastic deformation. Additionally, the issue will be presented and discussed whether thermal convection around the lifting body diminishes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly or not.

  18. Vibration and shape control of hinged light structures using electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yuji; Miyachi, Shigenobu; Sasaki, Toshiyuki

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes a new electromagnetic device for vibration control of a light-weighted deployable/retractable structure which consists of many small units connected with mechanical hinges. A typical example of such a structure is a solar cell paddle of an artificial satellite which is composed of many thin flexible blankets connected in series. Vibration and shape control of the paddle is not easy, because control force and energy do not transmit well between the blankets which are discretely connected by hinges with each other. The new device consists of a permanent magnet glued along an edge of a blanket and an electric current-conducting coil glued along an adjoining edge of another adjacent blanket. Conduction of the electric current in a magnetic field from the magnet generates an electromagnetic force on the coil. By changing the current in the coil, therefore, we may control the vibration and shape of the blankets. To confirm the effectiveness of the new device, constructing a simple paddle model consisting eight hinge- panels, we have carried out a model experiment of vibration and shape control of the paddle. In addition, a numerical simulation of vibration control of the hinge structure is performed to compare with measured data.

  19. Training augmentation device for the Air Force satellite Control Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoates, Keith B.

    1993-01-01

    From the 1960's and into the early 1980's satellite operations and control were conducted by Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), now Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), out of the Satellite Control Facility at Onizuka AFB, CA. AFSC was responsible for acquiring satellite command and control systems and conducting routine satellite operations. The daily operations, consisting of satellite health and status contacts and station keeping activities, were performed for AFSC by a Mission Control Team (MCT) staffed by civilian contractors who were responsible for providing their own technically 'qualified' personnel as satellite operators. An MCT consists of five positions: mission planner, ground controller, planner analyst, orbit analyst, and ranger controller. Most of the training consisted of On-the-Job-Training (OJT) with junior personnel apprenticed to senior personnel until they could demonstrate job proficiency. With most of the satellite operators having 15 to 25 years of experience, there was minimal risk to the mission. In the mid 1980's Air Force Space Command (AFSPACOM) assumed operational responsibility for a newly established control node at Falcon AFB (FAFB) in CO. The satellites and ground system program offices (SPO's) are organized under AFSC's Space and Missiles Systems Center (SMC) to function as a systems engineering and acquisition agency for AFSPACECOM. The collection of the satellite control nodes, ground tracking stations, computer processing equipment, and connecting communications links is referred to as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN).

  20. Controlling adhesion force by means of nanoscale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Rao, Akshata; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2011-08-16

    Control of adhesion is a crucial aspect in the design of microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices. To understand the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness, a roughness gradient has been employed. Monomodal roughness gradients were fabricated by means of silica nanoparticles (diameter ∼12 nm) to produce substrates with varying nanoparticle density. Pull-off force measurements on the gradients were performed using (polyethylene) colloidal-probe microscopy under perfluorodecalin, in order to restrict interactions to van der Waals forces. The influence of normal load on pull-off forces was studied and the measured forces compared with existing Hamaker-approximation-based models. We observe that adhesion force reaches a minimum value at an optimum particle density on the gradient sample, where the mean particle spacing becomes comparable with the diameter of the contact area with the polyethylene sphere. We also observe that the effect on adhesion of increasing the normal load depends on the roughness of the surface.

  1. Controlling the Casimir force via the electromagnetic properties of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yaping; Chen Hong; Zeng Ran; Zhu Shiyao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-02-15

    The control of the Casimir force between two parallel plates can be achieved through adjusting the frequency-dependent electromagnetic properties of materials of the two plates. We show that, for different plate separations, the main contribution to the Casimir force comes from different frequency regions: For smaller (larger) separation, it comes from the higher (lower) frequency region. When the separation of the plates increases, the Casimir force can vary from attractive to repulsive and/or vice versa, by selecting the two plates with suitable electromagnetic properties. We discuss how a restoring Casimir force, which varies from repulsive to attractive by increasing the separation, can be realized and that the stable equilibrium is formed at zero Casimir force.

  2. A Smart Magnetically Active Nanovehicle for on-Demand Targeted Drug Delivery: Where van der Waals Force Balances the Magnetic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sudipta; Maji, Somnath; Maiti, Tapas K; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2015-11-04

    The magnetic field is a promising external stimulus for controlled and targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Here, we focused on the preparation of a novel magnetically active polymeric micelle (MAPM) for magnetically targeted controlled drug delivery. To accomplish this, a number of superparamagnetic as well as biocompatible hybrid micelles were prepared by grafting four armed pentaerythretol poly(ε-caprolactone) (PE-PCL) onto the surface of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of two different ranges of size (∼5 nm and ∼15 nm). PE-PCL (four-armed) was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization, and it has been subsequently grafted onto the surface of modified MNP through urethane (-NHCO-) linkage. Polymer-immobilized MNP (5 and 15 nm) showed peculiar dispersion behavior. One displayed uniform dispersion of MNP (5 nm), while the other (15 nm) revealed associated structure. This type of size dependent contradictory dispersion behavior was realized by taking the van der Waals force as well as magnetic dipole-dipole force into consideration. The uniformly dispersed polymer immobilized MNP (5 nm) was used for the preparation of MAPM. The hydrodynamic size and bulk morphology of MAPM were studied by dynamic light scattering and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The anticancer drug (DOX) was encapsulated into the MAPM. The magnetic field triggers cell uptake of MAPM micelles preferentially toward targeted cells compare to untargeted ones. The cell viabilities of MAMP, DOX-encapsulated MAPM, and free DOX were studied against HeLa cell by MTT assay. In vitro release profile displayed about 51.5% release of DOX from MAPM (just after 1 h) under the influence of high frequency alternating magnetic field (HFAMF; prepared in-house device). The DOX release rate has also been tailored by on-demand application of HFAMF.

  3. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H∞ control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  4. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  5. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Motion of Paramagnetic Oxygen Molecules in Air by Magnetic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Nobuhisa; Fukushima, Kimichika

    2000-03-01

    Oxygen molecules with integer spin in air move upward to higher magnetic fields along magnetic field gradient. This motion is disturbed by the collisions between oxygen molecules and other diamagnetic molecules. To magnetically separate oxygen molecules in air, it is necessary to suppress the collisions with diamagnetic molecules and enhance the transport by magnetic force. In our study, molecular dynamics calculations were carried out to investigate temperature and pressure dependence of the ratio of oxygen molecules to air transported along magnetic field gradient. At temperature T=300K, pressure P=0.1MPa and magnetic field H=20T, the ratio of oxygen molecules to air transported along magnetic field gradient increased from 20% without magnetic fields to about 22% in magnetic fields; at T=200K and P=0.1MPa, to 25%; at T=300K and P=0.005MPa, to 24%. This indicates that the transport of oxygen molecules in air by magnetic force was promoted at lower temperature and pressure.

  7. Using Strong Magnetic Fields to Control Solutal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    force counteracts terrestrial gravity. The general objective is to test the hypothesis of convective control using a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient and to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play. Specifically we aim to delineate causative factors and to quantify them through experiments, analysis and numerical modeling. The paper will report on the experimental results using paramagnetic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analytical predictions.

  8. Magnetic Control of Rigid Achiral Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U.; Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry; Kim, Minjun

    2013-11-01

    We report control of rigid achiral microswimmers in low Reynolds number environments. A rotating magnetic field was used to actuate the microswimmers wirelessly by rotating the microswimmers, which produces propulsion. Previous magnetically actuated microswimmers in bulk fluids have been designed with either flexibility or chiral geometry; we show that simpler geometries with neither flexibility nor chirality can produce propulsion. The microswimmer consists of three magnetic beads conjugated using avidin-biotin linkages into an arc formation. We designed a magnetic field generator consisting of electromagnetic coils arranged in an approximate Helmholtz configuration. A highspeed camera provided realtime imaging of the microswimmers' motion in a PDMS chamber. The rigidity of the microswimmer was characterized by tracking the position of the individual beads and calculating their relative distances. As a function of field strength and rotation frequency, we observed changes in the rotational axis of the microswimmers and the corresponding effects on their velocities. The achiral microswimmers exhibited active propulsion and were controllable in both speed and direction, which demonstrates the possibility for future biomedical applications such as drug delivery.

  9. Optimum control forces for multibody systems with intermittent motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ider, Sitki Kemal; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to address the continuity of motion when a dynamical system is suddenly subjected to constraint conditions. Motion discontinuity due to the initial constraint violation is avoided by prior control forces that adjust the motion and yield velocity and acceleration consistent at the point of application of the constraint. The optimum control forces are determined for a specified control interval. The method proposed provides an optimum adjustment of the system's motion and assures that the stresses developed at the system components are kept within acceptable limits. The procedures developed will be illustrated making use of inequality constraints applied to obstacle avoidance problems in robotics.

  10. Basal Ganglia Mechanisms Underlying Precision Grip Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Prodoehl, Janey; Corcos, Daniel M.; Vaillancourt, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The classic grasping network has been well studied but thus far the focus has been on cortical regions in the control of grasping. Sub-cortically, specific nuclei of the basal ganglia have been shown to be important in different aspects of precision grip force control but these findings have not been well integrated. In this review we outline the evidence to support the hypothesis that key basal ganglia nuclei are involved in parameterizing specific properties of precision grip force. We review literature from different areas of human and animal work that converges to build a case for basal ganglia involvement in the control of precision gripping. Following on from literature showing anatomical connectivity between the basal ganglia nuclei and key nodes in the cortical grasping network, we suggest a conceptual framework for how the basal ganglia could function within the grasping network, particularly as it relates to the control of precision grip force. PMID:19428499

  11. Magnetic force microscopy investigation of arrays of nickel nanowires and nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tabasum, M R; Zighem, F; De La Torre Medina, J; Encinas, A; Piraux, L; Nysten, B

    2014-06-20

    The magnetic properties of arrays of nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs), 150 nm in diameter, electrodeposited inside nanoporous polycarbonate membranes are investigated. The comparison of the nanoscopic magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging and the macroscopic behavior as measured by alternating gradient force magnetometry (AGFM) is made. It is shown that MFM is a complementary technique that provides an understanding of the magnetization reversal characteristics at the microscopic scale of individual nanostructures. The local hysteresis loops have been extracted by MFM measurements. The influence of the shape of such elongated nanostructures on the dipolar coupling and consequently on the squareness of the hysteresis curves is demonstrated. It is shown that the nanowires exhibit stronger magnetic interactions than nanotubes. The non-uniformity of the magnetization states is also revealed by combining the MFM and AGFM measurements.

  12. Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an Axially Symmetric Solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.

  13. Force control of a multi-arm robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, Thomas E.; Soloway, Donald I.

    1988-01-01

    A force-compensated control method for multiple manipulators is presented that allows coordinated manipulation of a jointly grasped object. In this scheme, each arm independently carries out the motions required to realize the desired motion of a prescribed point on the manipulated object. The approach has been implemented and demonstrated on a laboratory system consisting of two industrial, computer-controller manipulators.

  14. Influence of the magnetic tip in ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbois, V.; Naletov, V. V.; Youssef, J. Ben; Klein, O.

    2002-06-01

    We compare mechanically detected ferromagnetic resonance spectra for different separations h between the magnetic tip and sample surface. When the bias field generated by the tip is smaller than a few hundred gauss, the prominent changes are shifts of the entire spectrum (without line shape distortions) to higher frequency as h decreases. These results are in agreement with the Damon and Eshbach model for spin waves propagating in a potential perturbed by the additional field of the probe magnet. It is used to predict the spatial resolution limit for magnetostatic modes bounded by the stray field of the tip. The answer is approx4 mum for yttrium iron garnet.

  15. Magnetic energy dissipation in force-free jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Konigl, Arieh

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that a magnetic pressure-dominated, supersonic jet which expands or contracts in response to variations in the confining external pressure can dissipate magnetic energy through field-line reconnection as it relaxes to a minimum-energy configuration. In order for a continuous dissipation to occur, the effective reconnection time must be a fraction of the expansion time. The dissipation rate for the axisymmetric minimum-energy field configuration is analytically derived. The results indicate that the field relaxation process could be a viable mechanism for powering the synchrotron emission in extragalactic jets if the reconnection time is substantially shorter than the nominal resistive tearing time in the jet.

  16. Controlling cohesive forces in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G"Ogelein, Christoph; Schr"Oter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2009-11-01

    When adding a small amount of water to a pile of granular matter, e.g., sand heap, close-by grains can be connected by liquid bridges [1]. Thus, the material becomes plastically and can sustain a larger stress as compared to dry sand. Our general aim is to compare the mechanical properties of wet and dry granular media. For this purpose, we use a suspension of micrometer large glass or Latex spheres dispersed in a binary liquid mixture. The suspending water-lutidine(oil) mixture exhibits a lower critical solution temperature leading to a water-oil-like phase separation slightly above ambient temperature. Close to this demixing region, the oil-like phase undergoes a pre-wetting transition on the particle glass surface inducing liquid bridges [2]. Thus, by varying the temperature we can switch the liquid bridges on and off. We will report on our attempts to directly visualize the formation and control of liquid bridges using confocal and non- confocal microscopy. [4pt] [1] M. Scheel, et al., Nature Materials 7, 174 (2008)[0pt] [2] D. Beysens, and D. Esteve, Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2123 (1985)

  17. Switching of both local ferroelectric and magnetic domains in multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film by mechanical force.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tingting; Kimura, Hideo; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhao, Hongyang

    2016-08-22

    Cross-coupling of ordering parameters in multiferroic materials by multiple external stimuli other than electric field and magnetic field is highly desirable from both practical application and fundamental study points of view. Recently, mechanical force has attracted great attention in switching of ferroic ordering parameters via electro-elastic coupling in ferroelectric materials. In this work, mechanical force induced both polarization and magnetization switching were visualized in a polycrystalline multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film using a scanning probe microscopy system. The piezoresponse force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy responses suggest that both the ferroelectric domains and the magnetic domains in Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 film could be switched by mechanical force as well as by electric field. High tip stress applied on our thin film is demonstrated as able to induce ferroelastic switching and thus induce both ferroelectric dipole and magnetic spin flipping, as a consequence of electro-elastic coupling and magneto-electric coupling. The demonstration of mechanical force control of both the ferroelectric and the magnetic domains at room temperature provides a new freedom for manipulation of multiferroics and could result in devices with novel functionalities.

  18. Switching of both local ferroelectric and magnetic domains in multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film by mechanical force

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Tingting; Kimura, Hideo; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhao, Hongyang

    2016-01-01

    Cross-coupling of ordering parameters in multiferroic materials by multiple external stimuli other than electric field and magnetic field is highly desirable from both practical application and fundamental study points of view. Recently, mechanical force has attracted great attention in switching of ferroic ordering parameters via electro-elastic coupling in ferroelectric materials. In this work, mechanical force induced both polarization and magnetization switching were visualized in a polycrystalline multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film using a scanning probe microscopy system. The piezoresponse force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy responses suggest that both the ferroelectric domains and the magnetic domains in Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 film could be switched by mechanical force as well as by electric field. High tip stress applied on our thin film is demonstrated as able to induce ferroelastic switching and thus induce both ferroelectric dipole and magnetic spin flipping, as a consequence of electro-elastic coupling and magneto-electric coupling. The demonstration of mechanical force control of both the ferroelectric and the magnetic domains at room temperature provides a new freedom for manipulation of multiferroics and could result in devices with novel functionalities. PMID:27546488

  19. Switching of both local ferroelectric and magnetic domains in multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film by mechanical force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tingting; Kimura, Hideo; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhao, Hongyang

    2016-08-01

    Cross-coupling of ordering parameters in multiferroic materials by multiple external stimuli other than electric field and magnetic field is highly desirable from both practical application and fundamental study points of view. Recently, mechanical force has attracted great attention in switching of ferroic ordering parameters via electro-elastic coupling in ferroelectric materials. In this work, mechanical force induced both polarization and magnetization switching were visualized in a polycrystalline multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film using a scanning probe microscopy system. The piezoresponse force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy responses suggest that both the ferroelectric domains and the magnetic domains in Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 film could be switched by mechanical force as well as by electric field. High tip stress applied on our thin film is demonstrated as able to induce ferroelastic switching and thus induce both ferroelectric dipole and magnetic spin flipping, as a consequence of electro-elastic coupling and magneto-electric coupling. The demonstration of mechanical force control of both the ferroelectric and the magnetic domains at room temperature provides a new freedom for manipulation of multiferroics and could result in devices with novel functionalities.

  20. Autonomous and forced dynamics in a spin-transfer nano-oscillator: Quantitative magnetic-resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    In this talk, we will discuss how magnetic-resonance force microscopy, can provide quantitative measurement of the power emitted by a spin-transfer nano-oscillator, consisting of a normally magnetized Py|Cu|Py circular nanopillar, excited both in the autonomous and forced regimes.[2] From the power behavior in the subcritical region of the autonomous dynamics, one obtains a quantitative measurement of the threshold current and of the noise level. Their field dependence directly yields both the spin torque efficiency acting on the thin layer and the nature of the mode which first auto-oscillates: the lowest energy, spatially most uniform spin-wave mode. We will then demonstrate that the observed spin-wave spectrum in the forced regime critically depends on the method of excitation. While the spatially uniform radio-frequency (RF) magnetic field excites only the axially symmetric modes having azimuthal index l = 0 , the RF current flowing through the nano-pillar, creating a circular RF Oersted field, excites only the modes having azimuthal index l = + 1 .[3] It is then demonstrated that in order to phase lock this auto-oscillating mode, the external source must have the same spatial symmetry as the mode profile, i.e., a uniform microwave field must be used rather than a microwave current flowing through the nanopillar. This research was partially supported by the French Grant Spinnova (ANR-11-NANO-0016)

  1. Electrodynamic forces in tethered satellite systems. Part 1: System control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, Ehud; Kane, Thomas R.

    1994-10-01

    Part 1 of this work deals with the use of electrodynamic forces for control of tethered satellite system. A system formed by two massive end-bodies connected to each other by a current carrying tether is to be kept in an earth-pointing orientation by means of joint actions of thrusters on one of the end-bodies and electrodynamic forces acting on the tether.

  2. Spin Hall Control of Magnetization in a Perpendicularly-Magnetized Magnetic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Chi-Feng; Quindeau, Andy; Tang, Astera; Onbasli, Mehmet; Mann, Maxwell; Caretta, Lucas; Ross, Caroline; Beach, Geoffrey

    Spin Hall effect (SHE)-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) has been shown to be an efficient mechanism to control the magnetization in magnetic heterostructures. Although numerous works have demonstrated the efficacy of SOT in manipulating the magnetization of ferromagnetic metals (FM), SOT-controlled switching of ferromagnetic insulators (FMIs) has not yet been observed. In this work we show that spin Hall currents in Pt and Ta can generate SOTs strong enough to control the magnetization direction in an adjacent thulium iron garnet FMI film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We find that dc current in the heavy metal (HM) generates an out-of-plane effective field in the FMI consistent with an antidamping torque whose magnitude is comparable to that observed in all-metallic systems. Spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) measurements reveal a large spin-mixing conductance, which implies considerable spin transparency at the metal/insulator interface and explains the observed strong current-induced torque. Our results show that charge currents flowing in a HM can be used to both control and detect the magnetization direction in a FMI electrically.

  3. Implementation of robotic force control with position accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1992-06-01

    As the need for robotic manipulation in fields such as manufacturing and telerobotics increases, so does the need for effective methods of controlling the interaction forces between the manipulators and their environment. Position Accommodation (PA) is a form of robotic force control where the nominal path of the manipulator is modified in response to forces and torques sensed at the tool-tip of the manipulator. The response is tailored such that the manipulator emulates a mechanical impedance to its environment. PA falls under the category of position-based robotic force control, and may be viewed as a form of Impedance Control. The practical implementations are explored of PA into an 18 degree-of-freedom robotic testbed consisting of two PUMA 560 arms mounted on two 3 DOF positioning platforms. Single and dual-arm architectures for PA are presented along with some experimental results. Characteristics of position-based force control are discussed, along with some of the limitations of PA.

  4. Implementation of robotic force control with position accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    As the need for robotic manipulation in fields such as manufacturing and telerobotics increases, so does the need for effective methods of controlling the interaction forces between the manipulators and their environment. Position Accommodation (PA) is a form of robotic force control where the nominal path of the manipulator is modified in response to forces and torques sensed at the tool-tip of the manipulator. The response is tailored such that the manipulator emulates a mechanical impedance to its environment. PA falls under the category of position-based robotic force control, and may be viewed as a form of Impedance Control. The practical implementations are explored of PA into an 18 degree-of-freedom robotic testbed consisting of two PUMA 560 arms mounted on two 3 DOF positioning platforms. Single and dual-arm architectures for PA are presented along with some experimental results. Characteristics of position-based force control are discussed, along with some of the limitations of PA.

  5. Turbulent-like laminar flows sustained and controlled by multiscale electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hascoet, Erwan; Rossi, Lionel; Christos Vassilicos, John

    2006-11-01

    We perform DNS of electromagnetically fractal-forced and Rayleigh-damped 2D flows and compare the results with a recent laboratory experiment of a similarly forced quais-2D thin layer of brine (JFM (2006) vol. 558 p. 207). We determine a range of DNS parameters where the multiscale streamline topology is the same as in the laboratory. It is possible to vary flow intensity whilst keeping multiscale flow topology constant. Our simulations show broad band power law energy spectra E(k)˜k^-p. When the fractal distribution of magnets is as in the laboratory experiment then p 2.5 in agreement with the experiment. When the fractal distribution of magnets is changed, then p is found to vary linearly with Df, the fractal dimension of the magnet set up. Hence, fractal control of the energy spectrum is possible. The multiscale flow imposed by the fractal electromagnetic forcing resembles a deterministic β-model of turbulence which also predicts a linear relation between p and the fractal dimension of the multiscale flow. In both cases, p increases as the fractal dimension decreases. In the power-law range the Rayleigh damping balances the fractal forcing's energy input rate scale by scale. The small difference between the two equals the interscale energy transfer function which is severely depleted. The energy flux oscillates between positive and negative values and the wavenumbers where it cancels are a direct reflection of the multiscale stagnation point structure of the flow.

  6. Diamagnetically-stabilized levitation control of an intraluminal magnetic capsule.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michael; Mintchev, Martin P

    2008-01-01

    Controlled navigation promotes full utilization of capsule endoscopy for reliable real-time diagnosis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but intermittent natural peristalsis can disturb the navigational control, destabilize the capsule and take it out of levitation. A real-size magnetic navigation system that can handle peristaltic forces of up to 1.5 N was designed utilizing the computer-aided design (CAD) system Maxwell 3D (Ansoft, Pittsburg, PA), and was verified using a small-size physical experimental setup. The proposed system contains a pair of 50-cm in diameter, 10,000-turns copper electromagnets with a 10-cm by 10-cm ferrous core driven by currents of up to 300 Amperes and can successfully maintain position control over the levitating capsule during peristalsis. The addition of Bismuth diamagnetic casing for stabilizing the levitating capsule was also studied.

  7. Magnetic field regulation control system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Badelt, Steven W.

    1996-05-01

    This study comprises (1) an analytical characterization of the Cameca ion microscope`s magnetic field regulation circuitry and (2) comparisons between the analytical predictions and the measured performance of the control system. It is the first step in a project to achieve routine field regulation better than 10ppm. The control loop was decomposed into functional subcircuits and simulated in SPICE to determine DC, AC, and transient response. Transfer functions were extracted from SPICE, simplified, and analyzed in MATLAB. Both SPICE and MATLAB simulations were calculated for step inputs, and these results were compared to actual measurements. Magnetic field fluctuations were measured at high mass resolving power. The frequency spectrum of the fluctuations was analyzed by FFT. Difficulties encountered and implications for future work are discussed.

  8. A Miniature Magnetic-Force-Based Three-Axis AC Magnetic Sensor with Piezoelectric/Vibrational Energy-Harvesting Functions

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chiao-Fang; Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a miniature magnetic-force-based, three-axis, AC magnetic sensor with piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. For magnetic sensing, the sensor employs a magnetic–mechanical–piezoelectric configuration (which uses magnetic force and torque, a compact, single, mechanical mechanism, and the piezoelectric effect) to convert x-axis and y-axis in-plane and z-axis magnetic fields into piezoelectric voltage outputs. Under the x-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 0.2–3.2 gauss) and the z-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 0.2–3.2 gauss), the voltage output with the sensitivity of the sensor are 1.13–26.15 mV with 8.79 mV/gauss and 1.31–8.92 mV with 2.63 mV/gauss, respectively. In addition, through this configuration, the sensor can harness ambient vibrational energy, i.e., possessing piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. Under x-axis vibration (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 3.5 g) and z-axis vibration (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 3.8 g), the root-mean-square voltage output with power output of the sensor is 439 mV with 0.333 μW and 138 mV with 0.051 μW, respectively. These results show that the sensor, using this configuration, successfully achieves three-axis magnetic field sensing and three-axis vibration energy-harvesting. Due to these features, the three-axis AC magnetic sensor could be an important design reference in order to develop future three-axis AC magnetic sensors, which possess energy-harvesting functions, for practical industrial applications, such as intelligent vehicle/traffic monitoring, processes monitoring, security systems, and so on. PMID:28208693

  9. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-03-02

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10(-20) A m(2), respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution.

  10. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  11. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10‑20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution.

  12. Deficits in inhibitory force control in young adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Wang, Peiyuan; Chennavasin, Amanda P; Samimy, Shaadee; Tucker, Jacqueline; Merida, Andrea; Perez-Edgar, Koraly; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia

    2017-03-09

    Poor inhibitory control is a well-established cognitive correlate of adults with ADHD. However, the simple reaction time (RT) task used in a majority of studies records performance errors only via the presence or absence of a single key press. This all-or-nothing response makes it impossible to capture subtle differences in underlying processes that shape performance. Subsequently, all-or-nothing tasks may underestimate the prevalence of executive function deficits in ADHD. The current study measured inhibitory control using a standard Go/No-Go RT task and a more sensitive continuous grip force task among adults with (N=51, 22 female) and without (N=51, 29 female) ADHD. Compared to adults without ADHD, adults with ADHD made more failed inhibits in the classic Go/No-Go paradigm and produced greater and more variable force during motor inhibition. The amount of force produced on failed inhibits was a stronger predictor of ADHD-related symptoms than the number of commissions in the standard RT task. Adults with ADHD did not differ from those without ADHD on the mean force and variability of force produced in Go trials. These findings suggest that the use of a precise and continuous motor task, such as the force task used here, provides additional information about the nature of inhibitory motor control in adults with ADHD.

  13. Large-stroke convex micromirror actuated by electromagnetic force for optical power control.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mahabub; Bin, Wu; Kong, Seong Ho

    2015-11-02

    This paper contributes a novel design and the corresponding fabrication process to research on the unique topic of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable convex micromirror used for focusing-power control. In this design, the shape of a thin planar metal-coated polymer-membrane mirror is controlled electromagnetically by using the repulsive force between two magnets, a permanent magnet and a coil solenoid, installed in an actuator system. The 5 mm effective aperture of a large-stroke micromirror showed a maximum center displacement of 30.08 µm, which enabled control of optical power across a wide range that could extend up to around 20 diopters. Specifically, utilizing the maximum optical power of 20 diopter by applying a maximum controlling current of 0.8 A yielded consumption of at most 2 W of electrical power. It was also demonstrated that this micromirror could easily be integrated in miniature tunable optical imaging systems.

  14. Magnetic Fields Can Control Heat and Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-23

    Joseph Heremans March 23 2015, 2.48pm EDT Magnetic fields can control heat and sound AUTHOR Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering...Physics, and Materials Science & Engineering at The Ohio State University Sound is carried by periodic vibrations of atoms in gases, liquids and... sound waves, which then propagate through the air until they hit a listener’s eardrums and make them vibrate as well. From these vibrations, the listener

  15. Small Satellite Passive Magnetic Attitude Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, David T.

    Passive Magnetic Attitude Control (PMAC) is capable of aligning a satellite within 5 degrees of the local magnetic field at low resource cost, making it ideal for a small satellite. However, simulation attempts to date have not been able to predict the attitude dynamics at a level sufficient for mission design. Also, some satellites have suffered from degraded performance due to an incomplete understanding of PMAC system design. This dissertation alleviates these issues by discussing the design, inputs, and validation of PMAC systems for small satellites. Design rules for a PMAC system are defined using the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat as an example. A Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF) is defined for the attitude determination of a PMAC satellite without a rate gyro. After on-orbit calibration of the off-the-shelf magnetometer and photodiodes and an on-orbit fit to the satellite magnetic moment, the MEKF regularly achieves a three sigma attitude uncertainty of 4 degrees or less. CSSWE is found to settle to the magnetic field in seven days, verifying its attitude design requirement. A Helmholtz cage is constructed and used to characterize the CSSWE bar magnet and hysteresis rods both individually and in the flight configuration. Fitted parameters which govern the magnetic material behavior are used as input to a PMAC dynamics simulation. All components of this simulation are described and defined. Simulation-based dynamics analysis shows that certain initial conditions result in abnormally decreased settling times; these cases may be identified by their dynamic response. The simulation output is compared to the MEKF output; the true dynamics are well modeled and the predicted settling time is found to possess a 20 percent error, a significant improvement over prior simulation.

  16. Control of Thermal Convection in Layered Fluids Using Magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Immiscible fluid layers are found in a host of applications ranging from materials processing, for example the use of encapsulants in float zone crystal growth technique and a buffer layer in industrial Czochralski growth of crystals to prevent Marangoni convection, to heat transfer phenomena in day-to-day processes like the presence of air pockets in heat exchangers. In the microgravity and space processing realm, the exploration of other planets requires the development of enabling technologies in several fronts. The reduction in the gravity level poses unique challenges for fluid handling and heat transfer applications. The present work investigates the efficacy of controlling thermal convective flow using magnetic fluids and magnetic fields. The setup is a two-layer immiscible liquids system with one of the fluids being a diluted ferrofluid (super paramagnetic nano particles dispersed in carrier fluid). Using an external magnetic field one can essentially dial in a volumetric force - gravity level, on the magnetic fluid and thereby affect the system thermo-fluid behavior. The paper will describe the experimental and numerical modeling approach to the problem and discuss results obtained to date.

  17. Laboratory study of low-β forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; ...

    2016-11-04

    Here, the loss-of-equilibrium is a solar eruption mechanism whereby a sudden breakdown of the magnetohydrodynamic force balance in the Sun's corona ejects a massive burst of particles and energy into the heliosphere. Predicting a loss-of-equilibrium, which has more recently been formulated as the torus instability, relies on a detailed understanding of the various forces that hold the pre-eruption magnetic flux rope in equilibrium. Traditionally, idealized analytical force expressions are used to derive simplified eruption criteria that can be compared to solar observations and modeling. What is missing, however, is a validation that these idealized analytical force expressions can be appliedmore » to the line-tied, low-aspect-ratio conditions of the corona. In this paper, we address this shortcoming by using a laboratory experiment to study the forces that act on long-lived, arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Three key force terms are evaluated over a wide range of experimental conditions: (1) the upward hoop force; (2) the downward strapping force; and (3) the downward toroidal field tension force. First, the laboratory force measurements show that, on average, the three aforementioned force terms cancel to produce a balanced line-tied equilibrium. This finding validates the laboratory force measurement techniques developed here, which were recently used to identify a dynamic toroidal field tension force that can prevent flux rope eruption. The verification of magnetic force balance also confirms the low-beta assumption that the plasma thermal pressure is negligible in these experiments. Next, the measured force terms are directly compared to corresponding analytical expressions. While the measured and analytical forces are found to be well correlated, the low-aspect-ratio, line-tied conditions in the experiment are found to both reduce the measured hoop force and increase the measured tension force with respect to analytical expectations. These two co

  18. Laboratory study of low-β forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2016-11-01

    The loss-of-equilibrium is a solar eruption mechanism whereby a sudden breakdown of the magnetohydrodynamic force balance in the Sun's corona ejects a massive burst of particles and energy into the heliosphere. Predicting a loss-of-equilibrium, which has more recently been formulated as the torus instability, relies on a detailed understanding of the various forces that hold the pre-eruption magnetic flux rope in equilibrium. Traditionally, idealized analytical force expressions are used to derive simplified eruption criteria that can be compared to solar observations and modeling. What is missing, however, is a validation that these idealized analytical force expressions can be applied to the line-tied, low-aspect-ratio conditions of the corona. In this paper, we address this shortcoming by using a laboratory experiment to study the forces that act on long-lived, arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Three key force terms are evaluated over a wide range of experimental conditions: (1) the upward hoop force; (2) the downward strapping force; and (3) the downward toroidal field tension force. First, the laboratory force measurements show that, on average, the three aforementioned force terms cancel to produce a balanced line-tied equilibrium. This finding validates the laboratory force measurement techniques developed here, which were recently used to identify a dynamic toroidal field tension force that can prevent flux rope eruptions [Myers et al., Nature 528, 526 (2015)]. The verification of magnetic force balance also confirms the low-β assumption that the plasma thermal pressure is negligible in these experiments. Next, the measured force terms are directly compared to corresponding analytical expressions. While the measured and analytical forces are found to be well correlated, the low-aspect-ratio, line-tied conditions in the experiment are found to both reduce the measured hoop force and increase the measured tension force with respect to analytical

  19. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces

    SciTech Connect

    Punyabrahma, P.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory.

  20. Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Poggio, M; Degen, C L

    2010-08-27

    We review recent efforts to detect small numbers of nuclear spins using magnetic resonance force microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that relies on the mechanical measurement of the weak magnetic force between a microscopic magnet and the magnetic moments in a sample. Spurred by the recent progress in fabricating ultrasensitive force detectors, MRFM has rapidly improved its capability over the last decade. Today it boasts a spin sensitivity that surpasses conventional, inductive nuclear magnetic resonance detectors by about eight orders of magnitude. In this review we touch on the origins of this technique and focus on its recent application to nanoscale nuclear spin ensembles, in particular on the imaging of nanoscale objects with a three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution better than 10 nm. We consider the experimental advances driving this work and highlight the underlying physical principles and limitations of the method. Finally, we discuss the challenges that must be met in order to advance the technique towards single nuclear spin sensitivity-and perhaps-to 3D microscopy of molecules with atomic resolution.

  1. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB /B ˜10-3 to 10-4 ) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error fields at low

  2. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-15

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries (δB/B∼10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4}) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas (β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error

  3. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    Objective. A drawback of active prostheses is that they detach the subject from the produced forces, thereby preventing direct mechanical feedback. This can be compensated by providing somatosensory feedback to the user through mechanical or electrical stimulation, which in turn may improve the utility, sense of embodiment, and thereby increase the acceptance rate. Approach. In this study, we compared a novel approach to closing the loop, namely EMG feedback (emgFB), to classic force feedback (forceFB), using electrotactile interface in a realistic task setup. Eleven intact-bodied subjects and one transradial amputee performed a routine grasping task while receiving emgFB or forceFB. The two feedback types were delivered through the same electrotactile interface, using a mixed spatial/frequency coding to transmit 8 discrete levels of the feedback variable. In emgFB, the stimulation transmitted the amplitude of the processed myoelectric signal generated by the subject (prosthesis input), and in forceFB the generated grasping force (prosthesis output). The task comprised 150 trials of routine grasping at six forces, randomly presented in blocks of five trials (same force). Interquartile range and changes in the absolute error (AE) distribution (magnitude and dispersion) with respect to the target level were used to assess precision and overall performance, respectively. Main results. Relative to forceFB, emgFB significantly improved the precision of myoelectric commands (min/max of the significant levels) for 23%/36% as well as the precision of force control for 12%/32%, in intact-bodied subjects. Also, the magnitude and dispersion of the AE distribution were reduced. The results were similar in the amputee, showing considerable improvements. Significance. Using emgFB, the subjects therefore decreased the uncertainty of the forward pathway. Since there is a correspondence between the EMG and force, where the former anticipates the latter, the emgFB allowed for

  4. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950-1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters.

  5. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950–1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters. PMID:28217547

  6. Forced Magnetic Reconnection and Field Penetration of an Externally Applied Rotating Helical Magnetic Field in the TEXTOR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Y.; Finken, K. H.; Jakubowski, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Reiser, D.; Wolf, R. C.; Zimmermann, O.; Bock, M. F. M. de; Jaspers, R.; Matsunaga, G.

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization.

  7. Resolving sub-cellular force dynamics using arrays of magnetic microposts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The biological response of cells to mechanical forces is integral to both normal cell function and the progression of many diseases, such as hypertensive vascular wall thickening. This likely results from the fact that mechanical stresses can directly affect many cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, growth, differentiation, and survival. The need to understand the relationship between applied forces and the mechanical response of cells as a critical step towards understanding mechanotransduction calls for tools that can apply forces to cells while measuring their contractile response. This talk will describe an approach that simultaneously allows local mechanical stimulation of the adherent surface of a cell and spatially resolved measurement of the local force fields generated throughout the cell in response to this stimulation. Cells are cultured on the top surfaces of arrays of micrometer-scale posts made from a flexible elastomer (PDMS), and the contractile forces generated by an adherent cell bend the posts. Measurements of the displacement of each post allow the contractile force field of the cell to be mapped out with sub-cellular precision. To apply forces to cells, rod- shaped magnetic nanoparticles are embedded in some of the posts so that externally applied magnetic fields selectively deform these ``magnetic posts,'' thereby exerting tunable local, mechanical stresses to the adherent surface of attached cells. Alternatively, magnetic particles bound to or internalized by the cell may be employed to apply forces and torques to the cell. With either approach, measuring the deflection of the surrounding non-magnetic posts probes the full mechanical response of the cell to these stresses. Results that illustrate the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of the non-local response of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells to local stresses will be discussed.

  8. The force analysis for superparamagnetic nanoparticles-based gene delivery in an oscillating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiajia; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Zhang, Pengbo

    2017-04-01

    Due to the peculiar magnetic properties and the ability to function in cell-level biological interaction, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) have been being the attractive carrier for gene delivery. The superparamagnetic nanoparticles with surface-bound gene vector can be attracted to the surface of cells by the Kelvin force provided by external magnetic field. In this article, the influence of the oscillating magnetic field on the characteristics of magnetofection is studied in terms of the magnetophoretic velocity. The magnetic field of a cylindrical permanent magnet is calculated by equivalent current source (ECS) method, and the Kelvin force is derived by using the effective moment method. The results show that the static magnetic field accelerates the sedimentation of the particles, and drives the particles inward towards the axis of the magnet. Based on the investigation of the magnetophoretic velocity of the particle under horizontally oscillating magnetic field, an oscillating velocity within the amplitude of the magnet oscillation is observed. Furthermore, simulation results indicate that the oscillating amplitude plays an important role in regulating the active region, where the particles may present oscillating motion. The analysis of the magnetophoretic velocity gives us an insight into the physical mechanism of the magnetofection. It's also helpful to the optimal design of the magnetofection system.

  9. Formation Control of Robotic Swarm Using Bounded Artificial Forces

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yabing; Peng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Formation control of multirobot systems has drawn significant attention in the recent years. This paper presents a potential field control algorithm, navigating a swarm of robots into a predefined 2D shape while avoiding intermember collisions. The algorithm applies in both stationary and moving targets formation. We define the bounded artificial forces in the form of exponential functions, so that the behavior of the swarm drove by the forces can be adjusted via selecting proper control parameters. The theoretical analysis of the swarm behavior proves the stability and convergence properties of the algorithm. We further make certain modifications upon the forces to improve the robustness of the swarm behavior in the presence of realistic implementation considerations. The considerations include obstacle avoidance, local minima, and deformation of the shape. Finally, detailed simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, and the direction of possible futrue work is discussed in the conclusions. PMID:24453809

  10. Satellite cascade attitude control via fuzzy PD controller with active force control under momentum dumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Z.; Varatharajoo, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, fuzzy proportional-derivative (PD) controller with active force control (AFC) scheme is studied and employed in the satellite attitude control system equipped with reaction wheels. The momentum dumping is enabled via proportional integral (PI) controller as the system is impractical without momentum dumping control. The attitude controllers are developed together with their governing equations and evaluated through numerical treatment with respect to a reference satellite mission. From the results, it is evident that the three axis attitudes accuracies can be improved up to ±0.001 degree through the fuzzy PD controller with AFC scheme for the attitude control. In addition, the three-axis wheel angular momentums are well maintained during the attitude control tasks.

  11. Force control in the absence of visual and tactile feedback.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Abbink, David A; Schouten, Alfred C; van der Helm, Frans C T; Arendzen, J H; Meskers, Carel G M

    2013-02-01

    Motor control tasks like stance or object handling require sensory feedback from proprioception, vision and touch. The distinction between tactile and proprioceptive sensors is not frequently made in dynamic motor control tasks, and if so, mostly based on signal latency. We previously found that force control tasks entail more compliant behavior than a passive, relaxed condition and by neuromuscular modeling we were able to attribute this to adaptations in proprioceptive force feedback from Golgi tendon organs. This required the assumption that both tactile and visual feedback are too slow to explain the measured adaptations in face of unpredictable force perturbations. Although this assumption was shown to hold using model simulations, so far no experimental data is available to validate it. Here we applied a systematic approach using continuous perturbations and engineering analyses to provide experimental evidence for the hypothesis that motor control adaptation in force control tasks can be achieved using proprioceptive feedback only. Varying task instruction resulted in substantial adaptations in neuromuscular behavior, which persisted after eliminating visual and/or tactile feedback by a nerve block of the nervus plantaris medialis. It is concluded that proprioception adapts dynamic human ankle motor control even in the absence of visual and tactile feedback.

  12. Experimental signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative magnetic monopoles in spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, C.; Giblin, S. R.; Lhotel, E.; Prabhakaran, D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Matsuhira, K.; Bramwell, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    A non-Ohmic current that grows exponentially with the square root of applied electric field is well known from thermionic field emission (the Schottky effect), electrolytes (the second Wien effect) and semiconductors (the Poole-Frenkel effect). It is a universal signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative electrical charges, which is revealed as the charges are driven in opposite directions by the force of an applied electric field. Here we apply thermal quenches to spin ice to prepare metastable populations of bound pairs of positive and negative emergent magnetic monopoles at millikelvin temperatures. We find that the application of a magnetic field results in a universal exponential-root field growth of magnetic current, thus confirming the microscopic Coulomb force between the magnetic monopole quasiparticles and establishing a magnetic analogue of the Poole-Frenkel effect. At temperatures above 300 mK, gradual restoration of kinetic monopole equilibria causes the non-Ohmic current to smoothly evolve into the high-field Wien effect for magnetic monopoles, as confirmed by comparison to a recent and rigorous theory of the Wien effect in spin ice. Our results extend the universality of the exponential-root field form into magnetism and illustrate the power of emergent particle kinetics to describe far-from-equilibrium response in complex systems.

  13. Force versus current and air gap calibration of a double acting magnetic thrust bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Baun, D.O.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Force versus current and air gap measurements were obtained for a double acting thrust bearing. Static force measurements were made for various air gap settings and bearing current combinations. The resulting data was reduced and an optimized expression representing the force versus current and air gap relationship of the bearing was found. In addition, a theoretical force model was developed using simple magnetic circuit theory and magnetic properties obtained from standard magnetic material tests. The theoretical and the experimentally derived force models were compared. Hysteresis tests were conducted with the thrust disk in the centered position for various current perturbation amplitudes about the design bias current. Hysteresis effects were shown to cause a difference between the measured force as the current was increasing as compared to when the current was decreasing. A second order polynomial expression was developed to express the coercive force as a function of the perturbation current amplitude. The bearing frequency response was examined by injecting sinusoidal currents of varying frequencies into the bearing. A maximum actuator bandwidth of approximately 700 Hz was determined. Above 700 Hz the bearing frequency response could not be distinguished from the test fixture frequency response.

  14. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J. K.; Cribb, J.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Taylor, R. M.; Haase, J.; Bloom, K.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2006-01-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 μm paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 μm paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4π sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 μm xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  15. Voluntary control of static endpoint stiffness during force regulation tasks.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Eric J; Kirsch, Robert F; Crago, Patrick E

    2002-06-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the degree to which subjects could voluntarily modulate static endpoint stiffness orientation and to quantify the effects of simultaneously generated voluntary endpoint forces on this ability. Static endpoint stiffness, which characterizes the relationship between externally imposed displacements of the hand and the elastic forces generated in response, was estimated in real time during the application of planar, stochastic perturbations of endpoint position. This estimation was accomplished using a real-time parametric identification algorithm on measured force and position data. Subjects were provided with real-time visual feedback of endpoint stiffness, and their ability to modulate the orientation of maximum static stiffness was measured for different endpoint force magnitudes and directions. We found that individuals can voluntarily change stiffness orientation but that the magnitude of these changes is small, the range of available stiffness orientations decreases as endpoint force exertion increases, and endpoint force direction significantly constrains direction and magnitude of the stiffness orientations that can be achieved. Given these findings it appears unlikely that static endpoint stiffness orientation is controlled independently of force by voluntary neural mechanisms during postural tasks.

  16. Time-delay control of a magnetic levitated linear positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, J. H.; Juang, K. Y.; Lin, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy linear positioning system with a linear force actuator and magnetic levitation is proposed. By locating a permanently magnetized rod inside a current-carrying solenoid, the axial force is achieved by the boundary effect of magnet poles and utilized to power the linear motion, while the force for levitation is governed by Ampere's Law supplied with the same solenoid. With the levitation in a radial direction, there is hardly any friction between the rod and the solenoid. The high speed motion can hence be achieved. Besides, the axial force acting on the rod is a smooth function of rod position, so the system can provide nanometer resolution linear positioning to the molecule size. Since the force-position relation is highly nonlinear, and the mathematical model is derived according to some assumptions, such as the equivalent solenoid of the permanently magnetized rod, so there exists unknown dynamics in practical application. Thus 'robustness' is an important issue in controller design. Meanwhile the load effect reacts directly on the servo system without transmission elements, so the capability of 'disturbance rejection; is also required. With the above consideration, a time-delay control scheme is chosen and applied. By comparing the input-output relation and the mathematical model, the time-delay controller calculates an estimation of unmodeled dynamics and disturbances and then composes the desired compensation into the system. Effectiveness of the linear positioning system and control scheme are illustrated with simulation results.

  17. Cognitive Science Program. Force Control and Its Relation to Timing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    RD-Rl7l 74 COGNITIYE SCIENCE PRORRM FORCE CONTROL RIO ITS / I REL TION TO TIMING (U) O EGON UNIY EUGENE DEPT OF I PSYCHOLOGY S W KEELE ET RL. SI NAY...STANDA. DS 1963 A .- ’.:: -I~ op. %., o .. I a Cognitive Science Program I FOiE aW - MD ITS Of LATICI TO TIMING BY STEVEN W. KEELEj RICHARD I. IVRYj...ONR No. 86-4 IF._ C TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED FORCE CONTROL AND ITS RELATION TO TIMING Final Report 6. PERFORMING ORG

  18. Roles of superconducting magnetic bearings and active magnetic bearings in attitude control and energy storage flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiqiang; Fang, Jiancheng; Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    2012-12-01

    Compared with conventional energy storage flywheel, the rotor of attitude control and energy storage flywheel (ACESF) used in space not only has high speed, but also is required to have precise and stable direction. For the presented superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) and active magnetic bearing (AMB) suspended ACESF, the rotor model including gyroscopic couples is established originally by taking the properties of SMB and AMB into account, the forces of SMB and AMB are simplified by linearization within their own neighbors of equilibrium points. For the high-speed rigid discal rotor with large inertia, the negative effect of gyroscopic effect of rotor is prominent, the radial translation and tilting movement of rotor suspended by only SMB, SMB with equivalent PMB, or SMB together with PD controlled AMB are researched individually. These analysis results proved originally that SMB together with AMB can make the rotor be stable and make the radial amplitude of the vibration of rotor be small while the translation of rotor suspended by only SMB or SMB and PM is not stable and the amplitude of this vibration is large. For the stability of the high-speed rotor in superconducting ACESF, the AMB can suppress the nutation and precession of rotor effectively by cross-feedback control based on the separated PD type control or by other modern control methods.

  19. Position Sensorless Vector Control for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors Based on Maximum Torque Control Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Hajime; Tomigashi, Yoshio; Kishimoto, Keiji

    High efficiency drive can be achieved by the maximum torque-per-ampere (MTPA) control which used reluctance torque effectively. However, the calculations for estimating rotor position and for controlling the d-axis current are required. The motor parameters of inductance etc. that are easily affected by magnetic saturation are included in those calculations. This paper proposes a new MTPA control method, which is robust against changes of motor parameters caused by magnetic saturation. In addition, complex calculation for d-axis current or reference to the table is not necessary. In this method, we define a novel coordinate frame, which has one axis aligned with the current vector of the MTPA control, and estimate the frame directly. Because the parameter Lqm for estimating the frame is less affected by the magnetic saturation than the conventional Lq, the effect of magnetic saturation on the position estimation can be greatly suppressed. First, an extended electromotive force model based on the proposed frame and a parameter Lqm for an estimation of the frame are derived. Next, the effectiveness of this proposed method is confirmed by simulations and experiments.

  20. Telerobotic hand controller study of force reflection with position control mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, Kelli F.; Hankins, Walter W.; Morris, A. Terry; Mixon, Randolph W.

    1992-01-01

    To gain further information about the effectiveness of kinesthetic force feedback or force reflection in position control mode for a telerobot, two Space Station related tasks were performed by eight subjects with and without the use of force reflection. Both time and subjective responses were measured. No differences due to force were found, however, other differences were found, e.g., gender. Comparisons of these results with other studies are discussed.

  1. Magnetic field sensor based on the Ampere's force using dual-polarization DBR fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuang; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Baiou

    2015-08-01

    A novel magnetic field sensor using distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser by Ampere's force effect is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key sensing element, that is the dual-polarization DBR fiber laser, is fixed on the middle part of two copper plates which carry the current. Ampere's force is applied onto the coppers due to an external magnetic field generated by a DC solenoid. Thus, the lateral force from the coppers is converted to a corresponding beat frequency signal shift produced by the DBR laser. The electric current sensing is also realized by the same configuration and same principle simultaneously in an intuitive manner. Good agreement between the theory calculation and the experimental results is obtained, which shows a good linearity. This sensor's sensitivity to the magnetic field and to the electric current finally reaches ~258.92 kHz/mT and ~1.08727 MHz/A, respectively.

  2. Levitation force of small clearance superconductor-magnet system under non-coaxial condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jimin; Jin, Yingze; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Miao, Xusheng

    2017-03-01

    A novel superconducting tilting-pad bearing was proposed for the advanced research of reusable liquid hydrogen turbopump in liquid rocket. The bearing is a combination of superconducting magnetic bearing and hydrodynamic fluid-film bearing. Since the viscosity of cryogenic fuel to activate superconducting state and form hydrodynamic fluid-film is very low, bearing clearance will be very small. This study focuses on the investigation of superconducting levitation force in this kind of small clearance superconductor-magnet system. Based on Bean critical state model and three-dimensional finite element method, an analysis method is presented to obtain the levitation force under such situation. Since the complicated operational conditions and structural arrangement for application in liquid rocket, center lines of bulk superconductor and magnet rotor will usually be in non-coaxial state. Superconducting levitation forces in axial direction and radial direction under non-coaxial situation are also analyzed by the presented method.

  3. Shockwave-turbulent boundary layer interaction control using magnetically driven surface discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Chiranjeev S.; Zaidi, Sohail H.; Miles, Richard B.; Macheret, Sergey O.

    2011-03-01

    This study demonstrates the potential for shockwave-turbulent boundary layer interaction control in air using low current DC constricted surface discharges forced by moderate strength magnetic fields. An analytical model describing the physics of magnetic field forced discharge interaction with boundary layer flow is developed and compared to experiments. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 2.6 indraft air tunnel with discharge currents up to 300 mA and magnetic field strengths up to 5 Tesla. Separation- and non-separation-inducing shocks are generated with diamond-shaped shockwave generators located on the wall opposite to the surface electrodes, and flow properties are measured with schlieren imaging, static wall pressure probes and acetone flow visualization. The effect of plasma control on boundary layer separation depends on the direction of the Lorentz force ( j × B). It is observed that by using a Lorentz force that pushes the discharge upstream, separation can be induced or further strengthened even with discharge currents as low as 30 mA in a 3-Tesla magnetic field. If shock-induced separation is present, it is observed that by using Lorentz force that pushes the discharge downstream, separation can be suppressed, but this required higher currents, greater than 80 mA. Acetone planar laser scattering is used to image the flow structure in the test section and the reduction in the size of recirculation bubble and its elimination are observed experimentally as a function of actuation current and magnetic field strength.

  4. A time delay controller for magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youcef-Toumi, K.; Reddy, S.

    1991-01-01

    The control of systems with unknown dynamics and unpredictable disturbances has raised some challenging problems. This is particularly important when high system performance needs to be guaranteed at all times. Recently, the Time Delay Control has been suggested as an alternative control scheme. The proposed control system does not require an explicit plant model nor does it depend on the estimation of specific plant parameters. Rather, it combines adaptation with past observations to directly estimate the effect of the plant dynamics. A control law is formulated for a class of dynamic systems and a sufficient condition is presented for control systems stability. The derivation is based on the bounded input-bounded output stability approach using L sub infinity function norms. The control scheme is implemented on a five degrees of freedom high speed and high precision magnetic bearing. The control performance is evaluated using step responses, frequency responses, and disturbance rejection properties. The experimental data show an excellent control performance despite the system complexity.

  5. First order reversal curves (FORC) analysis of individual magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlit, Merlin; Eibisch, Paul; Akbari, Maryam; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Alongside the development of artificially created magnetic nanostructures, micro-Hall magnetometry has proven to be a versatile tool to obtain high-resolution hysteresis loop data and access dynamical properties. Here we explore the application of First Order Reversal Curves (FORC)—a technique well-established in the field of paleomagnetism for studying grain-size and interaction effects in magnetic rocks—to individual and dipolar-coupled arrays of magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall sensors. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on a macroscopic piece of a floppy disk as a reference sample well known in the literature demonstrates that the FORC diagrams obtained by magnetic stray field measurements using home-built magnetometers are in good agreement with magnetization data obtained by a commercial vibrating sample magnetometer. We discuss in detail the FORC diagrams and their interpretation of three different representative magnetic systems, prepared by the direct-write Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID) technique: (1) an isolated Co-nanoisland showing a simple square-shaped hysteresis loop, (2) a more complex CoFe-alloy nanoisland exhibiting a wasp-waist-type hysteresis, and (3) a cluster of interacting Co-nanoislands. Our findings reveal that the combination of FORC and micro-Hall magnetometry is a promising tool to investigate complex magnetization reversal processes within individual or small ensembles of nanomagnets grown by FEBID or other fabrication methods. The method provides sub-μm spatial resolution and bridges the gap of FORC analysis, commonly used for studying macroscopic samples and rather large arrays, to studies of small ensembles of interacting nanoparticles with the high moment sensitivity inherent to micro-Hall magnetometry.

  6. First order reversal curves (FORC) analysis of individual magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Pohlit, Merlin; Eibisch, Paul; Akbari, Maryam; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Alongside the development of artificially created magnetic nanostructures, micro-Hall magnetometry has proven to be a versatile tool to obtain high-resolution hysteresis loop data and access dynamical properties. Here we explore the application of First Order Reversal Curves (FORC)-a technique well-established in the field of paleomagnetism for studying grain-size and interaction effects in magnetic rocks-to individual and dipolar-coupled arrays of magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall sensors. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on a macroscopic piece of a floppy disk as a reference sample well known in the literature demonstrates that the FORC diagrams obtained by magnetic stray field measurements using home-built magnetometers are in good agreement with magnetization data obtained by a commercial vibrating sample magnetometer. We discuss in detail the FORC diagrams and their interpretation of three different representative magnetic systems, prepared by the direct-write Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID) technique: (1) an isolated Co-nanoisland showing a simple square-shaped hysteresis loop, (2) a more complex CoFe-alloy nanoisland exhibiting a wasp-waist-type hysteresis, and (3) a cluster of interacting Co-nanoislands. Our findings reveal that the combination of FORC and micro-Hall magnetometry is a promising tool to investigate complex magnetization reversal processes within individual or small ensembles of nanomagnets grown by FEBID or other fabrication methods. The method provides sub-μm spatial resolution and bridges the gap of FORC analysis, commonly used for studying macroscopic samples and rather large arrays, to studies of small ensembles of interacting nanoparticles with the high moment sensitivity inherent to micro-Hall magnetometry.

  7. Magnetic resonance force microscopy of paramagnetic electron spins at millikelvin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vinante, A; Wijts, G; Usenko, O; Schinkelshoek, L; Oosterkamp, T H

    2011-12-06

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a powerful technique to detect a small number of spins that relies on force detection by an ultrasoft magnetically tipped cantilever and selective magnetic resonance manipulation of the spins. MRFM would greatly benefit from ultralow temperature operation, because of lower thermomechanical noise and increased thermal spin polarization. Here we demonstrate MRFM operation at temperatures as low as 30 mK, thanks to a recently developed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based cantilever detection technique, which avoids cantilever overheating. In our experiment, we detect dangling bond paramagnetic centres on a silicon surface down to millikelvin temperatures. Fluctuations of such defects are supposedly linked to 1/f magnetic noise and decoherence in SQUIDs, as well as in several superconducting and single spin qubits. We find evidence that spin diffusion has a key role in the low-temperature spin dynamics.

  8. Magnetic control of dipolaritons in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Arias, J S; Rodríguez, B A; Vinck-Posada, H

    2016-12-21

    Dipolaritons are quasiparticles that arise in coupled quantum wells embedded in a microcavity, they are a superposition of a photon, a direct exciton and an indirect exciton. We propose the existence of dipolaritons in a system of two coupled quantum dots inside a microcavity in direct analogy with the quantum well case and find that, despite some similarities, dipolaritons in quantum dots have different properties and can lead to true dark polariton states. We use a finite system theory to study the effects of the magnetic field on the system, including the emission, and find that it can be used as a control parameter of the properties of excitons and dipolaritons, and the overall magnetic behaviour of the structure.

  9. Magnetic and electrical control of engineered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Ivan K.; de La Venta Granda, Jose; Wang, Siming; Ramirez, Gabriel; Erekhinskiy, Mikhail; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-08-16

    Methods, systems, and devices are disclosed for controlling the magnetic and electrical properties of materials. In one aspect, a multi-layer structure includes a first layer comprising a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic material, and a second layer positioned within the multi-layer structure such that a first surface of the first layer is in direct physical contact with a second surface of the second layer. The second layer includes a material that undergoes structural phase transitions and metal-insulator transitions upon experiencing a change in temperature. One or both of the first and second layers are structured to allow a structural phase change associated with the second layer cause a change magnetic properties of the first layer.

  10. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  11. Electric contributions to magnetic force microscopy response from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lu Hua Chen, Ying

    2014-12-07

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) signals have recently been detected from whole pieces of mechanically exfoliated graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanosheets, and magnetism of the two nanomaterials was claimed based on these observations. However, non-magnetic interactions or artefacts are commonly associated with MFM signals, which make the interpretation of MFM signals not straightforward. A systematic investigation has been done to examine possible sources of the MFM signals from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets and whether the MFM signals can be correlated with magnetism. It is found that the MFM signals have significant non-magnetic contributions due to capacitive and electrostatic interactions between the nanosheets and conductive cantilever tip, as demonstrated by electric force microscopy and scanning Kevin probe microscopy analyses. In addition, the MFM signals of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets are not responsive to reversed magnetic field of the magnetic cantilever tip. Therefore, the observed MFM response is mainly from electric artefacts and not compelling enough to correlate with magnetism of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets.

  12. Magnetic force microscopy study of the switching field distribution of low density arrays of single domain magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabasum, M. R.; Zighem, F.; De La Torre Medina, J.; Encinas, A.; Piraux, L.; Nysten, B.

    2013-05-01

    In the present work, we report on the in situ magnetic force microscopy (MFM) study of the magnetization reversal in two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic Ni80Fe20 and Co55Fe45 nanowires (NW) with different diameters (40, 50, 70, and 100 nm) deposited inside low porosity (P < 1%) nanoporous polycarbonate membranes. In such arrays, the nanowires are sufficiently isolated from each other so that long range dipolar interactions can be neglected. The MFM experiments performed for different magnetization states at the same spot of the samples are analysed to determine the switching field distribution (SFD). The magnetization curves obtained from the MFM images are relatively square shaped. The SFD widths are narrower compared to those obtained for high density arrays. The weak broadening of the curves may be ascribed to the NW intrinsic SFD. The influence of diameter and composition of the ferromagnetic NW is also investigated.

  13. Self-magnetized effects in relativistic cold plasmas due to ponderomotive forces: application to relativistic magnetic guiding of light.

    PubMed

    Lehner, T; di Menza, L

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear equations are derived relevant to describe the propagation of powerful electromagnetic fields launched within a plasma. The nonlinear generation of self-induced collective electromagnetic perturbations are obtained with matter lying in the relativistic regime. Our main result is the self-consistent treatment of the coupled equations between the pump and its self-induced fields. In particular, a mechanism is pointed out for self-generation of quasistatic magnetic field that is due to the relativistic ponderomotive force. This process is found to be more efficient to produce quasistatic magnetic fields, as confirmed by recent experiments, as compared to known effects such as the inverse Faraday effect. As an application, we investigate conditions for relativistic magnetic guiding of light to occur under the combined action of the self-induced density and magnetic field.

  14. Effect of size on levitation force in a magnet/superconductor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. J.; Hull, J. R.

    1996-03-01

    We consider a model system consisting of an infinitely long magnetic dipole line placed symmetrically above an infinitely long superconducting strip. Using the Meissner effect of superconductors, we derive analytical expressions of the levitation forces acting on the dipole line. At lowest-order approximation, we discuss the possible application of our model system to estimate the upper limit of the levitation forces in some magnetic bearing systems. In one example, the model correctly calculated the vertical vibration frequency of an experimental superconducting bearing.

  15. Simultaneous Single-Molecule Force and Fluorescence Sampling of DNA Nanostructure Conformations Using Magnetic Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Swoboda, Marko; Kauert, Dominik J; Grieb, M Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Seidel, Ralf; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-01-13

    We present a hybrid single-molecule technique combining magnetic tweezers and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Through applying external forces to a paramagnetic sphere, we induce conformational changes in DNA nanostructures, which are detected in two output channels simultaneously. First, by tracking a magnetic bead with high spatial and temporal resolution, we observe overall DNA length changes along the force axis. Second, the measured FRET efficiency between two fluorescent probes monitors local conformational changes. The synchronized orthogonal readout in different observation channels will facilitate deciphering the complex mechanisms of biomolecular machines.

  16. Practical limits to the performance of magnetic bearings: Peak force, slew rate, and displacement sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslen, E.; Hermann, P.; Scott, M.; Humphris, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are subject to performance limits which are quite different from those of conventional bearings. These are due in part to the inherent nonlinearity of the device and in part to its electrical nature. Three important nonideal behaviors are presented: peak force capacity, force slew rate limitation, and sensitivity to rotor motion at large displacements. The problem of identifying the dynamic requirements of a magnetic bearing when used to support a known structure subject to known loads is discussed in the context of these limitations. Several simple design tools result from this investigation.

  17. An Improved Force Feedback Control Algorithm for Active Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tieneng; Liu, Zhifeng; Cai, Ligang

    2012-01-01

    An active tendon, consisting of a displacement actuator and a co-located force sensor, has been adopted by many studies to suppress the vibration of large space flexible structures. The damping, provided by the force feedback control algorithm in these studies, is small and can increase, especially for tendons with low axial stiffness. This study introduces an improved force feedback algorithm, which is based on the idea of velocity feedback. The algorithm provides a large damping ratio for space flexible structures and does not require a structure model. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on a structure similar to JPL-MPI. The results show that large damping can be achieved for the vibration control of large space structures. PMID:23112660

  18. Nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolation scheme based on the direct boundary integral formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Han; Wang, Huaning

    2008-05-01

    The boundary integral equation (BIE) method was first proposed by Yan and Sakurai (2000) and used to extrapolate the nonlinear force-free magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. Recently, Yan and Li (2006) improved the BIE method and proposed the direct boundary integral equation (DBIE) formulation, which represents the nonlinear force-free magnetic field by direct integration of the magnetic field on the bottom boundary surface. On the basis of this new method, we devised a practical calculation scheme for the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation above solar active regions. The code of the scheme was tested by the analytical solutions of Low and Lou (1990) and was applied to the observed vector magnetogram of solar active region NOAA 9077. The results of the calculations show that the improvement of the new computational scheme to the scheme of Yan and Li (2006) is significant, and the force-free and divergence-free constraints are well satisfied in the extrapolated fields. The calculated field lines for NOAA 9077 present the X-shaped structure and can be helpful for understanding the magnetic configuration of the filament channel as well as the magnetic reconnection process during the Bastille Day flare on 14 July 2000.

  19. Effect of reciprocating motions around working points on levitation force of superconductor-magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jimin; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Tao; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Cuiping

    2016-09-01

    In order to simulate vibration around working points in practical operation of superconducting levitation system, magnet in a simple superconductor-magnet system are conducted reciprocating motions around static height in this study. Two YBCO cylindrical samples with different grain orientations are used to investigate the effect of reciprocating motions of magnet on superconducting magnetic force. The c-axis of sample S1 is perpendicular to the top surface while sample S2 is parallel to the top surface. The initial cooling processes for the superconductors include zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and filed-cooled (FC). Compared to the levitation force before reciprocating motions, the ZFC levitation force at static height becomes smaller after reciprocating while the FC force presents opposite phenomenon. It is found that levitation force at static height tends to be stable after several times of reciprocating under ZFC and FC conditions and its time-decay phenomenon is suppressed in some extent, which is meaningful for the practical application of superconducting levitation system. Based on vortex dynamic, some physical discussions are presented to the experimental results.

  20. Forces and Stored Energy in Thin Cosine (n0) Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.

    1996-03-18

    We wish to compute Lorentz forces, equilibrium stress and stored energy in thin multipole magnets (Fig.1), that are proportional to cos(n{theta}) and whose strength varies purely as a Fourier sinusoidal series of the longitudinal coordinate z (say proportional to cos (2m-1){pi}z/L where L denotes the half-period and m = 1,2,3...). We shall demonstrate that in cases where the current is situated on such a surface of discontinuity at r = R (i.e. J = f({theta},z)), by computing the Lorentz force and solving the state of equilibrium on that surface, a closed form solution can be obtained for single function magnets as well as for any combination of interacting nested multi function magnets. The results that have been obtained, indicate that the total axial force on the end of a single multipole magnet n is independent (orthogonal) to any other multipole magnet i as long as n {ne} i. The same is true for the stored energy, the total energy of a nested set of multipole magnets is equal to the some of the energy of the individual magnets (of the same period length 2L). Finally we demonstrate our results on a nested set of magnets a dipole (n = 1) and a quadmpole (n=2) that have an identical single periodicity {omega}{sub 1}. We show that in the limiting 2D case (period 2L tends to infinity), the force reduces to the commonly known 2D case.

  1. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  2. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  3. Fluidic assisted thin-film device heterogeneous integration: Surface tension as driving force and magnetic as guiding force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Ray Chaudhuri, Ritesh; Seo, Sang-Woo

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a fluidic assisted heterogeneous integration of optical thin-film device using surface tension as driving force and magnetic field as guiding force. Thin-film devices can be auto-aligned and integrated using surface tension onto their predesigned locations on a host substrate due to minimization of interfacial energy. By inserting a layer of nickel (Ni) into device metallization step, magnetic force was employed to increase mobility and contact probability of thin-film devices to their binding sites on the host substrate. A thin-film gallium arsenide (GaAs) inverted Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) photodetector (PD) has been successfully integrated onto a silicon host substrate with the proposed integration approach. The influence of the nickel layer to the PD performance was also investigated. Due to the self-assembly capability and thin-film format of the device, the proposed method has potential for wafer-scale implementation and is compatible with the matured silicon-based CMOS technology. This is a critical step towards a scalable manufacturing process to create advanced photonic/optoelectronic systems that are low-cost, compact, high performance, and complex in multi-material functionality.

  4. Tractor controls actuating force limits for Indian operators.

    PubMed

    Mehta, C R; Pandey, M M; Tiwari, P S; Gite, L P; Khadatkar, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    In four-wheel tractors, proper design of controls is important for comfortable and safe operation of the tractor. The design involves location and dimensions of controls as well as strength limits for operating these controls. The present study was aimed to quantify human strength for operation of tractor controls and to recommend the maximum control actuating forces for normal operation of tractors based on strength capability of 3,423 Indian male agricultural workers. The 5th percentile values of strength parameters i.e. leg strength sitting (left and right), foot strength sitting (right), torque strength (both hands) sitting, push strength (left hand and right hand) sitting and pull strength (left hand and right hand) sitting of agricultural workers collected using a strength measurement set-up were taken into consideration for the study. It was recommended that the maximum actuating forces for normal operation of frequently operated brake and clutch pedals of tractors should not exceed 260 N and 125 N based on 5th percentile values of right and left leg strength of male agricultural workers, respectively. The maximum actuating force required in steering wheel operation should not exceed 51 N based on 5th percentile value of torque strength (both hands) sitting of workers. The maximum actuating forces required for operating frequently operated levers viz. gear selection, speed selection, hydraulic control and hand throttle of Indian tractors should not exceed 46 N, 46 N, 25 N and 25 N, respectively. It may be concluded that the maximum actuating force limits as given in Bureau of Indian Standards IS 10703 are very high as compared to the findings of the study based on strength data of Indian male operators, which highlight the need to revise the standard.

  5. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; ...

    2015-12-23

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has notmore » yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. In this paper, we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. Lastly, this magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.« less

  6. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; Deluca, Edward E.

    2015-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun’s corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such ‘failed torus’ events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  7. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions.

    PubMed

    Myers, Clayton E; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E

    2015-12-24

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  8. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E.

    2015-12-23

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. In this paper, we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. Lastly, this magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  9. Shear force control for a terahertz near field microscope.

    PubMed

    Buersgens, F; Acuna, G; Lang, C H; Potrebic, S I; Manus, S; Kersting, R

    2007-11-01

    We report on the advancement of apertureless terahertz microscopy by active shear force control of the scanning probe. Extreme subwavelength spatial resolution and a maximized image contrast are achieved by maintaining a tip-surface distance of about 20 nm. The constant distance between scanning tip and surface results in terahertz images that mirror the dielectric permittivity of the surface.

  10. Geometric Aspects of Force Controllability for a Swimming Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khapalov, A. Y.

    2008-02-15

    We study controllability properties (swimming capabilities) of a mathematical model of an abstract object which 'swims' in the 2-D Stokes fluid. Our goal is to investigate how the geometric shape of this object affects the forces acting upon it. Such problems are of interest in biology and engineering applications dealing with propulsion systems in fluids.

  11. Force Feedback Control of Robotic Forceps for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Chiharu; Kamei, Yusuke

    2008-06-01

    Recently, the robotic surgical support systems are in clinical use for minimally invasive surgery. For improvement in operativity and safety of minimally invasive surgery, the development of haptic forceps manipulator is in demand to help surgeon's immersion and dexterity. We have developed a multi-DOF robotic forceps manipulator using a novel omni-directional bending mechanism, so far. In this paper, in order to control the developed robotic forceps as a slave manipulator, joy-stick type master manipulator with force feedback mechanism for remote control is designed and built, and force feedback bilateral control system was constructed for grasping and bending motions of the robotic forceps. Experimental works were carried out and experimental results showed the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  12. Collective behaviour in two-dimensional cobalt nanoparticle assemblies observed by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Puntes, Victor F; Gorostiza, Pau; Aruguete, Deborah M; Bastus, Neus G; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2004-04-01

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles in the development of ultra-high-density recording media is the subject of intense research. Much of the attention of this research is devoted to the stability of magnetic moments, often neglecting the influence of dipolar interactions. Here, we explore the magnetic microstructure of different assemblies of monodisperse cobalt single-domain nanoparticles by magnetic force microscopy and magnetometric measurements. We observe that when the density of particles per unit area is higher than a determined threshold, the two-dimensional self-assemblies behave as a continuous ferromagnetic thin film. Correlated areas (similar to domains) of parallel magnetization roughly ten particles in diameter appear. As this magnetic percolation is mediated by dipolar interactions, the magnetic microstructure, its distribution and stability, is strongly dependent on the topological distribution of the dipoles. Thus, the magnetic structures of three-dimensional assemblies are magnetically soft, and an evolution of the magnetic microstructure is observed with consecutive scans of the microscope tip.

  13. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  14. Electromotive force and huge magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with zinc-blende MnAs nano-magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pham Nam

    2010-03-01

    For nanostructures such as magnetic nanowires or spin valves, it is theoretically predicted that an electromotive force (emf) arises from a time-varying magnetization in a static magnetic field [1]. This reflects the conversion of magnetic energy to electrical energy. Here we show that such an emf can indeed be induced by a static magnetic field in magnetic tunnel junctions containing zinc-blende (ZB) MnAs quantum nano-magnets. The ZB MnAs nanomagnets are coupled to a NiAs-structure hexagonal MnAs top electrode through an AlAs tunnel barrier, and to a GaAs:Be bottom electrode through a GaAs barrier. Under a static magnetic field, an emf of up to 7 mV was observed for a time scale of 10^2˜10^3 sec. This emf is induced by a co-tunneling process of electrons and magnetization of ZB MnAs nanomagnets subject to a strong Coulomb blockade of 50 meV. Huge magnetoresistance of up to 100,000% is observed for certain bias voltages. Our results strongly suggest that Faraday's Law of induction must be generalized to account for purely spin effects in magnetic nanostructures [2]. The author thanks S. Ohya, M. Tanaka, S.E. Barnes and M. Maekawa for their collaboration.[4pt] [1] S. E. Barnes et al. APL 89, 122507 (2006); PRL 98, 246601 (2007).[0pt] [2] P. N. Hai et al., Nature 458, 489 (2009).

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary action: directional facilitation of outputs and relationships to force generation.

    PubMed

    Cros, Didier; Soto, Oscar; Chiappa, Keith H

    2007-12-14

    Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human motor cortex evokes simple muscle jerks whose physiological significance is unclear. Indeed, in subjects performing a motor task, there is uncertainty as to whether TMS-evoked outputs reflect the ongoing behavior or, alternatively, a disrupted motor plan. Considering force direction and magnitude to reflect qualitative and quantitative features of the motor plan respectively, we studied the relationships between voluntary forces and those evoked by TMS. In five healthy adults, we recorded the isometric forces acting a hand joint and the electromyographic activity in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Responses obtained at rest were highly invariant. Evoked responses obtained while subjects generated static and dynamic contractions were highly codirectional with the voluntary forces. Such directional relationships were independent of stimulation intensity, stimulated cortical volume, or magnitude of voluntary force exerted. Dynamic force generation was associated with a marked increase in the magnitude of the evoked force that was linearly related to the rate of force generation. The timing of central conduction was different depending on functional role of the target muscle, as either agonist or joint fixator. These results indicate that the architecture of motor plans remain grossly undisrupted by cortical stimulation applied during voluntary motor behavior. The significant magnitude modulation of responses during dynamic force generation suggests an essential role of the corticospinal system in the specification of force changes. Finally, the corticospinal activation depends on the functional role assumed by the target muscle, either postural or agonist.

  16. Force and position control of robot manipulators: Learning and repetitive control approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Doyoung

    When a robot performs the same task repeatedly, a learning or repetitive controller can enhance the performance of the system significantly. Learning or repetitive control, however, has not been studied in the force control of a robot manipulator as extensively as in the position control of a robot manipulator. In this dissertation, learning control is applied to hybrid force and position control of robot manipulators. Also, repetitive control is applied to the control of a spring loaded end effector. When the geometry and position of the constraint surface is known, the hybrid force and position controller and the feedforward compensator can be designed in the constraint coordinates. When the operation is periodic, the learning hybrid force and position control enhances the control performance as the feedforward compensator is updated in each cycle by the force and position error in the preceding trials. This scheme is proved to be stable in the sense of Lyapunov. In the experiments, a two degree of freedom SCARA-type direct-drive robot manipulator is used to test the feasibility of the learning hybrid force and position control. The deburring tool mounted on the upper link of the robot could follow a flat, tilted flat, and curved 1/4 inch aluminum plate with a desired contact force of 10 N (within the robot-mean-square force error of 1.95 N) and with desired tangential velocity. Considering the loss of contact observed at the initial trial, the performance of the system improved significantly. A spring loaded end effector is useful in assembly operations such as mounting an electronics package on a board. With the known stiffness of the spring, the desired contact force tracking is accomplished by controlling the spring displacement. Uncertainties in the environment such as the stiffness of the board make it difficult to program the required control force. As the operation repeats, the tracking errors for the spring displacement, i.e., the contact force, are

  17. Magnetic force microscopy analysis of apoptosis of HL-60 cells induced by complex of antisense oligonucleotides and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, He-bai; Long, De-hong; Zhu, Long-zhang; Li, Xing-Yu; Dong, Ya-ming; Jia, Neng-qin; Zhou, Hai-qing; Xin, Xi; Sun, Yang

    2006-06-20

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been employed to observe antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs)-coupled silica-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs) internalized into human leukemia (HL-60) cells. The experiment demonstrated that the ASOs-coupled SMNPs delivery into the cells really occurred. The nanoparticles were internalized into the cells and the apoptotic topography can be directly visualized simultaneously with MFM technology. These present observations offer direct morphology evidence on studying the apoptosis of tumor cells and provide useful information for better design of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools in tumor treatment.

  18. Laser controlled magnetism in hydrogenated fullerene films

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Tatiana L.; Shelankov, Andrei L.; Kvyatkovskii, Oleg E.; Zakharova, Irina B.; Buga, Sergei G.; Volkov, Aleksandr P.

    2011-04-15

    Room temperature ferromagnetic-like behavior in fullerene photopolymerized films treated with monatomic hydrogen is reported. The hydrogen treatment controllably varies the paramagnetic spin concentration and laser induced polymerization transforms the paramagnetic phase to a ferromagnetic-like one. Excess laser irradiation destroys magnetic ordering, presumably due to structural changes, which was continuously monitored by Raman spectroscopy. We suggest an interpretation of the data based on first-principles density-functional spin-unrestricted calculations which show that the excess spin from mono-atomic hydrogen is delocalized within the host fullerene and the laser-induced polymerization promotes spin exchange interaction and spin alignment in the polymerized phase.

  19. Constraints on magnetic energy and mantle conductivity from the forced nutations of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffett, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of a presence of a conducting layer at the base of the mantle, as suggested by Knittle and Jeanloz (1986, 1989), was examined using observations of the earth's nutations. Evidence favoring the presence of a conducting layer is found in the effect of ohmic dissipation, which can cause the amplitude of the earth's nutation to be out-of-phase with tidal forcings. It is shown that the earth's magnetic field can produce observable signatures in the forced nutations of the earth when a thin conducting layer is located at the base of the mantle. The present theoretical calculations are compared with VLBI determinations of forced nutations.

  20. Design considerations of electromagnetic force in a direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. S.; Tsai, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of electromagnetic force associated with the width of stator teeth, width of rotor back iron, and slot opening for a ten-pole nine-slot direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor is presented. The study calculates the amplitude of the electromagnetic force on the rotating rotor by using the finite-element method. The results show that the amplitude of electromagnetic force, which may cause the noise and vibration of motors, changes with the variation of these above mentioned three factors. The relationship between the considerations of output torque and the minimization of noise and vibration is also established in this paper.