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Sample records for magnetic nanoparticles attached

  1. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  2. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  3. Magnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Mitchell B. (Inventor); Harwell, William D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A magnetic attachment mechanism adapted for interfacing with the manipulator arm of a remote manipulator system and comprising a pair of permanent magnets of rare earth material are arranged in a stator-rotor relationship. The rotor magnet is journalled for rotation about its longitudinal axis between pole plates of the stator magnet, each of which includes an adhering surface. In a first rotary position corresponding to the ON condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet is closely adjacent to a stator magnet pole plate of like polarity whereby the respective magnet fields are additive for producing a strong magnetic field emanating from the adhering surfaces for attracting a ferrous magnetic plate, or the like, affixed to the payload. When the rotor magnet is rotated to a second position corresponding to the OFF condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet is disposed closely adjacent to a pole plate of unlike polarity whereby the magnetic fields of the magnets are in cancelling relationship at the adhering surfaces, which permits the release of a payload. An actuator for selectively rotating the rotor magnet between the ON and OFF positions is provided for interfacing and connecting the magnetic attachment mechanism with a manipulator arm. For affecting an optimal rigidized attachment the payload is provided with guide means cooperable with guide means on the housing of the mechanism for directing adhering surfaces of the polar plates to the ferrous plate.

  4. Magnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwell, William D. (Inventor); Wu, Mitchell B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic attachment mechanism adapted for interfacing with the manipulator arm (11) of a remote manipulator system and comprising a pair of permanent magnets (31,32) of rare earth material which are arranged in a stator-rotor relationship. The rotor magnet (32), is journalled for rotation about its longitudinal axis between pole plates (35,36) of the stator magnet (31), each of which includes an adhering surface (35a,36a). In a first rotary position corresponding to the ON condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (32) is closely adjacent a stator magnet pole plate of like polarity whereby the respective magnet fields are additive for producing a strong magnetic field emanating from the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) for attracting a ferrous magnetic plate 20, or the like, affixed to the payload (20 or 50). When the rotor magnet (32) is rotated to a second position corresponding to the OFF condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (31) is disposed closely adjacent a pole plate of unlike polarity whereby the magnetic fields of the magnets are in cancelling relationship at the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) which permits the release of a payload. An actuator (51 or 70) for selectively rotating the rotor magnet (32) between the ON and OFF positions is provided for interfacing and connecting the magnetic attachment mechanism with a manipulator arm. For effecting an optimal rigidized attachment the payload is provided with guides (91,92) cooperable with guides (96,16,17) on the housing of the mechanism for directing adhering surfaces (35a,36a) of the polar plates to the ferrous plate (20).

  5. Fluorescent sensing of pyrophosphate anion in synovial fluid based on DNA-attached magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tong, Li-Li; Chen, Zhen-zhen; Jiang, Zhong-yao; Sun, Miao-miao; Li, Lu; Liu, Ju; Tang, Bo

    2015-10-15

    In this work, a new fluorescent method for sensitive detection of pyrophosphate anion (P2O7(4-), PPi) in the synovial fluid was developed using fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA-attached Fe3O4 NPs. The sensing approach is based on the strong affinity of PPi to Fe3O4 NPs and highly efficient fluorescent quenching ability of Fe3O4 NPs for fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA. In the presence of PPi, the fluorescence would enhance dramatically due to desorption of fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA from the surface of Fe3O4 NPs, which allowed the analysis of PPi in a very simple manner. The proposed sensing system allows for the sensitive determination of PPi in the range of 2.0 × 10(-7)-4 × 10(-6)M with a detection limit of 76 nM. Importantly, the protocol exhibits excellent selectivity for the determination of PPi over other phosphate-containing compounds. The method was successfully applied to the determination of PPi in the synovial fluid, which suggests our proposed method has great potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:25957830

  6. Oriented attachment explains cobalt ferrite nanoparticle growth in bioinspired syntheses.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Annalena; Hetaba, Walid; Wißbrock, Marco; Löffler, Stefan; Mill, Nadine; Eckstädt, Katrin; Dreyer, Axel; Ennen, Inga; Sewald, Norbert; Schattschneider, Peter; Hütten, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Oriented attachment has created a great debate about the description of crystal growth throughout the last decade. This aggregation-based model has successfully described biomineralization processes as well as forms of inorganic crystal growth, which could not be explained by classical crystal growth theory. Understanding the nanoparticle growth is essential since physical properties, such as the magnetic behavior, are highly dependent on the microstructure, morphology and composition of the inorganic crystals. In this work, the underlying nanoparticle growth of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in a bioinspired synthesis was studied. Bioinspired syntheses have sparked great interest in recent years due to their ability to influence and alter inorganic crystal growth and therefore tailor properties of nanoparticles. In this synthesis, a short synthetic version of the protein MMS6, involved in nanoparticle formation within magnetotactic bacteria, was used to alter the growth of cobalt ferrite. We demonstrate that the bioinspired nanoparticle growth can be described by the oriented attachment model. The intermediate stages proposed in the theoretical model, including primary-building-block-like substructures as well as mesocrystal-like structures, were observed in HRTEM measurements. These structures display regions of substantial orientation and possess the same shape and size as the resulting discs. An increase in orientation with time was observed in electron diffraction measurements. The change of particle diameter with time agrees with the recently proposed kinetic model for oriented attachment. PMID:24605288

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles for "smart liposomes".

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Mustapić, Mislav; Ebrahimian, Haleh; Wagner, Pawel; Kim, Jung Ho; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Horvat, Joseph; Martinac, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Liposomal drug delivery systems (LDDSs) are promising tools used for the treatment of diseases where highly toxic pharmacological agents are administered. Currently, destabilising LDDSs by a specific stimulus at a target site remains a major challenge. The bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) presents an excellent candidate biomolecule that could be employed as a remotely controlled pore-forming nanovalve for triggered drug release from LDDSs. In this study, we developed superparamagnetic nanoparticles for activation of the MscL nanovalves by magnetic field. Synthesised CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with the radius less than 10 nm were labelled by SH groups for attachment to MscL. Activation of MscL by magnetic field with the nanoparticles attached was examined by the patch clamp technique showing that the number of activated channels under ramp pressure increased upon application of the magnetic field. In addition, we have not observed any cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles in human cultured cells. Our study suggests the possibility of using magnetic nanoparticles as a specific trigger for activation of MscL nanovalves for drug release in LDDSs. PMID:26184724

  8. Metallic magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hernando, A; Crespo, P; García, M A

    2005-12-22

    In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm), covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  9. Magnetically Attached Multifunction Maintenance Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Joffe, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mobile telerobot, denoted the magnetically attached multifunction maintenance rover (MAGMER), has been proposed for use in the inspection and maintenance of the surfaces of ships, tanks containing petrochemicals, and other large ferromagnetic structures. As its name suggests, this robot would utilize magnetic attraction to adhere to a structure. As it moved along the surface of the structure, the MAGMER would perform tasks that could include close-up visual inspection by use of video cameras, various sensors, and/or removal of paint by water-jet blasting, laser heating, or induction heating. The water-jet nozzles would be mounted coaxially within compressed-air-powered venturi nozzles that would collect the paint debris dislodged by the jets. The MAGMER would be deployed, powered, and controlled from a truck, to which it would be connected by hoses for water, compressed air, and collection of debris and by cables for electric power and communication (see Figure 1). The operation of the MAGMER on a typical large structure would necessitate the use of long cables and hoses, which can be heavy. To reduce the load of the hoses and cables on the MAGMER and thereby ensure its ability to adhere to vertical and overhanging surfaces, the hoses and cables would be paid out through telescopic booms that would be parts of a MAGMER support system. The MAGMER would move by use of four motorized, steerable wheels, each of which would be mounted in an assembly that would include permanent magnets and four pole pieces (see Figure 2). The wheels would protrude from between the pole pieces by only about 3 mm, so that the gap between the pole pieces and the ferromagnetic surface would be just large enough to permit motion along the surface but not so large as to reduce the magnetic attraction excessively. In addition to the wheel assemblies, the MAGMER would include magnetic adherence enhancement fixtures, which would comprise arrays of permanent magnets and pole pieces

  10. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  11. Dental magnetic attachment: toward third generation devices.

    PubMed

    Tegawa, Yoshinori; Kinouchi, Yohsuke

    2008-03-01

    Toward realizing the performance of functional and versatile dental magnetic attachments in the third generation required for individual prosthesis, it is important to control retentive characteristics of the attachments. For this purpose, three new types of magnetic attachment, i.e., split-pole type with a slant magnetization, modified split-pole type, and cylinder type, have been developed and evaluated in terms of the restoring force as well as the retentive force. The new attachments are designed to have high corrosion resistance, combining magnetic and nonmagnetic stainless steels and microlaser welding similar to the usual cup-yoke and sandwich-yoke types. It has been found that the two split-pole types have stronger restoring force and the cylinder type has weaker restoring force in comparison with the usual magnetic attachments. The attachments can be used properly and selectively according to individual requirement on abutment state and denture retention. As a result, the newly developed attachments may provide flexible retention performance useful for more effective and extensive applications of a magnetic attachment.

  12. Structural characterization of copolymer embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, G. G.; Nastro, A.; Filippelli, L.; Cazacu, M.; Iacob, M.; Rossi, C. Oliviero; Popa, A.; Toloman, D.; Dobromir, M.; Iacomi, F.

    2015-10-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized by co-precipitation and coated by emulsion polymerization with poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) (PMMA-co-AAc) to create surface functional groups that can attach drug molecules and other biomolecules. The coated and uncoated magnetite nanoparticles were stored for two years in normal closed ships and than characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solid phase transformation of magnetite to maghemite, as well as an increase in particle size were evidenced for the uncoated nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles preserved their magnetite structure and magnetic properties. The influences of monomers and surfactant layers on interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles evidenced that the thickness of the polymer has a significant effect on magnetic properties.

  13. Multifunctional biocompatible coatings on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkova, A. V.; Sorokina, O. N.; Rosenfeld, M. A.; Kovarski, A. L.

    2012-11-01

    Methods for coating formation on magnetic nanoparticles used in biology and medicine are considered. Key requirements to the coatings are formulated, namely, biocompatibility, stability, the possibility of attachment of pharmaceutical agents, and the absence of toxicity. The behaviour of nanoparticle/coating nanosystems in the body including penetration through cellular membranes and the excretion rates and routes is analyzed. Parameters characterizing the magnetic properties of these systems and their magnetic controllability are described. Factors limiting the applications of magnetically controlled nanosystems for targeted drug delivery are discussed. The bibliography includes 405 references.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  15. Biotemplated magnetic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Johanna M; Bramble, Jonathan P; Rawlings, Andrea E; Burnell, Gavin; Evans, Stephen D; Staniland, Sarah S

    2012-01-23

    Immobilized biomineralizing protein Mms6 templates the formation of uniform magnetite nanoparticles in situ when selectively patterned onto a surface. Magnetic force microscopy shows that the stable magnetite particles maintain their magnetic orientation at room temperature, and may be exchange coupled. This precision-mixed biomimetic/soft-lithography methodology offers great potential for the future of nanodevice fabrication.

  16. Biotemplated magnetic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Johanna M; Bramble, Jonathan P; Rawlings, Andrea E; Burnell, Gavin; Evans, Stephen D; Staniland, Sarah S

    2012-01-23

    Immobilized biomineralizing protein Mms6 templates the formation of uniform magnetite nanoparticles in situ when selectively patterned onto a surface. Magnetic force microscopy shows that the stable magnetite particles maintain their magnetic orientation at room temperature, and may be exchange coupled. This precision-mixed biomimetic/soft-lithography methodology offers great potential for the future of nanodevice fabrication. PMID:22052737

  17. Covalent attachment of Mn-porphyrin onto doxorubicin-loaded poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for potential magnetic resonance imaging and pH-sensitive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lijia; Liang, Xiaolong; Li, Xiaoda; Yang, Yongbo; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, theranostic nanoparticles (MnP-DOX NPs) were fabricated by conjugating Mn-porphyrin onto the surface of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (DOX NPs) for potential T1 magnetic resonance imaging and pH-sensitive drug delivery. An in vitro drug release study showed that the release rate of DOX from MnP-DOX NPs was slow at neutral pH but accelerated significantly in acidic conditions. It was found that MnP-DOX NPs could be easily internalized by HeLa cells and effectively suppressed the growth of HeLa cells and HT-29 cells due to the accelerated drug release in acidic lysosomal compartments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning analysis demonstrated that MnP-DOX NPs had much higher longitudinal relaxivity in water (r1 value of 27.8 mM(-1) s(-1) of Mn(3+)) than Mn-porphyrin (Mn(III)TPPS3NH2; r1 value of 6.70 mM(-1) s(-1) of Mn(3+)), behaving as an excellent contrast agent for T1-weighted MRI both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, such a smart and promising nanoplatform integrates multiple capabilities for effective cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Magnetoacoustic Sensing of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Rosenthal, Amir; Myklatun, Ahne; Westmeyer, Gil G; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-11

    The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic fields can be determined through electrical signal induction in coils due to magnetization. However, the direct measurement of instant electromagnetic energy absorption by magnetic nanoparticles, as it relates to particle characterization or magnetic hyperthermia studies, has not been possible so far. We introduce the theory of magnetoacoustics, predicting the existence of second harmonic pressure waves from magnetic nanoparticles due to energy absorption from continuously modulated alternating magnetic fields. We then describe the first magnetoacoustic system reported, based on a fiber-interferometer pressure detector, necessary for avoiding electric interference. The magnetoacoustic system confirmed the existence of previously unobserved second harmonic magnetoacoustic responses from solids, magnetic nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-loaded cells, exposed to continuous wave magnetic fields at different frequencies. We discuss how magnetoacoustic signals can be employed as a nanoparticle or magnetic field sensor for biomedical and environmental applications.

  19. Magnetoacoustic Sensing of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Rosenthal, Amir; Myklatun, Ahne; Westmeyer, Gil G; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-11

    The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic fields can be determined through electrical signal induction in coils due to magnetization. However, the direct measurement of instant electromagnetic energy absorption by magnetic nanoparticles, as it relates to particle characterization or magnetic hyperthermia studies, has not been possible so far. We introduce the theory of magnetoacoustics, predicting the existence of second harmonic pressure waves from magnetic nanoparticles due to energy absorption from continuously modulated alternating magnetic fields. We then describe the first magnetoacoustic system reported, based on a fiber-interferometer pressure detector, necessary for avoiding electric interference. The magnetoacoustic system confirmed the existence of previously unobserved second harmonic magnetoacoustic responses from solids, magnetic nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-loaded cells, exposed to continuous wave magnetic fields at different frequencies. We discuss how magnetoacoustic signals can be employed as a nanoparticle or magnetic field sensor for biomedical and environmental applications. PMID:27015511

  20. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles for theragnostics

    PubMed Central

    Shubayev, Veronica I.; Pisanic, Thomas R.; Jin, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a cutting-edge tool in medicine because they can be simultaneously functionalized and guided by a magnetic field. Use of MNPs has advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cell tracking and bioseparation. Integrative therapeutic and diagnostic (i.e., theragnostic) applications have emerged with MNP use, such as MRI-guided cell replacement therapy or MRI-based imaging of cancer-specific gene delivery. However, mounting evidence suggests that certain properties of nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell and tissue barriers, resistance to biodegradation) amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to molecular or bulk counterparts. Oxidative stress, a 3-tier paradigm of nanotoxicity, manifests in activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (tier I), followed by a pro-inflammatory response (tier II) and DNA damage leading to cellular apoptosis and mutagenesis (tier III). In vivo administered MNPs are quickly challenged by macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system (RES), resulting in not only neutralization of potential MNP toxicity but also reduced circulation time necessary for MNP efficacy. We discuss the role of MNP size, composition and surface chemistry in their intracellular uptake, biodistribution, macrophage recognition and cytotoxicity, and review current studies on MNP toxicity, caveats of nanotoxicity assessments and engineering strategies to optimize MNPs for biomedical use. PMID:19389434

  2. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles: design, synthesis, and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinhao; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Bing

    2009-08-18

    The combination of nanotechnology and molecular biology has developed into an emerging research area: nanobiotechnology. Magnetic nanoparticles are well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated externally, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications in biology and medicine, including protein purification, drug delivery, and medical imaging. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, researchers would like to design and fabricate multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles. Currently, there are two strategies to fabricate magnetic nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanostructures. The first, molecular functionalization, involves attaching antibodies, proteins, and dyes to the magnetic nanoparticles. The other method integrates the magnetic nanoparticles with other functional nanocomponents, such as quantum dots (QDs) or metallic nanoparticles. Because they can exhibit several features synergistically and deliver more than one function simultaneously, such multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles could have unique advantages in biomedical applications. In this Account, we review examples of the design and biomedical application of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles. After their conjugation with proper ligands, antibodies, or proteins, the biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles exhibit highly selective binding. These results indicate that such nanoparticles could be applied to biological medical problems such as protein purification, bacterial detection, and toxin decorporation. The hybrid nanostructures, which combine magnetic nanoparticles with other nanocomponents, exhibit paramagnetism alongside features such as fluorescence or enhanced optical contrast. Such structures could provide a platform for enhanced medical imaging and controlled drug delivery. We expect that the combination of unique structural

  3. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  4. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ying

    Nanotechnology is revolutionizing human's life. Synthesis and application of magnetic nanoparticles is a fast burgeoning field which has potential to bring significant advance in many fields, for example diagnosis and treatment in biomedical area. Novel nanoparticles to function efficiently and intelligently are in desire to improve the current technology. We used a magnetron-sputtering-based nanocluster deposition technique to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles in gas phase, and specifically engineered nanoparticles for different applications. Alternating magnetic field heating is emerging as a technique to assist cancer treatment or drug delivery. We proposed high-magnetic-moment Fe3Si particles with relatively large magnetic anisotropy energy should in principle provide superior performance. Such nanoparticles were experimentally synthesized and characterized. Their promising magnetic properties can contribute to heating performance under suitable alternating magnetic field conditions. When thermal energy is used for medical treatment, it is ideal to work in a designed temperature range. Biocompatible and "smart" magnetic nanoparticles with temperature self-regulation were designed from both materials science and biomedicine aspects. We chose Fe-Si material system to demonstrate the concept. Temperature dependent physical property was adjusted by tuning of exchange coupling between Fe atoms through incorporation of various amount of Si. The magnetic moment can still be kept in a promising range. The two elements are both biocompatible, which is favored by in-vivo medical applications. A combination of "smart" magnetic particles and thermo-sensitive polymer were demonstrated to potentially function as a platform for drug delivery. Highly sensitive diagnosis for point-of-care is in desire nowadays. We developed composition- and phase-controlled Fe-Co nanoparticles for bio-molecule detection. It has been demonstrated that Fe70Co30 nanoparticles and giant

  5. Enzymatic Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C.; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T. Randall; Willson, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  6. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  7. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing.

  8. A Renewable Electrochemical Magnetic Immunosensor Based on Gold Nanoparticle Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-05-24

    A particle-based renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor was developed by using magnetic beads and a gold nanoparticle label. Anti-IgG antibody-modified magnetic beads were attached to a renewable carbon paste transducer surface by magnets that were fixed inside the sensor. A gold nanoparticle label was capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads by sandwich immunoassay. Highly sensitive electrochemical stripping analysis offers a simple and fast method to quantify the capatured gold nanoparticle tracer and avoid the use of an enzyme label and substrate. The stripping signal of gold nanoparticle is related to the concentration of target IgG in the sample solution. A transmission electron microscopy image shows that the gold nanoparticles were successfully capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads through sandwich immunoreaction events. The parameters of immunoassay, including the loading of magnetic beads, the amount of gold nanoparticle conjugate, and the immunoreaction time, were optimized. The detection limit of 0.02 μg ml-1of IgG was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. Such particle-based electrochemical magnetic immunosensors could be readily used for simultaneous parallel detection of multiple proteins by using multiple inorganic metal nanoparticle tracers and are expected to open new opportunities for disease diagnostics and biosecurity.

  9. Technique to optimize magnetic response of gelatin coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nidhi; Parekh, Kinnari

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the results of optimization of magnetic response for highly stable bio-functionalize magnetic nanoparticles dispersion. Concentration of gelatin during in situ co-precipitation synthesis was varied from 8, 23 and 48 mg/mL to optimize magnetic properties. This variation results in a change in crystallite size from 10.3 to 7.8 ± 0.1 nm. TEM measurement of G3 sample shows highly crystalline spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 7.2 ± 0.2 nm and diameter distribution (σ) of 0.27. FTIR spectra shows a shift of 22 cm(-1) at C=O stretching with absence of N-H stretching confirming the chemical binding of gelatin on magnetic nanoparticles. The concept of lone pair electron of the amide group explains the mechanism of binding. TGA shows 32.8-25.2% weight loss at 350 °C temperature substantiating decomposition of chemically bind gelatin. The magnetic response shows that for 8 mg/mL concentration of gelatin, the initial susceptibility and saturation magnetization is the maximum. The cytotoxicity of G3 sample was assessed in Normal Rat Kidney Epithelial Cells (NRK Line) by MTT assay. Results show an increase in viability for all concentrations, the indicative probability of a stimulating action of these particles in the nontoxic range. This shows the potential of this technique for biological applications as the coated particles are (i) superparamagnetic (ii) highly stable in physiological media (iii) possibility of attaching other drug with free functional group of gelatin and (iv) non-toxic.

  10. Magnetic Separation Dynamics of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, M.; Huijin Zhang,; You Qiang,

    2013-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are appealing candidates for analytical separation of heavy metal ions from waste water and separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. This work studies the separation dynamics and investigates the appropriate magnetic-field gradients. A dynamic study of colloidal MNPs was performed for steady-state flow. Measurements were conducted to record the separation time of particles as a function of magnetic field gradient. The drag and magnetic forces play a significant role on the separation time. A drop in saturation magnetization and variation of particle size occurs after surface functionalization of the MNPs; these are the primary factors that affect the separation time and velocity of the MNPs. The experimental results are correlated to a theoretical one-dimensional model.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticle sensing: decoupling the magnetization from the excitation field

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of magnetic nanoparticles has exciting applications for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and molecular detection. We introduce, simulate, and experimentally demonstrate an innovation—a sensing coil that is geometrically decoupled from the excitation field—for magnetic nanoparticle spectroscopy that increases the flexibility and capabilities of remote detection. The decoupling enhances the sensitivity absolutely; to small amounts of nanoparticles, and relatively; to small changes in the nanoparticle dynamics. We adapt a previous spectroscopic method that measures the relaxation time of nanoparticles and demonstrate a new measurement of nanoparticle temperature that could potentially be used concurrently during hyperthermia. PMID:24610961

  12. Intravenous magnetic nanoparticle cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui S; Hainfeld, James F

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles heated by an alternating magnetic field could be used to treat cancers, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. However, direct intratumoral injections suffer from tumor incongruence and invasiveness, typically leaving undertreated regions, which lead to cancer regrowth. Intravenous injection more faithfully loads tumors, but, so far, it has been difficult achieving the necessary concentration in tumors before systemic toxicity occurs. Here, we describe use of a magnetic nanoparticle that, with a well-tolerated intravenous dose, achieved a tumor concentration of 1.9 mg Fe/g tumor in a subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma mouse model, with a tumor to non-tumor ratio > 16. With an applied field of 38 kA/m at 980 kHz, tumors could be heated to 60°C in 2 minutes, durably ablating them with millimeter (mm) precision, leaving surrounding tissue intact. PMID:23901270

  13. Development of a Magnetic Attachment Method for Bionic Eye Applications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kate; Meffin, Hamish; Burns, Owen; Abbott, Carla J; Allen, Penelope J; Opie, Nicholas L; McGowan, Ceara; Yeoh, Jonathan; Ahnood, Arman; Luu, Chi D; Cicione, Rosemary; Saunders, Alexia L; McPhedran, Michelle; Cardamone, Lisa; Villalobos, Joel; Garrett, David J; Nayagam, David A X; Apollo, Nicholas V; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Stacey, Alastair; Escudie, Mathilde; Lichter, Samantha; Shepherd, Robert K; Prawer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Successful visual prostheses require stable, long-term attachment. Epiretinal prostheses, in particular, require attachment methods to fix the prosthesis onto the retina. The most common method is fixation with a retinal tack; however, tacks cause retinal trauma, and surgical proficiency is important to ensure optimal placement of the prosthesis near the macula. Accordingly, alternate attachment methods are required. In this study, we detail a novel method of magnetic attachment for an epiretinal prosthesis using two prostheses components positioned on opposing sides of the retina. The magnetic attachment technique was piloted in a feline animal model (chronic, nonrecovery implantation). We also detail a new method to reliably control the magnet coupling force using heat. It was found that the force exerted upon the tissue that separates the two components could be minimized as the measured force is proportionately smaller at the working distance. We thus detail, for the first time, a surgical method using customized magnets to position and affix an epiretinal prosthesis on the retina. The position of the epiretinal prosthesis is reliable, and its location on the retina is accurately controlled by the placement of a secondary magnet in the suprachoroidal location. The electrode position above the retina is less than 50 microns at the center of the device, although there were pressure points seen at the two edges due to curvature misalignment. The degree of retinal compression found in this study was unacceptably high; nevertheless, the normal structure of the retina remained intact under the electrodes. PMID:26416723

  14. Development of a Magnetic Attachment Method for Bionic Eye Applications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kate; Meffin, Hamish; Burns, Owen; Abbott, Carla J; Allen, Penelope J; Opie, Nicholas L; McGowan, Ceara; Yeoh, Jonathan; Ahnood, Arman; Luu, Chi D; Cicione, Rosemary; Saunders, Alexia L; McPhedran, Michelle; Cardamone, Lisa; Villalobos, Joel; Garrett, David J; Nayagam, David A X; Apollo, Nicholas V; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Stacey, Alastair; Escudie, Mathilde; Lichter, Samantha; Shepherd, Robert K; Prawer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Successful visual prostheses require stable, long-term attachment. Epiretinal prostheses, in particular, require attachment methods to fix the prosthesis onto the retina. The most common method is fixation with a retinal tack; however, tacks cause retinal trauma, and surgical proficiency is important to ensure optimal placement of the prosthesis near the macula. Accordingly, alternate attachment methods are required. In this study, we detail a novel method of magnetic attachment for an epiretinal prosthesis using two prostheses components positioned on opposing sides of the retina. The magnetic attachment technique was piloted in a feline animal model (chronic, nonrecovery implantation). We also detail a new method to reliably control the magnet coupling force using heat. It was found that the force exerted upon the tissue that separates the two components could be minimized as the measured force is proportionately smaller at the working distance. We thus detail, for the first time, a surgical method using customized magnets to position and affix an epiretinal prosthesis on the retina. The position of the epiretinal prosthesis is reliable, and its location on the retina is accurately controlled by the placement of a secondary magnet in the suprachoroidal location. The electrode position above the retina is less than 50 microns at the center of the device, although there were pressure points seen at the two edges due to curvature misalignment. The degree of retinal compression found in this study was unacceptably high; nevertheless, the normal structure of the retina remained intact under the electrodes.

  15. The role of ROS generation from magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field on cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wydra, Robert J.; Rychahou, Piotr G.; Evers, B. Mark; Anderson, Kimberly W.; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Hilt, J. Zach

    2015-01-01

    Monosaccharide coated iron oxide nanoparticles were developed to selectively target colon cancer cell lines for magnetically mediated energy delivery therapy. The nanoparticles were prepared using a coupling reaction to attach the glucose functional group to the iron oxide core, and functionality was confirmed with physicochemical characterization techniques. The targeted nanoparticles were internalized into CT26 cells at a greater extent than non-targeted nanoparticles, and the nanoparticles were shown to be localized within lysosomes. Cells with internalized nanoparticles were exposed to an AMF to determine the potential to delivery therapy. Cellular ROS generation and apoptotic cell death was enhanced with field exposure. The nanoparticle coatings inhibit the Fenton-like surface generation of ROS suggesting a thermal or mechanical effect is more likely the source of the intracellular effect. PMID:26143604

  16. [Magnetic nanoparticles and intracellular delivery of biopolymers].

    PubMed

    Kornev, A A; Dubina, M V

    2014-03-01

    The basic methods of intracellular delivery of biopolymers are present in this review. The structure and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, their stabilizing surfactants are described. The examples of the interaction of nanoparticles with biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are considered. The final part of the review is devoted to problems physiology and biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles for gene and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Stuart C; Yiu, Humphrey HP; Dobson, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery began over 30 years ago. Since that time, major progress has been made in particle design and synthesis techniques, however, very few clinical trials have taken place. Here we review advances in magnetic nanoparticle design, in vitro and animal experiments with magnetic nanoparticle-based drug and gene delivery, and clinical trials of drug targeting. PMID:18686777

  18. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  19. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Non-magnetic CNTs and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayondo, Moses; Seifu, Dereje

    Magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in non-magnetic CNTs and graphene matrix to incorporate all the advantages and the unique properties of CNTs and graphene. Composites of CNTs and graphene with magnetic nanoparticles may offer new opportunities for a wide variety of potential applications such as magnetic data storage, magnetic force microscopy tip, electromagnetic interference shields, thermally conductive films, reinforced polymer composites, transparent electrodes for displays, solar cells, gas sensors, magnetic nanofluids, and magnetically guided drug delivery systems. Magnetic nanoparticles coated CNTs can also be used as an electrode in lithium ion battery to replace graphite because of the higher theoretical capacity. Graphene nanocomposites, coated with magnetic sensitive nanoparticles, have demonstrated enhanced magnetic property. We would like to acknowledge support by NSF-MRI-DMR-1337339.

  20. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    David, Anand

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall

  1. Dual immobilization and magnetic manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Y.; Jian, Z. F.; Horng, H. E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H. C.; Wu, C. C.; Lee, Y. H.

    By suitably bio-functionalizing the surfaces, magnetic nanoparticles are able to bind specific biomolecules, and may serve as vectors for delivering bio-entities to target tissues. In this work, the synthesis of bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with two kinds of bio-probes is developed. Here, the stem cell is selected as a to-be-delivered bio-entity and infarcted myocardium is the target issue. Thus, cluster designation-34 (CD-34) on stem cell and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) (or troponin I) on infarcted myocardium are the specific biomolecules to be bound with bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. In addition to demonstrating the co-coating of two kinds of bio-probes on a magnetic nanoparticle, the feasibility of manipulation on bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles by external magnetic fields is investigated.

  2. Magnetic relaxation in dipolar magnetic nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, Ondrej; Barker, Joe; Chantrell, Roy; Friedman, Gary; York-Drexel Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the role of dipolar interactions on thermal relaxation in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems is of fundamental importance in magnetic recording, for optimizing the hysteresis heating contribution in the hyperthermia cancer treatment in biomedicine, or for biological and chemical sensing, for example. In this talk, we discuss our related efforts to quantify the influence of dipolar interactions on thermal relaxation in small clusters of MNPs. Setting up the master equation and solving the associated eigenvalue problem, we identify the observable relaxation time scale spectra for various types of MNP clusters, and demonstrate qualitatively different spectral characteristics depending on the point group of symmetries of the particle arrangement within the cluster - being solely a dipolar interaction effect. Our findings provide insight into open questions related to magnetic relaxation in bulk MNP systems, and may prove to be also of practical relevance, e.g., for improving robustness of methodologies in biological and chemical sensing. OH gratefully acknowledges support from a Marie Curie Intra European Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme under grant agreement PIEF-GA-2010-273014

  3. Synthesis and characterization of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Dipti; Peeples, Brianna N.; Spence, Destiny D.; Peeples, Caryn; Bell, Crystal N.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in a wide array of industrial and biomedical applications due to their unique properties at the nanoscale level. They are extensively used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic hyperthermia treatment, drug delivery, and in assays for biological separations. Furthermore, superparamagnetic nanoparticles are of large interest for in vivo applications. However, these unmodified nanoparticles aggregate and consequently lose their superparamagnetic behaviors, due to high surface to volume ratio and strong dipole to dipole interaction. For these reasons, surface coating is necessary for the enhancement and effectiveness of magnetic nanoparticles to be used in various applications. In addition to providing increased stability to the nanoparticles in different solvents or media, stabilizers such as surfactants, organic/inorganic molecules, polymer and co-polymers are employed as surface coatings, which yield magnetically responsive systems. In this work we present the synthesis and magnetic characterization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (APS) and citric acid. The particles magnetic hysteresis was measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer with an in-plane magnetic field. The uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis.

  4. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Oliviero L.; Sjaastad, Kristine; Radomski, Marek W.; Volkov, Yuri; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2015-01-01

    In a report from 2008, The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicted a tripled cancer incidence from 1975, projecting a possible 13-17 million cancer deaths worldwide by 2030. While new treatments are evolving and reaching approval for different cancer types, the main prevention of cancer mortality is through early diagnosis, detection and treatment of malignant cell growth. The last decades have seen a development of new imaging techniques now in widespread clinical use. The development of nano-imaging through fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to detect and diagnose cancer at an earlier stage than with current imaging methods. The characteristic properties of nanoparticles result in their theranostic potential allowing for simultaneous detection of and treatment of the disease. This review provides state of the art of the nanotechnological applications for cancer therapy. Furthermore, it advances a novel concept of personalized nanomedical theranostic therapy using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in conjunction with MRI imaging. Regulatory and industrial perspectives are also included to outline future perspectives in nanotechnological cancer research. PMID:26379790

  5. A silica-based magnetic platform decorated with mixed ligand gold nanoparticles: a recyclable catalyst for esterification reactions.

    PubMed

    Ertem, Elif; Murillo-Cremaes, Nerea; Carney, Randy Patrick; Laromaine, Anna; Janeček, Emma-Rose; Roig, Anna; Stellacci, Francesco

    2016-04-25

    A novel and convenient synthetic strategy for the preparation of magnetically responsive silica nanospheres decorated with mixed ligand protected gold nanoparticles is described. Gold nanoparticles are attached to the silica surface via stable amide bond formation. The hierarchical nanospheres show promising results as reusable and efficient catalysts for esterification reactions and they can be recovered through a simple magnetic separation.

  6. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  7. Engineering biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles for biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Maria; Pelaz, Beatriz; López-Larrubia, Pilar; García-Martin, Maria L.; Grazú, Valeria; de La Fuente, Jesus M.

    2010-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the surrounding water protons due to nanoparticle aggregation demonstrates the bioactivity of these nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. To finish with, nanoparticle toxicity is evaluated by means of MTT assay. The obtained results clearly indicate that these nanoparticles are excellent candidates for their further application in nanomedicine or nanobiotechnology.Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the

  8. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Bridot, Jean-Luc; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

    2010-03-01

    Due to their high magnetization, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles induce an important decrease in the transverse relaxation of water protons and are, therefore, very efficient negative MRI contrast agents. The knowledge and control of the chemical and physical characteristics of nanoparticles are of great importance. The choice of the synthesis method (microemulsions, sol-gel synthesis, laser pyrolysis, sonochemical synthesis or coprecipitation) determines the magnetic nanoparticle's size and shape, as well as its size distribution and surface chemistry. Nanoparticles can be used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia drug delivery. New developments focus on targeting through molecular imaging and cell tracking. PMID:21426176

  9. Direct attachment of nanoparticle cargo to Salmonella typhimurium membranes designed for combination bacteriotherapy against tumors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Robert; Choe, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Jared; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is an emerging approach to resolve difficult-to-manage internal diseases. It is highly regarded, in particular, for medical use in treatment of cancer due to the innate ability of certain nanoparticles to accumulate in the porous environment of tumors and to be toxic to cancer cells. However, the therapeutic success of nanoparticles is limited by the technical difficulty of fully penetrating and thus attacking the tumor. Additionally, while nanoparticles possess seeming-specificity due to the unique physiological properties of tumors themselves, it is difficult to tailor the delivery of nanoparticles or drugs in other models, such as use in cardiac disease, to the specific target. Thus, a need for delivery systems that will accurately and precisely bring nanoparticles carrying drug payloads to their intended sites currently exists. Our solution to this engineering challenge is to load such nanoparticles onto a biological "mailman" (a novel, nontoxic, therapeutic strain of Salmonella typhimurium engineered to preferentially and precisely seek out, penetrate, and hinder prostate cancer cells as the biological delivery system) that will deliver the therapeutics to a target site. In this chapter, we describe two methods that establish proof-of-concept for our cargo loading and delivery system by attaching nanoparticles to the Salmonella membrane. The first method (Subheading 1.1) describes association of sucrose-conjugated gold nanoparticles to the surface of Salmonella bacteria. The second method (Subheading 1.2) biotinylates the native Salmonella membrane to attach streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores as example nanoparticle cargo, with an alternative method (expression of membrane bound biotin target sites using autodisplay plasmid vectors) that increases the concentration of biotin on the membrane surface for streptavidin-conjugated nanoparticle attachment. By directly attaching the fluorophores to our bacterial vector through biocompatible

  10. Direct attachment of nanoparticle cargo to Salmonella typhimurium membranes designed for combination bacteriotherapy against tumors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Robert; Choe, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Jared; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is an emerging approach to resolve difficult-to-manage internal diseases. It is highly regarded, in particular, for medical use in treatment of cancer due to the innate ability of certain nanoparticles to accumulate in the porous environment of tumors and to be toxic to cancer cells. However, the therapeutic success of nanoparticles is limited by the technical difficulty of fully penetrating and thus attacking the tumor. Additionally, while nanoparticles possess seeming-specificity due to the unique physiological properties of tumors themselves, it is difficult to tailor the delivery of nanoparticles or drugs in other models, such as use in cardiac disease, to the specific target. Thus, a need for delivery systems that will accurately and precisely bring nanoparticles carrying drug payloads to their intended sites currently exists. Our solution to this engineering challenge is to load such nanoparticles onto a biological "mailman" (a novel, nontoxic, therapeutic strain of Salmonella typhimurium engineered to preferentially and precisely seek out, penetrate, and hinder prostate cancer cells as the biological delivery system) that will deliver the therapeutics to a target site. In this chapter, we describe two methods that establish proof-of-concept for our cargo loading and delivery system by attaching nanoparticles to the Salmonella membrane. The first method (Subheading 1.1) describes association of sucrose-conjugated gold nanoparticles to the surface of Salmonella bacteria. The second method (Subheading 1.2) biotinylates the native Salmonella membrane to attach streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores as example nanoparticle cargo, with an alternative method (expression of membrane bound biotin target sites using autodisplay plasmid vectors) that increases the concentration of biotin on the membrane surface for streptavidin-conjugated nanoparticle attachment. By directly attaching the fluorophores to our bacterial vector through biocompatible

  11. Terahertz magnetic modulator based on magnetically clustered nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mostafa; Peccianti, Marco; Ozturk, Yavuz; Al-Naib, Ibraheem; Hauri, Christoph P.; Morandotti, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    Random orientation of liquid-suspended magnetic nanoparticles (Ferrofluids) gives rise to a zero net magnetic orientation. An external magnetic field tends to align these nanoparticles into clusters, leading to a strong linear dichroism on a propagating wave. Using 10 nm-sized Fe3O4, we experimentally realize a polarization-sensitive magnetic modulator operating at terahertz wavelengths. We reached a modulation depth of 66% using a field as low as 35 mT. The proposed concept offers a solution towards fundamental terahertz magnetic modulators.

  12. Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid.

    PubMed

    Welch, David A; Woehl, Taylor J; Park, Chiwoo; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel D

    2016-01-26

    Optimization of colloidal nanoparticle synthesis techniques requires an understanding of underlying particle growth mechanisms. Nonclassical growth mechanisms are particularly important as they affect nanoparticle size and shape distributions, which in turn influence functional properties. For example, preferential attachment of nanoparticles is known to lead to the formation of mesocrystals, although the formation mechanism is currently not well-understood. Here we employ in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to demonstrate that the experimentally observed preference for end-to-end attachment of silver nanorods is a result of weaker solvation forces occurring at rod ends. SMD reveals that when the side of a nanorod approaches another rod, perturbation in the surface-bound water at the nanorod surface creates significant energy barriers to attachment. Additionally, rod morphology (i.e., facet shape) effects can explain the majority of the side attachment effects that are observed experimentally. PMID:26588243

  13. Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, David A.; Woehl, Taylor J.; Park, Chiwoo; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-11-20

    We discuss optimization of colloidal nanoparticle synthesis techniques, which requires an understanding of underlying particle growth mechanisms. Nonclassical growth mechanisms are particularly important as they affect nanoparticle size and shape distributions, which in turn influence functional properties. For example, preferential attachment of nanoparticles is known to lead to the formation of mesocrystals, although the formation mechanism is currently not well-understood. Here we employ in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to demonstrate that the experimentally observed preference for end-to-end attachment of silver nanorods is a result of weaker solvation forces occurring at rod ends. In conclusion, SMD reveals that when the side of a nanorod approaches another rod, perturbation in the surface-bound water at the nanorod surface creates significant energy barriers to attachment. Additionally, rod morphology (i.e., facet shape) effects can explain the majority of the side attachment effects that are observed experimentally.

  14. Properties and biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Rajesh Kumar

    Magnetic nanoparticles have a number of unique properties, making them promising agents for applications in medicine including magnetically targeted drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiation therapy. They are biocompatible and can also be coated with biocompatible surfactants, which may be further functionalized with optically and therapeutically active molecules. These nanoparticles can be manipulated with non-invasive external magnetic field to produce heat, target specific site, and monitor their distribution in vivo. Within this framework, we have investigated a number of biomedical applications of these nanoparticles. We synthesized a thermosensitive microgel with iron oxide adsorbed on its surface. An alternating magnetic field applied to these nanocomposites heated the system and triggered the release of an anticancer drug mitoxantrone. We also parameterized the chain length dependence of drug release from dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles, finding that both the release rate and equilibrium release fraction depend on the molecular mass of the surfactant. Finally, we also localized dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles labeled with tat peptide to the cell nucleus, which permits this system to be used for a variety of biomedical applications. Beyond investigating magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications, we also studied their magnetohydrodynamic and dielectric properties in solution. Magnetohydrodynamic properties of ferrofluid can be controlled by appropriate selection of surfactant and deielctric measurement showed magnetodielectric coupling in this system. We also established that some complex low temperature spin structures are suppressed in Mn3O4 nanoparticles, which has important implications for nanomagnetic devices. Furthermore, we explored exchange bias effects in Ni-NiO core-shell nanoparticles. Finally, we also performed extensive magnetic studies in nickel metalhydride (NiMH) batteries to

  15. Magnetic-Plasmonic Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Carly S.; Hofmann, Cristina; Ali, Tamer A.; Kelly, Anna T.; Morosan, Emilia; Nordlander, Peter; Whitmire, Kenton H.; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles composed of magnetic cores with continuous Au shell layers simultaneously possess both magnetic and plasmonic properties. Faceted and tetracubic nanocrystals consisting of wüstite with magnetite-rich corners and edges retain magnetic properties when coated with an Au shell layer, with the composite nanostructures showing ferrimagnetic behavior. The plasmonic properties are profoundly influenced by the high dielectric constant of the mixed-iron-oxide nanocrystalline core. A comprehensive theoretical analysis that examines the geometric plasmon tunability over a range of core permittivities enables us to identify the dielectric properties of the mixed-oxide magnetic core directly from the plasmonic behavior of the core-shell nanoparticle. PMID:19441794

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  17. Development of Novel Magnetic Nanoparticles for Hyperthermia Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cassim, Shiraz M; Giustini, Andrew J; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P Jack

    2011-02-23

    Advances in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia are opening new doors in cancer therapy. As a standalone or adjuvant therapy this new modality has the opportunity significantly advance thermal medicine. Major advantages of using magnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are their highly localized power deposition and the fact that the alternating magnetic fields (AMF) used to excite them can penetrate deeply into the body without harmful effect. One limitation, however, which hinders the technology, is the problem of inductive heating of normal tissue by the AMF if the frequency and fields strength are not appropriately matched to the tissue. Restricting AMF amplitude and frequency limits the heat dose which can be selectively applied to cancerous tissue via the magnetic nanoparticle, thus lowering therapeutic effect. In an effort to address this problem, particles with optimized magnetic properties must be developed. Using particles with higher saturation magnetizations and coercivity will enhance hysteresis heating increasing particle power density at milder AMF strengths and frequencies. In this study we used oil in water microemulsions to develop nanoparticles with zero-valent Fe cores and magnetite shells. The superior magnetic properties of zero-valent Fe give these particles the potential for improved SAR over pure magnetite particles. Silane and subsequently dextran have been attached to the particle surface in order to provide a biocompatible surfactant coating. The heating capability of the particles was tested in-vivo using a mouse tumor model. Although we determined that the final stage of synthesis, purification of the dextran coated particles, permits significant corrosion/oxidation of the iron core to hematite, the particles can effectively heat tumor tissue. Improving the purification procedure will allow the generation Fe/Fe3O4 with superior SAR values. PMID:24619487

  18. Development of novel magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassim, Shiraz M.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Advances in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia are opening new doors in cancer therapy. As a standalone or adjuvant therapy this new modality has the opportunity significantly advance thermal medicine. Major advantages of using magnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are their highly localized power deposition and the fact that the alternating magnetic fields (AMF) used to excite them can penetrate deeply into the body without harmful effect. One limitation, however, which hinders the technology, is the problem of inductive heating of normal tissue by the AMF if the frequency and fields strength are not appropriately matched to the tissue. Restricting AMF amplitude and frequency limits the heat dose which can be selectively applied to cancerous tissue via the magnetic nanoparticle, thus lowering therapeutic effect. In an effort to address this problem, particles with optimized magnetic properties must be developed. Using particles with higher saturation magnetizations and coercivity will enhance hysteresis heating increasing particle power density at milder AMF strengths and frequencies. In this study we used oil in water microemulsions to develop nanoparticles with zero-valent Fe cores and magnetite shells. The superior magnetic properties of zero-valent Fe give these particles the potential for improved SAR over pure magnetite particles. Silane and subsequently dextran have been attached to the particle surface in order to provide a biocompatible surfactant coating. The heating capability of the particles was tested in-vivo using a mouse tumor model. Although we determined that the final stage of synthesis, purification of the dextran coated particles, permits significant corrosion/oxidation of the iron core to hematite, the particles can effectively heat tumor tissue. Improving the purification procedure will allow the generation Fe/Fe3O4 with superior SAR values.

  19. Development of Novel Magnetic Nanoparticles for Hyperthermia Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Shiraz M.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Advances in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia are opening new doors in cancer therapy. As a standalone or adjuvant therapy this new modality has the opportunity significantly advance thermal medicine. Major advantages of using magnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are their highly localized power deposition and the fact that the alternating magnetic fields (AMF) used to excite them can penetrate deeply into the body without harmful effect. One limitation, however, which hinders the technology, is the problem of inductive heating of normal tissue by the AMF if the frequency and fields strength are not appropriately matched to the tissue. Restricting AMF amplitude and frequency limits the heat dose which can be selectively applied to cancerous tissue via the magnetic nanoparticle, thus lowering therapeutic effect. In an effort to address this problem, particles with optimized magnetic properties must be developed. Using particles with higher saturation magnetizations and coercivity will enhance hysteresis heating increasing particle power density at milder AMF strengths and frequencies. In this study we used oil in water microemulsions to develop nanoparticles with zero-valent Fe cores and magnetite shells. The superior magnetic properties of zero-valent Fe give these particles the potential for improved SAR over pure magnetite particles. Silane and subsequently dextran have been attached to the particle surface in order to provide a biocompatible surfactant coating. The heating capability of the particles was tested in-vivo using a mouse tumor model. Although we determined that the final stage of synthesis, purification of the dextran coated particles, permits significant corrosion/oxidation of the iron core to hematite, the particles can effectively heat tumor tissue. Improving the purification procedure will allow the generation Fe/Fe3O4 with superior SAR values. PMID:24619487

  20. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra

    2006-03-01

    Nanomaterials play an increasingly important role in the research, diagnosis and treatment of numerous pathologies. Biomedical applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia require magnetic nanoparticles with a large saturation magnetization that are biocompatible, form stable suspensions in water-based fluids, and can be functionalized. We use chemical synthesis and inert-gas condensation into fluids to produce biocompatible magnetic nanoparticle fluids that allow magnetic targeting of drugs and simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging. We have developed a water-dispersible oleic-acid/Pluronic/iron-oxide nanoparticle formulation that can be loaded with high doses of water-insoluble anti-cancer drugs. An external magnetic field is used to attract the nanoparticles to the treatment region and MRI is used to verify their location. A primary limitation on magnetic targeting, however, is the low moment of iron-oxide nanoparticles. Inert-gas-condensation into fluids produces iron and cobalt nanoparticles from 5-45 nm in diameter. Coating or passivation of these materials is required to prevent oxidation; however, the interaction between surface atoms and surfactant or other functionalizing molecules can greatly diminish the magnetic moment. A study of surfactant interactions with iron nanoparticles shows that the physical barrier provided by a concentric shell of polymeric surfactant offers significantly more protection against oxidation than the radial barrier formed by most linear surfactants. The talk will conclude with a brief overview of the opportunities and challenges for condensed matter and materials physicists in biomagnetic materials. This work is done in collaboration with V. Labhasetwar and T. Jain at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, and Marco Morales, Nguyen Hai, Shannon Fritz, Kishore Sreenivasan and David Schmitter at the University of Nebraska -- Lincoln.

  1. Thermal potentiation of chemotherapy by magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of hyperthermia as an adjuvant for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, significant clinical challenges have been encountered, such as a broader spectrum of toxicity, lack of patient tolerance, temperature control and significant invasiveness. Hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles in high-frequency oscillating magnetic fields, commonly termed magnetic fluid hyperthermia, is a promising form of heat delivery in which thermal energy is supplied at the nanoscale to the tumor. This review discusses the mechanisms of heat dissipation of iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles, current methods and challenges to deliver heat in the clinic, and the current work related to the use of magnetic nanoparticles for the thermal-chemopotentiation of therapeutic drugs. PMID:24074390

  2. Thermal potentiation of chemotherapy by magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of hyperthermia as an adjuvant for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, significant clinical challenges have been encountered, such as a broader spectrum of toxicity, lack of patient tolerance, temperature control and significant invasiveness. Hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles in high-frequency oscillating magnetic fields, commonly termed magnetic fluid hyperthermia, is a promising form of heat delivery in which thermal energy is supplied at the nanoscale to the tumor. This review discusses the mechanisms of heat dissipation of iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles, current methods and challenges to deliver heat in the clinic, and the current work related to the use of magnetic nanoparticles for the thermal-chemopotentiation of therapeutic drugs.

  3. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced magnetic resonance and multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikma, Elise Ann Schultz

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for noninvasive tomographic imaging of biological systems with high spatial and temporal resolution. Superparamagnetic (SPM) nanoparticles have emerged as highly effective MR contrast agents due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and magnetic properties. Conventional nanoparticle contrast agents suffer from difficult synthetic reproducibility, polydisperse sizes and weak magnetism. Numerous synthetic techniques and nanoparticle formulations have been developed to overcome these barriers. However, there are still major limitations in the development of new nanoparticle-based probes for MR and multimodal imaging including low signal amplification and absence of biochemical reporters. To address these issues, a set of multimodal (T2/optical) and dual contrast (T1/T2) nanoparticle probes has been developed. Their unique magnetic properties and imaging capabilities were thoroughly explored. An enzyme-activatable contrast agent is currently being developed as an innovative means for early in vivo detection of cancer at the cellular level. Multimodal probes function by combining the strengths of multiple imaging techniques into a single agent. Co-registration of data obtained by multiple imaging modalities validates the data, enhancing its quality and reliability. A series of T2/optical probes were successfully synthesized by attachment of a fluorescent dye to the surface of different types of nanoparticles. The multimodal nanoparticles generated sufficient MR and fluorescence signal to image transplanted islets in vivo. Dual contrast T1/T2 imaging probes were designed to overcome disadvantages inherent in the individual T1 and T2 components. A class of T1/T2 agents was developed consisting of a gadolinium (III) complex (DTPA chelate or DO3A macrocycle) conjugated to a biocompatible silica-coated metal oxide nanoparticle through a disulfide linker. The disulfide linker has the ability to be reduced

  4. Quantifying the complex permittivity and permeability of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. M.; Gui, Y. S.; Worden, M.; Hegmann, T.; Xing, M.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; Wroczynskyj, Y.; van Lierop, J.; Hu, C.-M.

    2015-04-01

    The complex permittivity and permeability of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles has been quantified using a circular waveguide assembly with a static magnetic field to align the nanoparticle's magnetization. The high sensitivity of the measurement provides the precise resonant feature of nanoparticles. The complex permeability in the vicinity of ferromagnetic resonance is in agreement with the nanoparticle's measured magnetization via conventional magnetometry. A rigorous and self-consistent measure of complex permittivities and permeabilities of nanoparticles is crucial to ascertain accurately the dielectric behaviour as well as the frequency response of nanoparticle magnetization, necessary ingredients when designing and optimizing magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

  5. Functionalized magnetic-fluorescent hybrid nanoparticles for cell labelling.

    PubMed

    Lou, Lei; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Zhengli; Li, Bo; Zhu, Jianzhong; Wang, Yiting; Huang, Rong; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2011-05-01

    A facile method of synthesizing 60 nm magnetic-fluorescent core-shell bifunctional nanocomposites with the ability to label cells is presented. Hydrophobic trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO)-capped CdSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were assembled on polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (MNP). Polyethyleneimine was utilized for the realization of multifunction, including attaching 4 nm TOPO capped CdSe@ZnS quantum dots onto magnetite particles, altering the surface properties of quantum dots from hydrophobic to hydrophilic as well as preventing the formation of large aggregates. Results show that these water-soluble hybrid nanocomposites exhibit good colloidal stability and retain good magnetic and fluorescent properties. Because TOPO-capped QDs are assembled instead of their water-soluble equivalents, the nanocomposites are still highly luminescent with no shift in the PL peak position and present long-term fluorescence stability. Moreover, TAT peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPQ) functionalized hybrid nanoparticles were also studied due to their combined magnetic enrichment and optical detection for cell separation and rapid cell labelling. A cell viability assay revealed good biocompatibility of these hybrid nanoparticles. The potential application of the new magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites in biological and medicine is demonstrated. PMID:21503355

  6. Application of Magnetic Nanoparticles to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kami, Daisuke; Takeda, Shogo; Itakura, Yoko; Gojo, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Toyoda, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is being incorporated into many areas of molecular science and biomedicine. Because nanoparticles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including the circulatory system and cells, they have been and continue to be exploited for basic biomedical research as well as clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For example, nanoparticles hold great promise for enabling gene therapy to reach its full potential by facilitating targeted delivery of DNA into tissues and cells. Substantial progress has been made in binding DNA to nanoparticles and controlling the behavior of these complexes. In this article, we review research on binding DNAs to nanoparticles as well as our latest study on non-viral gene delivery using polyethylenimine-coated magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:21747701

  7. Using magnetic nanoparticles to manipulate biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-09-01

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for the manipulation of biological objects, including proteins, genes, cellular organelles, bacteria, cells, and organs, are reviewed. MNPs are popular candidates for controlling and probing biological objects with a magnetic force. In the past decade, progress in the synthesis and surface engineering of MNPs has further enhanced this popularity.

  8. Approaches for modeling magnetic nanoparticle dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B; Weaver, John B

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful biological probes as well as therapeutic agents. There have been several approaches used to model nanoparticle magnetization dynamics for both Brownian as well as Néel rotation. The magnetizations are often of interest and can be compared with experimental results. Here we summarize these approaches including the Stoner-Wohlfarth approach, and stochastic approaches including thermal fluctuations. Non-equilibrium related temperature effects can be described by a distribution function approach (Fokker-Planck equation) or a stochastic differential equation (Langevin equation). Approximate models in several regimes can be derived from these general approaches to simplify implementation. PMID:25271360

  9. MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLE HYPERTHERMIA IN CANCER TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Cassim, Shiraz M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-01-01

    The activation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) is currently being explored as technique for targeted therapeutic heating of tumors. Various types of superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic particles, with different coatings and targeting agents, allow for tumor site and type specificity. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is also being studied as an adjuvant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review provides an introduction to some of the relevant biology and materials science involved in the technical development and current and future use of mNP hyperthermia as clinical cancer therapy. PMID:24348868

  10. Characterization of magnetically fractionated magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Othman, N. B.; Enpuku, K.

    2013-11-01

    We have characterized fractionated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for magnetic particle imaging. Original Ferucarbotran particles were magnetically divided into three fractionated MNPs called MS1, MS2, and MS3. Harmonic spectra from the three fractionated MNPs were measured at excitation fields of 2.8 and 28 mT with a frequency of 10 kHz. MS1 showed a 2.5-fold increase in the harmonic spectrum over that of the original MNPs. To understand the origin of the enhancement in the harmonic spectrum from MS1, we explored the magnetic properties of the MS series, such as distributions of effective core size and anisotropy energy barrier, and the correlation between them. Using these results, we performed numerical simulations of the harmonic spectra based on the Langevin equation. The simulation results quantitatively explained the experimental results of the fractionated MS series. It was also clarified that MS1 includes a large portion of the MNPs that are responsible for the harmonic spectrum.

  11. Targeting intracellular compartments by magnetic polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kocbek, Petra; Kralj, Slavko; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Kristl, Julijana

    2013-09-27

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show a great promise for a wide specter of bioapplications, due to their characteristic magnetic properties exhibited only in the presence of magnetic field. Their advantages in the fields of magnetic drug targeting and imaging are well established and their safety is assumed, since iron oxide nanoparticles have already been approved for in vivo application, however, according to many literature reports the bare metal oxide nanoparticles may cause toxic effects on treated cells. Therefore, it is reasonable to prevent the direct interactions between metal oxide core and surrounding environment. In the current research ricinoleic acid coated maghemite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized, characterized and incorporated in the polymeric matrix, resulting in nanosized magnetic polymeric particles. The carrier system was shown to exhibit superparamagnetic properties and was therefore responsive towards external magnetic field. Bioevaluation using T47-D breast cancer cells confirmed internalization of magnetic polymeric nanoparticles (MNPs) and their intracellular localization in various subcellular compartments, depending on presence/absence of external magnetic field. However, the number of internalized MNPs observed by fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy was relatively low, making such way of targeting effective only for delivery of highly potent drugs. The scanning electron microscopy of treated cells revealed that MNPs influenced the cell adhesion, when external magnetic field was applied, and that treatment resulted in damaged apical plasma membrane right after exposure to the magnetic carrier. On the other hand, MNPs showed only reversibly reduced cellular metabolic activity in concentrations up to 200 μg/ml and, in the tested concentration the cell cycle distribution was within the normal range, indicating safety of the established magnetic carrier system for the treated cells.

  12. Biological cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report a manipulation of biological cells (erythrocytes) by magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The experiment was accomplished on the top of a micro-electromagnet consisting of two magnetic field generating contours. An electric current flowing through the contour(s) produces a non-uniform magnetic field, which is about 1.4 mT/μm in strength at 100 mA current in the vicinity of the current-carrying wire. In responses to the magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticles move towards the systems energy minima. In turn, magnetic nanoparticles drag biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data showing cell manipulation through the control of electric current. This technique allows us to capture and move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, whose frequency is controlled by an electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of non-destructive cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles with micrometer-scale precision.

  13. Recent advances on surface engineering of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Naregalkar, Rohan R; Vaidya, Vikas Deep; Gupta, Mona

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with appropriate surface coatings are increasingly being used clinically for various biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia, drug delivery, tissue repair, cell and tissue targeting and transfection. This is because of the nontoxicity and biocompatibility demand that mainly iron oxide-based materials are predominantly used, despite some attempts to develop 'more magnetic nanomaterials' based on cobalt, nickel, gadolinium and other compounds. For all these applications, the material used for surface coating of the magnetic particles must not only be nontoxic and biocompatible but also allow a targetable delivery with particle localization in a specific area. Magnetic nanoparticles can bind to drugs and an external magnetic field can be applied to trap them in the target site. By attaching the targeting molecules, such as proteins or antibodies, at particles surfaces, the latter may be directed to any cell, tissue or tumor in the body. In this review, different polymers/molecules that can be used for nanoparticle coating to stabilize the suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles under in vitro and in vivo situations are discussed. Some selected proteins/targeting ligands that could be used for derivatizing magnetic nanoparticles are also explored. We have reviewed the various biomedical applications with some of the most recent uses of magnetic nanoparticles for early detection of cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis.

  14. Effect of magnetic field in malaria diagnosis using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Yuen, Clement

    2011-07-01

    The current gold standard method of Malaria diagnosis relies on the blood smears examination. The method is laborintensive, time consuming and requires the expertise for data interpretation. In contrast, Raman scattering from a metabolic byproduct of the malaria parasite (Hemozoin) shows the possibility of rapid and objective diagnosis of malaria. However, hemozoin concentration is usually extremely low especially at the early stage of malaria infection, rendering weak Raman signal. In this work, we propose the sensitive detection of enriched β-hematin, whose spectroscopic properties are equivalent to hemozoin, based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by using magnetic nanoparticles. A few orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal of β-hematin can be achieved using magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the effect of magnetic field on SERS enhancement is investigated. Our result demonstrates the potential of SERS using magnetic nanoparticles in the effective detection of hemozoin for malaria diagnosis.

  15. A study on the changes in attractive force of magnetic attachments for overdenture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Yu-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Although magnetic attachment is used frequently for overdenture, it is reported that attractive force can be decreased by abrasion and corrosion. The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical basis about considerations and long term prognosis of overdenture using magnetic attachments by investigating the change in attractive force of magnetic attachment applied to the patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Among the patients treated with overdenture using magnetic attachments in Dankook University Dental Hospital, attractive force records of 61 magnetic attachments of 20 subjects who re-visited from July 2013 to June 2014 were analyzed. Dental magnet tester (Aichi Micro Intelligent Co., Aichi, Japan) was used for measurement. The magnetic attachments used in this study were Magfit IP-B Flat, Magfit DX400, Magfit DX600 and Magfit DX800 (Aichi Steel Co., Aichi, Japan) filled with Neodymium (NdFeB), a rare-earth magnet. RESULTS Reduction ratio of attractive force had no significant correlation with conditional variables to which attachments were applied, and was higher when the maintenance period was longer (P<.05, r=.361). Reduction ratio of attractive force was significantly higher in the subject group in which attachments were used over 9 years than within 9 years (P<.05). Furthermore, 16.39% of total magnetic attachments showed detachment of keeper or assembly. CONCLUSION Attractive force of magnetic attachment is maintained regardless of conditional variables and reduction ratio increased as the maintenance period became longer. Further study on adhesive material, attachment method and design improvement to prevent detachment of magnetic attachment is needed. PMID:26949482

  16. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: A novel heterogeneous catalyst support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have emerged as viable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. Post-synthetic surface modification protocol for magnetic nanoparticles has been developed that imparts desirable che...

  17. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Jamison, Andrew C.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Willson, Richard C.; Lee, T. Randall

    2013-01-01

    The tremendous interest in magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is reflected in published research that ranges from novel methods of synthesis of unique nanoparticle shapes and composite structures to a large number of MNP characterization techniques, and finally to their use in many biomedical and nanotechnology-based applications. The knowledge gained from this vast body of research can be made more useful if we organize the associated results to correlate key magnetic properties with the parameters that influence them. Tuning these properties of MNPs will allow us to tailor nanoparticles for specific applications, thus increasing their effectiveness. The complex magnetic behavior exhibited by MNPs is governed by many factors; these factors can either improve or adversely affect the desired magnetic properties. In this report, we have outlined a matrix of parameters that can be varied to tune the magnetic properties of nanoparticles. For practical utility, this review focuses on the effect of size, shape, composition, and shell-core structure on saturation magnetization, coercivity, blocking temperature, and relaxation time. PMID:23912237

  18. Radiofrequency heating and magnetically induced displacement of dental magnetic attachments during 3.0 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, K; Hasegawa, M; Abe, Y; Tabuchi, T; Namiki, T; Ishigami, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of injury from dental magnetic attachments due to their radiofrequency (RF) heating and magnetically induced displacement during 3.0 T MRI. Methods To examine the magnetic attachments, we adopted the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-02a and F2052-06 standards in two MRI systems (Achieva 3.0 T Nova Dual; Philips, Tokyo, Japan, and Signa HDxt 3.0 T; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). The temperature change was measured in a cylindrical keeper (GIGAUSS D600; GC, Tokyo, Japan) with coping of the casting alloy and a keeper with a dental implant at the maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) for 20 min. To measure the magnetically induced displacement force, three sizes of keepers (GIGAUSS D400, D600 and D1000) were used in deflection angle tests conducted at the point of the maximum magnetic field strength. Results Temperature elevations of both coping and implant were higher in the Signa system than in the Achieva system. The highest temperature changes in the keeper with implant and keeper with coping were 0.6 °C and 0.8 °C in the Signa system, respectively. The temperature increase did not exceed 1.0 °C at any location. The deflection angle (α) was not measurable because it exceeded 90°. GIGAUSS D400 required an extra 3.0 g load to constrain the deflection angle to less than 45°; GIGAUSS D600 and D1000 required 5.0 and 9.0 g loads, respectively. Conclusions Dental magnetic attachments pose no risk due to RF heating and magnetically induced displacement at 3.0 T MRI. However, it is necessary to confirm that these keepers are securely attached to the prosthesis before imaging. PMID:22499128

  19. Microfluidic Biosensing Systems Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24022689

  20. Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion. Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

  1. Tailored super magnetic nanoparticles synthesized via template free hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attallah, Olivia A.; Girgis, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles of controlled shape and dimensions were synthesized using a modified hydrothermal technique. The influence of different synthesis conditions on the shape, size (length and diameter), structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanoparticles is presented. The mineral phases, the morphologies, size distribution of the resulting magnetic nanoparticles and their magnetic properties were characterized using different characterization methods. We designed magnetite nanoparticles with different morphologies (nanospheres, nanorods, nanocubes and hexagons) and with improved saturation magnetization reaching 90 emu/g.

  2. Optimized steric stabilization of aqueous ferrofluids and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nirmesh; Wang, Yanjun; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Warr, Gregory G

    2010-03-16

    The preparation and properties of an aqueous ferrofluid consisting of a concentrated (>65 wt %) dispersion of sterically stabilized superparamagnetic, iron oxide (maghemite) nanoparticles stable for several months at high ionic strength and over a broad pH range is described. The 6-8 nm diameter nanoparticles are individually coated with a short poly(acrylic acid)-b-poly(acrylamide) copolymer, designed to form the thinnest possible steric stabilizing layer while remaining strongly attached to the iron oxide surface over a wide range of nanoparticle concentrations. Thermogravimetric analysis yields an iron oxide content of 76 wt % in the dried particles, consistent with a dry polymer coating of approximately 1 nm in thickness, while the poly(acrylamide) chain length indicated by electrospray mass spectrometry is consistent with the 4-5 nm increase in the hydrodynamic radius observed by light scattering when the poly(acrylamide) stabilizing chains are solvated. Saturation magnetization experiments indicate nonmagnetic surface layers resulting from the strong chemical attachment of the poly(acrylic acid) block to the particle surface, also observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:19950943

  3. Preparation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with chitosan coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung, Doan Thi Kim; Hoang Hai, Tran; Phuc, Le Hong; Long, Bui Duc; Khanh Vinh, Le; Nha Truc, Phan

    2009-09-01

    Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by the suspension cross-linking technique for use in the application of magnetic carrier technology. The Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation of FeCl2 and FeCl3 solution in base medium for using in the preparation of the magnetic chitosan. The morphological and magnetic properties of the magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques (TEM, XRD, VSM, FTIR, etc.). The magnetic properties of chitosan - magnetic nanoparticles were analyzed by VSM, and MS around 15 emu/g.

  4. Monodisperse Magnetic Nanoparticles for Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Don; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus The development of highly effective medicine requires the on-time monitoring of the medical treatment process. This combination of monitoring and therapeutics allows a large degree of control on the treatment efficacy and is now commonly referred to as “theranostics”. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) provide a unique nano-platform for theranostic applications due to their comparable sizes with various functional biomolecules, their biocompatibility and their responses to the external magnetic field. Recent efforts in studying magnetic NPs for both imaging and therapeutic applications have led to great advances in NP fabrication with controls in dimension, surface functionalization and magnetic property. These magnetic NPs have been proven to be robust agents that can be target-specific for enhancing magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity and magnetic heating efficiency. These, plus the deep tissue penetration of magnetic field, make magnetic NPs the most promising candidates for successful theranostics in the future. In this Account, we review the recent advances in the synthesis of magnetic NPs of iron oxide, Fe, as well as FePt and FeCo NPs for imaging and therapeutic applications. We will first introduce briefly nanomagnetism, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). We will then focus on chemical synthesis of monodisperse magnetic NPs with controlled sizes, morphologies, and magnetic properties. Typical examples in using monodisperse magnetic NPs for MRI and MFH are highlighted. PMID:21661754

  5. Magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M A; Merino, J M; Fernández Pinel, E; Quesada, A; de la Venta, J; Ruíz González, M L; Castro, G R; Crespo, P; Llopis, J; González-Calbet, J M; Hernando, A

    2007-06-01

    We experimentally show that it is possible to induce room-temperature ferromagnetic-like behavior in ZnO nanoparticles without doping with magnetic impurities but simply inducing an alteration of their electronic configuration. Capping ZnO nanoparticles ( approximately 10 nm size) with different organic molecules produces an alteration of their electronic configuration that depends on the particular molecule, as evidenced by photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and altering their magnetic properties that varies from diamagnetic to ferromagnetic-like behavior.

  6. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, S. Liébana; Simeonidis, K.; Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z.; Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D.; Angelakeris, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe2O4 where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core-shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe2O4) or magnetically harder (CoFe2O4) core and a magnetite (Fe3O4) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe2O4) by Fe3O4 provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe3O4 outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects.

  7. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Jena, Prasanna K.; Behera, Sumita; Lockey, Richard F.; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    A major problem associated with therapy is the inability to deliver pharmaceuticals to a specific site of the body without causing nonspecific toxicity. Development of magnetic nanoparticles and techniques for their safe transport and concentration in specific sites in the body would constitute a powerful tool for gene/drug therapy in vivo. Furthermore, drug delivery in vitro could improve further if the drugs were modified with antibodies, proteins or ligands. For in vivo experiments, magnetic nanoparticles were conjugated with plasmid DNA expressing GFP and then coated with chitosan. These particles were injected into mice through tail vein and directed to heart and kidney by means of external magnets of 25 gauss or 2kA –kA/m. These particles were concentrated in the lungs, heart, and kidney of mice and the expression of GFP in these sites were monitored. The expression of GFP in specific locations was visualized by whole-body fluorescent imaging and the concentration of these particles in the designated body locations was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In another model system, we used atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and Carcino Embryonic Antigen (CEA) antibodies coupled to the chitosan coated magnetic nanoparticles to target cells in vitro. The present work demonstrates that a simple external magnetic field is all that is necessary to target a drug to a specific site inside the body without the need to functionalize the nanoparticles. However, the option to use magnetic targeting with external magnets on functionalized nanoparticles could prove as a more efficient means of drug delivery. PMID:19446653

  8. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles. PMID:26975332

  9. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  10. Behavior of nanoparticle clouds around a magnetized microsphere under magnetic and flow fields.

    PubMed

    Magnet, C; Kuzhir, P; Bossis, G; Meunier, A; Nave, S; Zubarev, A; Lomenech, C; Bashtovoi, V

    2014-03-01

    When a micron-sized magnetizable particle is introduced into a suspension of nanosized magnetic particles, the nanoparticles accumulate around the microparticle and form thick anisotropic clouds extended in the direction of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon promotes colloidal stabilization of bimodal magnetic suspensions and allows efficient magnetic separation of nanoparticles used in bioanalysis and water purification. In the present work, the size and shape of nanoparticle clouds under the simultaneous action of an external uniform magnetic field and the flow have been studied in detail. In experiments, a dilute suspension of iron oxide nanoclusters (of a mean diameter of 60 nm) was pushed through a thin slit channel with the nickel microspheres (of a mean diameter of 50 μm) attached to the channel wall. The behavior of nanocluster clouds was observed in the steady state using an optical microscope. In the presence of strong enough flow, the size of the clouds monotonically decreases with increasing flow speed in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This is qualitatively explained by enhancement of hydrodynamic forces washing the nanoclusters away from the clouds. In the longitudinal field, the flow induces asymmetry of the front and the back clouds. To explain the flow and the field effects on the clouds, we have developed a simple model based on the balance of the stresses and particle fluxes on the cloud surface. This model, applied to the case of the magnetic field parallel to the flow, captures reasonably well the flow effect on the size and shape of the cloud and reveals that the only dimensionless parameter governing the cloud size is the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces-the Mason number. At strong magnetic interactions considered in the present work (dipolar coupling parameter α≥2), the Brownian motion seems not to affect the cloud behavior.

  11. EDITORIAL: Biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Grady, K.

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic materials have been used with grain sizes down to the nanoscale for longer than any other type of material. This is because of a fundamental change in the magnetic structure of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials when grain sizes are reduced. In these circumstances, the normal macroscopic domain structure transforms into a single domain state at a critical size which typically lies below 100 nm. Once this transformation occurs the mechanism of magnetisation reversal can only be via the rotation of the magnetisation vector from one magnetic easy axis to another via a magnetically hard direction. This change of reversal mechanism has led to a new class of magnetic materials whose properties and the basic underlying physical mechanism governing them were defined in a seminal work first published by E C Stoner and E P Wolhfarth in 1949. As a consequence of this rotation mechanism, magnetic nanoparticles exist having coercivities which are highly controllable and lie between soft materials and normal permanent magnet materials. This ability to control coercivity in such particles has led to a number of significant technological advances, particularly in the field of information storage. The high value of information storage technology has meant that since the 1950s an enormous research and development effort has gone into techniques for the preparation of magnetic particles and thin films having well defined properties. Hence, certainly since the 1960s, a wide range of techniques to produce both metallic and oxide magnetic nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4-100 nm has been developed. The availability of this wide range of materials led to speculation from the 1960s onwards that they may have applications in biology and medicine. The fact that a magnetic field gradient can be used to either remotely position or selectively filter biological materials leads to a number of obvious applications. These applications fall broadly into two categories: those

  12. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  13. Targeted diagnostic magnetic nanoparticles for medical imaging of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, I; Strauss, A; Dobiasch, S; Weis, C; Szanyi, S; Gil-Iceta, L; Alonso, E; González Esparza, M; Gómez-Vallejo, V; Szczupak, B; Plaza-García, S; Mirzaei, S; Israel, L L; Bianchessi, S; Scanziani, E; Lellouche, J-P; Knoll, P; Werner, J; Felix, K; Grenacher, L; Reese, T; Kreuter, J; Jiménez-González, M

    2015-09-28

    Highly aggressive cancer types such as pancreatic cancer possess a mortality rate of up to 80% within the first 6months after diagnosis. To reduce this high mortality rate, more sensitive diagnostic tools allowing an early stage medical imaging of even very small tumours are needed. For this purpose, magnetic, biodegradable nanoparticles prepared using recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) and incorporated iron oxide (maghemite, γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were developed. Galectin-1 has been chosen as target receptor as this protein is upregulated in pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions but not in healthy pancreatic tissue nor in pancreatitis. Tissue plasminogen activator derived peptides (t-PA-ligands), that have a high affinity to galectin-1 have been chosen as target moieties and were covalently attached onto the nanoparticle surface. Improved targeting and imaging properties were shown in mice using single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT), a handheld gamma camera, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  14. Synthesis, Microstructural and Magnetic Characterizations of Self-Assembled Hematite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bhavya; Mukherjee, Samrat; Das, Dipankar

    2012-08-01

    Phase pure hematite nanoparticles coated with octyl ether and oleic acid were synthesized by a facile chemical route. Nanoparticles in the size range 7-25 nm were obtained by annealing the as-prepared samples at different temperatures. Transmission electron micrographs revealed that the particles tend to organize themselves in chain-like structures consisting of three to six nanoparticles along a common axis. The reason behind this oriented attachment is traced to the exchange coupling between the nanoparticles. Effect of exchange coupling was also evidenced as suppression of superparamagnetism in lower dimension hematite nanoparticles. Morin transition was observed around 260 K by magnetization measurement for hematite nanoparticles having average crystallite size of 25 nm.

  15. Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Welch, David A.; Woehl, Taylor J.; Park, Chiwoo; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-11-20

    We discuss optimization of colloidal nanoparticle synthesis techniques, which requires an understanding of underlying particle growth mechanisms. Nonclassical growth mechanisms are particularly important as they affect nanoparticle size and shape distributions, which in turn influence functional properties. For example, preferential attachment of nanoparticles is known to lead to the formation of mesocrystals, although the formation mechanism is currently not well-understood. Here we employ in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to demonstrate that the experimentally observed preference for end-to-end attachment of silver nanorods is a result of weaker solvation forces occurring at rodmore » ends. In conclusion, SMD reveals that when the side of a nanorod approaches another rod, perturbation in the surface-bound water at the nanorod surface creates significant energy barriers to attachment. Additionally, rod morphology (i.e., facet shape) effects can explain the majority of the side attachment effects that are observed experimentally.« less

  16. Multi-vortex states in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. L.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Wong, D. W.; Purnama, I.; Chiam, S. Y.; Wong, L. M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a fabrication technique to create cylindrical NiFe magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with controlled dimensions and composition. MNPs thicker than 200 nm can form a double vortex configuration, which consists of a pair of vortices with opposite chirality. When MNPs thicker than 300 nm are relaxed after saturation, it forms a frustrated triple vortex state which produces a higher net magnetization as verified by light transmissivity measurements. Therefore, a greater magnetic torque can be actuated on a MNP in the triple vortex state.

  17. Nonlinear simulations to optimize magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Daniel B. Weaver, John B.

    2014-03-10

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is an attractive emerging cancer treatment, but the acting microscopic energy deposition mechanisms are not well understood and optimization suffers. We describe several approximate forms for the characteristic time of Néel rotations with varying properties and external influences. We then present stochastic simulations that show agreement between the approximate expressions and the micromagnetic model. The simulations show nonlinear imaginary responses and associated relaxational hysteresis due to the field and frequency dependencies of the magnetization. This suggests that efficient heating is possible by matching fields to particles instead of resorting to maximizing the power of the applied magnetic fields.

  18. Arranging matter by magnetic nanoparticle assemblers

    PubMed Central

    Yellen, Benjamin B.; Hovorka, Ondrej; Friedman, Gary

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a method for transporting colloidal particles, large molecules, cells, and other materials across surfaces and for assembling them into highly regular patterns. In this method, nonmagnetic materials are manipulated by a fluid dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles. Manipulation of materials is guided by a program of magnetic information stored in a substrate. Dynamic control over the motion of nonmagnetic particles can be achieved by reprogramming the substrate magnetization on the fly. The unexpectedly large degree of control over particle motion can be used to manipulate large ensembles of particles in parallel, potentially with local control over particle trajectory. PMID:15956215

  19. Measuring and controlling the transport of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jason R.

    increases with pore diameter. We find that fluxes are faster in aqueous solutions than in hexane, which is attributed to the hydrophilic nature of the porous membranes and differences in wettability. The impact of an applied magnetic flux gradient, which induces magnetization and motion, on permeation is also examined. Surface chemistry plays an important role in determining flux through porous media such as in the environment. Diffusive flux of nanoparticles through alkylsilane modified porous alumina is measured as a model for understanding transport in porous media of differing surface chemistries. Experiments are performed as a function of particle size, pore diameter, attached hydrocarbon chain length and chain terminus, and solvent. Particle fluxes are monitored by the change in absorbance of the solution in the receiving side of a diffusion cell. In general, flux increases when the membranes are modified with alkylsilanes compared to untreated membranes, which is attributed to the hydrophobic nature of the porous membranes and differences in wettability. We find that flux decreases, in both hexane and aqueous solutions, when the hydrocarbon chain lining the interior pore wall increases in length. The rate and selectivity of transport across these membranes is related to the partition coefficient (Kp) and the diffusion coefficient (D) of the permeating species. By conducting experiments as a function of initial particle concentration, we find that KpD increases with increasing particle size, is greater in alkylsilane--modified pores, and larger in hexane solution than water. The impact of the alkylsilane terminus (--CH3, --Br, --NH2, --COOH) on permeation in water is also examined. In water, the highest KpD is observed when the membranes are modified with carboxylic acid terminated silanes and lowest with amine terminated silanes as a result of electrostatic effects during translocation. Finally, the manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles for the controlled formation

  20. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chen; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted enormous research attention due to their unique magnetic properties that enable the detection by the non-invasive medical imaging modality—magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By incorporating advanced features, such as specific targeting, multimodality, therapeutic delivery, the detectability and applicability of MNPs have been dramatically expanded. A delicate design on structure, composition and surface chemistry is essential to achieving desired properties in MNP systems, such as high imaging contrast and chemical stability, non-fouling surface, target specificity and/or multimodality. This article presents the design fundamentals on the development of MNP systems, from discussion of material selection for nanoparticle cores and coatings, strategies for chemical synthesis and surface modification and their merits and limitations, to conjugation of special biomolecules for intended functions, and reviews the recent advances in the field. PMID:20593005

  1. Tailoring magnetic nanoparticle for transformers application.

    PubMed

    Morais, P C; Silva, A S; Leite, E S; Garg, V K; Oliveira, A C; Viali, W R; Sartoratto, P P C

    2010-02-01

    In this study photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of dilution of an oil-based magnetic fluid sample on the magnetic nanoparticle surface-coating. Changes of the photoacoustic signal intensity on the band-L region (640 to 830 nm) upon dilution of the stock magnetic fluid sample were discussed in terms of molecular surface desorption. The model proposed here assumes that the driving force taking the molecules out from the nanoparticle surface into the bulk solvent is the gradient of osmotic pressure. This gradient of osmotic pressure is established between the nanoparticle surface and the bulk suspension. It is further assumed that the photoacoustic signal intensity (area under the photoacoustic spectra) scales linearly with the number of coating molecules (surface grafting) at the nanoparticle surface. This model picture provides a non-linear analytical description for the reduction of the surface grafting coefficient upon dilution, which was successfully-used to curve-fit the photoacoustic experimental data. PMID:20352784

  2. Tracking stem cells using magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cromer Berman, Stacey M.; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapies offer great promise for many diseases, especially those without current effective treatments. It is believed that noninvasive imaging techniques, which offer the ability to track the status of cells after transplantation, will expedite progress in this field and help to achieve maximized therapeutic effect. Today’s biomedical imaging technology allows for real-time, noninvasive monitoring of grafted stem cells including their biodistribution, migration, survival, and differentiation, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of nanoparticle-labeled cells being one of the most commonly used techniques. Among the advantages of MR cell tracking are its high spatial resolution, no exposure to ionizing radiation, and clinical applicability. In order to track cells by MRI, the cells need to be labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, for which many types exist. There are several cellular labeling techniques available, including simple incubation, use of transfection agents, magnetoelectroporation, and magnetosonoporation. In this overview article, we will review the use of different magnetic nanoparticles and discuss how these particles can be used to track the distribution of transplanted cells in different organ systems. Caveats and limitations inherent to the tracking of nanoparticle-labeled stem cells are also discussed. PMID:21472999

  3. Bioactivity and protein attachment onto bioactive glasses containing silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vulpoi, A; Gruian, C; Vanea, E; Baia, L; Simon, S; Steinhoff, H-J; Göller, G; Simon, V

    2012-05-01

    There is much interest in silver containing glasses for use in bone replacement owing to the demonstrated antibacterial effect. In this work, 2 and 8 mol % of silver was added during the sol-gel process to the composition of a bioactive glass belonging to CaO-SiO(2 -P(2)O(5) system. The samples were characterized by means of ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques to demonstrate that the silver is embedded into the glass matrix as nanoparticles. Bioactivity test in simulated body fluid proved that the presence of silver in the bioactive glass composition, even in high amount, preserve or even improve the bioactivity of the starting glass, and consequently, leads to the carbonated apatite formation, which is the prerequisite for bioactive materials to bond with living bones. Complementary information proving these findings were delivered by performing X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and XPS measurements. The presence of silver also improves protein binding capability to the bioactive glass surface as demonstrated by cw-electron paramagnetic resonance experiments and XPS measurements.

  4. Stochastic magnetization dynamics of biochemically bound magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Daniel; Weaver, John

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in applied magnetic fields is critical for biosensing and therapeutic applications. In biological environments, the nanoparticles may clump together and the resultant dynamics are interesting and important. We show simulation schemes using stochastic Langevin equations that describe the particle rotations in various conditions and suggest ways to improve the applications. Biochemical binding is described in terms of changes of the size distribution from network theory perspective. Also, using log-normally size distributed particles, a master variable is derived that contains all the significant variables. This compacts the parameter space, quickens simulation, and improves intuition. An approximate closed form solution to the magnetization harmonics in an oscillating field is given in terms of this variable using the Langevin function.

  5. Thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticles for seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qipeng; Chen, Ningping; Zhao, Dieling; Lu, Xianmao

    2013-11-13

    Thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a class of smart materials that respond to a change in temperature may by used as a draw solute to extract water from brackish or seawater by forward osmosis (FO). A distinct advantage is the efficient regeneration of the draw solute and the recovery of water via heat-facilitated magnetic separation. However, the osmotic pressure attained by this type of draw solution is too low to counteract that of seawater. In this work, we have designed a FO draw solution based on multifunctional Fe3O4 nanoparticles grafted with copolymer poly(sodium styrene-4-sulfonate)-co-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PSSS-PNIPAM). The resulting regenerable draw solution shows high osmotic pressure for seawater desalination. This is enabled by three essential functional components integrated within the nanostructure: (i) a Fe3O4 core that allows magnetic separation of the nanoparticles from the solvent, (ii) a thermoresponsive polymer, PNIPAM, that enables reversible clustering of the particles for further improved magnetic capturing at a temperature above its low critical solution temperature (LCST), and (iii) a polyelectrolyte, PSSS, that provides an osmotic pressure that is well above that of seawater.

  6. Thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticles for seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qipeng; Chen, Ningping; Zhao, Dieling; Lu, Xianmao

    2013-11-13

    Thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a class of smart materials that respond to a change in temperature may by used as a draw solute to extract water from brackish or seawater by forward osmosis (FO). A distinct advantage is the efficient regeneration of the draw solute and the recovery of water via heat-facilitated magnetic separation. However, the osmotic pressure attained by this type of draw solution is too low to counteract that of seawater. In this work, we have designed a FO draw solution based on multifunctional Fe3O4 nanoparticles grafted with copolymer poly(sodium styrene-4-sulfonate)-co-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PSSS-PNIPAM). The resulting regenerable draw solution shows high osmotic pressure for seawater desalination. This is enabled by three essential functional components integrated within the nanostructure: (i) a Fe3O4 core that allows magnetic separation of the nanoparticles from the solvent, (ii) a thermoresponsive polymer, PNIPAM, that enables reversible clustering of the particles for further improved magnetic capturing at a temperature above its low critical solution temperature (LCST), and (iii) a polyelectrolyte, PSSS, that provides an osmotic pressure that is well above that of seawater. PMID:24134565

  7. In situ TEM investigations of mineral growth through oriented attachment of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Nielsen, M.; Lee, J. R.; Frandsen, C.; Banfield, J. F.; Kisailus, D.; De Yoreo, J.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of crystals through aggregation and coalescence of nanoparticles is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon in biomineral, biomimetic and natural systems, and during synthetic production of nanoparticles and nanowires. The resulting crystals often exhibit complex forms ranging from quasi-one-dimensional chains to 3D hierarchical and self-similar superstructures. Yet the final structure typically diffracts as a single crystal, implying that the primary particles aligned during growth. When coalignment is accompanied by coalescence, this growth process is often referred to as oriented attachment (OA). OA is now recognized as an important mechanism of crystal growth in many materials in the environment. However, the pathway by which OA occurs has not been established. Although the preservation of primary particle morphology and formation of twins and stacking faults at particle-particle boundaries strongly suggest a sequence of whole particle alignment followed by interface elimination, atom-by-atom reorientation via dislocation and grain-boundary migration after attachment are another potential mechanism. If indeed the primary particles align before attachment, the dynamics of that process and the forces that drive it have yet to be revealed. To achieve this understanding we are investigating crystal nucleation and oriented attachment in a number of systems, such as iron oxides and oxyhydroxide as well as titanium dioxide, through in situ and ex situ TEM. We performed high-resolution TEM using a fluid cell to directly observe oriented attachment of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles. The particles undergo continuous rotation and interaction until they find a perfect lattice match. A sudden jump to contact then occurs over less than 1 nanometer, followed by lateral atom-by-atom addition initiated at the contact point. Interface elimination proceeds at a rate consistent with the curvature dependence of the Gibbs free energy. Measured translational and

  8. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

  9. Surface observation for seed-mediated growth attachment of gold nanoparticles on a glassy carbon substrate.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Munetaka; Yamaguchi, Shin-Ya; Zhang, Jingdong

    2009-02-01

    A seed-mediated growth method for surface modification was applied to the attachment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to glassy carbon (GC) surfaces. By simply immersing a GC plate at first into a seed solution containing 4 nm Au nano-seed particles and then into a growth solution containing HAuCl(4), ascorbic acid and cetyltrimethyammonium bromide, AuNPs could be successfully attached to the GC surface via the growth of nanoparticles. A possible control of the size and density of AuNPs on GC was examined by observing surface images with a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) after several preparations with different immersion times. Compared with previous results on the growth of AuNPs on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces, it was characteristic that the AuNPs attached to GC surfaces exhibited smaller size and higher density as well as a flatter and non-crystal-like morphology. In addition, for performing the dense attachment of regular nano-sized AuNPs on GC surfaces, immersion for 2 h into the growth solution was sufficient. Longer immersion for 24 h caused an irregular growth of bold Au micro-crystals, while 24 h was necessary in the case of AuNPs on ITO surfaces. Shorter seeding and growth times were found to be effective for a sparse attachment of smaller Au nanoparticles whose size was ca. 20 nm. It was clarified that the seed-mediated growth method for surface modification was valid for fabricating a nanointerface composed of AuNPs on GC surfaces.

  10. The Effects of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Kappiyoor, Ravi; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment in which biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are dispersed into a tumor and heated by an external AC magnetic field. Over a period of time, the tumor cells are locally heated, leading to hyperthermia which damages and kills the tumor cells with minimal damage to the surrounding normal tissue. The applied magnetic field must be high enough to induce hyperthermia for a specified magnetic particle concentration in the tumor but also lies within the safe limit for human exposure. Six materials, barium ferrite, cobalt ferrite, iron-cobalt, iron-platinum, magnetite and maghemite, are considered as candidates for MFH use. We find that fcc iron-platinum, magnetite and maghemite generate useful treatment temperatures and, when included in a ferrofluid, can produce sufficient and effective MFH for which optimal conditions are explored.

  11. DLVO Approximation Methods for Predicting the Attachment of Silver Nanoparticles to Ceramic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Mikelonis, Anne M; Youn, Sungmin; Lawler, Desmond F

    2016-02-23

    This article examines the influence of three common stabilizing agents (citrate, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), and branched poly(ethylenimine) (BPEI)) on the attachment affinity of silver nanoparticles to ceramic water filters. Citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticles were found to have the highest attachment affinity (under conditions in which the surface potential was of opposite sign to the filter). This work demonstrates that the interaction between the electrical double layers plays a critical role in the attachment of nanoparticles to flat surfaces and, in particular, that predictions of double-layer interactions are sensitive to boundary condition assumptions (constant charge vs constant potential). The experimental deposition results can be explained when using different boundary condition assumptions for different stabilizing molecules but not when the same assumption was assumed for all three types of particles. The integration of steric interactions can also explain the experimental deposition results. Particle size was demonstrated to have an effect on the predicted deposition for BPEI-stabilized particles but not for PVP. PMID:26797148

  12. Mechanistic Insights to the Influence of Adsorbed Organic Macromolecules on Nanoparticle Attachment Efficiency in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenrat, T.; Song, J.; Cisneros, C. M.; Schoenfelder, D. P.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, R. D.; Lowry, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    Assessing the potential risks of natural or engineered nanoparticles to the environment and human health requires the ability to predict their mobility in porous media such as groundwater aquifers or sand filters used in water treatment. Semi-empirical correlations to predict the collision efficiency of electrostatically stabilized nanoparticles are available; however, they are not applicable to nanoparticles coated with natural organic matter (NOM) or polymeric surface coatings because the existing correlations do not account the electrosteric repulsions and lubrication afforded by coatings that inhibit or reverse nanoparticle attachment to surfaces. Regression analysis of published data on the collision efficiency of NOM-coated latex and hematite particles, and on new data collected for poly(styrene sulfonate)-, carboxy methyl cellulose, and polyaspartate-coated hematite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles was used to develop an empirical correlation of the collision efficiency of NOM- and polymer-coated nanomaterials and dimensionless parameters including the adsorbed layer-electrokinetic parameter (NLEK) representing electrosteric repulsions and lubrication afforded by adsorbed NOM or polyelectrolyte. An empirical correlation with three dimensionless parameters can predict the measured collision efficiency on coated metal oxide nanoparticles over a wide dynamic range in particle type, coating type, and solution conditions (~80 data points). This study indicates that including the adsorbed NOM and polymer layer properties of the properties is essential for understanding the transport and fate of NOM- and polymer-coated natural and manufactured nanomaterials in porous media.

  13. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetically-Guided and Magnetically-Responsive Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Escribano, Elvira; Queralt, Josep; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the recent advances in and problems with the use of magnetically-guided and magnetically-responsive nanoparticles in drug delivery and magnetofection. In magnetically-guided nanoparticles, a constant external magnetic field is used to transport magnetic nanoparticles loaded with drugs to a specific site within the body or to increase the transfection capacity. Magnetofection is the delivery of nucleic acids under the influence of a magnetic field acting on nucleic acid vectors that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles. In magnetically-responsive nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated or embedded in a larger colloidal structure that carries a drug. In this last case, an alternating magnetic field can modify the structure of the colloid, thereby providing spatial and temporal control over drug release. PMID:25867479

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles as gene delivery agents: enhanced transfection in the presence of oscillating magnet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBain, S. C.; Griesenbach, U.; Xenariou, S.; Keramane, A.; Batich, C. D.; Alton, E. W. F. W.; Dobson, J.

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle-based gene transfection has been shown to be effective in combination with both viral vectors and with non-viral agents. In these systems, therapeutic or reporter genes are attached to magnetic nanoparticles which are then focused to the target site/cells via high-field/high-gradient magnets. The technique has been shown to be efficient and rapid for in vitro transfection and compares well with cationic lipid-based reagents, producing good overall transfection levels with lower doses and shorter transfection times. In spite of its potential advantages (particularly for in vivo targeting), the overall transfection levels do not generally exceed those of other non-viral agents. In order to improve the overall transfection levels while maintaining the advantages inherent in this technique, we have developed a novel, oscillating magnet array system which adds lateral motion to the particle/gene complex in order to promote transfection. Experimental results indicate that the system significantly enhances overall in vitro transfection levels in human airway epithelial cells compared to both static field techniques (p<0.005) and the cationic lipids (p<0.001) tested. In addition, it has the previously demonstrated advantages of magnetofection—rapid transfection times and requiring lower levels of DNA than cationic lipid-based transfection agents. This method shows potential for non-viral gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. EDITORIAL: Biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Grady, K.

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic materials have been used with grain sizes down to the nanoscale for longer than any other type of material. This is because of a fundamental change in the magnetic structure of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials when grain sizes are reduced. In these circumstances, the normal macroscopic domain structure transforms into a single domain state at a critical size which typically lies below 100 nm. Once this transformation occurs the mechanism of magnetisation reversal can only be via the rotation of the magnetisation vector from one magnetic easy axis to another via a magnetically hard direction. This change of reversal mechanism has led to a new class of magnetic materials whose properties and the basic underlying physical mechanism governing them were defined in a seminal work first published by E C Stoner and E P Wolhfarth in 1949. As a consequence of this rotation mechanism, magnetic nanoparticles exist having coercivities which are highly controllable and lie between soft materials and normal permanent magnet materials. This ability to control coercivity in such particles has led to a number of significant technological advances, particularly in the field of information storage. The high value of information storage technology has meant that since the 1950s an enormous research and development effort has gone into techniques for the preparation of magnetic particles and thin films having well defined properties. Hence, certainly since the 1960s, a wide range of techniques to produce both metallic and oxide magnetic nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4-100 nm has been developed. The availability of this wide range of materials led to speculation from the 1960s onwards that they may have applications in biology and medicine. The fact that a magnetic field gradient can be used to either remotely position or selectively filter biological materials leads to a number of obvious applications. These applications fall broadly into two categories: those

  16. Modular Fabrication of Polymer Brush Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles: Engineering the Interface for Targeted Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Oz, Yavuz; Arslan, Mehmet; Gevrek, Tugce N; Sanyal, Rana; Sanyal, Amitav

    2016-08-01

    Development of efficient and rapid protocols for diversification of functional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) would enable identification of promising candidates using high-throughput protocols for applications such as diagnostics and cure through early detection and localized delivery. Polymer brush coated magnetic nanoparticles find use in many such applications. A protocol that allows modular diversification of a pool of parent polymer coated nanoparticles will lead to a library of functional materials with improved uniformity. In the present study, polymer brush coated parent magnetic nanoparticles obtained using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization are modified to obtain nanoparticles with different "clickable" groups. In this design, trithiocarbonate group terminated polymer brushes are "grafted from" MNPs using a catechol group bearing initiator. A postpolymerization radical exchange reaction allows installation of "clickable" functional groups like azides and maleimides on the chain ends of the polymers. Thus, modified MNPs can be functionalized using alkyne-containing and thiol-containing moieties like peptides and dyes using the alkyne-azide cycloaddition and the thiol-ene conjugation, respectively. Using the approach outlined here, a cell surface receptor targeting cyclic peptide and a fluorescent dye are attached onto nanoparticle surface. This multifunctional construct allows selective recognition of cancer cells that overexpress integrin receptors. Furthermore, the approach outlined here is not limited to the installation of azide and maleimide functional groups but can be expanded to a variety of "clickable" groups to allow nanoparticle modification using a broad range of chemical conjugations. PMID:27406320

  17. Reorientation Response of Magnetic Microspheres Attached to Gold Electrodes Under an Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Los Santos Valladares, L.; Dominguez, A. Bustamante; Aguiar, J. Albino; Reeve, R. M.; Mitrelias, T.; Langford, R. M.; Azuma, Y.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Majima, Y.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report the mechanical reorientation of thiolated ferromagnetic microspheres bridging a pair of gold electrodes under an external magnetic field. When an external magnetic field (7 kG) is applied during the measurement of the current-voltage characteristics of a carboxyl ferromagnetic microsphere (4 μm diameter) attached to two gold electrodes by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of octane dithiol (C8H18S2), the current signal is distorted. Rather than due to magnetoresistance, this effect is caused by a mechanical reorientation of the ferromagnetic sphere, which alters the number of SAMs between the sphere and the electrodes and therefore affects conduction. To study the physical reorientation of the ferromagnetic particles, we measure their hysteresis loops while suspended in a liquid solution.

  18. Improving the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast and Detection Methods with Engineered Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Zhong, Xiaodong; Wang, Liya; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Engineering and functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles have been an area of the extensive research and development in the biomedical and nanomedicine fields. Because their biocompatibility and toxicity are well investigated and better understood, magnetic nanoparticles, especially iron oxide nanoparticles, are better suited materials as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and for image-directed delivery of therapeutics. Given tunable magnetic properties and various surface chemistries from the coating materials, most applications of engineered magnetic nanoparticles take advantages of their superb MRI contrast enhancing capability as well as surface functionalities. It has been found that MRI contrast enhancement by magnetic nanoparticles is highly dependent on the composition, size and surface properties as well as the degree of aggregation of the nanoparticles. Therefore, understanding the relationships between these intrinsic parameters and the relaxivities that contribute to MRI contrast can lead to establishing essential guidance that may direct the design of engineered magnetic nanoparticles for theranostics applications. On the other hand, new contrast mechanism and imaging strategy can be developed based on the novel properties of engineered magnetic nanoparticles. This review will focus on discussing the recent findings on some chemical and physical properties of engineered magnetic nanoparticles affecting the relaxivities as well as the impact on MRI contrast. Furthermore, MRI methods for imaging magnetic nanoparticles including several newly developed MRI approaches aiming at improving the detection and quantification of the engineered magnetic nanoparticles are described. PMID:22272222

  19. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-12-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  20. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-01-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  1. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-12-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case.

  2. Ac magnetic susceptibility study of in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    We analysed magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution, before and after cytokine conjugation, in a mouse model by ac susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Mice received repeated intravenous injections of nanoparticle suspension for two weeks and they were euthanized 1 h after the last injection. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues. The rest of the particles may probably be metabolized or excreted by the organism. Our findings indicate that the adsorption of interferon to DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles changes their biodistribution, reducing the presence of nanoparticles in lungs and therefore their possible toxicity. The specific targeting of the particles to tumour tissues by the use of an external magnetic field has also been studied. Magnetic nanoparticles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the targeted tissue and quantified by ac magnetic susceptibility.

  3. Magnoelastic coupling in magnetic oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Baker, Sheila; Birkel, Christina; Seshadri, Ram; Tremel, Wolfgang; Christianson, Andrew; Musfeldt, Janice

    2012-02-01

    Phonons are exquisitely sensitive to finite length scale effects in a wide variety of materials. To investigate confinement in combination with strong magnetoelastic interactions, we measured the infrared vibrational properties of MnO and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and their parent compounds. For MnO, a charge and bonding analysis reveals that Born effective charge, local effective charge, total polarizability, and the force constant are overall lower in the nanoparticles compared to the bulk. We find that the spin-lattice coupling drops from ˜7 cm-1 in the single crystal to <1 cm-1 in the nanoparticles. For CoFe2O4, the spectroscopic response is sensitive to the size-induced crossover to the superparamagnetic state, which occurs between 7 and 10 nm, and a spin-phonon coupling analysis supports the core-shell model. Moreover, it provides an estimate of the thickness of the magnetically disordered shell, increasing from 0.4 nm in the 14 nm particles to 0.8 nm in the 5 nm particles, demonstrating that the associated local lattice distortions take place on the length scale of the unit cell. These findings are important for understanding finite length scale effects in magnetic oxides and other more complex functional oxides.

  4. Monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles for theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Ho, Don; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2011-10-18

    Effective medical care requires the concurrent monitoring of medical treatment. The combination of imaging and therapeutics allows a large degree of control over the treatment efficacy and is now commonly referred to as "theranostics". Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) provide a unique nanoplatform for theranostic applications because of their biocompatibility, their responses to the external magnetic field, and their sizes which are comparable to that of functional biomolecules. Recent studies of magnetic NPs for both imaging and therapeutic applications have led to greater control over size, surface functionalization, magnetic properties, and specific binding capabilities of the NPs. The combination of the deep tissue penetration of the magnetic field and the ability of magnetic NPs to enhance magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity and magnetic heating efficiency makes magnetic NPs promising candidates for successful future theranostics. In this Account, we review recent advances in the synthesis of magnetic NPs for biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). Our focus is on iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) NPs, gold-iron oxide (Au-Fe(3)O(4)) NPs, metallic iron (Fe) NPs, and Fe-based alloy NPs, such as iron-cobalt (FeCo) and iron-platinum (FePt) NPs. Because of the ease of fabrication and their approved clinical usage, Fe(3)O(4) NPs with controlled sizes and surface chemistry have been studied extensively for MRI and MFH applications. Porous hollow Fe(3)O(4) NPs are expected to have similar magnetic, chemical, and biological properties as the solid Fe(3)O(4) NPs, and their structures offer the additional opportunity to store and release drugs at a target. The Au-Fe(3)O(4) NPs combine both magnetically active Fe(3)O(4) and optically active Au within one nanostructure and are a promising NP platform for multimodal imaging and therapeutics. Metallic Fe and FeCo NPs offer the opportunity for probes with even higher

  5. Preparation and Properties of Various Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Drbohlavova, Jana; Hrdy, Radim; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Hubalek, Jaromir

    2009-01-01

    The fabrications of iron oxides nanoparticles using co-precipitation and gadolinium nanoparticles using water in oil microemulsion method are reported in this paper. Results of detailed phase analysis by XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy are discussed. XRD analysis revealed that the crystallite size (mean coherence length) of iron oxides (mainly γ-Fe2O3) in the Fe2O3 sample was 30 nm, while in Fe2O3/SiO2 where the ε-Fe2O3 phase dominated it was only 14 nm. Gd/SiO2 nanoparticles were found to be completely amorphous, according to XRD. The samples showed various shapes of hysteresis loops and different coercivities. Differences in the saturation magnetization (MS) correspond to the chemical and phase composition of the sample materials. However, we observed that MS was not reached in the case of Fe2O3/SiO2, while for Gd/SiO2 sample the MS value was extremely low. Therefore we conclude that only unmodified Fe2O3 nanoparticles are suitable for intended biosensing application in vitro (e.g. detection of viral nucleic acids) and the phase purification of this sample for this purpose is not necessary. PMID:22574017

  6. Covalent attachment of nanoparticles to copolymer surfaces to control structure-property relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Marla D.

    Interest in functional nanoparticles has increased in recent years, because their small size gives them unique properties. Surface assembly of nanoparticles is particularly appealing, because it can create surfaces with tunable wetting and optical properties. This thesis presents a novel method for the covalent assembly of silica nanoparticles on random copolymer films via covalent bonding, and the subsequent analysis of the wetting and optical properties of these functionalized surfaces. First, the kinetics of the covalent attachment of amine-modified silica nanoparticles to poly(styrene-ran-acrylic acid) were investigated. The surface swelling of the copolymer films upon exposure to reaction solvents was studied with in situ AFM. The films' surface roughness controlled the nanoparticle attachment kinetics, as well as the final nanoparticle coverage. For particle diameters on the order of the roughness features, 70% surface coverage was achieved, while particles with diameters much larger than the surface features reached only 30% coverage. The wetting properties of the nanoparticle surfaces were investigated as a function of particle coverage and diameter. At low coverages of small particles, the surfaces exhibited Wenzel-type wetting behavior. At high particle coverages, the surfaces showed Cassie-type wetting. Finally, the particles were observed to sink into the polymer film with increasing reaction time. This sinking, as well as the magnitude of the contact angles achieved at high particle coverages, led to the hypothesis that polymer chains wet onto the surface of the silica particles. Core-shell Janus particles were prepared by electrostatic assembly of gold nanoparticles on the unprotected surfaces of the silica particles. The plasmon resonance absorption of the gold particles underwent a red shift upon formation of closely-packed networks on the silica particle surfaces. By applying gold, chromium, and gold:palladium coatings to the Janus particles and

  7. A Solid State Nanopore Device for Investigating the Magnetic Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, SangYoon; Lim, Jaekwan; Pak, Y. Eugene; Moon, Seunghyun; Song, Yoon-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored magnetic nanoparticles translocating through a nanopore in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field. By detecting the ionic current blockade signals with a silicon nitride nanopore, we found that the translocation velocity that is driven by magnetic and hydrodynamic forces on a single magnetic nanoparticle can be accurately determined and is linearly proportional to the magnetization of the magnetic nanoparticle. Thus, we obtained the magneto-susceptibility of an individual nanoparticle and the average susceptibility over one hundred particles within a few minutes. PMID:23708272

  8. Ultralow field magnetization reversal of two-body magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jincheng; Lu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Rujun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Field induced magnetization reversal was investigated in a system of two magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropies and magnetostatic interaction. By using the micromagnetic simulation, ultralow switching field strength was found when the separation distance between the two particles reaches a critical small value (on nanometer scale) in the perpendicular configuration where the anisotropic axes of the two particles are perpendicular to the separation line. The switching field increases sharply when the separation is away from the critical distance. The ultralow field switching phenomenon was missed in the parallel configuration where both the anisotropic axes are aligned along the separation line of the two particles. The micromagnetic results are consistent with the previous theoretical prediction [J. Appl. Phys. 109, 104303 (2011)] where dipolar interaction between two single-domain magnetic particles was considered. Our present simulations offered further proofs and possibilities for the low-power applications of information storage as the two-body magnetic nanoparticles might be implemented as a composite information bit.

  9. Facile Surface Functionalization of Hydrophobic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nonpolar phase synthesized hydrophobic nanocrystals show attractive properties and have demonstrated prominent potential in biomedical applications. However, the preparation of biocompatible nanocrystals is made difficult by the presence of hydrophobic surfactant stabilizer on their surfaces. To address this limitation, we have developed a facile, high efficiency, single-phase and low-cost method to convert hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to an aqueous phase using tetrahydrofuran, NaOH and 3,4-dihydroxyhydrocinnamic acid without any complicated organic synthesis. The as-transferred hydrophilic MNPs are water-soluble over a wide pH range (pH = 3–12), and the solubility is pH-controllable. Furthermore, the as-transferred MNPs with carboxylate can be readily adapted with further surface functionalization, varying from small molecule dyes to oligonucleotides and enzymes. Finally, the strategy developed here can easily be extended to other types of hydrophobic nanoparticles to facilitate biomedical applications of nanomaterials. PMID:25140614

  10. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24205624

  11. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific

  13. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  14. Magnetic vectoring of magnetically responsive nanoparticles within the murine peritoneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klostergaard, Jim; Bankson, James; Auzenne, Edmond; Gibson, Don; Yuill, William; Seeney, Charles E.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) might be candidates for pro-drug formulations for intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of ovarian cancer. We conducted feasibility experiments in an i.p. human ovarian carcinoma xenograft model to determine whether MNPs can be effectively vectored within this environment. Our initial results based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicate that i.p.-injected ˜15 nm magnetite-based MNPs can in fact migrate toward NdFeB magnets externally juxtaposed to the peritoneal cavity above the xenografts growing in the anterior abdominal wall. MNP localization to the tumor/peri-tumoral environment occurs. Further development of this MNP pro-drug strategy is underway.

  15. A feasibility study of magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticle for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Han, S; Hong, S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently reported that a UK company has developed a naturally non-toxic magnetoferritin to act as a draw solute for drawing water in forward osmosis process. The gist of this technology is the utilization of the magnetic nanoparticle and high-gradient magnetic separation for draw solute separation and reuse. However, any demonstration on this technology has not been reported yet. In this study, a feasibility test of magnetic separation using magnetic nanoparticle was therefore performed to investigate the possibility of magnetic separation in water treatment such as desalination. Basically, a magnetic separation system consisted of a column packed with a bed of magnetically susceptible wools placed between the poles of electromagnet and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle was used as a model nanoparticle. The effect of nanoparticle size to applied magnetic field in separation column was experimentally investigated and the magnetic field distribution in a magnet gap and the magnetic field gradient around stainless steel wool wire were analyzed through numerical simulation. The amount of magnetic nanoparticle captured in the separator column increased as the magnetic field strength and particle size increased. As a result, if magnetic separation is intended to be used for draw solute separation and reuse, both novel nanoparticle and large-scale high performance magnetic separator must be developed.

  16. A feasibility study of magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticle for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Han, S; Hong, S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently reported that a UK company has developed a naturally non-toxic magnetoferritin to act as a draw solute for drawing water in forward osmosis process. The gist of this technology is the utilization of the magnetic nanoparticle and high-gradient magnetic separation for draw solute separation and reuse. However, any demonstration on this technology has not been reported yet. In this study, a feasibility test of magnetic separation using magnetic nanoparticle was therefore performed to investigate the possibility of magnetic separation in water treatment such as desalination. Basically, a magnetic separation system consisted of a column packed with a bed of magnetically susceptible wools placed between the poles of electromagnet and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle was used as a model nanoparticle. The effect of nanoparticle size to applied magnetic field in separation column was experimentally investigated and the magnetic field distribution in a magnet gap and the magnetic field gradient around stainless steel wool wire were analyzed through numerical simulation. The amount of magnetic nanoparticle captured in the separator column increased as the magnetic field strength and particle size increased. As a result, if magnetic separation is intended to be used for draw solute separation and reuse, both novel nanoparticle and large-scale high performance magnetic separator must be developed. PMID:22097022

  17. Recyclable antibacterial magnetic nanoparticles grafted with quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) brushes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongchen; Huang, Jinyu; Koepsel, Richard R; Ye, Penglin; Russell, Alan J; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2011-04-11

    Highly efficient recyclable antibacterial magnetite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetic Fe(3)O(4) core with an antibacterial poly(quaternary ammonium) (PQA) coating were prepared in an efficient four-step process. The synthetic pathway included: (1) preparation of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles via coprecipitation of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) in the presence of an alkaline solution; (2) attachment of an ATRP initiating functionality to the surface of the nanoparticles; (3) surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA); and (4) transformation of PDMAEMA brushes to PQA via quaternization with ethyl bromide. The success of the surface functionalization was confirmed by FT-IR, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The PQA-modified magnetite nanoparticles were dispersed in water and exhibited a response to an external magnetic field, making the nanoparticles easy to remove from water after antibacterial tests. The PQA-modified magnetite nanoparticles retained 100% biocidal efficiency against E. coli (10(5) to 10(6)E. coli/mg nanoparticles) during eight exposure/collect/recycle procedures without washing with any solvents or water.

  18. Influence Of Nanoparticles Diameter On Structural Properties Of Magnetic Fluid In Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kúdelčík, Jozef; Bury, Peter; Hardoň, Štefan; Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-07-01

    The properties of magnetic fluids depend on the nanoparticle diameter, their concentration and the carrier liquid. The structural changes in magnetic fluids with different nanoparticle diameter based on transformer oils TECHNOL and MOGUL under the effect of a magnetic field and temperature were studied by acoustic spectroscopy. At a linear and jump changes of the magnetic field at various temperatures a continuous change was observed of acoustic attenuation caused by aggregation of the magnetic nanoparticles to structures. From the anisotropy of acoustic attenuation and using the Taketomi theory the basic parameters of the structures are calculated and the impact of nanoparticle diameters on the size of structures is confirmed.

  19. The effects of magnetic nanoparticle properties on magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappiyoor, Ravi; Liangruksa, Monrudee; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a noninvasive treatment that destroys cancer cells by heating a ferrofluid-impregnated malignant tissue with an ac magnetic field while causing minimal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. The strength of the magnetic field must be sufficient to induce hyperthermia but it is also limited by the human ability to safely withstand it. The ferrofluid material used for hyperthermia should be one that is readily produced and is nontoxic while providing sufficient heating. We examine six materials that have been considered as candidates for MFH use. Examining the heating produced by nanoparticles of these materials, barium-ferrite and cobalt-ferrite are unable to produce sufficient MFH heating, that from iron-cobalt occurs at a far too rapid rate to be safe, while fcc iron-platinum, magnetite, and maghemite are all capable of producing stable controlled heating. We simulate the heating of ferrofluid-loaded tumors containing nanoparticles of the latter three materials to determine their effects on tumor tissue. These materials are viable MFH candidates since they can produce significant heating at the tumor center yet maintain the surrounding healthy tissue interface at a relatively safe temperature.

  20. Surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xin; Yu, Jing; Hou, Yang-Long

    2015-01-01

    Progress in surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is summarized with regard to organic molecules, macromolecules and inorganic materials. Many researchers are now devoted to synthesizing new types of multi-functional MNPs, which show great application potential in both diagnosis and treatment of disease. By employing an ever-greater variety of surface modification techniques, MNPs can satisfy more and more of the demands of medical practice in areas like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorescent marking, cell targeting, and drug delivery. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51125001 and 51172005), the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing,China (Grant No. 2122022), the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81421004), and the Doctoral Program of the Education Ministry of China (Grant No. 20120001110078).

  1. [Microwave absorption by magnetic nanoparticles in organisms].

    PubMed

    Bingi, V N

    2011-01-01

    An estimate of the rate of absorption of the electromagnetic microwaves by magnetic nanoparticles in organisms is presented. The absorption takes place due to the energy dissipation at the ferromagnetic resonance. Based on the known solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation, the imaginary part of the complex magnetic susceptibility is evaluated that gives the absorption rate. It is shown that even in the conditions of thermal isolation of the particles, their temperature growth would be insignificant at absorption of the emission with the energy flux density of the order of 1 mW/cm2, and the given mechanism is unrelated to the observable effects of low-intensity microwaves. PMID:22279759

  2. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Assembly of Anisotropic Superstructures by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengpeng; Leung, Chi Wah; Pong, Philip W T

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle superstructures with controlled magnetic alignment and desired structural anisotropy hold promise for applications in data storage and energy storage. Assembly of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles under a magnetic field could lead to highly ordered superstructures, providing distinctive magnetic properties. In this work, a low-cost fabrication technique was demonstrated to assemble sub-20-nm iron oxide nanoparticles into crystalline superstructures under an in-plane magnetic field. The gradient of the applied magnetic field contributes to the anisotropic formation of micron-sized superstructures. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field promotes the alignment of magnetic moments of the nanoparticles. The strong dipole-dipole interactions between the neighboring nanoparticles lead to a close-packed pattern as an energetically favorable configuration. Rod-shaped and spindle-shaped superstructures with uniform size and controlled spacing were obtained using spherical and polyhedral nanoparticles, respectively. The arrangement and alignment of the superstructures can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions. The two types of superstructures both show enhancement of coercivity and saturation magnetization along the applied field direction, which is presumably associated with the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic dipole interactions of the constituent nanoparticles and the increased shape anisotropy of the superstructures. Our results show that the magnetic-field-assisted assembly technique could be used for fabricating nanomaterial-based structures with controlled geometric dimensions and enhanced magnetic properties for magnetic and energy storage applications.

  3. Polysaccharide-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uthaman, Saji; Cherukula, Kondareddy; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Today, nanotechnology plays a vital role in biomedical applications, especially for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. Among the many different types of fabricated nanoparticles, magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles stand out as unique and useful tools for biomedical applications, because of their imaging characteristics and therapeutic properties such as drug and gene carriers. Polymer-coated magnetic particles are currently of particular interest to investigators in the fields of nanobiomedicine and fundamental biomaterials. Theranostic magnetic nanoparticles that are encapsulated or coated with polymers not only exhibit imaging properties in response to stimuli, but also can efficiently deliver various drugs and therapeutic genes. Even though a large number of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles have been fabricated over the last decade, most of these have only been used for imaging purposes. The focus of this review is on polysaccharide-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for imaging and gene delivery. PMID:26078971

  4. Polysaccharide-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging and Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Uthaman, Saji; Lee, Sang Joon; Cherukula, Kondareddy; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Today, nanotechnology plays a vital role in biomedical applications, especially for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. Among the many different types of fabricated nanoparticles, magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles stand out as unique and useful tools for biomedical applications, because of their imaging characteristics and therapeutic properties such as drug and gene carriers. Polymer-coated magnetic particles are currently of particular interest to investigators in the fields of nanobiomedicine and fundamental biomaterials. Theranostic magnetic nanoparticles that are encapsulated or coated with polymers not only exhibit imaging properties in response to stimuli, but also can efficiently deliver various drugs and therapeutic genes. Even though a large number of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles have been fabricated over the last decade, most of these have only been used for imaging purposes. The focus of this review is on polysaccharide-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for imaging and gene delivery.

  5. Local Control of Ultrafast Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhov, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2009-02-06

    Using the local control theory we derive analytical expressions for magnetic field pulses that steer the magnetization of a monodomain magnetic nanoparticle to a predefined state. Finite-temperature full numerical simulations confirm the analytical results and show that a magnetization switching or freezing is achievable within few precessional periods and that the scheme is exploitable for fast thermal switching.

  6. Nonlinear Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2 = 0.99, CNR = 84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2 > 0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. PMID:25505816

  7. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2=0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2>0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI.

  8. Monitoring colloidal stability of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles using AC susceptibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Adriana P; Barrera, Carola; Zayas, Yashira; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2010-02-15

    The application of the response of magnetic nanoparticles to oscillating magnetic fields to probe transitions in colloidal state and structure of polymer-coated nanoparticles is demonstrated. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with narrow size distribution were prepared and shown to respond to oscillating magnetic fields through a Brownian relaxation mechanism, which is dependent on the mechanical coupling between the particle dipoles and the surrounding matrix. These nanoparticles were coated with covalently-attached poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) or poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) (pNIPMAM) through free radical polymerization. The temperature induced transitions of colloidal suspensions of these nanoparticles were studied through a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and AC susceptibility measurements. In the pNIPAM coated nanoparticles excellent agreement was found for a transition temperature of approximately 30 degrees C by all three methods, although the AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation which was not evident from the DLS results. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results obtained for pNIPAM coated nanoparticles confirmed that aggregation indeed occurs above the lower critical transition temperature of pNIPAM. For the pNIPMAM coated nanoparticles DLS and AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation at a temperature of approximately 33-35 degrees C, much lower than the transition temperature peak at 40 degrees C observed by DSC. However, the transition observed by DSC is very broad, hence it is possible that aggregation begins to occur at temperatures lower than the peak, as indicated by the AC susceptibility and DLS results. These experiments and observations demonstrate the possibility of using AC susceptibility measurements to probe transitions in colloidal suspensions induced by external stimuli. Because magnetic measurements do not require optical transparency, these

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of polymer coated iron based nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have recently attracted much attention for potential biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and hyperthermia treatment of cancerous cells. Future research on biomedical applications also includes use of magnetic nanoparticles for cell and DNA separation. By functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles with cells or DNA selective biomolecules, the particles attach to the target and are removed from the sample upon passing through magnetic field gradients. The field gradients apply a force that attracts the particles given by the equation F = ∇(m · B), where m is the magnetization of the MNP, and B is the applied magnetic field. This type of magnetic manipulation is potential for in vivo applications such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. The magnitude of the field gradients of magnetic nanoparticles are significantly reduced due to the inverse square law dependence of magnetic field strength and subsequently the forces set up are reduced. Although the research in this field has focused primarily on iron oxide nanoparticles, these oxide nanoparticles have a low magnetization that renders them ineffective, at the distances required for in vivo applications, due to the reduced forces felt by the nanoparticles. Successful implementation of such magnetic nanoparticles based system in vivo may require higher magnetization. The aim of this proposal is to synthesize high magnetization Fe-based MNPs functionalized with artificial proteins. The research described in this dissertation focuses on synthesis, size control, structural and magnetic characterization and associated experimental studies to characterize their properties for application in magnetic fluid hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging applications. The method used for the synthesis of the Fe-based nanoparticles is the conventional borohydride

  10. Synthesis of 64Cu-Labeled Magnetic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Benjamin R.; Gustafsson, Björn; Kukis, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Complementary imaging modalities provide more information than either method alone can yield and we have developed a dual-mode imaging probe for combined magnetic resonance (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. We have developed dual-mode PET/MRI active probes targeted to vascular inflammation and present synthesis of (1) an aliphatic amine polystyrene bead and (2) a novel superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle targeted to macrophages that were both coupled to positron-emitting copper-64 isotopes. The amine groups of the polystyrene beads were directly conjugated with an amine-reactive form (isothiocyanate) of aza-macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Iron oxide nanoparticles are dextran sulfate coated, and the surface was modified to contain aldehyde groups to conjugate to an amine-activated DOTA. Incorporation of chelated Cu-64 to nanoparticles under these conditions, which is routinely used to couple DOTA to macromolecules, was unexpectedly difficult and illustrates that traditional conjugation methods do not always work in a nanoparticle environment. Therefore, we developed new methods to couple Cu-64 to nanoparticles and demonstrate successful labeling to a range of nanoparticle types. We obtained labeling yields of 24% for the amine polystyrene beads and 21% radiolabeling yield for the anionic dextran sulfate iron oxide nanoparticles. The new coupling chemistry can be generalized for attaching chelated metals to other nanoparticle platforms. PMID:18578485

  11. Biomedical and environmental applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Dai Lam; Le, Van Hong; Linh Pham, Hoai; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Quy Nguyen, Thi; Luong, Thien Tai; Thu Ha, Phuong; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of syntheses and applications of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at the Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology. Three families of oxide MNPs, magnetite, manganite and spinel ferrite materials, were prepared in various ways: coprecipitation, sol-gel and high energy mechanical milling. Basic properties of MNPs were characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Physical Properties Measurement Systems (PPMS). As for biomedical application, the aim was to design a novel multifunctional, nanosized magnetofluorescent water-dispersible Fe3O4-curcumin conjugate, and its ability to label, target and treat tumor cells was described. The conjugate possesses a magnetic nano Fe3O4 core, chitosan (CS) or Oleic acid (OL) as an outer shell and entrapped curcumin (Cur), serving the dual function of naturally autofluorescent dye as well as antitumor model drug. Fe3O4-Cur conjugate exhibited a high loading cellular uptake with the help of a macrophage, which was clearly visualized dually by Fluorescence Microscope and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (LSCM), as well as by magnetization measurement (PPMS). A preliminary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study also showed a clear contrast enhancement by using the conjugate. As for the environmental aspect, the use of magnetite MNPs for the removal of heavy toxic metals, such as Arsenic (As) and Lead (Pb), from contaminated water was studied.

  12. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P.; Orange, François; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe2O4 and polystyrene/CoFe2O4 mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters.

  13. Navigation with magnetic nanoparticles: magnetotactic bacteria and magnetic micro-robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Stefan; Kiani, Bahareh; Vach, Peter; Faivre, Damien

    2015-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria navigate in the magnetic field of the Earth by aligning and swimming along field lines with the help of special magnetic organelles called magnetosomes. These organelles contain magnetic nanoparticles and are organized into chain structures in cells. Here we review recent work on the formation of these chains and provide some estimates of the magnetic interaction energies and the corresponding forces involved in this process. In addition, we briefly discuss the propulsion of synthetic micro- or nanopropellers based on magnetic nanoparticles.

  14. Development of magnetic chromatography to sort polydisperse nanoparticles in ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Forge, Delphine; Gossuin, Yves; Roch, Alain; Laurent, Sophie; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

    2010-01-01

    Whatever the strategy of synthesis, nanoparticles in magnetic fluids commonly feature a broad size distribution. However, the presence of several size populations in ferrofluids is often problematic because of the close relationship between the efficiency of the nanoparticles and their physicochemical properties. In this work, a magnetic size sorting procedure is developed in order to reduce this polydispersity, using the magnetic properties of the iron oxide nanoparticles. This magnetic sorting with an adjustable magnetic field allows isolation of the small superparamagnetic particles as well as the larger particles. Magnetometry, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles and transmission electron microscopy were successfully used to check the efficiency of the magnetic sorting procedure, which was shown to work as a 'magnetic' chromatography.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles: synthesis, functionalization, and applications in bioimaging and magnetic energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Natalie A.; Peng, Sheng; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review summarizes the recent advances in the chemical synthesis and potential applications of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to nanomagnetism, the review focuses on recent developments in solution phase syntheses of monodisperse MFe2O4, Co, Fe, CoFe, FePt and SmCo5 nanoparticles. The review further outlines the surface, structural, and magnetic properties of these nanoparticles for biomedicine and magnetic energy storage applications. PMID:19690734

  16. Peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Anastasia Kruse

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the United States. Radiation and chemotherapy are conventional treatments, but they result in serious side effects and the probability of tumor recurrence remains high. Therefore, there is an increasing need to enhance the efficacy of conventional treatments. Magnetic nanoparticles have been previously studied for a variety of applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, anemia treatment, magnetic cell sorting and magnetically mediated hyperthermia (MMH). In this work, dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles were developed and functionalized with peptides to target the nanoparticles to either the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumor tissue or to localize the nanoparticles in subcellular regions after cell uptake. The magnetic nanoparticles were utilized for a variety of applications. First, heating properties of the nanoparticles were utilized to administer hyperthermia treatments combined with chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were functionalized with peptides to target fibrinogen in the ECM and extensively characterized for their physicochemical properties, and MMH combined with chemotherapy was able to enhance the toxicity of chemotherapy. The second application of the nanoparticles was magnetically mediated energy delivery. This treatment does not result in a bulk temperature rise upon actuation of the nanoparticles by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) but rather results in intracellular damage via friction from Brownian rotation or nanoscale heating effects from Neel relaxations. The nanoparticles were functionalized with a cell penetrating peptide to facilitate cell uptake and lysosomal escape. The intracellular effects of the internalized nanoparticles alone and with activation by an AMF were evaluated. Iron concentrations in vivo are highly regulated as excess iron can catalyze the formation of the hydroxyl radical through Fenton chemistry. Although often a concern of using iron

  17. Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles: fabrication and their laccase immobilization performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Guo, Chen; Yang, Liang-rong; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Newly large-pore magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNPs) with wormhole framework structures were synthesized for the first time by using tetraethyl orthosilicate as the silica source and amine-terminated Jeffamine surfactants as template. Iminodiacerate was attached on these MMSNPs through a silane-coupling agent and chelated with Cu(2+). The Cu(2+)-chelated MMSNPs (MMSNPs-CPTS-IDA-Cu(2+)) showed higher adsorption capacity of 98.1 mg g(-1)-particles and activity recovery of 92.5% for laccase via metal affinity adsorption in comparison with MMSNPs via physical adsorption. The Michaelis constant (K(m)) and catalytic constant (k(cat)) of laccase immobilized on the MMSNPs-CPTS-IDA-Cu(2+) were 3.28 mM and 155.4 min(-1), respectively. Storage stability and temperature endurance of the immobilized laccase on MMSNPs-CPTS-IDA-Cu(2+) increased significantly, and the immobilized laccase retained 86.6% of its initial activity after 10 successive batch reactions operated with magnetic separation.

  18. Promising iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Vo, Toi Van; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2012-12-01

    For the past few decades biomedical engineering has imprinted its significant impact on the map of science through its wide applications on many other fields. An important example obviously proving this fact is the versatile application of magnetic nanoparticles in theranostics. Due to preferable properties such as biocompatibility, non-toxicity compared to other metal derivations, iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles was chosen to be addressed in this review. Aim of this review is to give the readers a whole working window of these magnetic nanoparticles in the current context of science. Thus, preparation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the so-far techniques, methods of characterizing the nanoparticles as well as their most recent biomedical applications will be stated.

  19. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  20. Nanoparticle distribution and temperature elevations in prostatic tumours in mice during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Ma, Ronghui; Qiu, Yun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Among a variety of hyperthermia methods, magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a highly promising approach for its confined heating within the tumour. In this study we perform in vivo animal experiments on implanted prostatic tumours in mice to measure temperature distribution in the tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. Temperature elevations are induced by a commercially available ferrofluid injected via a single injection to the centre of the tumour, when the tumour is subject to an alternating magnetic field. Temperature mapping in the tumours during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia has demonstrated the feasibility of elevating tumour temperatures higher than 50°C using only 0.1 cm(3) ferrofluid injected in the tumour under a relatively low magnetic field (3 kA/m). Detailed 3-D nanoparticle concentration distribution is quantified using a high-resolution microCT imaging system. The calculated nanoparticle distribution volume based on the microCT scans is useful to analyse nanoparticle deposition in the tumours. Slower ferrofluid infusion rates result in smaller nanoparticle distribution volumes in the tumours. Nanoparticles are more confined in the vicinity of the injection site with slower infusion rates, causing higher temperature elevations in the tumours. The increase in the nanoparticle distribution volume in the tumour group after the heating from that in the tumour group without heating suggests possible nanoparticle re-distribution in the tumours during the heating. PMID:21756046

  1. Magnetic nanoparticle-based cancer nanodiagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Yousaf Muhammad; Yu, Jing; Hou, Yang-Long; Gao, Song

    2013-05-01

    Diagnosis facilitates the discovery of an impending disease. A complete and accurate treatment of cancer depends heavily on its early medical diagnosis. Cancer, one of the most fatal diseases world-wide, consistently affects a larger number of patients each year. Magnetism, a physical property arising from the motion of electrical charges, which causes attraction and repulsion between objects and does not involve radiation, has been under intense investigation for several years. Magnetic materials show great promise in the application of image contrast enhancement to accurately image and diagnose cancer. Chelating gadolinium (Gd III) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have the prospect to pave the way for diagnosis, operative management, and adjuvant therapy of different kinds of cancers. The potential of MNP-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents (CAs) now makes it possible to image portions of a tumor in parts of the body that would be unclear with the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple functionalities like variety of targeting ligands and image contrast enhancement have recently been added to the MNPs. Keeping aside the additional complexities in synthetic steps, costs, more convoluted behavior, and effects in-vivo, multifunctional MNPs still face great regulatory hurdles before clinical availability for cancer patients. The trade-off between additional functionality and complexity is a subject of ongoing debate. The recent progress regarding the types, design, synthesis, morphology, characterization, modification, and the in-vivo and in-vitro uses of different MRI contrast agents, including MNPs, to diagnose cancer will be the focus of this review. As our knowledge of MNPs' characteristics and applications expands, their role in the future management of cancer patients will become very important. Current hurdles are also discussed, along with future prospects of MNPs as the savior of cancer victims.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the static magnetic field distortion caused by magnetic nanoparticles: Simulation and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogola, Daniel; Štrbák, Oliver; Krafčík, Andrej; Škrátek, Martin; Frollo, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Nanoparticles in contrast agents possess a magnetic moment which generates local inhomogeneities in the static magnetic field of the MR scanner. These inhomogeneities cause a rapid loss of phase coherence which leads to the fast decay of the MR signal and thus produce a negative contrast in MR images. This article is focused on the interaction of magnetic nanoparticles aligned in a thin layer with the external homogeneous magnetic field, which changes the uniform distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in the carrier liquid. The goal of this study is to investigate the influence of the arrangement of magnetic nanoparticles on the final image contrast during MRI.

  3. Measurement of Nanoparticle Magnetic Hyperthermia Using Fluorescent Microthermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaowan; van Keuren, Edward

    Nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia uses the application of an AC magnetic field to ferromagnetic nanoparticles to elevate the temperature of cancer cells. The principle of hyperthermia as a true cell-specific therapy is that tumor cells are more sensitive to high temperature, so it is of great importance to control the locality and magnitude of the temperature differences. One technique to measure temperature variations on microscopic length scales is fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI). Since it is the local temperature that is measured in FMI, effects such as heating due to nearby field coils can be accounted for. A dye, the rare earth chelate europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (Eu:TTA), with a strong temperature-dependent fluorescence emission has been incorporated into magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer films. FMI experiments were carried out on these samples under an applied high frequency magnetic field. Preliminary results show that FMI is a promising technique for characterizing the local generation of heat in nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia.

  4. Proteins and Patients — Magnetic Nanoparticles as Analytic Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    Exciting new applications of low noise magnetic sensors in biotechnology, medical diagnosis and therapy are at hand for magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), which are already used in the clinical routine. The relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles is a fascinating method which can be employed for the characterization of ferrofluids and is further developed as analytical tool for biochemistry. In this article the basics and methods of the characterization of diluted ferrofluids by magnetore-laxometry (MRX) are described. We start with the properties of the ferrofluid which consists of magnetic nanoparticles. The time schedule for relaxation measurements is discussed. The details of our fluxgate based experimental set-up are presented. To achieve high sensitivity even at low concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles we optimize fluxgate sensors for low intrinsic noise, high sensitivity and large bandwidth.

  5. Inhalable magnetic nanoparticles for targeted hyperthermia in lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Wiedmann, Timothy S; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer (specifically, non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Poor response rates and survival with current treatments clearly indicate the urgent need for developing an effective means to treat NSCLC. Magnetic hyperthermia is a non-invasive approach for tumor ablation, and is based on heat generation by magnetic materials, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, when subjected to an alternating magnetic field. However, inadequate delivery of magnetic nanoparticles to tumor cells can result in sub-lethal temperature change and induce resistance while non-targeted delivery of these particles to the healthy tissues can result in toxicity. In our studies, we evaluated the effectiveness of tumor-targeted SPIO nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia of lung cancer. EGFR-targeted, inhalable SPIO nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized for targeting lung tumor cells as well as for magnetic hyperthermia-mediated antitumor efficacy in a mouse orthotopic model of NSCLC. Our results show that EGFR targeting enhances tumor retention of SPIO nanoparticles. Further, magnetic hyperthermia treatment using targeted SPIO nanoparticles resulted in significant inhibition of in vivo lung tumor growth. Overall, this work demonstrates the potential for developing an effective anticancer treatment modality for the treatment of NSCLC based on targeted magnetic hyperthermia.

  6. Bacterially synthesized ferrite nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia applications.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Eva; Byrne, James M; Farrow, Neil; Moise, Sandhya; Coker, Victoria S; Bencsik, Martin; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Telling, Neil D

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia uses AC stimulation of magnetic nanoparticles to generate heat for cancer cell destruction. Whilst nanoparticles produced inside magnetotactic bacteria have shown amongst the highest reported heating to date, these particles are magnetically blocked so that strong heating occurs only for mobile particles, unless magnetic field parameters are far outside clinical limits. Here, nanoparticles extracellularly produced by the bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens are investigated that contain Co or Zn dopants to tune the magnetic anisotropy, saturation magnetization and nanoparticle sizes, enabling heating within clinical field constraints. The heating mechanisms specific to either Co or Zn doping are determined from frequency dependent specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements and innovative AC susceptometry simulations that use a realistic model concerning clusters of polydisperse nanoparticles in suspension. Whilst both particle types undergo magnetization relaxation and show heating effects in water under low AC frequency and field, only Zn doped particles maintain relaxation combined with hysteresis losses even when immobilized. This magnetic heating process could prove important in the biological environment where nanoparticle mobility may not be possible. Obtained SARs are discussed regarding clinical conditions which, together with their enhanced MRI contrast, indicate that biogenic Zn doped particles are promising for combined diagnostics and cancer therapy. PMID:25232657

  7. Functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetic nanoparticles with biological entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mǎgeruşan, Lidia; Mrówczyński, Radosław; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    New hybrid materials, obtained through introduction of cysteine, lysine and folic acid as biological entities into polydopamine-coated magnetite nanoparticles, are reported. The syntheses are straight forward and various methods were applied for structural and morphological characterization of the resulting nanoparticles. XPS proved a very powerful tool for surface chemical analysis and it evidences the functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetite nanoparticles. The superparamagnetic behavior and the high values of saturation magnetization recommend all products for further application where magnetism is important for targeting, separation, or heating by alternative magnetic fields.

  8. Magnetic properties of superparamagnetic nanoparticles loaded into silicon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granitzer, Petra; Rumpf, Klemens; Gonzalez, Roberto; Coffer, Jeffery; Reissner, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In this work, the magnetic properties of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) filled with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) are investigated. SiNTs with different wall thicknesses of 10 and 70 nm and an inner diameter of approximately 50 nm are prepared and filled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 4 and 10 nm in diameter. The infiltration process of the NPs into the tubes and dependence on the wall-thickness is described. Furthermore, data from magnetization measurements of the nanocomposite systems are analyzed in terms of iron oxide nanoparticle size dependence. Such biocompatible nanocomposites have potential merit in the field of magnetically guided drug delivery vehicles.

  9. Experimental issues in magnetic force microscopy of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloni, L.; Passeri, D.; Reggente, M.; Rossi, M.; Mantovani, D.; Lazzaro, L.; Nepi, F.; De Angelis, F.; Barteri, M.

    2015-06-01

    The development of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications requires a detailed characterization of their magnetic properties, with relation not only to their chemical structure, but also their morphology and size. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM), thanks to its nanometric lateral resolution and its capability to detect weak magnetic fields, appears as a powerful tool for the characterization of the magnetic properties of single nanoparticles, together with their morphological characteristics. Nevertheless, the application of MFM to the quantitative measurements of magnetic properties at the nanoscale is still an open issue because of a certain incongruence between experimental data and existing theoretical models of the tip-sample magnetic interactions. In this work, MFM data acquired on different magnetic nanoparticles in different experimental conditions (magnetized and not magnetized probes, out-of-field and in-field measurements) are analyzed, with the aim of individuating the possible phenomena affecting MFM measurements. These include topography-induced artifacts resulting from the tip-sample capacitive coupling, which we propose here for the first time. In case of measurements performed in presence of an external magnetic field, much more intense MFM signals were detected as it produces the saturation of the magnetization of the nanoparticles, which is not completely obtained by the sole stray field produced by the tip. Nevertheless, even in in-field measurements, the results evidenced the presence of significant electrostatic effects in MFM images, which, therefore, appear as an important factor to be taken into account for the quantitative interpretation of MFM data.

  10. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles for bio-analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlapalli, Sri Lakshmi

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely being used in various fields of medicine, biology and separations. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis and use of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and analytical separations. The goals of this research include synthesis of biocompatible surface modified monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) by novel techniques for targeted drug delivery and use of SPIONs as analytical sensing tools. Surface modification of SPIONs was performed with two different co-polymers: tri block co-polymer Pluronics and octylamine modified polyacrylic acid. Samples of SPIONs were subsequently modified with 4 different commercially available, FDA approved tri-block copolymers (Pluronics), covering a wide range of molecular weights (5.75-14.6 kDa). A novel, technically simpler and faster phase transfer approach was developed to surface modify the SPIONs with Pluronics for drug delivery and other biomedical applications. The hydrodynamic diameter and aggregation properties of the Pluronic modified SPIONs were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The coverage of SPIONs with Pluronics was supported with IR Spectroscopy and characterized by Thermo gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The drug entrapment capacity of SPIONs was studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy using a hydrophobic carbocyanine dye, which serves as a model for hydrophobic drugs. These studies resulted in a comparison of physical properties and their implications for drug loading capacities of the four types of Pluronic coated SPIONs for drug delivery assessment. These drug delivery systems could be used for passive drug targeting. However, Pluronics lack the functional group necessary for bioconjugation and hence cannot achieve active targeting. SPIONs were functionalized with octylamine modified polyacrylic acid-based copolymer, providing water solubility and facile biomolecular conjugation. Epirubicin was loaded onto SPIONs and the drug entrapment was

  12. Attempt to remove peanut allergens from peanut extracts, using IgE-attached magnetic beads.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies from sera of peanut-allergic individuals are known to bind specifically to major peanut allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2. The objective of this study was to determine the efficiency of magnetic beads (Dynabeads) attached with IgE antibodies in the removal of major pea...

  13. Direct measurement of electrostatic fields using single Teflon nanoparticle attached to AFM tip

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A single 210-nm Teflon nanoparticle (sTNP) was attached to the vertex of a silicon nitride (Si3N4) atomic force microscope tip and charged via contact electrification. The charged sTNP can then be considered a point charge and used to measure the electrostatic field adjacent to a parallel plate condenser using 30-nm gold/20-nm titanium as electrodes. This technique can provide a measurement resolution of 250/100 nm along the X- and Z-axes, and the minimum electrostatic force can be measured within 50 pN. PACS 07.79.Lh, 81.16.-c, 84.37. + q PMID:24314111

  14. Sensitivity of crescent-shaped metal nanoparticles to attachment of dielectric colloids.

    PubMed

    Unger, Andreas; Rietzler, Uwe; Berger, Rüdiger; Kreiter, Maximilian

    2009-06-01

    The response of the plasmonic resonances of crescent-shaped nanoparticles to the attachment of a dielectric colloidal particle was investigated. The colloid serves as a model analyte which is easy to handle and allows for benchmarking of the sensing capabilities of plasmonic resonators. A clear red shift of the resonances is observed in agreement with the prediction from numerical simulations. From the response for different colloid positions, we obtain information on the nanoscale near field distribution. A field localization to length scales of 20 nm is proven directly. All resonators under study show a comparable response which is important for possible sensing application. We estimate that a further increase of the sensitivity by a factor of 8 would allow for label-free single biomolecule detection.

  15. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  16. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-04-01

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Multi-Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-wook; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2013-01-01

    Various bio-medical applications of magnetic nanoparticles have been explored during the past few decades. As tools that hold great potential for advancing biological sciences, magnetic nanoparticles have been used as platform materials for enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents, biological separation and magnetic drug delivery systems, and magnetic hyperthermia treatment. Furthermore, approaches that integrate various imaging and bioactive moieties have been used in the design of multi-modality systems, which possess synergistically enhanced properties such as better imaging resolution and sensitivity, molecular recognition capabilities, stimulus responsive drug delivery with on-demand control, and spatio-temporally controlled cell signal activation. Below, recent studies that focus on the design and synthesis of multi-mode magnetic nanoparticles will be briefly reviewed and their potential applications in the imaging and therapy areas will be also discussed. PMID:23579479

  18. Magnetic nanoparticle-supported glutathione: a conceptually sustainable organocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptually novel nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable organocatalyst has been developed, which is readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials in a truly sustainable manner; which catalyzes Paal-Knorr reaction with high yield in pure aqueous medium that...

  19. Lectin-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for reproductive improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Semen ejaculates contain heterogeneous sperm populations that can jeopardize male fertility. Recent development of nanotechnology in physiological systems may have applications in reproductive biology. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles as a novel strategy for sperm purification to imp...

  20. Magnetic field-induced acceleration of the accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lamkowsky, Marie-Christin; Geppert, Mark; Schmidt, Maike M; Dringen, Ralf

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) are considered for various biomedical and neurobiological applications that involve the presence of external magnetic fields. However, little is known on the effects of a magnetic field on the uptake of such particles by brain cells. Cultured brain astrocytes accumulated dimercaptosuccinate-coated Fe-NP in a time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent manner. This accumulation was strongly enhanced by the presence of the magnetic field generated by a permanent neodymium iron boron magnet that had been positioned below the cells. The magnetic field-induced acceleration of the accumulation of Fe-NP increased almost proportional to the strength of the magnetic field applied, increasing the cellular-specific iron content from an initial 10 nmol/mg protein within 4 h of incubation at 37°C to up to 12,000 nmol/mg protein. However, presence of a magnetic field also increased the amounts of iron that attached to the cells during incubation with Fe-NP at 4°C. These results suggest that the presence of an external magnetic field promotes in cultured astrocytes both the binding of Fe-NP to the cell membrane and the internalization of Fe-NP.

  1. Tailored Magnetic Nanoparticles for Optimizing Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Khandhar, Amit; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Simon, Julian A.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising approach towards adjuvant cancer therapy that is based on the localized heating of tumors using the relaxation losses of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in alternating magnetic fields (AMF). In this study, we demonstrate optimization of MFH by tailoring MNP size to an applied AMF frequency. Unlike conventional aqueous synthesis routes, we use organic synthesis routes that offer precise control over MNP size (diameter ~ 10–25 nm), size distribution and phase purity. Furthermore, the particles are successfully transferred to the aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer, and demonstrate long-term shelf life. A rigorous characterization protocol ensures that the water-stable MNPs meet all the critical requirements: (1) uniform shape and monodispersity, (2) phase purity, (3) stable magnetic properties approaching that of the bulk, (4) colloidal stability, (5) substantial shelf life and (6) pose no significant in vitro toxicity. Using a dedicated hyperthermia system, we then identified that 16 nm monodisperse MNPs (σ ~ 0.175) respond optimally to our chosen AMF conditions (f = 373 kHz, Ho = 14 kA/m); however, with a broader size distribution (σ ~ 0.284) the Specific Loss Power (SLP) decreases by 30%. Finally, we show that these tailored MNPs demonstrate maximum hyperthermia efficiency by reducing viability of Jurkat cells in vitro, suggesting our optimization translates truthfully to cell populations. In summary, we present a way to intrinsically optimize MFH by tailoring the MNPs to any applied AMF, a required precursor to optimize dose and time of treatment. PMID:22213652

  2. Tailored magnetic nanoparticles for optimizing magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Khandhar, Amit P; Ferguson, R Matthew; Simon, Julian A; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising approach towards adjuvant cancer therapy that is based on the localized heating of tumors using the relaxation losses of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in alternating magnetic fields (AMF). In this study, we demonstrate optimization of MFH by tailoring MNP size to an applied AMF frequency. Unlike conventional aqueous synthesis routes, we use organic synthesis routes that offer precise control over MNP size (diameter ∼10 to 25 nm), size distribution, and phase purity. Furthermore, the particles are successfully transferred to the aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer, and demonstrate long-term shelf life. A rigorous characterization protocol ensures that the water-stable MNPs meet all the critical requirements: (1) uniform shape and monodispersity, (2) phase purity, (3) stable magnetic properties approaching that of the bulk, (4) colloidal stability, (5) substantial shelf life, and (6) pose no significant in vitro toxicity. Using a dedicated hyperthermia system, we then identified that 16 nm monodisperse MNPs (σ-0.175) respond optimally to our chosen AMF conditions (f = 373 kHz, H₀ = 14 kA/m); however, with a broader size distribution (σ-0.284) the Specific Loss Power (SLP) decreases by 30%. Finally, we show that these tailored MNPs demonstrate maximum hyperthermia efficiency by reducing viability of Jurkat cells in vitro, suggesting our optimization translates truthfully to cell populations. In summary, we present a way to intrinsically optimize MFH by tailoring the MNPs to any applied AMF, a required precursor to optimize dose and time of treatment. PMID:22213652

  3. Synthesis and application of magnetic chitosan nanoparticles in oilfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Qi; Zheng, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    The novel magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles has the advantage of excellent biodegradation and a high level of controllability. The Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles was prepared successfully. The size of the Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles were all below 100 nm. The saturated magnetization of the Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles could reach 80 emu/g and showed the characteristics of superparamagnetism at the same time. The image of TEM and SEM electron microscopy showed that the cubic-shape magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 particles were encapsulated by the spherical chitosan nanoparticles. The evaluation on the interfacial properties of the product showed that the interfacial tension between crude oil and water could be reduce to ultra-low values as low as 10-3 mN/m when the magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticle was used in several blocks in Shengli Oilfield without other additives. Meanwhile, the magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles possessed good salt-resisting capacity.

  4. Bacterially synthesized ferrite nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Céspedes, Eva; Byrne, James M.; Farrow, Neil; Moise, Sandhya; Coker, Victoria S.; Bencsik, Martin; Lloyd, Jonathan R.; Telling, Neil D.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia uses AC stimulation of magnetic nanoparticles to generate heat for cancer cell destruction. Whilst nanoparticles produced inside magnetotactic bacteria have shown amongst the highest reported heating to date, these particles are magnetically blocked so that strong heating occurs only for mobile particles, unless magnetic field parameters are far outside clinical limits. Here, nanoparticles extracellularly produced by the bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens are investigated that contain Co or Zn dopants to tune the magnetic anisotropy, saturation magnetization and nanoparticle sizes, enabling heating within clinical field constraints. The heating mechanisms specific to either Co or Zn doping are determined from frequency dependent specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements and innovative AC susceptometry simulations that use a realistic model concerning clusters of polydisperse nanoparticles in suspension. Whilst both particle types undergo magnetization relaxation and show heating effects in water under low AC frequency and field, only Zn doped particles maintain relaxation combined with hysteresis losses even when immobilized. This magnetic heating process could prove important in the biological environment where nanoparticle mobility may not be possible. Obtained SARs are discussed regarding clinical conditions which, together with their enhanced MRI contrast, indicate that biogenic Zn doped particles are promising for combined diagnostics and cancer therapy.Magnetic hyperthermia uses AC stimulation of magnetic nanoparticles to generate heat for cancer cell destruction. Whilst nanoparticles produced inside magnetotactic bacteria have shown amongst the highest reported heating to date, these particles are magnetically blocked so that strong heating occurs only for mobile particles, unless magnetic field parameters are far outside clinical limits. Here, nanoparticles extracellularly produced by the bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens are

  5. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide and enhancement of its electrical and optical properties by attaching Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sunny; Ali, Javid; Harsh; Husain, M.; Zulfequar, M.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene has attracted the attention of the scientists and researchers because of its peculiar properties. Because of various unique properties, graphene can be used in sensing device applications, solar cells and liquid crystal display devices etc. In this research paper, we present a chemical route towards bulk production of r-GO (reduced graphene oxide). We have employed a modified method to achieve better results which is often termed as modified Hummer's and Offeman method. It is modified in terms of filtration technique. We have also attached silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) to as synthesised r-GO. After successful growth, silver nanoparticles have been attached to r-GO by suitable treatment with AgNO3 (aq.) N/50 solution. The as grown samples were characterised by FESEM, Raman Spectroscopy and EDS to make sure that r-GO and r-GO-Ag-NP have been successfully synthesised. The electrical and optical studies of the as grown samples were performed by dc conductivity measurements and UV visible spectroscopy. The conductivity was found to have increased with attachment of Ag-NP. The optical transmittance also improved to 90% as against 70% before Ag-NP attachment. The reduced graphene oxide attached with silver nanoparticles could find promising applications in synthesis of transparent electrode materials and optoelectronic devices.

  6. Preparation of silica coated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for the purification of histidine-tagged proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygar, Gülfem; Kaya, Murat; Özkan, Necati; Kocabıyık, Semra; Volkan, Mürvet

    2015-12-01

    Surface modified cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles containing Ni-NTA affinity group were synthesized and used for the separation of histidine tag proteins from the complex matrices through the use of imidazole side chains of histidine molecules. Firstly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared in an aqueous solution using the controlled co-precipitation method. In order to obtain small CoFe2O4 agglomerates, oleic acid and sodium chloride were used as dispersants. The CoFe2O4 particles were coated with silica and subsequently the surface of these silica coated particles (SiO2-CoFe2O4) was modified by amine (NH2) groups in order to add further functional groups on the silica shell. Then, carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups were added to the SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles through the NH2 groups. After that Nα,Nα-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine hydrate (NTA) was attached to carboxyl ends of the structure. Finally, the surface modified nanoparticles were labeled with nickel (Ni) (II) ions. Furthermore, the modified SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as a new system that allows purification of the N-terminal His-tagged recombinant small heat shock protein, Tpv-sHSP 14.3.

  7. Soft magnets from the self-organization of magnetic nanoparticles in twisted liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Matt, Benjamin; Pondman, Kirsten M; Asshoff, Sarah J; Ten Haken, Bennie; Fleury, Benoit; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2014-11-10

    Organizing magnetic nanoparticles into long-range and dynamic assemblies would not only provide new insights into physical phenomena but also open opportunities for a wide spectrum of applications. In particular, a major challenge consists of the development of nanoparticle-based materials for which the remnant magnetization and coercive field can be controlled at room temperature. Our approach consists of promoting the self-organization of magnetic nanoparticles in liquid crystals (LCs). Using liquid crystals as organizing templates allows us to envision the design of tunable self-assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles, because liquid crystals are known to reorganize under a variety of external stimuli. Herein, we show that twisted liquid crystals can be used as efficient anisotropic templates for superparamagnetic nanoparticles and demonstrate the formation of hybrid soft magnets at room temperature.

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Surface Effects and Properties Related to Biomedicine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Albiss, Borhan A.; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Due to finite size effects, such as the high surface-to-volume ratio and different crystal structures, magnetic nanoparticles are found to exhibit interesting and considerably different magnetic properties than those found in their corresponding bulk materials. These nanoparticles can be synthesized in several ways (e.g., chemical and physical) with controllable sizes enabling their comparison to biological organisms from cells (10–100 μm), viruses, genes, down to proteins (3–50 nm). The optimization of the nanoparticles’ size, size distribution, agglomeration, coating, and shapes along with their unique magnetic properties prompted the application of nanoparticles of this type in diverse fields. Biomedicine is one of these fields where intensive research is currently being conducted. In this review, we will discuss the magnetic properties of nanoparticles which are directly related to their applications in biomedicine. We will focus mainly on surface effects and ferrite nanoparticles, and on one diagnostic application of magnetic nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. PMID:24232575

  9. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Seeded Growth of Nucleotide Coordinated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hao; Liu, Biwu; Yuan, Qipeng; Liu, Juewen

    2016-06-22

    The introduction of functional molecules to the surface of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is of critical importance. Most previously reported methods were focused on surface ligand attachment either by physisorption or covalent conjugation, resulting in limited ligand loading capacity. In this work, we report the seeded growth of a nucleotide coordinated polymer shell, which can be considered as a special form of adsorption by forming a complete shell. Among all of the tested metal ions, Fe(3+) is the most efficient for this seeded growth. A diverse range of guest molecules, including small organic dyes, proteins, DNA, and gold NPs, can be encapsulated in the shell. All of these molecules were loaded at a much higher capacity compared to that on the naked iron oxide NP core, confirming the advantage of the coordination polymer (CP) shell. In addition, the CP shell provides better guest protein stability compared to that of simple physisorption while retaining guest activity as confirmed by the entrapped glucose oxidase assay. Use of this system as a peroxidase nanozyme and glucose biosensor was demonstrated, detecting glucose as low as 1.4 μM with excellent stability. This work describes a new way to functionalize inorganic materials with a biocompatible shell. PMID:27248668

  10. A highly sensitive magnetic biosensor for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs tagged to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingo, J.; Devkota, J.; Mai, T. T. T.; Nguyen, X. P.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.; Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology Collaboration; University of South Florida Team

    2014-03-01

    A precise detection of low concentrations of biomolecules attached to magnetic nanoparticles in complex biological systems is a challenging task and requires biosensors with improved sensitivity. Here, we present a highly sensitive magnetic biosensor based on the magneto-reactance (MX) effect of a Co65Fe4Ni2Si15B14 amorphous ribbon with nanohole-patterned surface for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs (Curcumin) tagged to Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The detection and quantification of Curcumin were assessed by the change in MX of the ribbon subject to varying concentrations of the functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A high capacity of the MX-based biosensor in quantitative analysis of the nanoparticles was achieved in the range of 0 - 50 ng/ml, beyond which the detection sensitivity (η) remained unchanged. The η of the biosensor reached an extremely high value of 30%, which is about 4-5 times higher than that of a magneto-impedance (MI) based biosensor. This biosensor is well suited for detection of low-concentration magnetic biomarkers in biological systems. This work was supported by was supported by the Florida Cluster for Advanced Smart Sensor Technologies, USAMRMC (Grant # W81XWH-07-1-0708), and the NSF-funded REU program at the USF.

  11. Unexpected magnetization in highly pure metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. B.; Alanko, Gordon; Beausoleil, Boone; Chess, Jordan; Thurber, Aaron; Punnoose, Alex

    2012-02-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a large set of highly pure metal oxide (CeO2, SnO2 and ZnO) nanoparticles of ultra-small size (2-10 nm). While the metal oxide systems in this study are non-magnetic as bulk materials, our prepared nanoparticles possess an unexpected small room-temperature ferromagnetic magnetization on the order of 0.001 emu/g. This magnetization is shown to not be a result of magnetic impurities, and is discussed in terms of modification of the electronic structure and crystal lattice. These nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized in their size and phase by x-ray diffraction, morphology by transmission electron microscopy, chemical state and elemental purity by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic bandgap by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic properties by vibrating sample magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  12. Amine-functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for DNA separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Junjian; Qi, Xiaoliang; Zuo, Gancheng; Chen, Qi; Pan, Xihao; Dong, Wei

    2016-11-01

    We report a modified approach for the functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSN) using polymer microspheres incorporated with magnetic nanoparticles in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the core-shell magnetic silica nanoparticles (MSN). These particles were functionalized with amino groups via the addition of aminosilane directly to the particle sol. We then evaluate their DNA separation abilities and find the capacity of DNA binding significantly increased (210.22 μg/mg) compared with normal magnetic silica spheres (138.44 μg/mg) by using an ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer (UV). The morphologies, magnetic properties, particle size, pore size, core-shell structure and Zeta potential are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). This work demonstrates that our MMSN own an excellent potential application in bioseparation and drug delivery.

  13. Design and Application of Magnetic-based Theranostic Nanoparticle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wadajkar, Aniket S.; Menon, Jyothi U.; Kadapure, Tejaswi; Tran, Richard T.; Yang, Jian; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, magnetic-based theranostic nanoparticle (MBTN) systems have been studied, researched, and applied extensively to detect and treat various diseases including cancer. Theranostic nanoparticles are advantageous in that the diagnosis and treatment of a disease can be performed in a single setting using combinational strategies of targeting, imaging, and/or therapy. Of these theranostic strategies, magnetic-based systems containing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have gained popularity because of their unique ability to be used in magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic targeting, hyperthermia, and controlled drug release. To increase their effectiveness, MNPs have been decorated with a wide variety of materials to improve their biocompatibility, carry therapeutic payloads, encapsulate/bind imaging agents, and provide functional groups for conjugation of biomolecules that provide receptor-mediated targeting of the disease. This review summarizes recent patents involving various polymer coatings, imaging agents, therapeutic agents, targeting mechanisms, and applications along with the major requirements and challenges faced in using MBTN for disease management. PMID:23795343

  14. Taking the temperature of the interiors of magnetically heated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juyao; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2014-05-27

    The temperature increase inside mesoporous silica nanoparticles induced by encapsulated smaller superparamagnetic nanocrystals in an oscillating magnetic field is measured using a crystalline optical nanothermometer. The detection mechanism is based on the temperature-dependent intensity ratio of two luminescence bands in the upconversion emission spectrum of NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+). A facile stepwise phase transfer method is developed to construct a dual-core mesoporous silica nanoparticle that contains both a nanoheater and a nanothermometer in its interior. The magnetically induced heating inside the nanoparticles varies with different experimental conditions, including the magnetic field induction power, the exposure time to the magnetic field, and the magnetic nanocrystal size. The temperature increase of the immediate nanoenvironment around the magnetic nanocrystals is monitored continuously during the magnetic oscillating field exposure. The interior of the nanoparticles becomes much hotter than the macroscopic solution and cools to the temperature of the ambient fluid on a time scale of seconds after the magnetic field is turned off. This continuous absolute temperature detection method offers quantitative insight into the nanoenvironment around magnetic materials and opens a path for optimizing local temperature controls for physical and biomedical applications. PMID:24779552

  15. Taking the Temperature of the Interiors of Magnetically Heated Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The temperature increase inside mesoporous silica nanoparticles induced by encapsulated smaller superparamagnetic nanocrystals in an oscillating magnetic field is measured using a crystalline optical nanothermometer. The detection mechanism is based on the temperature-dependent intensity ratio of two luminescence bands in the upconversion emission spectrum of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+. A facile stepwise phase transfer method is developed to construct a dual-core mesoporous silica nanoparticle that contains both a nanoheater and a nanothermometer in its interior. The magnetically induced heating inside the nanoparticles varies with different experimental conditions, including the magnetic field induction power, the exposure time to the magnetic field, and the magnetic nanocrystal size. The temperature increase of the immediate nanoenvironment around the magnetic nanocrystals is monitored continuously during the magnetic oscillating field exposure. The interior of the nanoparticles becomes much hotter than the macroscopic solution and cools to the temperature of the ambient fluid on a time scale of seconds after the magnetic field is turned off. This continuous absolute temperature detection method offers quantitative insight into the nanoenvironment around magnetic materials and opens a path for optimizing local temperature controls for physical and biomedical applications. PMID:24779552

  16. Design of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yimeng; Lai, Pui To; Leung, Cheung Hoi; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technique producing quantitative images of the distribution of tracer materials (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) without interference from the anatomical background of the imaging objects (either phantoms or lab animals). Theoretically, the MPI platform can image with relatively high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. In practice, the quality of the MPI images hinges on both the applied magnetic field and the properties of the tracer nanoparticles. Langevin theory can model the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and predict the crucial influence of nanoparticle core size on the MPI signal. In addition, the core size distribution, anisotropy of the magnetic core and surface modification of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles also determine the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the MPI images. As a result, through rational design of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the performance of MPI could be effectively optimized. In this review, the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in MPI is investigated. Rational synthesis and modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and summarized. The potential medical application areas for MPI, including cardiovascular system, oncology, stem cell tracking and immune related imaging are also analyzed and forecasted. PMID:24030719

  17. Fabrication and characterization of magnetic nanoparticle composite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, Akeem Armand

    To effectively and accurately deliver drugs within the human body, both new designs and components for implantable micropumps are being studied. Designs must ensure high biocompatibility, drug compatibility, accuracy and small power consumption. The focus of this thesis was to fabricate a prototype magnetic nanoparticle membrane for eventual incorporation into a biomedical pump and then determine the relationship between this membrane deflection and applied pneumatic or magnetic force. The magnetic nanoparticle polymer composite (MNPC) membranes in this study were composed of crosslinked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). An optimal iron oxide fabrication route was identified and particle size in each batch was approximately 24.6 nm. Once these nanoparticles were incorporated into a membrane (5 wt. %), the nanoparticle formed agglomerates with an average diameter of 2.26 +/-1.23 microm. Comparisons between the 0 and 5 wt. % loading of particles into the membranes indicated that the elastic modulus of the composite decreased with increasing particle concentration. The pressure- central deflection of the membranes could not be predicated by prior models and variation between magnetic and pneumatic pressure-deflection curves was quantified. Attempts to fabricate membranes with above 5 wt. % nanoparticles were not successful (no gelation). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results suggest that excess oleic acid on the nanoparticles prior to mixing might have prevented crosslinking.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F.; Hempelmann, R.

    2013-11-13

    Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

  19. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza, A.; Arcos, D.; Vallet-Regí, M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia.

  20. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media.

    PubMed

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-20

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles' performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications.

  1. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media.

    PubMed

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-20

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles' performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications. PMID:22456180

  2. Photodegradation of Eosin Y Using Silver-Doped Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Eman

    2015-01-01

    The purification of industrial wastewater from dyes is becoming increasingly important since they are toxic or carcinogenic to human beings. Nanomaterials have been receiving significant attention due to their unique physical and chemical properties compared with their larger-size counterparts. The aim of the present investigation was to fabricate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using a coprecipitation method, followed by coating with silver (Ag) in order to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the MNPs by loading metal onto them. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag were characterised using different instruments such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average size of the magnetic nanoparticles had a mean diameter of about 48 nm, and the average particle size changed to 55 nm after doping. The fabricated Ag-doped magnetic nanoparticles were used for the degradation of eosin Y under UV-lamp irradiation. The experimental results revealed that the use of fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag can be considered as reliable methods for the removal of eosin Y since the slope of evaluation of pseudo-first-order rate constant from the slope of the plot between ln⁡(Co/C) and the irradiation time was found to be linear. Ag-Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be considered an efficient photocatalyst to degrade textile dyes avoiding the tedious filtration step. PMID:26617638

  3. Photodegradation of Eosin Y Using Silver-Doped Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Eman

    2015-01-01

    The purification of industrial wastewater from dyes is becoming increasingly important since they are toxic or carcinogenic to human beings. Nanomaterials have been receiving significant attention due to their unique physical and chemical properties compared with their larger-size counterparts. The aim of the present investigation was to fabricate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using a coprecipitation method, followed by coating with silver (Ag) in order to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the MNPs by loading metal onto them. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag were characterised using different instruments such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average size of the magnetic nanoparticles had a mean diameter of about 48 nm, and the average particle size changed to 55 nm after doping. The fabricated Ag-doped magnetic nanoparticles were used for the degradation of eosin Y under UV-lamp irradiation. The experimental results revealed that the use of fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag can be considered as reliable methods for the removal of eosin Y since the slope of evaluation of pseudo-first-order rate constant from the slope of the plot between ln⁡(C o /C) and the irradiation time was found to be linear. Ag-Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be considered an efficient photocatalyst to degrade textile dyes avoiding the tedious filtration step. PMID:26617638

  4. Structural origin of low temperature glassy relaxation in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra; Regmi, Rajesh; Lawes, Gavin

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles often exhibit glass-like relaxation features at low temperatures. Here we discuss the effects of doping boron, cobalt, gadolinium and lanthanum on the low temperature magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We investigated the structure of the nanoparticles using both X-ray diffraction and Raman studies, and find evidence for secondary phase formation in certain samples. We acquired Transmission Electron Microscopic images to give direct information on the morphology and microstructure of these doped nanoparticles. We measured the ac out-of-phase susceptibility (χ//) vs temperature (T) to parameterize the low temperature glassy magnetic relaxation. All samples show low temperature magnetic relaxation, but the amplitude of the signal increases dramatically for certain dopants. We attribute these low temperature frequency-dependent magnetic relaxation features to structural defects, which are enhanced in some of the doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These studies also confirm that the low temperature relaxation in nanoparticles arises from single particle effects and are not associated with interparticle interactions.

  5. Magnetoelectric Effect and Magnetodielectric Effect in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungsuk

    Nano-sized magnetic particles represent considerable interests in modern science because their properties are advantageous to applications such as data storage and medical science. In particular, superparamagnetism is a magnetic property which is found in nano-sized (approximately less than 20 nm) ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic particles. Studies have shown that superparamagnetic material shows ferromagnetic magnetization only with an external magnetic field; without an external magnetic field, it loses magnetic properties even at ambient temperature overcoming its intrinsic anisotropy energy. From a magnetic memory standpoint, as bit size decreases, superparamagnetism is a major obstacle to thermal stability due to this volatility, resulting in a loss of information. If it is possible to modulate the superparamagnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles, this might provide a solution to this critical issue. In this dissertation, we studied the modulation of superparamagnetic properties by applying an electric field on a magnetoelectric composite composed of magnetic nanoparticles and a piezoelectric substrate. The magnetoelectric effect might present an additional solution to memory device in terms of reducing writing energy by using an electric field rather than an electric current. Additionally, for systems lacking a significant magnetoelectric coupling (for instance, magnetic nanoparticles incased in polymer resin), the relationship between the dielectric constant, which is intrinsically related to ferroelectric order, and magnetic anisotropy energy was investigated.

  6. Magnetic Composite Thin Films of Fe xO y Nanoparticles and Photocrosslinked Dextran Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsen, Annette; Utech, Stefanie; Maskos, Michael; Knoll, Wolfgang; Jonas, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic hydrogel composites are promising candidates for a broad field of applications from medicine to mechanical engineering. Here, surface-attached composite films of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and a polymeric hydrogel (HG) were prepared from magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and a carboxymethylated dextran with photoreactive benzophenone substituents. A blend of the MNP and the dextran polymer was prepared by mixing in solution, and after spin-coating and drying the blend film was converted into a stable MNP-HG composite by photocrosslinking through irradiation with UV light. The bulk composite material shows strong mobility in a magnetic field, imparted by the MNPs. By utilizing a surface layer of a photoreactive adhesion promoter on the substrates, the MNP-HG films were covalently immobilized during photocrosslinking. The high stability of the composite was documented by rinsing experiments with UV-Vis spectroscopy, while surface plasmon resonance and optical waveguide mode spectroscopy was employed to investigate the swelling behavior in dependence of the nanoparticle concentration, the particle type, and salt concentration.

  7. Synthesis and properties of magnetic ceramic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorescu, Monica

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic ceramic nanoparticles of the type xIn2O3-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3, xV2O5-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3 and xZnO-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3 (x=0.1-0.7) were synthesized from the mixed oxides using mechanochemical activation for 0-12 hours. X-ray diffraction was used to derive the phase content, lattice constants and particle size information as function of ball milling time. Mossbauer spectroscopy results correlated with In3+, V5+ and Zn2+ substitution of Fe3+ in the hematite lattice. SEM/EDS measurements revealed that the mechanochemical activation by ball milling produced systems with a wide range of particle size distribution, from nanometer particles to micrometer agglomerates, but with a uniform distribution of the elements. Simultaneous DSC-TGA investigations up to 800 degrees C provided information on the heat flow, weight loss and the enthalpy of transformation in the systems under investigation. This study demonstrates the formation of a nanostructured solid solution for the indium oxide, an iron vanadate (FeVO4) for the vanadium oxide, and of the zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) for the zinc oxide. The transformation pathway for each case can be related to the oxidation state of the metallic specie of the oxide used in connection with hematite.

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticle Quantitation with Low Frequency Magnetic Fields: Compensating for Relaxation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kuehlert, Esra; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Reeves, Daniel B.; Perreard, Irina M.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the number of nanoparticles present in tissue is central to many in vivo and in vitro applications. Magnetic nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro using the harmonics of their magnetization produced in a sinusoidal magnetic field. However, relaxation effects damp the magnetic harmonics rendering them of limited use in quantitation. We show that an accurate measure of the number of nanoparticles can be made by correcting for relaxation effects. Correction for relaxation reduced errors of 50% for larger nanoparticles in high relaxation environments to 2%. The result is a method of nanoparticle quantitation capable of in vivo and in vitro applications including histopathology assays, quantitative imaging, drug delivery and thermal therapy preparation. PMID:23867287

  9. Enhanced Intracellular Hyperthermia Efficiency by Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Nucleus and Mitochondria Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Zhou, Jumei; Chen, Benke; Tang, Zhenghai; Zhang, Jieying; Li, Liya; Tang, Jintian

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate whether cell organelle targeting peptide can transport magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into specific cell organelle, peptides bearing nuclear localization signal (NLS) or mitochondria targeting sequences were coagulated to MNPs. In vitro cytotoxicity study on the human liver cancer cells (HepG2) was tested by using MTT assay. Sub-cellular location of each peptide modified MNP (PEP-MNPs) was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The uptake of HepG2 cells growing in PEP-MNPs was measured by using ICP-OES. Magnetic induction heating efficacies of PEP-MNPs were analyzed by exposing the PEP-MNPs containing cells in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). It was demonstrated that PEP-MNPs were efficient agents for cancer nanothermotherapy with satisfactory biocompatibility. TEM showed that the fate of MNPs inside the cells depended on the peptide sequence attached to the particle surface. The uptake improvement was observed both in PEP-MNPs bearing NLS peptides and in PEP-MNPs bearing mitochondria targeting sequences. Virus original endocytosis sequence can enhance the uptake. MNP bearing mitochondria targeting sequence exerted a better magnetic induction hyperthermia performance comparing to that of NLS. Our investigation provides a strategy for fabrication cell organelle targeting magnetic nanoparticles. For instance, mitochondria targeting peptide conjugated MNPs for highly-efficiency magnetic nanothermotherapy and nuclear targeting peptides conjugated MNPs for gene magnetofection. PMID:27427753

  10. Enhanced Intracellular Hyperthermia Efficiency by Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Nucleus and Mitochondria Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Zhou, Jumei; Chen, Benke; Tang, Zhenghai; Zhang, Jieying; Li, Liya; Tang, Jintian

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate whether cell organelle targeting peptide can transport magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into specific cell organelle, peptides bearing nuclear localization signal (NLS) or mitochondria targeting sequences were coagulated to MNPs. In vitro cytotoxicity study on the human liver cancer cells (HepG2) was tested by using MTT assay. Sub-cellular location of each peptide modified MNP (PEP-MNPs) was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The uptake of HepG2 cells growing in PEP-MNPs was measured by using ICP-OES. Magnetic induction heating efficacies of PEP-MNPs were analyzed by exposing the PEP-MNPs containing cells in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). It was demonstrated that PEP-MNPs were efficient agents for cancer nanothermotherapy with satisfactory biocompatibility. TEM showed that the fate of MNPs inside the cells depended on the peptide sequence attached to the particle surface. The uptake improvement was observed both in PEP-MNPs bearing NLS peptides and in PEP-MNPs bearing mitochondria targeting sequences. Virus original endocytosis sequence can enhance the uptake. MNP bearing mitochondria targeting sequence exerted a better magnetic induction hyperthermia performance comparing to that of NLS. Our investigation provides a strategy for fabrication cell organelle targeting magnetic nanoparticles. For instance, mitochondria targeting peptide conjugated MNPs for highly-efficiency magnetic nanothermotherapy and nuclear targeting peptides conjugated MNPs for gene magnetofection.

  11. Lanthanide doped nanoparticles as remote sensors for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Junpei; Xu, Beibei; Sang, Xiangwen; Chen, Weibo; Liu, Xiaofeng; Han, Junbo; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-10-01

    We report the effect of magnetic fields (MFs) on emission Eu-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles. A notable shift in the position of emission bands and the suppressed emission intensity are observed with the MF. These magnetic-optical interactions are explained in terms of the Zeeman effect, enhanced cross-relaxation rate and change of site symmetry. PMID:25123099

  12. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of CoPt Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trung, Truong Thanh; Nhung, Do Thi; Nam, Nguyen Hoang; Luong, Nguyen Hoang

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles CoPt were prepared by the chemical reduction of cobalt (II) chloride and chloroplatinic acid, then the samples were ultrasonicated for 2 h. After annealing at various temperatures from 400°C to 700°C for 1 h, the samples showed hard magnetic properties with coercivity up to 1.15 kOe at room temperature.

  13. Physics of heat generation using magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cindi L; Ivkov, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and thermal ablation have been actively studied experimentally and theoretically. In this review, we provide a summary of the literature describing the properties of nanometer-scale magnetic materials suspended in biocompatible fluids and their interactions with external magnetic fields. Summarised are the properties and mechanisms understood to be responsible for magnetic heating, and the models developed to understand the behaviour of single-domain magnets exposed to alternating magnetic fields. Linear response theory and its assumptions have provided a useful beginning point; however, its limitations are apparent when nanoparticle heating is measured over a wide range of magnetic fields. Well-developed models (e.g. for magnetisation reversal mechanisms and pseudo-single domain formation) available from other fields of research are explored. Some of the methods described include effects of moment relaxation, anisotropy, nanoparticle and moment rotation mechanisms, interactions and collective behaviour, which have been experimentally identified to be important. Here, we will discuss the implicit assumptions underlying these analytical models and their relevance to experiments. Numerical simulations will be discussed as an alternative to these simple analytical models, including their applicability to experimental data. Finally, guidelines for the design of optimal magnetic nanoparticles will be presented. PMID:24131317

  14. Magnetic properties of heat treated bacterial ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Bayukov, O. A.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Ladygina, V. P.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles, which are products of vital functions of Klebsiella oxitoca bacteria, have been studied. The initial powder containing the nanoparticles in an organic shell was subjected to low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment for up to 240 h. The bacterial ferrihydrite particles exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior. Their characteristic blocking temperature increases from 26 to 80 K with the heat treatment. Analysis of the magnetization curves with regard to the magnetic moment distribution function and antiferromagnetic contribution shows that the low-temperature heat treatment enhances the average magnetic moment of a particle; i.e., the nanoparticles coarsen, probably due to their partial agglomeration during heat treatment. It was established that the blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. Therefore, a model was proposed that takes into account both the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy. Using this model, the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants KV≈1.7×105 erg/cm3 and KS≈0.055 erg/cm2 have been determined. The effect of the surface magnetic anisotropy of ferrihydrite nanoparticles on the observed magnetic hysteresis loops is discussed.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, J. C.; D. Mercês, A. A.; Cabrera, M.; Shigeyosi, W. T.; de Souza, S. D.; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D.; Cardoso, C. A.; Neri, D. F. M.; C. Silva, M. P.; Carvalho, L. B.

    2016-12-01

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3+ ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ˜15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and 57Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite ( γFe2O3). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled "mPANI") presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample "mPANIG-Trypsin"). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 ∘C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles: In vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Lima-Tenório, Michele K; Pineda, Edgardo A Gómez; Ahmad, Nasir M; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-09-30

    Recently, significant research efforts have been devoted to the finding of efficient approaches in order to reduce the side effects of traditional cancer therapy and diagnosis. In this context, magnetic nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their unique physical properties, magnetic susceptibility, biocompatibility, stability and many more relevant characteristics. Particularly, magnetic nanoparticles for in vivo biomedical applications need to fulfill special criteria with respect to size, size distribution, surface charge, biodegradability or bio-eliminability and optionally bear well selected ligands for specific targeting. In this context, many routes have been developed to synthesize these materials, and tune their functionalities through intriguing techniques including functionalization, coating and encapsulation strategies. In this review article, the use of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy and diagnosis is evaluated addressing potential applications in MRI, drug delivery, hyperthermia, theranostics and several other domains. In view of potential biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, the review focuses on the most recent progress made with respect to synthetic routes to produce magnetic nanoparticles and their salient accomplishments for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  17. A magnonic gas sensor based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, D; Kolokoltsev, O V; Qureshi, N; Mejía-Uriarte, E V; Saniger, J M

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative, simple and inexpensive gas sensor based on the variation in the magnetic properties of nanoparticles due to their interaction with gases. To measure the nanoparticle response a magnetostatic spin wave (MSW) tunable oscillator has been developed using an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) epitaxial thin film as a delay line (DL). The sensor has been prepared by coating a uniform layer of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles on the YIG film. The unperturbed frequency of the oscillator is determined by a bias magnetic field, which is applied parallel to the YIG film and perpendicularly to the wave propagation direction. In this device, the total bias magnetic field is the superposition of the field of a permanent magnet and the field associated with the layer of magnetic nanoparticles. The perturbation produced in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle layer due to its interaction with gases induces a frequency shift in the oscillator, allowing the detection of low concentrations of gases. In order to demonstrate the ability of the sensor to detect gases, it has been tested with organic volatile compounds (VOCs) which have harmful effects on human health, such as dimethylformamide, isopropanol and ethanol, or the aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene and xylene more commonly known by its abbreviation (BTX). All of these were detected with high sensitivity, short response time, and good reproducibility.

  18. Microfluidic separation of magnetic nanoparticles on an ordered array of magnetized micropillars.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, G; Kuzhir, P; Izmaylov, Y; Alves Marins, J; Ezzaier, H; Robert, L; Doutre, F; Noblin, X; Lomenech, C; Bossis, G; Meunier, A; Sandoz, G; Zubarev, A

    2016-06-01

    Microfluidic separation of magnetic particles is based on their capture by magnetized microcollectors while the suspending fluid flows past the microcollectors inside a microchannel. Separation of nanoparticles is often challenging because of strong Brownian motion. Low capture efficiency of nanoparticles limits their applications in bioanalysis. However, at some conditions, magnetic nanoparticles may undergo field-induced aggregation that amplifies the magnetic attractive force proportionally to the aggregate volume and considerably increases nanoparticle capture efficiency. In this paper, we have demonstrated the role of such aggregation on an efficient capture of magnetic nanoparticles (about 80 nm in diameter) in a microfluidic channel equipped with a nickel micropillar array. This array was magnetized by an external uniform magnetic field, of intensity as low as 6-10 kA/m, and experiments were carried out at flow rates ranging between 0.3 and 30 μL/min. Nanoparticle capture is shown to be mostly governed by the Mason number Ma, while the dipolar coupling parameter α does not exhibit a clear effect in the studied range, 1.4 < α < 4.5. The capture efficiency Λ shows a strongly decreasing Mason number behavior, Λ∝Ma^{-1.78} within the range 32 ≤ Ma ≤ 3250. We have proposed a simple theoretical model which considers destructible nanoparticle chains and gives the scaling behavior, Λ∝Ma^{-1.7}, close to the experimental findings. PMID:27415317

  19. Microfluidic separation of magnetic nanoparticles on an ordered array of magnetized micropillars.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, G; Kuzhir, P; Izmaylov, Y; Alves Marins, J; Ezzaier, H; Robert, L; Doutre, F; Noblin, X; Lomenech, C; Bossis, G; Meunier, A; Sandoz, G; Zubarev, A

    2016-06-01

    Microfluidic separation of magnetic particles is based on their capture by magnetized microcollectors while the suspending fluid flows past the microcollectors inside a microchannel. Separation of nanoparticles is often challenging because of strong Brownian motion. Low capture efficiency of nanoparticles limits their applications in bioanalysis. However, at some conditions, magnetic nanoparticles may undergo field-induced aggregation that amplifies the magnetic attractive force proportionally to the aggregate volume and considerably increases nanoparticle capture efficiency. In this paper, we have demonstrated the role of such aggregation on an efficient capture of magnetic nanoparticles (about 80 nm in diameter) in a microfluidic channel equipped with a nickel micropillar array. This array was magnetized by an external uniform magnetic field, of intensity as low as 6-10 kA/m, and experiments were carried out at flow rates ranging between 0.3 and 30 μL/min. Nanoparticle capture is shown to be mostly governed by the Mason number Ma, while the dipolar coupling parameter α does not exhibit a clear effect in the studied range, 1.4 < α < 4.5. The capture efficiency Λ shows a strongly decreasing Mason number behavior, Λ∝Ma^{-1.78} within the range 32 ≤ Ma ≤ 3250. We have proposed a simple theoretical model which considers destructible nanoparticle chains and gives the scaling behavior, Λ∝Ma^{-1.7}, close to the experimental findings.

  20. Enhancement in magnetic properties of magnesium substituted bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jianlong; Xie, Dan E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Teng, Changjiu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Yilin; Ren, Tian-Ling E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zeng, Min; Gao, Xingsen; Zhao, Yonggang

    2015-06-14

    We report a potential way to effectively improve the magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) nanoparticles through Mg{sup 2+} ion substitution at the Fe-sites of BFO lattice. The high purity and structural changes induced by Mg doping are confirmed by X-ray powder diffractometer and Raman spectra. Enhanced magnetic properties are observed in Mg substituted samples, which simultaneously exhibit ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. A physical model is proposed to support the observed ferromagnetism of Mg doped samples, and the superparamagnetic properties are revealed by the temperature dependent magnetization measurements. The improved magnetic properties and soft nature obtained by Mg doping in BFO nanoparticles demonstrate the possibility of BFO nanoparticles to practical applications.

  1. Neural correlates of attachment trauma in borderline personality disorder: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Kircher, Tilo; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Ruchsow, Martin; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2008-08-30

    Functional imaging studies have shown that individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display prefrontal and amygdala dysfunction while viewing or listening to emotional or traumatic stimuli. The study examined for the first time the functional neuroanatomy of attachment trauma in BPD patients using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the telling of individual stories. A group of 11 female BPD patients and 17 healthy female controls, matched for age and education, told stories in response to a validated set of seven attachment pictures while being scanned. Group differences in narrative and neural responses to "monadic" pictures (characters facing attachment threats alone) and "dyadic" pictures (interaction between characters in an attachment context) were analyzed. Behavioral narrative data showed that monadic pictures were significantly more traumatic for BPD patients than for controls. As hypothesized BPD patients showed significantly more anterior midcingulate cortex activation in response to monadic pictures than controls. In response to dyadic pictures patients showed more activation of the right superior temporal sulcus and less activation of the right parahippocampal gyrus compared to controls. Our results suggest evidence for potential neural mechanisms of attachment trauma underlying interpersonal symptoms of BPD, i.e. fearful and painful intolerance of aloneness, hypersensitivity to social environment, and reduced positive memories of dyadic interactions. PMID:18635342

  2. Measuring Cytokine Concentrations Using Magnetic Spectroscopy of Nanoparticle Brownian Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John

    The magnetic particle spectroscopy is a newly developed non-invasive technique for obtaining information about the nanoparticles' micro environment. In this technique the nanoparticles' magnetization, induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies, is processed to analyze rotational freedom of nanoparticles. By analyzing average rotational freedom, it is possible to measure the nanoparticle's relaxation time, and hence get an estimate of the temperature and viscosity of the medium. In molecular concentration sensing, the rotational freedom indicates the number of nanoparticles that are bound by a selected analyte. We have developed microscopic nanoparticles probes to measure the concentration of selected molecules. The nanoparticles are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely. Previously, sensitivity measurements has been reported to be of the factor of 200. However, with our newer perpendicular field setup (US Patent Application Serial No 61/721,378), it possible to sense cytokine concentrations as low as 5 Pico-Molar in-vitro. The excellent sensitivity of this apparatus is due to isolation of the drive field from the signal so the output can be amplified to a higher level. Dartmouth College.

  3. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Amit M.; Qiang, You; Meyer, Daniel R.; Souza, Ryan; Mcconnaughoy, Alan; Muldoon, Leslie; Baer, Donald R.

    2008-04-01

    Non-toxic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have expanded the treatment delivery options in the medical world. With a size range from 2 to 200 nm MNPs can be compiled with most of the small cells and tissues in living body. Monodispersive iron-iron oxide core shell nanoparticles were prepared in our novel cluster deposition system. This unique method of preparing the core shell MNPs gives nanoparticles very high magnetic moment. We tested the nontoxicity and uptake of MNPs coated with/without dextrin by incubating them with rat LX-1 small cell lung cancer cells (SCLC). Since core iron enhances the heating effect [7] the rate of oxidation of iron nanoparticles was tested in deionized water at certain time interval. Both coated and noncoated MNPs were successfully uptaken by the cells, indicating that the nanoparticles were not toxic. The stability of MNPs was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) scan after 0, 24, 48, 96, 204 hours. Due to the high magnetic moment offered by MNPs produced in our lab, we predict that even in low applied external alternating field desired temperature can be reached in cancer cells in comparison to the commercially available nanoparticles. Moreover, our MNPs do not require additional anti-coagulating agents and provide a cost effective means of treatment with significantly lower dosage in the body in comparison to commercially available nanoparticles.

  4. Biodegradation of magnetic nanoparticles evaluated from Mössbauer and magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischenko, I.; Chuev, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Polikarpov, M.; Panchenko, V.

    2013-04-01

    In order to extract a quantitative information about characteristics of the magnetic nanoparticles injected into a living organism it is necessary to define a model of the magnetic dynamics for fitting self-consistently the whole set of the experimental data, specifically, the evolution of Mössbauer spectral shape with temperature and external magnetic field as well as the magnetization curves. We have developed such a model and performed such an analysis of the temperature- and magnetic field-dependent spectra and magnetization curves of nanoparticles injected into mice. This allowed us to reliably evaluate changes in the characteristics of the residual particles and their chemical transformation to paramagnetic ferritin-like forms in different mouse organs as a function of time. Actually, the approach makes it possible to quantitatively characterize biodegradation and biotransformation of magnetic nanoparticles delivered in a body.

  5. Magnetic domains and surface effects in hollow maghemite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Puntes, Victor; Balcells, Lluis; Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar

    2008-09-30

    In the present work, we investigate the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic and non-interacting maghemite hollow nanoparticles obtained by the Kirkendall effect. From the experimental characterization of their magnetic behavior, we find that polycrystalline hollow maghemite nanoparticles exhibit low blocked-to-superparamagnetic transition temperatures, small magnetic moments, significant coercivities and irreversibility fields, and no magnetic saturation on external magnetic fields up to 5 T. These results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural parameters characterizing the maghemite shells by means of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of an individual spherical shell. The model comprises strongly interacting crystallographic domains arranged in a spherical shell with random orientations and anisotropy axis. The Monte Carlo simulation allows discernment between the influence of the polycrystalline structure and its hollow geometry, while revealing the magnetic domain arranggement in the different temperataure regimes.

  6. Enhanced drug transport through alginate biofilms using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Shayna L.; Cuylear, Carla; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Osinski, Marek; Smyth, Hugh

    2009-02-01

    The development of microbiological biofilms greatly reduces the efficacy of antibiotic therapies and is a serious problem in chronic infection and for implantable medical devices. We investigated the potential of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to increase transport through in vitro models of alginate biofilms. An in vitro alginate biofilm model was developed to mimic the composition of in vivo samples of P. aeruginosa infections. Transport through this model biofilm was performed using both bulk diffusion methods and single particle tracking techniques in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. Bulk diffusion of nanoparticles through the biofilm was significantly enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field, both visually and quantitatively. Nanoparticle trajectories also showed transport increases were significantly higher when magnetic fields were applied. We also showed that surface chemistry (cationic, anioni, or neutral) of the nanoparticles significantly influenced transport rates. Finally, nanoparticle size also influenced the transport rates and variability of transport rates through the biofilm. In these first studies using magnetic nanoparticles in bacterial biofilms, we demonstrate that transport enhancement can be achieved and further studies are warranted.

  7. [Assemble of magnetic nanoparticles into the structure of cisplatin liposome].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yang, Cai-qin; Wang, Jing

    2011-05-01

    Effects of different procedures of magnetic nanoparticles into the liposome structure on the distribution of magnetic particles in the liposome were investigated. Magnetic liposomes with high-encapsulating rate of cisplatin (CDDP) were obtained. Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles which was modified by organic functional group on surface was synthesized by an one-step modified hydrothermal method. The CDDP magnetic liposomes were prepared by a film scattering-ultrasonic technique and the concentrations of CDDP in the liposomes were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorbance spectroscopy. Magnetic liposomes with different microstructure were prepared by the two different procedures, where the magnetic particles were combined with phospholipid before the film preparation to form liposome in procedure I, and drug solution and the magnetic particles were mixed before hydrating the lipids film to form liposome in procedure II. The liposome structure was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The CDDP magnetic liposomes were prepared by the optimized method which was selected by orthogonal test. Encapsulation rate of the magnetic particles distributed in the phospholipid bilayer through the procedure I was 34.90%. While liposome, produced by the procedure II technique, contained magnetic particles in the interior aqueous compartment, which encapsulation rate was 28.34%. Encapsulation rates of both I and II were higher than that of conventional liposome. The release profile of all the three different liposomes in vitro fitted with a first-order equation. Because of distribution of magnetic particles in the phospholipid bilayer, the skeleton of phospholipid bilayer was changed. The releasing tl/2 of magnetic liposomes produced by the procedure I technique is 9 h, which is shorter than that of the other two liposomes. Assemble of magnetic nanoparticles into the structure of liposome was succeeded by the procedure I, which showed superiority than by procedure II

  8. A Two-Magnet System to Push Therapeutic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Benjamin; Dormer, Kenneth; Rutel, Isaac B.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to direct magnetically susceptible nanoparticles to disease locations: to infections, blood clots, or tumors. Any single magnet always attracts (pulls) ferro- or para-magnetic particles towards it. External magnets have been used to pull therapeutics into tumors near the skin in animals and human clinical trials. Implanting magnetic materials into patients (a feasible approach in some cases) has been envisioned as a means of reaching deeper targets. Yet there are a number of clinical needs, ranging from treatments of the inner ear, to antibiotic-resistant skin infections and cardiac arrhythmias, which would benefit from an ability to magnetically "inject", or push in, nanomedicines. We develop, analyze, and experimentally demonstrate a novel, simple, and effective arrangement of just two permanent magnets that can magnetically push particles. Such a system might treat diseases of the inner ear; diseases which intravenously injected or orally administered treatments cannot reach due to the blood-brain barrier.

  9. A Two-Magnet System to Push Therapeutic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Benjamin; Dormer, Kenneth; Rutel, Isaac B.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to direct magnetically susceptible nanoparticles to disease locations: to infections, blood clots, or tumors. Any single magnet always attracts (pulls) ferro- or para-magnetic particles towards it. External magnets have been used to pull therapeutics into tumors near the skin in animals and human clinical trials. Implanting magnetic materials into patients (a feasible approach in some cases) has been envisioned as a means of reaching deeper targets. Yet there are a number of clinical needs, ranging from treatments of the inner ear, to antibiotic-resistant skin infections and cardiac arrhythmias, which would benefit from an ability to magnetically “inject”, or push in, nanomedicines. We develop, analyze, and experimentally demonstrate a novel, simple, and effective arrangement of just two permanent magnets that can magnetically push particles. Such a system might treat diseases of the inner ear; diseases which intravenously injected or orally administered treatments cannot reach due to the blood-brain barrier. PMID:21243119

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankhurst, Q. A.; Connolly, J.; Jones, S. K.; Dobson, J.

    2003-07-01

    The physical principles underlying some current biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles are reviewed. Starting from well-known basic concepts, and drawing on examples from biology and biomedicine, the relevant physics of magnetic materials and their responses to applied magnetic fields are surveyed. The way these properties are controlled and used is illustrated with reference to (i) magnetic separation of labelled cells and other biological entities; (ii) therapeutic drug, gene and radionuclide delivery; (iii) radio frequency methods for the catabolism of tumours via hyperthermia; and (iv) contrast enhancement agents for magnetic resonance imaging applications. Future prospects are also discussed.

  11. Spherical magnetic nanoparticles fabricated by laser target evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronov, A. P.; Beketov, I. V.; Komogortsev, S. V.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Medvedev, A. I.; Leiman, D. V.; Larrañaga, A.; Bhagat, S. M.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide (MNPs) were prepared by the laser target evaporation technique (LTE). The main focus was on the fabrication of de-aggregated spherical maghemite MNPs with a narrow size distribution and enhanced effective magnetization. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, magnetization and microwave absorption measurements were comparatively analyzed. The shape of the MNPs (mean diameter of 9 nm) was very close to being spherical. The lattice constant of the crystalline phase was substantially smaller than that of stoichiometric magnetite but larger than the lattice constant of maghemite. High value of Ms up to 300 K was established. The 300 K ferromagnetic resonance signal is a single line located at a field expected from spherical magnetic particles with negligible magnetic anisotropy. The maximum obtained concentration of water based ferrofluid was as high as 10g/l of magnetic material. In order to understand the temperature and field dependence of MNPs magnetization, we invoke the core-shell model. The nanoparticles is said to have a ferrimagnetic core (roughly 70 percent of the caliper size) while the shell consists of surface layers in which the spins are frozen having no long range magnetic order. The core-shell interactions were estimated in frame of random anisotropy model. The obtained assembly of de-aggregated nanoparticles is an example of magnetic nanofluid stable under ambient conditions even without an electrostatic stabilizer.

  12. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using Magnetic Hyperthermia System (MHS) for the application in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, M. E.; Patel, Ronak; Mast, David B.; Shi, Donglu; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Zhang, Jiaming; Xu, Hong

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the heating profiles of various concentrations of three Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle systems were measured when the nanoparticles were exposed to alternating magnetic fields in a RF Magnetic Hyperthermia System. The Fe3O4 core nanoparticles of each system were approximately 10nm in diameter, but each system had different nanoparticle configurations and surface modifications. The heating profiles were used to investigate the dominant heating mechanism, the heat transfer into the surrounding fluid, and the overall effectiveness of each nanoparticle system for possible use in hyperthermia cancer treatments. Magnetization measurements showed that all samples were superparamagnetic in nature with almost zero retentivity and coercivity. For all samples, the saturation magnetization was observed to increase linearly with increasing concentration of Fe3O4. Five different concentrations of the three Fe3O4 nanoparticle samples were exposed to a 13.56 MHz alternating magnetic field with an amplitude of 4500 A/m, while the solution temperature was measured as a function of time using an optical fiber temperature probe. A correlation was observed between the heating rate, the initial susceptibility, and the type of surface modification of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  13. Cobalt-based Magnetic Nanoparticles: Design, Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi

    The ever-increasing desire for more energy attainable from a smaller volume of matter has driven researchers to explore advanced materials at the molecular or even atomic size scale. Magnetic materials at the nanometer size scale have been the subject of enormous research effort worldwide for more than half a century. Different magnetic nanoparticles have shown different behavior in the absence and presence of an external magnetic field, which has led them to be categorized as soft (easy to demagnetize) or hard (resistive against demagnetization) magnets. Applications range from medical and biomedical devices to magnetic recording media and magnetic sensing have emphasized the importance of this class of materials. Soft magnetic phases have found application in power generation and magnetic targeted drug delivery, while hard magnets have been subject of extensive research for application as energy storage media. Discovery of the exchange-coupling phenomenon between the spins of two adjacent hard and soft magnetic phases which means taking advantage of both high magnetic moment of the soft phase as well as high coercivity of the hard phase has attracted scientists to develop advanced materials for energy storage with no usage of fossil fuels: clean energy. In this Dissertation, synthesis of pure phase, soft FeCo nanoparticles with high magnetic moment and hard phase CoxC nanoparticles possessing high coercivity is reported. The polyol method (chemical co-precipitating at polyhydric alcohol as reducing agent) is used to make FeCo and Co xC nanoparticles and the effects of important reaction kinetics parameters on the structure and magnetic properties of the products are studied. Careful analysis of correlations between these parameters and the properties of the magnetic particles has made synthesis of FeCo and CoxC nanoparticles with desired properties possible. Fabrication of MnAlC-FeCo heterostructures as a rare earth-free alternative for high-performance permanent

  14. The unusual magnetism of nanoparticle LaCoO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Durand, A. M.; Belanger, D. P.; Hamil, T. J.; Ye, F.; Chi, S.; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.; Booth, C. H.; Abdollahian, Y.; Bhat, M.

    2015-04-15

    Bulk and nanoparticle powders of LaCoO3 (LCO) were synthesized and their magnetic and structural properties were studied using SQUID magnetometry and neutron diffraction. The bulk and large nanoparticles exhibit weak ferromagnetism (FM) below T≈85K and a crossover from strong to weak antiferromagnetic (AFM) correlations near a transition expressed in the lattice parameters, To ≈ 40 K. This crossover does not occur in the smallest nanoparticles; instead, the magnetic behavior is predominantly ferromagnetic. The amount of FM in the nanoparticles depends on the amount of Co3O4 impurity phase, which induces tensile strain on the LCO lattice. A core-interface model is introduced,more » with the core region exhibiting the AFM crossover and with FM in the interface region near surfaces and impurity phases.« less

  15. Nematic-like organization of magnetic mesogen-hybridized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Demortière, Arnaud; Buathong, Saïwan; Pichon, Benoît P; Panissod, Pierre; Guillon, Daniel; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Donnio, Bertrand

    2010-06-21

    A fluid nematic-like phase is induced in monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.3 nm. This supramolecular arrangement is governed by the covalent functionalization of the nanoparticle surface with cyanobiphenyl-based ligands as mesogenic promoters. The design and synthesis of these hybrid materials and the study of their mesogenic properties are reported. In addition, the modifications of the magnetic properties of the hybridized nanoparticles are investigated as a function of the different grafted ligands. Owing to the rather large interparticular distances (about 7 nm), the dipolar interaction between nanoparticles is shown to play only a minor role. Conversely, the surface magnetic anisotropy of the particles is significantly affected by the surface derivatization. PMID:20486228

  16. Magnetic Nanoparticle Drug Carriers and their Study by Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancers and other pathological conditions. The efficient delivery of therapeutic levels of drug to a target site while limiting nonspecific, systemic toxicity requires optimization of the drug delivery materials, the applied magnetic field, and the treatment protocol. The history and current state of magnetic drug targeting is reviewed. While initial studies involved micron-sized and larger carriers, and work with these microcarriers continues, it is the sub-micron carriers or nanocarriers that are of increasing interest. An aspect of magnetic drug targeting using nanoparticle carriers that has not been considered is then addressed. This aspect involves the variation in the magnetic properties of the nanocarriers. Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a relatively new technique for characterizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is unique in its capability of determining the distribution in magnetic properties of a nanoparticle sample in suspension. The development and current state of this technique is also reviewed. Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers have been found by QMgFFF analysis to be highly polydisperse in their magnetic properties, and the strength of response of the particles to magnetic field gradients is predicted to vary by orders of magnitude. It is expected that the least magnetic fraction of a formulation will contribute the most to systemic toxicity, and the depletion of this fraction will result in a more effective drug carrying material. A material that has a reduced systemic toxicity will allow higher doses of cytotoxic drugs to be delivered to the tumor with reduced side effects. Preliminary experiments involving a novel method of refining a magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier to achieve this result are described. QMgFFF is used to characterize the refined and unrefined material. PMID:19591456

  17. Collective magnetic response of CeO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coey, Michael; Ackland, Karl; Venkatesan, Munuswamy; Sen, Siddhartha

    2016-07-01

    The magnetism of nanoparticles and thin films of wide-bandgap oxides that include no magnetic cations is an unsolved puzzle. Progress has been hampered by both the irreproducibility of much of the experimental data, and the lack of any generally accepted theoretical explanation. The characteristic signature is a virtually anhysteretic, temperature-independent magnetization curve that saturates in an applied field that is several orders of magnitude greater than the magnetization. It would seem as if a tiny volume fraction, <~0.1%, of the samples is magnetic and that the energy scale is unusually high for spin magnetism. Here we investigate the effect of dispersing 4 nm CeO2 nanoparticles with powders of γAl2O3, sugar or latex microspheres. The saturation magnetization, Ms ≍ 60 A m-1 for compact samples, is maximized by 1 wt% lanthanum doping. Dispersing the CeO2 nanopowder reduces its magnetic moment by up to an order of magnitude, and there is a characteristic length scale of order 100 nm for the magnetism to appear in CeO2 nanoparticle clusters. The phenomenon is explained in terms of a giant orbital paramagnetism that appears in coherent mesoscopic domains due to resonant interaction with zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum electromagnetic field. The theory explains the observed temperature-independent magnetization curve and its doping and dispersion dependence, based on a length scale of 300 nm that corresponds to the wavelength of a maximum in the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the magnetic CeO2 nanoparticles. The coherent domains occupy roughly 10% of the sample volume.

  18. Facile synthesis of gold nanoworms with a tunable length and aspect ratio through oriented attachment of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Waqqar; Glass, Christian; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M.

    2014-10-01

    We report a seedless protocol based on the oriented attachment of nanoparticles for the synthesis of Au nanoworms (NWs). NWs are grown by reducing HAuCl4 with ascorbic acid (AA) in high pH reaction medium and in the presence of growth directional agents, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and AgNO3. Although we have used the same reducing and growth directional agents as typically used for the synthesis of Au nanorods, the growth mechanism of NWs is markedly different from that of nanorods. Instead of the anisotropic growth of seed particles, the NWs grow through oriented attachment of nanoparticles. By varying different reaction parameters we have seen that the length of NWs can be controlled from tens of nanometers to a micrometer. Furthermore, the aspect ratio (AR) can be tuned from 2 to 30. This is almost the whole range of AR and length for Au nanorods so far achieved with seed-mediated multiple step synthesis protocols.

  19. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Haase, Axel

    2015-04-01

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5-7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using programmed quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation is a relatively new technique for the separation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are often of composite nature having a magnetic component, which may be a very finely divided material, and a polymeric or other material coating that incorporates this magnetic material and stabilizes the particles in suspension. There may be other components such as antibodies on the surface for specific binding to biological cells, or chemotherapeutic drugs for magnetic drug delivery. Magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) has the potential for determining the distribution of the magnetic material among the particles in a given sample. MgFFF differs from most other forms of field-flow fractionation in that the magnetic field that brings about particle separation induces magnetic dipole moments in the nanoparticles, and these potentially can interact with one another and perturb the separation. This aspect is examined in the present work. Samples of magnetic nanoparticles were analysed under different experimental conditions to determine the sensitivity of the method to variation of conditions. The results are shown to be consistent and insensitive to conditions, although magnetite content appeared to be somewhat higher than expected. PMID:20732895

  1. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using programmed quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-09-28

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation is a relatively new technique for the separation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are often of composite nature having a magnetic component, which may be a very finely divided material, and a polymeric or other material coating that incorporates this magnetic material and stabilizes the particles in suspension. There may be other components such as antibodies on the surface for specific binding to biological cells, or chemotherapeutic drugs for magnetic drug delivery. Magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) has the potential for determining the distribution of the magnetic material among the particles in a given sample. MgFFF differs from most other forms of field-flow fractionation in that the magnetic field that brings about particle separation induces magnetic dipole moments in the nanoparticles, and these potentially can interact with one another and perturb the separation. This aspect is examined in the present work. Samples of magnetic nanoparticles were analysed under different experimental conditions to determine the sensitivity of the method to variation of conditions. The results are shown to be consistent and insensitive to conditions, although magnetite content appeared to be somewhat higher than expected.

  2. Bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjiao; Zheng, Yang; You, Shusen; Wang, Feng; Gao, Zhuo; Shen, Jie; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-03-11

    A new type of bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent Fe3O4@SiO2-PDI-PAA/Ca(2+) nanoparticles has been prepared by coating PDI-cored star polymers (PDI-PAA) onto the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanostructures. The morphology and properties of the composite nanoparticles are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, fluorescence spectrometry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The composite nanoparticles display a strong red emission and superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. The cell viability and uptake assays reveal good biocompatibility of these hybrid nanoparticles. Hence, the composite nanoparticles are of potential to be further explored as therapeutic vector in biomedical field. PMID:25691125

  3. Bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjiao; Zheng, Yang; You, Shusen; Wang, Feng; Gao, Zhuo; Shen, Jie; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-03-11

    A new type of bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent Fe3O4@SiO2-PDI-PAA/Ca(2+) nanoparticles has been prepared by coating PDI-cored star polymers (PDI-PAA) onto the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanostructures. The morphology and properties of the composite nanoparticles are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, fluorescence spectrometry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The composite nanoparticles display a strong red emission and superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. The cell viability and uptake assays reveal good biocompatibility of these hybrid nanoparticles. Hence, the composite nanoparticles are of potential to be further explored as therapeutic vector in biomedical field.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles for enhancing the effectiveness of ultrasonic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, A.; Kaczmarek, K.; Hornowski, T.; Kubovčíková, M.; Rozynek, Z.; Timko, M.; Skumiel, A.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic hyperthermia is a method of cancer treatment in which tumors are exposed to an elevated cytotoxic temperature using ultrasound (US). In conventional ultrasonic hyperthermia, the ultrasound-induced heating in the tumor is achieved through the absorption of wave energy. However, to obtain appropriate temperature in reasonable time, high US intensities, which can have a negative impact on healthy tissues, are required. The effectiveness of US for medical purposes can be significantly improved by using the so-called sonosensitizers, which can enhance the thermal effect of US on the tissue by increasing US absorption. One possible candidate for such sonosensitizers is magnetic nanoparticles with mean sizes of 10-300 nm, which can be efficiently heated because of additional attenuation and scattering of US. Additionally, magnetic nanoparticles are able to produce heat in the alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). The synergetic application of ultrasonic and magnetic hyperthermia can lead to a promising treatment modality.

  5. Magnetic ToF GISANS on self-assembled nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavic, Artur; Josten, Elisabeth; Petracic, Oleg; Lauter, Valeria

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticle superlattices can be considered as novel type of materials with controllable electronic, optical and magnetic properties. Their building blocks are nanoparticles (or ``nanocrystals'') from a metallic, metal-oxide, or semiconducting material or hybrid between different materials. Using self-assembling techniques it is possible to create a large amount of highly ordered 3D structures, which we have investigated for their structural and magnetic properties. The lateral ordering is quantified using electron microscopy and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). The macroscopic magnetic behavior and correlations are investigated by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Utilizing the time of flight (ToF) magnetism reflectometer at SNS the magnetic correlations have been studied with polarized GISANS and PNR. This research at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source was sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Physical Justification for Negative Remanent Magnetization in Homogeneous Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuo; He, Weidong; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Taisen; Jin, Yi; ElBidweihy, Hatem; Mao, Yiwu; Dickerson, James H.; Wagner, Michael J.; Torre, Edward Della; Bennett, Lawrence H.

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of negative remanent magnetization (NRM) has been observed experimentally in a number of heterogeneous magnetic systems and has been considered anomalous. The existence of NRM in homogenous magnetic materials is still in debate, mainly due to the lack of compelling support from experimental data and a convincing theoretical explanation for its thermodynamic validation. Here we resolve the long-existing controversy by presenting experimental evidence and physical justification that NRM is real in a prototype homogeneous ferromagnetic nanoparticle, an europium sulfide nanoparticle. We provide novel insights into major and minor hysteresis behavior that illuminate the true nature of the observed inverted hysteresis and validate its thermodynamic permissibility and, for the first time, present counterintuitive magnetic aftereffect behavior that is consistent with the mechanism of magnetization reversal, possessing unique capability to identify NRM. The origin and conditions of NRM are explained quantitatively via a wasp-waist model, in combination of energy calculations. PMID:25183061

  7. Supramolecular immobilization of redox enzymes on cyclodextrin-coated magnetic nanoparticles for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Díez, Paula; Villalonga, Reynaldo; Villalonga, María L; Pingarrón, José M

    2012-11-15

    Mono-6-formyl-β-cyclodextrin moieties were attached to (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-coated superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles by reductive alkylation with NaBH(3)CN. The oligosaccharide-capped core-shell nanoparticles were employed as support for the supramolecular immobilization of two different adamantane-modified enzymes, tyrosinase and xanthine oxidase, through host-guest interactions. The enzyme-modified nanomaterial was further used to magnetically modify carbon paste electrodes for constructing amperometric biosensors toward cathecol and xanthine. The tyrosinase and xanthine oxidase based biosensors showed excellent electroanalytical behaviours, with linear ranges of 100 nM-12 μM cathecol and 5.0-120 μM xanthine, sensitivities of 12 mA/M and 130 mA/M, and low detection limits of 22 nM and 2.0 μM, respectively. The supramolecular nature of the immobilization approach was confirmed by electroanalytical methods.

  8. A novel strategy for functionalizable photoluminescent magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huan; Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Min-Ho; Kim, Chanjoong

    2014-12-01

    This study presents functionalizable photoluminescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PLMNPs) produced by heating magnetic nanoparticles coated with non-photoluminescent hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) but without any add-on photoluminescent chemicals. The photoluminescence of PLMNPs is originated from a carbon nanodot layer that is converted from the PAA polymer coating layer during the heating process. Interestingly, PLMNPs are more photo-stable than conventional organic dyes. Further functionalization of PLMNPs is easily achieved through the coupling reaction with carboxyl groups of the coating layer on the surface. PLMNPs can be remotely heated by applying an alternating magnetic field due to the superparamagnetism, and are found to have good heating efficiency. All these advantages make these nanoparticles appealing for various biomedical applications, such as dual modality imaging and hyperthermia treatment.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids improve firefly luciferase properties.

    PubMed

    Noori, Ali Reza; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ghiasi, Parisa; Akbari, Jafar; Heydari, Akbar

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids as neoteric solvents, microwave irradiation, and alternative energy source are becoming as a solvent for many enzymatic reactions. We recently showed that the incubation of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis with various ionic liquids increased the activity and stability of luciferase. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids have been obtained by covalent bonding of ionic liquids-silane on magnetic silica nanoparticles. In the present study, the effects of [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImCl] and [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImI] were investigated on the structural properties and function of luciferase using circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and bioluminescence assay. Enzyme activity and structural stability increased in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids. Furthermore, the effect of ingredients which were used was not considerable on K(m) value of luciferase for adenosine-5'-triphosphate and also K(m) value for luciferin.

  10. Waved albatrosses can navigate with strong magnets attached to their head.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Frost, Barrie J; Anderson, David J

    2003-11-01

    The foraging excursions of waved albatrosses Phoebastria irrorata during incubation are ideally suited for navigational studies because they navigate between their Galápagos breeding site and one specific foraging site in the upwelling zone of Peru along highly predictable, straight-line routes. We used satellite telemetry to follow free-flying albatrosses after manipulating magnetic orientation cues by attaching magnets to strategic places on the birds' heads. All experimental, sham-manipulated and control birds, were able to navigate back and forth from Galápagos to their normal foraging sites at the Peruvian coast over 1000 km away. Birds subjected to the three treatments did not differ in the routes flown or in the duration and speed of the trips. The interpretations and implications of this result depend on which of the current suggested magnetic sensory mechanisms is actually being used by the birds.

  11. T1-T2 Dual-modal MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with surface attached gadolinium complexes.

    PubMed

    Szpak, Agnieszka; Fiejdasz, Sylwia; Prendota, Witold; Strączek, Tomasz; Kapusta, Czesław; Szmyd, Janusz; Nowakowska, Maria; Zapotoczny, Szczepan

    2014-01-01

    Dual-mode MRI contrast agents consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) cores and gadolinium ions associated with the ionic chitosan protecting layer were synthesized and studied. Gadolinium ions were introduced into the coating layer via direct complex formation on the nanoparticles surface, covalent attachment or electrostatically driven deposition of the preformed Gd complex. The modified SPIONs having hydrodynamic diameters ca. 100 nm form stable, well-defined dispersions in water and have excellent magnetic properties. Physiochemical properties of those new materials were characterized using e.g., FTIR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray fluorescence, TEM, and vibrating sample magnetometry. They behave as superparamagnetics and shorten both T1 and T2 proton relaxation times, thus influencing both r1 and r2 relaxivity values that reach 53.7 and 375.5 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively, at 15 MHz. The obtained materials can be considered as highly effective contrast agents for low-field MRI, particularly useful at permanent magnet-based scanners.

  12. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Jason R.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have become important tools for the imaging of prevalent diseases, such as cancer, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and others. While first generation nanoparticles were fairly nonspecific, newer generations have been targeted to specific cell types and molecular targets via affinity ligands. Commonly, these ligands emerge from phage or small molecule screens, or are based on antibodies or aptamers. Secondary reporters and combined therapeutic molecules have further opened potential clinical applications of these materials. This review summarizes some of the recent biomedical applications of these newer magnetic nanomaterials. PMID:18508157

  13. Magnetic properties of nanoparticles in {Pd}/{Ni} alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, N.; Hori, H.; Teranishi, T.; Miyake, M.; Yamada, S.

    1998-12-01

    In order to investigate the alloying effect in {Ni}/{Pd} nanoparticles, a special chemical reaction method has been developed to generate a sufficient number of well-conformed Pd ultra-fine particles. Ni concentration dependence on magnetization reveals the existence of a giant magnetic moment effect, where the critical concentration of 6.3 at% is higher than the bulk state one. The higher harmonics intensity of ESR is remarkably enlarged in the alloying particles. The enhanced spectra with ΔS = 2 and the broad spectra arise from the nonlinear effect of the isolated nanoparticles with a long spin-lattice relaxation time.

  14. Magnetic Nanoparticle Arrays Self-Assembled on Perpendicular Magnetic Recording Media.

    PubMed

    Mohtasebzadeh, Abdul Rahman; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M

    2015-08-20

    We study magnetic-field directed self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles onto templates recorded on perpendicular magnetic recording media, and quantify feature width and height as a function of assembly time. Feature widths are determined from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, while heights are obtained with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). For short assembly times, widths were ~150 nm, while heights were ~14 nm, a single nanoparticle on average with a 10:1 aspect ratio. For long assembly times, widths approach 550 nm, while the average height grows to 3 nanoparticles, ~35 nm; a 16:1 aspect ratio. We perform magnetometry on these self-assembled structures and observe the slope of the magnetic moment vs. field curve increases with time. This increase suggests magnetic nanoparticle interactions evolve from nanoparticle-nanoparticle interactions to cluster-cluster interactions as opposed to feature-feature interactions. We suggest the aspect ratio increase occurs because the magnetic field gradients are strongest near the transitions between recorded regions in perpendicular media. If these gradients can be optimized for assembly, strong potential exists for using perpendicular recording templates to assemble complex heterogeneous materials.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticle and magnetic field assisted siRNA delivery in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mykhaylyk, Olga; Sanchez-Antequera, Yolanda; Vlaskou, Dialechti; Cerda, Maria Belen; Bokharaei, Mehrdad; Hammerschmid, Edelburga; Anton, Martina; Plank, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how to design and conduct experiments to deliver siRNA to adherent cell cultures in vitro by magnetic force-assisted transfection using self-assembled complexes of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and cationic lipids or polymers that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). These magnetic complexes are targeted to the cell surface by the application of a gradient magnetic field. A further development of the magnetic drug-targeting concept is combining it with an ultrasound-triggered delivery using magnetic microbubbles as a carrier for gene or drug delivery. For this purpose, selected MNPs, phospholipids, and siRNAs are assembled in the presence of perfluorocarbon gas into flexible formulations of magnetic lipospheres (microbubbles). Methods are described how to accomplish the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetofection and how to test the association of siRNA with the magnetic components of the transfection vector. A simple method is described to evaluate magnetic responsiveness of the magnetic siRNA transfection complexes and estimate the complex loading with magnetic nanoparticles. Procedures are provided for the preparation of magnetic lipoplexes and polyplexes of siRNA as well as magnetic microbubbles for magnetofection and downregulation of the target gene expression analysis with account for the toxicity determined using an MTT-based respiration activity test. A modification of the magnetic transfection triplexes with INF-7, fusogenic peptide, is described resulting in reporter gene silencing improvement in HeLa, Caco-2, and ARPE-19 cells. The methods described can also be useful for screening vector compositions and novel magnetic nanoparticle preparations for optimized siRNA transfection by magnetofection in any cell type.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticle and magnetic field assisted siRNA delivery in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mykhaylyk, Olga; Sanchez-Antequera, Yolanda; Vlaskou, Dialechti; Cerda, Maria Belen; Bokharaei, Mehrdad; Hammerschmid, Edelburga; Anton, Martina; Plank, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how to design and conduct experiments to deliver siRNA to adherent cell cultures in vitro by magnetic force-assisted transfection using self-assembled complexes of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and cationic lipids or polymers that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). These magnetic complexes are targeted to the cell surface by the application of a gradient magnetic field. A further development of the magnetic drug-targeting concept is combining it with an ultrasound-triggered delivery using magnetic microbubbles as a carrier for gene or drug delivery. For this purpose, selected MNPs, phospholipids, and siRNAs are assembled in the presence of perfluorocarbon gas into flexible formulations of magnetic lipospheres (microbubbles). Methods are described how to accomplish the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetofection and how to test the association of siRNA with the magnetic components of the transfection vector. A simple method is described to evaluate magnetic responsiveness of the magnetic siRNA transfection complexes and estimate the complex loading with magnetic nanoparticles. Procedures are provided for the preparation of magnetic lipoplexes and polyplexes of siRNA as well as magnetic microbubbles for magnetofection and downregulation of the target gene expression analysis with account for the toxicity determined using an MTT-based respiration activity test. A modification of the magnetic transfection triplexes with INF-7, fusogenic peptide, is described resulting in reporter gene silencing improvement in HeLa, Caco-2, and ARPE-19 cells. The methods described can also be useful for screening vector compositions and novel magnetic nanoparticle preparations for optimized siRNA transfection by magnetofection in any cell type. PMID:25319646

  17. Structure and magnetism in Cr-embedded Co nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Kurt, M S; Roy, M; Lees, M R; Binns, C

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the atomic structure and magnetism of 2 nm diameter Co nanoparticles embedded in an antiferromagnetic Cr matrix. The nanocomposite films used in this study were prepared by co-deposition directly from the gas phase, using a gas aggregation source for the Co nanoparticles and a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) source for the Cr matrix material. Co K and Cr K edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments were performed in order to investigate atomic structure in the embedded nanoparticles and matrix respectively, while magnetism was investigated by means of a vibrating sample magnetometer. The atomic structure type of the Co nanoparticles is the same as that of the Cr matrix (bcc) although with a degree of disorder. The net Co moment per atom in the Co/Cr nanocomposite films is significantly reduced from the value for bulk Co, and decreases as the proportion of Co nanoparticles in the film is decreased; for the sample with the most dilute concentration of Co nanoparticles (4.9% by volume), the net Co moment was 0.25 μ B/atom. After field cooling to below 30 K all samples showed an exchange bias, which was largest for the most dilute sample. Both the structural and magnetic results point towards a degree of alloying at the nanoparticle/matrix interface, leading to a core/shell structure in the embedded nanoparticles consisting of an antiferromagnetic CoCr alloy shell surrounding a reduced ferromagnetic Co core.

  18. Universal behavior of dense clusters of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, N. A.; Serebryakova, O. N.

    2016-07-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of quasistatic hysteresis loops of dense clusters of interacting magnetic nanoparticles is carried out. Both clusters of magnetically soft and magnetically hard nanoparticles are considered. The clusters are characterized by an average particle diameter D, the cluster radius Rc, the particle saturation magnetization Ms, and the uniaxial anisotropy constant K. The number of particles in the cluster varies between Np = 30 - 120. The particle centers are randomly distributed within the cluster, their easy anisotropy axes being randomly oriented. It is shown that a dilute assembly of identical random clusters of magnetic nanoparticles can be characterized by two dimensionless parameters: 1) the relative strength of magneto-dipole interaction, K/Ms2, and the average particle concentration within the cluster, η = V Np/Vc. Here V is the nanoparticle volume, and Vc is the volume of the cluster, respectively. In the strong interaction limit, Msη/Ha > > 1, where Ha = 2K/Ms is the anisotropy field, the ultimate hysteresis loops of dilute assemblies of clusters have been constructed. In the variables (M/Ms, H/Ms) these hysteresis loops depend only on the particle volume fraction η. In the weak interaction limit, Msη/Ha < < 1, the assembly hysteresis loops in the variables (M/Ms, H/Ha) are close to the standard Stoner-Wohlfarth hysteresis loop.

  19. Synthesis of Ultralong Polyaniline Nanorods by Magnetic Nanoparticles as Templates Under External Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Miao, Tingting; Li, Yijing; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    We report the successful synthesis of ultralong polyaniline nanorods (UL-PANI-NRs) via using water-soluble magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as soft templates under the assistance of external magnetic field. It was found that the concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, the aniline concentration and the use of an external magnetic field significantly affect the morphology of the PANI products. The following characterizations including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD). and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were conducted to investigate the electronic structure and composition of as-prepared UL-PANI-NRs. Our preliminary result indicates that complicated polymer structures (such as ultralong rods with vertical branches) may be prepared by water-soluble magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as soft templates under the assistance of alternatively external magnetic fields. PMID:27427623

  20. Synthesis of Ultralong Polyaniline Nanorods by Magnetic Nanoparticles as Templates Under External Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Miao, Tingting; Li, Yijing; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    We report the successful synthesis of ultralong polyaniline nanorods (UL-PANI-NRs) via using water-soluble magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as soft templates under the assistance of external magnetic field. It was found that the concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, the aniline concentration and the use of an external magnetic field significantly affect the morphology of the PANI products. The following characterizations including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD). and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were conducted to investigate the electronic structure and composition of as-prepared UL-PANI-NRs. Our preliminary result indicates that complicated polymer structures (such as ultralong rods with vertical branches) may be prepared by water-soluble magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as soft templates under the assistance of alternatively external magnetic fields.

  1. Lanthanide-Functionalized Hydrophilic Magnetic Hybrid Nanoparticles: Assembly, Magnetic Behaviour, and Photophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuai; Tang, Yu; Guo, Haijun; Qin, Shenjun; Wu, Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The lanthanide-functionalized multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles combining the superparamagnetic core and the luminescent europium complex were successfully designed and assembled via layer-by-layer strategy in this work. It is noted that the hybrid nanoparticles were modified by a hydrophilic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) through hydrogen bonding which bestowed excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility on this material. A bright-red luminescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy, revealing that these magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles were both colloidally and chemically stable in PBS solution. Therefore, the nanocomposite with magnetic resonance response and fluorescence probe property is considered to be of great potential in multi-modal bioimaging and diagnostic applications.

  2. Lanthanide-Functionalized Hydrophilic Magnetic Hybrid Nanoparticles: Assembly, Magnetic Behaviour, and Photophysical Properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuai; Tang, Yu; Guo, Haijun; Qin, Shenjun; Wu, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    The lanthanide-functionalized multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles combining the superparamagnetic core and the luminescent europium complex were successfully designed and assembled via layer-by-layer strategy in this work. It is noted that the hybrid nanoparticles were modified by a hydrophilic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) through hydrogen bonding which bestowed excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility on this material. A bright-red luminescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy, revealing that these magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles were both colloidally and chemically stable in PBS solution. Therefore, the nanocomposite with magnetic resonance response and fluorescence probe property is considered to be of great potential in multi-modal bioimaging and diagnostic applications. PMID:27245169

  3. Simulation of magnetophoresis of magnetic nanoparticles in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zongqian; Sun, Jiajia; Jia, Shenli; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-08-01

    Magnetophoresis, which is known as a process of driving magnetic particles to depart from the dispersion in the presence of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field, has gained substantial investigations due to its significance in various fields. The main objective of this paper is to analyze the magnetophoretic mechanism of magnetic nanoparticles in fluids with a Lagrangian approach. The equivalent current source method is used to calculate the magnetic field of a cylindrical permanent magnet, which provides a feasible way to simulate the magnetophoresis process. Then the magnetophoretic velocity of particles and the influence of various key factors, e.g. the dimension of a cylindrical permanent magnet, the saturation magnetization of particles and the viscosity of fluid, are investigated. Furthermore, an efficient algorithm is proposed to calculate the trajectory of particles, and to describe the capture efficiency of the particles and the distribution of the captured particles at different times. In addition, the applicability of the Lagrangian approach is also discussed.

  4. Taking a hard line with biotemplating: cobalt-doped magnetite magnetic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Bird, Scott M; Galloway, Johanna M; Rawlings, Andrea E; Bramble, Jonathan P; Staniland, Sarah S

    2015-04-28

    Rapid advancements made in technology, and the drive towards miniaturisation, means that we require reliable, sustainable and cost effective methods of manufacturing a wide range of nanomaterials. In this bioinspired study, we take advantage of millions of years of evolution, and adapt a biomineralisation protein for surface patterning of biotemplated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We employ soft-lithographic micro-contact printing to pattern a recombinant version of the biomineralisation protein Mms6 (derived from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1). The Mms6 attaches to gold surfaces via a cysteine residue introduced into the N-terminal region. The surface bound protein biotemplates highly uniform MNPs of magnetite onto patterned surfaces during an aqueous mineralisation reaction (with a mean diameter of 90 ± 15 nm). The simple addition of 6% cobalt to the mineralisation reaction maintains the uniformity in grain size (with a mean diameter of 84 ± 14 nm), and results in the production of MNPs with a much higher coercivity (increased from ≈ 156 Oe to ≈ 377 Oe). Biotemplating magnetic nanoparticles on patterned surfaces could form a novel, environmentally friendly route for the production of bit-patterned media, potentially the next generation of ultra-high density magnetic data storage devices. This is a simple method to fine-tune the magnetic hardness of the surface biotemplated MNPs, and could easily be adapted to biotemplate a wide range of different nanomaterials on surfaces to create a range of biologically templated devices.

  5. Taking a hard line with biotemplating: cobalt-doped magnetite magnetic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Bird, Scott M; Galloway, Johanna M; Rawlings, Andrea E; Bramble, Jonathan P; Staniland, Sarah S

    2015-04-28

    Rapid advancements made in technology, and the drive towards miniaturisation, means that we require reliable, sustainable and cost effective methods of manufacturing a wide range of nanomaterials. In this bioinspired study, we take advantage of millions of years of evolution, and adapt a biomineralisation protein for surface patterning of biotemplated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We employ soft-lithographic micro-contact printing to pattern a recombinant version of the biomineralisation protein Mms6 (derived from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1). The Mms6 attaches to gold surfaces via a cysteine residue introduced into the N-terminal region. The surface bound protein biotemplates highly uniform MNPs of magnetite onto patterned surfaces during an aqueous mineralisation reaction (with a mean diameter of 90 ± 15 nm). The simple addition of 6% cobalt to the mineralisation reaction maintains the uniformity in grain size (with a mean diameter of 84 ± 14 nm), and results in the production of MNPs with a much higher coercivity (increased from ≈ 156 Oe to ≈ 377 Oe). Biotemplating magnetic nanoparticles on patterned surfaces could form a novel, environmentally friendly route for the production of bit-patterned media, potentially the next generation of ultra-high density magnetic data storage devices. This is a simple method to fine-tune the magnetic hardness of the surface biotemplated MNPs, and could easily be adapted to biotemplate a wide range of different nanomaterials on surfaces to create a range of biologically templated devices. PMID:25825205

  6. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, J. F. D. F.; Bruno, A. C.; Louro, S. R. W.

    2015-10-15

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer’s sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10{sup −8} Am{sup 2} was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  7. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, J. F. D. F.; Bruno, A. C.; Louro, S. R. W.

    2015-10-01

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer's sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10-8 Am2 was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  8. Citrinin mycotoxin recognition and removal by naked magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Magro, Massimiliano; Moritz, Denise Esteves; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Baratella, Davide; Terzo, Milo; Jakubec, Petr; Malina, Ondřej; Čépe, Klára; de Aragao, Glaucia Maria Falcao; Zboril, Radek; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-07-15

    Citrinin is a nephrotoxic mycotoxin which can be synthesized by Monascus mold during the fermentation process in foods. Monascus, generally described as red mold, is a red-pigmented filamentous fungus attracting a great interest for the production of natural dyes and cholesterol-lowering statins. We individuated a specie of Monascus producing high amount of natural dyes. However, this high pigmentation was correlated with the production of citrinin. Peculiar magnetic nanoparticles, synthesized in-house and called "Surface Active Maghemite Nanoparticles" (SAMNs), are proposed as an efficient and reliable mean for citrinin removal from Monascus treated foods. The nanomaterial efficiency for citrinin binding was proved on Monascus suspensions, and SAMN@citrinin complex was characterized by Mӧssbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements, showing that SAMNs resulted structurally and magnetically well conserved after citrinin binding. SAMNs are excellent and stable magnetic nano-carrier for toxin removal, which can be applied in food industry.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Lin, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury.

  10. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Araujo, J F D F; Bruno, A C; Louro, S R W

    2015-10-01

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer's sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10(-8) Am(2) was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  11. Synthesis and characterizations of novel magnetic and plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Naween

    This dissertation reports the colloidal synthesis of iron silicide, hafnium oxide core-gold shell and water soluble iron-gold alloy for the first time. As the first part of the experimentation, plasmonic and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of gold and iron are synthesized in the form of core-shell and alloy. The purpose of making these nanoparticles is that the core-shell and alloy nanoparticles exhibit enhanced properties and new functionality due to close proximity of two functionally different components. The synthesis of core-shell and alloy nanoparticles is of special interest for possible application towards magnetic hyperthermia, catalysis and drug delivery. The iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles prepared in the reverse micelles reflux in high boiling point solvent (diphenyl ether) in presence of oleic acid and oleyl amine results in the formation of monodisperse core-shell nanoparticles. The second part of the experimentation includes the preparation of water soluble iron-gold alloy nanoparticles. The alloy nanoparticles are prepared for the first time at relatively low temperature (110 °C). The use of hydrophilic ligand 3-mercapto-1-propane sulphonic acid ensures the aqueous solubility of the alloy nanoparticles. Next, hafnium oxide core-gold shell nanoparticles are prepared for the first time using high temperature reduction method. These nanoparticles are potentially important as a high kappa material in semiconductor industry. Fourth, a new type of material called iron silicide is prepared in solution phase. The material has been prepared before but not in a colloidal solution. The Fe3Si obtained is superparamagnetic. Another phase beta-FeSi 2 is a low band gap (0.85 eV) semiconductor and is sustainable and environmentally friendly. At last, the iron monosilicide (FeSi) and beta-FeSi2 are also prepared by heating iron-gold core-shell and alloy nanoparticles on silicon (111) substrate. The nucleation of gaseous silicon precursor on the melted

  12. X-space MPI: magnetic nanoparticles for safe medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick William; Saritas, Emine Ulku; Croft, Laura Rose; Kim, Tyson N; Krishnan, Kannan M; Schaffer, David V; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-07-24

    One quarter of all iodinated contrast X-ray clinical imaging studies are now performed on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. Unfortunately, the iodine contrast agent used in X-ray is often toxic to CKD patients' weak kidneys, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Hence, we are pioneering a new medical imaging method, called Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), to replace X-ray and CT iodinated angiography, especially for CKD patients. MPI uses magnetic nanoparticle contrast agents that are much safer than iodine for CKD patients. MPI already offers superb contrast and extraordinary sensitivity. The iron oxide nanoparticle tracers required for MPI are also used in MRI, and some are already approved for human use, but the contrast agents are far more effective at illuminating blood vessels when used in the MPI modality. We have recently developed a systems theoretic framework for MPI called x-space MPI, which has already dramatically improved the speed and robustness of MPI image reconstruction. X-space MPI has allowed us to optimize the hardware for fi ve MPI scanners. Moreover, x-space MPI provides a powerful framework for optimizing the size and magnetic properties of the iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used in MPI. Currently MPI nanoparticles have diameters in the 10-20 nanometer range, enabling millimeter-scale resolution in small animals. X-space MPI theory predicts that larger nanoparticles could enable up to 250 micrometer resolution imaging, which would represent a major breakthrough in safe imaging for CKD patients.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for thermal lysis and application in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumana; Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Veerla, Sarath Chandra; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation-therapy are conventional treatment procedure of cancer. Though radiation therapy is very common practice for cancer treatment, it has limitations including incomplete and non specific destruction. Heating characteristics of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) is modelled using molecular dynamics simulation setup. This model would give an understanding for the treatment of cancer cell through MNP associated radiation-therapy. In this paper, alternating magnetic field driven heat generation of MNP is studied using classical molecular dynamics. Temperature is measured as an ensemble average of velocity of the atoms. Temperature stabilization is achieved. Under this simulation setting with certain parameters, 45°C temperature was obtained in our simulations. Simulation data would be helpful for experimental analysis to treat cancerous cell in presence of MNP under exposure to radiofrequency. The in vitro thermal characteristics of magnetite nanoparticles using magnetic coil of various frequencies (5, 7.5, 10 and 15 kHz), the saturation temperature was found at 0.5 mg/mL concentration. At frequency 50 kHz the live/dead and MTT assay was performed on magnetite nanoparticles using MC3T3 cells for 10 min duration. Low radio frequency (RF) radiation induced localized heat into the metallic nanoparticles which is clearly understood using the molecular dynamics simulation setup. Heating of nanoparticle trigger the killing of the tumor cells, acts as a local therapy, as it generates less side effects in comparison to other treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  14. Toxicity and tissue distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Sung; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Yu, Kyeong Nam; Kim, Byung Gul; Park, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Kee Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Cho, Myung Haing

    2006-01-01

    The development of technology enables the reduction of material size in science. The use of particle reduction in size from micro to nanoscale not only provides benefits to diverse scientific fields but also poses potential risks to humans and the environment. For the successful application of nanomaterials in bioscience, it is essential to understand the biological fate and potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological distribution as well as the potential toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles to enable their diverse applications in life science, such as drug development, protein detection, and gene delivery. We recently synthesized biocompatible silica-overcoated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) within a silica shell of controllable thickness [MNPs@SiO2(RITC)]. In this study, the MNPs@SiO2(RITC) with 50-nm thickness were used as a model nanomaterial. After intraperitoneal administration of MNPs@SiO2(RITC) for 4 weeks into mice, the nanoparticles were detected in the brain, indicating that such nanosized materials can penetrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) without disturbing its function or producing apparent toxicity. After a 4-week observation, MNPs@SiO2(RITC) was still present in various organs without causing apparent toxicity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that magnetic nanoparticles of 50-nm size did not cause apparent toxicity under the experimental conditions of this study.

  15. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: Opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24564857

  16. Computational studies of steering nanoparticles with magnetic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylak, Sultan Suleyman

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided nanorobotic systems that could perform diagnostic, curative, and reconstructive treatments in the human body at the cellular and subcellular level in a controllable manner have recently been proposed. The concept of a MRI-guided nanorobotic system is based on the use of a MRI scanner to induce the required external driving forces to guide magnetic nanocapsules to a specific target. However, the maximum magnetic gradient specifications of existing clinical MRI systems are not capable of driving magnetic nanocapsules against the blood flow. This thesis presents the visualization of nanoparticles inside blood vessel, Graphical User Interface (GUI) for updating file including initial parameters and demonstrating the simulation of particles and C++ code for computing magnetic forces and fluidic forces. The visualization and GUI were designed using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML), MATLAB and C#. The addition of software for MRI-guided nanorobotic system provides simulation results. Preliminary simulation results demonstrate that external magnetic field causes aggregation of nanoparticles while they flow in the vessel. This is a promising result --in accordance with similar experimental results- and encourages further investigation on the nanoparticle-based self-assembly structures for use in nanorobotic drug delivery.

  17. Human erythrocytes as nanoparticle carriers for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Markov, D E; Boeve, H; Gleich, B; Borgert, J; Antonelli, A; Sfara, C; Magnani, M

    2010-11-01

    The potential of red blood cells (RBCs) loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles as a tracer material for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has been investigated. MPI is an emerging, quantitative medical imaging modality which holds promise in terms of sensitivity in combination with spatial and temporal resolution. Steady-state and dynamic magnetization measurements, supported by semi-empirical modeling, were employed to analyze the MPI signal generation using RBCs as novel biomimetic constructs. Since the superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) bulk material that is used in this study contains nanoparticles with different sizes, it is suggested that during the RBC loading procedure, a preferential entrapment of nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameter ≤60 nm occurs by size-selection through the erythrocyte membrane pores. This affects the MPI signal of an erythrocyte-based tracer, compared to bulk. The reduced signal is counterbalanced by a higher in vivo stability of the SPIO-loaded RBCs constructs for MPI applications.

  18. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, Bogdan Silviu; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary tumor of the liver, ranking as the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used so far in tumor diagnosis and treatment, demonstrating great potential and promising results. In principle, three different approaches can be used in the treatment of tumors with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetically induced hyperthermia, drug targeting and selective suppression of tumor growth. This review focuses on the use of iron oxide nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of liver cancer and offers a walkthrough from the MNPs imaging applicability to further therapeutic options, including their potential flaws. The MNP unique physical and biochemical properties will be mentioned in close relationship to their subsequent effects on the human body, and, also, their toxic potential will be noted. A presentation of what barriers the MNPs should overcome to be more successful will conclude this review. PMID:27689203

  19. Human erythrocytes as nanoparticle carriers for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Markov, D E; Boeve, H; Gleich, B; Borgert, J; Antonelli, A; Sfara, C; Magnani, M

    2010-11-01

    The potential of red blood cells (RBCs) loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles as a tracer material for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has been investigated. MPI is an emerging, quantitative medical imaging modality which holds promise in terms of sensitivity in combination with spatial and temporal resolution. Steady-state and dynamic magnetization measurements, supported by semi-empirical modeling, were employed to analyze the MPI signal generation using RBCs as novel biomimetic constructs. Since the superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) bulk material that is used in this study contains nanoparticles with different sizes, it is suggested that during the RBC loading procedure, a preferential entrapment of nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameter ≤60 nm occurs by size-selection through the erythrocyte membrane pores. This affects the MPI signal of an erythrocyte-based tracer, compared to bulk. The reduced signal is counterbalanced by a higher in vivo stability of the SPIO-loaded RBCs constructs for MPI applications. PMID:20959685

  20. Theoretical studies to elucidate the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions occurring in the magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaci, M.; Cacciola, M.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the study of magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively developed not only for their fundamental theoretical interest, but also for their many technological applications, especially biomedical applications, ranging from contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to the deterioration of cancer cells via hyperthermia treatment. The theoretical and experimental research has shown until now that the magnetic dipolar interactions between nanoparticles can have a significant influence on the magnetic behaviour of the system. But, this influence is not well understood. It is clear that the magnetic dipolar interaction intensity is correlated with the nanoparticle concentration, volume fraction and magnetic moment orientations. In this paper, we try to understand the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions on the behaviour of magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications. For the model, we considered spherical nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy and lognormal distribution of the sizes. The model involves a simulation stage of the spatial distribution and orientation of the nanoparticles and their easy axes of magnetic anisotropy, and an evaluation stage of the Néel relaxation time. To assess the Néel relaxation time, we are going to discretise and adapt, to the local magnetic field, the Coffey analytical solution for the equation Fokker-Planck describing the dynamics of magnetic moments of nanoparticles in oblique external magnetic field. There are three fundamental aspects of interest in our studies on the magnetic nanoparticles: their spatial & orientational distributions, concentrations and sizes.

  1. Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a potential candidate to eliminate intracellular reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Xiuhong; Teng, Xiyao; Yan, Manqing; Bi, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs-HRP) have been synthesized by a NHS/EDC coupling between the amino groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the carboxyl groups on the MMSNs surface. It is found that the immobilized HRP on MMSNs still retain high activity and the MMSNs-HRP can eliminate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells induced by the addition of H2O2 aqueous solution. Further, the fluorescent MMSN-HRP-CD nanoparticles have been prepared by attaching biocompatible, fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) to MMSNs-HRP. We have also investigated the effect of an applied magnetic field on cellular uptake of MMSNs-HRP-CDs and found that the internalization of MMSNs-HRP-CDs by CHO cells could be enhanced within 2 hours under the magnetic field. This work provides us with a novel and efficient method to eliminate ROS in living cells by using HRP-immobilized nanoparticles.Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs-HRP) have been synthesized by a NHS/EDC coupling between the amino groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the carboxyl groups on the MMSNs surface. It is found that the immobilized HRP on MMSNs still retain high activity and the MMSNs-HRP can eliminate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells induced by the addition of H2O2 aqueous solution. Further, the fluorescent MMSN-HRP-CD nanoparticles have been prepared by attaching biocompatible, fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) to MMSNs-HRP. We have also investigated the effect of an applied magnetic field on cellular uptake of MMSNs-HRP-CDs and found that the internalization of MMSNs-HRP-CDs by CHO cells could be enhanced within 2 hours under the magnetic field. This work provides us with a novel and efficient method to eliminate ROS in living cells by using HRP-immobilized nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM image of CDs, BET XRD

  2. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. Methods To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. Results We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells

  3. Enzymatic conversion of magnetic nanoparticles to a non-magnetic precipitate: a new approach to magnetic sensing.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kourentzi, Katerina; Litvinov, Dmitri; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Willson, Richard C; Randall Lee, T

    2016-09-21

    Magnetic sensing utilizes the detection of biomolecule-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our new strategy offers a novel approach to magnetic sensing where in situ conversion produces a "loss of signal" in the sensing device. This report demonstrates the enzymatic conversion of Fe3O4 MNPs to a non-magnetic precipitate via reduction by l-ascorbic acid generated by the action of alkaline phosphatase. PMID:27518879

  4. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Hunter B.; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J.; David, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization. PMID:26307980

  5. Magnetic Nanoparticle Arrays Self-Assembled on Perpendicular Magnetic Recording Media

    PubMed Central

    Mohtasebzadeh, Abdul Rahman; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    We study magnetic-field directed self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles onto templates recorded on perpendicular magnetic recording media, and quantify feature width and height as a function of assembly time. Feature widths are determined from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, while heights are obtained with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). For short assembly times, widths were ~150 nm, while heights were ~14 nm, a single nanoparticle on average with a 10:1 aspect ratio. For long assembly times, widths approach 550 nm, while the average height grows to 3 nanoparticles, ~35 nm; a 16:1 aspect ratio. We perform magnetometry on these self-assembled structures and observe the slope of the magnetic moment vs. field curve increases with time. This increase suggests magnetic nanoparticle interactions evolve from nanoparticle–nanoparticle interactions to cluster–cluster interactions as opposed to feature–feature interactions. We suggest the aspect ratio increase occurs because the magnetic field gradients are strongest near the transitions between recorded regions in perpendicular media. If these gradients can be optimized for assembly, strong potential exists for using perpendicular recording templates to assemble complex heterogeneous materials. PMID:26307967

  6. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers. PMID:25331121

  7. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers.

  8. Colorize magnetic nanoparticles using a search coil based testing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Wang, Yi; Feng, Yinglong; Yu, Lina; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Different magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) possess unique spectral responses to AC magnetic field and we can use this specific magnetic property of MNPs as "colors" in the detection. In this paper, a detection scheme for magnetic nanoparticle size distribution is demonstrated by using an MNPs and search-coils integrated detection system. A low frequency (50 Hz) sinusoidal magnetic field is applied to drive MNPs into saturated region. Then a high frequency sinusoidal field sweeping from 5 kHz to 35 kHz is applied in order to generate mixing frequency signals, which are collected by a pair of balanced search coils. These harmonics are highly specific to the nonlinearity of magnetization curve of the MNPs. Previous work focused on using the amplitude and phase of the 3rd harmonic or the amplitude ratio of the 5th harmonic over 3rd harmonic. Here we demonstrate to use the amplitude and phase information of both 3rd and 5th harmonics as magnetic "colors" of MNPs. It is found that this method effectively reduces the magnetic colorization error.

  9. Heat-inducible gene expression system by applying alternating magnetic field to magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ito, Akira; Ono, Akihiko; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2014-05-16

    By combining synthetic biology with nanotechnology, we demonstrate remote controlled gene expression using a magnetic field. Magnetite nanoparticles, which generate heat under an alternating magnetic field, have been developed to label cells. Magnetite nanoparticles and heat-induced therapeutic genes were introduced into tumor xenografts. The magnetically triggered gene expression resulted in tumor growth inhibition. This system shows great potential for controlling target gene expression in a space and time selective manner and may be used for remote control of cell functions via gene expression. PMID:24144205

  10. Magnetism of FePt nanoparticles and nanodot arrays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hao

    2008-03-01

    L10 structured FePt materials show great potential for magnetic data storage media applications.^1 The first part of this talk concerns the magnetism in chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles. Discrete FePt nanoparticles with L10 structure have recently been realized by salt annealing, making it possible to study their size dependent magnetic properties.^2 We have discovered a strong reduction of magnetization with decreasing FePt particle size and an unusual temperature dependent magnetization that deviates from the Bloch's T^3/2 law at low temperatures. A model based on competing exchange interactions is proposed to explain the unusual behavior, considering explicitly the nanoparticle shape. FePt system has complicated exchange interactions, with interaction in the (100) plane being strongly ferromagnetic and inter-plane much weaker. The ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions contribute differently at the nanoparticle surface and interior, leading to reduced ferromagnetic order at the surface terminated by certain facets. The model correctly explains the magnetization reduction with decreasing particle size, a surface paramagnetic phase as evidenced by Mossbauer spectroscopy and the unusual temperature dependent magnetization behaviors. The second part of this talk will report our recent efforts in developing ordered FePt nanodot arrays using self-assembled porous templates as evaporation masks. The arrays possess perpendicular anisotropy, large coercivity and extremely high density, all of which are desirable features for future data storage media. ^1S. Sun et al., Science, 287, 1989 (2000). ^2C. Rong, et al., Adv. Mater. 18, 2984 (2006).

  11. Dye-attached magnetic poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanospheres for albumin depletion from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Gökay, Öznur; Karakoç, Veyis; Andaç, Müge; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-02-01

    The selective binding of albumin on dye-affinity nanospheres was combined with magnetic properties as an alternative approach for albumin depletion from human plasma. Magnetic poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (mPHEMA) nanospheres were synthesized using mini-emulsion polymerization method in the presence of magnetite powder. The specific surface area of the mPHEMA nanospheres was found to be 1302 m(2)/g. Subsequent to Cibacron Blue F3GA (CB) immobilization onto mPHEMA nanospheres, a serial characterization processing was implemented. The quantity of immobilized CB was calculated as 800 μmol/g. Ultimately, albumin adsorption performance of the CB-attached mPHEMA nanospheres from both aqueous dissolving medium and human plasma were explored.

  12. Magnetic field intensified bi-enzyme system with in situ cofactor regeneration supported by magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Muqing; Su, Zhiguo; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Songping

    2013-10-20

    Efficient dynamic interactions among cofactor, enzymes and substrate molecules are of primary importance for multi-step enzymatic reactions with in situ cofactor regeneration. Here we showed for the first time that the above dynamic interactions could be significantly intensified by exerting an external alternating magnetic field on magnetic nanoparticles-supported multi-enzymatic system so that the inter-particle collisions due to Brownian motion of nanoparticles could be improved. To that end, a multienzyme system including glutamate dehydrogenase (GluDH), glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and cofactor NAD(H) were separately immobilized on silica coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles with an average diameter of 105 nm, and the effect of magnetic field strength and frequency on the kinetics of the coupled bi-enzyme reaction was investigated. It was found that at low magnetic field frequency (25 Hz and 100 Hz), increasing magnetic field strength from 9.8 to 161.1 Gs led to only very slight increase in reaction rate of the coupled bi-enzyme reaction expressed by glucose consumption rate. At higher magnetic field of 200 Hz and 500 Hz, reaction rate increased significantly with increase of magnetic field strength. When the magnetic field frequency was kept at 500 Hz, the reaction rate increased from 3.89 μM/min to 8.11 μM/min by increasing magnetic field strength from 1.3 to 14.2 Gs. The immobilized bi-enzyme system also showed good reusability and stability in the magnetic field (500 Hz, 14.2 Gs), that about 46% of original activity could be retained after 33 repeated uses, accounting for totally 34 days continuous operation. These results demonstrated the feasibility in intensifying molecular interactions among magnetic nanoparticle-supported multienzymes by using nano-magnetic stirrer for efficient multi-step transformations.

  13. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research. PMID:27250457

  14. Probing magnetic and electric optical responses of silicon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakov, Dmitry; Sinev, Ivan; Markovich, Dmitry; Samusev, Anton; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel; Valuckas, Vytautas; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris S.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-04-27

    We study experimentally both magnetic and electric optically induced resonances of silicon nanoparticles by combining polarization-resolved dark-field spectroscopy and near-field scanning optical microscopy measurements. We reveal that the scattering spectra exhibit strong sensitivity of electric dipole response to the probing beam polarization and attribute the characteristic asymmetry of measured near-field patterns to the excitation of a magnetic dipole mode. The proposed experimental approach can serve as a powerful tool for the study of photonic nanostructures possessing both electric and magnetic optical responses.

  15. Random lasing action in magnetic nanoparticles doped dye solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lihua; Lu, Jincheng; Lv, Changgui; Feng, Yangyang; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-04-01

    Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles were used as scatters in Rhodamine B solutions, and coherent random lasing was achieved. It was revealed that Fe3O4@SiO2 doped dye solution has a magnetically controllable feature. When external magnetic field is applied, the laser peaks would disappear if the diameter of Fe3O4 is relatively large (~100 nm), while the laser peaks would exist if the diameter of Fe3O4 is relatively small (~12 nm). This kind of random laser may has potential applications in fabricating magnetic sensors and integrated optical device.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles and nanocomposites for remote controlled therapies.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Anastasia K; Wydra, Robert J; Stocke, Nathanael A; Anderson, Kimberly W; Hilt, J Zach

    2015-12-10

    This review highlights the state-of-the-art in the application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and their composites for remote controlled therapies. Novel macro- to nano-scale systems that utilize remote controlled drug release due to actuation of MNPs by static or alternating magnetic fields and magnetic field guidance of MNPs for drug delivery applications are summarized. Recent advances in controlled energy release for thermal therapy and nanoscale energy therapy are addressed as well. Additionally, studies that utilize MNP-based thermal therapy in combination with other treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation to enhance the efficacy of the conventional treatment are discussed. PMID:26407670

  17. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678

  18. Thermal fluctuations of magnetic nanoparticles: Fifty years after Brown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, William T.; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2012-12-01

    The reversal time, superparamagnetic relaxation time, of the magnetization of fine single domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles owing to thermal fluctuations plays a fundamental role in information storage, paleomagnetism, biotechnology, etc. Here a comprehensive tutorial-style review of the achievements of fifty years of development and generalizations of the seminal work of Brown [Phys. Rev. 130, 1677 (1963)] on thermal fluctuations of magnetic nanoparticles is presented. Analytical as well as numerical approaches to the estimation of the damping and temperature dependence of the reversal time based on Brown's Fokker-Planck equation for the evolution of the magnetic moment orientations on the surface of the unit sphere are critically discussed while the most promising directions for future research are emphasized.

  19. Magnetic Properties of Chemically Synthesized FePt Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, J. W.

    2005-03-01

    Chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention in recent years because of their potential use in ultra-high density magnetic recording media. In the original procedure described by Sun et al., the as-synthesized nanoparticles have the fcc phase and must be thermally annealed to achieve the high-anisotropy L10 phase [1]. We have been addressing some of the materials problems associated with obtaining the L10 phase. These include lowering the ordering temperature, reducing sintering during annealing, orienting the easy axes, and understanding the size effect on chemical ordering. Additive Au and Ag significantly lower the ordering temperature, while additive Cr and Cu increase the ordering temperature; however, the onset of ordering is correlated with sintered grain growth. Sintering can be reduced by encapsulating the nanoparticles with a shell such as silicon oxide or copper. Easy-axis orientation has been achieved using L10 FePt nanoparticles that were directly synthesized using a high-temperature solvent [2]. The nanoparticles were dispersed in a PVC binder and oriented by drying the dispersion in a magnetic field. [1] S. Sun et al., Science 287, 1989 (2000). [2] S. Kang et al., Appl Phys. Lett. (in press).

  20. Nontrivial magnetoresistive behavior of a single-wall carbon nanotube with an attached molecular magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płomińska, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-11-01

    The spin-resolved transport properties of a single-wall carbon nanotube quantum dot, with an attached single molecular magnet, are studied theoretically. With the aid of the real-time diagrammatic technique in the lowest-order perturbation expansion with respect to the tunnel coupling, the current, differential conductance, and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) are determined in both the linear and nonlinear response regimes. It is shown that transport properties depend greatly on both the shell filling sequence of the carbon nanotube and the type of exchange interaction between the molecular magnet and nanotube. This results in highly nontrivial behavior of the TMR, which is especially visible in the low bias voltage regime. Depending on the gate voltage and parameters of the system, we find transport regimes where either a greatly enhanced or negative TMR develops. The mechanism leading to such behavior is associated with nonequilibrium spin accumulation, which builds up in the antiparallel magnetic configuration of the device. We show that it is crucial whether the spin accumulation occurs in the highest-weight spin states or in states with lower spin values. While in the former case it leads to enhanced TMR, in the latter case it may result in negative tunnel magnetoresistance. In addition, we analyze how the above effects depend on the magnitude of the molecular magnet's spin, and show that this dependence is generally nonmonotonic.

  1. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple crosslinking of the enzyme to magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while a control sample of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. Digestions were carried out on a single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome, and also compared for digestion at atmospheric pressure and 37 ºC for 12 h, and in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, the EC-TR/NPs performed equally as well or better than free trypsin in terms of the number of peptide/protein identifications and reproducibility across technical replicates. However, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very fast (~1 min) and more reproducible digestions.

  2. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple multilayer random crosslinking of the trypsin molecules onto magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while the conventional immobilization of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. A single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome were digested at atmospheric pressure and 37 °C for 12 h or in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, EC-TR/NPs performed equally to or better than free trypsin in terms of both identified peptide/protein number and the digestion reproducibility. In addition, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very rapid (~1 min) and efficient digestions with more reproducible digestion results. PMID:21204257

  3. Targeting of systemically-delivered magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia using a noninvasive, static, external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulauf, Grayson D.; Trembly, B. Stuart; Giustini, Andrew J.; Flint, Brian R.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    One of the greatest challenges of nanoparticle cancer therapy is the delivery of adequate numbers of nanoparticles to the tumor site. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have many favorable qualities, including their nontoxic composition, the wide range of diameters in which they can be produced, the cell-specific cytotoxic heating that results from their absorption of energy from a nontoxic, external alternating magnetic field (AMF), and the wide variety of functional coatings that can be applied. Although IONPs can be delivered via an intra-tumoral injection to some tumors, the resulting tumor IONP distribution is generally inadequate; additionally, local tumor injections do not allow for the treatment of systemic or multifocal disease. Consequently, the ultimate success of nanoparticle based cancer therapy likely rests with successful systemic, tumor-targeted IONP delivery. In this study, we used a surface-based, bilateral, noninvasive static magnetic field gradient produced by neodymiumboron- iron magnets (80 T/m to 130 T/m in central plane between magnets), a rabbit ear model, and systemicallydelivered starch-coated 100 nm magnetic (iron oxide) nanoparticles to demonstrate a spatially-defined increase in the local tissue accumulation of IONPs. In this non-tumor model, the IONPs remained within the local vascular space. It is anticipated that this technique can be used to enhance IONP delivery significantly to the tumor parenchyma/cells.

  4. Crosswell Magnetic Sensing of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Subsurface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, A.; Athey, A.; Wilt, M.; Chen, J.

    2012-12-01

    Stable dispersions of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, already used in biomedicine as image-enhancing agents, have potential in subsurface applications. The surface-coated nanoparticles are capable of flowing through micron-size pores across long distances in a reservoir with minimal retention in rock. These particles change the magnetic permeability of the flooded region, and when added to the injected fluid during enhanced oil recovery processes, they can be used to tag the flood. In this paper, we model the propagation of a "ferrofluid" slug in a reservoir and its response to a crosswell magnetic tomography system. The magnetic response to these contrast agents can thus help characterize the formation and fluid displacement mechanisms. The monitoring of fluid injections into reservoirs builds upon the established EM conductivity monitoring technology. In this work, however, particular attention is paid to distinguish the injected and resident fluids when they have similar conductivities but different magnetic permeabilities. Specifically, we focus on low-frequency (less than 100 Hz) magnetic excitations generated by a vertical magnetic dipole source positioned at the injection well. At such low frequencies, the induction effect is small, the casing effect is manageable, and the crosswell response originates purely from the magnetic contrast in the formation. In this study, we assume a 2d axisymmetric model and track a donut-shaped ferrofluid slug of magnetic permeability 2 as it propagates toward an observatory well, housing magnetic field receivers and located 100 m away from the injection well. We apply vertical magnetic dipole source and receivers at multiple levels within the tomography section. A non-magnetic and non-conductive casing is assumed for both wells. The ferrofluid slug volume is conserved throughout the dispersionless propagation and confined within a 20 m thick reservoir layer at a depth of 1 Km. We compare the response of a conductive slug

  5. Spatiotemporal control of microtubule nucleation and assembly using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Céline; Mazari, Elsa; Lallet, Sylvie; Le Borgne, Roland; Marchi, Valérie; Gosse, Charlie; Gueroui, Zoher

    2013-03-01

    Decisions on the fate of cells and their functions are dictated by the spatiotemporal dynamics of molecular signalling networks. However, techniques to examine the dynamics of these intracellular processes remain limited. Here, we show that magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with key regulatory proteins can artificially control, in time and space, the Ran/RCC1 signalling pathway that regulates the cell cytoskeleton. In the presence of a magnetic field, RanGTP proteins conjugated to superparamagnetic nanoparticles can induce microtubule fibres to assemble into asymmetric arrays of polarized fibres in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. The orientation of the fibres is dictated by the direction of the magnetic force. When we locally concentrated nanoparticles conjugated with the upstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, the assembly of microtubule fibres could be induced over a greater range of distances than RanGTP particles. The method shows how bioactive nanoparticles can be used to engineer signalling networks and spatial self-organization inside a cell environment. PMID:23334169

  6. Characterization of single 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle attachments on AFM tips for single sub-4-nm object pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hui-Wen; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Tang, Song-Nien; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the attachment of a 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle (Au-NP) to the tip of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe through the application of a current-limited bias voltage. The resulting probe is capable of picking up individual objects at the sub-4-nm scale. We also discuss the mechanisms involved in the attachment of the Au-NP to the very apex of an AFM probe tip. The Au-NP-modified AFM tips were used to pick up individual 4-nm quantum dots (QDs) using a chemically functionalized method. Single QD blinking was reduced considerably on the Au-NP-modified AFM tip. The resulting AFM tips present an excellent platform for the manipulation of single protein molecules in the study of single protein-protein interactions.

  7. Magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a microfluidic system for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agiotis, L.; Theodorakos, I.; Samothrakitis, S.; Papazoglou, S.; Zergioti, I.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS), have attracted major interest, due to their small size and unique magnetic properties, for drug delivery applications. In this context, iron oxide nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) (150 nm magnetic core diameter), were used as drug carriers, aiming to form a magnetically controlled nano-platform. The navigation capabilities of the iron oxide nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel were investigated by simulating the magnetic field and the magnetic force applied on the magnetic nanoparticles inside a microfluidic chip. The simulations have been performed using finite element method (ANSY'S software). The optimum setup which intends to simulate the magnetic navigation of the nanoparticles, by the use of MRI-type fields, in the human circulatory system, consists of two parallel permanent magnets to produce a homogeneous magnetic field, in order to ensure the maximum magnetization of the magnetic nanoparticles, an electromagnet for the induction of the magnetic gradients and the creation of the magnetic force and a microfluidic setup so as to simulate the blood flow inside the human blood vessels. The magnetization of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the consequent magnetic torque developed by the two permanent magnets, together with the mutual interactions between the magnetized nanoparticles lead to the creation of rhabdoid aggregates in the direction of the homogeneous field. Additionally, the magnetic gradients introduced by the operation of the electromagnet are capable of directing the aggregates, as a whole, to the desired direction. By removing the magnetic fields, the aggregates are disrupted, due to the super paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles, avoiding thus the formation of undesired thrombosis.

  8. Nanostructured diblock copolymer films with embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xin; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Ruderer, Matthias A.; Körstgens, Volker; Busch, Peter; Böni, Peter; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Nanostructured diblock copolymer films with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are prepared by solution casting. The diblock copolymer polystyrene-block-polymethylmethacrylate with a fully deuterated polystyrene block of a weight ratio of 0.22 is used as a structure-directing matrix. Maghemite nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3) are coated with polystyrene and thus have a selective affinity to the minority block of the diblock copolymer. The hybrid film morphology is investigated as a function of nanoparticle concentration. The surface structure is probed with atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The inner film structure and the structure at the polymer-substrate interface are detected with grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS). Irrespective of the nanoparticle concentration a well developed micro-phase separation structure is present. From the Bragg peaks observed in the GISANS data a linear nanoparticle concentration dependence of the inter-domain spacing of the micro-phase separation structure is determined. The superparamagnetic and blocking behavior can be explained with a generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth-Néel theory which includes either an elastic torque being exerted on the nanoparticles by the field or a broad distribution of anisotropy constants.

  9. Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wydra, Robert John

    Despite recent advances, cancer remains the second leading cause of deaths in the United States. Magnetic nanoparticles have found various applications in cancer research as drug delivery platforms, enhanced contrast agents for improved diagnostic imaging, and the delivery of thermal energy as standalone therapy. Iron oxide nanoparticles absorb the energy from an alternating magnetic field and convert it into heat through Brownian and Neel relaxations. To better utilize magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy, surface functionalization is essential for such factors as decreasing cytotoxicity of healthy tissue, extending circulation time, specific targeting of cancer cells, and manage the controlled delivery of therapeutics. In the first study, iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based polymer shell. The PEG coating was selected to prevent protein adsorption and thus improve circulation time and minimize host response to the nanoparticles. Thermal therapy application feasibility was demonstrated in vitro with a thermoablation study on lung carcinoma cells. Building on the thermal therapy demonstration with iron oxide nanoparticles, the second area of work focused on intracellular delivery. Nanoparticles can be appropriately tailored to enter the cell and deliver energy on the nanoscale eliminating individual cancer cells. The underlying mechanism of action is still under study, and we were interested in determining the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) catalytically generated from the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles in this measured cytotoxicity. When exposed to an AMF, the nanoscale heating effects are capable of enhancing the Fenton-like generation of ROS determined through a methylene blue degradation assay. To deliver this enhanced ROS effect to cells, monosaccharide coated nanoparticles were developed and successfully internalized by colon cancer cell lines. Upon AMF exposure, there was a measured increase in

  10. Morphology and magnetic flux distribution in superparamagnetic, single-crystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticle rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeno, Yumu; Murakami, Yasukazu; Sato, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Park, Hyun Soon; Shindo, Daisuke; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-11-01

    This study reports on the correlation between crystal orientation and magnetic flux distribution of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the form of self-assembled rings. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the nanoparticles were single-crystalline, highly monodispersed, (25 nm average diameter), and showed no appreciable lattice imperfections such as twins or stacking faults. Electron holography studies of these superparamagnetic nanoparticle rings indicated significant fluctuations in the magnetic flux lines, consistent with variations in the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the nanoparticles. The observations provide useful information for a deeper understanding of the micromagnetics of ultrasmall nanoparticles, where the magnetic dipolar interaction competes with the magnetic anisotropy.

  11. A Tunable Magnetic Domain Wall Conduit Regulating Nanoparticle Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro; Johansen, Tom H; Sancho, José M

    2016-08-10

    We demonstrate a general and robust method to confine on a plane strongly diffusing nanoparticles in water by using size tunable magnetic channels. These virtual conduits are realized with pairs of movable Bloch walls located within an epitaxially grown ferrite garnet film. We show that once inside the magnetic conduit the particles experience an effective local parabolic potential in the transverse direction, while freely diffusing along the conduit. The stiffness of the magnetic potential is determined as a function of field amplitude that varies the width of the magnetic channel. Precise control of the degree of confinement is demonstrated by tuning the applied field. The magnetic conduit is then used to realize single files of nonpassing particles and to induce periodic condensation of an ensemble of particles into parallel stripes in a completely controllable and reversible manner.

  12. A Tunable Magnetic Domain Wall Conduit Regulating Nanoparticle Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro; Johansen, Tom H; Sancho, José M

    2016-08-10

    We demonstrate a general and robust method to confine on a plane strongly diffusing nanoparticles in water by using size tunable magnetic channels. These virtual conduits are realized with pairs of movable Bloch walls located within an epitaxially grown ferrite garnet film. We show that once inside the magnetic conduit the particles experience an effective local parabolic potential in the transverse direction, while freely diffusing along the conduit. The stiffness of the magnetic potential is determined as a function of field amplitude that varies the width of the magnetic channel. Precise control of the degree of confinement is demonstrated by tuning the applied field. The magnetic conduit is then used to realize single files of nonpassing particles and to induce periodic condensation of an ensemble of particles into parallel stripes in a completely controllable and reversible manner. PMID:27434042

  13. Attachment of gold nanoparticles to glassy carbon electrode and its application for the direct electrochemistry and electrocatalytic behavior of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Xiue; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2005-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles have been attached onto glassy carbon electrode surface through sulfhydryl-terminated monolayer and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The gold nanoparticles-attached glassy carbon electrodes have been applied to the immobilization/adsorption of hemoglobin, with a monolayer surface coverage of about 2.1 x 10(-10) mol cm(-2), and consequently obtained the direct electrochemistry of hemoglobin. Gold nanoparticles, acting as a bridge of electron transfer, can greatly promote the direct electron transfer between hemoglobin and the modified glassy carbon electrode without the aid of any electron mediator. In phosphate buffer solution with pH 6.8, hemoglobin shows a pair of well-defined redox waves with formal potential (E0') of about -0.085 V (versus Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl). The immobilized hemoglobin maintained its biological activity, showing a surface controlled electrode process with the apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ks) of 1.05 s(-1) and charge-transfer coefficient (a) of 0.46, and displays the features of a peroxidase in the electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide. A potential application of the hemoglobin-immobilized gold nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode as a biosensor to monitor hydrogen peroxide has been investigated. The steady-state current response increases linearly with hydrogen peroxide concentration from 2.0 x 10(-6) to 2.4 x 10(-4) M. The detection limit (3sigma) for hydrogen peroxide is 9.1 x 10(-7) M.

  14. Multifunctional clickable and protein-repellent magnetic silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estupiñán, Diego; Bannwarth, Markus B.; Mylon, Steven E.; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the introduced surface functionality. Herein, organosilane chemistry is employed to produce magnetic silica nanoparticles bearing differing amounts of amino and alkene functional groups on their surface as orthogonally addressable chemical functionalities. Simultaneously, a short-chain zwitterion is added to decrease the non-specific adsorption of biomolecules on the nanoparticles surface. The multifunctional particles display reduced protein adsorption after incubation in undiluted fetal bovine serum as well as in single protein solutions (serum albumin and lysozyme). Besides, the particles retain their capacity to selectively react with biomolecules. Thus, they can be covalently bio-functionalized with an antibody by means of orthogonal click reactions. These features make the described multifunctional silica nanoparticles a promising system for the study of surface interactions with biomolecules, targeting, and bio-sensing.Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the

  15. Influence of magnetic field on the compressive behavior of carbon nanotube with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. K.; Suri, A.; Misra, A.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) in their cellular like micro-structure have presented an excellent mechanical energy absorption capacity. Although, several efforts have been progressed to modify the CNT structure for further enhancing their energy absorption capacity but yet no report has revealed the effect of magnetic field on the mechanical behavior of as-grown CNT mat that contains magnetic iron nanoparticles in the form of decorated nanoparticles on the surface or filled inside core of the CNT. We report a significant impact of the presence of magnetic content that modifies the mechanical behavior of the entangled CNT mat in the presence of an external magnetic field. The energy absorption capacity doubles when magnetic field was applied in the radial direction of the CNT mat under uniaxial compression.

  16. GMR sensors and magnetic nanoparticles for immuno-chromatographic assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquina, C.; de Teresa, J. M.; Serrate, D.; Marzo, J.; Cardoso, F. A.; Saurel, D.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Ibarra, M. R.

    2012-10-01

    Conventional tests based on immunorecognition and on the use of coloured colloidal particles have still some drawbacks that limit their use: they do not provide a quantitative determination of the analyte, and their sensitivity is limited. Our strategy to overcome these disadvantages consists in the use of superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles to tag the analyte. The use of these magnetic labels allows us to quantify the amount of analyte present in our sample with a very high sensitivity, detecting their magnetic response by means of the suitable magnetic sensor. Our method is based on measuring the magnetoresistive response of a spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor placed in proximity to the magnetic nanoparticles present in the lateral flow strip. Here, a brief description of our prototype and of the measurement procedure will be presented, as well as preliminary assays using our biosensor to detect the hCG pregnancy hormone in a solution. A crucial aspect to take into account in order to increase the sensitivity is the proper functionalisation of the nanoparticle shell, in order to achieve an oriented immobilisation of the antibodies to be used in the immunorecognition process. Several strategies to further increase the sensor sensitivity are suggested.

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetically assisted patterned coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodi, Gianina; Hritcu, Doina; Draganescu, Dan; Popa, Marcel I.

    2015-08-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles able to magnetically assemble during the curing stage of a polymeric support to create micro-scale surface protuberances in a controlled manner were prepared and characterized. The bare Fe3O4 particles were obtained by two methods: co-precipitation from an aqueous solution containing Fe3+/Fe2+ ions with a molar ratio of 2:1 and partial oxidation of ferrous ions in alkaline conditions. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization measurement. They were subsequently functionalized using oleic acid, sodium oleate, or non-ionic surfactant mixtures with various hydrophilic to lipophilic balance (HLB) values. Composite nanoparticle-polymer films prepared by spraying were deposited and cured by drying on glass slides under a static magnetic field in the range of 1.5-5.5 mT. Magnetic field generated surface roughness was evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum hierarchical patterning was obtained with the nanoparticles produced by partial oxidation and functionalized with hydrophobic surfactants. Possible applications may include ice-phobic composite coatings.

  18. Ni doped Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Larumbe, S; Gómez-Polo, C; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; García-Prieto, A; Alonso, J; Fdez-Gubieda, M L; Cordero, D; Gómez, J

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the effect of nickel doping on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles is analysed. Ni(x)Fe(3-x)O4 nanoparticles (x = 0, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.11) were obtained by chemical co-precipitation method, starting from a mixture of FeCl2 x 4H2O and Ni(AcO)2 x 4H2O salts. The analysis of the structure and composition of the synthesized nanoparticles confirms their nanometer size (main sizes around 10 nm) and the inclusion of the Ni atoms in the characteristic spinel structure of the magnetite Fe3O4 phase. In order to characterize in detail the structure of the samples, X-ray absorption (XANES) measurements were performed on the Ni and Fe K-edges. The results indicate the oxidation of the Ni atoms to the 2+ state and the location of the Ni2+ cations in the Fe2+ octahedral sites. With respect to the magnetic properties, the samples display the characteristic superparamagnetic behaviour, with anhysteretic magnetic response at room temperature. The estimated magnetic moment confirms the partial substitution of the Fe2+ cations by Ni2+ atoms in the octahedral sites of the spinel structure. PMID:22755104

  19. Biomimetic control over size, shape and aggregation in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerdijk, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a widespread magnetic iron oxide encountered in both geological and biomineralizing systems, which also has many technological applications, e.g. in ferrofluids, inks, magnetic data storage materials and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. As its magnetic properties depend largely on the size and shape of the crystals, control over crystal morphology is an important aspect in the application of magnetite nanoparticles, both in biology and synthetic systems. Indeed, in nature organisms such as magnetotactic bacteria demonstrate a precise control over the magnetite crystal morphology, resulting in uniform and monodisperse nanoparticles. The magnetite formation in these bacteria is believed to occur through the co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, which is also the most widely applied synthetic route in industry. Synthetic strategies to magnetite with controlled size and shape exist, but involve high temperatures and rather harsh chemical conditions. However, synthesis via co-precipitation generally yields poor control over the morphology and therefore over the magnetic properties of the obtained crystals. Here we demonstrate that by tuning the reaction kinetics we can achieve biomimetic control over the size and shape of magnetite crystals but also over their organization in solution as well as their magnetic properties. We employ amino acids-based polymers to direct the formation of magnetite in aqueous media at room temperature via both the co-precipitation and the partial oxidation method. By using 2D and 3D (cryo)TEM it is shown that acidic amino acid monomers are most effective in affecting the magnetite particle morphology. By changing the composition of the polymers we can tune the morphology, the dispersibility as well as the magnetic properties of these nanoparticles.

  20. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Mediators of Ligand-Free Activation of EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Cornelia; Klaver, Arjen; Kanger, Johannes S.; Jovin, Thomas M.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are of particular interest in biomedical research, and have been exploited for molecular separation, gene/drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermic cancer therapy. In the case of cultured cells, magnetic manipulation of NPs provides the means for studying processes induced by mechanotransduction or by local clustering of targeted macromolecules, e.g. cell surface receptors. The latter are normally activated by binding of their natural ligands mediating key signaling pathways such as those associated with the epidermal growth factor (EGFR). However, it has been reported that EGFR may be dimerized and activated even in the absence of ligands. The present study assessed whether receptor clustering induced by physical means alone suffices for activating EGFR in quiescent cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The EGFR on A431 cells was specifically targeted by superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) carrying either a ligand-blocking monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody or a streptavidin molecule for targeting a chimeric EGFR incorporating a biotinylated amino-terminal acyl carrier peptide moiety. Application of a magnetic field led to SPION magnetization and clustering, resulting in activation of the EGFR, a process manifested by auto and transphosphorylation and downstream signaling. The magnetically-induced early signaling events were similar to those inherent to the ligand dependent EGFR pathways. Magnetization studies indicated that the NPs exerted magnetic dipolar forces in the sub-piconewton range with clustering dependent on Brownian motion of the receptor-SPION complex and magnetic field strength. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that EGFR on the cell surface that have their ligand binding-pocket blocked by an antibody are still capable of transphosphorylation and initiation of signaling cascades if they are clustered by SPIONs either attached locally or targeted to another site of the receptor

  1. Numerical simulation of magnetic nanoparticles targeting in a bifurcation vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimi, M. M.; Ramiar, A.; Ranjbar, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as novel drug delivery vehicles. The present paper is devoted to study on MDT (Magnetic Drug Targeting) technique by particle tracking in the presence of magnetic field in a bifurcation vessel. The blood flow in bifurcation is considered incompressible, unsteady and Newtonian. The flow analysis applies the time dependent, two dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian fluids. The Lagrangian particle tracking is performed to estimate particle behavior under influence of imposed magnetic field gradients along the bifurcation. According to the results, the magnetic field increased the volume fraction of particle in target region, but in vessels with high Reynolds number, the efficiency of MDT technique is very low. Also the results showed that in the bifurcation vessels with lower angles, wall shear stress is higher and consequently the risk of the vessel wall rupture increases.

  2. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  3. Increased accumulation of magnetic nanoparticles by magnetizable implant materials for the treatment of implant-associated complications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In orthopaedic surgery, accumulation of agents such as anti-infectives in the bone as target tissue is difficult. The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers principally enables their accumulation via an externally applied magnetic field. Magnetizable implants are principally able to increase the strength of an externally applied magnetic field to reach also deep-seated parts in the body. Therefore, the integration of bone-addressed therapeutics in MNPs and their accumulation at a magnetic orthopaedic implant could improve the treatment of implant related infections. In this study a martensitic steel platelet as implant placeholder was used to examine its accumulation and retention capacity of MNPs in an in vitro experimental set up considering different experimental frame conditions as magnet quantity and distance to each other, implant thickness and flow velocity. Results The magnetic field strength increased to approximately 112% when a martensitic stainless steel platelet was located between the magnet poles. Therewith a significantly higher amount of magnetic nanoparticles could be accumulated in the area of the platelet compared to the sole magnetic field. During flushing of the tube system mimicking the in vivo blood flow, the magnetized platelet was able to retain a higher amount of MNPs without an external magnetic field compared to the set up with no mounted platelet during flushing of the system. Generally, a higher flow velocity led to lower amounts of accumulated MNPs. A higher quantity of magnets and a lower distance between magnets led to a higher magnetic field strength. Albeit not significantly the magnetic field strength tended to increase with thicker platelets. Conclusion A martensitic steel platelet significantly improved the attachment of magnetic nanoparticles in an in vitro flow system and therewith indicates the potential of magnetic implant materials in orthopaedic surgery. The use of a remanent magnetic implant

  4. Self-assembly of magnetic biofunctional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Thode, C. J.; Mabry, J. K.; Harrell, J. W.; Nikles, D. E.; Sun, K.; Wang, L. M.

    2005-05-01

    Spherical, ferromagnetic FePt nanoparticles with a particle size of 3 nm were prepared by the simultaneous polyol reduction of Fe(acac)3 and Pt(acac)2 in phenyl ether in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. The oleic acid ligands can be replaced with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid, giving particles that can be dispersed in water. Both x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy indicated that FePt particles were not affected by ligands replacement. Dispersions of the FePt particles with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid ligands and ammonium counter ions gave self-assembled films consisting of highly ordered hexagonal arrays of particles.

  5. Visualization of pulsatile flow for magnetic nanoparticle based therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzel, Andrew; Yecko, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Pulsatile flow of blood through branched, curved, stenosed, dilated or otherwise perturbed vessels is more complex than flow through a straight, uniform and rigid tube. In some magnetic hyperthermia and magnetic chemo-therapies, localized regions of magnetic nanoparticle laden fluid are deliberately formed in blood vessels and held in place by magnetic fields. The effect of localized magnetic fluid regions on blood flow and the effect of the pulsatile blood flow on such magnetic fluid regions are poorly understood and difficult to examine in vivo or by numerical simulation. We present a laboratory model that facilitates both dye tracer and particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) studies of pulsatile flow of water through semi-flexible tubes in the presence of localized magnetic fluid regions. Results on the visualization of flows over a range of Reynolds and Womersley numbers and for several different (water-based) ferrofluids are compared for straight and curved vessels and for different magnetic localization strategies. These results can guide the design of improved magnetic cancer therapies. Support from the William H. Sandholm Program of Cooper Union's Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Detection of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles using MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weifeng; Schrag, Benaiah D.; Carter, Matthew J.; Xie, Jin; Xu, Chenjie; Sun, Shouheng; Xiao, Gang

    2008-04-01

    We have demonstrated the detection of 2.5μM target DNA labeled with 16nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) and 50nm commercial MACS™ NPs using arrays of magnetic tunnel junction sensors with (001)-oriented MgO barrier layers. Signal-to-noise ratios of 25 and 12 were obtained with Fe3O4 and MACS™ NPs, respectively. These data show conclusively that MgO-based MTJ sensor arrays are very promising candidates for future applications involving the accurate detection and identification of biomolecules tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  7. Quantitative Characterization of Magnetic Mobility of Nanoparticle in Solution-Based Condition.

    PubMed

    Rodoplu, Didem; Boyaci, Ismail H; Bozkurt, Akif G; Eksi, Haslet; Zengin, Adem; Tamer, Ugur; Aydogan, Nihal; Ozcan, Sadan; Tugcu-Demiröz, Fatmanur

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are considered as the ideal substrate to selectively isolate target molecules or organisms from sample solutions in a wide variety of applications including bioassays, bioimaging and environmental chemistry. The broad array of these applications in fields requires the accurate magnetic characterization of nanoparticles for a variety of solution based-conditions. Because the freshly synthesized magnetic nanoparticles demonstrated a perfect magnetization value in solid form, they exhibited a different magnetic behavior in solution. Here, we present simple quantitative method for the measurement of magnetic mobility of nanoparticles in solution-based condition. Magnetic mobility of the nanoparticles was quantified with initial mobility of the particles using UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy in water, ethanol and MES buffer. We demonstrated the efficacy of this method through a systematic characterization of four different core-shell structures magnetic nanoparticles over three different surface modifications. The solid nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and saturation magnetization (Ms). The surfaces of the nanoparticles were functionalized with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and bovine serum albumin BSA was selected as biomaterial. The effect of the surface modification and solution media on the stability of the nanoparticles was monitored by zeta potentials and hydrodynamic diameters of the nanoparticles. Results obtained from the mobility experiments indicate that the initial mobility was altered with solution media, surface functionalization, size and shape of the magnetic nanoparticle. The proposed method easily determines the interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles and their surrounding biological media, the magnetophoretic responsiveness of nanoparticles and the initial mobilities of the nanoparticles. PMID:26377661

  8. Magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles loaded with aliskiren: A promising tool for hypertension treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antal, Iryna; Kubovcikova, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Koneracka, Martina; Pechanova, Olga; Barta, Andrej; Cebova, Martina; Antal, Vitaliy; Diko, Pavel; Zduriencikova, Martina; Pudlak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In this study anti-hypertensive drug called aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles by the modified nanoprecipitation method. The effect of magnetite and drug concentrations on the size distribution and zeta potential of polymer nanoparticles was investigated. The optimized loadings were as follows: theoretical magnetite loading was 20 mg/100 mg polymer nanoparticles and aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles at theoretical loading 0.6 mg aliskiren/100 mg magnetic polymer nanoparticles. The physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles were studied, with spherical shape of nanoparticles sized between 58 and 227 nm being one of the observed results. Differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy confirmed that aliskiren was successfully identified in the magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles. The in vivo experiments indicated that encapsulated aliskiren decreased blood pressure of the studied male spontaneously hypertensive rat even more significantly than common administered drug.

  9. Fluorochrome-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for high-sensitivity monitoring of the polymerase chain reaction by magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, David; Guo, Yanyan; Yuan, Hushan; Goergen, Craig J; Chen, Howard H; Cho, Hoonsung; Sosnovik, David E; Josephson, Lee

    2012-07-01

    Easy to find: magnetic nanoparticles bearing fluorochromes (red) that intercalate with DNA (green) form microaggregates with DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These aggregates can be detected at low cycle numbers by magnetic resonance (MR).

  10. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticle by dynamic light scattering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we provide a complete review on the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to study the size distribution and colloidal stability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The mathematical analysis involved in obtaining size information from the correlation function and the calculation of Z-average are introduced. Contributions from various variables, such as surface coating, size differences, and concentration of particles, are elaborated within the context of measurement data. Comparison with other sizing techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy, revealed both the advantages and disadvantages of DLS in measuring the size of magnetic nanoparticles. The self-assembly process of MNP with anisotropic structure can also be monitored effectively by DLS. PMID:24011350

  11. Electrodeposition of highly uniform magnetic nanoparticle arrays in ordered alumite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming; Zangari, Giovanni; Shamsuzzoha, Mohammad; Metzger, Robert M.

    2001-05-01

    We report the fabrication of nanometer scale ordered arrays of magnetic cylindrical nanoparticles with low aspect ratio (height/radius a=0.2-7) and ultrahigh uniformity. Anodization and electrochemical deposition are employed for template synthesis and metal particle growth, respectively. Particle uniformity is achieved by an electrodeposition scheme, utilizing pulse reverse voltage wave forms to control nucleation and growth of the particles. The resulting nanoparticles are polycrystalline and grains are randomly oriented. The magnetic properties of the array are dominated by particle shape and by interparticle magnetostatic interactions. A very clear transition of the anisotropy from perpendicular to in plane is observed at an aspect ratio a of about two. The arrays exhibit good thermal stability, demonstrating a great potential of these structures as future recording media in a patterned scheme. The pulse reverse electrodeposition technique shows great promise for the synthesis of nanostructures of various nature.

  12. Elastic torsion effects in magnetic nanoparticle diblock-copolymer structures.

    PubMed

    Schulz, L; Schirmacher, W; Omran, A; Shah, V R; Böni, P; Petry, W; Müller-Buschbaum, P

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic properties of thin composite films, consisting of non-interacting polystyrene-coated γ-Fe(2)O(3) (maghemite) nanoparticles embedded into polystyrene-block-polyisoprene P(S-b-I) diblock-copolymer films are investigated. Different particle concentrations, ranging from 0.7 to 43 wt%, have been used. The magnetization measured as a function of external field and temperature shows typical features of anisotropic superparamagnets including a hysteresis at low temperatures and blocking phenomena. However, the data cannot be reconciled with the unmodified Stoner-Wohlfarth-Néel theory. Applying an appropriate generalization we find evidence for either an elastic torque being exerted on the nanoparticles by the field or a broad distribution of anisotropy constants.

  13. Magnetic heating of silica-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Yousaf; Bae, Hongsub; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook

    2016-07-01

    Manganese ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using the reverse micelle method; these particles were then coated with silica. The silica-coated nanoparticles were spherical in shape, with an average diameter of 14 nm. The inverse spinel crystalline structure was observed through X-ray diffraction patterns. The coating status of silica on the surface of the nanoparticles was confirmed with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The superparamagnetic properties were revealed by the zero coercive force in the hysteresis curve. Controllable heating at a fixed temperature of 42 °C was achieved by changing either the concentration of nanoparticles in the aqueous solution or the intensity of the alternating magnetic field. We found that at a fixed field strength of 5.5 kA/m, the 2.6 mg/ml sample showed a saturation temperature of 42 °C for magnetic hyperthermia. On the other hand, at a fixed concentration of 3.6 mg/ml, a field intensity of 4.57 kA/m satisfied the required temperature of 42 °C.

  14. Facile synthesis of gold nanoworms with a tunable length and aspect ratio through oriented attachment of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Waqqar; Glass, Christian; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M

    2014-11-01

    We report a seedless protocol based on the oriented attachment of nanoparticles for the synthesis of Au nanoworms (NWs). NWs are grown by reducing HAuCl4 with ascorbic acid (AA) in high pH reaction medium and in the presence of growth directional agents, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and AgNO3. Although we have used the same reducing and growth directional agents as typically used for the synthesis of Au nanorods, the growth mechanism of NWs is markedly different from that of nanorods. Instead of the anisotropic growth of seed particles, the NWs grow through oriented attachment of nanoparticles. By varying different reaction parameters we have seen that the length of NWs can be controlled from tens of nanometers to a micrometer. Furthermore, the aspect ratio (AR) can be tuned from 2 to 30. This is almost the whole range of AR and length for Au nanorods so far achieved with seed-mediated multiple step synthesis protocols. PMID:25257513

  15. Observation of the Sagnac Effect in the Magnetization of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Water.

    PubMed

    Watarai, Hitoshi; Chen, Ziyu; Chen, Siyu

    2016-01-01

    A square optical loop used to observe the Sagnac effect was constructed by using a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser, a polarizing beam splitter and three mirrors, combined with a detection system. When a magnetic field was applied from the transversal direction to the beam of the loop, which passed through the sample cell containing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water, Sagnac interference was observed depending on the concentration of MNPs, indicating evolution of the magnetic birefringence. A possible analytical use of the magnetic Sagnac effect has been suggested. PMID:27396649

  16. Understanding the physics of magnetic nanoparticles and their applications in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra Santa

    The study of magnetic nanoparticles is of great interest because of their potential uses in magnetic-recording, medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Additionally, they also offer an opportunity to understand the physics underlying the complex behavior exhibited by these materials. Two of the most important relaxation phenomena occurring in magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic blocking and spin-glass-like freezing. In addition to features attributed to superparamagnetism, these nanoparticles can also exhibit magnetic relaxation effects at very low temperatures (≤ 50 K). Our studies suggest that all structural defects, and not just surface spins, are responsible for the low-temperature glass-like relaxation observed in many magnetic nanoparticles. The characteristic dipolar interaction energy existing in an ensemble of magnetic nanoparticles does not apparently depend on the average spacing between the nanoparticles but is likely to be strongly influenced by the fluctuations in the nanoparticle distribution. Our findings revealed that incorporating a small percentage of boron can stabilize the spinel structure in Mn 3O4 nanoparticles. We have also demonstrated that the dipolar interactions between the magnetic cores can be tuned by introducing non-magnetic nanoparticles. In particular, we studied the magnetic properties of Gd-doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles, a potential applicant for T1--T2 dual-modal MRI contrast agent. We have explored the interactions of BiFeO3 nanoparticles on live cells and the binding of FITC-conjugated Fe3O 4 nanoparticles with artificial lipid membranes to investigate these materials as candidates in medical imaging. Taken together, these studies have advanced our understanding of the fundamental physical principles that governs magnetism in magnetic materials with a focus on developing these nanoparticles for advanced biomedical applications. The materials developed and studied expand the repertoire of tools available for

  17. Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for potential delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Cuilian; Zhu, Yufang

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica (MMS) nanoparticles with controllable magnetization have been synthesized by encapsulating Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a mesoporous silica matrix. The structure, magnetic heating capacity and drug delivery ability of MMS nanoparticles were evaluated. The results showed that MMS nanoparticles had an average particle size of 150 nm and showed low cytotoxicity and efficient cell uptake ability. MMS nanoparticles exhibited a sustained drug release in the medium of pH 5.0, but a very slow release in the medium of pH 7.4. On the other hand, MMS nanoparticles could controllably generate heat to reach the hyperthermia temperature within a short time upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field due to the superparamagnetic behavior and controllable magnetization. Therefore, MMS nanoparticles could provide a promising multifunctional platform for the combination of chemotherapy and hyperthermia for cancer therapy. PMID:25190592

  18. Study on performance of magnetic fluorescent nanoparticles as gene carrier and location in pig kidney cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Cui, Haixin; Sun, Changjiao; Du, Wei; Cui, Jinhui; Zhao, Xiang

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated the performance of green fluorescent magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) as gene carrier and location in pig kidney cells. When the mass ratio of NPs to green fluorescent protein plasmid DNA reached 1:16 or above, DNA molecules can be combined completely with NPs, which indicates that the NPs have good ability to bind negative DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were carried out to investigate the binding mechanism between NPs and DNA. AFM images show that individual DNA strands come off of larger pieces of netlike agglomerations and several spherical nanoparticles are attached to each individual DNA strand and interact with each other. The pig kidney cells were labelled with membrane-specific red fluorescent dye 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate and nucleus-specific blue fluorescent dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride. We found that green fluorescent nanoparticles can past the cell membrane and spread throughout the interior of the cell. The NPs seem to locate more frequently in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus.

  19. A method for introduction of magnetic nanoparticles into tissues by means of magnetic field gradient: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Dobretsov, K G; Afon'kin, V Yu; Kirichenko, A K; Ladygina, V P; Stolyar, S V; Bayukov, O A; Sipkin, A V

    2009-06-01

    Targeted effects of magnetic nanoparticles were studied. Solution with iron-containing nanosubstance was applied to resected nasal bone and cartilage tissues. Magnetic field was generated by a Polus-101 device for low-frequency magnetotherapy, which provided permanent work of one inductor (10.14+/-19.56 mT). The results indicate that magnetic nanoparticles placed into magnetic field gradient penetrate into the thickness of the cartilage and bone tissues. PMID:19902074

  20. Magnetic Particle Imaging with Tailored Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Arami, Hamed; Saritas, Emine U.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Halkola, Aleksi; Rahmer, Jürgen; Borgert, Jörn; Conolly, Steven M.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) shows promise for medical imaging, particularly in angiography of patients with chronic kidney disease. As the first biomedical imaging technique that truly depends on nanoscale materials properties, MPI requires highly optimized magnetic nanoparticle tracers to generate quality images. Until now, researchers have relied on tracers optimized for MRI T2*-weighted imaging that are suboptimal for MPI. Here, we describe new tracers tailored to MPI's unique physics, synthesized using an organic-phase process and functionalized to ensure biocompatibility and adequate in vivo circulation time. Tailored tracers showed up to 3x greater SNR and better spatial resolution than existing commercial tracers in MPI images of phantoms. PMID:25438306

  1. Multifunctional fluorescent and magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvan, Subramanian T.

    2012-03-01

    Hybrid multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) are emerging as useful probes for magnetic based targeting, delivery, cell separation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and fluorescence-based bio-labeling applications. Assessing from the literature, the development of multifunctional NPs for multimodality imaging is still in its infancy state. This report focuses on our recent work on quantum dots (QDs), magnetic NPs (MNPs) and bi-functional NPs (composed of either QDs or rare-earth NPs, and magnetic NPs - iron oxide or gadolinium oxide) for multimodality imaging based biomedical applications. The combination of MRI and fluorescence would ally each other in improving the sensitivity and resolution, resulting in improved and early diagnosis of the disease. The challenges in this area are discussed.

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticles in MR Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Conroy; Lee, Jerry S.H.; Zhang, Miqin

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) possess unique magnetic properties and the ability to function at the cellular and molecular level of biological interactions making them an attractive platform as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as carriers for drug delivery. Recent advances in nanotechnology have improved the ability to specifically tailor the features and properties of MNPs for these biomedical applications. To better address specific clinical needs, MNPs with higher magnetic moments, non-fouling surfaces, and increased functionalities are now being developed for applications in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of malignant tumors, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disease. Through the incorporation of highly specific targeting agents and other functional ligands, such as fluorophores and permeation enhancers, the applicability and efficacy of these MNPs have greatly increased. This review provides a background on applications of MNPs as MR imaging contrast agents and as carriers for drug delivery and an overview of the recent developments in this area of research. PMID:18558452

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

  4. Multifunctional clickable and protein-repellent magnetic silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Estupiñán, Diego; Bannwarth, Markus B; Mylon, Steven E; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the introduced surface functionality. Herein, organosilane chemistry is employed to produce magnetic silica nanoparticles bearing differing amounts of amino and alkene functional groups on their surface as orthogonally addressable chemical functionalities. Simultaneously, a short-chain zwitterion is added to decrease the non-specific adsorption of biomolecules on the nanoparticles surface. The multifunctional particles display reduced protein adsorption after incubation in undiluted fetal bovine serum as well as in single protein solutions (serum albumin and lysozyme). Besides, the particles retain their capacity to selectively react with biomolecules. Thus, they can be covalently bio-functionalized with an antibody by means of orthogonal click reactions. These features make the described multifunctional silica nanoparticles a promising system for the study of surface interactions with biomolecules, targeting, and bio-sensing. PMID:26781542

  5. Micro CT imaging assessment for spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in an ex vivo thrombolysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2012-03-01

    In recent nanotechnology development, iron-based magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in several investigations on biomedical research for small animal experiments. Their important applications include targeted drug delivery for therapeutic purpose, contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermia treatment for tumors. These MNPs can be guided by an external magnetic field due to their physical characteristics of superparamagnetism. In a recent report, authors indicated that covalently bound recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) to MNP (MNPrtPA) with preserved enzyme activity may be guided by a bar magnet and induce target thrombolysis in an embolic model in rats. Delivery of rtPA by binding the thrombolytic drug to MNPs will improve the possibility of the drug to be delivered under magnetic guidance and retained in a local targeted area in the circulation system. In this work, an ex vivo intravascular thrombolysis model was developed to study the impact of external magnetic field on the penetration of MNP-rtPA in the blood clot samples. The samples were then scanned by a micro CT system for quantification. Images of MNPs show strong contrast with their surrounding blood clot materials. The optimum drug loading was found when 0.5 mg/ml rtPA is conjugated with 10 mg SiO2-MNP where 98% drug was attached to the carrier with full retention of its thrombolytic activity. Effective thrombolysis with tPA bound to SiO2-MNP under magnetic guidance was demonstrated in our ex vivo model where substantial reduction in time for blood clot lysis was observed compared with control groups without magnetic field application.

  6. Magnetic controlling of migration of DNA and proteins using one-step modified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-06-01

    A protocol was developed for preparing magnetic gold nanoparticles via one-step modification with a paramagnetic cationic surfactant. These magnetic gold nanoparticles can bind to and manipulate a low strength magnetic field-based delivery of DNA and proteins powerfully and non-invasively. PMID:25847127

  7. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  8. Optimizing magnetite nanoparticles for mass sensitivity in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Minard, Kevin R.; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, the authors explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. The driving field amplitude H0=6 mT μ0−1 and frequency f0=250 kHz were chosen to be suitable for imaging small animals. Experimental results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: The experimental results show a clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP diameter that is in agreement with simulated results. A maximum in the plot of MPI signal vs MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen f0. Conclusions: The authors observed that MNPs 15 nm in diameter generate maximum signal amplitude in MPI experiments at 250 kHz. The authors expect the physical basis for this result, the change in magnetic relaxation with MNP size, will impact MPI under other experimental conditions. PMID:21520874

  9. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  10. Real time monitoring of superparamagnetic nanoparticle self-assembly on surfaces of magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Crawford, T. M.; Qi, B.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.

    2014-05-07

    Nanoparticle self-assembly dynamics are monitored in real-time by detecting optical diffraction from an all-nanoparticle grating as it self-assembles on a grating pattern recorded on a magnetic medium. The diffraction efficiency strongly depends on concentration, pH, and colloidal stability of nanoparticle suspensions, demonstrating the nanoparticle self-assembly process is highly tunable. This metrology could provide an alternative for detecting nanoparticle properties such as colloidal stability.

  11. Polarization of Magnetic Dipole Emission and Spinning Dust Emission from Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic dipole emission (MDE) from interstellar magnetic nanoparticles is potentially an important Galactic foreground in the microwave frequencies, and its polarization level may pose great challenges for achieving reliable measurements of cosmic microwave background B-mode signal. To obtain realistic predictions for the polarization of MDE, we first compute the degree of alignment of big silicate grains incorporated with magnetic inclusions. We find that thermally rotating big grains with magnetic inclusions are weakly aligned and can achieve alignment saturation when the magnetic alignment rate becomes much faster than the rotational damping rate. We then compute the degree of alignment for free-flying magnetic nanoparticles, taking into account various interaction processes of grains with the ambient gas and radiation field, including neutral collisions, ion collisions, and infrared emission. We find that the rotational damping by infrared emission can significantly decrease the degree of alignment of small particles from the saturation level, whereas the excitation by ion collisions can enhance the alignment of ultrasmall particles. Using the computed degrees of alignment, we predict the polarization level of MDE from free-flying magnetic nanoparticles to be rather low. Such a polarization level is within the upper limits measured for anomalous microwave emission (AME), which indicates that MDE from free-flying iron particles may not be ruled out as a source of AME. We also quantify rotational emission from free-flying iron nanoparticles with permanent magnetic moments and find that its emissivity is about one order of magnitude lower than that from spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  12. Electronic measurements in an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for studying magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Z.; Hussein, Z. A.; Hartzell, S.

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a promising cancer treatment in which magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a tumor and then exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). This process releases heat and damages tumor cells, but the exact mechanisms behind the effectiveness of this therapy are still unclear. Accurate sensors are required to monitor the temperature and, potentially, other parameters such as magnetic field or mechanical stress during clinical therapy or lab research. Often, optical rather than electronic temperature sensors are used to avoid eddy current self-heating in conducting parts in the AMF. However, eddy current heating is strongly dependent on the size and geometry of the conducting part, thus micro- and nano-scale electronics are a promising possibility for further exploration into magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. This presentation quantitatively discusses the eddy current self-heating of thin wires (thermocouples) and will also present a proof of concept thin film resistive thermometer and magnetic field sensor along with measurements of their eddy current self-heating. The results show that electronic measurements are feasible in an AMF with both thin wires and patterned thin film sensors under certain conditions.

  13. Resolution improvement of the molecular imaging technique based on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Yasutoshi; Kusayama, Yusuke

    2009-02-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) based on the nonlinear interaction between internally administered magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic waves that externally irradiate the body has attracted attention for the early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In MPI, the local magnetic field distribution is scanned, and the magnetization signals are detected from the magnetic nanoparticles inside a target region. However, interference of the magnetization signals generated from the magnetic nanoparticles outside a target region due to nonlinear responses results in the degradation of image resolution. In this study, we clearly show that the degradation of image resolution is a result of the presence of even harmonics in the magnetization response of magnetic nanoparticles. We propose a new image reconstruction method for reducing these even harmonics and a correction method for suppressing the interference of the signals. This is achieved by taking into account the difference between the saturated waveform of the magnetization signal detected from the magnetic nanoparticles outside a target region and that detected from the magnetic nanoparticles inside a target region. In this study, we perform numerical analyses to prove that the image resolution in the molecular imaging technique can be improved by using our proposed image reconstruction method, which is based on the abovementioned ideas. Furthermore, a fundamental system is constructed and the numerical analyses are experimentally validated by using magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of ~20 nm.

  14. Temperature-induced phenomena in systems of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiya, Abdul Wazed

    Magnetic nanoparticle ensembles have received a lot of attention, stemming in part from their current and potential applications in biomedicine and in the development of high-density magnetic storage media. Key to the functionality of these systems are microscopic structures and mechanisms that make them exhibit unique properties and behave differently from their bulk counterparts. We studied microscopic structures and processes that dictate macroscopic properties, behavior and functionality of magnetic nanoparticle ensembles. As the temperature T strongly influences the magnetic behavior of these systems, we studied temperature dependent magnetic properties using AC-susceptibility and DC-magnetization measurements carried out over a broad range of temperatures, between 3 and 300 K. We extracted structural information from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and direct imaging techniques and correlate it with magnetic properties, in an attempt at better understanding the microscopic structures and magnetic mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic magnetic behavior. We studied ensembles of magnetic nanoparticles: nickel ferrite immobilized in a solid matrix and cobalt ferrite immersed in carrier fluid respectively, in order to explore their potential use in biomedical applications and magnetic recording. For both NiFe2O4(NFO) and Co0.2Fe2.8O4 (CFO) relaxation mechanisms were determined. Structural properties and average particle sizes were derived from XRD, including synchrotron XRD, and direct imaging techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Temperature dependent magnetic measurements, FC-ZFC DC magnetometry, as well as AC complex susceptibility measurements at frequencies between 10 and 10,000 Hz were carried out within the temperature range 3Kmagnetization and AC susceptibility measurements were performed using a Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS), which allows measurements in magnetic fields up

  15. Electrostatic complexation of polyelectrolyte and magnetic nanoparticles: from wild clustering to controllable magnetic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Minhao; Qu, Li; Fan, Jiangxia; Ren, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We present the electrostatic complexation between polyelectrolytes and charged nanoparticles. The nanoparticles in solution are γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) spheres with 8.3 nm diameter and anionic surface charges. The complexation was monitored using three different formulation pathways such as direct mixing, dilution, and dialysis. In the first process, the hybrids were obtained by mixing stock solutions of polymers and nanoparticles. A `destabilization state' with sharp and intense maximum aggregation was found at charges stoichiometry (isoelectric point). While on the two sides of the isoelectric point, `long-lived stable clusters state' (arrested states) were observed. Dilution and dialysis processes were based on controlled desalting kinetics according to methods developed in molecular biology. Under an external magnetic field ( B = 0.3 T), from dialysis at isoelectric point and at arrested states, cationic polyelectrolytes can `paste' these magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) together to yield irregular aggregates (size of 100 μm) and regular rod-like aggregates, respectively. These straight magnetic wires were fabricated with diameters around 200 nm and lengths comprised between 1 μm and 0.5 mm. The wires can have either positive or negative charges on their surface. After analyzing their orientational behavior under an external rotating field, we also showed that the wires made from different polyelectrolytes have the same magnetic property. The recipe used a wide range of polyelectrolytes thereby enhancing the versatility and applied potentialities of the method. This simple and general approach presents significant perspective for the fabrication of hybrid functional materials.

  16. Mössbauer spectroscopy for characterizing biodegradation of magnetic nanoparticles in a living organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischenko, Ilya Nikitich; Chuev, Michail Alexandrovich; Cherepanov, Valeriy Mihailovich; Polikarpov, Michail Alexeevich

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a model for describing nanoparticles magnetic dynamics. This allows us to fit self-consistently the wide set of the experimental data, particularly, the evolution of Mössbauer spectral shape with temperature and external magnetic field as well as the magnetization curves for nanoparticles injected into mice. Thus, we reliably evaluate changes in characteristics of the nanoparticles and their chemical transformation to ferritin-like forms in mouse's organs as a function of time after injection of nanoparticles. Actually, the approach allows one to quantitatively characterize biodegradation and biotransformation of magnetic particles in a body.

  17. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolkova, Ilona S.; Kazantseva, Natalia E.; Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g-1 to 48 emu g-1) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2-7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g-1. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy.

  18. Magnetic Properties of Ubiquitous yet Underrated Antiferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyodo, Y. J.; Till, J. L.; Lagroix, F.; Bonville, P.; Penn, R.; Sainctavit, P.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Morin, G.

    2013-05-01

    Ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite and goethite are antiferromagnetic, weakly "ferromagnetic" iron oxyhydroxides that are commonly found in diverse environments, including ground waters and streams, sediments, soils, or acid mine drainage. One of them, ferrihydrite, constitutes the mineral core of ferritin, a vital iron storage protein. Iron oxyhydroxides take part in multiple biological and abiological processes, and can evolve, under changing environmental or geological conditions, to more magnetic phases such as hematite, maghemite, or magnetite. Therefore, they represent key minerals with regard to paleoclimate, paleoenvironmental, and paleomagnetic studies. We will present low temperature magnetic properties acquired on fully characterized synthetic iron oxyhydroxides. The complex nature of the magnetism of these minerals is revealed by comparing magnetic data with other types of characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy or synchrotron X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), or when the early-stages of solid-state alteration (under oxidizing or reducing atmosphere) are studied. In particular, we will present resent results about the structure of 6-line ferrihydrite, about the possible presence of ferri-magnetic nano-clusters in lepidocrocite, and about uncompensated magnetic moments in goethite nanoparticles.

  19. Magnetic metal nanoparticles coated polyacrylonitrile textiles as microwave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, O.; Kavas, H.; Baykal, A.; Toprak, M. S.; Çoruh, Ali; Aktaş, B.

    2013-02-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) textiles with 2 mm thickness are coated with magnetic nanoparticles in coating baths with Ni, Co and their alloys via an electroless metal deposition method. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic nature of composites are investigated by X-ray Powder diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and dc magnetization measurement techniques. The frequency dependent microwave absorption measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (X and P bands). Diamagnetic and ferromagnetic properties are also investigated. Finally, the microwave absorption of composites is found strongly dependent on the coating time. One absorption peak is observed between 14.3 and 15.8 GHz with an efficient absorption bandwidth of 3.3-4.1 GHz (under -20 dB reflection loss limit). The Reflection loss (RL) can be achieved between -30 and -50 dB. It was found that the RL is decreasing and absorption bandwidth is decreasing with increasing coating time. While absorption peak moves to lower frequencies in Ni coated PAN textile, it goes higher frequencies in Co coated ones. The Ni-Co alloy coated composites have fluctuating curve of absorption frequency with respect to coating time. These results encourage further development of magnetic nanoparticle coated textile absorbers for broadband applications.

  20. Effects of dipolar interactions in magnetic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, Sergiu; Hovorka, Ondrej; Chantrell, Roy

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the effects of magnetostatic interactions in magnetic nanoparticle systems is of importance in magnetic recording, biomedical applications such as in hyperthermia cancer treatment, or for sensing approaches in biology and chemistry, for example. In this talk we discuss the macroscopic and microscopic effects of dipole-dipole interactions in three-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles in various spatial arrangements, including the BCC, FCC, or randomized lattices. Our study is based on the kinetic Monte-Carlo modelling and concentrates on exploring the effect of the particle arrangement, distributions of particle volumes and anisotropy axes, and the role of thermal effects on the overall behaviour of hysteresis loops, ZFC/FC temperature scans and the magnetization decay data computed during the relaxation to equilibrium. In the case of the FCC lattice we find a counter-intuitive effect where increasing the interaction strength enhances/suppresses the hysteresis loop coercivity at high/low temperatures. The analysis of the domain pattern formation and pair correlation functions suggests for the observed behaviour to be a result of the phenomenon of frustration. We also discuss the possibility of observing the super-ferromagnetic phases on similar syste

  1. Labeled magnetic nanoparticles assembly on polypyrrole film for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Fredj, H Ben; Helali, S; Esseghaier, C; Vonna, L; Vidal, L; Abdelghani, A

    2008-05-15

    In recent years, conducting polymers combined with metallic nanoparticles have been paid more attention due to their potential applications in microelectronics, microsystems, optical sensors and photoelectronic chemistry. The work presented in this paper describes the preparation and characterization of a nanocomposite composed by a thin polypyrrole (PPy) film covered with an assembly of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). The magnetic particles were immobilized on PPy films under appropriate magnetic field in order to control their organization on the PPy film and finally to improve the sensitivity of the system in potential sensing applications. The electrical properties and morphology of the resulting PPy film and the PPy film/NPs composite were characterized with cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy (IS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and infra-red spectroscopy (IR). By using streptavidin labeled magnetic particles it was possible to functionalize the NPs assembly with biotin-Fab fragment K47 antibody. The designed biosensor had been successfully applied in rapid, simple, and accurate measurements of atrazine concentrations, with a significantly low detection limit of 5 ng/ml. PMID:18585140

  2. Sonochemical synthesis of magnetic Janus nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Teo, Boon M; Suh, Su Kyung; Hatton, T Alan; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Grieser, Franz

    2011-01-01

    The sonochemical synthesis of nanosized surface-dissymmetrical (Janus) particles is described. The Janus particles were composed of silica and polystyrene, with the polystyrene portion loaded with nanosized magnetite particles. It is shown that the Janus particles can be used to form kinetically stable oil-in-water emulsions that can be spontaneously broken on application of an external magnetic field. The one-pot synthetic process used to prepare the Janus particles has several advantages over other conventional methods of producing such particles. PMID:21133341

  3. Effect of magnetic nanoparticle shape on flux amplification in inductive coil magnetic resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbic, Mladen; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2016-09-01

    We model and analyze the effect of particle shape on the signal amplification in inductive coil magnetic resonance detection using the reversible transverse magnetic susceptibility of oriented magnetic nanostructures. Utilizing the single magnetic domain Stoner-Wohlfarth model of uniform magnetization rotation, we reveal that different ellipsoidal particle shapes can have a pronounced effect on the magnetic flux enhancement in detection configurations typical of magnetic resonance settings. We compare and contrast the prolate ellipsoids, oblate ellipsoids, and exchange-biased spheres and show that the oblate ellipsoids and exchange-biased spheres have a significantly higher flux amplification effect than the prolate ellipsoids considered previously. In addition, oblate ellipsoids have a much broader polarizing magnetic field range over which their transverse flux amplification is significant. We show the dependence of transverse flux amplification on magnetic resonance bias field and discuss the resulting signal-to-noise ratio of inductive magnetic resonance detection due to the magnetic nanoparticle-filled core of the magnetic resonance detection coil.

  4. Magnetic field enhanced cell uptake efficiency of magnetic silica mesoporous nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jixi; Xia, Weiliang; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-06-01

    The advantages of using magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSNs) in biomedical applications have been widely recognized. However, poor uptake efficiency may hinder the potential of M-MSNs in many applications, such as cell tracking, drug delivery, fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. An external magnetic field may improve the cellular uptake efficiency. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of a magnetic field on the uptake of M-MSNs. We found that the internalization of M-MSNs by A549 cancer cells could be accelerated and enhanced by a magnetic field. An endocytosis study indicated that M-MSNs were internalized by A549 cells mainly through an energy-dependent pathway, namely clathrin-induced endocytosis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that M-MSNs were trafficked into lysosomes. With the help of a magnetic field, anticancer drug-loaded M-MSNs induced elevated cancer cell growth inhibition.

  5. Imaging of Her2-Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles for Breast Cancer Detection: Comparison of SQUID-detected Magnetic Relaxometry and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Adolphi, Natalie L.; Butler, Kimberly S.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Tessier, T. E.; Trujillo, Jason E.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Fegan, Danielle L.; Monson, Todd C.; Stevens, Tyler E.; Huber, Dale L.; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Bryant, Howard C.; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, non-invasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125,000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T2-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15,600 cells in a 150 μl volume, with r1 = 1.1 mM−1s−1 and r2 = 166 mM−1s−1. Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies. PMID:22539401

  6. Chemically attached gold nanoparticle-carbon nanotube hybrids for highly sensitive SERS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beqa, Lule; Singh, Anant Kumar; Fan, Zheng; Senapati, Dulal; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2011-08-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been shown as one of the most powerful analytical tool with high sensitivity. In this manuscript, we report the chemical design of SERS substrate, based on gold nanoparticles of different shapes-decorated with carbon nanotube with an enhancement factor of 7.5 × 1010. Shape dependent result shows that popcorn shape gold nanoparticle decorated SWCNT is the best choice for SERS substrate due to the existence of 'lightning rod effect' through several sharp edges or corners. Our results provide a good approach to develop highly sensitive SERS substrates and can help to improve the fundamental understanding of SERS phenomena.

  7. Measuring and modeling the magnetic settling of superparamagnetic nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Prigiobbe, Valentina; Ko, Saebom; Huh, Chun; Bryant, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present settling experiments and mathematical modeling to study the magnetic separation of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) from a brine. The experiments were performed using SPIONs suspensions of concentration between 3 and 202g/L dispersed in water and separated from the liquid under the effect of a permanent magnet. A 1D model was developed in the framework of the sedimentation theory with a conservation law for SPIONs and a mass flux function based on the Newton's law for motion in a magnetic field. The model describes both the hindering effect of suspension concentration (n) during settling due to particle collisions and the increase in settling rate due to the attraction of the SPIONs towards the magnet. The flux function was derived from the settling experiments and the numerical model validated against the analytical solution and the experimental data. Suspensions of SPIONs were of 2.8cm initial height, placed on a magnet, and monitored continuously with a digital camera. Applying a magnetic field of 0.5T of polarization, the SPION's velocity was of approximately 3·10(-5)m/s close to the magnet and decreases of two orders of magnitude across the domain. The process was characterized initially by a classical sedimentation behavior, i.e., an upper interface between the clear water and the suspension slowly moving towards the magnet and a lower interface between the sediment layer and the suspension moving away from the magnet. Subsequently, a rapid separation of nanoparticle occured suggesting a non-classical settling phenomenon induced by magnetic forces which favor particle aggregation and therefore faster settling. The rate of settling decreased with n and an optimal condition for fast separation was found for an initial n of 120g/L. The model agrees well with the measurements in the early stage of the settling, but it fails to describe the upper interface movement during the later stage, probably because of particle

  8. Measuring and modeling the magnetic settling of superparamagnetic nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Prigiobbe, Valentina; Ko, Saebom; Huh, Chun; Bryant, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present settling experiments and mathematical modeling to study the magnetic separation of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) from a brine. The experiments were performed using SPIONs suspensions of concentration between 3 and 202g/L dispersed in water and separated from the liquid under the effect of a permanent magnet. A 1D model was developed in the framework of the sedimentation theory with a conservation law for SPIONs and a mass flux function based on the Newton's law for motion in a magnetic field. The model describes both the hindering effect of suspension concentration (n) during settling due to particle collisions and the increase in settling rate due to the attraction of the SPIONs towards the magnet. The flux function was derived from the settling experiments and the numerical model validated against the analytical solution and the experimental data. Suspensions of SPIONs were of 2.8cm initial height, placed on a magnet, and monitored continuously with a digital camera. Applying a magnetic field of 0.5T of polarization, the SPION's velocity was of approximately 3·10(-5)m/s close to the magnet and decreases of two orders of magnitude across the domain. The process was characterized initially by a classical sedimentation behavior, i.e., an upper interface between the clear water and the suspension slowly moving towards the magnet and a lower interface between the sediment layer and the suspension moving away from the magnet. Subsequently, a rapid separation of nanoparticle occured suggesting a non-classical settling phenomenon induced by magnetic forces which favor particle aggregation and therefore faster settling. The rate of settling decreased with n and an optimal condition for fast separation was found for an initial n of 120g/L. The model agrees well with the measurements in the early stage of the settling, but it fails to describe the upper interface movement during the later stage, probably because of particle

  9. Influence of spherical assembly of copper ferrite nanoparticles on magnetic properties: orientation of magnetic easy axis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biplab K; Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Dey, Abhishek; Ghosh, Chandan K; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic properties of copper ferrite (CuFe2O4) nanoparticles prepared via sol-gel auto combustion and facile solvothermal method are studied focusing on the effect of nanoparticle arrangement. Randomly oriented CuFe2O4 nanoparticles (NP) are obtained from the sol-gel auto combustion method, while the solvothermal method allows us to prepare iso-oriented uniform spherical ensembles of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles (NS). X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) are used to investigate the composition, microstructure and magnetic properties of as-prepared ferrite nanoparticles. The field-dependent magnetization measurement for the NS sample at low temperature exhibits a step-like rectangular hysteresis loop (M(R)/M(S) ~ 1), suggesting cubic anisotropy in the system, whereas for the NP sample, typical features of uniaxial anisotropy (M(R)/M(S) ~ 0.5) are observed. The coercive field (HC) for the NS sample shows anomalous temperature dependence, which is correlated with the variation of effective anisotropy (K(E)) of the system. A high-temperature enhancement of H(C) and K(E) for the NS sample coincides with a strong spin-orbit coupling in the sample as evidenced by significant modification of Cu/Fe-O bond distances. The spherical arrangement of nanocrystals at mesoscopic scale provokes a high degree of alignment of the magnetic easy axis along the applied field leading to a step-like rectangular hysteresis loop. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of the system is carried out, emphasizing the influence of the formation of spherical iso-oriented assemblies. PMID:24714977

  10. Optimization of pulse sequences in magnetic resonance lymphography of axillary lymph nodes using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gharehaghaji, Nahideh; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Sarkar, Saeed; Amirmohseni, Saeedeh; Ghanaati, Hossein

    2009-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences have an important role in detection of lymph nodes using magnetic nanoparticles as a contrast agent. Current imaging sequences lack an optimum pulse sequence based on lymph node relaxation times after accumulation of magnetic nanoparticles. This deficiency is due to the limited information regarding the particle uptake in tissues, and their related magnetic properties used by magnetic resonance imaging. The aim of this study is to optimize the imaging pulse sequences based on in vivo measurement of relaxation times for obtaining the best contrast-enhanced images of axillary lymph nodes. In vivo studies were performed on normal rats on a 1.5 T clinical magnetic resonance imaging system. The used contrast agent was dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 20 nm. Relaxation time measurements were performed for enhanced (after injection) and nonenhanced axillary lymph nodes, and the surrounding tissue. Since magnetic resonance signal depends highly on tissue parameters; T1, T2, and T2*, as well as magnetic resonance acquisition parameters; repetition time and echo time, knowing the tissue characteristics is important in order to design a right magnetic resonance protocol for each application. Based on our proposed approach, the relaxivity characteristic of the lymph node after accumulation of a contrast agent and its corresponding relaxation rate is used to define optimum imaging parameters (i.e., repetition time and echo time) for maximum contrast. According to these imaging parameter values, various T1, T2, T2* and proton density weighted sequences were applied. Optimum pulse sequences were found to be T2*-weighted fast gradient echo, T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient echo and proton density-weighted fast spin echo sequences.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles to recover cellular organelles and study the time resolved nanoparticle-cell interactome throughout uptake.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Filippo; Davies, Gemma-Louise; Monopoli, Marco P; Moloney, Micheal; Gun'ko, Yurii K; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2014-08-27

    Nanoparticles in contact with cells and living organisms generate quite novel interactions at the interface between the nanoparticle surface and the surrounding biological environment. However, a detailed time resolved molecular level description of the evolving interactions as nanoparticles are internalized and trafficked within the cellular environment is still missing and will certainly be required for the emerging arena of nanoparticle-cell interactions to mature. In this paper promising methodologies to map out the time resolved nanoparticle-cell interactome for nanoparticle uptake are discussed. Thus silica coated magnetite nanoparticles are presented to cells and their magnetic properties used to isolate, in a time resolved manner, the organelles containing the nanoparticles. Characterization of the recovered fractions shows that different cell compartments are isolated at different times, in agreement with imaging results on nanoparticle intracellular location. Subsequently the internalized nanoparticles can be further isolated from the recovered organelles, allowing the study of the most tightly nanoparticle-bound biomolecules, analogous to the 'hard corona' that so far has mostly been characterized in extracellular environments. Preliminary data on the recovered nanoparticles suggest that significant portion of the original corona (derived from the serum in which particles are presented to the cells) is preserved as nanoparticles are trafficked through the cells.

  12. Interactions of Graphene Oxide with Model Cell Membranes: Probing Nanoparticle Attachment and Lipid Bilayer Disruption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitong; Chen, Kai Loon

    2015-11-10

    With the rapid growth in the application of graphene oxide (GO) in diverse fields, the toxicity of GO toward bacterial and mammalian cells has recently attracted extensive research attention. While several mechanisms have been proposed for the cytotoxicity of GO, the attachment of GO to cell membranes is expected to be the key initial process that precedes these mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the propensity for GO to attach to and disrupt model cell membranes using supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and supported vesicular layers (SVLs) that are composed of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). The deposition kinetics of GO on SLBs were determined using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and were observed to increase with increasing electrolyte (NaCl and CaCl2) concentrations, indicating that GO attachment to SLBs was controlled by electrostatic interactions. The GO deposition kinetics measured at elevated electrolyte concentrations were lower than mass-transfer-limited kinetics, likely due to the presence of hydration forces between GO and SLBs. Upon the attachment of GO to supported vesicles that were encapsulated with a fluorescent dye, dye leakage was detected, thus indicating that the lipid vesicles were disrupted. When the exposure of the SVL to the GO suspension was terminated, the leakage of dye decreased significantly, demonstrating that the pores on the lipid bilayers have a self-healing ability. PMID:26466194

  13. Prediction of Nanoparticle and Colloid Attachment on Unfavorable Mineral Surfaces Using Representative Discrete Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Trauscht, Jacob; Pazmino, Eddy; Johnson, William P

    2015-09-01

    Despite several decades of research there currently exists no mechanistic theory to predict colloid attachment in porous media under environmental conditions where colloid-collector repulsion exists (unfavorable conditions for attachment). It has long been inferred that nano- to microscale surface heterogeneity (herein called discrete heterogeneity) drives colloid attachment under unfavorable conditions. Incorporating discrete heterogeneity into colloid-collector interaction calculations in particle trajectory simulations predicts colloid attachment under unfavorable conditions. As yet, discrete heterogeneity cannot be independently measured by spectroscopic or other approaches in ways directly relevant to colloid-surface interaction. This, combined with the fact that a given discrete heterogeneity representation will interact differently with differently sized colloids as well as different ionic strengths for a given sized colloid, suggests a strategy to back out representative discrete heterogeneity by a comparison of simulations to experiments performed across a range of colloid size, solution IS, and fluid velocity. This has recently been performed for interaction of carboxylate-modified polystyrene latex (CML) microsphere attachment to soda lime glass at pH 6.7 with NaCl electrolyte. However, extension to other surfaces, pH values, and electrolytes is needed. For this reason, the attachment of CML (0.25, 1.1, and 2.0 μm diameters) from aqueous suspension onto a variety of unfavorable mineral surfaces (soda lime glass, muscovite, and albite) was examined for pH values of 6.7 and 8.0), fluid velocities (1.71 × 10(-3) and 5.94 × 10(-3) m s(-1)), IS (6.0 and 20 mM), and electrolytes (NaCl, CaSO4, and multivalent mixtures). The resulting representative heterogeneities (heterodomain size and surface coverage, where heterodomain refers to nano- to microscale attractive domains) yielded colloid attachment predictions that were compared to predictions from existing

  14. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; He, Quanguo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2008-10-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed.

  15. Size dependence of non-magnetic thickness in YIG nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyaifar, M.; Mohammadpour, H.; Dorafshani, M.; Hasanpour, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study is focused on particle size dependence of structural and magnetic properties in yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12) nanoparticles. A series of YIG samples with different particle size were produced by varying the annealing temperatures. The X-ray analysis revealed an inverse correlation between lattice parameter and the crystallite size. The normal distribution is used for fitting the particles size distribution which is extracted from scanning electron micrographs. Also, by using the results of vibrating sample magnetometer, the magnetic diameter was calculated based on Langevin model in order to investigate the variation of dead layer thickness. Furthermore, the observed line broadening in Mössbauer spectra confirmed the increase of non-magnetic thickness due to the reduction of particle size.

  16. Bench-to-bedside translation of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dhirender; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Kabanov, Alexander V; Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Gendelman, Howard E

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are a new and promising addition to the spectrum of biomedicines. Their promise revolves around the broad versatility and biocompatibility of the MNPs and their unique physicochemical properties. Guided by applied external magnetic fields, MNPs represent a cutting-edge tool designed to improve diagnosis and therapy of a broad range of inflammatory, infectious, genetic and degenerative diseases. Magnetic hyperthermia, targeted drug and gene delivery, cell tracking, protein bioseparation and tissue engineering are but a few applications being developed for MNPs. MNPs toxicities linked to shape, size and surface chemistry are real and must be addressed before clinical use is realized. This article presents both the promise and perils of this new nanotechnology, with an eye towards opportunity in translational medical science. PMID:24910878

  17. Evaluation of hyperthermia of magnetic nanoparticles by dehydrating DNA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lina; Liu, Jinming; Wu, Kai; Klein, Todd; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    A method based on the thermodynamic equilibrium reached between the hybridization and denaturation of double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) is opened up to evaluate the hyperthermia performance of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Two kinds of MNPs with different sizes and magnetic performance are chosen, and their temperature increments at the surface area under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are calculated and compared through the concentration variation of ds-DNA modified on the surface. The temperature difference between the surface area of MNPs and bulk solution is also investigated, which can reach as high as 57.8°C when AMF applied for 300 s. This method provides a direct path way of comparison hyperthermia ability of MNPs, and serves as a good reference to choose MNPs and decides the therapy parameters based on the unique drug response of individual patient. PMID:25427561

  18. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  19. Magnetic nanoparticle imaging using multiple electron paramagnetic resonance activation sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Coene, A. Dupré, L.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in several biomedical applications such as hyperthermia, drug targeting, and disease detection. To realize an effective working of these applications, the spatial distribution of the particles needs to be accurately known, in a non-invasive way. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a promising and sensitive measurement technique for recovering these distributions. In the conventional approach, EPR is applied with a homogeneous magnetic field. In this paper, we employ different heterogeneous magnetic fields that allow to stabilize the solution of the associated inverse problem and to obtain localized spatial information. A comparison is made between the two approaches and our novel adaptation shows an average increase in reconstruction quality by 5% and is 12 times more robust towards noise. Furthermore, our approach allows to speed up the EPR measurements while still obtaining reconstructions with an improved accuracy and noise robustness compared to homogeneous EPR.

  20. Theoretical predictions for spatially-focused heating of magnetic nanoparticles guided by magnetic particle imaging field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) transfer some of the field's energy to their surroundings in the form of heat, a property that has attracted significant attention for use in cancer treatment through hyperthermia and in developing magnetic drug carriers that can be actuated to release their cargo externally using magnetic fields. To date, most work in this field has focused on the use of AMFs that actuate heat release by nanoparticles over large regions, without the ability to select specific nanoparticle-loaded regions for heating while leaving other nanoparticle-loaded regions unaffected. In parallel, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a promising approach to image the distribution of magnetic nanoparticle tracers in vivo, with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The underlying principle in MPI is the application of a selection magnetic field gradient, which defines a small region of low bias field, superimposed with an AMF (of lower frequency and amplitude than those normally used to actuate heating by the nanoparticles) to obtain a signal which is proportional to the concentration of particles in the region of low bias field. Here we extend previous models for estimating the energy dissipation rates of magnetic nanoparticles in uniform AMFs to provide theoretical predictions of how the selection magnetic field gradient used in MPI can be used to selectively actuate heating by magnetic nanoparticles in the low bias field region of the selection magnetic field gradient. Theoretical predictions are given for the spatial decay in energy dissipation rate under magnetic field gradients representative of those that can be achieved with current MPI technology. These results underscore the potential of combining MPI and higher amplitude/frequency actuation AMFs to achieve selective magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) guided by MPI.

  1. Magnetization and Hysteresis of Dilute Magnetic-Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Balamurugan, B.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Real-structure imperfections in dilute magnetic oxides tend to create small concentrations of local magnetic moments that are coupled by fairly long-range exchange interactions, mediated by p-electrons. The robustness of these interactions is caused by the strong overlap of the p orbitals, as contrasted to the much weaker interatomic exchange involving iron-series 3d electrons. The net exchange between defect moments can be positive or negative, which gives rise to spin structures with very small net moments. Similarly, the moments exhibit magnetocrystalline anisotropy, reinforced by electron hopping to and from 3d states and generally undergoing some random-anuisotropy averaging. Since the coercivity scales as 2K1/M and M is small, this creates pronounced and -- in thin films -- strongly anisotropic hysteresis loops. In finite systems with N moments, both K1 and M are reduced by a factor of order N1/2 due to random anisotropy and moment compensation, respectively, so that that typical coercivities are comparable to bulk magnets. Thermal activation readily randomizes the net moment of small oxide particles, so that the moment is easier to measure in compacted or aggregated particle ensembles. This research is supported by DOE (BES).

  2. Thermal and magnetic properties of chitosan-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paula I P; Machado, Diana; Laia, César; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-09-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer widely used for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, wound healing, and tissue engineering. Chitosan can be used as coating for other types of materials such as iron oxide nanoparticles, improving its biocompatibility while extending its range of applications. In this work iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) produced by chemical precipitation and thermal decomposition and coated with chitosan with different molecular weights were studied. Basic characterization on bare and chitosan-Fe3O4 NPs was performed demonstrating that chitosan does not affect the crystallinity, chemical composition, and superparamagnetic properties of the Fe3O4 NPs, and also the incorporation of Fe3O4 NPs into chitosan nanoparticles increases the later hydrodynamic diameter without compromising its physical and chemical properties. The nano-composite was tested for magnetic hyperthermia by applying an alternating current magnetic field to the samples demonstrating that the heating ability of the Fe3O4 NPs was not significantly affected by chitosan.

  3. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using magnetic carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardarajan, V.; Gu, L.; Kanneganti, A.; Mohanty, S. K.; Koymen, A. R.

    2011-03-01

    Photothermal therapy offers a solution for the destruction of cancer cells without significant collateral damage to otherwise healthy cells. Several attempts are underway in using carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and nanotubes due to their excellent absorption properties in the near-infrared spectrum of biological window. However, minimizing the required number of injected nanoparticles, to ensure minimal cytotoxicity, is a major challenge. We report on the introduction of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) onto cancer cells, localizing them in a desired region by applying an external magnetic field and irradiating them with a near-infrared laser beam. The MCNPs were prepared in Benzene, using an electric plasma discharge, generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. The CNPs were made ferromagnetic by use of Fe-electrodes to dope the CNPs, as confirmed by magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy measurements showed the size distribution of these MCNPs to be in the range of 5-10 nm. For photothermal irradiation, a tunable continuous wave Ti: Sapphire laser beam was weakly focused on to the cell monolayer under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The response of different cell types to photothermal irradiation was investigated. Cell death in the presence of both MCNPs and laser beam was confirmed by morphological changes and propidium iodide fluorescence inclusion assay. The results of our study suggest that MCNP based photothermal therapy is a promising approach to remotely guide photothermal therapy.

  4. Enhanced Magnetic Properties in Antiferromagnetic-Core/Ferrimagnetic-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakaki, Marianna; Trohidou, Kalliopi N.; Nogués, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles are gaining increasing interest due to their foreseen applications. Inverse antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferrimagnetic(FiM) core/shell nanoparticles are particularly appealing since they may overcome some of the limitations of conventional FiM/AFM systems. However, virtually no simulations exist on this type of morphology. Here we present systematic Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations of the exchange bias properties of such nanoparticles. The coercivity, HC, and loop shift, Hex, present a non-monotonic dependence with the core diameter and the shell thickness, in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. Additionally, we demonstrate novel unconventional behavior in FiM/AFM particles. Namely, while HC and Hex decrease upon increasing FiM thickness for small AFM cores (as expected), they show the opposite trend for large cores. This presents a counterintuitive FiM size dependence for large AFM cores that is attributed to the competition between core and shell contributions, which expands over a wider range of core diameters leading to non-vanishing Hex even for very large cores. Moreover, the results also hint different possible ways to enhance the experimental performance of inverse core/shell nanoparticles for diverse applications. PMID:25872473

  5. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Huber, Dale L.

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  6. Investigation of magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles using temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemala, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, V. M.; Vaishnava, P. P.; Lawes, G.; Naik, R.

    2014-07-01

    Rate of heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a ferrofluid is affected by their magnetic properties, temperature, and viscosity of the carrier liquid. We have investigated temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in ferrofluids, consisting of dextran coated superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, subjected to external magnetic fields of various frequencies (188-375 kHz) and amplitudes (140-235 Oe). Transmission electron microscopy measurements show that the nanoparticles are polydispersed with a mean diameter of 13.8 ± 3.1 nm. The fitting of experimental dc magnetization data to a standard Langevin function incorporating particle size distribution yields a mean diameter of 10.6 ± 1.2 nm, and a reduced saturation magnetization (˜65 emu/g) compared to the bulk value of Fe3O4 (˜95 emu/g). This is due to the presence of a finite surface layer (˜1 nm thickness) of non-aligned spins surrounding the ferromagnetically aligned Fe3O4 core. We found the specific absorption rate, measured as power absorbed per gram of iron oxide nanoparticles, decreases monotonically with increasing temperature for all values of magnetic field and frequency. Using the size distribution of magnetic nanoparticles estimated from the magnetization measurements, we have fitted the specific absorption rate versus temperature data using a linear response theory and relaxation dissipation mechanisms to determine the value of magnetic anisotropy constant (28 ± 2 kJ/m3) of Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  7. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    PubMed

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  8. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Suman; Smith, Carol Anne; del Pino, Pablo; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Berry, Catherine C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation) blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake. PMID:24275948

  9. Permanent magnetism, magnetic anisotropy, and hysteresis of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Crespo, P; Litrán, R; Rojas, T C; Multigner, M; de la Fuente, J M; Sánchez-López, J C; García, M A; Hernando, A; Penadés, S; Fernández, A

    2004-08-20

    We report on the experimental observation of magnetic hysteresis up to room temperature in thiol-capped Au nanoparticles with 1.4 nm size. The coercive field ranges from 860 Oe at 5 K to 250 Oe at 300 K. It is estimated that the Au atoms exhibit a magnetic moment of mu=0.036mu(B). However, Au nanoparticles with similar size but stabilized by means of a surfactant, i.e., weak interaction between protective molecules and Au surface atoms, are diamagnetic, as bulk Au samples are. The apparent ferromagnetism is consequently associated with 5d localized holes generated through Au-S bonds. These holes give rise to localized magnetic moments that are frozen in due to the combination of the high spin-orbit coupling (1.5 eV) of gold and the symmetry reduction associated with two types of bonding: Au-Au and Au-S.

  10. Magnetic-nanoparticle-doped carbogenic nanocomposite: an effective magnetic resonance/fluorescence multimodal imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sachchidanand; Awasthi, Rishi; Tripathi, Deepak; Rai, Mohit K; Agarwal, Vikas; Agrawal, Vinita; Gajbhiye, Namdeo S; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2012-04-10

    A novel and facile approach is developed to synthesize a magnetic nanoparticle (iron oxide)-doped carbogenic nanocomposite (IO-CNC) for magnetic resonance (MR)/fluorescence imaging applications. IO-CNC is synthesized by thermal decomposition of organic precursors in the presence of Fe(3) O(4) nanoparticles with an average size of 6 nm. IO-CNC shows wavelength-tunable fluorescence properties with high quantum yield. Magnetic studies confirm the superparamagnetic nature of IO-CNC at room temperature. IO-CNC shows MR contrast behavior by affecting the proton relaxation phenomena. The measured longitudinal (r(1) ) and transverse (r(2) ) relaxivity values are 4.52 and 34.75 mM(-1) s(-1) , respectively. No apparent cytotoxicity is observed and the nanocomposite shows a biocompatible nature. In vivo MR studies show both T(1) and T(2) * contrast behavior of the nanocomposite. Fluorescence imaging indicates selective uptake of IO-CNC by macrophages in spleen.

  11. Magnetic Nanoparticles with High Specific Absorption Rate at Low Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Kekalo, K.; Baker, I.; Meyers, R.; Shyong, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a new type of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) for use in the hyperthermia treatment of tumors. These particles consist of 2–4 nm crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 gathered in 20–40 nm aggregates with a coating of carboxymethyl-dextran, producing a zetasize of 110–120 nm. Despite their very low saturation magnetization (1.5–6.5 emu/g), the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the nanoparticles is 22–200 W/g at applied alternating magnetic field (AMF) with strengths of 100–500 Oe at a frequency of 160 kHz. PMID:26884816

  12. Effects of inter- and intra-aggregate magnetic dipolar interactions on the magnetic heating efficiency of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, J G; Cabrera, D; Carrey, J; Valdivielso, T; Salas, G; Teran, F J

    2016-04-28

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found an increasing number of biomedical applications as sensing or trapping platforms and therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Most of these applications are based on their magnetic properties, which may vary depending on the nanoparticle aggregation state and/or concentration. In this work, we assess the effect of the inter- and intra-aggregate magnetic dipolar interactions on the heat dissipation power and AC hysteresis loops upon increasing the nanoparticle concentration and the hydrodynamic aggregate size. We observe different effects produced by inter- (long distance) and intra-aggregate (short distance) interactions, resulting in magnetizing and demagnetizing effects, respectively. Consequently, the heat dissipation power under alternating magnetic fields strongly reflects such different interacting phenomena. The intra-aggregate interaction results were successfully modeled by numerical simulations. A better understanding of magnetic dipolar interactions is mandatory for achieving a reliable magnetic hyperthermia response when nanoparticles are located into biological matrices.

  13. Effects of inter- and intra-aggregate magnetic dipolar interactions on the magnetic heating efficiency of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, J G; Cabrera, D; Carrey, J; Valdivielso, T; Salas, G; Teran, F J

    2016-04-28

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found an increasing number of biomedical applications as sensing or trapping platforms and therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Most of these applications are based on their magnetic properties, which may vary depending on the nanoparticle aggregation state and/or concentration. In this work, we assess the effect of the inter- and intra-aggregate magnetic dipolar interactions on the heat dissipation power and AC hysteresis loops upon increasing the nanoparticle concentration and the hydrodynamic aggregate size. We observe different effects produced by inter- (long distance) and intra-aggregate (short distance) interactions, resulting in magnetizing and demagnetizing effects, respectively. Consequently, the heat dissipation power under alternating magnetic fields strongly reflects such different interacting phenomena. The intra-aggregate interaction results were successfully modeled by numerical simulations. A better understanding of magnetic dipolar interactions is mandatory for achieving a reliable magnetic hyperthermia response when nanoparticles are located into biological matrices. PMID:27041536

  14. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward R.; Bryant, H. C.; Bergemann, Christian; Larson, Richard S.; Lovato, Debbie; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-04-01

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 10 5 cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy.

  15. Preparation and characterization of biofunctionalized chitosan/Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles for application in liver magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoli; Luo, Xiadan; Zhang, Qingqing; Zhu, Aiping; Ji, Lijun; Yan, Caifeng

    2015-08-01

    Biofunctionalized chitosan@Fe3O4 nanoparticles are synthesized by combining Fe3O4 and CS chemically modified with PEG and lactobionic acid in one step. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles are characterized by TEM, X-ray, DLS, zeta-potential and magnetic measurements. The in vitro and in vivo behaviors of the biofunctionalized nanoparticles, especially, the cytotoxicity, the protein resistance, metabolism and iron toxicity are assessed. The functional groups, PEG enable the nanoparticles more biocompatible and the lactobionic acid groups enable liver targeting. The potential applications of the nanoparticles in liver magnetic resonance imaging are confirmed. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles are suspension stability, non-cytotoxicity, non-tissue toxicity and sensitive in liver magnetic resonance imaging, representing potential tools for applications in the biomedical field.

  16. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics of cobalt nanoparticles and individual ferromagnetic dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-01

    The ultrafast magnetization dynamics of magnetic materials can be investigated using femtosecond laser pulses to perform femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr and Faraday measurements [1]. In this talk, we will focus on the magnetization dynamics of cobalt nanoparticles which are either ferromagnetic or super-paramagnetic at room temperature and on the dynamics of individual ferromagnetic dots. In the first case (Co nanoparticles), we will demonstrate that the magnetization dynamics preceding the fluctuations over the anisotropy energy barrier is coherent but exhibits a strongly damped precession [2]. These results, which have been obtained with a three dimensional analysis of the magnetization vector [3] will be discussed in the context of the N'eel-Brown models involving the gyromagnetic character of the magnetization. We will also examine the dynamics of self-organized supra-crystals of cobalt nanoparticles [4]. In the second case, we will present the ultrafast magnetization dynamics of individual ferromagnetic dots (CoPt3, Permalloy, Nickel) made either by e-beam lithography or induced optically on thin films deposited on sapphire and glass substrates. The technique employed is the magneto-optical pump probe imaging (MOPPI) which allows performing time resolved magneto-optical Kerr images with with spatial and temporal resolutions of 300 nm and 150 fs [5]. The study of the demagnetization of the dots for different laser intensities shows that it is possible to write and read ultrafast monodomains on thin films. [3pt] [1] E. Beaurepaire, J.-C. Merle, A. Daunois, J.-Y. Bigot Phys. Rev. Lett., 76, 4250 (1996) [0pt] [2] L.H.F. Andrade, A. Laraoui, M. Vomir, D. Muller, J.-P. Stoquert, C. Estournès, E. Beaurepaire, J.-Y. Bigot Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 127401 (2006). [0pt] [3] M. Vomir, L. H.F. Andrade, L. Guidoni, E. Beaurepaire, J.-Y. Bigot Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 237601 (2005). [0pt] [4] I. Lisiecki, V. Halt'e, C. Petit, M.-P. Pileni, J.-Y. Bigot Adv. Mater., 20, 4176 (2008

  17. Multi-functional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Othman, Shadi F.; Curtis, Evan T.; Gupta, Brij K.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a multi-layer approach for the synthesis of water-dispersible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and drug delivery applications. In this approach, iron oxide core nanoparticles were obtained by precipitation of iron salts in the presence of ammonia and provided β-cyclodextrin and pluronic polymer (F127) coatings. This formulation (F127250) was highly water dispersible which allowed encapsulation of the anti-cancer drug(s) in β-cyclodextrin and pluronic polymer for sustained drug release. The F127250 formulation has exhibited superior hyperthermia effects over time under alternating magnetic field compared to pure magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and β-cyclodextrin coated nanoparticles (CD200). Additionally, the improved MRI characteristics were also observed for the F127250 formulation in agar gel and in cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells (A12780CP) compared to MNP and CD200 formulations. Furthermore, the drug loaded formulation of F127250 exhibited many folds of imaging contrast properties. Due to the internalization capacity of the F127250 formulation, its curcumin loaded formulation (F127250-CUR) exhibited almost equivalent inhibition effects on A2780CP (ovarian), MDA-MB-231 (breast), and PC3 (prostate) cancer cells even though curcumin release was only 40%. The improved therapeutic effects were verified by examining molecular effects using Western blotting and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. F127250-CUR also exhibited haemocompatibility, suggesting a nanochemo-therapuetic agent for cancer therapy. PMID:21167595

  18. Visualization on the behavior of nanoparticles in magnetic fluids under the electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.-H.; Lee, J.-C.

    2013-02-01

    The dielectric breakdown characteristics of magnetic fluids can be influenced by the magnetic nanoparticles included because their properties should be affected by the applied electric field. Based on measuring the dielectric breakdown voltage of magnetic fluids, we found that it is higher than that of the pure transformer oil in the case of the specific volume concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles. It is known from a numerical simulation that the conductive nanoparticles might behavior as electron scavengers in the electrically stressed magnetic fluids and change fast electrons into slowly negative charged nanoparticles for the electrical breakdown. In this study, we focus on the motion of magnetic nanoparticles in the fluids under the electric field applied by the visualization using a microchannel and an optical microscope.

  19. [Preparation of core-shell magnetic nanoparticles and its application in separation and spectral detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Yao, Jian-lin; Guo, Qing-hua; Gu, Ren-ao

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles as well as core-shell magnetic nanocomposites are of great interest for researchers due to their potential applications in lots of areas. In the present review, the authors summarized several universal synthetic methods of nanocomposites and their specific properties. In the following, the authors focused on the applications of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in separation and spectral detection, along with the introduction of some work in the authors' lab. At last, the questions remaining in magnetic nanoparticles and the application perspectives of magnetic nanocomposites were discussed.

  20. NMR Relaxation in Systems with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Temperature Study

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Hejasee, Rola H.; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure and model NMR relaxation enhancement due to the presence of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles at different temperatures. Materials and Methods Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using FSE sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using chemical co-precipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Results Relaxivity (in s−1 mM−1 Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. T2 data was fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG coated particles than the uncoated ones. Conclusion The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. PMID:23720101

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles: a new tool for antibiotic delivery to sinonasal tissues. Results of preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Dobretsov, K; Stolyar, S; Lopatin, A

    2015-04-01

    Herein we examined the toxicity, penetration properties and ability of Fe2O3·nH2O magnetic nanoparticles extracted from silt of the Borovoye Lake (Krasnoyarsk, Russia) to bind an antibiotic. Experimental studies were carried out using magnetic nanoparticles alone and after antibiotic exposure in tissue samples from nasal mucosa, cartilage and bone (in vitro). Toxicity of particles was studied in laboratory animals (in vivo). Tissues removed at endonasal surgery (nasal mucosa, cartilage and bone of the nasal septum) were placed in solution containing nanoparticles and exposed to a magnetic field. Distribution of nanoparticles was determined by Perls' reaction. After intravenous injection, possible toxic effects of injected nanoparticles on the organs and tissues of rats were evaluated by histological examination. Binding between the nanoparticles and antibiotic (amoxicillin clavulanate) was studied using infrared spectroscopy. In 30 in vitro experiments, magnetisation of Fe2O3·nH2O nanoparticles resulted in their diffuse infiltration into the mucosa, cartilage and bone tissue of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Intravenous injection of 0.2 ml of magnetic nanoparticles into the rat's tail vein did not result in any changes in parenchymatous organs, and the nanoparticles were completely eliminated from the body within 24 hours. The interaction of nanoparticles with amoxicillin clavulanate was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. Positive results of experimental studies provide a basis for further clinical investigations of these magnetic nanoparticles and their use in otorhinolaryngology.

  2. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy Morais, J. P. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Silva, L. P.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Báo, S. N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall.

  3. Structural, optical, magnetic and photocatalytic properties of Co doped CuS diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreelekha, N.; Subramanyam, K.; Amaranatha Reddy, D.; Murali, G.; Ramu, S.; Rahul Varma, K.; Vijayalakshmi, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Pristine and Co doped covellite CuS nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous solution by facile chemical co-precipitation method with Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid (EDTA) as a stabilizing agent. EDAX measurements confirmed the presence of Co in the CuS host lattice. Hexagonal crystal structure of pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were authenticated by XRD patterns. TEM images indicated that sphere-shape of nanoparticles through a size ranging from 5 to 8 nm. The optical absorption edge moved to higher energies with increase in Co concentration as indicated by UV-vis spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed that bare CuS sample show sign of diamagnetic character where as in Co doped nanoparticles augmentation of room temperature ferromagnetism was observed with increasing doping precursor concentrations. Photocatalytic performance of the pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were assessed by evaluating the degradation rate of rhodamine B solution under sun light irradiation. The 5% Co doped CuS nanoparticles provide evidence for high-quality photocatalytic activity.

  4. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  5. Recent advances in magnetic nanoparticles with bulk-like properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NP) are an excellent example of nanostructured materials and exhibit fascinating properties with applications in high-density recording and biomedicine. Controlling the effects of the nanostructure and surface chemistry and magnetism at the monolayer level have become relevant issues. As the size is reduced below 100 nm, deviations from bulk behavior have been attributed to finite-size effects and changes in the magnetic ordering at the surface, thus giving rise to a significant decrease in the magnetization and increase in the magnetic anisotropy. The existence of a surface spin glass-like state due to magnetic frustration has been widely suggested in ferrimagnetic NP. However, in this talk, we will show that high crystal quality magnetite Fe3-xO4 NP of about a few nanometers in diameter and coated with different organic surfactants display bulk-like structural, magnetic and electronic properties. Magnetic measurements, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism and Monte Carlo simulations, evidenced that none of the usual particle-like behavior is observed in high quality NP of a few nm. Consequently, the magnetic and electronic disorder phenomena typically observed in those single-phase ferrimagnetic NP should not be considered as an intrinsic effect. We also performed a real-space characterization at the sub-nanometer scale, combining scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and electron magnetic chiral dichroism. For the first time, we found that the surface magnetization is as high as about 70% of that of the core. The comparison to density functional theory suggested the relevance of the strong surface bond between the Fe ions and the organic surfactant. All the foregoing demonstrates the key role of both the crystal quality and surface bond on the physical properties of ferrimagnetic NP and paves the way to the fabrication of the next generation of NP with

  6. Quantitative photoacoustics to measure single cell melanin production and nanoparticle attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Eshein, Adam; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Viator, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustics can be used as a label-free spectroscopic method of identifying pigmented proteins and characterizing their intracellular concentration over time in a single living cell. The authors use a microscopic laser irradiation system with a 5 ns, Q-switched laser focused onto single cells in order to collect photoacoustic responses of melanoma cells from the HS936 cell line and gold nanoparticle labeled breast cancer cells from the T47D cell line. The volume averaged intracellular concentration of melanin is found to range from 29-270 mM for single melanoma cells and the number of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is shown to range from 850-5900 AuNPs/cell. Additionally, the melanin production response to UV-A light stimulus is measured in four melanoma cells to find a mass production rate of 5.7 pg of melanin every 15 min.

  7. Quantitative photoacoustics to measure single cell melanin production and nanoparticle attachment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Eshein, Adam; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Viator, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustics can be used as a label-free spectroscopic method of identifying pigmented proteins and characterizing their intracellular concentration over time in a single living cell. The authors use a microscopic laser irradiation system with a 5 ns, Q-switched laser focused onto single cells in order to collect photoacoustic responses of melanoma cells from the HS936 cell line and gold nanoparticle labeled breast cancer cells from the T47D cell line. The volume averaged intracellular concentration of melanin is found to range from 29–270mM for single melanoma cells and the number of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is shown to range from 850–5900 AuNPs/cell. Additionally, the melanin production response to UV-A light stimulus is measured in four melanoma cells to find a mass production rate of 5.7 pg of melanin every 15 minutes. PMID:25803095

  8. Ultrafine metallic Fe nanoparticles: synthesis, structure and magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Margeat, Olivier; Lecante, Pierre; Chaudret, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Summary The results of the investigation of the structural and magnetic (static and dynamic) properties of an assembly of metallic Fe nanoparticles synthesized by an organometallic chemical method are described. These nanoparticles are embedded in a polymer, monodisperse, with a diameter below 2 nm, which corresponds to a number of around 200 atoms. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure and Mössbauer spectrum are characteristic of metallic Fe. The structural studies by wide angle X-ray scattering indicate an original polytetrahedral atomic arrangement similar to that of β-Mn, characterized by a short-range order. The average magnetic moment per Fe atom is raised to 2.59 µB (for comparison, bulk value of metallic Fe: 2.2 µB). Even if the spontaneous magnetization decreases rapidly as compared to bulk materials, it remains enhanced even up to room temperature. The gyromagnetic ratio measured by ferromagnetic resonance is of the same order as that of bulk Fe, which allows us to conclude that the orbital and spin contributions increase at the same rate. A large magnetic anisotropy for metallic Fe has been measured up to (3.7 ± 1.0)·105 J/m3. Precise analysis of the low temperature Mössbauer spectra, show a broad distribution of large hyperfine fields. The largest hyperfine fields display the largest isomer shifts. This indicates a progressive increase of the magnetic moment inside the particle from the core to the outer shell. The components corresponding to the large hyperfine fields with large isomer shifts are indeed characteristic of surface atoms. PMID:21977400

  9. Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a potential candidate to eliminate intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Xiuhong; Teng, Xiyao; Yan, Manqing; Bi, Hong

    2015-02-21

    Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs-HRP) have been synthesized by a NHS/EDC coupling between the amino groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the carboxyl groups on the MMSNs surface. It is found that the immobilized HRP on MMSNs still retain high activity and the MMSNs-HRP can eliminate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells induced by the addition of H2O2 aqueous solution. Further, the fluorescent MMSN-HRP-CD nanoparticles have been prepared by attaching biocompatible, fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) to MMSNs-HRP. We have also investigated the effect of an applied magnetic field on cellular uptake of MMSNs-HRP-CDs and found that the internalization of MMSNs-HRP-CDs by CHO cells could be enhanced within 2 hours under the magnetic field. This work provides us with a novel and efficient method to eliminate ROS in living cells by using HRP-immobilized nanoparticles. PMID:25587910

  10. Targeted Drug Delivery with Polymers and Magnetic Nanoparticles: Covalent and Noncovalent Approaches, Release Control, and Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Karel; Holá, Kateřina; Šubr, Vladimir; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Tuček, Jiří; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-05-11

    Targeted delivery combined with controlled drug release has a pivotal role in the future of personalized medicine. This review covers the principles, advantages, and drawbacks of passive and active targeting based on various polymer and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle carriers with drug attached by both covalent and noncovalent pathways. Attention is devoted to the tailored conjugation of targeting ligands (e.g., enzymes, antibodies, peptides) to drug carrier systems. Similarly, the approaches toward controlled drug release are discussed. Various polymer-drug conjugates based, for example, on polyethylene glycol (PEG), N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA), polymeric micelles, and nanoparticle carriers are explored with respect to absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME scheme) of administrated drug. Design and structure of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and condensed magnetic clusters are classified according to the mechanism of noncovalent drug loading involving hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, coordination chemistry, and encapsulation in porous materials. Principles of covalent conjugation of drugs with SPIONs including thermo- and pH-degradable bonds, amide linkage, redox-cleavable bonds, and enzymatically-cleavable bonds are also thoroughly described. Finally, results of clinical trials obtained with polymeric and magnetic carriers are analyzed highlighting the potential advantages and future directions in targeted anticancer therapy.

  11. Comparison of Two Approaches for the Attachment of a Drug to Gold Nanoparticles and Their Anticancer Activities.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingjie; Feng, Qishuai; Chen, Yifan; Shen, Yajing; Su, Qihang; Zhang, Yinglei; Zhou, Xiang; Cheng, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Drug attachment is important in drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy. The elucidation of the release mechanism and biological behavior of a drug is essential for the design of delivery systems. Here, we used a hydrazone bond or an amide bond to attach an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox), to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and compared the effects of the chemical bond on the anticancer activities of the resulting Dox-GNPs. The drug release efficiency, cytotoxicity, subcellular distribution, and cell apoptosis of hydrazone-linked HDox-GNPs and amide-linked SDox-GNPs were evaluated in several cancer cells. HDox-GNPs exhibited greater potency for drug delivery via triggered release comediated by acidic pH and glutathione (GSH) than SDox-GNPs triggered by GSH alone. Dox released from HDox-GNPs was released in lysosomes and exerted its drug activity by entering the nuclei. Dox from SDox-GNPs was mainly localized in lysosomes, significantly reducing its efficacy against cancer cells. In addition, in vivo studies in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that HDox-GNPs and SDox-GNPs both accumulate in tumor tissue. However, only HDox-GNPs enhanced inhibition of subcutaneous tumor growth. This study demonstrates that HDox-GNPs display significant advantages in drug release and antitumor efficacy. PMID:27518201

  12. Effects of core/shell structure on magnetic induction heating promotion in Fe3O4/γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Chi; Fu, Chao-Ming; Chang, Fu-Hsiung

    2013-10-01

    Fe3O4/γ-Fe2O3 core-shell magnetic nanoparticles have demonstrated superior heating efficiency by applying the alternating magnetic field. The magnetic induction heating properties of core-shell magnetic nanoparticles were analyzed by the rate-dependent hysteresis model, taken into account the magnetic anisotropies and actual size distribution of particles. The analyzed results have disclosed the significance of magnetic anisotropies and shell-thickness to the promotion of magnetic induction heating performance. Further experiments about the cancer cells with uptake of these core-shell magnetic nanoparticles conjugated biocompatible cationic liposomes have achieved in vitro intracellular magnetically induced hyperthermia under a weak alternating magnetic field.

  13. Nanovaccines for malaria using Plasmodium falciparum antigen Pfs25 attached gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Ray, Paresh C; Datta, Dibyadyuti; Bansal, Geetha P; Angov, Evelina; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-09-22

    Malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) targeting sexual stages of the parasite represent an ideal intervention to reduce the burden of the disease and eventual elimination at the population level in endemic regions. Immune responses against sexual stage antigens impair the development of parasite inside the mosquitoes. Target antigens identified in Plasmodium falciparum include surface proteins Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 in male and female gametocytes and Pfs25 expressed in zygotes and ookinetes. The latter has undergone extensive evaluation in pre-clinical and phase I clinical trials and remains one of the leading target antigens for the development of TBV. Pfs25 has a complex tertiary structure characterized by four EGF-like repeat motifs formed by 11 disulfide bonds, and it has been rather difficult to obtain Pfs25 as a homogenous product in native conformation in any heterologous expression system. Recently, we have reported expression of codon-harmonized recombinant Pfs25 in Escherichia coli (CHrPfs25) and which elicited highly potent malaria transmission-blocking antibodies in mice. In the current study, we investigated CHrPfs25 along with gold nanoparticles of different shapes, size and physicochemical properties as adjuvants for induction of transmission blocking immunity. The results revealed that CHrPfs25 delivered with various gold nanoparticles elicited strong transmission blocking antibodies and suggested that gold nanoparticles based formulations can be developed as nanovaccines to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccine antigens.

  14. Nanovaccines for Malaria Using Plasmodium falciparum Antigen Pfs25 Attached Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Ray, Paresh C.; Datta, Dibyadyuti; Bansal, Geetha P.; Angov, Evelina; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-01-01

    Malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) targeting sexual stages of the parasite represent an ideal intervention to reduce the burden of the disease and eventual elimination at the population level in endemic regions. Immune responses against sexual stage antigens impair the development of parasite inside the mosquitoes. Target antigens identified in Plasmodium falciparum include surface proteins Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 in male and female gametocytes and Pfs25 expressed in zygotes and ookinetes. The latter has undergone extensive evaluation in pre-clinical and phase I clinical trials and remains one of the leading target antigens for the development of TBV. Pfs25 has a complex tertiary structure characterized by four EGF-like repeat motifs formed by 11 disulfide bonds, and it has been rather difficult to obtain Pfs25 as a homogenous product in native conformation in any heterologous expression system. Recently, we have reported expression of codon-harmonized recombinant Pfs25 in E. coli (CHrPfs25) and which elicited highly potent malaria transmission-blocking antibodies in mice. In the current study, we investigated CHrPfs25 along with gold nanoparticles of different shapes, size and physicochemical properties as adjuvants for induction of transmission blocking immunity. The results revealed that CHrPfs25 delivered with various gold nanoparticles elicited strong transmission blocking antibodies and suggested that gold nanoparticles based formulations can be developed as nanovaccines to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccine antigens. PMID:26299750

  15. Magnetic phase diagram of superantiferromagnetic TbCu2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria-Bonet, C.; Rojas, D. P.; Espeso, J. I.; Rodríguez Fernández, J.; de la Fuente Rodríguez, M.; Fernández Barquín, L.; Rodríguez Fernández, L.; Gorria, P.; Blanco, J. A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Bauer, E.; Damay, F.

    2015-12-01

    The structural state and static and dynamic magnetic properties of TbCu2 nanoparticles are reported to be produced by mechanical milling under inert atmosphere. The randomly dispersed nanoparticles as detected by TEM retain the bulk symmetry with an orthorhombic Imma lattice and Tb and Cu in the 4e and 8h positions, respectively. Rietveld refinements confirm that the milling produces a controlled reduction of particle sizes reaching ≃6 nm and an increase of the microstrain up to ≃0.6%. The electrical resistivity indicates a metallic behavior and the presence of a magnetic contribution to the electronic scattering which decreases with milling times. The dc-susceptibility shows a reduction of the Néel transition (from 49 K to 43 K) and a progressive increase of a peak (from 9 K to 15 K) in the zero-field-cooled magnetization with size reduction. The exchange anisotropy is very weak (a bias field of ≃30 Oe) and is due to the presence of a disordered (thin) shell coupled to the antiferromagnetic core. The dynamic susceptibility evidences a critical slowing down in the spin-disordered state for the lowest temperature peak associated with a spin glass-like freezing with a tendency of zv and β exponents to increase when the size becomes 6 nm (zv≃ 6.6 and β ≃ 0.85 ). A Rietveld analysis of the neutron diffraction patterns 1.8≤slant T≤slant 60 K, including the magnetic structure determination, reveals that there is a reduction of the expected moment (≃80%), which must be connected to the presence of the disordered particle shell. The core magnetic structure retains the bulk antiferromagnetic arrangement. The overall interpretation is based on a superantiferromagnetic behavior which at low temperatures coexists with a canting of surface moments and a mismatch of the antiferromagnetic sublattices of the nanoparticles. We propose a novel magnetic phase diagram where changes are provoked by a combination of the decrease of size and the increase of

  16. Stabilisation effects of superparamagnetic nanoparticles on clustering in nanocomposite microparticles and on magnetic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, K.; Hutter, F.; Gellermann, C.; Sextl, G.

    2013-04-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of magnetite were coprecipitated from iron salts, dispersed with nitric acid and stabilised either by lactic acid (LA) or by a polycarboxylate-ether polymer (MELPERS4343, MP). The differently stabilised nanoparticles were incorporated into a silica matrix to form nanocomposite microparticles. The silica matrix was prepared either from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) or from an aqueous sodium silicate (water glass) solution. Stabilisation of nanoparticles had a crucial influence on microparticle texture and nanoparticle distribution in the silica matrix. Magnetic measurements in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations suggest a uniform magnetic interaction of nanoparticles in case of LA stabilisation and magnetically interacting nanoparticle clusters of different sizes in case of MP stabilisation. Splitting of blocking temperature (TB) and irreversible temperature (Tir) in zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) measurements is discussed in terms of nanoparticle clustering.

  17. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  18. Facile Method for the Site-Specific, Covalent Attachment of full-length IgG onto Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hui, James Zhe; Al Zaki, Ajlan; Cheng, Zhiliang; Popik, Vladimir; Zhang, Hongtao; Luning Prak, Eline T.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies, most commonly IgGs, have been widely used as targeting ligands in research and therapeutic applications due to their wide array of targets, high specificity and proven efficacy. Many of these applications require antibodies to be conjugated onto surfaces (e.g. nanoparticles and microplates); however, most conventional bioconjugation techniques exhibit low crosslinking efficiencies, reduced functionality due to non-site-specific labeling and random surface orientation, and/or require protein engineering (e.g. cysteine handles), which can be technically challenging. To overcome these limitations, we have recombinantly expressed Protein Z, which binds the Fc region of IgG, with an UV active non-natural amino acid benzoylphenyalanine (BPA) within its binding domain. Upon exposure to long wavelength UV light, the BPA is activated and forms a covalent link between the Protein Z and the bound Fc region of IgG. This technology was combined with expressed protein ligation (EPL), which allowed for the introduction of a fluorophore and click chemistry-compatible azide group onto the C-terminus of Protein Z during the recombinant protein purification step. This enabled crosslinked-Protein Z-IgG complexes to be efficiently and site-specifically attached to aza-dibenzycyclooctyne-modified nanoparticles, via copper-free click chemistry. PMID:24729432

  19. Structural origin for low-temperature relaxation features in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S. S.; Regmi, R.; Lawes, G.

    2013-08-01

    In addition to superparamagnetic relaxation associated with coherent spin reversal, magnetic nanoparticles often also exhibit additional relaxation features in the magnetic dissipation at low temperatures. Our studies show that the incorporation of boron, gadolinium and lanthanum into iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles substantially enhances these low-temperature magnetic relaxation properties. The structural and morphological studies of these nanoparticles were conducted using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The doped samples have retained the crystal structure of the parent Fe3O4 nanoparticles, although the shape and size of some of the nanoparticle samples have changed. Using ac magnetic susceptibility measurements, we parameterized the low-temperature magnetic features, with the amplitude of the associated magnetic relaxation showing a dramatic increase for certain dopants. The enhanced frequency-dependent magnetic relaxation features can be attributed to structural, rather than magnetic, defects in these doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These results strongly suggest that the low-temperature magnetic relaxation typically observed in magnetic nanoparticles is a single-particle effect produced by structural defects and is not significantly influenced by interparticle interactions.

  20. Synthesis of magnetic multicomponent nanoparticles CuxNi1-xFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingölbali, A.; Doğan, N.; Yeşil, Z.; Asiltürk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of great importance in many biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, hyperthermia, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement. To build the most effective magnetic nanoparticle systems for various biomedical applications, characteristics of particle, including size, surface chemistry, magnetic properties, and toxicity have to be fully investigated. In this work, the effects of some production methods of the magnetic nanoparticles for the bio-medical applications are discussed. In this study, multicomponents of CuxNi1-xFe2O4 nanoparticles (where x=0, 0.6, and 1) were prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis method. In addition, X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a vibrating scanning magnetometer (VSM) were used to characterize the structural, morphological and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. The particle sizes of the samples were measured by Malvern Instruments Zeta Sizer Nano-ZS instrument. The data were recorded under magnetic fields for different ratios of CuxNi1-xFe2O4 nanoparticles. The temperature dependence of field cooled (FC) magnetization of the CuxNi1-xFe2O4 samples has been shown in this work. Magnetizations change with decreasing the dopant value of Cu. The magnetic phase transition was observed for CuxNi1-xFe2O4 nanoparticles.

  1. Magnetic properties of hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadic, Marin; Panjan, Matjaz; Damnjanovic, Vesna; Milosevic, Irena

    2014-11-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles are successfully synthesized by using the hydrothermal synthesis method. An X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) of the sample shows formation of the nanocrystalline α-Fe2O3 phase. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements show spherical morphology of the hematite nanoparticles and narrow size distribution. An average hematite nanoparticle size is estimated to be about 8 nm by TEM and XRD. Magnetic properties were measured using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Investigation of the magnetic properties of hematite nanoparticles showed a divergence between field-cooled (FC) and zero-field-cooled (ZFC) magnetization curves below Tirr = 103 K (irreversibility temperature). The ZFC magnetization curve showed maximum at TB = 52 K (blocking temperature). The sample did not exhibit the Morin transition. The M(H) (magnetization versus magnetic field) dependence at 300 K showed properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). The M(H) data were successfully fitted by the Langevin function and magnetic moment μp = 657 μB and diameter d = 8.1 nm were determined. Furthermore, magnetic measurements showed high magnetization at room temperature (MS = 3.98 emu/g), which is desirable for application in spintronics and biomedicine. Core-shell structure of the nanoparticles was used to describe high magnetization of the hematite nanoparticles.

  2. Modulation of Magnetic Heating via Dipolar Magnetic Interactions in Monodisperse and Crystalline Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salas, Gorka; Camarero, Julio; Cabrera, David; Takacs, Hélène; Varela, María; Ludwig, Robert; Dähring, Heidi; Hilger, Ingrid; Miranda, Rodolfo; Morales, María del Puerto; et al

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report on the study of heat dissipation power in monodisperse and crystalline magnetite nanoparticles as function of particle and aggregate sizes, magnetic field frequencies (up to 435 kHz) and amplitudes (up to 50 mT), media viscosity and particle concentration. These nanoparticles display specific absorption rate values of few hundreds of WgFe-1 at moderate frequencies (~100 kHz), increasing up to 3632 WgFe-1 at more extreme field conditions (430 kHz and 40 mT) for the largest size. We have found that Néelian relaxation processes are dominant for all nanoparticle sizes, whereas Brownian contribution dominates only for the largest size (22more » nm) at high particle concentrations when dipolar interactions enhance the effective magnetic anisotropy. Besides, the particle concentration dependence of the specific absorption rate reflects the importance of magnetic dipolar interactions which strongly depend on aggregate and particle size. Our results show that dipolar interactions tune the effective magnetic anisotropy determining the Néelian and Brownian contributions into SAR values. The possibility of switching between heating mechanisms via dipolar interactions is of great importance towards controlling the heat exposure supplied by IONP as intracellular heating mediators.« less

  3. Modulation of Magnetic Heating via Dipolar Magnetic Interactions in Monodisperse and Crystalline Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, Gorka; Camarero, Julio; Cabrera, David; Takacs, Hélène; Varela, María; Ludwig, Robert; Dähring, Heidi; Hilger, Ingrid; Miranda, Rodolfo; Morales, María del Puerto; Teran, Francisco Jose

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report on the study of heat dissipation power in monodisperse and crystalline magnetite nanoparticles as function of particle and aggregate sizes, magnetic field frequencies (up to 435 kHz) and amplitudes (up to 50 mT), media viscosity and particle concentration. These nanoparticles display specific absorption rate values of few hundreds of WgFe-1 at moderate frequencies (~100 kHz), increasing up to 3632 WgFe-1 at more extreme field conditions (430 kHz and 40 mT) for the largest size. We have found that Néelian relaxation processes are dominant for all nanoparticle sizes, whereas Brownian contribution dominates only for the largest size (22 nm) at high particle concentrations when dipolar interactions enhance the effective magnetic anisotropy. Besides, the particle concentration dependence of the specific absorption rate reflects the importance of magnetic dipolar interactions which strongly depend on aggregate and particle size. Our results show that dipolar interactions tune the effective magnetic anisotropy determining the Néelian and Brownian contributions into SAR values. The possibility of switching between heating mechanisms via dipolar interactions is of great importance towards controlling the heat exposure supplied by IONP as intracellular heating mediators.

  4. Renal perfusion evaluation by alternating current biosusceptometry of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quini, Caio C.; Matos, Juliana F.; Próspero, André G.; Calabresi, Marcos Felipe F.; Zufelato, Nicholas; Bakuzis, Andris F.; Baffa, Oswaldo; Miranda, José Ricardo A.

    2015-04-01

    Alternating current susceptometry, a simple and affordable technique, was employed to study the sensitivity of this approach to assess rat kidney perfusion by the injection of 200 μL of magnetic nanoparticles with a concentration of 23 mg/mL in the femoral vein and the measurement of the signal above the kidney. The instrument was able to detect the signal and the transit time of the first and second pass were measured in five animals with average values of 13.6±4.3 s and 20.6±7.1 s.

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles: preparation, physical properties, and applications in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Finally, we have addressed some relevant findings on the importance of having well-defined synthetic strategies developed for the generation of MNPs, with a focus on particle formation mechanism and recent modifications made on the preparation of monodisperse samples of relatively large quantities not only with similar physical features, but also with similar crystallochemical characteristics. Then, different methodologies for the functionalization of the prepared MNPs together with the characterization techniques are explained. Theorical views on the magnetism of nanoparticles are considered. PMID:22348683

  6. Synthesis of high magnetization Fe and FeCo nanoparticles by high temperature chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kandapallil, B; Colborn, RE; Bonitatibus, PJ; Johnson, F

    2015-03-15

    Fe and FeCo ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the 5-10 nm size regimes featuring high magnetization were synthesized using a modified chemical reduction method. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were confirmed by XRD and TOM analysis. These small, monodisperse and phase pure nanoparticles exhibited magnetic saturation of 210 emu/g (Fe) and 220 emu/g (Fe+Co) for Fe and FeCo nanoparticles respectively. The magnetization was found to be dependent on the temperature at which the reducing agent was introduced. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

  7. Hydrophilic Monodisperse Magnetic Nanoparticles Protected by an Amphiphilic Alternating Copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Shtykova, Eleonora V.; Huang, Xinlei; Gao, Xinfeng; Dyke, Jason C.; Schmucker, Abrin L.; Dragnea, Bogdan; Remmes, Nicholas; Baxter, David V.; Stein, Barry; Konarev, Peter V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Bronstein, Lyudmila M.

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) with diameters of 16.1, 20.5, and 20.8 nm prepared from iron oleate precursors were coated with poly(maleic acid-alt-1-octadecene) (PMAcOD). The coating procedure exploited hydrophobic interactions of octadecene and oleic acid tails while hydrolysis of maleic anhydride moieties allowed the NP hydrophilicity. The PMAcOD nanostructure in water and the PMAcOD-coated NPs were studied using transmission electron microscopy, ζ-potential measurements, small-angle X-ray scattering, and fluorescence measurements. The combination of several techniques suggests that independently of the iron oxide core and oleic acid shell structures, PMAcOD encapsulates NPs, forming stable hydrophilic shells which withstand absorption of hydrophobic molecules, such as pyrene, without shell disintegration. Moreover, the PMAcOD molecules are predominantly attached to a single NP instead of self-assembling into the PMAcOD disklike nanostructures or attachment to several NPs. This leads to highly monodisperse aqueous samples with only a small fraction of NPs forming large aggregates due to cross-linking by the copolymer macromolecules. PMID:19194520

  8. Magnetic Carbon nanoparticles enabled efficient photothermal alteration of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Thomas, Patrick; Yu, Lingfeng; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    While cw near-infrared (NIR) laser beams have been finding widespread application in photothermal therapy of cancer and pulsed NIR laser microbeams are recently being used for optoporation of exogeneous impermeable materials into cells. Since, carbon nanomaterials are very good in photothermal conversion, we utilized carbon nanoparticles (CNP) doped with Fe, so that they can be localized in a defined area by two fold selectivity, (i) external magnetic field for retention of the CNP in targeted area and (ii) surface functionalization for binding the targeted cells. Here, we report efficient photothermal therapy as well as poration of cells using magnetic CNPs with very low power continuous wave laser beam. Localization of CNPs on cell membrane under application of magnetic field was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. At different power levels, cells could be damaged or microinjected with fluorescence protein-encoding plasmids or impermeable dyes. Monte Carlo simulation showed that the dose of NIR laser beam is sufficient to elicit response for magnetic CNP based photothermal treatment at significant depth. The results of our study suggest that magnetic CNP based photothermal alteration is a viable approach to remotely guide treatments offering high efficiency with significantly reduced cytotoxicity.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles as both imaging probes and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ho, Don; Sun, Shouheng

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been explored extensively as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or as heating agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) [1]. To achieve optimum operation conditions in MRI and MFH, these NPs should have well-controlled magnetic properties and biological functionalities. Although numerous efforts have been dedicated to the investigations on MNPs for biomedical applications [2-5], the NP optimizations for early diagnostics and efficient therapeutics are still far from reached. Recent efforts in NP syntheses have led to some promising MNP systems for sensitive MRI and efficient MFH applications. This review summarizes these advances in the synthesis of monodisperse MNPs as both contrast probes in MRI and as therapeutic agents via MFH. It will first introduce the nanomagnetism and elucidate the critical parameters to optimize the superparamagnetic NPs for MRI and ferromagnetic NPs for MFH. It will further outline the new chemistry developed for making monodisperse MNPs with controlled magnetic properties. The review will finally highlight the NP functionalization with biocompatible molecules and biological targeting agents for tumor diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20388109

  10. Functionalization of whole‐cell bacterial reporters with magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Özmen, Mustafa; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jian; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Li, Guanghe; Huang, Wei E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We developed a biocompatible and highly efficient approach for functionalization of bacterial cell wall with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Three Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 chromosomally based bioreporters, which were genetically engineered to express bioluminescence in response to salicylate, toluene/xylene and alkanes, were functionalized with 18 ± 3 nm iron oxide MNPs to acquire magnetic function. The efficiency of MNPs functionalization of Acinetobacter bioreporters was 99.96 ± 0.01%. The MNPs‐functionalized bioreporters (MFBs) can be remotely controlled and collected by an external magnetic field. The MFBs were all viable and functional as good as the native cells in terms of sensitivity, specificity and quantitative response. More importantly, we demonstrated that salicylate sensing MFBs can be applied to sediments and garden soils, and semi‐quantitatively detect salicylate in those samples by discriminably recovering MFBs with a permanent magnet. The magnetically functionalized cells are especially useful to complex environments in which the indigenous cells, particles and impurities may interfere with direct measurement of bioreporter cells and conventional filtration is not applicable to distinguish and harvest bioreporters. The approach described here provides a powerful tool to remotely control and selectively manipulate MNPs‐functionalized cells in water and soils. It would have a potential in the application of environmental microbiology, such as bioremediation enhancement and environment monitoring and assessment. PMID:21255376

  11. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  12. On the accessibility of surface-bound drugs on magnetic nanoparticles. Encapsulation of drugs loaded on modified dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide by β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Natesan; Yousuf, Sameena; Israel, Enoch V M V; Paulraj, Mosae Selvakumar; Dhanaraj, Premnath

    2016-05-01

    We report the loading of drugs on aminoethylaminodextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, their superparamagnetic behavior, loading of drugs on them, and the β-cyclodextrin-complex formation of the drugs on the surface of the nanoparticles. The magnetic behavior is studied using vibrating sample magnetometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to analyze the elemental composition of drug-loaded nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy shows ordered structures of drug-loaded nanoparticles. UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to study the binding of the surface-loaded drugs to β-cyclodextrin. All of the drugs form 1:1 host-guest complexes. The iodide ion quenching of fluorescence of free- and iron oxide-attached drugs are compared. The binding strengths of the iron oxide surface-loaded drugs-β-cyclodextrin binding are smaller than those of the free drugs. PMID:26895504

  13. Capture Efficiency of Biocompatible Magnetic Nanoparticles in Arterial Flow: A Computer Simulation for Magnetic Drug Targeting.

    PubMed

    Lunnoo, Thodsaphon; Puangmali, Theerapong

    2015-12-01

    The primary limitation of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) relates to the strength of an external magnetic field which decreases with increasing distance. Small nanoparticles (NPs) displaying superparamagnetic behaviour are also required in order to reduce embolization in the blood vessel. The small NPs, however, make it difficult to vector NPs and keep them in the desired location. The aims of this work were to investigate parameters influencing the capture efficiency of the drug carriers in mimicked arterial flow. In this work, we computationally modelled and evaluated capture efficiency in MDT with COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4. The studied parameters were (i) magnetic nanoparticle size, (ii) three classes of magnetic cores (Fe3O4, Fe2O3, and Fe), and (iii) the thickness of biocompatible coating materials (Au, SiO2, and PEG). It was found that the capture efficiency of small particles decreased with decreasing size and was less than 5 % for magnetic particles in the superparamagnetic regime. The thickness of non-magnetic coating materials did not significantly influence the capture efficiency of MDT. It was difficult to capture small drug carriers (D<200 nm) in the arterial flow. We suggest that the MDT with high-capture efficiency can be obtained in small vessels and low-blood velocities such as micro-capillary vessels. PMID:26515074

  14. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  15. Magnetic properties, water proton relaxivities, and in-vivo MR images of paramagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gang Ho; Chang, Yongmin

    2015-07-01

    In this mini review, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on lanthanideoxide (Ln2O3) nanoparticles are described. Ln2O3 (Ln = Gd, Dy, Ho, and Er) nanoparticles are paramagnetic, but show appreciable magnetic moments at room temperature and even at ultrasmall particle diameters. Among Ln2O3 nanoparticles, Gd2O3 nanoparticles show larger longitudinal water proton relaxivity (r1) values than Gd-chelates because of the large amount of Gd in the nanoparticle, and the other Ln2O3 nanoparticles (Ln = Dy, Ho, and Er) show appreciable transverse water proton relaxivity (r2) values. Therefore, Gd2O3 nanoparticles are potential T1 MRI contrast agents while the other Ln2O3 nanoparticles are potential T2 MRI contrast agents at high MR fields.

  16. Enhancing the magnetic anisotropy of maghemite nanoparticles via the surface coordination of molecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Yoann; Daffé, Niéli; Michel, Aude; Georgelin, Thomas; Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe; Arrio, Marie-Anne; Cartier-Dit-Moulin, Christophe; Sainctavit, Philippe; Fleury, Benoit; Dupuis, Vincent; Lisnard, Laurent; Fresnais, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles are promising objects for data storage or medical applications. In the smallest--and more attractive--systems, the properties are governed by the magnetic anisotropy. Here we report a molecule-based synthetic strategy to enhance this anisotropy in sub-10-nm nanoparticles. It consists of the fabrication of composite materials where anisotropic molecular complexes are coordinated to the surface of the nanoparticles. Reacting 5 nm γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with the [CoII(TPMA)Cl2] complex (TPMA: tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) leads to the desired composite materials and the characterization of the functionalized nanoparticles evidences the successful coordination--without nanoparticle aggregation and without complex dissociation--of the molecular complexes to the nanoparticles surface. Magnetic measurements indicate the significant enhancement of the anisotropy in the final objects. Indeed, the functionalized nanoparticles show a threefold increase of the blocking temperature and a coercive field increased by one order of magnitude.

  17. Enhanced magnetic resonance contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in a porous silicon nanoparticle host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, Joseph; Ananda, Shalini; Andrew, Jennifer; Grondek, Joel; Chien, Miao-Ping; Scandeng, Miriam; Gianneschi, Nathan; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sailor, Michael

    2013-02-01

    In this report, we prepared a porous Si nanoparticle with a pore morphology that facilitates the proximal loading and alignment of magnetite nanoparticles. We characterized the composite materials using superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and MRI. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the composite materials was tested using cell viability assays on human liver cancer cells and rat hepatocytes. An in vivo analysis using a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) Sprague Dawley rat model was used to determine the biodistribution properties of the material, while naïve Sprague Dawley rats were used to determine the pharmocokinetic properties of the nanomaterials. The composite material reported here demonstrates an injectable nanomaterial that exploits the dipolar coupling of superparamagnetic nanoparticles trapped within a secondary inorganic matrix to yield significantly enhanced MRI contrast. This preparation successfully avoids agglomeration issues that plague larger ferromagnetic systems. A Fe3O4:pSi composite formulation consisting of 25% by mass Fe3O4 yields an maximal T2* value of 556 mM Fe-1 s-1. No cellular (HepG2 or rat hepatocyte cells) or in vivo (rat) toxicity was observed with the formulation, which degrades and is eliminated after 4-8 h in vivo. The ability to tailor the magnetic properties of such materials may be useful for in vivo imaging, magnetic hyperthermia, or drug-delivery applications.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with different shells for biorecognition: high specific binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Tumturk, Hayrettin; Sahin, Ferat; Turan, Eylem

    2014-03-01

    Modifying the surfaces of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by the covalent attachment of biomolecules will enable their application as media for magnetically-assisted bioseparations. In this paper, we reported both the activity and specific binding capacity of ferritin antibodies on core-shell MNPs. The antibodies were covalently attached on silica-, silver- and polydopamine-coated MNPs by different methods. Anti-ferritin was bound onto the silica- or silver-coated MNPs by conventional methods using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA), which was followed by activation of carboxyl groups by EDC/NHS. However with anti-ferritin immobilized onto the Fe3O4 nanoparticles modified with polydopamine, an in situ coating formed through the adhesive proteins. In addition, a great deal of anti-ferritin biomolecules covalently attached onto the MNPs. According to our results, the amounts of bound anti-ferritin onto the silica-, silver- and PDA-coated MNPs were 70, 75 and 95 μg anti-ferritin per mg MNP, respectively. In the experiments, polydopamine (PDA)-coated MNPs showed faster adsorption, more significant selectivity and a larger binding capacity than the others. Also, the equilibrium dissociation constants of the antigen-antibody complexes were determined on the anti-ferritin-immobilized MNPs. Silica-, PDA- and silver-coated MNPs had Kd values of 5.45 × 10(-7), 2.12 × 10(-7) and 3.91 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), respectively. Based on these results, the affinity of the anti-ferritin for ferritin on the PDA-coated MNPs was approximately 10-fold higher than that on the silica- and silver-coated MNPs. In addition, among the anti-ferritin-immobilized silica-, silver- and PDA-coated MNPs, the PDA-coated MNPs showed the highest antigen selectivity values. As a result, anti-ferritin-immobilized PDA-coated MNPs represented a higher activity and stronger affinity for the specific antigen than the others. PMID:24409453

  19. Cancer Theranostics: The Rise of Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Adam J.; Yang, Victor C.; David, Allan E.

    2011-01-01

    Interest in utilizing magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) for biomedical applications has grown considerably over the past two decades. This excitement is driven in large part by the success of MNPs as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The recent investigative trend with respect to cancer has continued down a diagnostic path, but has also turned toward concurrent therapy – giving rise to the distinction of MNPs as potential “theranostics”. Here we review both the key technical principles of MNPs and the ongoing advancement toward a cancer theranostic MNP. Recent progress in diagnostics, hyperthermia treatments, and drug delivery are all considered. We conclude by identifying current barriers to clinical translation of MNPs and offer considerations for their future development. PMID:21489647

  20. Therapeutic approaches of magnetic nanoparticles for the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent one of the fastest growing areas of concern requiring urgent medical attention. Treatment of CNS ailments is hindered owing to different physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which limits the accessibility of potential drugs. With the assistance of a nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategy, the problems could be overcome. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have proven immensely useful as drug carriers for site-specific delivery and as contrast agents owing to their magnetic susceptibility and biocompatibility. By utilizing MNPs, diagnosis and treatment of CNS diseases have progressed by overcoming the hurdles of the BBB. In this review, the therapeutic aspect and the future prospects related to the theranostic approach of MNPs are discussed.

  1. Chemisorption of cyanogen chloride by spinel ferrite magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Glover, T Grant; DeCoste, Jared B; Sabo, Daniel; Zhang, Z John

    2013-05-01

    Spinel ferrite magnetic nanoparticles, MnFe2O4, NiFe2O4, and CoFe2O4, were synthesized and used as gas-phase adsorbents for the removal of cyanogen chloride from dry air. Fixed-bed adsorption breakthrough experiments show adsorption wave behavior at the leading edge of the breakthrough curve that is not typical of physically adsorbed species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results indicate that CK is reacting with the spinel ferrite surface and forming a carbamate species. The reaction is shown to be a function of the hydroxyl groups and adsorbed water on the surface of the particles as well as the metallic composition of the particles. The surface reaction decreases the remnant and saturation magnetism of the MnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 particles by approximately 25%.

  2. Diffusive and thermodiffusive transfer of magnetic nanoparticles in porous media.

    PubMed

    Sints, Viesturs; Blums, Elmars; Maiorov, Michail; Kronkalns, Gunars

    2015-05-01

    Experimental results on mass transfer within a thin porous layer saturated with ferrofluid are outlined in this paper. From the analysis of particle concentration distribution across the layer it is shown that both the mass diffusion and the Soret coefficients of nanoparticles are remarkably less than those measured in free fluid. The particle transport coefficient changes due to an external uniform magnetic field qualitatively well agree with the predictions of existing theoretical research. The magnetic field that is oriented transversely to the porous layer causes an increase in the diffusion coefficient and a decrease in the Soret coefficient whilst the longitudinal field causes a reduction of the mass diffusion and an intensification of the particle thermodiffusion. PMID:25957178

  3. Bioconjugated magnetic nanoparticles for the detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu W; Engebretson, David A; Carey, James R

    2013-12-01

    Blood culture is traditionally a time-consuming method and has not changed significantly in several decades. Using nanotechnology, such as the use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), the blood culture process may be streamlined. An important advantage of using MNPs to capture bacteria is the simple separation of bacteria from biological samples using magnets. Indeed, high bacteria capture efficiencies have been realized using MNPs. The binding events between MNPs and bacteria can be tightly controlled through carefully selected biorecognition events, using molecules such as vancomycin, daptomycin, antibodies, and others. These biomolecules can be readily conjugated onto MNPs followed by tethering to bacteria, thus enabling detection using the beacon produced by the bacteria conjugated MNPs. Methods to prepare bioconjugated MNPs and their performance with bacteria are reviewed. Finally, future directions on bacteria detection using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensors are discussed.

  4. First-principles computation of surface segregation in L10 CoPt magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we have employed the first-principles density functional theory (DFT) computational method to predict the influence of surface segregation on the magnetic properties of small L10 CoPt nanoparticles. For both the modelled cuboidal (with a chemical formula of Co26Pt12) and cuboctahedral (with a chemical formula of Co18Pt20) CoPt nanoparticles, the DFT calculations predict that Pt surface segregation should occur thermodynamically. Associated with this Pt surface segregation, the surface-segregated CoPt magnetic nanoparticles are predicted to have significantly reduced magnetic moments and magnetic anisotropy energies than those of the corresponding bulk-terminated (i.e. non-segregated) nanoparticles. Hence, our study suggests that surface segregation could deteriorate the magnetic properties of CoPt nanoparticles.

  5. Graphitic Surface Attachment by Single-Stranded DNA and Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Luke

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes are extreme mechanical and electronic materials which have been the subjects of intense study and development since their discoveries. While many of their intrinsic properties have been discovered, their interactions with other materials are only beginning to be explored. The noncovalent binding of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to carbon nanotubes and graphene has been seen to give rise to effective gas sensors. We examine similar systems to each of these in turn, imaging carbon nanotubes decorated with single-stranded DNA in Transmission Electron Microscope, and performing X-ray reflectivity of a single-stranded DNA film on graphite. The TEM study shows that the DNA bunches up along tubes but does not tend to clump on single tubes. Helical wrapping is not seen on single tubes. X-ray reflectivity shows that DNA on a graphite surface forms an inhomogeneous layer around 1.6 nm thick. The differences between the various thicknesses of few-layer graphene are substantial though often underappreciated. These differences are highlighted in the system of several-nanometer metal particles on few-layer graphene flakes. We formed such particles by evaporation and annealing, then examined them in Scanning Electron Microscope. We found that gold nanoparticles were circular and experienced limited growth, with the radius varying as the number of layers to the 1/3 power. A theoretical explanation is given for this observation, based on an electrostatic interaction. This theory is also consistent with observations for titanium and silver nanoparticles. Ytterbium nanoparticles on graphene form instead into filaments. A related theory is presented showing that the same electrostatic interaction is capable of overcoming surface tension to deform particles from circularity.

  6. Influence of static magnetic field strength on the temperature resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of dc magnetic field strength on the resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) thermometer, which employs the fundamental f0 and 2f0 harmonics of the MNP magnetization induced by ac and superimposed dc magnetic fields. In ac and parallel dc magnetic fields, the strength of dc magnetic field modulates the harmonics of the MNP magnetization, which affects their temperature sensitivities and measurement signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A temperature-adjustable fluxgate-based magnetic particle spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of the MNP magnetization at different temperatures. To determine the temperature, the amplitudes of the measured f0 and 2f0 harmonics were modeled based on the static Langevin function. AC susceptibility measurements on a MNP sample demonstrate the applicability of the static Langevin function for the description of the MNP magnetization spectra at a low frequency ac magnetic field without taking into account the MNP dynamics. Our simulations and experiments show that with increasing dc magnetic field from 0.2 mT to 2.0 mT, both the amplitude of the 2f0 harmonic and the temperature sensitivity of the amplitude ratio of the 2f0 to f0 harmonics increase by a factor of about 10 in an ac magnetic field with a frequency of 70 Hz and an amplitude of 1 mT. Concomitantly, the SNR of the 2f0 harmonic significantly increases by about 20 dB. Consequently, the temperature resolution of the MNP thermometer is improved from 1.97 K to 0.26 K.

  7. Magnetic Pickering emulsions stabilized by Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Qiao, Xiuying; Binks, Bernard P; Sun, Kang; Bai, Mingwen; Li, Yunlong; Liu, Yi

    2011-04-01

    Superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles prepared by a classical coprecipitation method were used as the stabilizer to prepare magnetic Pickering emulsions, and the effects of particle concentration, oil/water volume ratio, and oil polarity on the type, stability, composition, and morphology of these functional emulsions were investigated. The three-phase contact angle (θ(ow)) of the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles at the oil-water interface was evaluated using the Washburn method, and the results showed that for nonpolar and weakly polar oils of dodecane and silicone, θ(ow) is close to 90°, whereas for strongly polar oils of butyl butyrate and 1-decanol, θ(ow) is far below 90°. Inherently hydrophilic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles can be used to prepare stable dodecane-water and silicone-water emulsions, but they cannot stabilize butyl butyrate-water and decanol-water mixtures with macroscopic phase separation occurring, which is in good agreement with the contact angle data. Emulsions are of the oil-in-water type for both dodecane and silicone oil, and the average droplet size increases with an increase in the oil volume fraction. For stable emulsions, not all of the particles are adsorbed to drop interfaces; the fraction adsorbed decreases with an increase in the initial oil volume fraction. Changes in the particle concentration have no obvious influence on the stability of these emulsions, even though the droplet size decreases with concentration.

  8. Direct dyes removal using modified magnetic ferrite nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic adsorbent nanoparticle was modified using cationic surface active agent. Zinc ferrite nanoparticle and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide were used as an adsorbent and a surface active agent, respectively. Dye removal ability of the surface modified nanoparticle as an adsorbent was investigated. Direct Green 6 (DG6), Direct Red 31 (DR31) and Direct Red 23 (DR23) were used. The characteristics of the adsorbent were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration and salt was evaluated. In ternary system, dye removal of the adsorbent at 90, 120, 150 and 200 mg/L dye concentration was 63, 45, 30 and 23% for DR23, 97, 90, 78 and 45% for DR31 and 51, 48, 42 and 37% for DG6, respectively. It was found that dye adsorption onto the adsorbent followed Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption kinetic of dyes was found to conform to pseudo-second order kinetics. PMID:24991427

  9. Preparation and optimization of chitosan nanoparticles and magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as delivery systems using Box-Behnken statistical design.

    PubMed

    Elmizadeh, Hamideh; Khanmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Ghasemi, Keyvan; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Garmarudi, Amir Bagheri

    2013-06-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles and magnetic chitosan nanoparticles can be applied as delivery systems for the anti-Alzheimer drug tacrine. Investigation was carried out to elucidate the influence of process parameters on the mean particle size of chitosan nanoparticles produced by spontaneous emulsification. The method was optimized using design of experiments (DOE) by employing a 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken statistical design. This statistical design is used in order to achieve the minimum size and suitable morphology of nanoparticles. Also, magnetic chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized according to optimal method. The designed nanoparticles have average particle size from 33.64 to 74.87nm, which were determined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Drug loading in the nanoparticles as drug delivery systems has been done according to the presented optimal method and appropriate capacity of drug loading was shown by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. Chitosan and magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as drug delivery systems were characterized by Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Mid Infrared spectroscopy (DR-FTMIR).

  10. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetic nanoplatforms as drug carriers

    PubMed Central

    Wahajuddin; Arora, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    A targeted drug delivery system is the need of the hour. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as novel drug delivery vehicles. SPIONs are small synthetic γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) or Fe3O4 (magnetite) particles with a core ranging between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter. These magnetic particles are coated with certain biocompatible polymers, such as dextran or polyethylene glycol, which provide chemical handles for the conjugation of therapeutic agents and also improve their blood distribution profile. The current research on SPIONs is opening up wide horizons for their use as diagnostic agents in magnetic resonance imaging as well as for drug delivery vehicles. Delivery of anticancer drugs by coupling with functionalized SPIONs to their targeted site is one of the most pursued areas of research in the development of cancer treatment strategies. SPIONs have also demonstrated their efficiency as nonviral gene vectors that facilitate the introduction of plasmids into the nucleus at rates multifold those of routinely available standard technologies. SPION-induced hyperthermia has also been utilized for localized killing of cancerous cells. Despite their potential biomedical application, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and altered cellular responses are some SPION-related toxicological aspects which require due consideration. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of SPIONs with regard to their method of preparation, their utility as drug delivery vehicles, and some concerns which need to be resolved before they can be moved from bench top to bedside. PMID:22848170

  11. Investigation of nanoparticle distribution formed by the rotation of the magnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Andrej; Kozireva, Svetlana; Avotiņa, Dace; Chernobayeva, Lidija; Baryshev, Mikhail

    2014-11-01

    An even dispersion of nanoparticles onto a cell monolayer may open up new options for the gene transfer into cells and this could be a valuable achievement in the field of nanotechnology based drug delivery. Here we report on our evaluation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) patterning formed by magnetic arrays with unipolar NdFeB magnet arrangements and describe a rotating magnetic array as well as underlying mechanisms of the nanoparticle pattern formation. SPION pattern derived from static magnetic array represents line-like pattern, while the pattern formed by orbital magnetic array is homogenously distributed nanoparticles. Our results show that the SPION sedimentation under the time-phase varying action of magnetic field occurs with horizontal motion of nanoparticles and forms a homogenous distribution of them on the target. In the process, the amplitude of nanoparticle displacement reaches up to 0.5 μm at the magnet boundary, at the greatest linear speed tested of 60 mm/s (magnetic field gradient: 50 T/m). Application of the orbital magnetic array increases the probability of nanoparticle-cell interactions and enhances the efficiency of the gene delivery.

  12. Hybrid nanoparticle architecture for cellular uptake and bioimaging: direct crystallization of a polymer immobilized with magnetic nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2012-09-01

    We describe here the success of an innovative approach of direct immobilization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) onto carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The approach involved functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles and consequent covalent linkage to a copolymer (PE-b-PEG). Next, the immobilized magnetic nanoparticles on the copolymer were directly crystallized on the long axis of CNTs, where the interfacial adhesion comes from electrostatic and van der Waals interaction. The intracellular trafficking of a hybrid nanoparticle system [(PE-b-PEG)-MNP-CNT-FITC] in HeLa cells was monitored using a fluorescent marker, FITC, conjugated to the nanoparticle system. The distribution of the nanoparticle system inside cells was studied by fluorescence microscopy in a time and dose dependent manner, and it was observed that the nanoparticles are located in the cytoplasm and no apparent cell death was observed at the concentration studied. Also, the effect of an externally applied magnetic field on actin cytoskeleton, cell morphology and intracellular uptake of iron was studied. The approach described here is promising for simultaneous imaging and monitoring intracellular uptake.

  13. Hybrid nanoparticle architecture for cellular uptake and bioimaging: direct crystallization of a polymer immobilized with magnetic nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Depan, D; Misra, R D K

    2012-10-21

    We describe here the success of an innovative approach of direct immobilization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) onto carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The approach involved functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles and consequent covalent linkage to a copolymer (PE-b-PEG). Next, the immobilized magnetic nanoparticles on the copolymer were directly crystallized on the long axis of CNTs, where the interfacial adhesion comes from electrostatic and van der Waals interaction. The intracellular trafficking of a hybrid nanoparticle system [(PE-b-PEG)-MNP-CNT-FITC] in HeLa cells was monitored using a fluorescent marker, FITC, conjugated to the nanoparticle system. The distribution of the nanoparticle system inside cells was studied by fluorescence microscopy in a time and dose dependent manner, and it was observed that the nanoparticles are located in the cytoplasm and no apparent cell death was observed at the concentration studied. Also, the effect of an externally applied magnetic field on actin cytoskeleton, cell morphology and intracellular uptake of iron was studied. The approach described here is promising for simultaneous imaging and monitoring intracellular uptake.

  14. Electrostatic complexation of polyelectrolyte and magnetic nanoparticles: from wild clustering to controllable magnetic wires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present the electrostatic complexation between polyelectrolytes and charged nanoparticles. The nanoparticles in solution are γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) spheres with 8.3 nm diameter and anionic surface charges. The complexation was monitored using three different formulation pathways such as direct mixing, dilution, and dialysis. In the first process, the hybrids were obtained by mixing stock solutions of polymers and nanoparticles. A ‘destabilization state’ with sharp and intense maximum aggregation was found at charges stoichiometry (isoelectric point). While on the two sides of the isoelectric point, ‘long-lived stable clusters state’ (arrested states) were observed. Dilution and dialysis processes were based on controlled desalting kinetics according to methods developed in molecular biology. Under an external magnetic field (B = 0.3 T), from dialysis at isoelectric point and at arrested states, cationic polyelectrolytes can ‘paste’ these magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) together to yield irregular aggregates (size of 100 μm) and regular rod-like aggregates, respectively. These straight magnetic wires were fabricated with diameters around 200 nm and lengths comprised between 1 μm and 0.5 mm. The wires can have either positive or negative charges on their surface. After analyzing their orientational behavior under an external rotating field, we also showed that the wires made from different polyelectrolytes have the same magnetic property. The recipe used a wide range of polyelectrolytes thereby enhancing the versatility and applied potentialities of the method. This simple and general approach presents significant perspective for the fabrication of hybrid functional materials. PMID:24910569

  15. Current investigations into magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wei, Jianrong; Aifantis, Katerina E; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2016-05-01

    It is generally recognized that nanoparticles possess unique physicochemical properties that are largely different from those of conventional materials, specifically the electromagnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). These properties have attracted many researchers to launch investigations into their potential biomedical applications, which have been reviewed in this article. First, common types of MNPs were briefly introduced. Then, the biomedical applications of MNPs were reviewed in seven parts: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cancer therapy, the delivery of drugs and genes, bone and dental repair, tissue engineering, biosensors, and in other aspects, which indicated that MNPs possess great potentials for many kinds of biomedical applications due to their unique properties. Although lots of achievements have been obtained, there is still a lot of work to do. New synthesis techniques and methods are still needed to develop the MNPs with satisfactory biocompatibility. More effective methods need to be exploited to prepare MNPs-based composites with fine microstructures and high biomedical performances. Other promising research points include the development of more appropriate techniques of experiments both in vitro and in vivo to detect and analyze the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of MNPs and understand the possible influencing mechanism of the two properties. More comprehensive investigations into the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of composites containing MNPs with "core-shell" structure and deeper understanding and further study into the properties of MNPs to reveal their new biomedical applications, are also described in the conclusion and perspectives part.

  16. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gómez, P.; Muñoz, J. M.; Valente, M. A.; Torres, C.; de Francisco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer's formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  17. Synthesis and magnetic properties of gold coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Susmita; Morales, Marienette; Mukherjee, Pritish; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2009-04-01

    We report on synthesis, structural, and magnetic properties of chemically synthesized iron oxide (Fe3O4) and Fe3O4@Au core-shell nanoparticles. Structural characterization was done using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, and the magnetite phase of the core (˜6nm) and fcc Au shell (thickness of ˜1nm) were confirmed. Magnetization (M) versus temperature (T) data at H =200Oe for zero-field-cooled and field-cooled modes exhibited a superparamagnetic blocking temperature TB˜35K (40K) for parent (core-shell) system. Enhanced coercivity (Hc˜200Oe) at 5K along with nonsaturating M-H loops observed for Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles indicate the possible role of spin disorder at the Au -Fe3O4 interface and weak exchange coupling between surface and core spins. Analysis of ac susceptibility (χ' and χ″) data shows that the interparticle interaction is reduced upon Au coating and the relaxation mechanism follows the Vogel-Fulcher law.

  18. Nonlinear magnetization relaxation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in superimposed ac and dc magnetic bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Serguey V.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; El Mrabti, Halim; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear ac response of the magnetization M(t) of a uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic nanoparticle subjected to both ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths and orientations is determined by averaging Gilbert’s equation augmented by a random field with Gaussian white-noise properties in order to calculate exactly the relevant statistical averages. It is shown that the magnetization dynamics of the uniaxial particle driven by a strong ac field applied at an angle to the easy axis of the particle (so that the axial symmetry is broken) alters drastically leading to different nonlinear effects due to coupling of the thermally activated magnetization reversal mode with the precessional modes of M(t) via the driving ac field.

  19. Investigation of Switching Fields of Magnetic Nanoparticles With Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, S.; Grutter, P.; Zhu, X.; Beauvais, J.; Beerens, J.

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic quantum cellular automata (MQCA) has been proposed as an alternate paradigm for computing. This requires a thorough understanding of switching behavior of magnetic nanoparticles. Both experimental [1] and theoretical [2] investigations into MQCA rely on particle shape anisotropies as an intrinsic part of their architectures for input or control structures, while requiring other elements to be strictly uniform so that their switching behavior is consistent. We have patterned elliptical particles with and without characteristic edge flaws using electron beam lithography. Magnetic force microscopy with an in-situ magnetic field was then performed to produce an ensemble hysteresis loop. Particles with atypical switching fields were identified and further examined in a scanning electron microscope to search for any edge defects or characteristic edge roughness which could account for their atypical switching behavior. [1] R. Cowburn et al, Science 287, 1466 (2000) [2] G. Csaba et al, Int. J. Circ. Theor. Appl. 31, 67 (2003)

  20. Influence of the morphology of ferrite nanoparticles on the directed assembly into magnetically anisotropic hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Lisjak, Darja; Jenuš, Petra; Mertelj, Alenka

    2014-06-10

    The effect of the morphology of ferrite nanoparticles on their assembly in a magnetic field was studied. Thin BaFe12O19 nanoplatelets were compared with isotropic, spherical or octahedral, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, all of which were synthesized hydrothermally. The nanoplatelets and nanoparticles assembled into a variety of hierarchical structures from stable suspensions during the "drop deposition" and drying in a magnetic field. The alignment of the nanoparticles in the magnetic field was observed in situ with an optical microscope. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and the subsequent assemblies were observed with transmission and scanning electron microscopes, respectively. The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and the assemblies were measured with a vibrating-sample magnetometer. The BaFe12O19 nanoplatelets aligned in the plane of the substrate and formed several-micrometers-thick, ordered films with a magnetic alignment of approximately 90%. The CoFe2O4 nanoparticles assembled into thick, dense columns with a height of several hundreds of micrometers and showed a magnetic alignment of up to 60%. The differences in the morphologies and the magnetic alignments between the BaFe12O19 and CoFe2O4 hierarchical structures could be explained in terms of the differences in the shape and magnetocrystalline structure of the specific nanoparticles. PMID:24841592

  1. Relaxation of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in ultra-low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. C.; Chiu, L. L.; Liao, S. H.; Chen, H. H.; Horng, H. E.; Liu, C. W.; Liu, C. I.; Chen, K. L.; Chen, M. J.; Wang, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the spin-spin relaxation rate, 1/T2, and spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, of protons' spins induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids are investigated using a high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device-detected magnetometer in ultra-low fields. The biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles are the anti-human C-reactive protein (antiCRP) coated onto dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxides Fe3O4, which is labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. The ferrofluids are dextran-coated iron oxides. It was found that both 1/T2 and 1/T1 of protons in Fe3O4-antiCRP are enhanced by the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. Additionally, both the 1/T1 and 1/T2 of Fe3O4-antiCRP are close to that of ferrofluids, which are dextran-coated Fe3O4 dispersed in phosphate buffer saline. Characterizing the relaxation of Fe3O4-antiCRP can be useful for biomedical applications.

  2. In situ measurements of magnetic nanoparticles after placenta perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Robert; Gläser, Marcus; Göhner, Claudia; Seyfarth, Lydia; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Hofmann, Andreas; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) present promising tools for medical applications. However, the investigation of their spatial and temporal distribution is hampered by missing in-situ particle detection and quantification technologies. The placenta perfusion experiment represents an interesting model for the study of the particle distribution at a biological barrier. It allows the ex-vivo investigation of the permeability of the placenta for materials of interest. We introduce an approach based on a magnetic system for an in situ measurement of the concentration of magnetic NPs in such an experiment. A previously off-line utilized magnetic readout device (sensitivity of ≈10-8 Am2) was used for long term measurements of magnetic NP of 100-150 nm size range in a closed circuit of a placenta perfusion. It represents a semiquantitative approach. The behavior of particles in the placenta and in the measurement system was studied, as well as the influence of particle surface modifications. The results suggest a transfer of a low amount of particles from the maternal to the fetal blood circuit.

  3. Dynamic response of magnetic nanoparticles arranged in a tubular shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiale, J.; Sánchez, R. D.; Ramos, C. A.; Leyva, A. G.; Butera, A.

    We have developed a model that describes the ferromagnetic resonance spectra recently observed in nanotubes formed by assembled La 0.67Sr 0.33MnO 3 manganite nanoparticles. The resonance line shape in these tubes resembles that of a system of randomly oriented flat particles instead of what is usually seen in elongated samples. In order to explain the experimental data we have assumed that each individual grain (or small group of grains) has an easy plane effective anisotropy which could be partially aligned in a cylindrical symmetry. The magnetization of each grain is also distributed around a mean value, and hence the magnitude of the anisotropy varies from grain to grain. Within this framework we have been able to fit reasonably well the resonance field and the overall line shape of nanotubes that were deposited on a glass substrate and were aligned in a magnetic field. From the simulations we have deduced an average effective magnetization M=180 emu/cm3 with a distribution width of 140 emu/cm3. This value of magnetization is smaller than that of bulk LaSr manganites at room temperature, probably due to the granular nature of the tubes.

  4. Two-component magnetic structure of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Klem, Michael T.; Russek, Stephen E.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Goldfarb, Ron B.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetometry was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within Listeria innocua protein cage. The electron magnetic resonance spectrum shows the presence of at least two magnetization components. The magnetization curves are explained by a sum of two Langevin functions in which each filled protein cage contains both a large magnetic iron oxide core plus an amorphous surface consisting of small noncoupled iron oxide spin clusters. This model qualitatively explains the observed decrease in the temperature dependent saturation moment and removes an unrealistic temperature dependent increase in the particle moment often observed in nanoparticle magnetization measurements.

  5. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, C; Joseph, B; Orpe, P B; Saini, N L; Mukherjee, S; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K; Stanek, J; Di Gioacchino, D; Marcelli, A

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications. PMID:27668803

  6. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, C; Joseph, B; Orpe, P B; Saini, N L; Mukherjee, S; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K; Stanek, J; Di Gioacchino, D; Marcelli, A

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  7. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Joseph, B.; Orpe, PB; Saini, NL; Mukherjee, S.; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K.; Stanek, J.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Marcelli, A.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  8. Triggering the apoptosis of targeted human renal cancer cells by the vibration of anisotropic magnetic particles attached to the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Leulmi, Selma; Chauchet, Xavier; Morcrette, Melissa; Ortiz, Guillermo; Joisten, Hélène; Sabon, Philippe; Livache, Thierry; Hou, Yanxia; Carrière, Marie; Lequien, Stéphane; Dieny, Bernard

    2015-10-14

    Cancer cells develop resistance to chemotherapy, and the side effects encountered seriously limit the effectiveness of treatments. For these reasons, the search for alternative therapies that target cancer cells without affecting healthy tissues is currently one of the most active areas of research on cancer. The present study focuses on a recently proposed approach for cancer cell destruction based on the targeted triggering of cancer cell spontaneous death through the mechanical vibration of anisotropic magnetic micro/nanoparticles attached to the cell membranes at low frequencies (∼20 Hz) and in weak magnetic fields (∼30 mT). The study was conducted in vitro, on human renal cancer cells with superparamagnetic-like particles. Three types of such particles made of NiFe or magnetite were prepared and characterized (either synthetic antiferromagnetic, vortex or polycrystalline with random grain anisotropy). The triggering of the apoptosis of these cancer cells was demonstrated with NiFe vortex particles and statistically characterized by flow-cytometry studies. The death pathway via apoptosis and not necrosis was identified by the clear observation of caspase activation.

  9. Triggering the apoptosis of targeted human renal cancer cells by the vibration of anisotropic magnetic particles attached to the cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leulmi, Selma; Chauchet, Xavier; Morcrette, Melissa; Ortiz, Guillermo; Joisten, Hélène; Sabon, Philippe; Livache, Thierry; Hou, Yanxia; Carrière, Marie; Lequien, Stéphane; Dieny, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Cancer cells develop resistance to chemotherapy, and the side effects encountered seriously limit the effectiveness of treatments. For these reasons, the search for alternative therapies that target cancer cells without affecting healthy tissues is currently one of the most active areas of research on cancer. The present study focuses on a recently proposed approach for cancer cell destruction based on the targeted triggering of cancer cell spontaneous death through the mechanical vibration of anisotropic magnetic micro/nanoparticles attached to the cell membranes at low frequencies (~20 Hz) and in weak magnetic fields (~30 mT). The study was conducted in vitro, on human renal cancer cells with superparamagnetic-like particles. Three types of such particles made of NiFe or magnetite were prepared and characterized (either synthetic antiferromagnetic, vortex or polycrystalline with random grain anisotropy). The triggering of the apoptosis of these cancer cells was demonstrated with NiFe vortex particles and statistically characterized by flow-cytometry studies. The death pathway via apoptosis and not necrosis was identified by the clear observation of caspase activation.

  10. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curely, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-10-15

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe{sup 3+} ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by 'direct' techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curély, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-10-01

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe3+ ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by "direct" techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization studies.

  13. Characterization of Magnetic NiFe Nanoparticles with Controlled Bimetallic Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Chi, Yanxiu; Shan, Shiyao; Yin, Jun; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-02-25

    The exploration of the magnetic properties of bimetallic alloy nanoparticles for various technological applications requires the ability to control the morphology, composition, and surface properties. In this report, we describe new findings of an investigation of the morphology and composition of NiFe alloy nanoparticles synthesized under controlled conditions. The controllability over the bimetallic composition has been demonstrated by the observation of an approximate linear relationship between the composition in the nanoparticles and in the synthetic feeding. The morphology of the NiFe nanoparticles is consistent with an fcc-type alloy, with the lattice strain increasing linearly with the iron content in the nanoparticles. The alloy nanoparticles exhibit remarkable resistance to air oxidation in comparison with Ni or Fe particles. The thermal stability and the magnetic properties of the as-synthesized alloy nanoparticles are shown to depend on the composition. The alloy nanoparticles have also be sown to display low saturation magnetization and coercivity values in comparison with the Ni nanoparticles, in line with the superparamagnetic characteristic. These findings have important implications for the design of stable and controllable magnetic nanoparticles for various technological applications.

  14. Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Contrast Agents in Tissues Tracked Using Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    John, Renu; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A

    2009-10-01

    Magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT) is an important tool for the visualization and quantitative assessment of magnetic nanoparticles in tissues. In this study, we demonstrate the use of MM-OCT for quantitative measurement of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle transport and concentration in ex vivo muscle, lung, and liver tissues. The effect of temperature on the dynamics of these nanoparticles is also analyzed. We observe that the rate of transport of nanoparticles in tissues is directly related to the elasticity of tissues, and describe how the origin of the MM-OCT signal is associated with nanoparticle binding. These results improve our understanding of how iron oxide nanoparticles behave dynamically in biological tissues, which has direct implications for medical and biological applications of targeted nanoparticles for contrast enhancement and therapy.

  15. Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Contrast Agents in Tissues Tracked Using Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    John, Renu; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT) is an important tool for the visualization and quantitative assessment of magnetic nanoparticles in tissues. In this study, we demonstrate the use of MM-OCT for quantitative measurement of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle transport and concentration in ex vivo muscle, lung, and liver tissues. The effect of temperature on the dynamics of these nanoparticles is also analyzed. We observe that the rate of transport of nanoparticles in tissues is directly related to the elasticity of tissues, and describe how the origin of the MM-OCT signal is associated with nanoparticle binding. These results improve our understanding of how iron oxide nanoparticles behave dynamically in biological tissues, which has direct implications for medical and biological applications of targeted nanoparticles for contrast enhancement and therapy. PMID:25378895

  16. Air stable iron/iron carbide magnetic nanoparticles embedded in amorphous carbon globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhanala, Hari Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2015-06-01

    We have synthesized Fe/Fe3C magnetic nanoparticles embedded in an amorphous carbon globule by pyrolysing of benzene, ferrocene and hydroboric acid. The diameter of the globules is ˜ 1 µm and that of Fe/Fe3C magnetic nanoparticles is ˜ 40 nm. The globules exhibit ferromagnetic like behavior and the magnetization as well as the coercivity is found to increases with decreasing temperature.

  17. Pulsed electric discharges in water as a source of magnetic nanoparticles for transportation of microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutberg, F. G.; Kolikov, V. A.; Snetov, V. N.; Stogov, A. Yu.; Abramov, E. G.; Bogomolova, E. V.; Panina, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    The distinguishing property of magnetic nanoparticles that determines the increasing interest in these objects is their mobility under the action of a magnetic field, which can be used for their directional transportation, deposition, and concentration in a preset region. It is shown that nanoparticles consisting of iron oxide can be used as magnetoactive agents for converting the cells of microorganisms into microaggregates for their directional transportation or concentration in liquid media under the action of a magnetic field.

  18. Release of Magnetic Nanoparticles from Cell-Encapsulating Biodegradable Nanobiomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Inci, Fatih; Mullick, Omer; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Sung, Yuree; Kavaz, Doga; Li, Baoqiang; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    The future of tissue engineering requires development of intelligent biomaterials using nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have several applications in biology and medicine; one example is Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, MNPs have been encapsulated within cell-encapsulating hydrogels to create novel nanobiomaterials (i.e., M-gels), which can be manipulated and assembled in magnetic fields. The M-gels can be used as building blocks for bottom-up tissue engineering to create 3D tissue constructs. For tissue engineering applications of M-gels, it is essential to study the release of encapsulated MNPs from the hydrogel polymer network and the effect of MNPs on hydrogel properties, including mechanical characteristics, porosity, swelling behavior, and cellular response (e.g., viability, growth). Therefore, we evaluated the release of MNPs from photocrosslinkable gelatin methacrylate hydrogels as the polymer network undergoes biodegradation using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. MNP release correlated linearly with hydrogel biodegradation rate with correlation factors (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient) of 0.96 ± 0.03 and 0.99 ± 0.01 for MNP concentrations of 1% and 5%, respectively. We also evaluated the effect of MNPs on hydrogel mechanical properties, porosity, and swelling behavior, as well as cell viability and growth in MNP-encapsulating hydrogels. Fibroblasts encapsulated with MNPs in hydrogels remained viable (>80% at t = 144 h) and formed microtissue constructs in culture (t = 144 h). These results indicated that MNP-encapsulating hydrogels show promise as intelligent nanobiomaterials, with great potential to impact broad areas of bioengineering, including tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:22680777

  19. Release of magnetic nanoparticles from cell-encapsulating biodegradable nanobiomaterials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Inci, Fatih; Mullick, Omer; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Sung, Yuree; Kavaz, Doga; Li, Baoqiang; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-08-28

    The future of tissue engineering requires development of intelligent biomaterials using nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have several applications in biology and medicine; one example is Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, MNPs have been encapsulated within cell-encapsulating hydrogels to create novel nanobiomaterials (i.e., M-gels), which can be manipulated and assembled in magnetic fields. The M-gels can be used as building blocks for bottom-up tissue engineering to create 3D tissue constructs. For tissue engineering applications of M-gels, it is essential to study the release of encapsulated MNPs from the hydrogel polymer network and the effect of MNPs on hydrogel properties, including mechanical characteristics, porosity, swelling behavior, and cellular response (e.g., viability, growth). Therefore, we evaluated the release of MNPs from photocrosslinkable gelatin methacrylate hydrogels as the polymer network undergoes biodegradation using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. MNP release correlated linearly with hydrogel biodegradation rate with correlation factors (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient) of 0.96 ± 0.03 and 0.99 ± 0.01 for MNP concentrations of 1% and 5%, respectively. We also evaluated the effect of MNPs on hydrogel mechanical properties, porosity, and swelling behavior, as well as cell viability and growth in MNP-encapsulating hydrogels. Fibroblasts encapsulated with MNPs in hydrogels remained viable (>80% at t = 144 h) and formed microtissue constructs in culture (t = 144 h). These results indicated that MNP-encapsulating hydrogels show promise as intelligent nanobiomaterials, with great potential to impact broad areas of bioengineering, including tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications.

  20. Dual magnetic-/temperature-responsive nanoparticles for microfluidic separations and assays.

    PubMed

    Lai, James J; Hoffman, John M; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Hoffman, Allan S; Estournès, Claude; Wattiaux, Alain; Stayton, Patrick S

    2007-06-19

    A stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticle system for diagnostic target capture and concentration has been developed for microfluidic lab card settings. Telechelic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) polymer chains were synthesized with dodecyl tails at one end and a reactive carboxylate at the opposite end by the reversible addition fragmentation transfer technique. These PNIPAAm chains self-associate into nanoscale micelles that were used as dimensional confinements to synthesize the magnetic nanoparticles. The resulting superparamagnetic nanoparticles exhibit a gamma-Fe2O3 core ( approximately 5 nm) with a layer of carboxylate-terminated PNIPAAm chains as a corona on the surface. The carboxylate group was used to functionalize the magnetic nanoparticles with biotin and subsequently with streptavidin. The functionalized magnetic nanoparticles can be reversibly aggregated in solution as the temperature is cycled through the PNIPAAm lower critical solution temperature (LCST). While the magnetophoretic mobility of the individual nanoparticles below the LCST is negligible, the aggregates formed above the LCST are large enough to respond to an applied magnetic field. The magnetic nanoparticles can associate with biotinylated targets as individual particles, and then subsequent application of a combined temperature increase and magnetic field can be used to magnetically separate the aggregated particles onto the poly(ethylene glycol)-modified polydimethylsiloxane channel walls of a microfluidic device. When the magnetic field is turned off and the temperature is reversed, the captured aggregates redisperse into the channel flow stream for further downstream processing. The dual magnetic- and temperature-responsive nanoparticles can thus be used as soluble reagents to capture diagnostic targets at a controlled time point and channel position. They can then be isolated and released after the nanoparticles have captured target molecules, overcoming the problem of low