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Sample records for magnetic relaxation method

  1. Nonlinear force-free extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field based on the magnetohydrodynamic relaxation method

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S.; Kim, K. S.; Pandey, V. S.; Shiota, D.; Kusano, K.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation code based on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation method. We extend the classical MHD relaxation method in two important ways. First, we introduce an algorithm initially proposed by Dedner et al. to effectively clean the numerical errors associated with ∇ · B . Second, the multigrid type method is implemented in our NLFFF to perform direct analysis of the high-resolution magnetogram data. As a result of these two implementations, we successfully extrapolated the high resolution force-free field introduced by Low and Lou with better accuracy in a drastically shorter time. We also applied our extrapolation method to the MHD solution obtained from the flux-emergence simulation by Magara. We found that NLFFF extrapolation may be less effective for reproducing areas higher than a half-domain, where some magnetic loops are found in a state of continuous upward expansion. However, an inverse S-shaped structure consisting of the sheared and twisted loops formed in the lower region can be captured well through our NLFFF extrapolation method. We further discuss how well these sheared and twisted fields are reconstructed by estimating the magnetic topology and twist quantitatively.

  2. Protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Cyril; Cousin, Samuel F; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a ubiquitous spectroscopic tool to explore molecules with atomic resolution. Nuclear magnetic relaxation is intimately connected to molecular motions. Many methods and models have been developed to measure and interpret the characteristic rates of nuclear magnetic relaxation in proteins. These approaches shed light on a rich and diverse range of motions covering timescales from picoseconds to seconds. Here, we introduce some of the basic concepts upon which these approaches are built and provide a series of illustrations.

  3. Topological constraints on magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Yeates, A R; Hornig, G; Wilmot-Smith, A L

    2010-08-20

    The final state of turbulent magnetic relaxation in a reversed field pinch is well explained by Taylor's hypothesis. However, recent resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the relaxation of braided solar coronal loops have led to relaxed fields far from the Taylor state, despite the conservation of helicity. We point out the existence of an additional topological invariant in any flux tube with a nonzero field: the topological degree of the field line mapping. We conjecture that this constrains the relaxation, explaining why only one of three example simulations reaches the Taylor state. PMID:20868104

  4. Magnetic relaxation with vortex creep observed by the magneto-optical image method for high Tc superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wongi; Lee, Jhinhwan; Youm, Dojun; Yoo, Jaeun

    2016-06-01

    The relaxation of magnetic flux in high Tc superconducting films was investigated. After the samples were cooled in the applied magnetic fields, the magnetic field was turned off and the changes of the remaining magnetic flux distribution were observed by using the magneto-optical image method. The induced current density was examined which varies with the logarithmic-time dependence associated with the creep motions of vortices. The overall magnitude of the induced current density is observed to decrease as the external magnetic field applied during cooling is increased. The range of external fields examined was 30-50 mT. This could be explained by taking into account the formation of meandering shapes of vortices which develop during the period of transition to the creep mode. The results of the numerical simulation for this effect are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Magnetization Transfer Induced Biexponential Longitudinal Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Prantner, Andrew M.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Garbow, Joel R.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal relaxation of brain water 1H magnetization in mammalian brain in vivo is typically analyzed on a per voxel basis using a monoexponential model, thereby assigning a single relaxation time constant to all 1H magnetization within a given voxel. This approach was tested by obtaining inversion recovery data from grey matter of rats at 64 exponentially-spaced recovery times. Using Bayesian probability for model selection, brain water data were best represented by a biexponential function characterized by fast and slow relaxation components. At 4.7 T, the amplitude fraction of the rapidly relaxing component is 3.4 ± 0.7 % with a rate constant of 44 ± 12 s-1 (mean ± SD; 174 voxels from 4 rats). The rate constant of the slow relaxing component is 0.66 ± 0.04 s-1. At 11.7 T, the corresponding values are 6.9 ± 0.9 %, 19 ± 5 s-1, and 0.48 ± 0.02 s-1 (151 voxels from 4 rats). Several putative mechanisms for biexponential relaxation behavior were evaluated, and magnetization transfer between bulk water protons and non-aqueous protons was determined to be the source of biexponential longitudinal relaxation. MR methods requiring accurate quantification of longitudinal relaxation may need to take this effect explicitly into account. PMID:18759367

  6. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  7. Magnetic Relaxation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth; Fornberg, Bengt; Flyer, Natasha; Low, B. C.

    2009-01-01

    This is a mathematical study of the long-lived hydromagnetic structures produced in the tenuous solar corona by the turbulent, resistive relaxation of a magnetic field under the condition of extremely high electrical conductivity. The relaxation theory of Taylor, originally developed for a laboratory device, is extended to treat the open atmosphere where the relaxing field must interact with its surrounding fields. A boundary-value problem is posed for a two-dimensional model that idealizes the corona as the half Cartesian plane filled with a potential field (1) that is anchored to a rigid, perfectly conducting base and (2) that embeds a force-free magnetic field in the form of a flux-rope oriented horizontally and perpendicular to the Cartesian plane. The flux-rope has a free boundary, which is an unknown in the construction of a solution for this atmosphere. Pairs of magnetostatic solutions are constructed to represent the initial and final states of a flux-rope relaxation that conserve both the total magnetic helicity and total axial magnetic flux, using a numerical iterative method specially developed for this study. The collection of numerical solutions found provides an insight into the interplay among several hydromagnetic properties in the formation of long-lived coronal structures. In particular, the study shows (1) that the outward spread of reconnection between a relaxing flux-rope and its external field may be arrested at some outer magnetic flux surface within which a constant-α force-free field emerges as the minimum-energy state and (2) that this outward spread is complicated by an inward, partial collapse of the relaxing flux-rope produced by a loss of internal magnetic pressure.

  8. Magnetic relaxation in dipolar magnetic nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, Ondrej; Barker, Joe; Chantrell, Roy; Friedman, Gary; York-Drexel Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the role of dipolar interactions on thermal relaxation in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems is of fundamental importance in magnetic recording, for optimizing the hysteresis heating contribution in the hyperthermia cancer treatment in biomedicine, or for biological and chemical sensing, for example. In this talk, we discuss our related efforts to quantify the influence of dipolar interactions on thermal relaxation in small clusters of MNPs. Setting up the master equation and solving the associated eigenvalue problem, we identify the observable relaxation time scale spectra for various types of MNP clusters, and demonstrate qualitatively different spectral characteristics depending on the point group of symmetries of the particle arrangement within the cluster - being solely a dipolar interaction effect. Our findings provide insight into open questions related to magnetic relaxation in bulk MNP systems, and may prove to be also of practical relevance, e.g., for improving robustness of methodologies in biological and chemical sensing. OH gratefully acknowledges support from a Marie Curie Intra European Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme under grant agreement PIEF-GA-2010-273014

  9. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  10. Relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Croft, Laura R; Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality that noninvasively images the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). MPI has demonstrated high contrast and zero attenuation with depth, and MPI promises superior safety compared to current angiography methods, X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging angiography. Nanoparticle relaxation can delay the SPIO magnetization, and in this work we investigate the open problem of the role relaxation plays in MPI scanning and its effect on the image. We begin by amending the x-space theory of MPI to include nanoparticle relaxation effects. We then validate the amended theory with experiments from a Berkeley x-space relaxometer and a Berkeley x-space projection MPI scanner. Our theory and experimental data indicate that relaxation reduces SNR and asymmetrically blurs the image in the scanning direction. While relaxation effects can have deleterious effects on the MPI scan, we show theoretically and experimentally that x-space reconstruction remains robust in the presence of relaxation. Furthermore, the role of relaxation in x-space theory provides guidance as we develop methods to minimize relaxation-induced blurring. This will be an important future area of research for the MPI community.

  11. Relaxation of magnetic systems after sudden magnetic field changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    In magnetic systems where the projection of the total spin moment of the system parallel to an external magnetic field is not conserved, a sudden change in the field produces oscillations in the magnetization. The amplitude and frequency of these oscillations depend nonlinearly on the change in the field. Landau-Lifshitz relaxation in the magnetic system leads to a nonlinear dependence of the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations on the relaxation parameter, as well as to a dependence of the damping rate on the energy parameters of the magnet and on the amplitude of the jump in the external magnetic field.

  12. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  13. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Deissler, Robert J. Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. Methods: The Fokker–Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker–Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. Results: The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present—if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance—the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the

  14. Formation of magnetic discontinuities through viscous relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2014-05-15

    According to Parker's magnetostatic theorem, tangential discontinuities in magnetic field, or current sheets (CSs), are generally unavoidable in an equilibrium magnetofluid with infinite electrical conductivity and complex magnetic topology. These CSs are due to a failure of a magnetic field in achieving force-balance everywhere and preserving its topology while remaining in a spatially continuous state. A recent work [Kumar, Bhattacharyya, and Smolarkiewicz, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112903 (2013)] demonstrated this CS formation utilizing numerical simulations in terms of the vector magnetic field. The magnetohydrodynamic simulations presented here complement the above work by demonstrating CS formation by employing a novel approach of describing the magnetofluid evolution in terms of magnetic flux surfaces instead of the vector magnetic field. The magnetic flux surfaces being the possible sites on which CSs develop, this approach provides a direct visualization of the CS formation, helpful in understanding the governing dynamics. The simulations confirm development of tangential discontinuities through a favorable contortion of magnetic flux surfaces, as the magnetofluid undergoes a topology-preserving viscous relaxation from an initial non-equilibrium state with twisted magnetic field. A crucial finding of this work is in its demonstration of CS formation at spatial locations away from the magnetic nulls.

  15. Magnetic relaxation in dysprosium-dysprosium collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Bonna K.; Johnson, Cort; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.; Brahms, Nathan; Au, Yat Shan; Connolly, Colin B.; Doyle, John M.

    2011-01-15

    The collisional magnetic reorientation rate constant g{sub R} is measured for magnetically trapped atomic dysprosium (Dy), an atom with large magnetic dipole moments. Using buffer gas cooling with cold helium, large numbers (>10{sup 11}) of Dy are loaded into a magnetic trap and the buffer gas is subsequently removed. The decay of the trapped sample is governed by collisional reorientation of the atomic magnetic moments. We find g{sub R}=1.9{+-}0.5x10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 390 mK. We also measure the magnetic reorientation rate constant of holmium (Ho), another highly magnetic atom, and find g{sub R}=5{+-}2x10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 690 mK. The Zeeman relaxation rates of these atoms are greater than expected for the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, suggesting that another mechanism, such as an anisotropic electrostatic interaction, is responsible. Comparison with estimated elastic collision rates suggests that Dy is a poor candidate for evaporative cooling in a magnetic trap.

  16. Magnetic Nanoparticle Quantitation with Low Frequency Magnetic Fields: Compensating for Relaxation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kuehlert, Esra; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Reeves, Daniel B.; Perreard, Irina M.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the number of nanoparticles present in tissue is central to many in vivo and in vitro applications. Magnetic nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro using the harmonics of their magnetization produced in a sinusoidal magnetic field. However, relaxation effects damp the magnetic harmonics rendering them of limited use in quantitation. We show that an accurate measure of the number of nanoparticles can be made by correcting for relaxation effects. Correction for relaxation reduced errors of 50% for larger nanoparticles in high relaxation environments to 2%. The result is a method of nanoparticle quantitation capable of in vivo and in vitro applications including histopathology assays, quantitative imaging, drug delivery and thermal therapy preparation. PMID:23867287

  17. Braided magnetic fields: equilibria, relaxation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontin, D. I.; Candelaresi, S.; Russell, A. J. B.; Hornig, G.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes containing non-trivial field line braiding (or linkage), using mathematical and computational modelling, in the context of testable predictions for the laboratory and their significance for solar coronal heating. We investigate the existence of braided force-free equilibria, and demonstrate that for a field anchored at perfectly-conducting plates, these equilibria exist and contain current sheets whose thickness scales inversely with the braid complexity—as measured for example by the topological entropy. By contrast, for a periodic domain braided exact equilibria typically do not exist, while approximate equilibria contain thin current sheets. In the presence of resistivity, reconnection is triggered at the current sheets and a turbulent relaxation ensues. We finish by discussing the properties of the turbulent relaxation and the existence of constraints that may mean that the final state is not the linear force-free field predicted by Taylor’s hypothesis.

  18. Delayed Over-Relaxation for iterative methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antuono, M.; Colicchio, G.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a variant of the relaxation step used in the most widespread iterative methods (e.g. Jacobi Over-Relaxation, Successive Over-Relaxation) which combines the iteration at the predicted step, namely (n + 1), with the iteration at step (n - 1). We provide a theoretical analysis of the proposed algorithm by applying such a delayed relaxation step to a generic (convergent) iterative scheme. We prove that, under proper assumptions, this significantly improves the convergence rate of the initial iterative method. As a relevant example, we apply the proposed algorithm to the solution of the Poisson equation, highlighting the advantages in comparison with classical iterative models.

  19. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Torres-Díaz, I.; Chiu-Lam, A.; Hernández, M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation.

  20. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for ¹⁹F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences.

  1. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jixi Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-15

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  2. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixi; Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-01

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  3. Two 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance methods to measure internal porosity of bone trabeculae: By solid-liquid signal separation and by longitudinal relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J. S.; Camaiti, Mara; Garavaglia, Carla; Viola, Rossella; Giavaresi, Gianluca

    2004-01-01

    Parameters related to pore-space structure of the trabeculae in cancellous bone are difficult to determine quantitatively, but they can be important to characterize changes induced in bone by diseases such as osteoporosis. We present two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods to measure the internal porosity φtrab of the trabeculae, based on two different measurements of the fraction of intratrabecular and intertrabecular pore-space in animal femur samples. These procedures have been developed within the more general framework of the NMR studies for fluids in porous media. In the first method we use the ratio between the amount of collagen (solid-like) 1H and that of the fluids in the samples. In the second, which can be applied only on defatted and water saturated samples, we use the distributions of longitudinal relaxation times. The φtrab values obtained are constant for porosity φ of the samples over the range 40%-70%, with each method giving φtrab=(29±4)%, which is consistent with the only data available, the porosity of related cortical bone. The traditional parameter bone volume fraction is simply given by (1-φ)/(1-φtrab).

  4. METHOD OF HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS WITH STIFF RELAXATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. LOWRIE; J. E. MOREL

    2001-03-01

    Three methods are analyzed for solving a linear hyperbolic system that contains stiff relaxation. We show that the semi-discrete discontinuous Galerkin method, with a linear basis, is accurate when the relaxation time is unresolved (asymptotically preserving--AP). A recently developed central method is shown to be non-AP. To discriminate between AP and non-AP methods, we argue that one must study problems that are diffusion dominated.

  5. Electric control of magnetization relaxation in thin film magnetic insulators.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Sun, Y.; Song, Y-Y.; Wu, M.; Schultheiss, H.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.

    2011-10-01

    Control of magnetization relaxation in magnetic insulators via interfacial spin scattering is demonstrated. The experiments use nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/Pt layered structures, with the Pt layer biased by an electric voltage. The bias voltage produces a spin current across the Pt thickness. As this current scatters off the YIG surface, it exerts a torque on the YIG surface spins. This torque can reduce or enhance the damping and thereby decrease or increase the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of the YIG film, depending on the field/current configuration.

  6. Multistage Spectral Relaxation Method for Solving the Hyperchaotic Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Nik, Hassan; Rebelo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM) is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results. PMID:25386624

  7. Magnetic Field Relaxation and Current Sheets in an Ideal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelaresi, S.; Pontin, D. I.; Hornig, G.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the existence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria for topologically complex magnetic fields. The approach employed is to perform ideal numerical relaxation experiments. We use a newly developed Lagrangian relaxation scheme that exactly preserves the magnetic field topology during the relaxation. Our configurations include both twisted and sheared fields, of which some fall into the category for which Parker predicted no force-free equilibrium. The first class of field considered contains no magnetic null points, and field lines connect between two perfectly conducting plates. In these cases, we observe only resolved current layers of finite thickness. In further numerical experiments, we confirm that magnetic null points are loci of singular currents.

  8. MAGNETIC FIELD RELAXATION AND CURRENT SHEETS IN AN IDEAL PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Candelaresi, S.; Pontin, D. I.; Hornig, G.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the existence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria for topologically complex magnetic fields. The approach employed is to perform ideal numerical relaxation experiments. We use a newly developed Lagrangian relaxation scheme that exactly preserves the magnetic field topology during the relaxation. Our configurations include both twisted and sheared fields, of which some fall into the category for which Parker predicted no force-free equilibrium. The first class of field considered contains no magnetic null points, and field lines connect between two perfectly conducting plates. In these cases, we observe only resolved current layers of finite thickness. In further numerical experiments, we confirm that magnetic null points are loci of singular currents.

  9. NMR Relaxation in Systems with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Temperature Study

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Hejasee, Rola H.; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure and model NMR relaxation enhancement due to the presence of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles at different temperatures. Materials and Methods Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using FSE sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using chemical co-precipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Results Relaxivity (in s−1 mM−1 Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. T2 data was fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG coated particles than the uncoated ones. Conclusion The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. PMID:23720101

  10. Control of Transport-Barrier Relaxations by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.

    2009-01-30

    Transport-barrier relaxation oscillations in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations are investigated using three-dimensional global fluid turbulence simulations from first principles at the edge of a tokamak. It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations have a stabilizing effect on these relaxation oscillations and that this effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of both residual magnetic island chains and a stochastic layer.

  11. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. PMID:23147444

  12. Relaxation schemes for spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Timothy N.

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of relaxation schemes for solving the systems of algebraic equations which arise from spectral discretizations of elliptic equations is examined. Iterative methods are an attractive alternative to direct methods because Fourier transform techniques enable the discrete matrix-vector products to be computed almost as efficiently as for corresponding but sparse finite difference discretizations. Preconditioning is found to be essential for acceptable rates of convergence. Preconditioners based on second-order finite difference methods are used. A comparison is made of the performance of different relaxation methods on model problems with a variety of conditions specified around the boundary. The investigations show that iterations based on incomplete LU decompositions provide the most efficient methods for solving these algebraic systems.

  13. Magnetic relaxation behaviour in Pr2NiSi3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.

    2016-05-01

    Time dependent isothemal remanent magnetizatin (IRM) behaviour for polycrystalline compound Pr2NiSi3 have been studied below its characteristic temperature. The compound undergoes slow magnetic relaxation with time. Along with competing interaction, non-magnetic atom disorder plays an important role in formation of non-equilibrium glassy like ground state for this compound.

  14. Structural origin of low temperature glassy relaxation in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra; Regmi, Rajesh; Lawes, Gavin

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles often exhibit glass-like relaxation features at low temperatures. Here we discuss the effects of doping boron, cobalt, gadolinium and lanthanum on the low temperature magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We investigated the structure of the nanoparticles using both X-ray diffraction and Raman studies, and find evidence for secondary phase formation in certain samples. We acquired Transmission Electron Microscopic images to give direct information on the morphology and microstructure of these doped nanoparticles. We measured the ac out-of-phase susceptibility (χ//) vs temperature (T) to parameterize the low temperature glassy magnetic relaxation. All samples show low temperature magnetic relaxation, but the amplitude of the signal increases dramatically for certain dopants. We attribute these low temperature frequency-dependent magnetic relaxation features to structural defects, which are enhanced in some of the doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These studies also confirm that the low temperature relaxation in nanoparticles arises from single particle effects and are not associated with interparticle interactions.

  15. Magnetic relaxation dispersion of lithium ion in solutions of DNA.

    PubMed

    Victor, Ken G; Teng, Ching-Ling; Dinesen, T R D; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Bryant, Robert G

    2004-06-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate constant defines the magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) and provides a direct characterization of the molecular dynamics that cause fluctuations in the magnetic couplings in the system and may also indicate the dimensional constraints on the motion. The counterion cloud surrounding a linear polyelectrolyte ion, such as DNA in solution, provides an interesting opportunity for ion confinement that helps in understanding the thermodynamics and the dynamics of the interactions between the polyion and other solutes. The MRD profiles of lithium ion and tetramethylammonium ion were recorded in dilute aqueous solutions of native calf thymus DNA, which provides a long, charged rod that reorients slowly. The 7Li ion relaxes through the nuclear electric quadrupole coupling and the proton-lithium dipole-dipole coupling; the protons of the tetramethylammonium ion relax by dipole-dipole coupling. MRD profiles of the 7Li+ ion are dominated by transient interactions with the DNA that yield a linear dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate constant on the logarithm of the Larmor frequency. This magnetic field dependence is consistent with diffusive ion motions that modulate two spatial coordinates that characterize the relaxation couplings in the vicinity of the polyion. Motions around the rod and fluctuations in the ion distance from the rod are consistent with these constraints for lithium. The magnetic field dependence of the tetramethylammonium ion proton relaxation rate constant is weak, but also approximately a linear function of the logarithm of the Larmor frequency, which implies that the field dependence is caused in part by local order in the DNA solution.

  16. Hysteresis and relaxation in granular permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R; Balamurugan, B; George, TA; Chipara, M; Wei, XH; Shield, JE; Sellmyer, DJ

    2012-04-01

    Some nontrivial aspects of the magnetic and structural characterization of hard-magnetic nanoparticles are investigated. Dilute ensembles are well-described by mean-field theory, although there is an asymmetry between exchange and magnetostatic interaction fields. Corrections to the mean-field approximation are caused by cooperative effects and have the character of Onsager reaction fields, which are much stronger in micromagnetism than in atomic-scale magnetism. The slow dynamics of zero-field-cooled (ZFC) magnetization curves is strongly affected by the particles' magnetic anisotropy, which reduces the corresponding energy-barrier height from 25 to 19.1 k(B)T. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3672845

  17. Magnetization relaxation and geometric forces in a Bose ferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Armaitis, J; Stoof, H T C; Duine, R A

    2013-06-28

    We construct the hydrodynamic theory for spin-1/2 Bose gases at arbitrary temperatures. This theory describes the coupling between the magnetization and the normal and superfluid components of the gas. In particular, our theory contains the geometric forces on the particles that arise from their spin's adiabatic following of the magnetization texture. The phenomenological parameters of the hydrodynamic theory are calculated in the Bogoliubov approximation and using the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation-time approximation. We consider the topological Hall effect due to the presence of a Skyrmion, and show that this effect manifests itself in the collective modes of the system. The dissipative coupling between the magnetization and the normal component is shown to give rise to magnetization relaxation that is fourth order in spatial gradients of the magnetization direction.

  18. Magnetic phases and relaxation effects in fullerite C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigvinadze, J. G.; Buntar, V.; Ashimov, S. M.; Dolbin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive torsional vibration technique is used to study the magnetic properties of fullerite C60 (99.98%) at temperatures of 77-300 K in dynamic and static experiments. Vibrational energy absorption peaks associated with phase transitions and realignment of the magnetic structure of the fullerite are detected at T = 152, 195, 230, and 260 K. Relaxation magnetic processes in fullerite C60 at room temperature are studied. "Spontaneous" rotation of a motionless sample of fullerite freely suspended on an elastic filament is observed when external longitudinal or transverse magnetic fields are switched on. The direction of the "spontaneous" rotation changes with time. It is proposed that these phenomena are related to relaxation processes in the rotational subsystem of C60 molecular rotators, as well as to magnetic flux trapped in the fullerite and weakly damped eddy currents induced in the sample by the applied field.

  19. Diffusion MRI/NMR magnetization equations with relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Daniel, Simon

    2012-10-01

    Bloch-Torrey diffusion magnetization equation ignores relaxation effects of magnetization. Relaxation times are important in any diffusion magnetization studies of perfusion in tissues(Brain and heart specially). Bloch-Torrey equation cannot therefore describe diffusion magnetization in a real-life situation where relaxation effects play a key role, characteristics of tissues under examination. This paper describes derivations of two equations for each of the y and z component diffusion NMR/MRI magnetization (separately) in a rotating frame of reference, where rf B1 field is applied along x direction and bias magnetic field(Bo) is along z direction. The two equations are expected to further advance the science & technology of Diffusion MRI(DMRI) and diffusion functional MRI(DFMRI). These two techniques are becoming increasingly important in the study and treatment of neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fibre structure and provide models of brain connectivity.

  20. Nonlinear Behavior of Magnetic Fluid in Brownian Relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Ogawa, Koutaro; Bhuiya, Anwarul K.; Enpuku, Keiji

    2010-12-02

    This study investigated the nonlinear behavior of magnetic fluids under high excitation fields due to nonlinear Brownian relaxation. As a direct indication of nonlinear behavior, we characterized the higher harmonics of the magnetization signal generated by the magnetic fluid. The amplitudes of the fundamental to the ninth harmonic of the magnetization signal were measured as a function of the external field. The experimental results were compared with numerical simulations based on the Fokker-Planck equation, which describes nonlinear Brownian relaxation. To allow a quantitative comparison, we estimated the size distribution and size dependence of the magnetic moment in the sample. In the present magnetic fluid, composed of agglomerates of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles, the magnetic moment was estimated to be roughly proportional to the diameter of the particles, in contrast to the case of single-domain particles. When the size distribution and the size dependence of the magnetic moment were taken into account, there was good quantitative agreement between the experiment and simulation.

  1. Rapid MRI method for mapping the longitudinal relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jung-Jiin; Glover, Gary H.

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for mapping the longitudinal relaxation time in a clinically acceptable time is developed based on a recent proposal [J.-J. Hsu, I.J. Lowe, Spin-lattice relaxation and a fast T1-map acquisition method in MRI with transient-state magnetization, J. Magn. Reson. 169 (2004) 270-278] and the speed of the spiral pulse sequence. The method acquires multiple curve-fitting samples with one RF pulse train. It does not require RF pulses of specific flip angles (e.g., 90° or 180°), nor are the long recovery waiting time and the measurement of the magnetization at thermal equilibrium needed. Given the value of the flip angle, the curve fitting is semi-logarithmic and not computationally intensive. On a heterogeneous phantom, the average percentage difference between measurements of the present method and those of an inversion-recovery method is below 2.7%. In mapping the human brain, the present method, for example, can obtain four curve-fitting samples for five 128 × 128 slices in less than 3.2 s and the results are in agreement with other studies in the literature.

  2. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  3. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  4. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature. PMID:26340435

  5. Structural and magnetic relaxations of mechanically alloyed Fe-Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiraskova, Y.; Bursik, J.; Turek, I.; Cizek, J.; Prochazka, I.

    2014-10-01

    The Fe-Mo sample mechanically alloyed for 250 h under air atmosphere was exposed to a series of isothermal and isochronal treatments with the aim to follow changes in the structure and magnetic properties regarding relaxations of strains and defects and stability of chemical composition. For this purpose x-ray diffraction, positron annihilation, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectrometry were applied and supplemented by magnetic measurements. The temperatures for the magnetic studies were selected from the thermomagnetic curve of the as-prepared sample. The time interval of isothermal treatments was chosen from 0-300 min. The Mo content in the bcc-Fe(Mo) phase has substantially exceeded the equilibrium solubility limit but it has been found to decrease under the thermal treatment which was reflected by decreasing lattice parameters. The small crystallite size of approximately 10 nm in the initial state starts to grow only after a certain amount of strains induced by severe deformation, due to mechanical alloying being released. This was also reflected in the magnetic parameters. From their time dependences at selected temperatures the characteristic relaxation times were obtained and used for a calculation of the activation enthalpy of relaxation processes.

  6. Relaxation Dispersion in MRI Induced by Fictitious Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J.; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-01-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ≥ 3. RAFF generates a fictitious field (E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i.e. the angle ε between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ε > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange (e.g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ε induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ε ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T1ρ experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T1ρ method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable. PMID:21334231

  7. Magnetic relaxation - coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1994-10-26

    The aim of the contract was to employ electron and nuclear magnetic relaxation techniques to investigate solvent swelling of coals, solvent extraction of coals and molecular interaction with solvent coal pores. Many of these investigations have appeared in four major publications and a conference proceedings. Another manuscript has been submitted for publication. The set of Argonne Premium Coals was chosen as extensively characterized and representative samples for this project.

  8. Electric control of magnetization relaxation in thin film ferromagnetic insulators.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Sun, Y.; Song, Y-Y.; Wu, M.; Schultheib, H.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of magnetization relaxation in magnetic insulators via interfacial spin scattering is demonstrated. The experiments use nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/Pt layered structures, with the Pt layer biased by an electric voltage. The bias voltage produces a spin current across the Pt thickness. As this current scatters off the YIG surface, it exerts a torque on the YIG surface spins. This torque can reduce or enhance the damping and thereby decrease or increase the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of the YIG film, depending on the field/current configuration.

  9. Study of stomach motility using the relaxation of magnetic tracers.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A A; Baffa, O; Oliveira, R B

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic tracers can be observed in the interior of the human body to give information about their quantity, position and state of order. With the aim of detecting and studying the degree of disorder of these tracers after they have been previously magnetized inside the stomach, a system composed of magnetization coils and magnetic detectors was developed. Helmholtz coils of diameter 84 cm were used to magnetize the sample and the remanent magnetization (RM) was detected with two first-order gradiometric fluxgate arrays each with a 15 cm base line, sensitivity of 0.5 nT and common mode rejection (CMR) of at least 10. The system allows simultaneous measurement in the anterior and posterior projections of the stomach. Measurements of the time evolution of the RM were performed in vitro and in normal subjects after the ingestion of a test meal labelled with magnetic particles. The data were fitted with an exponential curve and the relaxation time tau was obtained. Initial studies were performed to ascertain the action of a drug that is known to affect the gastric motility, showing that the decay of the remanent magnetization was indeed due to stomach contractions. PMID:10442706

  10. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  11. Proton magnetic relaxation and internal rotations in tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Utton, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation studies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (PSLRT) and proton second moment (PSM) are reported. Tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride (TMCC) was selected as a diamagnetic member of the isomorphic series, and hence proton data relate directly to the motion of the tetramethylammonium ion in the absence of paramagnetic ions. In the model adopted, the correlation time for hindered motion of one of the methyl groups differs from that of the other three groups in the low-temperature phase below 104 K. PSLRT and PSM values agree closely with experimental data with this model. Crystallographic phase transitions in TMCC occur at 104 K and 119 K according to the PSLRT measurements. Dipolar interactions between adjacent protons account for the PSLR rates below 104 K.

  12. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  13. Scheduled Relaxation Jacobi method: Improvements and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adsuara, J. E.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Aloy, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    Elliptic partial differential equations (ePDEs) appear in a wide variety of areas of mathematics, physics and engineering. Typically, ePDEs must be solved numerically, which sets an ever growing demand for efficient and highly parallel algorithms to tackle their computational solution. The Scheduled Relaxation Jacobi (SRJ) is a promising class of methods, atypical for combining simplicity and efficiency, that has been recently introduced for solving linear Poisson-like ePDEs. The SRJ methodology relies on computing the appropriate parameters of a multilevel approach with the goal of minimizing the number of iterations needed to cut down the residuals below specified tolerances. The efficiency in the reduction of the residual increases with the number of levels employed in the algorithm. Applying the original methodology to compute the algorithm parameters with more than 5 levels notably hinders obtaining optimal SRJ schemes, as the mixed (non-linear) algebraic-differential system of equations from which they result becomes notably stiff. Here we present a new methodology for obtaining the parameters of SRJ schemes that overcomes the limitations of the original algorithm and provide parameters for SRJ schemes with up to 15 levels and resolutions of up to 215 points per dimension, allowing for acceleration factors larger than several hundreds with respect to the Jacobi method for typical resolutions and, in some high resolution cases, close to 1000. Most of the success in finding SRJ optimal schemes with more than 10 levels is based on an analytic reduction of the complexity of the previously mentioned system of equations. Furthermore, we extend the original algorithm to apply it to certain systems of non-linear ePDEs.

  14. Thermoacoustic method for relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Koshovyi, V.V.; Pakhn`o, M.I.; Tsykhan, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a thermoacoustic method for the relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints, present a block diagram of a generator of local thermoacoustic pulses designed for implementation of this method, and describe our experiment aimed at relaxation of residual tensile stresses.

  15. Impact of Internal Magnetic Field Gradients on the NMR Relaxation Time Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grombacher, D. J.; Fay, E. L.; Knight, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the impact of internal magnetic field gradients, which arise due to the presence of a magnetic susceptibility contrast between grains and the pore fluid, on the relaxation time distribution. Relaxation times provide powerful insight into the pore geometry. This link to pore geometry relies on the fast-diffusion assumption, where relaxation is controlled by the pore surface and each pore is treated as isolated and is described by a single relaxation time. This allows the relaxation time distribution to be interpreted as a pore size distribution. However, internal gradients can complicate this interpretation by providing an additional relaxation mechanism impacting the decay. We present both synthetic and laboratory studies investigating the impact of internal gradients on the relaxation time distribution. A COMSOL multiphysics package is employed to determine the magnetic field's spatial distribution across the pore space, and to simulate the pore's NMR relaxation. The NMR simulation accounts for both surface relaxation, and relaxation related to internal gradients. We observe that as the influence of internal gradients increases, through either greater magnetic susceptibility contrasts or the use of longer echo times, the shape of the relaxation time distribution is altered. In these cases, relaxation within a single pore is no longer described by a single characteristic relaxation time, instead requiring multiple relaxation times to capture the time-dependent behavior. As a result, the relaxation time distribution is broadened and shifted to faster relaxation times. Laboratory results, performed for several samples sieved to ensure narrow grain size distributions and with varying magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility contrasts, exhibit similar trends to those observed in the synthetic studies. These results have significant implications for the interpretation of relaxation data to obtain pore size distributions, and the derived estimates of hydraulic

  16. Effect of substrate rotation on domain structure and magnetic relaxation in magnetic antidot lattice arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, Sougata; Mallik, Srijani; Bedanta, Subhankar

    2015-08-28

    Microdimensional triangular magnetic antidot lattice arrays were prepared by varying the speed of substrate rotation. The pre-deposition patterning has been performed using photolithography technique followed by a post-deposition lift-off. Surface morphology taken by atomic force microscopy depicted that the growth mechanism of the grains changes from chain like formation to island structures due to the substrate rotation. Study of magnetization reversal via magneto optic Kerr effect based microscopy revealed reduction of uniaxial anisotropy and increase in domain size with substrate rotation. The relaxation measured under constant magnetic field becomes faster with rotation of the substrate during deposition. The nature of relaxation for the non-rotating sample can be described by a double exponential decay. However, the relaxation for the sample with substrate rotation is well described either by a double exponential or a Fatuzzo-Labrune like single exponential decay, which increases in applied field.

  17. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  18. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and C-13 enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution H-1 and C-13 liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 angstrom. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time greater than 10(exp -8) s(exp -1). The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring (N-14)-(H-1) J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T(sub 1) and T(sub 2) experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in C-13 enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  19. Neodymium 1D systems: targeting new sources for field-induced slow magnetization relaxation.

    PubMed

    Jassal, Amanpreet Kaur; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Corbella, Montserrat; Aravena, Daniel; Ruiz, Eliseo; Hundal, Geeta

    2015-09-28

    Two non-isostructural homometallic 1D neodymium species displaying field-induced slow magnetization relaxations are presented together with theoretical studies. It is established that both systems are better described as organized 1D single molecule magnets (SMMs). Studies show great potential of Nd(III) ions to provide homometallic chains with slow magnetic relaxation.

  20. One-step detection of pathogens and viruses: combining magnetic relaxation switching and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Cha, Ruitao; Sun, Jiashu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-03-24

    We report a sensing methodology that combines magnetic separation (MS) and magnetic relaxation switching (MS-MRS) for one-step detection of bacteria and viruses with high sensitivity and reproducibility. We first employ a magnetic field of 0.01 T to separate the magnetic beads of large size (250 nm in diameter) from those of small size (30 nm in diameter) and use the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the water molecules around the 30 nm magnetic beads (MB30) as the signal readout of the immunoassay. An MS-MRS sensor integrates target enrichment, extraction, and detection into one step, and the entire immunoassay can be completed within 30 min. Compared with a traditional MRS sensor, an MS-MRS sensor shows enhanced sensitivity, better reproducibility, and convenient operation, thus providing a promising platform for point-of-care testing.

  1. Relaxation time measurements by an electronic method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brousseau, R.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a simple electronic system that permits the direct measurement of time constants of decaying signals. The system was used in connection with relaxation experiments on hydrogen and rubidium masers and was found to operate well. The use of a computing counter in the systems gives the possibility of making averages on several experiments and obtaining the standard deviation of the results from the mean. The program for the computing counter is given.

  2. Measuring Cytokine Concentrations Using Magnetic Spectroscopy of Nanoparticle Brownian Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John

    The magnetic particle spectroscopy is a newly developed non-invasive technique for obtaining information about the nanoparticles' micro environment. In this technique the nanoparticles' magnetization, induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies, is processed to analyze rotational freedom of nanoparticles. By analyzing average rotational freedom, it is possible to measure the nanoparticle's relaxation time, and hence get an estimate of the temperature and viscosity of the medium. In molecular concentration sensing, the rotational freedom indicates the number of nanoparticles that are bound by a selected analyte. We have developed microscopic nanoparticles probes to measure the concentration of selected molecules. The nanoparticles are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely. Previously, sensitivity measurements has been reported to be of the factor of 200. However, with our newer perpendicular field setup (US Patent Application Serial No 61/721,378), it possible to sense cytokine concentrations as low as 5 Pico-Molar in-vitro. The excellent sensitivity of this apparatus is due to isolation of the drive field from the signal so the output can be amplified to a higher level. Dartmouth College.

  3. Finite magnetic relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging: comparison of measurements and ferrohydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, R.; Hensley, D.; Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Croft, L. R.; Ceron, S.; Goodwill, P. W.; Conolly, S. M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tomographic imaging technology that detects magnetic nanoparticle tracers by exploiting their non-linear magnetization properties. In order to predict the behavior of nanoparticles in an imager, it is possible to use a non-imaging MPI relaxometer or spectrometer to characterize the behavior of nanoparticles in a controlled setting. In this paper we explore the use of ferrohydrodynamic magnetization equations for predicting the response of particles in an MPI relaxometer. These include a magnetization equation developed by Shliomis (Sh) which has a constant relaxation time and a magnetization equation which uses a field-dependent relaxation time developed by Martsenyuk, Raikher and Shliomis (MRSh). We compare the predictions from these models with measurements and with the predictions based on the Langevin function that assumes instantaneous magnetization response of the nanoparticles. The results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the ferrohydrodynamic models and the measurements without the use of fitting parameters and provide further evidence of the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  4. Optimal Transport, Convection, Magnetic Relaxation and Generalized Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Yann

    2009-10-01

    . Finally, we show how a “stringy” generalization of the AHT model can be related to the magnetic relaxation model studied by Arnold and Moffatt to obtain stationary solutions of the Euler equations with prescribed topology (see Arnold and Khesin in Topological methods in hydrodynamics. Applied mathematical sciences, vol. 125, Springer, Berlin, 1998; Moffatt in J. Fluid Mech. 159:359-378, 1985, Topological aspects of the dynamics of fluids and plasmas. NATO adv. sci. inst. ser. E, appl. sci., vol. 218, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1992; Schonbek in Theory of the Navier-Stokes equations, Ser. adv. math. appl. sci., vol. 47, pp. 179-184, World Sci., Singapore, 1998; Vladimirov et al. in J. Fluid Mech. 390:127-150, 1999; Nishiyama in Bull. Inst. Math. Acad. Sin. (N.S.) 2:139-154, 2007).

  5. Structural origin for low-temperature relaxation features in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S. S.; Regmi, R.; Lawes, G.

    2013-08-01

    In addition to superparamagnetic relaxation associated with coherent spin reversal, magnetic nanoparticles often also exhibit additional relaxation features in the magnetic dissipation at low temperatures. Our studies show that the incorporation of boron, gadolinium and lanthanum into iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles substantially enhances these low-temperature magnetic relaxation properties. The structural and morphological studies of these nanoparticles were conducted using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The doped samples have retained the crystal structure of the parent Fe3O4 nanoparticles, although the shape and size of some of the nanoparticle samples have changed. Using ac magnetic susceptibility measurements, we parameterized the low-temperature magnetic features, with the amplitude of the associated magnetic relaxation showing a dramatic increase for certain dopants. The enhanced frequency-dependent magnetic relaxation features can be attributed to structural, rather than magnetic, defects in these doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These results strongly suggest that the low-temperature magnetic relaxation typically observed in magnetic nanoparticles is a single-particle effect produced by structural defects and is not significantly influenced by interparticle interactions.

  6. An NCN-pincer ligand dysprosium single-ion magnet showing magnetic relaxation via the second excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Granroth, Garrett E.; Powell, Annie K.; Wu, Chunji; Nagler, Stephen E.; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Cui, Dongmei

    2014-06-01

    Single-molecule magnets are compounds that exhibit magnetic bistability purely of molecular origin. The control of anisotropy and suppression of quantum tunneling to obtain a comprehensive picture of the relaxation pathway manifold, is of utmost importance with the ultimate goal of slowing the relaxation dynamics within single-molecule magnets to facilitate their potential applications. Combined ab initio calculations and detailed magnetization dynamics studies reveal the unprecedented relaxation mediated via the second excited state within a new DyNCN system comprising a valence-localized carbon coordinated to a single dysprosium(III) ion. The essentially C2v symmetry of the DyIII ion results in a new relaxation mechanism, hitherto unknown for mononuclear DyIII complexes, opening new perspectives for means of enhancing the anisotropy contribution to the spin-relaxation barrier.

  7. An NCN-pincer ligand dysprosium single-ion magnet showing magnetic relaxation via the second excited state

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Granroth, Garrett E.; Powell, Annie K.; Wu, Chunji; Nagler, Stephen E.; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Cui, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets are compounds that exhibit magnetic bistability purely of molecular origin. The control of anisotropy and suppression of quantum tunneling to obtain a comprehensive picture of the relaxation pathway manifold, is of utmost importance with the ultimate goal of slowing the relaxation dynamics within single-molecule magnets to facilitate their potential applications. Combined ab initio calculations and detailed magnetization dynamics studies reveal the unprecedented relaxation mediated via the second excited state within a new DyNCN system comprising a valence-localized carbon coordinated to a single dysprosium(III) ion. The essentially C2v symmetry of the DyIII ion results in a new relaxation mechanism, hitherto unknown for mononuclear DyIII complexes, opening new perspectives for means of enhancing the anisotropy contribution to the spin-relaxation barrier. PMID:24969218

  8. Relaxation of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in ultra-low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. C.; Chiu, L. L.; Liao, S. H.; Chen, H. H.; Horng, H. E.; Liu, C. W.; Liu, C. I.; Chen, K. L.; Chen, M. J.; Wang, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the spin-spin relaxation rate, 1/T2, and spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, of protons' spins induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids are investigated using a high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device-detected magnetometer in ultra-low fields. The biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles are the anti-human C-reactive protein (antiCRP) coated onto dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxides Fe3O4, which is labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. The ferrofluids are dextran-coated iron oxides. It was found that both 1/T2 and 1/T1 of protons in Fe3O4-antiCRP are enhanced by the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. Additionally, both the 1/T1 and 1/T2 of Fe3O4-antiCRP are close to that of ferrofluids, which are dextran-coated Fe3O4 dispersed in phosphate buffer saline. Characterizing the relaxation of Fe3O4-antiCRP can be useful for biomedical applications.

  9. Correlation of superparamagnetic relaxation with magnetic dipole interaction in capped iron-oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, J.; Stromberg, F.; Darbandi, M.; Schöppner, C.; Keune, W.; Wende, H.

    2015-01-01

    Six nanometer sized iron-oxide nanoparticles capped with an organic surfactant and/or silica shell of various thicknesses have been synthesized by a microemulsion method to enable controllable contributions of interparticle magnetic dipole interaction via tunable interparticle distances. Bare particles with direct surface contact were used as a reference to distinguish between interparticle interaction and surface effects by use of Mössbauer spectroscopy. Superparamagnetic relaxation behaviour was analyzed by SQUID-magnetometry techniques, showing a decrease of the blocking temperature with decreasing interparticle interaction energies kBT0 obtained by AC susceptibility. A many-state relaxation model enabled us to describe experimental Mössbauer spectra, leading to an effective anisotropy constant Keff ≈ 45 kJm-3 in case of weakly interacting particles, consistent with results from ferromagnetic resonance. Our unique multi-technique approach, spanning a huge regime of characteristic time windows from about 10 s to 5 ns, provides a concise picture of the correlation of superparamagnetic relaxation with interparticle magnetic dipole interaction.

  10. Magnetic Relaxation and Coercivity of Finite-size Single Chain Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredig, Thomas; Byrne, Matthew; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic coercivity of hysteresis loops for iron phthalocyanine thin films depends on the iron chain length and the measurement sweep speed below 5 K. The average one-dimensional (1D) iron chain length in samples is controlled during deposition. These 1D iron chains can be tuned over one order of magnitude with the shortest chain having 100 elements. We show that the coercivity strongly increases with the average length of the iron chains, which self-assemble parallel to the substrate surface. Magnetic relaxation and sweep speed data suggest spin dynamics play an important role. Implementing Glauber dynamics with a finite-sized 1D Ising model provides qualitative agreement with experimental data. This suggests that iron phthalocyanine thin films act as single chain magnets and provide a solid test system for tunable finite-sized magnetic chains. This research has been supported with the NSF-DMR 0847552 grant.

  11. Magnetic relaxation for Mn-based compounds exhibiting the Larmor precession at THz wave range frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, S.; Iihama, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Sugihara, A.; Ranjbar, R.; Suzuki, K. Z.

    2016-10-01

    Mn-based hard magnets are potentially suitable for advanced ultra-high frequency spintronics applications because they exhibit the Larmor precession of magnetization at THz wave-range frequencies with low magnetic relaxation. However, the low magnetic relaxation properties are not well understood; thus, a more detailed study is necessary. In this study, magnetization precessions in L10 Mn1.54Ga, D022 Mn2.12Ga, and C38 MnAlGe epitaxial films grown on MgO substrates were investigated using an all-optical pump-probe method under a magnetic field of ˜20 kOe. The coherent magnetization precessions at frequencies of more than 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 THz for the C38 MnAlGe, L10 Mn1.54Ga, and D022 Mn2.12Ga films, respectively, were clearly measured. The effective damping constant for the C38 MnAlGe film was smaller than the previously reported value measured at 10 kOe by a factor of 2, whereas those showed a large angular dependence. The effective damping constants for the L10 Mn1.54Ga and D022 Mn2.12Ga films were independent of the field angle and approximately identical to the values measured at 10 kOe. Thus, it was concluded that the values for the Gilbert damping constant, α, were 0.008 and 0.012 for the L10 Mn1.54Ga and D022 Mn2.12Ga films, respectively. The possible origin of the discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical α values for these films is discussed.

  12. Analytical Methods for Characterizing Magnetic Resonance Probes

    PubMed Central

    Manus, Lisa M.; Strauch, Renee C.; Hung, Andy H.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The efficiency of Gd(III) contrast agents in magnetic resonance image enhancement is governed by a set of tunable structural parameters. Understanding and measuring these parameters requires specific analytical techniques. This Feature describes strategies to optimize each of the critical Gd(III) relaxation parameters for molecular imaging applications and the methods employed for their evaluation. PMID:22624599

  13. [Fluorescent and Magnetic Relaxation Switch Immunosensor for the Detecting Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica in Water Samples].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-bai; Zhang, Yan; An, Wen-ting; Wei, Yan-li; Wang, Yu; Shuang, Shao-min

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroimmunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic relaxation switch (MRS) immunoassay based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMN) were constructed to detect Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) in water samples. In fluoroimmunoassay, magnetic beads was conjugated with S. enterica capture antibody (MB-Ab2) to enrich S. enterica from sample solution, then the QDs was conjugated with the S. enterica detection antibody (QDs-Ab1) to detect S. enterica based on sandwich immunoassay format. And the fluorescence intensity is positive related to the bacteria concentration of the sample. Results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of this method was 102 cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 2 h. In MRS assay, magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugate (MN-Ab1) can switch their dispersed and aggregated state in the presence of the target. This state of change can modulate the spin-spin relaxation time (T₂) of the neighboring water molecule. The change in T₂(ΔT₂) positively correlates with the amount of the target in the sample. Thus, AT can be used as a detection signal in MRS immunosensors. Results showed that LOD of MRS sensor for S. enterica was 10³ cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 0.5 h. Two methods were compared in terms of advantages and disadvantages in detecting S. enterica. PMID:26978918

  14. Correlation between magnetic hysteresis and magnetic relaxation in YBaCuO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pust, L.; Kadlecova, J.; Jirsa, M.; Durcok, S. )

    1990-02-01

    The dependence of the magnetic moment m obtained from the hysteresis loops on the speed of the magnetic field sweep {dot H} = dH{sub ext}/dt is explained on the basis of Anderson's interpretation of the magnetic flux creep. In addition, a phenomenological model is suggested which predicts a linear dependence of m on In {vert bar}{dot H}{vert bar} with the slope {partial derivative}m/{partial derivative}In {vert bar}{dot H}{vert bar}, numerically equal to the relaxation rate {partial derivative}m/{partial derivative}In(t) from the usual magnetic relaxation. The model here presented also enables one to compare the critical state in the superconductor at a field sweep rate {dot H} with the critical state at some time t{sub eff} after a step change of H{sub ext}. The values of {dot H} analyzed in our experiments actually correspond to the critical state at times t{sub eff} between 0.04 and 4 sec after an imaginary large step change of H{sub ext}.

  15. Spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Rıza E-mail: rerdem29@hotmail.com; Gülpınar, Gül; Yalçın, Orhan; Pawlak, Andrzej

    2014-07-21

    A qualitative study of the spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field is presented. We have first determined the time dependence of the deviation of the lattice distortion parameter δΔ from the equilibrium state within framework of a technique combining the statistical equilibrium theory based on the transfer matrix method and the linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. We have shown that the time dependence of the lattice distortion parameter is characterized by a single time constant (τ) which diverges around the critical point in both dimerized (Δ≠0) and uniform (Δ=0) phase regions. When the temperature and magnetic field are fixed to certain values, the time τ depends only on exchange coupling between the spins. It is a characteristic time associated with the long wavelength fluctuations of distortion. We have also taken into account the effects of spatial fluctuations on the relaxation time using the full Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional. We have found an explicit expression for the relaxation time as a function of temperature, coupling constant and wave vector (q) and shown that the critical mode corresponds to the case q=0. Finally, our results are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the results obtained in recent experimental study on synchrotron x-ray scattering and muon spin relaxation in diluted material Cu{sub 1−y}Mg{sub y}GeO{sub 3} where the composition y is very close to 0.0209. These results can be considered as natural extensions of some previous works on static aspects of the problem.

  16. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method.

  17. Characterizing longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of ferrofluids in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Jye; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Yang, Hong-Chang; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Yi-Jia; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Shieh-Yueh

    2011-12-01

    Shortening spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) or spin-spin relaxation rates (1/T2) is the purpose of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. In this work, an ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and imager are set up to characterize the spin relaxation rates of Fe3O4 superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) for image contrast. It was found that both 1/T1 and 1/T2 increase linearly when the magnetic susceptibility χ of SPIO increases by increasing the concentration of SPIO dispersed in water. In an applied field, magnetic moments of SPIO generate microscopic field gradients that weaken the field homogeneity, in turn de-phasing the proton's nuclear spin and enhancing the relaxation rates. A T1-contrast image is demonstrated, using SPIO as the contrast agent and high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices as the detector. T1-contrast imaging in microtesla fields might provide a potential modality for discriminating cancer.

  18. Magnetic particle hyperthermia: Néel relaxation in magnetic nanoparticles under circularly polarized field.

    PubMed

    de Châtel, P F; Nándori, I; Hakl, J; Mészáros, S; Vad, K

    2009-03-25

    The mechanism of magnetization reversal in single-domain ferromagnetic particles is of interest in many applications, in most of which losses must be minimized. In cancer therapy by hyperthermia the opposite requirement prevails: the specific loss power should be maximized. Of the mechanisms of dissipation, here we study the effect of Néel relaxation on magnetic nanoparticles unable to move or rotate and compare the losses in linearly and circularly polarized fields. We present exact analytical solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation as derived from the Gilbert equation and use the calculated time-dependent magnetizations to find the energy loss per cycle. In frequencies lower than the Larmor frequency, linear polarization is found to be the better source of heat power, at high frequencies (beyond the Larmor frequency) circular polarization is preferable.

  19. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  20. In situ triaxial magnetic field compensation for the spin-exchange-relaxation-free atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Qin, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) atomic magnetometer is an ultra-high sensitivity magnetometer, but it must be operated in a magnetic field with strength less than about 10 nT. Magnetic field compensation is an effective way to shield the magnetic field, and this paper demonstrates an in situ triaxial magnetic field compensation system for operating the SERF atomic magnetometer. The proposed hardware is based on optical pumping, which uses some part of the SERF atomic magnetometer itself, and the compensation method is implemented by analyzing the dynamics of the atomic spin. The experimental setup for this compensation system is described, and with this configuration, a residual magnetic field of strength less than 2 nT (±0.38 nT in the x axis, ±0.43 nT in the y axis, and ±1.62 nT in the z axis) has been achieved after compensation. The SERF atomic magnetometer was then used to verify that the residual triaxial magnetic fields were coincident with what were achieved by the compensation system.

  1. Slowing hot-carrier relaxation in graphene using a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plochocka, P.; Kossacki, P.; Golnik, A.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Berger, C.; de Heer, W. A.; Potemski, M.

    2009-12-01

    A degenerate pump-probe technique is used to investigate the nonequilibrium carrier dynamics in multilayer graphene. Two distinctly different dynamics of the carrier relaxation are observed. A fast relaxation (˜50fs) of the carriers after the initial effect of phase-space filling followed by a slower relaxation (˜4ps) due to thermalization. Both relaxation processes are less efficient when a magnetic field is applied at low temperatures which is attributed to the suppression of the electron-electron Auger scattering due to the nonequidistant Landau-level spacing of the Dirac fermions in graphene.

  2. In Vitro Longitudinal Relaxivity Profile of Gd(ABE-DTTA), an Investigational Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Kiss, Pal; Rab, Andras; Suranyi, Pal; Lenkey, Zsofia; Simor, Tamas; Bryant, Robert G.; Elgavish, Gabriel A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose MRI contrast agents (CA) whose contrast enhancement remains relatively high even at the higher end of the magnetic field strength range would be desirable. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate such a desired magnetic field dependency of the longitudinal relaxivity for an experimental MRI CA, Gd(ABE-DTTA). Materials and Methods The relaxivity of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA) was measured by Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) in the range of 0.0002 to 1T. Two MRI and five NMR instruments were used to cover the range between 1.5 to 20T. Parallel measurement of a Gd-DTPA sample was performed throughout as reference. All measurements were carried out at 37°C and pH 7.4. Results The relaxivity values of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA) measured at 1.5, 3, and 7T, within the presently clinically relevant magnetic field range, were 15.3, 11.8, 12.4 s-1mM-1 and 18.1, 16.7, and 13.5 s-1mM-1, respectively. The control 4 mM Gd-DTPA relaxivities at the same magnetic fields were 3.6, 3.3, and 3.0 s-1mM-1, respectively. Conclusions The longitudinal relaxivity of Gd(ABE-DTTA) measured within the presently clinically relevant field range is three to five times higher than that of most commercially available agents. Thus, Gd(ABE-DTTA) could be a practical choice at any field strength currently used in clinical imaging including those at the higher end. PMID:26872055

  3. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and (1)H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Maria R; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications. PMID:27265726

  4. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  5. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15–20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  6. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian Ananta; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L

    2014-11-21

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)(-1) were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.

  7. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  8. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  9. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  10. Recent developments in the inversion by the method of relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    The relaxation method for inverse solution of the full radiative transfer equation is generalized to solve for all the atmospheric parameters that appear in the integrand as functions or functionals, without any a priori information about the expected solution. Illustrations are presented using the 7.5 micron CH4 band for determining temperature profiles in the Jovian atmosphere, and the 6.3 micron band for determining the water vapor mixing ratio in the earth's atmosphere.

  11. New electric field methods in chemical relaxation spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Persoons, A; Hellemans, L

    1978-01-01

    New stationary relaxation methods for the investigation of ionic and dipolar equilibria are presented. The methods are based on the measurement of non-linearities in conductance and permittivity under high electric field conditions. The chemical contributions to the nonlinear effects are discussed in their static as well as their dynamic behavior. A sampling of experimental results shows the potential and range of possible applications of the new techniques. It is shown that these methods will become useful in the study of nonlinear responses to perturbation, in view of the general applicability of the experimental principles involved. PMID:708817

  12. Measuring relative acetylcholine receptor agonist binding by selective proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Behling, R W; Yamane, T; Navon, G; Sammon, M J; Jelinski, L W

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented that uses selective proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements of nicotine in the presence of the acetylcholine receptor to obtain relative binding constants for acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and muscarine. For receptors from Torpedo californica the results show that (a) the binding constants are in the order acetylcholine greater than nicotine greater than carbamylcholine greater than muscarine; (b) selective NMR measurements provide a rapid and direct method for monitoring both the specific and nonspecific binding of agonists to these receptors and to the lipid; (c) alpha-bungarotoxin can be used to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding to the receptor; (d) the receptor--substrate interaction causes a large change in the selective relaxation time of the agonists even at concentrations 100x greater than that of the receptor. This last observation means that these measurements provide a rapid method to monitor drug binding when only small amounts of receptor are available. Furthermore, the binding strategies presented here may be useful for the NMR determination of the conformation of the ligand in its bound state. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3395661

  13. Transmitted light relaxation and microstructure evolution of ferrofluids under gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Li, Decai; Li, Feng; Zhu, Quanshui; Xie, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Using light transmission experiments and optical microscope observations with a longitudinal gradient magnetic field configuration, the relationship between the behavior of the transmitted light relaxation and the microstructure evolution of ionic ferrofluids in the central region of an axisymmetric field is investigated. Under a low-gradient magnetic field, there are two types of relaxation process. When a field is applied, the transmitted light intensity decreases to a minimum within a time on the order of 101-102 s. It is then gradually restored, approaching its initial value within a time on the order of 102 s. This is type I relaxation, which corresponds to the formation of magnetic columns. After the transmission reaches this value, it either increases or decreases slowly, stabilizing within a time on the order of 103 s, according to the direction of the field gradient. This is a type II relaxation, which results from the shadowing effect, corresponding to the motion of the magnetic columns under the application of a gradient force. Under a magnetic field with a centripetal high-gradient (magnetic materials subjected to a force pointing toward the center of the axisymmetric field), the transmitted light intensity decreases monotonously and more slowly than that under a low-gradient field. Magnetic transport and separation resulted from magnetophoresis under high-gradient fields, changing the formation dynamics of the local columns and influencing the final state of the column system.

  14. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  15. Magnetic field effects on spatial relaxation of swarm particles in the idealized steady-state Townsend experiment.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Robson, R E; White, R D

    2006-08-01

    The effect of a magnetic field at right angles to an electric field on spatial relaxation of a swarm of charged particles emitted by a plane source into a gas-the idealized steady-state Townsend experiment-is examined. The Boltzmann equation is solved using an adaptation of the "two-temperature" moment method, involving a Burnett function representation of the velocity distribution function, a technique which is valid for charged particles of arbitrary mass and is intrinsically of a "multiterm" nature. Results are presented for electrons in model and real gases, and are benchmarked against an exact analytical solution of the Boltzmann equation for a particular collision model. The application of a magnetic field significantly alters the relaxation profiles: in general, it can both enhance or retard spatial relaxation of transport properties. For methane gas, a multiterm analysis is essential to correctly account for the relaxation near the source, even though a two-term approximation may be sufficient when the magnetic field is sufficiently strong and hydrodynamic conditions dominate.

  16. Anomalous D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report an anomalous scaling of the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation with the momentum relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. We focus on the case in which the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the spin-orbit-coupling-induced effective magnetic field and its magnitude is much larger than the latter one. It is found that the longitudinal spin relaxation time is proportional to the momentum relaxation time even in the strong-scattering limit, indicating that the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation demonstrates Elliott-Yafet-like behavior. Moreover, the transverse spin relaxation time is proportional (inversely proportional) to the momentum relaxation time in the strong- (weak-) scattering limit, both in the opposite trends against the well-established conventional D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation behaviors. We further demonstrate that all the above anomalous scaling relations come from the unique form of the effective inhomogeneous broadening.

  17. Magnetism, coherent many-particle dynamics, and relaxation with ultracold bosons in optical superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, T.; Kasztelan, C.; McCulloch, I. P.; Schollwoeck, U.

    2009-05-15

    We study how well magnetic models can be implemented with ultracold bosonic atoms of two different hyperfine states in an optical superlattice. The system is captured by a two-species Bose-Hubbard model, but realizes in a certain parameter regime actually the physics of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg magnet, describing the second-order hopping processes. Tuning of the superlattice allows for controlling the effect of fast first-order processes versus the slower second-order ones. Using the density-matrix renormalization-group method, we provide the evolution of typical experimentally available observables. The validity of the description via the Heisenberg model, depending on the parameters of the Hubbard model, is studied numerically and analytically. The analysis is also motivated by recent experiments [S. Foelling et al., Nature (London) 448, 1029 (2007); S. Trotzky et al., Science 319, 295 (2008)] where coherent two-particle dynamics with ultracold bosonic atoms in isolated double wells were realized. We provide theoretical background for the next step, the observation of coherent many-particle dynamics after coupling the double wells. Contrary to the case of isolated double wells, relaxation of local observables can be observed. The tunability between the Bose-Hubbard model and the Heisenberg model in this setup could be used to study experimentally the differences in equilibration processes for nonintegrable and Bethe ansatz integrable models. We show that the relaxation in the Heisenberg model is connected to a phase averaging effect, which is in contrast to the typical scattering driven thermalization in nonintegrable models. We discuss the preparation of magnetic ground states by adiabatic tuning of the superlattice parameters.

  18. Effect of magnetic field and iron content on NMR proton relaxation of liver, spleen and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocq, Aline; Luhmer, Michel; Saussez, Sven; Louryan, Stéphane; Gillis, Pierre; Gossuin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Iron accumulation is observed in liver and spleen during hemochromatosis and important neurodegenerative diseases involve iron overload in brain. Storage of iron is ensured by ferritin, which contains a magnetic core. It causes a darkening on T2 -weighted MR images. This work aims at improving the understanding of the NMR relaxation of iron-loaded human tissues, which is necessary to develop protocols of iron content measurements by MRI. Relaxation times measurements on brain, liver and spleen samples were realized at different magnetic fields. Iron content was determined by atomic emission spectroscopy. For all samples, the longitudinal relaxation rate (1/T1 ) of tissue protons decreases with the magnetic field up to 1 T, independently of iron content, while their transverse relaxation rate (1/T2 ) strongly increases with the field, either linearly or quadratically, or a combination thereof. The extent of the inter-echo time dependence of 1/T2 also varies according to the sample. A combination of theoretical models is necessary to describe the relaxation of iron-containing tissues. This can be due to the presence, inside tissues, of ferritin clusters of different sizes and densities. When considering all samples, a correlation (r(2)  = 0.6) between 1/T1 and iron concentration is observed at 7.0 T. In contrast the correlation between 1/T2 and iron content is poor, even at high field (r(2)  = 0.14 at 7.0 T). Our results show that MRI methods based on T1 or T2 measurements will easily detect an iron overloading at high magnetic field, but will not provide an accurate quantification of tissue iron content at low iron concentrations. PMID:24954138

  19. Resonantly enhanced spin-lattice relaxation of Mn2 + ions in diluted magnetic (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Ryabchenko, S. M.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Maksimov, A. A.; Semenov, Yu. G.; Braukmann, D.; Rautert, J.; Löw, U.; Godlewski, M.; Waag, A.; Bayer, M.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of spin-lattice relaxation in the magnetic Mn2 + ion system of (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum-well structures are studied using optical methods. Pronounced cusps are found in the giant Zeeman shift of the quantum-well exciton photoluminescence at specific magnetic fields below 10 T, when the Mn spin system is heated by photogenerated carriers. The spin-lattice relaxation time of the Mn ions is resonantly accelerated at the cusp magnetic fields. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that a cusp occurs at a spin-level mixing of single Mn2 + ions and a quick-relaxing cluster of nearest-neighbor Mn ions, which can be described as intrinsic cross-relaxation resonance within the Mn spin system.

  20. Electron spin relaxation can enhance the performance of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Sowa, Jakub K.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    The radical pair model of the avian magnetoreceptor relies on long-lived electron spin coherence. Dephasing, resulting from interactions of the spins with their fluctuating environment, is generally assumed to degrade the sensitivity of this compass to the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Here we argue that certain spin relaxation mechanisms can enhance its performance. We focus on the flavin–tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome, currently the only candidate magnetoreceptor molecule. Correlation functions for fluctuations in the distance between the two radicals in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 1 were obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and used to calculate the spin relaxation caused by modulation of the exchange and dipolar interactions. We find that intermediate spin relaxation rates afford substantial enhancements in the sensitivity of the reaction yields to an Earth-strength magnetic field. Supported by calculations using toy radical pair models, we argue that these enhancements could be consistent with the molecular dynamics and magnetic interactions in avian cryptochromes.

  1. Effect of surfactant and solvent on spin-lattice relaxation dynamics of magnetic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sourav; Chen, Hsiang-Yun; Chen, Tai-Yen; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Son, Dong Hee

    2013-04-25

    The effect of varying the surfactant and solvent medium on the dynamics of spin-lattice relaxation in photoexcited Fe3O4 nanocrystals has been investigated by measuring the time-dependent magnetization employing pump-probe transient Faraday rotation technique. The variation of the surfactants having surface-binding functional groups modified not only the static magnetization but also the dynamics of the recovery of the magnetization occurring via spin-lattice relaxation in the photoexcited Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The variation of the polarity and size of the solvent molecules can also influence the spin-lattice relaxation dynamics. However, the effect is limited to the nanocrystals having sufficiently permeable surfactant layer, where the small solvent molecules (e.g., water) can access the surface and dynamically modify the ligand field on the surface. PMID:23003213

  2. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ante(k) (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries. PMID:25494741

  3. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ante(k) (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  4. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  5. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T{sub 2}, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T{sub 2} provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T{sub 2} distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T{sub 2} is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form −ant{sub e}{sup k} (where n is the number and t{sub e} the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T{sub 2} distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  6. The effect of fast electronic relaxation times on the 1H and 7Li magnetic relaxation dispersion modulated by the translational encounter of cation/cation pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesen, T. R. J.; Bryant, R. G.

    1999-04-01

    1H and 7Li magnetic relaxation dispersion data are presented, showing the field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rates of (H 3C) 4N + and Li(H 2O) n+ in Gd(III) and Mn(II) solutions. The limit of short electronic relaxation time is observed for Gd(III) up to about 7 T, in contrast to Mn(II) solutions wherein the intermolecular contribution to nuclear relaxation is dominated by relative translational diffusion. These results contradict the assumption made by Fries et al. (Chem. Phys. Lett. 286 (1998) 93) that the electron relaxation times may be neglected in the analysis of tetramethylammonium proton relaxation rates in Gd(III) solutions.

  7. Direct Simulation of Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Rates and Line Shapes from Molecular Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, David P.; Baveye, Philippe C.; Robinson, Bruce H.

    2012-01-01

    We simulate spin relaxation processes, which may be measured by either continuous wave or pulsed magnetic resonance techniques, using trajectory-based simulation methodologies. The spin–lattice relaxation rates are extracted numerically from the relaxation simulations. The rates obtained from the numerical fitting of the relaxation curves are compared to those obtained by direct simulation from the relaxation Bloch–Wangsness–Abragam– Redfield theory (BWART). We have restricted our study to anisotropic rigid-body rotational processes, and to the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and a single spin–spin dipolar (END) coupling mechanisms. Examples using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) nitroxide and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) deuterium quadrupolar systems are provided. The objective is to compare those rates obtained by numerical simulations with the rates obtained by BWART. There is excellent agreement between the simulated and BWART rates for a Hamiltonian describing a single spin (an electron) interacting with the bath through the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) mechanism undergoing anisotropic rotational diffusion. In contrast, when the Hamiltonian contains both the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and the spin–spin dipolar (END) mechanisms, the decay rate of a single exponential fit of the simulated spin–lattice relaxation rate is up to a factor of 0.2 smaller than that predicted by BWART. When the relaxation curves are fit to a double exponential, the slow and fast rates extracted from the decay curves bound the BWART prediction. An extended BWART theory, in the literature, includes the need for multiple relaxation rates and indicates that the multiexponential decay is due to the combined effects of direct and cross-relaxation mechanisms. PMID:22540276

  8. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N.; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values

  9. Phase diagram and magnetic relaxation phenomena in Cu2OSeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, F.; Wilhelm, H.; Aqeel, A.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Lefering, A. J. E.; Brück, E. H.; Pappas, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present an investigation of the magnetic-field-temperature phase diagram of Cu2OSeO3 based on dc magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements covering a broad frequency range of four orders of magnitude, from very low frequencies reaching 0.1 Hz up to 1 kHz. The experiments were performed in the vicinity of Tc=58.2 K and around the skyrmion lattice A phase. At the borders between the different phases the characteristic relaxation times reach several milliseconds and the relaxation is nonexponential. Consequently the borders between the different phases depend on the specific criteria and frequency used and an unambiguous determination is not possible.

  10. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Danby, G.

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager includes a generator for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager also includes a sensor for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object. 25 figs.

  11. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James; Reich, Morris; Danby, Gordon

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager 10 includes a generator 18 for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager 10 also includes a sensor 20 for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object.

  12. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678

  13. Tuning the Magnetic Interactions and Relaxation Dynamics of Dy2 Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shufang; Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2015-09-28

    Efficient modulation of single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior was realized by deliberate structural modification of the Dy2 cores of [Dy2(a'povh)2(OAc)2(DMF)2] (1) and [Zn2Dy2(a'povh)2(OAc)6]⋅4 H2O (2; H2a'povh = N'-[amino(pyrimidin-2-yl)methylene]-o-vanilloyl hydrazine). Compound 1 having fourfold linkage between the two dysprosium ions shows high-performance SMM behavior with a thermal energy barrier of 322.1 K, whereas only slow relaxation is observed for compound 2 with only twofold connection between the dysprosium ions. This remarkable discrepancy is mainly because of strong axiality in 1 due to one pronounced covalent bond, as revealed by experimental and theoretical investigations. The significant antiferromagnetic interaction derived from bis(μ2-O) and two acetate bridging groups was found to be crucial in leading to a nonmagnetic ground state in 1, by suppressing zero-field quantum tunneling of magnetization. PMID:26272604

  14. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R; St Pierre, Tim G; Mefford, O Thompson

    2013-03-01

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R(2), is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R(2) measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications. PMID:23389324

  15. Spin relaxation and linear-in-electric-field frequency shift in an arbitrary, time-independent magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Steven Michael

    2010-12-03

    A method is presented to calculate the spin relaxation times T{sub 1}, T{sub 2} due to a nonuniform magnetic field, and the linear-in-electric-field precession frequency shift {delta}{omega}{sub E} when an electric field is present, in the diffusion approximation for spins confined to a rectangular cell. It is found that the rectangular cell geometry admits of a general result for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and {delta}{omega}{sub E} in terms of the spatial cosine-transform components of the magnetic field.

  16. Relaxation method of compensation in an optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Daiuto, Brian J.

    1987-01-01

    An iterative method is proposed for the sharpening of programmable filters in a 4-f optical correlator. Continuously variable spatial light modulators (SLMs) permit the fine adjustment of optical processing filters so as to compensate for the departures from ideal behavior of a real optical system. Although motivated by the development of continuously variable phase-only SLMs, the proposed sharpening method is also applicable to amplitude modulators and, with appropriate adjustments, to binary modulators as well. A computer simulation is presented that illustrates the potential effectiveness of the method: an image is placed on the input to the correlator, and its corresponding phase-only filter is adjusted (allowed to relax) so as to produce a progressively brighter and more centralized peak in the correlation plane. The technique is highly robust against the form of the system's departure from ideal behavior.

  17. Magnetic relaxation induced by transverse flux shaking in MgB2 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzuriaga, J.; Badía-Majós, A.; Nieva, G.; Giordano, J. L.; López, C.; Serquis, A.; Serrano, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report on measurements and numerical simulations of the behavior of MgB2 superconductors when magnetic field components are applied along mutually perpendicular directions. By closely matching the geometry in simulations and measurements, full quantitative agreement is found. The critical state theory and a single phenomenological law, i.e. the field dependence of the critical current density Jc(B), are sufficient for a full quantitative description of the measurements. These were performed in thick strips of carbon nanotube doped MgB2 samples. Magnetization was measured in two orthogonal directions using a SQUID magnetometer. Magnetic relaxation effects induced by the application of an oscillatory perpendicular field were observed and simulated numerically. The measurements confirm the numerical predictions, that two relaxation regimes appear, depending on the amplitude of the applied magnetic field. The overall agreement constitutes a convincing validation of the critical state model and the numerical procedures used.

  18. Switching of Slow Magnetic Relaxation Dynamics in Mononuclear Dysprosium(III) Compounds with Charge Density.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Soo; Baldoví, José J; Lee, Woo Ram; Song, Jeong Hwa; Yoon, Sung Won; Suh, Byoung Jin; Coronado, Eugenio; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Hong, Chang Seop

    2016-06-01

    The symmetry around a Dy ion is recognized to be a crucial parameter dictating magnetization relaxation dynamics. We prepared two similar square-antiprismatic complexes, [Dy(LOMe)2(H2O)2](PF6) (1) and Dy(LOMe)2(NO3) (2), where LOMe = [CpCo{P(O)(O(CH3))2}3], including either two neutral water molecules (1) or an anionic nitrate ligand (2). We demonstrated that in this case relaxation dynamics is dramatically affected by the introduction of a charged ligand, stabilizing the easy axis of magnetization along the nitrate direction. We also showed that the application of either a direct-current field or chemical dilution effectively stops quantum tunneling in the ground state of 2, thereby increasing the relaxation time by over 3 orders of magnitude at 3.5 K. PMID:27186802

  19. Fast neutron irradiation effects on magnetization relaxation in YBCO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lensink, J.G.; Griessen, R.; Wiesinger, H.P.; Sauerzopf, F.M.; Weber, H.W.; Crabtree, G.W.

    1991-07-01

    A high-quality YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystal has been investigated by torque magnetometry prior to and following fast neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2{times}10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). In addition to large enhancements of the critical current densities, which have been observed in similar form previously by Sauerzopf et al, we find a dramatic change in the relaxation behavior following irradiation. At low temperatures ({le} 50 k) the relaxation rates are lowered by factors up to 4 in the irradiated state in a magnetic field of 1.5 T. At higher temperatures, on the other hand, they are enhanced compared to the unirradiated state. Both before and after irradiation, the magnetization relaxation follows a logarithmic time dependence, which we ascribe to thermally activated flux motion.

  20. Scalar relaxation of the second kind - a potential source of information on the dynamics of molecular movements. 2. Magnetic dipole moments and magnetic shielding of bromine nuclei.

    PubMed

    Gryff-Keller, Adam; Molchanov, Sergey; Wodyński, Artur

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we continue the exploration of possibilities, limitations, and methodological problems of the studies based on measurements of the nuclear spin relaxation rates running via the scalar relaxation of the second kind (SC2) mechanism. The attention has been focused on the (13)C-(79)Br and (13)C-(81)Br systems in organic bromo compounds, which are characterized by exceptionally small differences of Larmor frequencies, ΔωCBr, of the coupled nuclei. This unique property enables experimental observation of longitudinal SC2 relaxation of (13)C nuclei, which makes investigation of the SC2 relaxation rates an attractive experimental method of determination of spin-spin coupling constants and relaxation rates of quadrupole bromine nuclei, both types of parameters being hardly accessible by direct measurements. A careful examination of the methodology used in SC2 relaxation studies of carbon-bromine systems reveals, however, some disturbing facts that could burden the results with systematic inaccuracies. Namely, the way of calculating the Larmor frequency differences between (13)C and bromine isotopes, ΔωCBr, may cause some reservations. In this work, the values of (79)Br and (81)Br magnetogyric ratios have been rechecked using bromine NMR data for the KBr·Kryptofix 222 complex in acetonitrile solution and the results of the advanced calculations of the magnetic shielding of the bromine nucleus in the Br(-) anion. Moreover, it has been pointed out that in the case of (13)C-(79)Br, the magnetic shielding of the bromine nucleus in the investigated molecule must not be neglected during the calculation of the ΔωCBr parameter. Some recommendations concerning the exploitation of available theoretical methods to calculate bromine shielding constants for bromo compounds have also been formulated, keeping in mind relativistic effects.

  1. Effects of Off-Resonance Irradiation, Cross-Relaxation, and Chemical Exchange on Steady-State Magnetization and Effective Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-04-01

    In the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field, recovery of longitudinal magnetization to a steady state is not purely monoexponential. Under reasonable conditions with zero initial magnetization, recovery is nearly exponential and an effective relaxation rate constant R1eff = 1/T1eff can be obtained. Exact and approximate formulas for R1eff and steady-state magnetization are derived from the Bloch equations for spins undergoing cross-relaxation and chemical exchange between two sites in the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field. The relaxation formulas require that the magnetization of one spin is constant, but not necessarily zero, while the other spin relaxes. Extension to three sites with one radiofrequency field is explained. The special cases of off-resonance effects alone and with cross-relaxation or chemical exchange, cross-relaxation alone, and chemical exchange alone are compared. The inaccuracy in saturation transfer measurements of exchange rate constants by published formulas is discussed for the creatine kinase reaction.

  2. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik W.; Dalslet, Bjarke T.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Johansson, Christer; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple `click-on' fluidic system with integrated electrical contacts, which is suited for electrical measurements on chips in microfluidic systems. We show that microscopic magnetic field sensors based on the planar Hall effect can be used for detecting the complex magnetic response using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation with a constant hydrodynamic bead diameter when the temperature dependence of the viscosity of water is taken into account. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of performing measurements of the Brownian relaxation response in a lab-on-a-chip system and constitute the first step towards an integrated biosensor based on the detection of the dynamic response of magnetic beads.

  3. A novel oxime-derived 3d-4f single-molecule magnet exhibiting two single-ion magnetic relaxations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Yang, En-Cui; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new oxime-derived {DyNi} cluster with a paramagnetic butterfly-shaped Dy core and peripheral diamagnetic planar-square Ni(II) ions was solvothermally synthesized. The weak ferromagnetically coupled cluster exhibits field-induced single-molecule magnetic behavior with two thermally activated single-ion relaxations. PMID:27377056

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation in muscle water.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M; Puon, P S

    1981-01-01

    The origin of the nonexponentiality of proton spin echoes of skeletal muscle has been carefully examined. It is shown that the slowly decaying part of the proton spin echoes is not due to extracellular water. First, for muscle from mice with in vivo deuteration, the deuteron spin echoes were also nonexponential, but the slowly decaying part had a larger weighing factor. Second, for glycerinated muscle in which cell membranes were disrupted, the proton spin echoes were similar to those in intact muscle. Third, the nonexponentiality of the proton spin echoes in intact muscle increased when postmortem rigor set in. Finally, when the lifetimes of extracellular water and intracellular water were taken into account in the exchange, it was found that the two types of water would not give two resolvable exponentials with the observed decay constants. It is suggested that the unusually short T2's and the nonexponential character of the spin echoes of proton and deuteron in muscle water are mainly due to hydrogen exchange between water and functional groups in the protein filaments. These groups have large dipolar or quadrupolar splittings, and undergo hydrogen exchange with water at intermediate rates. The exchange processes and their effects on the spin echoes are pH-dependent. The dependence of transverse relaxation of pH was observed in glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers. PMID:7272437

  5. First-passage-time approach to overbarrier relaxation of magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klik, Ivo; Gunther, Leon

    1990-08-01

    We consider the irreversible dynamics of the magnetization vector M in a single-domain particle. The dynamics is given by a stochastic phenomenological equation due to Gilbert. It contains a damping field proportional to M and a corresponding white noise field component. The probability distribution function satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation derived by Brown. We give the overbarrier decay rate κ out of a metastable minimum. First we rederive the well-known expression for κ for an axially symmetric model. We argue that this result is unphysical. For systems of general point symmetry of the magnetic anisotropy energy we give κ in both the low-damping and intermediate- to high-damping limits.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  7. A method for measuring the Néel relaxation time in a frozen ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, Ronald J.; Thakur, Jagdish; Mosher, Nathaniel; Perkins-Harbin, Emily; Kumon, Ronald E.; Wang, Lihua; Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem P.

    2015-08-01

    We report a novel method of determining the average Néel relaxation time and its temperature dependence by calculating derivatives of the measured time dependence of temperature for a frozen ferrofluid exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The ferrofluid, composed of dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (diameter 13.7 nm ± 4.7 nm), was synthesized via wet chemical precipitation and characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An alternating magnetic field of constant amplitude ( H 0 = 20 kA/m) driven at frequencies of 171 kHz, 232 kHz, and 343 kHz was used to determine the temperature dependent magnetic energy absorption rate in the temperature range from 160 K to 210 K. We found that the specific absorption rate of the ferrofluid decreased monotonically with temperature over this range at the given frequencies. From these measured data, we determined the temperature dependence of the Néel relaxation time and estimate a room-temperature magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant of 40 kJ/m3, in agreement with previously published results.

  8. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Three-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-07-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have developed a non-perturbative theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole couplings, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we implement the general dipolar EMOR theory for a macromolecule-bound three-spin system, where one, two, or all three spins exchange with the bulk solution phase. In contrast to the previously studied two-spin system with a single dipole coupling, there are now three dipole couplings, so relaxation is affected by distinct correlations as well as by self-correlations. Moreover, relaxation can now couple the magnetizations with three-spin modes and, in the presence of a static dipole coupling, with two-spin modes. As a result of this complexity, three secondary dispersion steps with different physical origins can appear in the longitudinal relaxation dispersion profile, in addition to the primary dispersion step at the Larmor frequency matching the exchange rate. Furthermore, and in contrast to the two-spin system, longitudinal relaxation can be significantly affected by chemical shifts and by the odd-valued ("imaginary") part of the spectral density function. We anticipate that the detailed studies of two-spin and three-spin systems that have now been completed will provide the foundation for developing an approximate multi-spin dipolar EMOR theory sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to allow quantitative molecular-level interpretation of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation data from biophysical model systems and soft biological tissue.

  9. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Three-spin systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-07-21

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have developed a non-perturbative theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole couplings, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we implement the general dipolar EMOR theory for a macromolecule-bound three-spin system, where one, two, or all three spins exchange with the bulk solution phase. In contrast to the previously studied two-spin system with a single dipole coupling, there are now three dipole couplings, so relaxation is affected by distinct correlations as well as by self-correlations. Moreover, relaxation can now couple the magnetizations with three-spin modes and, in the presence of a static dipole coupling, with two-spin modes. As a result of this complexity, three secondary dispersion steps with different physical origins can appear in the longitudinal relaxation dispersion profile, in addition to the primary dispersion step at the Larmor frequency matching the exchange rate. Furthermore, and in contrast to the two-spin system, longitudinal relaxation can be significantly affected by chemical shifts and by the odd-valued ("imaginary") part of the spectral density function. We anticipate that the detailed studies of two-spin and three-spin systems that have now been completed will provide the foundation for developing an approximate multi-spin dipolar EMOR theory sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to allow quantitative molecular-level interpretation of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation data from biophysical model systems and soft biological tissue. PMID:27448879

  10. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Tombácz, Etelka; Bányai, István; Babos, Magor; Palkó, András

    2012-09-01

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide.

  11. Wide-band nanoscale magnetic resonance spectroscopy using quantum relaxation of a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, James D. A.; Broadway, David A.; Hall, Liam T.; Stacey, Alastair; Simpson, David A.; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical approach of nanoscale magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy whereby quantum relaxation (T1) of a single probe spin in diamond is monitored during a precise static magnetic field sweep to construct a spectrum of the surrounding spin environment. The method is inherently noninvasive as it involves no driving fields, and instead relies on the natural resonance between the quantum probe and target spins. As a proof of concept, we measure the T1-MR spectra across a wide band [megahertz (MHz) to gigahertz (GHz)] of a small ensemble of 14N impurities surrounding a single probe spin, providing information on both electron spin transitions (in the GHz range) and nuclear spin transitions (in the MHz range) of the 14N spin targets. Analysis of the T1-MR spectrum reveals that the electron spin transitions are probed via dipole interactions with the probe, while the relatively weak nuclear spin resonances are dramatically enhanced by hyperfine coupling in an electron-mediated process. With a projected sensitivity to external single-proton spins, this work establishes T1-MR as a powerful noninvasive wide-band technique for nanoscale MR spectroscopy.

  12. Magnetic field dependence of muon spin relaxation in geometrically frustrated Gd2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsiger, S. R.; Kiefl, R. F.; Chakhalian, J. A.; Greedan, J. E.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Miller, R. I.; Morris, G. D.; Price, A. N.; Raju, N. P.; Sonier, J. E.

    2006-05-01

    Muon spin relaxation has been investigated in the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet Gd2Ti2O7 as a function of magnetic field and temperature. Well above the magnetic ordering temperature of Tc=1K , the field dependence of the muon spin relaxation rate (T1-1) originates from field-induced changes in the spectral density of Gd fluctuations. This allows one to determine both the autocorrelation time and magnitude of the fluctuating local magnetic field at the muon. Well below Tc a coherent precession signal is observed, corresponding to a much smaller quasistatic local magnetic field. At low temperatures T1-1 levels off, at a constant value which is much larger than reported recently for a single crystal of Gd2Ti2O7 [Yaouanc , Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 047203 (2005)]. A magnetic field of 2T completely quenches the low-temperature spin relaxation in the present sample. These results indicate that the ordered state is characterized by low-frequency dynamics which are most likely due to residual crystalline disorder.

  13. T 1 Relaxation Measurement of Ex-Vivo Breast Cancer Tissues at Ultralow Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lim, Sanghyun; Han, Jae Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated T1 relaxations of ex-vivo cancer tissues at low magnetic fields in order to check the possibility of achieving a T1 contrast higher than those obtained at high fields. The T1 relaxations of fifteen pairs (normal and cancerous) of breast tissue samples were measured at three magnetic fields, 37, 62, and 122 μT, using our superconducting quantum interference device-based ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance setup, optimally developed for ex-vivo tissue studies. A signal reconstruction based on Bayesian statistics for noise reduction was exploited to overcome the low signal-to-noise ratio. The ductal and lobular-type tissues did not exhibit meaningful T1 contrast values between normal and cancerous tissues at the three different fields. On the other hand, an enhanced T1 contrast was obtained for the mucinous cancer tissue. PMID:25705658

  14. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  15. Suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in tilted magnetic fields within the geophysical range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtes, Theo; Pustelny, Szymon; Fritzsche, Stephan; Schultze, Volkmar; Stolz, Ronny; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on the relaxation of spin coherence due to the spin-exchange mechanism arising in the electronic ground states of alkali-metal vapor atoms. As opposed to the well-explored formation of a stretched state in a longitudinal geometry (magnetic field parallel to the laser propagation direction) we employ adapted hyperfine-selective optical pumping in order to suppress spin-exchange relaxation. By comparing measurements of the intrinsic relaxation rate of the spin coherence in the ground state of cesium atoms with detailed density-matrix simulations we show that the relaxation due to spin-exchange collisions can be reduced substantially even in a tilted magnetic field of geomagnetic strength, the major application case of scalar magnetic surveying. This explains the observed striking improvement in sensitivity and further deepens the understanding of the light-narrowed Mx magnetometer, which was presented recently. Additionally, new avenues for investigating the dynamics in alkali-metal atoms governed by the spin-exchange interaction and interacting with arbitrary external fields open up.

  16. Influence of microstructure on thermal relaxation in nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    LoBue, M.; Basso, V.; Beatrice, C.; Tiberto, P.; Bertotti, G.

    2001-06-01

    The interplay between activation volumes and microstructure is investigated in nanocrystalline Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9} (Finemet) alloys. Experiments are performed beyond the Curie point of the amorphous matrix, where relaxation effects are relevant. Measurements are analyzed within a theoretical framework where hysteresis and relaxation phenomena are jointly described. In highly crystallized samples magnetization processes are characterized by a unique length scale. In poorly crystallized samples the system behavior is controlled by a distribution of characteristic volumes related to structural disorder. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Estimation of magnetic relaxation property for CVD processed YBCO-coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    Ion Beam Assist Deposition/Chemical Vapor Deposition(IBAD/CVD)-processed YBCO-coated conductors with high critical current density Jc at high magnetic fields are expected to be applied to superconducting equipments such as superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES). For application to superconducting magnet in SMES one of the most important properties for superconductors is the relaxation property of superconducting current. In this paper, the relaxation property is investigated for IBAD/CVD-processed YBCO-coated conductors of the superconducting layer in the range of 0.18-0.90 μm. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential, U0∗. It is found that U0∗ takes a smaller value due to the two-dimensional pinning mechanism at high magnetic fields for conductor with thinner superconducting layer. Although U0∗ decreases with increasing thickness at low magnetic fields at 20 K, it increases at high magnetic fields. The results are theoretically explained by the model of the flux creep and flow based on the dimensionality of flux pinning. Scaling analysis is examined for the dependence of U0∗ on the magnetic field, temperature and the layer thickness.

  18. Tuning Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Dysprosium Layer Compound through Guest Molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Sun, Jun-Liang; Gao, Song

    2016-08-15

    A novel two-dimensional dysprosium(III) complex, [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF·H2O·2CH3OH (1), has been successfully synthesized from a new pyridine-N-oxide (PNO)-containing ligand, namely, N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)pyridine-N-oxidecarbohydrazide (H2L). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that complex 1 is composed of a dinuclear dysprosium subunit, which is further extended by the PNO part of the ligand to form a two-dimensional layer. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 1 shows well-defined temperature- and frequency-dependent signals under a zero direct-current (dc) field, typical of slow magnetic relaxation with an effective energy barrier Ueff of 33.6 K under a zero dc field. Interestingly, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that compound 1 undergoes a reversible phase transition that is induced by the desorption and absorption of methanol and water molecules. Moreover, the desolvated sample [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF (1a) also exhibits slow magnetic relaxation but with a higher anisotropic barrier of 42.0 K, indicating the tuning effect of solvent molecules on slow magnetic relaxation. PMID:27483199

  19. Tuning Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Dysprosium Layer Compound through Guest Molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Sun, Jun-Liang; Gao, Song

    2016-08-15

    A novel two-dimensional dysprosium(III) complex, [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF·H2O·2CH3OH (1), has been successfully synthesized from a new pyridine-N-oxide (PNO)-containing ligand, namely, N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)pyridine-N-oxidecarbohydrazide (H2L). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that complex 1 is composed of a dinuclear dysprosium subunit, which is further extended by the PNO part of the ligand to form a two-dimensional layer. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 1 shows well-defined temperature- and frequency-dependent signals under a zero direct-current (dc) field, typical of slow magnetic relaxation with an effective energy barrier Ueff of 33.6 K under a zero dc field. Interestingly, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that compound 1 undergoes a reversible phase transition that is induced by the desorption and absorption of methanol and water molecules. Moreover, the desolvated sample [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF (1a) also exhibits slow magnetic relaxation but with a higher anisotropic barrier of 42.0 K, indicating the tuning effect of solvent molecules on slow magnetic relaxation.

  20. Field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization in a pentacoordinate Co(II) compound [Co(phen)(DMSO)Cl2].

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ivan; Marx, Raphael; Herchel, Radovan; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-09-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic properties of a pentacoordinate [Co(phen)(DMSO)Cl2] compound (phen = 1,10'-phenanthroline, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) were thoroughly studied by experimental (SQUID magnetometry and HF-EPR spectroscopy) and theoretical methods (DFT and CASSCF calculations). It has been found from temperature/field-dependent magnetization measurements that the studied compound possesses a large and negative magnetic anisotropy (D = -17(1) cm(-1)) with large rhombicity (E/D = 0.24(5)), and these experimental results are in agreement with ab initio calculations (D = -17.7 cm(-1), E/D = 0.31). Interdoublet resonances were not observed in the HF-EPR measurements, but the large rhombicity was confirmed (DEPR = -17.7 cm(-1) (fixed from CASSCF calculations), E/DEPR = 0.33). A frequency dependent out-of-phase susceptibility signal was observed only in a non-zero static magnetic field (B = 0.1 T) and the following parameters of slow-relaxation of magnetisation were derived from the experimental data: either the energy of spin reversal barrier, Ueff = 10.4 K, and the relaxation time, τ0 = 5.69 × 10(-9) s using the Debye model, or Ueff = 21.4-40.3 K and τ0 = 0.248-58.3 × 10(-9) based on a simplified model. PMID:26229042

  1. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Stupic, K F; Elkins, N D; Pavlovskaya, G E; Repine, J E; Meersmann, T

    2011-07-01

    The (83)Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T(1) of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary (83)Kr T(1) relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) (83)Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp (83)Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times. The longitudinal (83)Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T(1) = 1.3 s and T(1) = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of (83)Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  2. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, K. F.; Elkins, N. D.; Pavlovskaya, G. E.; Repine, J. E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-07-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  3. Spin relaxation of a short-lived radical in zero magnetic field.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Iain

    2011-01-21

    A short-lived radical containing only one I = 1/2 nucleus, the muoniated 1,2-dicarboxyvinyl radical dianion, was produced in an aqueous solution by the reaction of muonium with the dicarboxyacetylene dianion. The identity of the radical was confirmed by measuring the muon hyperfine coupling constant (hfcc) by transverse field muon spin rotation spectroscopy and comparing this value with the hfcc obtained from DFT calculations. The muon spin relaxation rate of this radical was measured as a function of temperature in zero magnetic field by the zero field muon spin relaxation technique. The results have been interpreted using the theoretical model of Fedin et al. (J. Chem. Phys., 2003, 118, 192). The muon spin polarization decreases exponentially with time after muon implantation and the temperature dependence of the spin relaxation rate indicates that the dominant relaxation mechanism is the modulation of the anisotropic hyperfine interaction due to molecular rotation. The effective radius of the radical in solution was determined to be 1.12 ± 0.04 nm from the dependence of the muon spin relaxation rate on the temperature and viscosity of the solution, and is approximately 3.6 times larger than the value obtained from DFT calculations.

  4. Will spin-relaxation times in molecular magnets permit quantum information processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, Arzhang

    2007-03-01

    Certain computational tasks can be efficiently implemented using quantum logic, in which the information-carrying elements are permitted to exist in quantum superpositions. To achieve this in practice, a physical system that is suitable for embodying quantum bits (qubits) must be identified. Some proposed scenarios employ electron spins in the solid state, for example phosphorous donors in silicon, quantum dots, heterostructures and endohedral fullerenes, motivated by the long electron-spin relaxation times exhibited by these systems. An alternative electron-spin based proposal exploits the large number of quantum states and the non-degenerate transitions available in high spin molecular magnets. Although these advantages have stimulated vigorous research in molecular magnets, the key question of whether the intrinsic spin relaxation times are long enough has hitherto remained unaddressed. Using X-band pulsed electron spin resonance, we measure the intrinsic spin-lattice (T1) and phase coherence (T2) relaxation times in molecular nanomagnets for the first time. In Cr7M heterometallic wheels, with M = Ni and Mn, phase coherence relaxation is dominated by the coupling of the electron spin to protons within the molecule. In deuterated samples T2 reaches 3 μs at low temperatures, which is several orders of magnitude longer than the duration of spin manipulations, satisfying a prerequisite for the deployment of molecular nanomagnets in quantum information applications.

  5. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated.

  6. Anisotropic magnetization relaxation in ferromagnetic multilayers with variable interlayer exchange coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, A. F.; Polishchuk, D. M.; Dzhezherya, Yu. I.; Tovstolytkin, A. I.; Golub, V. O.; Korenivski, V.

    2016-08-01

    The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth and its anisotropy in F1/f /F2 /AF multilayers, where spacer f has a low Curie point compared to the strongly ferromagnetic F1 and F2, is investigated. The role of the interlayer exchange coupling in magnetization relaxation is determined experimentally by varying the thickness of the spacer. It is shown that stronger interlayer coupling via thinner spacers enhances the microwave energy exchange between the outer ferromagnetic layers, with the magnetization of F2 exchange dragged by the resonance precession in F1. A weaker mirror effect is also observed: the magnetization of F1 can be exchange dragged by the precession in F2, which leads to antidamping and narrower FMR linewidths. A theory is developed to model the measured data, which allows separating various contributions to the magnetic relaxation in the system. Key physical parameters, such as the interlayer coupling constant, in-plane anisotropy of the FMR linewidth, and dispersion of the magnetic anisotropy fields, are quantified. These results should be useful for designing high-speed magnetic nanodevices based on thermally assisted switching.

  7. Flow restrictive and shear reducing effect of magnetization relaxation in ferrofluid cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chamkor; Das, Arup Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report the effects of a uniform stationary magnetic field on the flow of ferrofluid (FF) inside a boundary driven cavity. A coupled set of conservation equations for the flow field, the Maxwell's magnetostatic equations, and the constitutive magnetization equation are solved numerically. The non-dimensional groups primarily influencing the phenomenon are first systematically identified through the normalization of the complete set of equations. We find the magnetization relaxation effects, under the stationary uniform field, to be flow restrictive in nature. The misalignment between the local magnetic field and the magnetization suppresses the vorticity field in the cavity, shifts the primary central vortex, and reduces the average shear stress at the boundaries. As a consequence, it becomes apparent that at a given Reynolds number, the application of uniform magnetic field can reduce the shear drag at the boundaries of the cavity, of course at an expense of reduced flow rate in their vicinity. Our study uniquely reveals that the relaxation time effects are dominant in the regions of ferrofluid flow where the change in the magnitude of the vorticity takes place over a length scale which is much smaller than the characteristic length scale of the flow geometry. Depending on the magnitudes of influencing parameters, the solution exhibits anomalous characteristics, such as creeping and saturating behavior.

  8. Probing α-relaxation with nuclear magnetic resonance echo decay and relaxation: a study on nitrile butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Simone; Pieruccini, Marco; Corti, Maurizio; Rigamonti, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    One dimensional (1)H NMR measurements have been performed to probe slow molecular motions in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) around its calorimetric glass transition temperature Tg. The purpose is to show how software aided data analysis can extract meaningful dynamical data from these measurements. Spin-lattice relaxation time, free induction decay (FID) and magic sandwich echo (MSE) measurements have been carried out at different values of the static field, as a function of temperature. It has been evidenced how the efficiency of the MSE signal in reconstructing the original FID exhibits a sudden minimum at a given temperature, with a slight dependence from the measuring frequency. Computer simulations performed with the software SPINEVOLUTION have shown that the minimum in the efficiency reconstruction of the MSE signal corresponds to the average motional frequency taking a value around the inter-proton coupling. The FID signals have been fitted with a truncated form of a newly derived exact correlation function for the transverse magnetization of a dipolar interacting spin pair, which allows one to avoid the restriction of the stationary and Gaussian approximations. A direct estimate of the conformational dynamics on approaching the Tg is obtained, and the results are in agreement with the analysis performed via the MSE reconstruction efficiency. The occurrence of a wide distribution of correlation frequencies for the chains motion, with a Vogel-Fulcher type temperature dependence, is addressed. A route for a fruitful study of the dynamics accompanying the glass transition by a variety of NMR measurements is thus proposed.

  9. Magnetic properties, water proton relaxivities, and in-vivo MR images of paramagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gang Ho; Chang, Yongmin

    2015-07-01

    In this mini review, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on lanthanideoxide (Ln2O3) nanoparticles are described. Ln2O3 (Ln = Gd, Dy, Ho, and Er) nanoparticles are paramagnetic, but show appreciable magnetic moments at room temperature and even at ultrasmall particle diameters. Among Ln2O3 nanoparticles, Gd2O3 nanoparticles show larger longitudinal water proton relaxivity (r1) values than Gd-chelates because of the large amount of Gd in the nanoparticle, and the other Ln2O3 nanoparticles (Ln = Dy, Ho, and Er) show appreciable transverse water proton relaxivity (r2) values. Therefore, Gd2O3 nanoparticles are potential T1 MRI contrast agents while the other Ln2O3 nanoparticles are potential T2 MRI contrast agents at high MR fields.

  10. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  11. An extended magnetic viscous relaxation dating for calibrating an older age: an example of tsunamigenic coral boulders in Ishigaki Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nakamura, N.; Goto, K.; Kumagai, Y.; Minoura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    2015-12-01

    A key to the understanding of past tsunami events is the ability to accurately date them. Analysis of past tsunami sediments is one of the most important tools for past tsunami reconstruction. A typical example of such tsunami sediment is tsunamigenic boulders. In Ishigaki Island, Japan, coral boulders that had been transported by tsunamis were distributed on the beach and land areas. Although the historical occurrences of several huge tsunamis were estimated based on large numbers of radiocarbon dating for coral boulders, radiocarbon dating can not determine a multiple rotational history by multiple tsunamis. A viscous remanet magnetization (VRM) dating method can be used to date any geological event that results in significant movements of a rock. Sato et al. (2014) applied VRM dating for comparing the radiocarbon age of these boulders. If a magnetic-mineral bearing rock is moved or re-oriented, the magnetism of the smaller magnetic grains re-aligns to the direction of the ambient magnetic field with time. This phenomenon is well known as Néel's (1949, 1955) single-domain (SD) relaxation theory. Pullaiah et al. (1975) derived a time-temperature (t-T relation) relation by assuming Néel's (1949, 1955) theory of magnetite. In principle, an experimental combination of short relaxation time and high temperature for removing VRM can determine the unknown relaxation time (tsunami age) at room temperature. We have been applied t-T relation to the coral boulders on Ishigaki Island, but their estimated ages showed older than radiocarbon dating. The longer relaxation time means that the observed magnetic relaxation is slower than the original Néel's theory. Such slow relaxation has been described by a stretched exponential function. The stretched exponential law provided a reasonable fit to the published experimental data. Thus, in this study, we revisit Néel's theory to provide a new t-T relation based on stretched exponential function.

  12. Understanding the effects of diffusion and relaxation in magnetic resonance imaging using computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Greg

    The work described in this dissertation was motivated by a desire to better understand the cellular pathology of ischemic stroke. Two of the three bodies of research presented herein address and issue directly related to the investigation of ischemic stroke through the use of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) methods. The first topic concerns the development of a computationally efficient finite difference method, designed to evaluate the impact of microscopic tissue properties on the formation of DWMRI signal. For the second body of work, the effect of changing the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of a restricted sample on clinical DWMRI experiments is explored. The final body of work, while motivated by the desire to understand stroke, addresses the issue of acquiring large amounts of MRI data well suited for quantitative analysis in reduced scan time. In theory, the method could be used to generate quantitative parametric maps, including those depicting information gleaned through the use of DWMRI methods. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to several topics. A description of the use of DWMRI methods in the study of ischemic stroke is covered. An introduction to the fundamental physical principles at work in MRI is also provided. In this section the means by which magnetization is created in MRI experiments, how MRI signal is induced, as well as the influence of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation are discussed. Attention is also given to describing how MRI measurements can be sensitized to diffusion through the use of qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the process. Finally, the reader is given a brief introduction to the use of numerical methods for solving partial differential equations. In Chapters 2, 3 and 4, three related bodies of research are presented in terms of research papers. In Chapter 2, a novel computational method is described. The method reduces the computation resources required to simulate DWMRI experiments. In

  13. Experimental investigation of plasma relaxation using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott; University of New Mexico Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation in a low density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear HelCat device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes within the intergalactic medium. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5-10 kV and ~100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities ~1.2Cs and densities ~1020 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  14. Superspin relaxation in Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluids: A dynamic susceptibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Cristian E.; Morris, Joshua L.; Eastman, Michael P.

    2012-07-01

    We have used frequency-resolved (100 Hz < f < 10,000 Hz) ac magnetic susceptibility measurements to directly determine the Néel and Brown relaxation times in 30-nm-size Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluids at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Our data collected on both powder and magnetic fluid samples allow the separation of the contributions from the Néel and Brown relaxation mechanisms that act concomitantly within the above-mentioned temperature range. At all temperatures we find that the Brown relaxation times (τB) are shorter than their Néel counterparts (τN), evidence that the Brown mechanism yields the major contribution towards the system's overall superspin dynamics. τB exhibits a steep two-order-of-magnitude decrease upon heating, from τB = 1 × 10-3 s at T = 237 K to τB = 1.5 × 10-5 s at T = 270 K, a behavior mostly driven by the heating-induced reduction of the liquid carrier's viscosity.

  15. Electron spin resonance and muon spin relaxation studies of single molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    We use a combination of electron spin resonance, muon-spin relaxation and SQUID magnetometry to study polycrystalline and single crystal samples of various novel single molecule magnets (SMMs). We also describe a theoretical framework which can be used to analyse the results from each technique. Electron spin resonance measurements are performed using a millimetre vector network analyser and data are presented on several SMM systems using microwave frequencies from 40-300 GHz. Muon-spin relaxation measurements have been performed on several SMM systems in applied longitudinal magnetic field and in temperatures down to 20 mK. The results suggest that dynamic local magnetic field fluctuations are responsible for the relaxation of the muon spin ensemble. We discuss what can be learned from these experiments concerning SMMs and suggest experiments which can probe the quantum nature of SMMs. (Work in collaboration with S Sharmin, T Lancaster, A Ardavan, F L Pratt, E J L McInnes and R E P Winpenny) References: S. J. Blundell and F. L. Pratt, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, R771 (2004); T. Lancaster et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, S4563 (2004); S. Sharmin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. in press.

  16. Relaxation Dynamics and Magnetic Anisotropy in a Low-Symmetry Dy(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Lucaccini, Eva; Briganti, Matteo; Perfetti, Mauro; Vendier, Laure; Costes, Jean-Pierre; Totti, Federico; Sessoli, Roberta; Sorace, Lorenzo

    2016-04-11

    The magnetic behaviour of a Dy(LH)3 complex (LH(-) is the anion of 2-hydroxy-N'-[(E)-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]benzhydrazide) was analysed in depth from both theoretical and experimental points of view. Cantilever torque magnetometry indicated that the complex has Ising-type anisotropy, and provided two possible directions for the easy axis of anisotropy due to the presence of two magnetically non-equivalent molecules in the crystal. Ab initio calculations confirmed the strong Ising-type anisotropy and disentangled the two possible orientations. The computed results obtained by using ab initio calculations were then used to rationalise the composite dynamic behaviour observed for both pure Dy(III) phase and Y(III) diluted phase, which showed two different relaxation channels in zero and non-zero static magnetic fields. In particular, we showed that the relaxation behaviour at the higher temperature range can be correctly reproduced by using a master matrix approach, which suggests that Orbach relaxation is occurring through a second excited doublet. PMID:26960531

  17. Homochiral mononuclear Dy-Schiff base complexes showing field-induced double magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Min; Xu, Zhong-Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Ze-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Chao; Zheng, Li-Min

    2016-01-14

    A pair of enantiopure mononuclear dysprosium/salen-type complexes (Et3NH)[Dy((R,R)/(S,S)-3-NO2salcy)2] (/), where 3-NO2salcyH2 represents N,N'-(1,2-cyclohexanediylethylene)bis(3-nitrosalicylideneiminato), are reported. The enantiomer contains two crystallographically independent dysprosium(iii) ions, each chelated by two enantiopure 3-NO2salcy(2-) ligands forming a [DyN4O4] core. Detailed magnetic studies on compound reveal a field-induced dual magnetic relaxation behavior, originating from single ion anisotropy and intermolecular interactions, respectively. PMID:26621766

  18. Slow magnetic relaxation at zero field in the tetrahedral complex [Co(SPh)4]2-.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Joseph M; Long, Jeffrey R

    2011-12-28

    The Ph(4)P(+) salt of the tetrahedral complex [Co(SPh)(4)](2-), possessing an S = (3)/(2) ground state with an axial zero-field splitting of D = -70 cm(-1), displays single-molecule magnet behavior in the absence of an applied magnetic field. At very low temperatures, ac magnetic susceptibility data show the magnetic relaxation time, τ, to be temperature-independent, while above 2.5 K thermally activated Arrhenius behavior is apparent with U(eff) = 21(1) cm(-1) and τ(0) = 1.0(3) × 10(-7) s. Under an applied field of 1 kOe, τ more closely approximates Arrhenius behavior over the entire temperature range. Upon dilution of the complex within a matrix of the isomorphous compound (Ph(4)P)(2)[Zn(SPh)(4)], ac susceptibility data reveal the molecular nature of the slow magnetic relaxation and indicate that the quantum tunneling pathway observed at low temperatures is likely mediated by intermolecular dipolar interactions.

  19. A comparison of the effects of symmetry and magnetoanisotropy on paramagnetic relaxation in related dysprosium single ion magnets.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ursula J; Mahoney, Brian D; DeGregorio, Patrick T; Carroll, Patrick J; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kikkawa, James M; Schelter, Eric J

    2012-06-01

    Dysprosium complexes of the tmtaa(2-) ligand were synthesized and characterized by X-band EPR and magnetism studies. Both complexes demonstrate magnetoanisotropy and slow paramagnetic relaxation. Comparison of these compounds with the seminal phthalocyanine complex [Dy(Pc)(2)](-) shows the azaannulide complexes are more susceptible to relaxation through non-thermal pathways.

  20. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

    PubMed

    Østerberg, F W; Rizzi, G; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T; Strömberg, M; Strømme, M; Svedlindh, P; Hansen, M F

    2013-02-15

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more accurate determination of the hydrodynamic size of the magnetic nanobeads. Finally, the bridge sensor has successfully been used to measure the change in dynamic magnetic response when rolling circle amplified DNA molecules are bound to the magnetic nanobeads. The change is validated by measurements performed in a commercial AC susceptometer. The presented bridge sensor is, thus, a promising component in future lab-on-a-chip biosensors for detection of clinically relevant analytes, including bacterial genomic DNA and proteins.

  1. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

    PubMed

    Østerberg, F W; Rizzi, G; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T; Strömberg, M; Strømme, M; Svedlindh, P; Hansen, M F

    2013-02-15

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more accurate determination of the hydrodynamic size of the magnetic nanobeads. Finally, the bridge sensor has successfully been used to measure the change in dynamic magnetic response when rolling circle amplified DNA molecules are bound to the magnetic nanobeads. The change is validated by measurements performed in a commercial AC susceptometer. The presented bridge sensor is, thus, a promising component in future lab-on-a-chip biosensors for detection of clinically relevant analytes, including bacterial genomic DNA and proteins. PMID:22841901

  2. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  3. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yang; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz(1/2), which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  4. A magnetic nanoparticles relaxation sensor for protein-protein interaction detection at ultra-low magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Peixiang; Dong, Hui; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Zhang, Yi; Willbold, Dieter; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-15

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can serve as magnetic relaxation sensors (MRSs) to detect different biological targets, because the clustering of magnetic particle may cause the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) decrease of the surrounding water protons. However, the application of MNPs in clinical NMR systems faces the challenge of poor stability at magnetic field strengths in the order of tesla. The recently developed ultra-low field (ULF) NMR technique working at microtesla (μT) range then becomes a candidate. Herein, we incorporated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the detector in the ultra-low field system to enhance the sensitivity. We functionalized the Fe3O4 nanoparticles with the gama-aminobutyrate type A receptor-associated proteins (GABARAP), which specifically interact with calreticulin (CRT). As a result of the interaction between GABARAP and CRT, the clustering of the functionalized MNPs generates local magnetic fields, which accelerate the dephasing of the water protons in the vicinity. We analyzed the relation between T2 values and the CRT concentrations at 211μT and the low detection limit for CRT is 10 pg/ml, which is superior to the immunoblot system. The high sensitivity of the ULF NMR system for protein-protein interaction detection demonstrates the potential to use this inexpensive, portable system for quick biochemical and clinical assays.

  5. Transverse relaxation of solvent protons induced by magnetized spheres: application to ferritin, erythrocytes, and magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis, P.; Koenig, S.H.

    1987-10-01

    Since 1/T2 of protons of tissue water is generally much greater than 1/T1 at typical imaging fields, small single-ion contrast agents--such as Gd(DTPA), which make comparable incremental contributions and therefore smaller fractional contributions to 1/T2 compared to 1/T1--are not as desirable for contrast-enhancement as agents that could enhance 1/T2 preferentially. In principle, such specialized agents will only be effective at higher fields because the field dependence (dispersion) of 1/T1 is such that it approaches zero at high fields whereas 1/T2 approaches a constant value. The residual 1/T2 is called the secular contribution and arises from fluctuations in time--as sensed by the protons of diffusing solvent or tissue water molecules--of the component of the magnetic field parallel to the static applied field. For solutions or suspensions of sufficiently large paramagnetic or ferromagnetic particles (greater than or equal to 250 A diameter), the paramagnetic contributions to the relaxation rates satisfy 1/T2 much greater than 1/T1 at typical imaging fields. We examine the theory of secular relaxation in some detail, particularly as it applies to systems relevant to magnetic resonance imaging, and then analyze the data for solutions, suspensions, or tissue containing ferritin, erythrocytes, agar-bound magnetite particles, and liver with low-density composite polymer-coated magnetite. In most cases we can explain the relaxation data, often quantitatively, in terms of the theory of relaxation of protons (water molecules) diffusing in the outer sphere environments of magnetized particles.

  6. Changes of the local pore space structure quantified in heterogeneous porous media by 1H magnetic resonance relaxation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgia, G. C.; Bortolotti, V.; Fantazzini, P.

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation analysis are combined in a spatially resolved technique (relaxation tomography), which is able to quantify the parameters connected to the local structure in the internal regions of a porous material saturated by water, giving information on the pore space structure beyond the nominal instrumental resolution. Voxel-by-voxel longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation curves are acquired in order to obtain T1, T2 and S(0) maps, where S(0) is the extrapolation to zero time of the total equilibrium magnetization corrected for T2 decay. The proposed method permits evaluation of the porosity (ratio of pore space to total volume), at different length scales, from the sample to the voxel, not all achievable by traditional methods. More striking is its ability to describe how porosity is shared among different classes of surface-to-volume ratios of diffusion cells (the regions that the individual water molecules, starting at their particular positions, can experience by diffusion before relaxing). This is a consequence of the fact that relaxation times of water confined in a porous material can, under favorable circumstances, distinguish regions with the same local porosity but with different pore sizes and connections. So, parameters can be introduced, such as the microporosity fraction, defined as the fraction of the "micropore" volume with respect to the total pore volume, and several voxel average porosities, defined as the average porosities of the voxels characterized by particular classes of diffusion cells. Moreover, the imaging methods enable us to get all this information in a user-defined region of interest. The method has been applied to quantify changes in the structure of carbonate cores with wide distributions of pore sizes induced by repeated cycles of freezing and heating of the sample. With freezing, the microporosity fraction decreases significantly; the voxel average porosity of voxels with T1 shorter than

  7. Preparation of amyloid-like fibrils containing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Effect of protein aggregation on proton relaxivity

    SciTech Connect

    Viktor Andersson, B.; Skoglund, Caroline; Uvdal, Kajsa; Solin, Niclas

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of amyloid materials labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of amyloid materials by electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of protein aggregation on the magnetic nanoparticle properties. -- Abstract: A method to prepare amyloid-like fibrils functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles has been developed. The amyloid-like fibrils are prepared in a two step procedure, where insulin and magnetic nanoparticles are mixed simply by grinding in the solid state, resulting in a water soluble hybrid material. When the hybrid material is heated in aqueous acid, the insulin/nanoparticle hybrid material self assembles to form amyloid-like fibrils incorporating the magnetic nanoparticles. This results in magnetically labeled amyloid-like fibrils which has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography. The influence of the aggregation process on proton relaxivity is investigated. The prepared materials have potential uses in a range of bio-imaging applications.

  8. Mechanisms of Tissue–Iron Relaxivity: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Human Liver Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Coates, Thomas D.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Wood, John C.

    2010-01-01

    MRI is becoming an increasingly important tool to assess iron overload disorders, but the complex nature of proton–iron interactions has troubled noninvasive iron quantification. Intersite and intersequence variability as well as methodological inaccuracies have been limiting factors to its widespread clinical use. It is important to understand the underlying proton relaxation mechanisms within the (human) tissue environment to address these differences. In this respect, NMR relaxometry was performed on 10 fresh human liver biopsy specimens taken from patients with transfusion-dependent anemia. T1 (1/R1) inversion recovery, T2 (1/R2) single echo, and multiecho T2 CPMG measurements were performed on a 60-MHz Bruker Minispectrometer. NMR parameters were compared to quantitative iron levels and tissue histology. Relaxivities R1 and R2 both increased linearly with hepatic iron content, with R2 being more sensitive to iron. CPMG data were well described by a chemical-exchange model and predicted effective iron center dimensions consistent with hemosiderin-filled lysosomes. Nonexponential relaxation was evident at short refocusing intervals with R2 and amplitude behavior suggestive of magnetic susceptibility-based compartmentalization rather than anatomic subdivisions. NMR relaxometry of human liver biopsy specimens yields unique insights into the mechanisms of tissue–iron relaxivity. PMID:16215963

  9. Resonant Scattering off Magnetic Impurities in Graphene: Mechanism for Ultrafast Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, D.; Gmitra, M.; Fabian, J.

    We give a tutorial account of our recently proposed mechanism for spin relaxation based on spin-flip resonant scattering off local magnetic moments. The mechanism is rather general, working in any material with a resonant local moment, but we believe that its particular niche is graphene, whose measured spin relaxation time is 100-1000 ps. Conventional spin-orbit coupling based mechanisms (Elliott-Yafet or Dyakonov-Perel) would require large concentrations (1000 ppm) of impurities to explain this. Our mechanism needs only 1 ppm of resonant local moments, as these act as local spin hot spots: the resonant scatterers do not appear to substantially affect graphene's measured resistivity, but are dominating spin relaxation. In principle, the local moments can come from a variety of sources. Most likely would be organic molecule adsorbants or metallic adatoms. As the representative model, particularly suited for a tutorial, we consider hydrogen adatoms which are theoretically and experimentally demonstrated to yield local magnetic moments when chemisorbed on graphene. We introduce the scattering formalism and apply it to graphene, to obtain the T-matrix and spin-flip scattering rates using the generalized Fermi golden rule.

  10. Distributions of transverse relaxation times for soft-solids measured in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Chelcea, R I; Fechete, R; Culea, E; Demco, D E; Blümich, B

    2009-02-01

    The single-sided NMR-MOUSE sensor that operates in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields is used to record a CPMG (1)H transverse relaxation decay by CPMG echo trains for a series of cross-linked natural rubber samples. Effective transverse relaxation rates 1/T(2,short) and 1/T(2,long) were determined by a bi-exponential fit. A linear dependence of transverse relaxation rates on cross-link density is observed for medium to large values of cross-link density. As an alternative to multi-exponential fits the possibility to analyze the dynamics of soft polymer network in terms of multi-exponential decays via the inverse Laplace transformation was studied. The transient regime and the effect of the T(1)/T(2) ratio in inhomogeneous static and radiofrequency magnetic fields on the CPMG decays were studied numerically using a dedicated C++ program to simulate the temporal and spatial dependence of the CPMG response. A correction factor T(2)/T(2,eff) is derived as a function of the T(1)/T(2) ratio from numerical simulations and compared with earlier results from two different well logging devices. High-resolution T(1)-T(2) correlations maps are obtained by two-dimensional Laplace inversion of CPMG detected saturation recovery curves. The T(1)-T(2) experimental correlations maps were corrected for the T(1)/T(2) effect using the derived T(2)/T(2,eff) correction factor.

  11. Effect of samarium impurity on the relaxation of the magnetization of a (NdDy)(FeCo)B alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. I.; Kucheryaev, V. V.; Kunitsyna, E. I.; Valeev, R. A.; Morgunov, R. B.; Piskorskii, V. P.; Ospennikova, O. G.; Kablov, E. N.

    2016-08-01

    Small Sm additions (~1-3 at %) have been found to slow down the relaxation of the magnetization in a magnetic field in the (NdDy)(FeCo)B alloy by several times. The effective "freezing" of the spontaneous relaxation of the magnetic moment is related to the substantial increase in the potential barriers for motion of domain walls when introducing Sm ions that have other symmetry of the single-ion anisotropy than that of Nd and Dy ions. The results can be used to stabilize the properties of hard magnets.

  12. Measurement of dynamic magnetization induced by a pulsed field: Proposal for a new rock magnetism method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-02-01

    This study proposes a new method for measuring transient magnetization of natural samples induced by a pulsed field with duration of 11 ms using a pulse magnetizer. An experimental system was constructed, consisting of a pair of differential sensing coils connected with a high-speed digital oscilloscope for data acquisition. The data were transferred to a computer to obtain an initial magnetization curve and a descending branch of a hysteresis loop in a rapidly changing positive field. This system was tested with synthetic samples (permalloy ribbon, aluminum plate, and nickel powder) as well as two volcanic rock samples. Results from the synthetic samples showed considerable differences from those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). These differences were principally due to the time-dependent magnetic properties or to electromagnetic effects, such as magnetic viscosity, eddy current loss, or magnetic relaxation. Results from the natural samples showed that the transient magnetization-field curves were largely comparable to the corresponding portions of the hysteresis loops. However, the relative magnetization (scaled to the saturation magnetization) at the end of a pulse was greater than that measured by a VSM. This discrepancy, together with the occurrence of rapid exponential decay after a pulse, indicates magnetic relaxations that could be interpreted in terms of domain wall displacement. These results suggest that with further developments, the proposed technique can become a useful tool for characterizing magnetic particles contained in a variety of natural materials.

  13. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Magnetic-field Relaxations in Solar-coronal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper treats the relaxation of a magnetic field into a minimum-energy force-free state in a cold (pressure-less) viscous fluid, under the frozen-in condition of perfect electrical conductivity and letting the viscosity-dissipated energy be completely lost. A non-Newtonian fluid in popular use is studied in relation to the Newtonian viscous fluid, as two alternative numerical means to (1) construct force-free fields representing solar coronal structures in realistic geometry and (2) investigate the Parker theory of spontaneous formation of electric current sheets as a basic MHD process. Faraday's induction equation imposes an independent condition on the fluid velocity at rigid, perfectly conducting boundaries. This boundary condition is quite compatible with Newtonian mechanics but not with the non-Newtonian fluid model where velocity is equated to the Lorentz force with a free, positive multiplicative-factor. This defining property gives rise to unphysical or artificial singularities not previously known that are completely distinct from the physically admissible singularities representing the current sheets of the Parker theory. In particular, the non-Newtonian fluid takes a magnetic field with neutral points from any one of a continuum of initial states into an unphysical state instead of the proper force-free end-state accessible by Newtonian relaxation. The validity of previously published MHD results based on this non-Newtonian fluid, including some counterclaims against the Parker theory, is dubious. Investigating the Parker theory requires numerical relaxation models capable of anticipating and accurately describing inevitable current-sheet singularities. By including a weak resistivity to dissipate the inevitable current sheets as they form, the field can change topology intermittently to seek a terminal force-free state free of singularities. The minimum-energy state of this more complete model corresponds to the long-lived relaxed structures in the

  14. NEWTONIAN AND NON-NEWTONIAN MAGNETIC-FIELD RELAXATIONS IN SOLAR-CORONAL MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper treats the relaxation of a magnetic field into a minimum-energy force-free state in a cold (pressure-less) viscous fluid, under the frozen-in condition of perfect electrical conductivity and letting the viscosity-dissipated energy be completely lost. A non-Newtonian fluid in popular use is studied in relation to the Newtonian viscous fluid, as two alternative numerical means to (1) construct force-free fields representing solar coronal structures in realistic geometry and (2) investigate the Parker theory of spontaneous formation of electric current sheets as a basic MHD process. Faraday's induction equation imposes an independent condition on the fluid velocity at rigid, perfectly conducting boundaries. This boundary condition is quite compatible with Newtonian mechanics but not with the non-Newtonian fluid model where velocity is equated to the Lorentz force with a free, positive multiplicative-factor. This defining property gives rise to unphysical or artificial singularities not previously known that are completely distinct from the physically admissible singularities representing the current sheets of the Parker theory. In particular, the non-Newtonian fluid takes a magnetic field with neutral points from any one of a continuum of initial states into an unphysical state instead of the proper force-free end-state accessible by Newtonian relaxation. The validity of previously published MHD results based on this non-Newtonian fluid, including some counterclaims against the Parker theory, is dubious. Investigating the Parker theory requires numerical relaxation models capable of anticipating and accurately describing inevitable current-sheet singularities. By including a weak resistivity to dissipate the inevitable current sheets as they form, the field can change topology intermittently to seek a terminal force-free state free of singularities. The minimum-energy state of this more complete model corresponds to the long-lived relaxed structures in the

  15. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Dennis, Kevin W.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties.

  16. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles. Wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties. 13 figures.

  17. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  18. Intra-well relaxation process in magnetic fluids subjected to strong polarising fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, C. N.; Fannin, P. C.; Mălăescu, I.; Barvinschi, P.; Ercuţa, A.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the frequency and field dependent complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of a kerosene-based magnetic fluid with iron oxide nanoparticles, stabilized with oleic acid, in the frequency range 0.1-6 GHz and over the polarising field range of 0-168.4 kA/m. By increasing polarising field, H, a subsidiary loss-peak clearly occurs in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic resonance peak, from which it remains distinct even in strong polarising fields of 168.4 kA/m. This is in contrast to other reported cases in which the intra-well relaxation process is manifested only as a shoulder of the resonance peak, which vanishes in polarising fields larger than that of 100 kA/m. The results of the XRD analysis connected to the anisotropy field results confirm that the investigated sample contains particles of magnetite and of the tetragonal phase of maghemite. Taking into account the characteristics of our sample, the theoretical analysis revealed that the intra-well relaxation process of the small particles of the tetragonal phase of maghemite may be responsible for the subsidiary loss peak of the investigated magnetic fluid.

  19. Earth's magnetic field enabled scalar coupling relaxation of 13C nuclei bound to fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N in amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazza, Enrico; Kubala, Eugen; Gringeri, Concetta V.; Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F.; Menzel, Marion I.

    2013-02-01

    Scalar coupling relaxation, which is usually only associated with closely resonant nuclei (e.g., 79Br-13C), can be a very effective relaxation mechanism. While working on hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, fast liquid-state polarization decay during transfer to the MRI scanner was observed. This behavior could hypothetically be explained by substantial T1 shortening due to a scalar coupling contribution (type II) to the relaxation caused by the fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N adjacent to the 13C nucleus in the amide group. This contribution is only effective in low magnetic fields (i.e., less than 800 μT) and prevents the use of molecules bearing the 13C-amide group as hyperpolarized MRS/MRI probes. In the present work, this hypothesis is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The results show that high hyperpolarization levels can be retained using either a 15N-labeled amide or by applying a magnetic field during transfer of the sample from the polarizer to the MRI scanner.

  20. Improving the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast and Detection Methods with Engineered Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Zhong, Xiaodong; Wang, Liya; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Engineering and functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles have been an area of the extensive research and development in the biomedical and nanomedicine fields. Because their biocompatibility and toxicity are well investigated and better understood, magnetic nanoparticles, especially iron oxide nanoparticles, are better suited materials as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and for image-directed delivery of therapeutics. Given tunable magnetic properties and various surface chemistries from the coating materials, most applications of engineered magnetic nanoparticles take advantages of their superb MRI contrast enhancing capability as well as surface functionalities. It has been found that MRI contrast enhancement by magnetic nanoparticles is highly dependent on the composition, size and surface properties as well as the degree of aggregation of the nanoparticles. Therefore, understanding the relationships between these intrinsic parameters and the relaxivities that contribute to MRI contrast can lead to establishing essential guidance that may direct the design of engineered magnetic nanoparticles for theranostics applications. On the other hand, new contrast mechanism and imaging strategy can be developed based on the novel properties of engineered magnetic nanoparticles. This review will focus on discussing the recent findings on some chemical and physical properties of engineered magnetic nanoparticles affecting the relaxivities as well as the impact on MRI contrast. Furthermore, MRI methods for imaging magnetic nanoparticles including several newly developed MRI approaches aiming at improving the detection and quantification of the engineered magnetic nanoparticles are described. PMID:22272222

  1. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  2. Ion hydration effects in aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes, according to proton magnetic relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnichenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    The concentration dependences of proton magnetic relaxation (PMR) rates measured at different temperatures in aqueous electrolyte solutions and concentrated seawater (SW) in a wide range of salt concentrations and for different seawater salinities are presented, along with the concentration dependences of PMR rates determined in salts dissolved directly in seawater. The coordination numbers of the basic ions in seawater were determined from the complete solvation limits and compared with those measured in single-component water-salt solutions. The attaining of complete solvation limits was determined using the PMR data for ions of different hydration signs.

  3. Alterations in Magnetic Resonance Imaging T2 Relaxation Times of the Ovine Intervertebral Disc Due to Non-enzymatic Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Jazini, Ehsan; Sharan, Alok D; Morse, Lee Jae; Dyke, Jonathon P; Aronowitz, Eric A; Chen, Louis KH; Tang, Simon Y

    2011-01-01

    Study Design An in vitro study using ovine intervertebral discs to correlate the effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) with disc hydration evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Objective To determine the relationship between the level of AGEs and tissue water content in intervertebral discs using T2 relaxation MRI. Summary of Background Data AGEs result from nonenzymatic glycation, and AGEs have been shown to accumulate in the IVD tissue with aging and degeneration. AGEs can alter biochemical properties, including the hydrophobicity of the extracellular matrix. Since one of the degenerative signs of the IVD is the reduced hydration, it was hypothesized that increased levels of tissue AGEs may contribute to disc hydration. T2 relaxation MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the hydration status of the disc, and may be valuable in detecting the changes in the IVD mediated by the increase of AGEs. Methods Thirty-eight IVDs were obtained from 4 ovine spines, and the annulus fibrosis (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues were isolated from these discs. The tissues were incubated in either a ribosylation or control solution for up to 8 days to induce the formation of AGEs. These tissues were subsequently analyzed for tissue water content and concentration of AGEs. T2 relaxation times were obtained from these tissues after ribosylation. Results Ribosylation led to the increased accumulation of AGEs and reduced water content in both the AF and NP in a dose-dependent manner. When analyzed by MRI, ribosylation significantly altered the mean T2 relaxation times in the NP (p=0.001), but not in the AF (p=0.912). Furthermore, the mean T2 values in the NP significantly decreased with increasing periods of incubation time (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrates that levels of AGEs in the IVD may affect the tissue water content. Moreover, these ribosylation-mediated changes in tissue hydration were detectable using T2 relaxation MRI. T2 relaxation MRI

  4. Casein-Coated Fe5C2 Nanoparticles with Superior r2 Relaxivity for Liver-Specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cowger, Taku A.; Tang, Wei; Zhen, Zipeng; Hu, Kai; Rink, David E.; Todd, Trever J.; Wang, Geoffrey D.; Zhang, Weizhong; Chen, Hongmin; Xie, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively used as T2 contrast agents for liver-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The applications, however, have been limited by their mediocre magnetism and r2 relaxivity. Recent studies show that Fe5C2 nanoparticles can be prepared by high temperature thermal decomposition. The resulting nanoparticles possess strong and air stable magnetism, suggesting their potential as a novel type of T2 contrast agent. To this end, we improve the synthetic and surface modification methods of Fe5C2 nanoparticles, and investigated the impact of size and coating on their performances for liver MRI. Specifically, we prepared 5, 14, and 22 nm Fe5C2 nanoparticles and engineered their surface by: 1) ligand addition with phospholipids, 2) ligand exchange with zwitterion-dopamine-sulfonate (ZDS), and 3) protein adsorption with casein. It was found that the size and surface coating have varied levels of impact on the particles' hydrodynamic size, viability, uptake by macrophages, and r2 relaxivity. Interestingly, while phospholipid- and ZDS-coated Fe5C2 nanoparticles showed comparable r2, the casein coating led to an r2 enhancement by more than 2 fold. In particular, casein coated 22 nm Fe5C2 nanoparticle show a striking r2 of 973 mM-1s-1, which is one of the highest among all of the T2 contrast agents reported to date. Small animal studies confirmed the advantage of Fe5C2 nanoparticles over iron oxide nanoparticles in inducing hypointensities on T2-weighted MR images, and the particles caused little toxicity to the host. The improvements are important for transforming Fe5C2 nanoparticles into a new class of MRI contrast agents. The observations also shed light on protein-based surface modification as a means to modulate contrast ability of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:26379788

  5. Casein-Coated Fe5C2 Nanoparticles with Superior r2 Relaxivity for Liver-Specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cowger, Taku A; Tang, Wei; Zhen, Zipeng; Hu, Kai; Rink, David E; Todd, Trever J; Wang, Geoffrey D; Zhang, Weizhong; Chen, Hongmin; Xie, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively used as T2 contrast agents for liver-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The applications, however, have been limited by their mediocre magnetism and r2 relaxivity. Recent studies show that Fe5C2 nanoparticles can be prepared by high temperature thermal decomposition. The resulting nanoparticles possess strong and air stable magnetism, suggesting their potential as a novel type of T2 contrast agent. To this end, we improve the synthetic and surface modification methods of Fe5C2 nanoparticles, and investigated the impact of size and coating on their performances for liver MRI. Specifically, we prepared 5, 14, and 22 nm Fe5C2 nanoparticles and engineered their surface by: 1) ligand addition with phospholipids, 2) ligand exchange with zwitterion-dopamine-sulfonate (ZDS), and 3) protein adsorption with casein. It was found that the size and surface coating have varied levels of impact on the particles' hydrodynamic size, viability, uptake by macrophages, and r2 relaxivity. Interestingly, while phospholipid- and ZDS-coated Fe5C2 nanoparticles showed comparable r2, the casein coating led to an r2 enhancement by more than 2 fold. In particular, casein coated 22 nm Fe5C2 nanoparticle show a striking r2 of 973 mM(-1)s(-1), which is one of the highest among all of the T2 contrast agents reported to date. Small animal studies confirmed the advantage of Fe5C2 nanoparticles over iron oxide nanoparticles in inducing hypointensities on T2-weighted MR images, and the particles caused little toxicity to the host. The improvements are important for transforming Fe5C2 nanoparticles into a new class of MRI contrast agents. The observations also shed light on protein-based surface modification as a means to modulate contrast ability of magnetic nanoparticles.

  6. A novel three-dimensional mesh deformation method based on sphere relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xuan; Li, Shuixiang

    2015-10-01

    In our previous work (2013) [19], we developed a disk relaxation based mesh deformation method for two-dimensional mesh deformation. In this paper, the idea of the disk relaxation is extended to the sphere relaxation for three-dimensional meshes with large deformations. We develop a node based pre-displacement procedure to apply initial movements on nodes according to their layer indices. Afterwards, the nodes are moved locally by the improved sphere relaxation algorithm to transfer boundary deformations and increase the mesh quality. A three-dimensional mesh smoothing method is also adopted to prevent the occurrence of the negative volume of elements, and further improve the mesh quality. Numerical applications in three-dimension including the wing rotation, bending beam and morphing aircraft are carried out. The results demonstrate that the sphere relaxation based approach generates the deformed mesh with high quality, especially regarding complex boundaries and large deformations.

  7. Epitaxial growth and stress relaxation of vapor-deposited Fe-Pd magnetic shape memory films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnemund, L.; Edler, T.; Kock, I.; Seibt, M.; Mayr, S. G.

    2009-11-01

    To achieve maximum performance in microscale magnetic shape memory actuation devices epitaxial films several hundred nanometers thick are needed. Epitaxial films were grown on hot MgO substrates (500 °C and above) by e-beam evaporation. Structural properties and stress relaxation mechanisms were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, in situ substrate curvature measurements and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The high misfit stress incorporated during Vollmer-Weber growth at the beginning was relaxed by partial or perfect dislocations depending on the substrate temperature. This relaxation allowed the avoidance of a stress-induced breakdown of epitaxy and no thickness limit for epitaxy was found. For substrate temperatures of 690 °C or above, the films grew in the fcc austenite phase. Below this temperature, iron precipitates were formed. MD simulations showed how these precipitates influence the movements of partial dislocations, and can thereby explain the higher stress level observed in the experiments in the initial stage of growth for these films.

  8. Superconducting layer thickness dependence of magnetic relaxation property in CVD processed YGdBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2011-11-01

    One of the most important properties of coated conductors for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is the relaxation property of persistent superconducting current. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential U0∗. In this paper, the dependence of U0∗ on the thickness of superconducting layer d is investigated in the range of 0.33-1.43 μm at the temperature range of 20-30 K and in magnetic fields up to 6.5 T for Y 0.7Gd 0.3Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ coated conductors. It was found that the value of critical current density did not appreciably depend on d at 20 K. This indicates that no structural deterioration of superconducting layer occurs during the process of increasing thickness. U0∗ increases and then tends to decrease with an increasing magnetic field. The magnetic field at which U0∗ starts to decrease increases with increasing thickness. This property was analyzed using the flux creep-flow model. Application of scaling law is examined for the dependence of U0∗ on magnetic field and temperature. It was found that the dependence could be expressed using scaling parameters B,U0 peak∗ in the temperature range 20-30 K.

  9. Collisional relaxation of bi-Maxwellian plasma temperatures in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2016-07-01

    In the literature, collisional processes are customarily discussed within the context of the Boltzmann-Balescu-Lenard-Landau type of collision integral, but such an equation is strictly valid for unmagnetized plasmas. For plasmas immersed in the ambient magnetic field, the foundational equation that describes binary collisions must be generalized to include the effects of magnetic field. The present paper makes use of such an equation in order to describe the collisional relaxation of temperatures under the assumption of bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The formalism derived in the present paper may be useful for studying the effects of binary collisions on the isotropization of temperatures in the solar wind plasma, among possible applications.

  10. Iron oxide nanoparticles as magnetic relaxation switching (MRSw) sensors: Current applications in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, David; Lopez, Soledad; García-Martin, María Luisa; Pozo, David

    2016-07-01

    Since pioneering work in the early 60s on the development of enzyme electrodes the field of sensors has evolved to different sophisticated technological platforms. Still, for biomedical applications, there are key requirements to meet in order to get fast, low-cost, real-time data acquisition, multiplexed and automatic biosensors. Nano-based sensors are one of the most promising healthcare applications of nanotechnology, and prone to be one of the first to become a reality. From all nanosensors strategies developed, Magnetic Relaxation Switches (MRSw) assays combine several features which are attractive for nanomedical applications such as safe biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles, increased sensitivity/specificity measurements, possibility to detect analytes in opaque samples (unresponsive to light-based interferences) and the use of homogeneous setting assay. This review aims at presenting the ongoing progress of MRSw technology and its most important applications in clinical medicine.

  11. Muon spin relaxation study of the magnetism in unilluminated Prussian Blue analogue photomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Z.; Parolin, T. J.; Chow, K. H.; Keeler, T. A.; Miller, R. I.; Wang, D.; Macfarlane, W. A.

    2006-05-01

    We present longitudinal field muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements in the unilluminated state of the photosensitive molecular magnetic Co-Fe Prussian Blue analogues M1-2xCo1+x[Fe(CN)6]•zH2O , where M=K and Rb with x=0.4 and ≃0.17 , respectively. These results are compared to those obtained in the x=0.5 stoichiometric limit Co1.5[Fe(CN)6]•6H2O , which is not photosensitive. We find evidence for correlation between the range of magnetic ordering and the value of x in the unilluminated state, which can be explained using a site percolation model.

  12. Field-Induced Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Mononuclear Manganese(III)-Porphyrin Complex.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Álvarez, Alejandro; Vallejo, Julia; Pardo, Emilio; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Krzystek, J; Armentano, Donatella; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cano, Joan

    2015-11-23

    We report on a novel manganese(III)-porphyrin complex with the formula [Mn(III) (TPP)(3,5-Me2 pyNO)2 ]ClO4 ⋅CH3 CN (2; 3,5-Me2 pyNO=3,5-dimethylpyridine N-oxide, H2 TPP=5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin), in which the Mn(III) ion is six-coordinate with two monodentate 3,5-Me2 pyNO molecules and a tetradentate TPP ligand to build a tetragonally elongated octahedral geometry. The environment in 2 is responsible for the large and negative axial zero-field splitting (D=-3.8 cm(-1) ), low rhombicity (E/|D|=0.04) of the high-spin Mn(III) ion, and, ultimately, for the observation of slow magnetic-relaxation effects (Ea =15.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G) in this rare example of a manganese-based single-ion magnet (SIM). Structural, magnetic, and electronic characterizations were carried out by means of single-crystal diffraction studies, variable-temperature direct- and alternating-current measurements and high-frequency and -field EPR spectroscopic analysis followed by quantum-chemical calculations. Slow magnetic-relaxation effects were also observed in the already known analogous compound [Mn(III) (TPP)Cl] (1; Ea =10.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G). The results obtained for 1 and 2 are compared and discussed herein.

  13. Diffusion, relaxation, and chemical exchange in casein gels: A nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Antje; Creamer, Lawrence K.; Hubbard, Penny L.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2005-01-01

    Water in protein/water mixtures can be described in terms of bound water and free water, by exchange between these two states, and by its exchange with appropriate sites on the protein. 1H-NMR diffusion and relaxation measurements provide insights into the mobility of these states. T2 relaxation-time dispersions (i.e., T2 relaxation times at different echo pulse spacings) reveal additional information about exchange. We present a comprehensive set of diffusion and T2 dispersion measurements on casein gels for which the protein/water ratio ranges from 0.25 to 0.5. The combination of these methods, taken in conjunction with concentration dependence, allows a good estimate of the parameters required to fit the data with Luz/Meiboom and Carver/Richards models for relaxation and chemical exchange. We compare the exchange (a) between water and protein and (b) between free water and bound water. Further, we attempt to distinguish chemical site exchange and diffusion/susceptibility exchange.

  14. Microscopic spin dephasing and magnetization relaxation in an s-d model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Hans Christian; Baral, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the spin dynamics in a model of itinerant carriers coupled antiferromagnetically to a macrospin (''s-d model''). The dephasing comes in via the coupling to a phonon bath in the presence of spin-orbit coupling, which we take to be of the Bychkov-Rashba type. Using a mean-field approximation for the s-d model with an antiferromagnetic exchange coupling, we derive Boltzmann scattering integrals for itinerant-carrier spin density matrix, i.e., for the distributions and spin coherences. The spin density matrix is needed because of a constant change of the longitudinal and transverse directions during the coupled dynamics of the itinerant spins and the macrospin. Due to the Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the resulting model describes a form of Elliot-Yafet type carrier-spin relaxation due to electron-phonon scattering within an equation-of-motion formalism. We extrapolate dephasing- and magnetization times T1 and T2 and draw a comparison to phenomenological equations such as the Landau-Lifshitz or Landau-Lifshitz Gilbert equations. We then analyze the magnetization precession and relaxation of the coupled carrier spins and macrospin in an anisotropy field, and find a carrier mediated dephasing of the macrospin via mean-field

  15. Protein self-association induced by macromolecular crowding: a quantitative analysis by magnetic relaxation dispersion.

    PubMed

    Snoussi, Karim; Halle, Bertil

    2005-04-01

    In the presence of high concentrations of inert macromolecules, the self-association of proteins is strongly enhanced through an entropic, excluded-volume effect variously called macromolecular crowding or depletion attraction. Despite the predicted large magnitude of this universal effect and its far-reaching biological implications, few experimental studies of macromolecular crowding have been reported. Here, we introduce a powerful new technique, fast field-cycling magnetic relaxation dispersion, for investigating crowding effects on protein self-association equilibria. By recording the solvent proton spin relaxation rate over a wide range of magnetic field strengths, we determine the populations of coexisting monomers and decamers of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in the presence of dextran up to a macromolecular volume fraction of 27%. Already at a dextran volume fraction of 14%, we find a 30-fold increase of the decamer population and 510(5)-fold increase of the association constant. The analysis of these results, in terms of a statistical-mechanical model that incorporates polymer flexibility as well as the excluded volume of the protein, shows that the dramatic enhancement of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor self-association can be quantitatively rationalized in terms of hard repulsive interactions. PMID:15665132

  16. Magnetic relaxation, current sheets, and structure formation in an extremely Tenuous fluid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bajer, K.; Moffatt, H. K.

    2013-12-20

    The process of relaxation of a unidirectional magnetic field in a highly conducting tenuous fluid medium is considered. Null points of the field play a critical role in this process. During an initial stage of relaxation, variations in magnetic pressure are eliminated, and current sheets build up in the immediate neighborhood of null points. This initial phase is followed by a long diffusive phase of slow algebraic decay of the field, during which fluid is continuously sucked into the current sheets, leading to exponential growth of fluid density and concentration of mass around the null points, which show a tendency to cluster. Ultimately, this second phase of algebraic decay gives way to a final period of exponential decay of the field. The peaks of density at the null points survive as a fossil relic of the decay process. Numerical solution of the governing equations provides convincing confirmation of this three-stage scenario. Generalizations to two- and three-dimensional fields are briefly considered.

  17. Metabolic properties in stroked rats revealed by relaxation-enhanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy at ultrahigh fields.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Muniz, Jose A; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) yields site-specific signatures that directly report metabolic concentrations, biochemistry and kinetics-provided spectral sensitivity and quality are sufficient. Here, an enabling relaxation-enhanced (RE) MRS approach is demonstrated that by combining highly selective spectral excitations with operation at very high magnetic fields, delivers spectra exhibiting signal-to-noise ratios >50:1 in under 6 s for ~5 × 5 × 5 (mm)(3) voxels, with flat baselines and no interference from water. With this spectral quality, MRS was used to interrogate a number of metabolic properties in stroked rat models. Metabolic confinements imposed by randomly oriented micro-architectures were detected and found to change upon ischaemia; intensities of downfield resonances were found to be selectively altered in stroked hemispheres; and longitudinal relaxation time of lactic acid was found to increase by over 50% its control value as early as 3-h post ischaemia, paralleling the onset of cytotoxic oedema. These results demonstrate potential of (1)H MRS at ultrahigh fields. PMID:25229942

  18. Magnetic spectra and Richter aftereffect relaxation in CexY3-xFe5O12 ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu; Wang, Xian; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-05-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic properties of cerium (Ce) doped yttrium iron garnet CexY3-xFe5O12 (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2) ferrites (YIG) have been reported in this work. The ferrites were fabricated by the traditional solid-state reaction method. All ferrite samples reveal pure garnet structure identified by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The substitution of cerium not only enhances the saturation magnetization of the samples, but also regulates the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant K1. Obvious differences in permeability spectra over a frequency of 1 MHz - 1 GHz can be observed. It is verified that the permeability dispersion and magnetic losses of Ce-doped YIG ferrite contain the contribution of Richter aftereffect relaxation due to the existence of Fe2+ ions. The fitting results of the permeability spectra applied three-mechanism model is in good agreement with experimental data, which successfully explains the mechanisms of magnetic losses observed at 1 MHz to 1 GHz for Ce-doped YIG ferrite. In addition, the frequency shift of Richter aftereffect has also been discussed.

  19. NOTE: Detection limits for ferrimagnetic particle concentrations using magnetic resonance imaging based proton transverse relaxation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, H.; Chua-anusorn, W.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Dobson, J.

    2003-03-01

    A clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to measure proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) in agar gels with varying concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in a field strength of 1.5 T. The nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of either dextran or polyvinyl alcohol. The method of preparation resulted in loosely packed clusters (dextran) or branched chains (polyvinyl alcohol) of particles containing of the order of 600 and 400 particles, respectively. For both methods of particle preparation, concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron in agar gel less than 0.01 mg ml-1 had no measurable effect on the value of R2 for the gel. The results indicate that MRI-based R2 measurements using 1.5 T clinical scanners are not quite sensitive enough to detect the very low concentrations of nanoparticulate biogenic magnetite reported in human brain tissue.

  20. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: General theory with applications to two-spin systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-02-28

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. We have embarked on a systematic program to develop, from the stochastic Liouville equation, a general and rigorous theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole coupling strengths, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we present a general theoretical framework applicable to spin systems of arbitrary size with symmetric or asymmetric exchange. So far, the dipolar EMOR theory is only available for a two-spin system with symmetric exchange. Asymmetric exchange, when the spin system is fragmented by the exchange, introduces new and unexpected phenomena. Notably, the anisotropic dipole couplings of non-exchanging spins break the axial symmetry in spin Liouville space, thereby opening up new relaxation channels in the locally anisotropic sites, including longitudinal-transverse cross relaxation. Such cross-mode relaxation operates only at low fields; at higher fields it becomes nonsecular, leading to an unusual inverted relaxation dispersion that splits the extreme-narrowing regime into two sub-regimes. The general dipolar EMOR theory is illustrated here by a detailed analysis of the asymmetric two-spin case, for which we present relaxation dispersion profiles over a wide range of conditions as well as analytical results for integral relaxation rates and time-dependent spin modes in the zero-field and motional-narrowing regimes. The general theoretical framework presented here will enable a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation in model systems with immobilized macromolecules and, ultimately, will provide a rigorous link between relaxation-based magnetic resonance image contrast and molecular parameters

  1. Measurement of the Thermal Properties of a Metal Using a Relaxation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, John N.; McMaster, Richard H.

    1975-01-01

    An undergraduate experiment is described which employs a relaxation method for the measurement of the thermal conductivity and specific heat of a metallic sample in a temperature range of 0-100 degrees centigrade. (Author/CP)

  2. Carrier relaxation in (In,Ga)As quantum dots with magnetic field-induced anharmonic level structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtze, H.; Bayer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Sophisticated models have been worked out to explain the fast relaxation of carriers into quantum dot ground states after non-resonant excitation, overcoming the originally proposed phonon bottleneck. We apply a magnetic field along the quantum dot heterostructure growth direction to transform the confined level structure, which can be approximated by a Fock-Darwin spectrum, from a nearly equidistant level spacing at zero field to strong anharmonicity in finite fields. This changeover leaves the ground state carrier population rise time unchanged suggesting that fast relaxation is maintained upon considerable changes of the level spacing. This corroborates recent models explaining the relaxation by polaron formation in combination with quantum kinetic effects.

  3. Superconducting magnet and fabrication method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method of trapping a field in a block of superconductor material, includes providing (i) a block of material defining a bore, (ii) a high permeability core within the bore that defines a low reluctance path through the bore, (iii) a high permeability external structure on the exterior of the block of material that defines a low reluctance path between opposite ends of the core, and (iv) an electromagnet configured to apply a magnetic field around the high permeability core. The method proceeds by energizing the electromagnet to produce an applied magnetic field around the high permeability core, cooling the block of material sufficiently to render the block of material superconducting, de-energizing the electromagnet to result in a trapped magnetic field, and at least partially removing the low reluctance path defined by the core and the external structure in order to increase the magnetic flux density of the trapped magnetic field.

  4. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Houshang; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Wan, Sha; Monopoli, Marco P.; Lynch, Iseult; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs influence the types and amounts of proteins present on their surfaces. This differential display of proteins bound to the surface of NPs can influence the tissue distribution, cellular uptake and biological effects of NPs. To date, the effects of adsorption of a protein corona (PC) on the magnetic properties of NPs have not been considered, despite the fact that some of their potential applications require their use in human blood. Here, to investigate the effects of a PC (using fetal bovine serum) on the MRI contrast efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs), we have synthesized two series of SPIONs with variation in the thickness and functional groups (i.e. surface charges) of the dextran surface coating. We have observed that different physico-chemical characteristics of the dextran coatings on the SPIONs lead to the formation of PCs of different compositions. 1H relaxometry was used to obtain the longitudinal, r1, and transverse, r2, relaxivities of the SPIONs without and with a PC, as a function of the Larmor frequency. The transverse relaxivity, which determines the efficiency of negative contrast agents (CAs), is very much dependent on the functional group and the surface charge of the SPIONs' coating. The presence of the PC did not alter the relaxivity of plain SPIONs, while it slightly increased the relaxivity of the negatively charged SPIONs and dramatically decreased the relaxivity of the positively charged ones, which was coupled with particle agglomeration in the presence of the proteins. To confirm the effect of the PC on the MRI contrast efficiency, in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz were performed using a low-field MRI scanner. The MRI

  5. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Houshang; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Wan, Sha; Monopoli, Marco P.; Lynch, Iseult; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs influence the types and amounts of proteins present on their surfaces. This differential display of proteins bound to the surface of NPs can influence the tissue distribution, cellular uptake and biological effects of NPs. To date, the effects of adsorption of a protein corona (PC) on the magnetic properties of NPs have not been considered, despite the fact that some of their potential applications require their use in human blood. Here, to investigate the effects of a PC (using fetal bovine serum) on the MRI contrast efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs), we have synthesized two series of SPIONs with variation in the thickness and functional groups (i.e. surface charges) of the dextran surface coating. We have observed that different physico-chemical characteristics of the dextran coatings on the SPIONs lead to the formation of PCs of different compositions. 1H relaxometry was used to obtain the longitudinal, r1, and transverse, r2, relaxivities of the SPIONs without and with a PC, as a function of the Larmor frequency. The transverse relaxivity, which determines the efficiency of negative contrast agents (CAs), is very much dependent on the functional group and the surface charge of the SPIONs' coating. The presence of the PC did not alter the relaxivity of plain SPIONs, while it slightly increased the relaxivity of the negatively charged SPIONs and dramatically decreased the relaxivity of the positively charged ones, which was coupled with particle agglomeration in the presence of the proteins. To confirm the effect of the PC on the MRI contrast efficiency, in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz were performed using a low-field MRI scanner. The MRI

  6. Nonlinear magnetization relaxation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in superimposed ac and dc magnetic bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Serguey V.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; El Mrabti, Halim; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear ac response of the magnetization M(t) of a uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic nanoparticle subjected to both ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths and orientations is determined by averaging Gilbert’s equation augmented by a random field with Gaussian white-noise properties in order to calculate exactly the relevant statistical averages. It is shown that the magnetization dynamics of the uniaxial particle driven by a strong ac field applied at an angle to the easy axis of the particle (so that the axial symmetry is broken) alters drastically leading to different nonlinear effects due to coupling of the thermally activated magnetization reversal mode with the precessional modes of M(t) via the driving ac field.

  7. Heterometallic Cu(II)-Dy(III) Clusters of Different Nuclearities with Slow Magnetic Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Modak, Ritwik; Sikdar, Yeasin; Cosquer, Goulven; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Yamashita, Masahiro; Goswami, Sanchita

    2016-01-19

    The synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties of two heterometallic Cu(II)-Dy(III) clusters are reported. The first structural motif displays a pentanuclear Cu(II)4Dy(III) core, while the second one reveals a nonanuclear Cu(II)6Dy(III)3 core. We employed o-vanillin-based Schiff base ligands combining o-vanillin with 3-amino-1-propanol, H2vap, (2-[(3-hydroxy-propylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol), and 2-aminoethanol, H2vae, (2-[(3-hydroxy-ethylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol). The differing nuclearities of the two clusters stem from the choice of imino alcohol arm in the Schiff bases, H2vap and H2vae. This work is aimed at broadening the diversity of Cu(II)-Dy(III) clusters and to perceive the consequence of changing the length of the alcohol arm on the nuclearity of the cluster, providing valuable insight into promising future synthetic directions. The underlying topological entity of the pentanuclear Cu4Dy cluster is reported for the first time. The investigation of magnetic behaviors of 1 and 2 below 2 K reveals slow magnetic relaxation with a significant influence coming from the variation of the alcohol arm affecting the nature of magnetic interactions. PMID:26702645

  8. Relaxation dynamics of vortex lines in disordered type-II superconductors following magnetic field and temperature quenches.

    PubMed

    Assi, Hiba; Chaturvedi, Harshwardhan; Dobramysl, Ulrich; Pleimling, Michel; Täuber, Uwe C

    2015-11-01

    We study the effects of rapid temperature and magnetic field changes on the nonequilibrium relaxation dynamics of magnetic vortex lines in disordered type-II superconductors by employing an elastic line model and performing Langevin molecular dynamics simulations. In a previously equilibrated system, either the temperature is suddenly changed or the magnetic field is instantaneously altered which is reflected in adding or removing flux lines to or from the system. The subsequent aging properties are investigated in samples with either randomly distributed pointlike or extended columnar defects, which allows us to distinguish the complex relaxation features that result from either type of pinning centers. One-time observables such as the radius of gyration and the fraction of pinned line elements are employed to characterize steady-state properties, and two-time correlation functions such as the vortex line height autocorrelations and their mean-square displacement are analyzed to study the nonlinear stochastic relaxation dynamics in the aging regime. PMID:26651664

  9. Imaging tumor hypoxia by magnetic resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia results from the negative balance between the oxygen demands of the tissue and the capacity of the neovasculature to deliver sufficient oxygen. The resulting oxygen deficit has important consequences with regard to the aggressiveness and malignancy of tumors, as well as their resistance to therapy, endowing the imaging of hypoxia with vital repercussions in tumor prognosis and therapy design. The molecular and cellular events underlying hypoxia are mediated mainly through hypoxia-inducible factor, a transcription factor with pleiotropic effects over a variety of cellular processes, including oncologic transformation, invasion and metastasis. However, few methodologies have been able to monitor noninvasively the oxygen tensions in vivo. MRI and MRS are often used for this purpose. Most MRI approaches are based on the effects of the local oxygen tension on: (i) the relaxation times of (19)F or (1)H indicators, such as perfluorocarbons or their (1)H analogs; (ii) the hemodynamics and magnetic susceptibility effects of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin; and (iii) the effects of paramagnetic oxygen on the relaxation times of tissue water. (19)F MRS approaches monitor tumor hypoxia through the selective accumulation of reduced nitroimidazole derivatives in hypoxic zones, whereas electron spin resonance methods determine the oxygen level through its influence on the linewidths of appropriate paramagnetic probes in vivo. Finally, Overhauser-enhanced MRI combines the sensitivity of EPR methodology with the resolution of MRI, providing a window into the future use of hyperpolarized oxygen probes.

  10. Structure, synthetic methods, magnetic properties and biomedical applications of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    This paper is aimed at conducting a survey of the synthetic methods and magnetic properties of nanoparticles as ferrofluids used in biomedicine. As compared with other works in the field, the distinctive feature of the current work is the systematic study of recent advances in ferrofluids utilized in hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The most important feature for application of ferrofluids is super-paramagnetic behavior of magnetic cores with relatively high saturation magnetization. Although Fe3O4 nanoparticles have traditionally been used in medicine; the modified Mn-ferrite has recently received special attention due to its higher saturation magnetization and r2-relaxivity as a contrast agent in MRI. Co-ferrite nanoparticles are also good candidates for hyperthermia treatment because of their high coercivity and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The thermal decomposition and hydrothermal methods are good candidates for obtaining appropriate super-paramagnetic particles. PMID:23623058

  11. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  12. Relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) of desiccation in M9787 silicone pads.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M; Cherry, Brian Ray; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2004-06-01

    The production and aging of silicone materials remains an important issue in the weapons stockpile due to their utilization in a wide variety of components and systems within the stockpile. Changes in the physical characteristics of silicone materials due to long term desiccation has been identified as one of the major aging effects observed in silicone pad components. Here we report relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) spectroscopy characterization of the silica-filled and unfilled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polydiphenylsiloxane (PDPS) copolymer (M9787) silicone pads within desiccating environments. These studies were directed at providing additional details about the heterogeneity of the desiccation process. Uniform NMR spin-spin relaxation time (T2) images were observed across the pad thickness indicating that the drying process is approximately uniform, and that the desiccation of the M9787 silicone pad is not a H2O diffusion limited process. In a P2O5 desiccation environment, significant reduction of T2 was observed for the silica-filled and unfilled M9787 silicone pad for desiccation up to 225 days. A very small reduction in T2 was observed for the unfilled copolymer between 225 and 487 days. The increase in relative stiffness with desiccation was found to be higher for the unfilled copolymer. These R-NMRI results are correlated to local changes in the modulus of the material

  13. Pentanuclear lanthanide pyramids based on thiacalix[4]arene ligand exhibiting slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing-Yuan; Ru, Jing; Gao, Feng; Song, You; Zhou, Xin-Hui; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-09-21

    A series of pentanuclear Ln(III) clusters, [Ln5(μ4-OH)(μ3-OH)4(L1)(acac)6] (H4L1 = p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene; acac = acetylacetonate; Ln = Dy, Ho, Er) and [Ln5(μ5-OH)(μ3-OH)4(L1)(L2)2(acac)2(CH3OH)2] (H3L2 = 5,11,17,23-tetrakis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-25,26,27-trihydroxy-28-methoxy thiacalix[4]arene; Ln = Dy, Ho, Er), have been synthesized based on the thiacalix[4]arene ligand. All of these complexes feature a square-based pyramid with four triangular Ln3 structural motifs. One μ4-OH group bridges four Ln(III) ions in the basal plane of , while the OH group in complexes adopts the μ5-coordination mode. Our results illuminate the coordination modes of the versatile thiacalix[4]arene ligands and their application to new cluster compounds. The structural and magnetic studies confirm that the molecular symmetries and coordination geometries for lanthanide metal cores have a significant effect on some parameters as single-molecule magnets. Among them, two Dy5 pyramids exhibit distinct slow magnetic relaxation. PMID:26237158

  14. Ion heating during magnetic relaxation in the helicity injected torus-II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, R.G.; Redd, A.J.; Hamp, W.T.; Smith, R.J.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-12-15

    Ion doppler spectroscopy (IDS) is applied to the helicity injected torus (HIT-II) spherical torus to measure impurity ion temperature and flows. [A. J. Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] The IDS instrument employs a 16-channel photomultiplier and can track temperature and velocity continuously through a discharge. Data for the coaxial helicity injection (CHI), transformer, and combined current drive configurations are presented. Ion temperatures for transformer-driven discharges are typically equal to or somewhat lower than electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering. Internal reconnection events in transformer-driven discharges cause rapid ion heating. The CHI discharges exhibit anomalously high ion temperatures >250 eV, which are an order of magnitude higher than Thomson measurements, indicating ion heating through magnetic relaxation. The CHI discharges that exhibit current and poloidal flux buildup after bubble burst show sustained ion heating during current drive.

  15. Muon spin relaxation studies on magnetic properties of organic conductors Pd(dmit)2 salts and α-(BETS)2I3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira-Kawamura, S.; Tamura, M.; Kato, R.; Hiraki, K.; Takahashi, T.; Iwasaki, M.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic properties of organic conductors β'-Et2Me2Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2 (Et = C2H5, Me = CH3), P21/m crystal of EtMe3P[Pd(dmit)2]2 and α-(BETS)2I3 were investigated by muon spin relaxation (μSR) method. It has been suggested that Et2Me2Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2 exhibits a charge separation phase below ~70 K and that EtMe3P[Pd(dmit)2]2 exhibits a spin-Peierls-like state below ~25 K although it has a quasi two-dimensional structure. Our zero-field μSR results indicate that these Pd(dmit)2 salts show quite similar behavior to an organic spin-Peierls system although changes in the μSR time spectra of the EtMe3P salt was ambiguous. For α-(BETS)2I3, a metal-insulator transition is expected to occur at TMI ~ 50 K. We observed a slight enhancement of the muon spin relaxation below TMI and it gradually became remarkable at lower temperatures. The present result may reveal the existence of a spin-singlet ground state showing similar temperature dependence of the muon spin relaxation rate to that in the Pd(dmit)2 salts. However, the possibility that the relaxation in this system originates from magnetic fluctuations is also still conceivable.

  16. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  17. Highly reduced double-decker single-molecule magnets exhibiting slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gonidec, Mathieu; Krivokapic, Itana; Vidal-Gancedo, Jose; Davies, E Stephen; McMaster, Jonathan; Gorun, Sergiu M; Veciana, Jaume

    2013-04-15

    F64Pc2Ln (1Ln, Ln = Tb or Lu) represent the first halogenated phthalocyanine double-decker lanthanide complexes, and 1Tb exhibits single-molecule magnet properties as revealed by solid-state magnetometry. The fluorine substituents of the phthalocyanine rings have a dramatic effect on the redox properties of the F64Pc2Ln complexes, namely, a stabilization of their reduced states. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements demonstrate that the 1Tb(-/2-) and 1Tb(2-/3-) couples exhibit redox reversibility and that the 1Tb(-), 1Tb(2-) and 1Tb(3-) species may be prepared by bulk electrolysis in acetone. Low-temperature MCD studies reveal for the first time magnetization hystereses for the super-reduced dianionic and trianionic states of Pc2Ln.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton dipolar order relaxation in thermotropic liquid crystals: A quantum theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamar, R. C.; Mensio, O.

    2004-12-01

    By means of the Jeener-Broekaert nuclear magnetic resonance pulse sequence, the proton spin system of a liquid crystal can be prepared in quasiequilibrium states of high dipolar order, which relax to thermal equilibrium with the molecular environment with a characteristic time (T1D). Previous studies of the Larmor frequency and temperature dependence of T1D in thermotropic liquid crystals, that included field cycling and conventional high-field experiments, showed that the slow hydrodynamic modes dominate the behavior of T1D, even at high Larmor frequencies. This noticeable predominance of the cooperative fluctuations (known as order fluctuations of the director, OFD) could not be explained by standard models based on the spin-lattice relaxation theory in the limit of high temperature (weak order). This fact points out the necessity of investigating the role of the quantum terms neglected in the usual high temperature theory of dipolar order relaxation. In this work, we present a generalization of the proton dipolar order relaxation theory for highly correlated systems, which considers all the spins belonging to correlated domains as an open quantum system interacting with quantum bath. As starting point, we deduce a formulation of the Markovian master equation of relaxation for the statistical spin operator, valid for all temperatures, which is suitable for introducing a dipolar spin temperature in the quantum regime, without further assumptions about the form of the spin-lattice Hamiltonian. In order to reflect the slow dynamics occurring in correlated systems, we lift the usual short-correlation-time assumption by including the average over the motion of the dipolar Hamiltonian together with the Zeeman Hamiltonian into the time evolution operator. In this way, we calculate the time dependence of the spin operators in the interaction picture in a closed form, valid for high magnetic fields, bringing into play the spin-spin interactions within the microscopic time

  19. Slow magnetic relaxation in a hydrogen-bonded 2D array of mononuclear dysprosium(III) oxamates.

    PubMed

    Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Vallejo, Julia; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2013-05-01

    The reaction of N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)oxamic acid with dysprosium(III) ions in a controlled basic media afforded the first example of a mononuclear lanthanide oxamate complex exhibiting a field-induced slow magnetic relaxation behavior typical of single-ion magnets (SIMs). The hydrogen-bond-mediated self-assembly of this new bifunctional dysprosium(III) SIM in the solid state provides a unique example of 2D hydrogen-bonded polymer with a herringbone net topology.

  20. Magnetic relaxation in Zn(PO3)2·Er(PO3)3 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendáč, M.; Tibenská, K.; Čižmár, E.; Tkáč, V.; Orendáčová, A.; Holubová, J.; Černošek, Z.; Černošková, E.

    2016-08-01

    The results of experimental studies of alternating (ac) magnetic susceptibility and specific heat of Zn(PO3)2·Er(PO3)3 glass are reported. Despite a high concentration of magnetic Er(III) ions the analysis of ac susceptibility ruled out the formation of a spin glass state in the used range of temperatures. Two relaxation processes were identified. The first one is thermally activated with a crossover in its temperature dependence observed at nominally 7 K. The relaxation at lower temperatures seems to be governed by a direct process with pronounced effect of phonon bottleneck. Striking deceleration of spin dynamics with increasing temperature found above 7 K is tentatively attributed to overcoming Ioffe - Regel crossover and strong scattering of acoustic phonons on local modes. Simplified prediction derived from a soft-mode-dynamics model confirms the presence of the boson peak observed in specific heat data and reasonably predicts the temperature of the crossover. The second process is consistent with a cross - tunneling relaxation. The obtained results suggest that magnetic doping of glasses and studying magnetic relaxation may represent an alternative tool for the investigation of lattice modes in glasses.

  1. Nanoscale {LnIII(24)ZnII(6)} Triangular Metalloring with Magnetic Refrigerant, Slow Magnetic Relaxation, and Fluorescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhao, Lang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chao; Yuan, Sen-Wen; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-12-01

    The self-assembly of Ln(ClO4)3 · 6H2O and Zn(OAc)2 · 2H2O with pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid (HL) results in the formation of three novel nanosized {LnIII(24)ZnII(6)} triangular metallorings, [Gd24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(H2O)14](ClO4)7(OAc) · 2CH3OH · 26H2O (1), [Tb24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(CH3O)2(CH3OH)2(H2O)10](ClO4)5(OH) · 6CH3OH · 12H2O (2), and (H3O)[Dy24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(H2O)14](ClO4)7(OAc)2 · 4CH3OH · 22H2O (3), having the largest nuclearity among any known Ln/Zn clusters. Magnetic and luminescent studies reveal the special prowess for each lanthanide complex. Magnetic studies reveal that 1 exhibits a significant cryogenic magnetocaloric effect with a maximum -ΔSm (isothermal magnetic entropy change) value of 30.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 2.5 K and 7 T and that a slow magnetization relaxation is observed for the dysprosium analogue. In addition, the solid-state photophysical properties of 2 display strong characteristic Tb(III) photoluminescent emission in the visible region, suggesting that Tb(III)-based luminescence is sensitized by the effective energy transfer from the ligand HL to the metal centers. PMID:26600284

  2. Metabolic T1 dynamics and longitudinal relaxation enhancement in vivo at ultrahigh magnetic fields on ischemia.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-11-01

    Interruptions in cerebral blood flow may lead to devastating neural outcomes. Magnetic resonance has a central role in diagnosing and monitoring these insufficiencies, as well as in understanding their underlying metabolic consequences. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in particular can probe ischemia via the signatures of endogenous metabolites including lactic acid (Lac), N-acetylaspartate, creatine (Cre), and cholines. Typically, MRS reports on these metabolites' concentrations. This study focuses on establishing the potential occurrence of in vivo longitudinal relaxation enhancement (LRE) effects-a phenomenon involving a reduction of the apparent T1 with selective bandwidth excitations- in a rat stroke model at 21.1 T. Statistically significant reductions in Cre's apparent T1s were observed at all the examined post-ischemia time points for both ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, thereby establishing the existence of LREs for this metabolite in vivo. Ischemia-dependent LRE trends were also noted for Lac in the ipsilateral hemisphere only 24 hours after ischemia. Metabolic T1s were also found to vary significantly as a function of post-stroke recovery time, with the most remarkable and rapid changes observed for Lac T1s. The potential of such measurements to understand stroke at a molecular level and assist in its diagnosis, is discussed. PMID:25204392

  3. Metabolic T1 dynamics and longitudinal relaxation enhancement in vivo at ultrahigh magnetic fields on ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions in cerebral blood flow may lead to devastating neural outcomes. Magnetic resonance has a central role in diagnosing and monitoring these insufficiencies, as well as in understanding their underlying metabolic consequences. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in particular can probe ischemia via the signatures of endogenous metabolites including lactic acid (Lac), N-acetylaspartate, creatine (Cre), and cholines. Typically, MRS reports on these metabolites' concentrations. This study focuses on establishing the potential occurrence of in vivo longitudinal relaxation enhancement (LRE) effects—a phenomenon involving a reduction of the apparent T1 with selective bandwidth excitations— in a rat stroke model at 21.1 T. Statistically significant reductions in Cre's apparent T1s were observed at all the examined post-ischemia time points for both ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, thereby establishing the existence of LREs for this metabolite in vivo. Ischemia-dependent LRE trends were also noted for Lac in the ipsilateral hemisphere only 24 hours after ischemia. Metabolic T1s were also found to vary significantly as a function of post-stroke recovery time, with the most remarkable and rapid changes observed for Lac T1s. The potential of such measurements to understand stroke at a molecular level and assist in its diagnosis, is discussed. PMID:25204392

  4. Three-dimensional gyrokinetic simulation of the relaxation of a magnetized temperature filament

    SciTech Connect

    Sydora, R. D.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.; Van Compernolle, B.

    2015-10-15

    An electromagnetic, 3D gyrokinetic particle code is used to study the relaxation of a magnetized electron temperature filament embedded in a large, uniform plasma of lower temperature. The study provides insight into the role played by unstable drift-Alfvén waves observed in a basic electron heat transport experiment [D. C. Pace et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 122304 (2008)] in which anomalous cross-field transport has been documented. The simulation exhibits the early growth of temperature-gradient-driven, drift-Alfvén fluctuations that closely match the eigenmodes predicted by linear theory. At the onset of saturation, the unstable fluctuations display a spiral spatial pattern, similar to that observed in the laboratory, which causes the rearrangement of the temperature profile. After saturation of the linear instability, the system exhibits a markedly different behavior depending on the inclusion in the computation of modes without variation along the magnetic field, i.e., k{sub z} = 0. In their absence, the initial filament evolves into a broadened temperature profile, self-consistent with undamped, finite amplitude drift-Alfvén waves. But the inclusion of k{sub z} = 0 modes causes the destruction of the filament and damping of the drift-Alfvén modes leading to a final state consisting of undamped convective cells and multiple, smaller-scale filaments.

  5. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C₃₂H₁₆MnN₈).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T(C)  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T(C) has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ' and χ″, near the quoted T(C). Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k(B)  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k(B)  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured |D|/  >  J. PMID:26954989

  6. Energy Distribution among Reaction Products. III: The Method of Measured Relaxation Applied to H + Cl2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacey, P. D.; Polyani, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    The method of measured relaxation is described for the determination of initial vibrational energy distribution in the products of exothermic reaction. Hydrogen atoms coming from an orifice were diffused into flowing chlorine gas. Measurements were made of the resultant ir chemiluminescence at successive points along the line of flow. The concurrent processes of reaction, diffusion, flow, radiation, and deactivation were analyzed in some detail on a computer. A variety of relaxation models were used in an attempt to place limits on k(nu prime), the rate constant for reaction to form HCl in specified vibrational energy levels: H+Cl2 yields (sup K(nu prime) HCl(sub nu prime) + Cl. The set of k(?) obtained from this work is in satisfactory agreement with those obtained by another experimental method (the method of arrested relaxation described in Parts IV and V of the present series.

  7. Collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized two-species pure ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chim, Chi Yung; O’Neil, Thomas M.; Dubin, Daniel H.

    2014-04-15

    The collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized pure ion plasma that is composed of two species with slightly different masses is discussed. We have in mind two isotopes of the same singly ionized atom. Parameters are assumed to be ordered as Ω{sub 1},Ω{sub 2}≫|Ω{sub 1}−Ω{sub 2}|≫v{sup ¯}{sub ij}/b{sup ¯} and v{sup ¯}{sub ⊥j}/Ω{sub j}≪b{sup ¯}, where Ω{sub 1} and Ω{sub 2} are two cyclotron frequencies, v{sup ¯}{sub ij}=√(T{sub ∥}/μ{sub ij}) is the relative parallel thermal velocity characterizing collisions between particles of species i and j, and b{sup ¯}=2e{sup 2}/T{sub ∥} is the classical distance of closest approach for such collisions, and v{sup ¯}{sub ⊥j}/Ω{sub j}=√(2T{sub ⊥j}/m{sub j})/Ω{sub j} is the characteristic cyclotron radius for particles of species j. Here, μ{sub ij} is the reduced mass for the two particles, and T{sub ∥} and T{sub ⊥j} are temperatures that characterize velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For this ordering, the total cyclotron action for the two species, I{sub 1}=∑{sub i∈1}m{sub 1}v{sub ⊥i}{sup 2}/(2Ω{sub 1}) and I{sub 2}=∑{sub i∈2}m{sub 2}v{sub ⊥i}{sup 2}/(2Ω{sub 2}) are adiabatic invariants that constrain the collisional dynamics. On the timescale of a few collisions, entropy is maximized subject to the constancy of the total Hamiltonian H and the two actions I{sub 1} and I{sub 2}, yielding a modified Gibbs distribution of the form exp[−H/T{sub ∥}−α{sub 1}I{sub 1}−α{sub 2}I{sub 2}]. Here, the α{sub j}’s are related to T{sub ∥} and T{sub ⊥j} through T{sub ⊥j}=(1/T{sub ∥}+α{sub j}/Ω{sub j}){sup −1}. Collisional relaxation to the usual Gibbs distribution, exp[−H/T{sub ∥}], takes place on two timescales. On a timescale longer than the collisional timescale by a factor of (b{sup ¯2}Ω{sub 1}{sup 2}/v{sup ¯}{sub 11}{sup 2})exp(5[3π(b{sup ¯}|Ω{sub 1}−Ω{sub 2}|/v{sup ¯}{sub 12})]{sup 2/5}/6), the two

  8. A relaxation method for minimizing a smooth function on a generalized spherical segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulliev, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The minimization of a smooth functional on a generalized spherical segment of a finite-dimensional Euclidean space is examined. A relaxation method that involves successive projections of the antigradient onto auxiliary sets of a simpler structure is proposed. It is shown that, under certain natural assumptions, this method converges to a stationary point.

  9. Methods for diffusive relaxation in the Pn equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hauck, Cory D; Mcclarren, Ryan G; Lowrie, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    We present recent progress in the development of two substantially different approaches for simulating the so-called of P{sub N} equations. These are linear hyperbolic systems of PDEs that are used to model particle transport in a material medium, that in highly collisional regimes, are accurately approximated by a simple diffusion equation. This limit is based on a balance between function values and gradients of certain variables in the P{sub N} system. Conventional reconstruction methods based on upwinding approximate such gradients with an error that is dependent on the size of the computational mesh. Thus in order to capture the diffusion limit, a given mesh must resolve the dynamics of the continuum equation at the level of the mean-free-path, which tends to zero in the diffusion limit. The two methods analyzed here produce accurate solutions in both collisional and non-collisional regimes; in particular, they do not require resolution of the mean-free-path in order to properly capture the diffusion limit. The first method is a straight-forward application of the discrete Galerkin (DG) methodology, which uses additional variables in each computational cell to capture the balance between function values and gradients, which are computed locally. The second method uses a temporal splitting of the fast and slow dynamics in the P{sub N} system to derive so-called regularized equations for which the diffusion limit is built-in. We focus specifically on the P{sub N} equations for one-dimensional, slab geometries. Preliminary results for several benchmark problems are presented which highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Further improvements and extensions are also discussed.

  10. Magnetic relaxation in the nanoscale granular alloy Fe20Cu20Ag60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucko, D. H.; Pankhurst, Q. A.; Fernández Barquín, L.; Rodríguez Fernández, J.; Cox, S. F. J.

    2001-09-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of a representative member of a class of technologically relevant ternary metallic alloys have been studied in detail. The alloy, of composition Fe20Cu20Ag60, is a member of the family of nanoscale granular alloys that are of current interest in both giant magnetoresistive alloys and nanocrystalline soft magnets. Samples were produced by mechanical alloying (70 h, argon sealed) and were homogeneous according to scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. Room-temperature magnetoresistance measurements in applied fields up to H=90 kOe gave a value of 5% (at 90 kOe) for the [R(H)-R(0)]/R(0) ratio. Rietveld calculations on high-resolution image plate data using a synchrotron source (λ=0.6920 Å) showed that the specimen comprised a dispersion of bcc Fe60Cu40 (Im-3m, a=2.951 Å) particles of mean size 5.5 nm in an fcc Ag90Cu10 (Fm-3m, a=4.057 Å) matrix. This structure was stable up to 380 K as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry. dc magnetization (peaks in zero-field-cooled data) and frequency-dependent ac susceptibility (in external dc magnetic fields from zero to 500 Oe) measurements showed blocking transitions between 280 and 300 K, with the onset of superparamagnetic behavior at higher temperatures. The superparamagnetic regime was confirmed at room temperature by the observation of anhysteretic M(H) curves, and through zero field and applied field Mössbauer experiments in which a combined singlet plus doublet spectrum was transformed to a magnetically split sextet on application of an 11-kOe field. In all cases the blocking transitions were clearly affected by the existence of intergranular interactions, which shifted them to higher temperatures than would be expected from noninteracting grains. Evidence of intergranular interactions were also found in the dynamic behavior of the ac susceptibility data (small frequency-dependent shifts in the blocking temperature, Vogel-Fulcher activation

  11. Lanthanide-Directed Fabrication of Four Tetranuclear Quadruple Stranded Helicates Showing Magnetic Refrigeration and Slow Magnetic Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Amit Kumar; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Malviya, Amita; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-06-01

    A rare class of four tetranuclear lanthanide based quadruple stranded helicates namely, [Ln4L4(OH)2](OAc)2·xH2O (Ln = Gd(III)(1), Dy(III)(2) and x = 4, 5 respectively), [Er4L4(OH)2](NO3)2·9H2O (3), and [Dy4L4(NO3)](NO3)2·2CH3OH·H2O (4) were synthesized by employing succinohydrazone derived bis-tridentate ligand (H2L) and characterized. Structures of 1-3 are similar to each other except the nature of counterions and number of lattice water molecules. In 4, a distorted nitrate ion was arranged in a hexagonal manner holding four dysprosium centers in a slightly twisted manner. Because of the symmetrical nature of each complex, the C4 axis crosses the center of helicate resulting a pseudo-D4 coordination environment. Each ligand coordinates to lanthanide centers in helical manner forming mixture of left (Λ) and right (Δ) handed discrete units. Complex 1 exhibits antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between nearby Gd(III) centers and shows magnetic refrigeration (-ΔSm = 24.4 J kg(-1) K(-1) for ΔH = 7 T at 3 K). AC magnetic susceptibility measurements of 2 and 4 demonstrate slow relaxation behavior, with Ueff (effective energy barrier) of 20.5 and 4.6 K, respectively. As per our knowledge, complexes 1, 2, and 4 represent the first examples of aesthetically pleasing quadruple stranded helicates showing potential magnetocaloric effect and single-molecule-magnet-like behavior. PMID:27196362

  12. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion-relaxation data--2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition.

    PubMed

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T; Engelsen, Søren B

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T(2)-D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T(2)-D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T(2)-D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D=3 x 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) and T(2)=180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D=10(-9) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=10 ms and D=3 x 10(-13) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  13. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  14. A simple method for characterizing and engineering thermal relaxation of an optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijian; Zhu, Jiangang; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Yang, Lan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal properties of a photonic resonator are determined not only by intrinsic properties of materials, such as thermo-optic coefficient, but also by the geometry and structure of the resonator. Techniques for characterization and measurement of thermal properties of individual photonic resonator will benefit numerous applications. In this work, we demonstrate a method to optically measure the thermal relaxation time and effective thermal conductance of a whispering gallery mode microcavity using optothermal effect. Two nearby optical modes within the cavity are optically probed, which allows us to quantify the thermal relaxation process of the cavity by analyzing changes in the transmission spectra induced by optothermal effect. We show that the effective thermal conductance can be experimentally deduced from the thermal relaxation measurement, and it can be tailored by changing the geometric parameters of the cavity. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the proposed analytical modeling. This method can be applied to various resonators in different forms.

  15. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  16. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  17. Modified small angle magnetization rotation method in multilayer magnetic microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejón, J.; Badini, G.; Pirota, K.; Vázquez, M.

    2007-09-01

    The small angle magnetization rotation (SAMR) technique is a widely used method to quantify magnetostriction in elongated ultrasoft magnetic materials. In the present work, we introduce significant optimization of the method, particularly simplification of the required equipment, profiting of the very peculiar characteristics of a recently introduced family of multilayer magnetic microwires consisting of a soft magnetic core, insulating intermediate layer and a hard magnetic outer layer. The introduced modified SAMR method is used not only to determine the saturation magnetostriction constant of the soft magnetic nucleus but also the magnetoelastic and magnetostatic coupling. This new method has a great potential in multifunctional sensor applications.

  18. Gd-DTPA T1 relaxivity in brain tissue obtained by convection-enhanced delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haar, Peter J.; Broaddus, William C.; Chen, Zhi-jian; Fatouros, Panos P.; Gillies, George T.; Corwin, Frank D.

    2010-06-01

    A common approach to quantify gadolinium (Gd) contrast agents involves measuring the post-contrast change in T1 rate and then using the constant T1 relaxivity R to determine the contrast agent concentration. Because this method is fast and non-invasive, it could be potentially valuable in many areas of brain research. However, to accurately measure contrast agent concentrations in the brain, the T1 relaxivity R of the specific agent must be accurately known. Furthermore, the macromolecular content and compartmentalization of the brain extracellular space (ECS) are expected to significantly alter R from values measured in aqueous solutions. In this study, the T1 relaxivity R of gadolinium-diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was measured following direct interstitial infusions of three different contrast agent concentrations to the parenchyma of rat brains. Changes in magnetic resonance (MR) T1 values were compared to brain slice concentrations determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) to determine R in 15 rats. Additionally, samples of cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine were analyzed to evaluate possible Gd-DTPA clearance from the brain. The T1 relaxivity R of Gd-DTPA in the brain ECS was measured to be 5.35 (mM s)-1 in a 2.4 T field. This value is considerably higher than estimations used in studies by other groups. Measurements of brain Gd-DTPA tissue concentrations using MRI and ICP-AES demonstrated a high degree of coincidence. Clearance of Gd-DTPA was minimal at the time point immediately after infusion. These results suggest that the environment of the brain does in fact significantly affect Gd T1 relaxivity, and that MRI can accurately measure contrast agent concentrations when this relaxivity is well characterized.

  19. Use of a high-Tc SQUID-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer in magnetically unshielded environments to discriminate tumors in rats, by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.-W.; Chen, H.-H.; Yang, H.-C.; Horng, H.-E.; Liao, S.-H.; Chieh, J.-J.; Yang, S. Y.

    2012-06-01

    This study uses a sensitive, high-Tc SQUID-detected nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer in magnetically unshielded environments to discriminate liver tumors in rats, by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate, T1-1. The high-Tc SQUID-based spectrometer has a spectral line width of 0.9Hz in low magnetic fields. It was found that relaxation rate for tumor tissues is (3.6 ± 0.02) s-1 and the relaxation rate for normal tissues is (7.7 ± 0.02) s-1. The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rates suggests that water structures around the DNA of cancer cells are different from those of normal tissues. The optimized detection sensitivity for the established system is 0.21 g at the present stage. It is concluded that T1-1 can be used to distinguish cancerous tissues from normal tissues. The high-Tc, SQUID-detected NMR and MRI in magnetically unshielded environments may also be useful for discriminating other tumors.

  20. Ferromagnetic interactions and slow magnetic relaxation behaviors of two lanthanide coordination polymers bridged by 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ming; Li, Xiuhua; Cui, Ping; Zhao, Bin

    2015-03-15

    Two lanthanide-based frameworks: (Ln(phen)(NDA){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} (Ln=Gd(1), NDA=2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate anion, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), and ([Dy(phen)(NDA){sub 1.5}]·0.5H{sub 2}NDA){sub n} (2) were structurally and magnetically characterized. Compound 1 exhibits 2D layer structure, belonging to the triclinic system with space group P−1, while compound 2 features a 3D framework with space group P−1. The magnetic studies revealed that ferromagnetic coupling existed between adjacent lanthanide ions in 1 and 2, and frequency-dependence out-of-phase signals in the measurement of alternate-current susceptibilities were observed for 2, albeit without reaching the characteristic maxima above 2 K, implying slow magnetic relaxation behavior in 2. After the application of a dc field, good peak shapes of ac signal were obtained and got the energy barrier ΔE/k{sub B}=29 K and the pre-exponential factor τ{sub 0}=4.47×10{sup −7} s at 2000 Oe field; and when the dc field was in 5000 Oe, giving ΔE/k{sub B}=40 K and τ{sub 0}=2.82×10{sup −6}. - Graphical abstract: Two novel lanthanide-based frameworks 1 and 2 were structurally and magnetically characterized. The results revealed that ferromagnetic coupling exists between adjacent lanthanide ions in 1 and 2, and 2 displayed slow magnetic relaxation behavior with the energy barrier of 29 K. - Highlights: • Two lanthanide frameworks were synthesized and magnetically characterized. • The magnetism studies indicate slow magnetic relaxation behavior in 2. • Weak ferromagnetic coupling existing between adjacent lanthanide centers.

  1. Investigation of the structure of an amorphous As-Se semiconductor system by relaxation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R. A. Bordovsky, V. A.; Grabko, G. I.; Taturevich, T. V.

    2011-12-15

    The results of a complex investigation into dark-current relaxation in the long-time region of an MIM structure based on an As-Se thin-film chalcogenide system are presented. The values of parameters describing the electronic processes ocurring in the contact layers of the investigated compounds are estimated. The coincidence of the nature of conductivity and charge-accumulation mechanisms is revealed. The relaxation-time distribution function is calculated, and its structural sensitivity to such technological factors as the change in the composition stoichiometry and the method for manufacturing experimental samples is established.

  2. Global magnetic fluctuations in S-1 Spheromak plasmas and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.; Hart, G.W.; Nam, C.H.; Yamada, M.

    1985-05-01

    Globally coherent modes have been observed during formation in the S-1 Spheromak plasma by analysis of magnetic field fluctuations measured from outside the plasma. The modes are of low n number (2 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 5), where n is defined by the functional dependence e/sup in phi/ of the fluctuation on toroidal angle phi. These modes are shown to be related to flux conversion and plasma relaxation toward a minimum-energy state during the spheromak formation. The modes are active while the q profile is rapidly changing, with q on-axis, q/sub 0/, rising to 0.7. A significant finding is the temporal progression through the n = 5, 4, 3, 2; m = 1 mode sequence as q rises through rational fractions m/n. During formation, peak amplitudes of the n = 2, 3, 4 modes relative to the unperturbed field have been observed as high as 20%, while more typical amplitudes are below 5%.

  3. Goblet-shaped pentanuclear lanthanide clusters assembled with a cyclen derivative ligand exhibiting slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoji; Wei, Yongqin; Wu, Kechen

    2016-08-01

    Two coordination compounds with the formula Ln5(H2O)(OH)4(NO3)3(BZA)4L (Ln = Tb(3+) (1), Dy(3+) (2)) have been assembled in a one-pot synthesis from the tetrasubstituted cyclen derivative ligand N,N',N'',N'''-tetra(2-hydroxy-3-methoxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (H4L), Ln(NO3)3·xH2O (Ln = Tb(3+) (x = 6), Dy(3+) (x = 5)) and the auxiliary ligand benzoic acid (HBZA). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that both compounds feature a novel homometallic appended cubane geometry. The magnetic study on 1 suggests the presence of anti-ferromagnetic interactions, whereas 2 exhibits weak ferromagnetic coupling. Under an applied dc field, 1 shows no out-of-phase alternating current (ac) signal whereas 2 shows slow-relaxation processes that correspond to an energy gap (Ea/kB) of 4.11 K and a pre-exponential factor (τ0) of 3.45 × 10(-5) s. PMID:27460863

  4. Influence of AC external magnetic field on guidance force relaxation between HTS bulk and NdFeB guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longcai; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiasu; Zheng, Jun

    2007-12-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to time-varying external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. So it is required to study whether the guidance force of the bulks is influenced by the inhomogeneity. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of the guidance force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet was used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experiment results, it was found that the guidance force was decreased with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increased with the amplitude and was almost independent of the frequency.

  5. Asymptotic dependence of the relaxation time of the magnetization of a ferromagnetic particle on the anisotropy of the particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, C. N.; Cregg, P. J.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    1992-01-01

    It is known that the direction of the magnetization vector of very fine single-domain ferromagnetic particles fluctuates under the influence of thermal agitation. Perturbation theory is applied rigorously to a singular integral equation to derive an asymptotic formula for the relaxation time of the magnetization, for the case of uniaxial anisotropy and an applied magnetic field. The result agrees with that of Brown [Phys. Rev. 130, 1677 (1963)] as described succinctly by Aharoni [Phys. Rev. 177, 793 (1969)]. It should be emphasized that both Gilbert's equation and the earlier Landau-Lifshitz equation are merely phenomenological equations, which are used to explain the time decay of the average magnetization. Brown suggested that the Gilbert equation should be augmented by a white-noise driving term in order to explain the effect of thermal fluctuations of the surroundings on the magnetization.

  6. A proof-of-concept study on the combination of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and relaxation techniques in chronic tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Peter M; Poeppl, Timm B; Bulla, Jan; Schlee, Winfried; Lehner, Astrid; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Interference of ongoing neuronal activity and brain stimulation motivated this study to combine repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and relaxation techniques in tinnitus patients. Forty-two patients were enrolled in this one-arm proof-of-concept study to receive ten sessions of rTMS applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and temporo-parietal cortex. During stimulation, patients listened to five different kinds of relaxation audios. Variables of interest were tinnitus questionnaires, tinnitus numeric rating scales, depressivity, and quality of life. Results were compared to results of historical control groups having received the same rTMS protocol (active control) and sham treatment (placebo) without relaxation techniques. Thirty-eight patients completed the treatment, drop-out rates and adverse events were low. Responder rates (reduction in tinnitus questionnaire (TQ) score ≥5 points 10 weeks after treatment) were 44.7 % in the study, 27.8 % in the active control group, and 21.7 % in the placebo group, differing between groups on a near significant level. For the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI), the main effect of group was not significant. However, linear mixed model analyses showed that the relaxation/rTMS group differed significantly from the active control group showing steeper negative THI trend for the relaxation/rTMS group indicating better amelioration over the course of the trial. Deepness of relaxation during rTMS and selection of active relaxation vs. passive listening to music predicted larger TQ. All remaining secondary outcomes turned out non-significant. This combined treatment proved to be a safe, feasible and promising approach to enhance rTMS treatment effects in chronic tinnitus. PMID:27315823

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy and thermal relaxation method to evaluate corn moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrochi, F.; Medina, A. N.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Luz, M. L. S.; Dalpasquale, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    In this study, samples of popcorn with different degrees of moisture were analyzed. The optical absorption bands at the mid infrared were measured using photoacoustic spectroscopy and were correlated to the sample moisture. The results were in agreement with moisture data determined by the well known reference method, the Karl Fischer. In addition, the thermal relaxation method was used to determine the sample specific heat as a function of the moisture content. The results were also in agreement with the two mentioned methods.

  8. Spin-lattice relaxation via quantum tunneling in diluted crystals of Fe4 single-molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repollés, A.; Cornia, A.; Luis, F.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the dynamic susceptibility of Fe4 single-molecule magnets with integer spin (S =5) in the form of pure crystals as well as diluted in crystals of isostructural, but nonmagnetic, Ga4 clusters. Below approximately 1 K, the spin-lattice relaxation becomes dominated by a temperature-independent process. The spin-lattice relaxation time τ measured in this "quantum regime" is 12 orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time scale of direct phonon-induced processes but agrees with the relaxation times of pure (i.e., not assisted by phonons) spin tunneling events. The present results show that the latter phenomenon, despite conserving the energy of the ensemble of electronic and nuclear spins, drives the thermalization of electronic spins at very low temperatures. The spin-lattice relaxation time scales with the concentration of Fe4, thus suggesting that the main effect of dipolar interactions is to block tunneling. The data show therefore no evidence for the contribution of collective phonon emission processes, such as phonon superradiance, to the spin-lattice relaxation.

  9. Composite scheme using localized relaxation with non-standard finite difference method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vivek; Raghurama Rao, S. V.

    2008-04-01

    Non-standard finite difference methods (NSFDM) introduced by Mickens [ Non-standard Finite Difference Models of Differential Equations, World Scientific, Singapore, 1994] are interesting alternatives to the traditional finite difference and finite volume methods. When applied to linear hyperbolic conservation laws, these methods reproduce exact solutions. In this paper, the NSFDM is first extended to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, by a novel utilization of the decoupled equations using characteristic variables. In the second part of this paper, the NSFDM is studied for its efficacy in application to nonlinear scalar hyperbolic conservation laws. The original NSFDMs introduced by Mickens (1994) were not in conservation form, which is an important feature in capturing discontinuities at the right locations. Mickens [Construction and analysis of a non-standard finite difference scheme for the Burgers-Fisher equations, Journal of Sound and Vibration 257 (4) (2002) 791-797] recently introduced a NSFDM in conservative form. This method captures the shock waves exactly, without any numerical dissipation. In this paper, this algorithm is tested for the case of expansion waves with sonic points and is found to generate unphysical expansion shocks. As a remedy to this defect, we use the strategy of composite schemes [R. Liska, B. Wendroff, Composite schemes for conservation laws, SIAM Journal of Numerical Analysis 35 (6) (1998) 2250-2271] in which the accurate NSFDM is used as the basic scheme and localized relaxation NSFDM is used as the supporting scheme which acts like a filter. Relaxation schemes introduced by Jin and Xin [The relaxation schemes for systems of conservation laws in arbitrary space dimensions, Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics 48 (1995) 235-276] are based on relaxation systems which replace the nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws by a semi-linear system with a stiff relaxation term. The relaxation parameter ( λ) is chosen locally

  10. Spectral Methods for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic anomalies. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic anomalies can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic anomaly and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this

  11. Magnetic relaxation dynamics driven by the first-order character of magnetocaloric La(Fe,Mn,Si)13.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Edmund; Bratko, Milan; Caplin, A David; Barcza, Alexander; Katter, Matthias; Ghivelder, Luis; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-08-13

    Here, we study the temporal evolution of the magnetic field-driven paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the La(Fe,Mn,Si)13 material family. Three compositions are chosen that show varying strengths of the first-order character of the transition, as determined by the relative magnitude of their magnetic hysteresis and temperature separation between the zero-field transition temperature Tc and the temperature Tcrit, where the transition becomes continuous. Systematic variations in the fixed field, isothermal rate of relaxation are observed as a function of temperature and as a function of the degree of first-order character. The relaxation rate is reduced in more weakly first-order compositions and is also reduced as the temperature is increased towards Tcrit At temperatures above Tcrit, the metastability of the transition vanishes along with its associated temporal dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'. PMID:27402929

  12. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-07

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were P{sub pe}=4.0×10{sup 22} eV/m for InSb and P{sub pe}=1.2×10{sup 23} eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  13. Spin-echo methods for the determination of 31P transverse relaxation times of the ATP NMR signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, K; Jung, W I; Bunse, M; Lutz, O; Küper, K; Dietze, G

    1994-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) examinations of the calf muscles of healthy volunteers were performed to determine T2 of the coupled ATP signals by use of the Hahn spin-echo and the frequency-selective spin-echo method. Additional measurements with the J-coupling refocused double echo are presented. The most reliable determination of T2 relaxation times is possible with the frequency-selective spin echo. The other methods yield substantially wrong results. Theoretical explanations are given how J-coupling and pulse-angle deviations affect the signals and therefore the T2 determinations. The calculations for a weakly coupled homonuclear AX spin system are shown because they demonstrate most of the relevant facts. In addition, some important results for a homonuclear AMX spin system, which the ATP is considered to be, are given.

  14. A New Method for Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sibaek; Choe, Gwangson; Lim, Daye

    2015-08-01

    We present a new, simple, variational method for reconstruction of coronal force-free magnetic fields based on vector magnetogram data. Our method employs vector potentials for magnetic field description in order to ensure the divergence-free condition. As boundary conditions, it only requires the normal components of magnetic field and current density so that the boundary conditions are not over-specified as in many other methods. The boundary normal current distribution is initially fixed once and for all and does not need continual adjustment as in stress-and-relax type methods. We have tested the computational code based on our new method in problems with known solutions and those with actual photospheric data. When solutions are fully given at all boundaries, the accuracy of our method is almost comparable to best performing methods in the market. When magnetic field data are given only at the photospheric boundary, our method excels other methods in most “figures of merit” devised by Schrijver et al. (2006). Furthermore the residual force in the solution is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that of any other method. It can also accommodate the source-surface boundary condition at the top boundary. Our method is expected to contribute to the real time monitoring of the sun required for future space weather forecasts.

  15. Experimental investigation in plasma relaxation by using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation process being conducted in the HELCAT device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5 - 10kV. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities 1.2Cs and densities 10e20 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter lambda determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  16. Gd(III) doping effect on magnetization and water proton relaxivities in ultra small iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun Sook; Xu, Wenlong; Baek, Myung Ju; Park, Ja Young; Kim, Joo Hyun; Chang, Yongmin; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-07-01

    Two samples of ultra small Gd(III) doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared to investigate Gd(III) doping effect on longitudinal (r1) and transverse (r2) water proton relaxivities. Gd(III) doping mole percents were 0.2 and 0.4 for samples 1 and 2, respectively. Average particle diameters were 2.5 to 2.1 nm for samples 1 and 2, respectively. Reduced r1 and r2 values were observed in both samples. We attributed this to reduced magnetizations arising from opposing effect of Gd(III) to net magnetizations of Fe(III)/Fe(II) in oxide nanoparticles.

  17. Foundations for the generalization of the Godunov method to hyperbolic systems with stiff relaxation source terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hittinger, Jeffrey Alan

    2000-10-01

    Hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations with relaxation source terms arise in the modeling of many physical problems where internal processes return non-equilibrium disturbances to equilibrium. A challenge in numerically approximating such systems is that the relaxation may take place on time scales much shorter than the time scales of the flow evolution. In such cases, it is desirable for numerical methods to accurately approximate the solution even if the relaxation scales are underresolved. High-resolution Godunov methods are very successful shock-capturing algorithms for the solution of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. It is desirable to extend this methodology to properly preserve the asymptotic behavior of hyperbolic-relaxation systems such that underresolved solutions can be accurately approximated. Godunov schemes solve or approximate Riemann problems at cell interfaces to estimate numerical fluxes that respect the physics, but, due to coupling between relaxation and wave propagation in hyperbolic-relaxation systems, the Riemann problem becomes much more complicated and its exact solution is no longer feasible. Evidence presented here suggests that to obtain robust, non-oscillatory, upwind discretizations that accurately compute underresolved solutions, aspects of this physical coupling must be included in the numerical flux calculations. A simple model system is extensively analyzed using Fourier and asymptotic analysis on both the system and its integral solution for both smooth and discontinuous initial conditions. Specifically, the early- and late-time asymptotic behaviors of the Riemann problem are determined, and the results are generalized to m x m constant-coefficient systems. A nonlinear physical example, a set of eleven macroscopic transport equations for a diatomic gas, is constructed from the Boltzmann equation and is investigated to verify the applicability of the linear analysis. Current numerical methods are reviewed, and

  18. Spatial analysis of magnetic resonance T1ρ and T2 relaxation times improves classification between subjects with and without osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Stahl, Robert; Blumenkrantz, Gabrielle; Romero, Adan; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that functional analysis of knee cartilage based on magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times is a valuable tool in the understanding of osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, the regional spatial distribution of knee cartilage T1ρ and T2 relaxation times based on texture and laminar analyses was studied to investigate if they provide additional insight compared to global mean values in the study of OA. Methods: Knee cartilage of 36 subjects, 19 healthy controls and 17 with mild OA, was divided into 16 compartments. T1ρ and T2 relaxation times were studied with first order statistics, eight texture parameters with four different orientations using gray-level co-occurrence matrices and by subdividing each compartment into two different layers: Deep and superficial. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the potential of each technique to correctly classify the populations. Results: Although the deep and superficial cartilage layers had in general significantly different T1ρ and T2 relaxation times, they performed similarly in terms of subject discrimination. The subdivision of lateral and medial femoral compartments into weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing regions did not improve discrimination. Also it was found that the most sensitive region was the patella and that T1ρ discriminated better than T2. The most important finding was that with respect to global mean values, laminar and texture analyses improved subject discrimination. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that spatially assessing MR images of the knee cartilage relaxation times using laminar and texture analyses could lead to better and probably earlier identification of cartilage matrix abnormalities in subjects with OA. PMID:19810478

  19. Serial changes in the T1 magnetic relaxation parameter after myocardial infarction in man.

    PubMed Central

    Been, M; Smith, M A; Ridgway, J P; Douglas, R H; de Bono, D P; Best, J J; Muir, A L

    1988-01-01

    A low field resistive nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system (0.08 Tesla) was used to study the in vivo changes in the relaxation parameter T1 of the left ventricular myocardium from the first day to six months after acute myocardial infarction in 41 consecutive patients admitted to a coronary care unit. T1 maps were constructed from transverse and coronal images at various times after infarction. Thrombolytic treatment had been successful in 28 patients. Thirty three of the 34 patients studied within two weeks of infarction had a significantly increased T1 value but this developed only after the third day in four. At day 1-3 the mean (1 SD) maximum T1 was 413 (29) ms (n = 23) compared with 430 (41) ms (n = 22) at day 4-7, 433 (35) ms (n = 24) at day 8-14, 420 (34) at one month (n = 22), 388 (39) (n = 20) at three months, and 361 (24) (n = 14) at six months. The number of regions of interest with an increased T1 followed a similar time course. Although the increase in T1 measured at three months correlated with the initial maximum creatine kinase and with the left ventricular ejection fraction measured at one month, the number of regions with abnormal T1 from day 4 through to one month correlated best with left ventricular ejection fraction. There was no significant difference in T1 between patients with or without reperfusion. The rise in T1 over the first few days together with the prolonged time course of T1 increase suggests that the increase in T1 may reflect cellular infiltration as much or more than tissue oedema. Images Fig 3 PMID:3342143

  20. Soil and litter phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: extractants, metals, and phosphorus relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Cade-Menun, B J; Liu, C W; Nunlist, R; McColl, J G

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an excellent tool with which to study soil organic P, allowing quantitative, comparative analysis of P forms. However, for 31P NMR to be tative, all peaks must be completely visible, and in their correct relative proportions. There must be no line broadening, and adequate delay times must be used to avoid saturation of peaks. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of extractants on delay times and peak saturation. Two samples (a forest litter and a mineral soil sample) and three extractants (0.25 M NaOH, NaOH plus Chelex (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, CA), and NaOH plus EDTA) were used to determine the differences in the concentration of P and cations solubilized by each extractant, and to measure spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times of P peaks in each extract. For both soil and litter, NaOH-Chelex extracted the lowest concentrations of P. For the litter sample, T1 values were short for all extractants due to the high Fe concentration remaining after extraction. For the soil sample, there were noticeable differences among the extractants. The NaOH-Chelex sample had less Fe and Mn remaining in solution after extraction than the other extractants, and the longest delay times used in the study, 6.4 s, were not long enough for quantitative analysis. Delay times of 1.5 to 2 s for the NaOH and NaOH-EDTA were adequate. Line broadening was highest in the NaOH extracts, which had the highest concentration of Fe. On the basis of these results, recommendations for future analyses of soil and litter samples by solution 31P NMR spectroscopy include: careful selection of an extractant; measurement of paramagnetic ions extracted with P; use of appropriate delay times and the minimum number of scans; and measurement of T1 values whenever possible.

  1. Field-induced slow magnetic relaxation in a six-coordinate mononuclear cobalt(II) complex with a positive anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Julia; Castro, Isabel; Ruiz-García, Rafael; Cano, Joan; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Pardo, Emilio

    2012-09-26

    The novel mononuclear Co(II) complex cis-[Co(II)(dmphen)(2)(NCS)(2)]·0.25EtOH (1) (dmphen = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) features a highly rhombically distorted octahedral environment that is responsible for the strong positive axial and rhombic magnetic anisotropy of the high-spin Co(II) ion (D = +98 cm(-1) and E = +8.4 cm(-1)). Slow magnetic relaxation effects were observed for 1 in the presence of a dc magnetic field, constituting the first example of field-induced single-molecule magnet behavior in a mononuclear six-coordinate Co(II) complex with a transverse anisotropy energy barrier.

  2. Polymeric Perturbation to the Magnetic Relaxations of the C2v-Symmetric [Er(Cp)2(OBu)2](-) Anion.

    PubMed

    Han, Tian; Ding, You-Song; Leng, Ji-Dong; Zheng, Zhiping; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2015-05-18

    To test the coordination symmetry effect on the magnetization-reversal barrier trend of Er(III)-based single-ion magnets, the C2v-symmetric organolanthanide anion [Er(Cp)2(O(t)Bu)2](-) has been incorporated with different countercations, resulting in two structures, namely, the discrete [K2(Cp)(18-C-6)2][Er(Cp)2(O(t)Bu)2] (1) and the polymeric [ErK2(Cp)3(O(t)Bu)2(THF)2]n (2), where 18-C-6 = 18-crown-6 ether and Cp = cyclopentadienide. Surprisingly, the polymeric 2 exhibits much stronger field-induced magnetization relaxing behavior compared to the monomeric 1. Such disparate dynamic magnetism is attributable to the subtle coordination environmental perturbations of the central Er(III) ions.

  3. The generalized Phillips-Twomey method for NMR relaxation time inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Xiao, Lizhi; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Qingming

    2016-10-01

    The inversion of NMR relaxation time involves the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Due to its ill-posedness, numerical solutions to this type of equations are often found much less accurate and bear little resemblance to the true solution. There has been a strong interest in finding a well-posed method for this ill-posed problem since 1950s. In this paper, we prove the existence, the uniqueness, the stability and the convergence of the generalized Phillips-Twomey regularization method for solving this type of equations. Numerical simulations and core analyses arising from NMR transverse relaxation time inversion are conducted to show the effectiveness of the generalized Phillips-Twomey method. Both the simulation results and the core analyses agree well with the model and the realities.

  4. Detection method of flexion relaxation phenomenon based on wavelets for patients with low back pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nougarou, François; Massicotte, Daniel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) can be defined as a reduction or silence of myoelectric activity of the lumbar erector spinae muscle during full trunk flexion. It is typically absent in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Before any broad clinical utilization of this neuromuscular response can be made, effective, standardized, and accurate methods of identifying FRP limits are needed. However, this phenomenon is clearly more difficult to detect for LBP patients than for healthy patients. The main goal of this study is to develop an automated method based on wavelet transformation that would improve time point limits detection of surface electromyography signals of the FRP in case of LBP patients. Conventional visual identification and proposed automated methods of time point limits detection of relaxation phase were compared on experimental data using criteria of accuracy and repeatability based on physiological properties. The evaluation demonstrates that the use of wavelet transform (WT) yields better results than methods without wavelet decomposition. Furthermore, methods based on wavelet per packet transform are more effective than algorithms employing discrete WT. Compared to visual detection, in addition to demonstrating an obvious saving of time, the use of wavelet per packet transform improves the accuracy and repeatability in the detection of the FRP limits. These results clearly highlight the value of the proposed technique in identifying onset and offset of the flexion relaxation response in LBP subjects.

  5. Dual magnetic circuit magnetic bead coagulation test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lianqing; Wang, Zicai; Guo, Shuangmao; Wang, Jun

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a dual magnetic circuit magnetic bead method and corresponding system for testing human blood coagulation. The system is composed mainly of a dual magnetic circuit magnetic beads test assembly, a signal modulation and demodulation module, a digital filter as well as a waveform processor. Smart hardware design together with subsequent software algorithm is presented for the system to overcome the defects of traditional dual magnetic circuit magnetic bead method. Experiments for verifying the system are carried out in comparison with an ACL200 coagulometer from Coulter Co. USA. Experimental results indicate that the system features excellent precision, repeatability better than 2.10%, and show that the dual magnetic circuit magnetic bead system suppresses external interference factors effectively.

  6. Analysis of Preconditioning and Relaxation Operators for the Discontinuous Galerkin Method Applied to Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2001-01-01

    The explicit stability constraint of the discontinuous Galerkin method applied to the diffusion operator decreases dramatically as the order of the method is increased. Block Jacobi and block Gauss-Seidel preconditioner operators are examined for their effectiveness at accelerating convergence. A Fourier analysis for methods of order 2 through 6 reveals that both preconditioner operators bound the eigenvalues of the discrete spatial operator. Additionally, in one dimension, the eigenvalues are grouped into two or three regions that are invariant with order of the method. Local relaxation methods are constructed that rapidly damp high frequencies for arbitrarily large time step.

  7. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Overton, Jr., William C.; Stewart, Walter F.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  8. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Overton, W.C. Jr.; Stewart, W.F.

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  9. Relaxation Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging Investigation of Heterogeneous Aging in a Hydroxy-Terminated Polybutadiene-Based Elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.; Cherry, Brian R.; Minard, Kevin R.; Celina, Mat C.

    2005-12-27

    Relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) was employed to investigate the effects of thermo-oxidative aging in a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based elastomer. A series of three-dimensional (3D) Hahn-echo weighted single point images (SPI) of the elastomer were utilized to generate a 3D parameter map of the aged material. NMR spin-spin relaxation times (T2) were measured for each voxel producing a 3D NMR parameter (T2) map of the aged polymer. These T2 maps reveal a dramatic reduction of local polymer mobility near the aging surface with the degree of T2 heterogeneity varying as a function of aging. Using correlations between NMR T2 and material modulus, the impact of this heterogeneous thermo-oxidative aging on the material properties is discussed.

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  11. On a ghost artefact in ultra low field magnetic resonance relaxation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volegov, P.; Schultz, L.; Espy, M.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used techniques across numerous disciplines. While typically implemented at fields >1 T, there has been continuous interest in the methods at much lower fields for reasons of cost, material contrast, or application. There have been numerous demonstrations of MR at much lower fields (from 1 μT to 1 mT), the so-called ultra-low field (ULF) regime. Approaches to ULF MR have included superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor technology for ultra-sensitive detection and the use of pulsed pre-polarizing fields to enhance the signal strength. There are many advantages to working in the ULF regime. However, due to the low strength of the measurement field, acquisition of MRI at ULF is more susceptible to ambient fields that cause image distortions. Imaging artifacts can be caused by transients associated with non-ideal field switching and from remnant fields in magnetic shielding, among other causes. In this paper, we introduce a general theoretical framework that describes effects of non-ideal measurement field inversion/rotation due to presence of these transient fields. We illustrate imaging artifacts via simulated and experimental examples.

  12. 19F nuclear spin relaxation and spin diffusion effects in the single-ion magnet LiYF4:Ho3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Vanyunin, M. V.; Graf, M. J.; Lago, J.; Borsa, F.; Lascialfari, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.; Barbara, B.

    2008-11-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependences of the 19F nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in a single crystal of LiYF4 doped with holmium are described by an approach based on a detailed consideration of the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between nuclei and impurity paramagnetic ions and nuclear spin diffusion processes. The observed non-exponential long time recovery of the nuclear magnetization after saturation at intermediate temperatures is in agreement with predictions of the spin-diffusion theory in a case of the diffusion limited relaxation. At avoided level crossings in the spectrum of electron-nuclear states of Ho3 + ions, rates of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation increase due to quasi-resonant energy exchange between nuclei and paramagnetic ions in contrast to the predominant role played by electronic cross-relaxation processes in the low-frequency ac-susceptibility.

  13. On a bivariate spectral relaxation method for unsteady magneto-hydrodynamic flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Magagula, Vusi M; Motsa, Sandile S; Sibanda, Precious; Dlamini, Phumlani G

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a significant improvement to the implementation of the spectral relaxation method (SRM) for solving nonlinear partial differential equations that arise in the modelling of fluid flow problems. Previously the SRM utilized the spectral method to discretize derivatives in space and finite differences to discretize in time. In this work we seek to improve the performance of the SRM by applying the spectral method to discretize derivatives in both space and time variables. The new approach combines the relaxation scheme of the SRM, bivariate Lagrange interpolation as well as the Chebyshev spectral collocation method. The technique is tested on a system of four nonlinear partial differential equations that model unsteady three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic flow and mass transfer in a porous medium. Computed solutions are compared with previously published results obtained using the SRM, the spectral quasilinearization method and the Keller-box method. There is clear evidence that the new approach produces results that as good as, if not better than published results determined using the other methods. The main advantage of the new approach is that it offers better accuracy on coarser grids which significantly improves the computational speed of the method. The technique also leads to faster convergence to the required solution.

  14. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  15. Localized T2 measurements using an OSIRIS-CPMG method. Application to measurements of blood oxygenation and transverse relaxation free of diffusion effect.

    PubMed

    Girard, F; Poulet, P; Namer, I J; Steibel, J; Chambron, J

    1994-12-01

    This work presents a new method allowing localized T2 measurements, based upon the OSIRIS scheme. A train of 180 degrees pulses is applied after the OSIRIS preparation cycle, recording directly the transverse magnetization decay. The method was verified for two nuclei, 1H and 19F, with phantoms and in vivo on rats. The accuracy of the T2 values is discussed, as well as possible applications of the OSIRIS-CPMG method to proton transverse spin relaxation measurements, free of diffusion effects, and to non-invasive in vivo blood oxygenation measurements, through the use of an emulsion of perfluorooctylbromide, a blood substitute containing fluorine.

  16. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    SciTech Connect

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  17. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-01

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  18. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion pathsmore » and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.« less

  19. Determination of diffusion coefficients in polypyrrole thin films using a current pulse relaxation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Vandyke, Leon S.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The current pulse E sub oc relaxation method and its application to the determination of diffusion coefficients in electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films is described. Diffusion coefficients for such films in Et4NBF4 and MeCN are determined for a series of submicron film thicknesses. Measurement of the double-layer capacitance, C sub dl, and the resistance, R sub u, of polypyrrole thin films as a function of potential obtained with the galvanostatic pulse method is reported. Measurements of the electrolyte concentration in reduced polypyrrole films are also presented to aid in the interpretation of the data.

  20. Coexisting static magnetic ordering and superconductivity in CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a heavy fermion system CeCu2.1 Si2 have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T(M) approximately 0.8 K, which coexists with superconductivity below T(c) = 0.7 K. The line shapes of the observed muon spin depolarization functions suggest an ordering in either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state, with a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit at T approaches 0.

  1. Time-parallel iterative methods for parabolic PDES: Multigrid waveform relaxation and time-parallel multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Vandewalle, S.

    1994-12-31

    Time-stepping methods for parabolic partial differential equations are essentially sequential. This prohibits the use of massively parallel computers unless the problem on each time-level is very large. This observation has led to the development of algorithms that operate on more than one time-level simultaneously; that is to say, on grids extending in space and in time. The so-called parabolic multigrid methods solve the time-dependent parabolic PDE as if it were a stationary PDE discretized on a space-time grid. The author has investigated the use of multigrid waveform relaxation, an algorithm developed by Lubich and Ostermann. The algorithm is based on a multigrid acceleration of waveform relaxation, a highly concurrent technique for solving large systems of ordinary differential equations. Another method of this class is the time-parallel multigrid method. This method was developed by Hackbusch and was recently subject of further study by Horton. It extends the elliptic multigrid idea to the set of equations that is derived by discretizing a parabolic problem in space and in time.

  2. Slow spin relaxation induced by magnetic field in [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O.

    PubMed

    Vrábel, P; Orendáč, M; Orendáčová, A; Čižmár, E; Tarasenko, R; Zvyagin, S; Wosnitza, J; Prokleška, J; Sechovský, V; Pavlík, V; Gao, S

    2013-05-01

    We report on a comprehensive investigation of the magnetic properties of [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O (bpdo=4, 4'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide) by use of electron paramagnetic resonance, magnetization, specific heat and susceptibility measurements. The studied material was identified as a magnet with an effective spin S = 1/2 and a weak exchange interaction J/kB = 25 mK. The ac susceptibility studies conducted at audio frequencies and at temperatures from 1.8 to 9 K revealed that the application of a static magnetic field induces a slow spin relaxation. It is suggested that the relaxation in the magnetic field appears due to an Orbach-like process between the two lowest doublet energy states of the magnetic Nd(3+) ion. The appearance of the slow relaxation in a magnetic field cannot be associated with a resonant phonon trapping. The obtained results suggest that the relaxation is influenced by nuclear spin driven quantum tunnelling which is suppressed by external magnetic field. PMID:23587762

  3. Slow spin relaxation induced by magnetic field in [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O.

    PubMed

    Vrábel, P; Orendáč, M; Orendáčová, A; Čižmár, E; Tarasenko, R; Zvyagin, S; Wosnitza, J; Prokleška, J; Sechovský, V; Pavlík, V; Gao, S

    2013-05-01

    We report on a comprehensive investigation of the magnetic properties of [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O (bpdo=4, 4'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide) by use of electron paramagnetic resonance, magnetization, specific heat and susceptibility measurements. The studied material was identified as a magnet with an effective spin S = 1/2 and a weak exchange interaction J/kB = 25 mK. The ac susceptibility studies conducted at audio frequencies and at temperatures from 1.8 to 9 K revealed that the application of a static magnetic field induces a slow spin relaxation. It is suggested that the relaxation in the magnetic field appears due to an Orbach-like process between the two lowest doublet energy states of the magnetic Nd(3+) ion. The appearance of the slow relaxation in a magnetic field cannot be associated with a resonant phonon trapping. The obtained results suggest that the relaxation is influenced by nuclear spin driven quantum tunnelling which is suppressed by external magnetic field.

  4. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating.

    PubMed

    Tretiak, O Yu; Blanchard, J W; Budker, D; Olshin, P K; Smirnov, S N; Balabas, M V

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene. PMID:26957176

  5. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiak, O. Yu.; Blanchard, J. W.; Budker, D.; Olshin, P. K.; Smirnov, S. N.; Balabas, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene.

  6. Relaxation dynamics of the Fe₈ molecular nanomagnet as probed by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Carretta, S; Bianchi, A; Santini, P; Amoretti, G

    2010-05-28

    The relaxation dynamics in molecular nanomagnets can be probed by measurements of NMR 1/T(1). By modelling magnetoelastic interactions, we theoretically investigate the behaviour of the prototype Fe(8) nanomagnet. The results of our model are in agreement with AC susceptibility and recent NMR measurements.

  7. Slow magnetic relaxation in octahedral cobalt(II) field-induced single-ion magnet with positive axial and large rhombic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Herchel, Radovan; Váhovská, Lucia; Potočňák, Ivan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-06-16

    Pseudooctahedral mononuclear cobat(II) complex [Co(abpt)2(tcm)2] (1), where abpt = 4-amino-3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazole and tcm = tricyanomethanide anion, shows field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization with U = 86.2 K and large axial and rhombic single-ion zero-field-splitting parameters, D = +48(2) cm(-1) and E/D = 0.27(2) (D = +53.7 cm(-1) and E/D = 0.29 from ab initio CASSCF/NEVPT2 calculations), thus presenting a new example of a field-induced single-ion magnet with transversal magnetic anisotropy. PMID:24853769

  8. Expansion and relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in a Pt/Co/Pt/Co/Pt multilayer with antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Stamps, R. L.; Jamet, J.-P.; Ferré, J.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.

    2012-01-01

    We detail measurements of field-driven expansion and zero-field relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin Co layers. The zero-field stability of aligned ('mirror') domains in such systems results from non-homogeneous dipolar stray fields which exist in the vicinity of the domain walls. During field-driven domain expansion, we evidence a separation of the domain walls which form the mirror domain boundary. However, the walls realign, thereby reforming a mirror domain, if their final separation is below a critical distance at the end of the field pulse. This critical distance marks the point at which the effective net interaction between the walls changes from attractive to repulsive.

  9. Expansion and relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in a Pt/Co/Pt/Co/Pt multilayer with antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, P J; Stamps, R L; Jamet, J-P; Ferré, J; Baltz, V; Rodmacq, B

    2012-01-18

    We detail measurements of field-driven expansion and zero-field relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin Co layers. The zero-field stability of aligned ('mirror') domains in such systems results from non-homogeneous dipolar stray fields which exist in the vicinity of the domain walls. During field-driven domain expansion, we evidence a separation of the domain walls which form the mirror domain boundary. However, the walls realign, thereby reforming a mirror domain, if their final separation is below a critical distance at the end of the field pulse. This critical distance marks the point at which the effective net interaction between the walls changes from attractive to repulsive. PMID:22173339

  10. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-Tc superconductors studied by muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 SrO.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4 kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  11. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-T(c) superconductors studied by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.; Jacobson, A. J.; Lewandowski, J. T.; Brewer, J. H.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  12. New strategy to construct single-ion magnets: a unique Dy@Zn₆ cluster exhibiting slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Gang; Qin, Xiang-Yang; Shi, Peng-Fei; Hou, Yin-Ling; Cui, Jian-Zhong; Zhao, Bin

    2014-04-25

    Two unique heptanuclear clusters Ln@Zn6 (Ln = Dy (1), Er (2)) were structurally and magnetically characterized. Each Dy(3+)/Er(3+) is located in a nona-coordinate D(3h) coordination environment, and is encapsulated in a diamagnetic Zn6 cage. Compound 1 exhibits single-ion magnetic behavior, and is the first example of a single-ion magnet (SIM) constructed through embedding one magnetic anisotropic metal ion into a diamagnetic cage.

  13. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, John R.; Clem, John R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  14. Study of anisotropy in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of water protons in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, S R; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropy of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of water protons in skeletal muscle tissue have been studied by the spin-echo technique. Both T1 and T2 have been measured for the water protons of the tibialis anterior muscle of mature male rats for theta = 0, 55, and 90 degrees, where theta is the orientation of the muscle fiber with respect to the static field. The anisotropy in T1 and T2 has been measured at temperatures of 28, -5 and -10 degrees C. No significant anisotropy was observed in the T1 of the tissue water, while an average anisotropy of approximately 5% was observed in T2 at room temperature. The average anisotropy of T2 at -5 and -10 degrees C was found to be approximately 2 and 1.3%, respectively. PMID:6266530

  15. Effect of gadolinium-DTPA on the magnetic relaxation times of normal and infarcted myocardium. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Wesbey, G.E.; Higgins, C.B.; McNamara, M.T.; Engelstad, B.L.; Lipton, M.J.; Sievers, R.; Ehman, R.L.; Lovin, J.; Brasch, R.C.

    1984-10-01

    Acute myocardial infarctions were produced in 11 dogs by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Twenty-four hours after ligation Gd-DTPA was injected intravenously, followed by cardiectomy either 90 seconds (3 dogs) or 5 minutes (5 dogs) later. The remaining 3 dogs had cardiectomy without injection of Gd-DTPA at 24 hours after coronary occlusion. The 3 dogs that did not receive Gd-DTPA had longer T1 and T2 relaxation times in infarcted myocardium than in normal myocardium. The T1 and T2 relaxation times of normal myocardium at 90 seconds postinjection of Gd-DTPA were significantly shorter than those of the normal myocardium of animals that did not receive Gd-DTPA. At five minutes postinjection, significantly greater T1 shortening was exhibited in the infarcted myocardium compared with adjacent normal myocardium in the dogs injected with Gd-DTPA. Thus, Gd-DTPA has differential and time-varying effects on relaxation times of normal and infarcted myocardium.

  16. A simulation based method to assess inversion algorithms for transverse relaxation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Supriyo; Keener, Kevin M.; Pan, Yong

    2008-04-01

    NMR relaxometry is a very useful tool for understanding various chemical and physical phenomena in complex multiphase systems. A Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) [P.T. Callaghan, Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1991] experiment is an easy and quick way to obtain transverse relaxation constant (T2) in low field. Most of the samples usually have a distribution of T2 values. Extraction of this distribution of T2s from the noisy decay data is essentially an ill-posed inverse problem. Various inversion approaches have been used to solve this problem, to date. A major issue in using an inversion algorithm is determining how accurate the computed distribution is. A systematic analysis of an inversion algorithm, UPEN [G.C. Borgia, R.J.S. Brown, P. Fantazzini, Uniform-penalty inversion of multiexponential decay data, Journal of Magnetic Resonance 132 (1998) 65-77; G.C. Borgia, R.J.S. Brown, P. Fantazzini, Uniform-penalty inversion of multiexponential decay data II. Data spacing, T2 data, systematic data errors, and diagnostics, Journal of Magnetic Resonance 147 (2000) 273-285] was performed by means of simulated CPMG data generation. Through our simulation technique and statistical analyses, the effects of various experimental parameters on the computed distribution were evaluated. We converged to the true distribution by matching up the inversion results from a series of true decay data and a noisy simulated data. In addition to simulation studies, the same approach was also applied on real experimental data to support the simulation results.

  17. FORCED FIELD EXTRAPOLATION: TESTING A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC (MHD) RELAXATION METHOD WITH A FLUX-ROPE EMERGENCE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. S.; Wang, H. N.; Du, Z. L.; Fan, Y. L.

    2013-05-10

    We undertake an attempt to reconstruct the Sun's non-force-free magnetic field. The solar corona is often considered to be magnetohydrostatic. We solve the full MHD equations with a semi-realistic atmosphere model to attain this stationary state. Our method is tested with a Sun-like model which simulates the emergence of a magnetic flux rope passing from below the photosphere into the corona. Detailed diagnostics shows that our method can model the forced field more successfully than the optimization and potential method, but it still needs to be applied to real data.

  18. Unsteady immiscible multiphase flow validation of a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclaire, S.; Pellerin, N.; Reggio, M.; Trépanier, J.-Y.

    2014-03-01

    The lattice Boltzmann modeling of immiscible multiphase flows needs to be further validated, especially when density variation occurs between the different flow phases. From this perspective, the goal of this research is to introduce the multiple-relaxation-time operator into a lattice Boltzmann model in order to improve its numerical stability in the presence of large density and viscosity ratios. Essentially, this research shows that the introduction of this operator greatly improves the numerical stability of the approach compared to the original single-relaxation-time collision operator. In many lattice Boltzmann research studies, multiphase lattice Boltzmann methods are validated using a reduced number of test cases, and unsteady flow test cases are frequently omitted before much more complex flow configurations are simulated. In this context, several test cases are proposed to evaluate the behavior of a lattice Boltzmann method for simulating immiscible multiphase flows with high density and viscosity ratios. These are: (1) two-phase Couette flow; (2) three-phase Laplace law; (3) three-phase Zalesak disk; (4) two-phase flow between oscillating plates; (5) two-phase capillary wave; and (6) the two-phase oscillating cylindrical bubble. The first two involve a steady regime, and the remaining four an unsteady regime.

  19. A Study of Successive Over-relaxation Method Parallelization over Modern HPC Languages

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2014-01-01

    Successive over-relaxation (SOR) is a computationally intensive, yet extremely important iterative solver for solving linear systems. Due to recent trends of exponential growth in amount of data generated and increasing problem sizes, serial platforms have proved to be insucient in providing the required computational power. In this paper, we present parallel implementations of red-black SOR method using three modern programming languages namely Chapel, D and Go. We employ SOR method for solving 2D steady-state heat conduction problem. We discuss the optimizations incorporated and the features of these languages which are crucial for improving the program performance. Experiments have been performed using 2, 4, and 8 threads and performance results are compared with serial execution. The analysis of results provides important insights into working of SOR method.

  20. On the magnetic anisotropy and nuclear relaxivity effects of Co and Ni doping in iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, T.; Albino, M.; Orsini, F.; Innocenti, C.; Basini, M.; Arosio, P.; Sangregorio, C.; Corti, M.; Lascialfari, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report a systematic experimental study of the evolution of the magnetic and relaxometric properties as a function of metal (Co, Ni) doping in iron oxide nanoparticles. A set of five samples, having the same size and ranging from stoichiometric cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) to stoichiometric nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) with intermediate doping steps, was ad hoc synthesized. Using both DC and AC susceptibility measurements, the evolution of the magnetic anisotropy depending on the doping is qualitatively discussed. In particular, we observed that the height of the magnetic anisotropy barrier is directly proportional to the amount of Co, while the Ni has an opposite effect. By Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion (NMR-D) experiments, the experimental longitudinal r1 and transverse r2 relaxivity profiles were obtained, and the heuristic theory of Roch et al. was used to analyze the data of both r1 and, for the first time, r2. While the experimental and fitting results obtained from r1 profiles were satisfying and confirmed the anisotropy trend, the model applied to r2 hardly explains the experimental findings.

  1. Slow Relaxation of Magnetization in an Isostructural Series of Zinc-Lanthanide Complexes: An Integrated EPR and AC Susceptibility Study.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Asma; Madalan, Augustin M; Andruh, Marius; Caneschi, Andrea; Sorace, Lorenzo

    2016-08-26

    We report the synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic and dynamic magnetic properties of a series of heterodinuclear complexes, [ZnLn(LH4 )2 ](NO3 )3 ⋅6 H2 O (Ln=Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb), with the singly deprotonated form of a new compartmentalized Schiff-base ligand, LH5 . The Ln(III) ions in these systems show a distorted square-antiprism geometry with an LnO8 coordination sphere. EPR spectroscopy and DC magnetic studies have shown that the anisotropic nature of the complexes is far more complicated than predicted on the basis of a simple electrostatic model. Among the investigated systems, only the Dy(III) derivative showed single-ion magnet behavior, in zero and an applied magnetic field, both in pure polycrystalline samples and in a series of polycrystalline samples with different degrees of dilution at the single-crystal level in the isostructural Y(III) derivative. The rich dynamics observed as functions of frequency, field, and temperature reveals that multiple relaxation mechanisms are at play, resulting in a barrier of 189 cm(-1) , which is among the highest reported for a dinuclear Zn-Dy system. Analysis of the dynamic behavior as a function of dilution degree further evidenced the persistence of non-negligible intermolecular interactions, even at the lowest concentration of 1 %. PMID:27465998

  2. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  3. [Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy methods for measuring intra- and extra-cellular pH: clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, P; Pérez-Mayoral, E; Benito, M; Cerdán, S

    2008-01-01

    We review the different methods for measuring pH by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy and discuss their potential diagnostic repercussions. We begin with a brief description of intra- and extra-cellular pH regulation in physiological and pathological conditions. Then we present the main 31P or 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy procedures, which are based on the dependence of the pH on the chemical displacements of the intrinsic intracellular inorganic phosphate or of the H2 proton of imidazole in extrinsic indicators. Finally, we describe the procedures that use magnetic resonance imaging, whose main tool is the dependence of the pH (i) on the relaxivity of certain paramagnetic contrast agents, or (ii) on the processes of magnetic transference between diamagnetic molecules (DIACEST) or paramagnetic molecules (PARACEST) and the free water in the tissues. We briefly illustrate the potential clinical applications of these new procedures.

  4. RADIAL TRANSPORT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN ACCRETION DISKS. II. RELAXATION TO STEADY STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Taku; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-20

    We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. The induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by two timescales: one is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, τ{sub adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux τ{sub dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale τ{sub disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution are quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales τ{sub adv}, τ{sub dif}, and τ{sub disk}. The most interesting phenomena occur when τ{sub adv} << τ{sub dif}, τ{sub disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and the magnetic flux has also been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work. We also find a condition for the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation that survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.

  5. Dynamics of phosphate head groups in biomembranes. Comprehensive analysis using phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance lineshape and relaxation time measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Dufourc, E J; Mayer, C; Stohrer, J; Althoff, G; Kothe, G

    1992-01-01

    Phospholipid head group dynamics have been studied by pulsed phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) of unoriented and macroscopically aligned dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes in the temperature range, 203-343 K. Lineshapes and echo intensities have been recorded as a function of interpulse delay times, temperature and macroscopic orientation of the bilayer normal with respect to the magnetic field. The dipolar proton-phosphorus (1H-31P) contribution to the transverse relaxation time, T2E, and to lineshapes was eliminated by means of a proton spin-lock sequence. In case of longitudinal spin relaxation, T1Z, the amount of dipolar coupling was evaluated by measuring the maximum nuclear Overhauser enhancement. Hence, the results could be analyzed by considering chemical shift anisotropy as the only relaxation mechanism. The presence of various minima both in T1Z and T2E temperature plots as well as the angular dependence of these relaxation times allowed description of the dynamics of the phosphate head group in the 31P-NMR time window, by three different motional classes, i.e., intramolecular, intermolecular and collective motions. The intramolecular motions consist of two hindered rotations and one free rotation around the bonds linking the phosphate head group to the glycerol backbone. These motions are the fastest in the hierarchy of time with correlation times varying from less than 10(-12) to 10(-6) s in the temperature range investigated. The intermolecular motions are assigned to phospholipid long axis rotation and fluctuation. They have correlation times ranging from 10(-11) s at high temperatures to 10(-3) s at low temperatures. The slowest motion affecting the 31P-NMR observables is assigned to viscoelastic modes, i.e., so called order director fluctuations and is only detected at high temperatures, above the main transition in pulse frequency dependent T2ECP experiments. Comprehensive analysis of the phosphate head group dynamics

  6. Photocytotoxicity and magnetic relaxivity responses of dual-porous γ-Fe2O3@meso-SiO2 microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shou-hu; Lee, Siu-Fung; Lau, Janet Ting-Fong; Zhu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Wang, Feng; Lai, Josie M Y; Sham, Kathy W Y; Lo, Pui-Chi; Yu, Jimmy C; Cheng, Christopher H K; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai

    2012-04-01

    Novel high magnetization microspheres with porous γ-Fe(2)O(3) core and porous SiO(2) shell were synthesized using a templating method, whereas the size of the magnetic core and the thickness of the porous shell can be controlled by tuning the experimental parameters. By way of an example, as-prepared γ-Fe(2)O(3)@meso-SiO(2) microspheres (170 nm) display excellent water-dispersity and show photonic characteristics under externally applied a magnetic field. The magnetic property of the γ-Fe(2)O(3) porous core enables the microspheres to be used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging with a high r(2) (76.5 s(-1) mM(-1) Fe) relaxivity. The biocompatible composites possess a large BET surface area (222.3 m(2)/g), demonstrating that they can be used as a bifunctional agent for both MRI and drug carrier. Because of the high substrate loading of the magnetic, dual-porous materials, only a low dosage of the substrate will be acquired for potential practical applications. Hydrophobic zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPC) photosensitizing molecules have been encapsulated into the dual-porous microspheres to form γ-Fe(2)O(3)@meso-SiO(2)-ZnPC microspheres. Biosafety, cellular uptake in HT29 cells, and in vitro MRI of these nanoparticles have been demonstrated. Photocytotoxicity (λ > 610 nm) of the HT29 cells uptaken with γ-Fe(2)O(3)@meso-SiO(2)-ZnPC microspheres has been demonstrated for 20 min illumination.

  7. Magnetic field penetration depth of La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4 measured by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossler, W. J.; Kempton, J. R.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Uemura, Y. J.

    1987-01-01

    Muon-spin-relaxation measurements have been performed on a high-Tc superconductor La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4. In an external transverse magnetic field of 500 G, a magnetic field penetration depth of 2000 A at T = 10 K has been determined from the muon-spin-relaxation rate which increased with decreasing temperature below Tc. From this depth and the Pauli susceptibility, the superconducting carrier density is estimated at 3 x 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The zero-field relaxation rates above and below Tc were equal, which suggests that the superconducting state in this sample is not associated with detectable static magnetic ordering.

  8. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  9. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized (129)Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon ((129)Xe and (131)Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe could be increased 2-7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of (129)Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm(2)/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm(2)/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  10. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of /sup 3/He gas. I. Pure /sup 3/He

    SciTech Connect

    Lusher, C.P.; Secca, M.F.; Richards, M.G.

    1988-07-01

    Longitudinal relaxation times T/sub 1/ have been measured in /sup 3/He gas, using pulsed NMR, for number densities between 3 /times/ 10/sup 23/ and 6 /times/ 10/sup 25/ spins m/sup /minus/3/ and temperatures between 0.6 and 15 K. Relaxation takes place on or near the walls of the Pyrex sample cells and measurements of T/sub 1/ give information about the surface phases. A cryogenic wall coating of solid molecular hydrogen was found to delay the formation of a /sup 3/He monolayer on cooling, and T/sub 1/ measurements were consistent with a binding energy of approx. 13 K for a /sup 3/He atom to a hydrogen surface. At temperatures below approx. 2 K a completed /sup 3/He monolayer forms on the H/sub 2/ coating. No variation of the areal density of monolayer completion with bulk number density at fixed temperature could be observed and the completed /sup 3/He monolayer is thought to be a dense fluid. Baking the Pyrex sample cells under vacuum and using an rf discharge in /sup 3/He gas to clean the walls before sealing in the sample gas were found to increase the observed T/sub 1/'s by up to three orders of magnitude. Once a /sup 3/He monolayer has formed on the H/sub 2/ surface in these cleaned, sealed cells, the dipolar interaction between adsorbed spins is thought to be the dominant source of longitudinal relaxation. The data are consistent with a dipolar relaxation model with a correlation time of approx. 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/9/ sec. This time is long compared to the value of 10/sup /minus/11/ or 10/sup /minus/12/ sec in the 3D fluid. This suggests that if the surface phase is a 2D fluid and the dipolar mechanism is indeed the dominant one, then the atoms in the 2D fluid are less mobile than in three dimensions. This is consistent with recent susceptibility measurements.

  11. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U = 14.7 cm−1, which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, Utheor. = 20.2 cm−1, based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D = −10.1 cm−1 fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  12. A family of tetranuclear quinolinolate Dy(iii)-based single-molecule magnets: effects of periphery ligand replacement on their magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da; Tian, Yong-Mei; Sun, Wen-Bin; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Yan, Peng-Fei

    2016-02-14

    Three complexes with formula {Dy(q)2(L)}2(μ3-OH)2{Dy(q)(L)}2(solvents) (where q = 8-quinolinolate; L = acetylacetone (acac) with (CH2Cl2)2 = solvent (1), 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-propanedione (DBM) and (CH2Cl2)2 = solvent (2), and hexafluoroacetylacetone (hfac) and CHCl3 = solvent (3)) were structurally and magnetically characterized. They have similar Dy4 structural cores bridged by N and O atoms from 8-quinolinolate, and only differ in the peripheral β-diketonate ligands. The variable-frequency and temperature alternating-current (ac) magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that complexes 1 and 2 display significant zero-field single-molecule-magnet (SMM) behavior, while complex 3 exhibits the field-induced SMM behavior, albeit they possess the nearly same primary coordination sphere. The ac susceptibility measurement on the diluted samples verified that their relaxation was of purely molecular origin, and their distinct slow magnetic behaviors were related to the replacement of the peripheral β-diketonate ligand, which is responsible for their different individual Dy(iii) ions' magnetic anisotropy and intramolecular coupling, as confirmed by ab initio calculation.

  13. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U = 14.7 cm(-1), which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, U(theor). = 20.2 cm(-1), based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D = -10.1 cm(-1) fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  14. On the force relaxation in the magnetic levitation system with a high-Tc superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyak, B. M.; Zakharov, M. S.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of magnetic flux creep on the lift force in a magnet/superconductor system was studied. It was shown experimentally that in the case of real levitation (when a levitating object bears only on a magnetic field) the suspension height and consequently the lift force did not change over a long period of time. When the levitating object is fixed for some time (i.e. a rigid constraint is imposed on it), the levitation height decreases after removal of the external constraint. It is assumed that free oscillations of the levitating object slow down the flux creep process, which is activated when these oscillations are suppressed.

  15. Magnetic method for stimulating transport in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle J.

    2016-10-18

    A method for producing mass and heat transport in fluids, wherein the method does not rely on conventional convection, that is, it does not require gravity, a thermal gradient, or a magnetic field gradient. This method gives rise to a unique class of vigorous, field-controllable flow patterns termed advection lattices. The advection lattices can be used to transport heat and/or mass in any desired direction using only magnetic fields.

  16. Magnetic relaxation -- coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the CW (continuous wave) and pulsed EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) have been examined of the swelled Argonne Premium whole coals and the swelled residues of these coals. The CW EPR spectra will not be of high quality due to the unexpectedly microwave-lossy character of the pyridine used for swelling. Being relatively unaffected by this characteristic, the pulsed EPR measurements of the spin relaxation times of the broad (non-inertinite) and narrow (inertinite) macerals have been completed. Although detailed analyses of these results have not yet been done, marked differences have been found between the relaxation times of the swelled and unswelled coals and residues. The most startling are the less than 200 nsec times T{sub 1} of the spin-lattice relaxation of the inertinite radicals in the swelled samples. The T{sub 1} of this maceral in the unswelled coal were approaching 1 millisecond. The T{sub 1} contrast was much less pronounced between the swelled and non-swelled non-inertinite macerals. The prospects of significant progress in coal pore size measurements with xenon and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) have dimmed since the beginning of this project. This assessment is based on the dearth of these types of studies, a paper at a contractors` meeting on this subject that did not materialize, and discussions with colleagues with experience with the technique in coals. Instead, the authors have been developing a pulsed EPR technique for the spin probing of molecular motion to be applied to pores in carbonaceous materials. This report contains a copy of a nearly final draft of a paper being prepared on the development of this technique, entitled {open_quotes}Physical Characterization of the State of Motion of the Phenalenyl Spin Probe in Cation-Exchanged Faujasite Zeolite Supercages with Pulsed EPR.{close_quotes}

  17. Effect of tissue fat and water content on nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Scholz, T D; Fleagle, S R; Parrish, F C; Breon, T; Skorton, D J

    1990-01-01

    Understanding tissue determinants that affect the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of myocardium would improve noninvasive characterization of myocardial tissue. To determine if NMR relaxation times would reflect changes in tissue fat content, two experimental models were investigated. First, an idealized model using mixtures of beef skeletal muscle and beef fat was studied to investigate the effects of a wide range of tissue fat content. Second, myocardium with varying fat content from hogs raised to have varying degrees of ponderosity was analyzed. Tissue fat and water contents and spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times at 20 MHz were measured. The skeletal muscle/fat mixtures ranged in fat content from 35% to 95% with water content variations from 50% to 75%. Water content decreased as fat content increased. A significant inverse linear relationship was found between T1 and sample fat content (r = -0.997). Spin-spin relaxation times showed a significant positive curvilinear relationship with fat content (r2 = 0.96). In the animal experiments, 18 hogs were studied with samples obtained from both right and left ventricular (LV) free walls, with care taken to avoid epicardial fat. Myocardial fat content ranged from 3% to 25%. A significant correlation was found between LV fat content and corrected LV mass (r = 0.62), which suggested that the increase in LV mass could be explained, at least in part, by changes in myocardial fat content. Similar to the muscle/fat mixture model, a significant positive curvilinear relationship was found between myocardial T2 and tissue fat content (r2 = 0.67) for all the myocardial samples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Method for reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, R. L. E.; Word, J. L.

    1968-01-01

    Method of reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers uses a degenerative feedback circuit consisting of a resistor and a separate winding on a magnetic core. The feedback circuit extends amplifier range by allowing it to be used at lower values of output current.

  19. Geometric Magnetic Frustration in Li3Mg2OsO6 Studied with Muon Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, J. P.; Derakhshan, S.; Greedan, J. E.

    Geometric frustration manifests when the spatial arrangement of ions inhibits magnetic order. Typically associated with antiferromagnetically (AF)-correlated moments on triangular or tetrahedral lattices, frustration occurs in a variety of structures and systems, resulting in rich phase diagrams and exotic ground states. As a window to exotic physics revealed by the cancellation of normally dominant interactions, the research community has taken great interest in frustrated systems. One family of recent interest are the rock-salt ordered oxides A5BO6, in which the B sites are occupied by magnetic ions comprising a network of interlocked tetrahedra, and nonmagnetic ions on the A sites control the B oxidation state through charge neutrality. Here we will discuss studies of Li3Mg2OsO6 using muon spin relaxation (μSR), a highly sensitive local probe of magnetism. Previous studies of this family included Li5OsO6, which exhibits AF order below 50K with minimal evidence for frustration, and Li4MgReO6, which exhibits glassy magnetism. Li3Mg2RuO6, meanwhile, exhibits long-range AF, with the ordering temperature suppressed by frustration. But its isoelectronic twin, Li3Mg2OsO6 (5d3 vs. 4d3) exhibits very different behavior, revealed by μSR to be a glassy ground state below 12K. Understanding why such similar systems exhibit diverse ground-state behavior is key to understanding the nature of geometric magnetic frustration. Financial support from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  20. Exploring the Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization in Co(III) -Decorated {Dy(III) 2 } Units.

    PubMed

    Funes, Alejandro V; Carrella, Luca; Rentschler, Eva; Alborés, Pablo

    2016-09-26

    We have prepared and structurally characterized a new member of the butterfly-like {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } single-molecule magnets (SMMs) through further Co(III) decoration, with the formula [Co(III) 4 Dy(III) 2 (OH)2 (teaH)2 (tea)2 (Piv)6 ] (teaH3 =triethanolamine; Piv=trimethylacetate or pivalate). Direct current (DC) susceptibility and magnetization measurements were performed allowing the extraction of possible crystal-field parameters. A simple electrostatic modeling shows reasonable agreement with experimental data. Alternating current (AC) susceptibility measurements under a zero DC field and under small applied fields were performed at different frequencies (i.e., 10-1500 Hz) and at low temperatures (i.e., 2-10 K). Multiple magnetization relaxation pathways are observed. Comparison with previously reported {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } complex measurements allows an overall discussion about the origin of the dynamic behavior and its relationship with crystal-field split ground multiplet sublevels.

  1. Theory of NMR 1 /T1 relaxation in a quantum spin nematic in an applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-01

    There is now strong theoretical evidence that a wide range of frustrated magnets should support quantum spin-nematic order in an applied magnetic field. Nonetheless, the fact that spin-nematic order does not break time-reversal symmetry makes it very difficult to detect in experiment. In this article, we continue the theme begun in Phys. Rev. B 88, 184430 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.184430, of exploring how spin-nematic order reveals itself in the spectrum of spin excitations. Building on an earlier analysis of inelastic neutron scattering [Phys. Rev. B 91, 174402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.174402], we show how the NMR 1 /T1 relaxation rate could be used to identify a spin-nematic state in an applied magnetic field. We emphasize the characteristic universal features of 1 /T1 using a symmetry-based description of the spin-nematic order parameter and its fluctuations. Turning to the specific case of spin-1/2 frustrated ferromagnets, we show that the signal from competing spin-wave excitations can be suppressed through a judicious choice of nuclear site and field direction. As a worked example, we show how 31P NMR in the square lattice frustrated ferromagnet BaCdVO (PO4)2 is sensitive to spin-nematic order.

  2. Exploring the Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization in Co(III) -Decorated {Dy(III) 2 } Units.

    PubMed

    Funes, Alejandro V; Carrella, Luca; Rentschler, Eva; Alborés, Pablo

    2016-09-26

    We have prepared and structurally characterized a new member of the butterfly-like {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } single-molecule magnets (SMMs) through further Co(III) decoration, with the formula [Co(III) 4 Dy(III) 2 (OH)2 (teaH)2 (tea)2 (Piv)6 ] (teaH3 =triethanolamine; Piv=trimethylacetate or pivalate). Direct current (DC) susceptibility and magnetization measurements were performed allowing the extraction of possible crystal-field parameters. A simple electrostatic modeling shows reasonable agreement with experimental data. Alternating current (AC) susceptibility measurements under a zero DC field and under small applied fields were performed at different frequencies (i.e., 10-1500 Hz) and at low temperatures (i.e., 2-10 K). Multiple magnetization relaxation pathways are observed. Comparison with previously reported {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } complex measurements allows an overall discussion about the origin of the dynamic behavior and its relationship with crystal-field split ground multiplet sublevels. PMID:27529474

  3. RELAXATION OF MAGNETIC FIELD RELATIVE TO PLASMA DENSITY REVEALED FROM MICROWAVE ZEBRA PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Sijie; Yan Yihua; Tan Baolin E-mail: yyh@nao.cas.cn

    2012-12-20

    It is generally considered that the emission of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures requires high density and high temperature, which is similar to the situation of the flaring region where primary energy is released. Therefore, a parameter analysis of ZPs may reveal the physical conditions of the flaring source region. This work investigates the variations of 74 microwave ZP structures observed by the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou) at 2.6-3.8 GHz in nine solar flares, and we find that the ratio between the plasma density scale height L{sub N} and the magnetic field scale height L{sub B} in emission sources displays a tendency to decrease during the flaring processes. The ratio L{sub N} /L{sub B} is about 3-5 before the maximum of flares. It decreases to about 2 after the maximum. The detailed analysis of three typical X-class flares implies that the variation of L{sub N} /L{sub B} during the flaring process is most likely due to topological changes of the magnetic field in the flaring source region, and the stepwise decrease of L{sub N} /L{sub B} possibly reflects the magnetic field relaxation relative to the plasma density when the flaring energy is released. This result may also constrain solar flare modeling to some extent.

  4. Functional behavior of the anomalous magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7-δ samples showing the paramagnetic Meissner effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. T.; Vieira, V. N.; Garcia, E. L.; Wolff-Fabris, F.; Kampert, E.; Gouvêa, C. P.; Schaf, J.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T.; Roa, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the functional behavior of the field-cooled (FC) magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123) samples with 30 wt% of Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (Y211) phase, in order to investigate anomalous paramagnetic moments observed during the experiments. FC magnetic relaxation experiments were performed under controlled conditions, such as cooling rate and temperature. Magnetic fields up to 5T were applied parallel to the ab plane and along the c-axis. Our results are associated with the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), characterized by positive moments during FC experiments, and related to the magnetic flux compression into the samples. After different attempts our experimental data could be adequately fitted by an exponential decay function with different relaxation times. We discuss our results suggesting the existence of different and preferential flux dynamics governing the anomalous FC paramagnetic relaxation in different time intervals. This work is one of the first attempts to interpret this controversial effect in a simple analysis of the pinning mechanisms and flux dynamics acting during the time evolution of the magnetic moment. However, the results may be useful to develop models to explain this interesting and still misunderstood feature of the paramagnetic Meissner effect.

  5. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  6. Static magnetic ordering of CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a polycrystal sample of a heavy fermion superconductor CeCu2.1 Si2 (T(c) = 0.7 K) have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T approximately 0.8 K. The line shapes of the observed spectra in zero field indicate a wide distribution of static random local fields at muon sites, suggesting that the ordering is either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state. The observed width of the random local field at T = 0.05 K corresponds to a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit.

  7. Magnetic flux reconstruction methods for shaped tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Chi-Wa

    1993-12-01

    The use of a variational method permits the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to be solved by reducing the problem of solving the 2D non-linear partial differential equation to the problem of minimizing a function of several variables. This high speed algorithm approximately solves the GS equation given a parameterization of the plasma boundary and the current profile (p` and FF` functions). The author treats the current profile parameters as unknowns. The goal is to reconstruct the internal magnetic flux surfaces of a tokamak plasma and the toroidal current density profile from the external magnetic measurements. This is a classic problem of inverse equilibrium determination. The current profile parameters can be evaluated by several different matching procedures. Matching of magnetic flux and field at the probe locations using the Biot-Savart law and magnetic Green`s function provides a robust method of magnetic reconstruction. The matching of poloidal magnetic field on the plasma surface provides a unique method of identifying the plasma current profile. However, the power of this method is greatly compromised by the experimental errors of the magnetic signals. The Casing Principle provides a very fast way to evaluate the plasma contribution to the magnetic signals. It has the potential of being a fast matching method. The performance of this method is hindered by the accuracy of the poloidal magnetic field computed from the equilibrium solver. A flux reconstruction package has been implemented which integrates a vacuum field solver using a filament model for the plasma, a multi-layer perception neural network as an interface, and the volume integration of plasma current density using Green`s functions as a matching method for the current profile parameters. The flux reconstruction package is applied to compare with the ASEQ and EFIT data. The results are promising.

  8. Broadband alternating current magnetic susceptibility: Method and application to the characterization of magnetic particles in igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, K.

    2012-12-01

    Low-field alternating current magnetic susceptibility (MS) is among the most commonly used magnetic property, not only in rock and mineral magnetism but also in environmental magnetism studies. This study proposes a new rock magnetic method, Frequency Spectrum of MS (FSM), based on the measurement of the real component of MS over a wide range of frequency (100 Hz to 500 kHz) and the measurement of the imaginary component at high frequencies in the order of 10-102 kHz. This study presents the FSM results at room and low temperatures obtained from a variety of igneous rocks with SP to SD grain sizes, including acidic to basic volcanic rocks in Japan and a basalt in Hawaii. The FSMs from the andesite samples at room temperature unexceptionally show small but anomalous increase, as much as 5%, over a specific frequency interval between 10 kHz and 120 kHz. In contrast, FSMs of basalts from Oshima and Hawaii show no such peak, a typical pattern indicating the presence of SP grain ensembles. The anomalous FSM from the andesites suggests a new rock and mineral magnetic behavior indicating either magnetic resonance or magnetic relaxation. Considering the anomalous FSM patterns and their variations at low temperatures, it is suggested that the hypothetical resonance could be relevant to some magnetoelastic phenomenon, in which magnetic energy could be dissipated through a long-range, magnetostructural coupling, most likely, magnetostriction. The fact that the annealed andesite samples showed less developed FSM anomaly strongly supports this hypothesis, because annealing generally lowers the internal stress leading to the reduction of resistance in a forced oscillation system. Analyses of the low temperature results confirm magnetic relaxation phenomena taking place at low temperatures, and consequently support the above interpretation.

  9. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for immiscible fluids at high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2013-02-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method for immiscible multiphase flows with large density ratio is extended to high Reynolds number flows using a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator, and its stability and accuracy are assessed by simulating the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The MRT model is successful at damping high-frequency oscillations in the kinetic energy emerging from traveling waves generated by the inclusion of curvature. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with prior studies using adaptive mesh refinement techniques applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Effects of viscosity and surface tension, as well as density ratio, are investigated in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. It is shown that increasing the Reynolds number results in a more chaotic interface evolution and eventually shattering of the interface, while surface tension is shown to have a stabilizing effect.

  10. Relaxation and approximate factorization methods for the unsteady full potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Ide, H.; Gorski, J.

    1984-01-01

    The unsteady form of the full potential equation is solved in conservation form, using implicit methods based on approximate factorization and relaxation schemes. A local time linearization for density is introduced to enable solution to the equation in terms of phi, the velocity potential. A novel flux-biasing technique is applied to generate proper forms of the artificial viscosity, to treat hyperbolic regions with shocks and sonic lines present. The wake is properly modeled by accounting not only for jumps in phi, but also for jumps in higher derivatives of phi obtained from requirements of density continuity. The far field is modeled using the Riemann invariants to simulate nonreflecting boundary conditions. Results are presented for flows over airfoils, cylinders, and spheres. Comparisons are made with available Euler and full potential results.

  11. The Search for Magnetic Order in delta-Pu metal using muon spin relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R; Ohishi, K; Fluss, M; Morris, G; MacLaughlin, D; Shu, L; Chung, B; McCall, S; Bauer, E; Sarrao, J; Ito, T; Higemoto, W

    2006-10-16

    We review results from previous muon spin relaxation ({mu}SR) measurements in applied fields of H{sub 0} = 0 and 0.25 T which established an upper limit for the ordered or disordered frozen spin moment above T = 4 K in {delta}-Pu (4.3 at. % Ga) of {micro}{sub ord} {le} 10{sup -3} {mu}{sub B}. In addition, we present new data in H{sub 0} = 0.25 T and 2 T applied field on a highly annealed {delta}-Pu (4.3 at. % Ga) sample. Neither the muon Knight shift (H{sub 0} = 2 T) nor the inhomogeneous linewidths in the new sample show appreciable temperature dependence below about T = 60 K, also consistent with no spin freezing. Recent theoretical arguments advanced to explain these results are mentioned.

  12. Magnetic trapping of silver and copper, and anomalous spin relaxation in the ag-he system.

    PubMed

    Brahms, Nathan; Newman, Bonna; Johnson, Cort; Greytak, Tom; Kleppner, Daniel; Doyle, John

    2008-09-01

    We have trapped large numbers of copper (Cu) and silver (Ag) atoms using buffer-gas cooling. Up to 3 x 10{12} Cu atoms and 4 x 10{13} Ag atoms are trapped. Lifetimes are as long as 5 s, limited by collisions with the buffer gas. Ratios of elastic to inelastic collision rates with He are >or=10{6}, suggesting Cu and Ag are favorable for use in ultracold applications. The temperature dependence of the Ag-3He collision rate varies as T;{5.8+/-0.4}. We find that this temperature dependence is inconsistent with the behavior predicted for relaxation arising from the spin-rotation interaction, and conclude that the Ag-3He system displays anomalous collisional behavior in the multiple-partial wave regime. Gold (Au) was ablated into 3He buffer gas, however, atomic Au lifetimes were observed to be too short to permit trapping.

  13. Measurements of Heme Relaxation and Ligand Recombination in Strong Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Ye, Xiong; Yu, Anchi; Champion, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Heme cooling signals and diatomic ligand recombination kinetics are measured in strong magnetic fields (up to 10 Tesla). We examined diatomic ligand recombination to heme model compounds (NO and CO), myoglobin (NO and O2), and horseradish peroxidase (NO). No magnetic field induced rate changes in any of the samples were observed within the experimental detection limit. However, in the case of CO binding to heme in glycerol and O2 binding to myoglobin, we observe a small magnetic field dependent change in the early time amplitude of the optical response that is assigned to heme cooling. One possibility, consistent with this observation, is that there is a weak magnetic field dependence of the non-radiative branching ratio into the vibrationally hot electronic ground state during CO photolysis. Ancillary studies of the “spin-forbidden” CO binding reaction in a variety of heme compounds in the absence of magnetic field demonstrate a surprisingly wide range for the Arrhenius prefactor. We conclude that CO binding to heme is not always retarded by unfavorable spin selection rules involving a double spin-flip superexchange mechanism. In fact, it appears that the small prefactor (~109s−1) found for CO rebinding to Mb may be anomalous, rather than the general rule for heme-CO rebinding. These results point to unresolved fundamental issues that underlie the theory of heme-ligand photolysis and rebinding. PMID:19588986

  14. Exchange interactions at the origin of slow relaxation of the magnetization in {TbCu₃} and {DyCu₃} single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Kettles, Fraser J; Milway, Victoria A; Tuna, Floriana; Valiente, Rafael; Thomas, Lynne H; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Ochsenbein, Stefan T; Murrie, Mark

    2014-09-01

    New {TbCu3} and {DyCu3} single-molecule magnets (SMMs) containing a low-symmetry Ln(III) center (shape measurements relative to a trigonal dodecahedron and biaugmented trigonal prism are 2.2-2.3) surrounded by three Cu(II) metalloligands are reported. SMM behavior is confirmed by frequency-dependent out-of-phase ac susceptibility signals and single-crystal temperature and sweep rate dependent hysteresis loops. The ferromagnetic exchange interactions between the central Ln(III) ion and the three Cu(II) ions could be accurately measured by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy and modeled effectively. The excitations observed by INS correspond to flipping of Cu(II) spins and appear at energies similar to the thermodynamic barrier for relaxation of the magnetization, ~15-20 K, and are thus at the origin of the SMM behavior. The magnetic quantum number M(tot) of the cluster ground state of {DyCu3} is an integer, whereas it is a half-integer for {TbCu3}, which explains their vastly different quantum tunneling of the magnetization behavior despite similar energy barriers.

  15. Single-molecule magnetism in three related {Co(III)2Dy(III)2}-acetylacetonate complexes with multiple relaxation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2013-06-17

    Three new heterometallic complexes with formulas of [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(teaH)2(acac)4(NO3)2] (1), [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OH)2(teaH)2(acac)4(NO3)2]·4H2O (2), and [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(mdea)2(acac)4(NO3)2] (3) were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and by dc and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements. All three complexes have an identical "butterfly"-type metallic core that consists of two Dy(III) ions occupying the "body" position and two diamagnetic low-spin Co(III) ions occupying the outer "wing-tips". Each complex displays single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior in zero applied magnetic field, with thermally activated anisotropy barriers of 27, 28, and 38 K above 7.5 K for 1-3, respectively, as well as observing a temperature-independent mechanism of relaxation below 5 K for 1 and 2 and at 3 K for 3, indicating fast quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). A second, faster thermally activated relaxation mechanism may also be active under a zero applied dc field as derived from the Cole-Cole data. Interestingly, these complexes demonstrate further relaxation modes that are strongly dependent upon the application of a static dc magnetic field. Dilution experiments that were performed on 1, in the {Y(III)2Co(III)2} diamagnetic analog, show that the slow magnetic relaxation is of a single-ion origin, but it was found that the neighboring ion also plays an important role in the overall relaxation dynamics.

  16. New analysis of the small-angle-magnetization-rotation method for magnetostriction measurements on amorphous ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, A. M.; Missell, F. P.

    1987-09-01

    The small-angle-magnetization-rotation (SAMR) method for measuring the saturation magnetostrictin λ s has been reanalyzed, taking into account the underlying domain structure of the amorphous ribbon. Although the condition for determining λ s reamins unchenged, the modifications introduced allow one to understand many additional features of the experimental data. With the appropriate modifications, the SAMR method can be used to study stress relaxation in amorphous alloys. Examples are given Fe-based and Co-based alloys.

  17. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  18. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection processes.

  19. Ionothermal synthesis of two oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains with slow magnetization relaxation by using a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Liu, Jun-Liang; Zhang, Ze-Min; Lin, Wei-Quan; Lin, Zhuo-Jia; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2013-09-28

    Two novel isostructural oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains, (choline)[Ln(ox)(H2O)3Cl]Cl·H2O (Ln = Dy/Er), were first obtained ionothermally by using a choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as both solvent and structure-directing agent, both of which show field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization.

  20. Field and dilution effects on the magnetic relaxation behaviours of a 1D dysprosium(iii)-carboxylate chain built from chiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Han, Tian; Leng, Ji-Dong; Ding, You-Song; Wang, Yanyan; Zheng, Zhiping; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2015-08-14

    A one-dimensional dysprosium(iii)-carboxylate chain in which the Dy(III) ions sit in a pseudo D(2d)-symmetry environment is synthesized and shows different slow magnetic relaxation behaviours depending on the field and dilution effects. Besides, the chiral ligand introduces the additional functions of the Cotton effect and polarization for this compound. PMID:26159885

  1. Ionothermal synthesis of two oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains with slow magnetization relaxation by using a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Liu, Jun-Liang; Zhang, Ze-Min; Lin, Wei-Quan; Lin, Zhuo-Jia; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2013-09-28

    Two novel isostructural oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains, (choline)[Ln(ox)(H2O)3Cl]Cl·H2O (Ln = Dy/Er), were first obtained ionothermally by using a choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as both solvent and structure-directing agent, both of which show field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. PMID:23903323

  2. Ferromagnetic coupling mediated by Coπ non-covalent contacts in a pentacoordinate Co(ii) compound showing field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization.

    PubMed

    Nemec, I; Herchel, R; Trávníček, Z

    2016-08-01

    [Co(II)(dpt)(NCS)2], where dpt = bis(3-aminopropyl)amine, was identified as a pentacoordinate Co(II) compound showing field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. Furthermore, intermolecular ferromagnetic coupling mediated by Coπ non-covalent contacts, where π orbitals originate from the thiocyanato ligand, is reported for the first time. PMID:27435418

  3. Electric Potential Surrounding Two Conducting Spheres: An Exercise for Advancing Student Understanding of the Method of Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Hugh; Chartrand, Bridget; Beach, John

    2016-03-01

    In undergraduate computational physics courses, the method of relaxation provides a well-established technique for obtaining solutions to Laplace's Equation. The technique's value stems from its accessibility and clear dependence on the properties of solutions to Laplace's Equation. We have created an exercise that allows students to develop an experiential understanding of the method of images and its connection to the properties of solutions to Laplace's Equation. The problem of two conducting spheres separated by a relatively small distance and maintained at fixed but distinct electric potentials is considered. Using the method of relaxation, students solve the problem in two-dimensions, three-dimensions with a Dirichlet condition on the outer boundary and three-dimensions using a Neumann condition on the outer boundary. At each step, the results are compared to a solution obtained using the method of images for a spherical conductor in an iterative fashion. Through this comparison, students gain insight into the significance of their choices for the solving the problem using the method of relaxation. We will discuss application of the relaxation method to this problem, validation by the method of images, and potential use in an undergraduate computational physics course.

  4. Long-Lasting and Efficient Tumor Imaging Using a High Relaxivity Polysaccharide Nanogel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Minnie; Lux, Jacques; Nishimura, Tomoki; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-09-14

    Clinically approved small-molecule magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are all rapidly cleared from the body and offer weak signal enhancement. To avoid repeated administration of contrast agent and improve signal-to-noise ratios, agents with stronger signal enhancement and better retention in tumors are needed. Therefore, we focused on hydrogels because of their excellent water accessibility and biodegradability. Gadolinium (Gd)-chelating cross-linkers were incorporated into self-assembled pullulan nanogels to both impart magnetic properties and to stabilize this material that has been extensively studied for medical applications. We show that these Gd-chelating pullulan nanogels (Gd-CHPOA) have the highest reported relaxivity for any hydrogel-based particles and accumulate in the 4T1 tumors in mice at high levels 4 h after injection. This combination offers high signal enhancement and lasts up to 7 days to delineate the tumor clearly for longer imaging time scales. Importantly, this long-term accumulation does not cause any damage or toxicity in major organs up to three months after injection. Our work highlights the clinical potential of Gd-CHPOA as a tumor-imaging MRI contrast agent, permitting tumor identification and assessment with a high signal-to-background ratio.

  5. High homogeneity B(1) 30.2 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation times measurements.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on design and construction of a double coil high-homogeneity ensuring Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation time measurements. NMR off-resonance experiments pose unique technical problems. Long irradiation can overheat the sample, dephase the spins because of B(1) field inhomogeneity and degrade the signal received by requiring the receiver bandwidth to be broader than that needed for normal experiment. The probe proposed solves these problems by introducing a separate off-resonance irradiation coil which is larger than the receiver coil and is wound up on the dewar tube that separates it from the receiver coil thus also thermally protects the sample from overheating. Large size of the irradiation coil also improves the field homogeneity because as a ratio of the sample diameter to the magnet (coil) diameter increases, the field inhomogeneity also increases (Blümich et al., 2008) [1]. The small receiver coil offers maximization of the filling factor and a high signal to the noise ratio.

  6. Turbulence in Toroidally Confined Plasma: Ion - - Gradient-Driven Turbulence; Dynamics of Magnetic Relaxation in Current-Carrying Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyung Su.

    This thesis is devoted to two studies of low-frequency turbulence in toroidally confined plasma. Low-frequency turbulence is believed to play an important role in anomalous transport in toroidal confinement devices. The first study pertains the the development of an analytic theory of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence in tokamaks. Energy-conserving, renormalized spectrum equations are derived and solved in order to obtain the spectra of stationary ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence. Corrections to mixing-length estimates are calculated explicitly. The resulting anomalous ion thermal diffusivity is derived and is found to be consistent with experimentally-deduced ion thermal diffusivities. The associated electron thermal diffusivity, particle and heat-pinch velocities are also calculated. The effects of impurity gradients on saturated ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence are discussed and a related explanation of density profile steepening during Z-mode operation is proposed. The second study is devoted to the role of multiple helicity nonlinear interactions of tearing modes and dynamics of magnetic relaxation in a high-temperature current-carrying plasma. To extend the resistive MHD theory of magnetic fluctuations and dynamo activity observed in the reversed field pinch, the fluid equations for high-temperature regime are derived and basic nonlinear interaction mechanism and the effects of diamagnetic corrections to the MHD turbulence theory are studied for the case of fully developed, densely packed turbulence. Modifications to the MHD dynamo theory and anomalous thermal transport and confinement scaling predictions are examined.

  7. Surface atomic relaxation and magnetism on hydrogen-adsorbed Fe(110) surfaces from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, Urslaan K.; Jimenez-Melero, Enrique; Koehler, Sven P. K.

    2016-11-01

    We have computed adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, surface relaxation and buckling for hydrogen adsorbed on a body-centred-cubic Fe(110) surface as a function of the degree of H coverage. This adsorption system is important in a variety of technological processes such as the hydrogen embrittlement in ferritic steels, which motivated this work, and the Haber-Bosch process. We employed spin-polarised density functional theory to optimise geometries of a six-layer Fe slab, followed by frozen mode finite displacement phonon calculations to compute Fe-H vibrational frequencies. We have found that the quasi-threefold (3f) site is the most stable adsorption site, with adsorption energies of ∼3.0 eV/H for all coverages studied. The long-bridge (lb) site, which is close in energy to the 3f site, is actually a transition state leading to the stable 3f site. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies collectively span from 730 to 1220 cm-1, for a range of coverages. The increased first-to-second layer spacing in the presence of adsorbed hydrogen, and the pronounced buckling observed in the Fe surface layer, may facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into the bulk, and therefore impact the early stages of hydrogen embrittlement in steels.

  8. Elastic and anelastic relaxations accompanying magnetic ordering and spin-flop transitions in hematite, Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oravova, Lucie; Zhang, Zhiying; Church, Nathan; Harrison, Richard J.; Howard, Christopher J.; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2013-03-01

    Hematite, Fe2O3, provides in principle a model system for multiferroic (ferromagnetic/ferroelastic) behavior at low levels of strain coupling. The elastic and anelastic behavior associated with magnetic phase transitions in a natural polycrystalline sample have therefore been studied by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) in the temperature range from 11 to 1072 K. Small changes in softening and attenuation are interpreted in terms of weak but significant coupling of symmetry-breaking and non-symmetry-breaking strains with magnetic order parameters in the structural sequence R\\overline{3}c{1}^{\\prime}\\rightarrow C 2/c\\rightarrow R\\overline{3}c. The R\\overline{3}c{1}^{\\prime}\\rightarrow C 2/c transition at TN = 946 ± 1 K is an example of a multiferroic transition which has both ferromagnetic (from canting of antiferromagnetically ordered spin moments) and ferroelastic (rhombohedral → monoclinic) character. By analogy with the improper ferroelastic transition in Pb3(PO4)2, W and W‧ ferroelastic twin walls which are also 60° and 120° magnetic domain walls should develop. These have been tentatively identified from microstructures reported in the literature. The very low attenuation in the stability field of the C2/c structure in the polycrystalline sample used in the present study, in comparison with the strong acoustic dissipation reported for single crystal samples, implies, however, that the individual grains each consist of a single ferroelastic domain or that the twin walls are strongly pinned by grain boundaries. This absence of attenuation allows an intrinsic loss mechanism associated with the transition point to be seen and interpreted in terms of local coupling of shear strains with fluctuations which have relaxation times in the vicinity of ˜10-8 s. The first order C 2/c\\rightarrow R\\overline{3}c (Morin) transition occurs through a temperature interval of coexisting phases but the absence of an acoustic loss peak suggests that the

  9. Solution of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model for image segmentation by generalized relaxation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambra, Pasqua; Tartaglione, Gaetano

    2015-03-01

    Image segmentation addresses the problem to partition a given image into its constituent objects and then to identify the boundaries of the objects. This problem can be formulated in terms of a variational model aimed to find optimal approximations of a bounded function by piecewise-smooth functions, minimizing a given functional. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are a set of two coupled elliptic partial differential equations with varying coefficients. Numerical solution of the above system often relies on alternating minimization techniques involving descent methods coupled with explicit or semi-implicit finite-difference discretization schemes, which are slowly convergent and poorly scalable with respect to image size. In this work we focus on generalized relaxation methods also coupled with multigrid linear solvers, when a finite-difference discretization is applied to the Euler-Lagrange equations of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model. We show that non-linear Gauss-Seidel, accelerated by inner linear iterations, is an effective method for large-scale image analysis as those arising from high-throughput screening platforms for stem cells targeted differentiation, where one of the main goal is segmentation of thousand of images to analyze cell colonies morphology.

  10. Reprint of Solution of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model for image segmentation by generalized relaxation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambra, Pasqua; Tartaglione, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    Image segmentation addresses the problem to partition a given image into its constituent objects and then to identify the boundaries of the objects. This problem can be formulated in terms of a variational model aimed to find optimal approximations of a bounded function by piecewise-smooth functions, minimizing a given functional. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are a set of two coupled elliptic partial differential equations with varying coefficients. Numerical solution of the above system often relies on alternating minimization techniques involving descent methods coupled with explicit or semi-implicit finite-difference discretization schemes, which are slowly convergent and poorly scalable with respect to image size. In this work we focus on generalized relaxation methods also coupled with multigrid linear solvers, when a finite-difference discretization is applied to the Euler-Lagrange equations of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model. We show that non-linear Gauss-Seidel, accelerated by inner linear iterations, is an effective method for large-scale image analysis as those arising from high-throughput screening platforms for stem cells targeted differentiation, where one of the main goal is segmentation of thousand of images to analyze cell colonies morphology.

  11. MM-wave emission by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, I. A. Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burmasov, V. S.; Popov, S. S.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sklyarov, V. F.; Vyacheslavov, L. N.; Burdakov, A. V.; Sorokina, N. V.; Gavrilenko, D. E.; Kasatov, A. A.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Trunev, Yu. A.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    There are described electromagnetic spectra of radiation emitted by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam in a double plasma frequency band. Experimental studies were performed at the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The electron beam had the following parameters: 70–110 keV for the electron energy, 1–10 MW for the beam power and 30–300 μs for its duration. The spectrum was measured in 75–230 GHz frequency band. The frequency of the emission follows variations in electron plasma density and magnetic field strength. The specific emission power on the length of the plasma column is estimated on the level 0.75 kW/cm.

  12. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  13. Nitroxide spin labels as EPR reporters of the relaxation and magnetic properties of the heme-copper site in cytochrome bo3, E. coli.

    PubMed

    Oganesyan, Vasily S; White, Gaye F; Field, Sarah; Marritt, Sophie; Gennis, Robert B; Yap, Lai Lai; Thomson, Andrew J

    2010-11-01

    A nitroxide spin label (SL) has been used to probe the electron spin relaxation times and the magnetic states of the oxygen-binding heme-copper dinuclear site in Escherichia coli cytochrome bo(3), a quinol oxidase (QO), in different oxidation states. The spin lattice relaxation times, T(1), of the SL are enhanced by the paramagnetic metal sites in QO and hence show a strong dependence on the oxidation state of the latter. A new, general form of equations and a computer simulation program have been developed for the calculation of relaxation enhancement by an arbitrary fast relaxing spin system of S ≥ 1/2. This has allowed us to obtain an accurate estimate of the transverse relaxation time, T (2), of the dinuclear coupled pair Fe(III)-Cu(B)(II) in the oxidized form of QO that is too short to measure directly. In the case of the F' state, the relaxation properties of the heme-copper center have been shown to be consistent with a ferryl [Fe(IV)=O] heme and Cu(B)(II) coupled by approximately 1.5-3 cm(-1) to a radical. The magnitude suggests that the coupling arises from a radical form of the covalently linked tyrosine-histidine ligand to Cu(II) with unpaired spin density primarily on the tyrosine component. This work demonstrates that nitroxide SLs are potentially valuable tools to probe both the relaxation and the magnetic properties of multinuclear high-spin paramagnetic active sites in proteins that are otherwise not accessible from direct EPR measurements.

  14. M(III)Dy(III)3 (M = Fe(III), Co(III)) complexes: three-blade propellers exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gong-Feng; Gamez, Patrick; Tang, Jinkui; Clérac, Rodolphe; Guo, Yun-Nan; Guo, Yang

    2012-05-21

    [Dy(III)(HBpz(3))(2)](2+) moieties (HBpz(3)(-) = hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate) and a 3d transition-metal ion (Fe(III) or Co(III)) have been rationally assembled using an dithiooxalato dianion ligand into 3d-4f [MDy(3)(HBpz(3))(6)(dto)(3)]·4CH(3)CN·2CH(2)Cl(2) (M = Fe (1), Co (2) complexes. Single-crystal X-ray studies reveal that three eight-coordinated Dy(III) centers in a square antiprismatic coordination environment are connecting to a central octahedral trivalent Fe or Co ion forming a propeller-type complex. The dynamics of the magnetization in the two isostructural compounds, modulated by the nature of the central M(III) metal ion, are remarkably different despite their analogous direct current (dc) magnetic properties. The slow relaxation of the magnetization observed for 2 mainly originates from isolated Dy ions, since a diamagnetic Co(III) metal ion links the magnetic Dy(III) ions. In the case of 1, the magnetic interaction between S = 1/2 Fe(III) ion and the three Dy(III) magnetic centers, although weak, generates a complex energy spectrum of magnetic states with low-lying excited states that induce a smaller energy gap than for 2 and thus a faster relaxation of the magnetization.

  15. Prognostic Significance of Transverse Relaxation Rate (R2*) in Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Young; Ko, Eun Sook; Han, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Sun Mi; Lim, Yaeji; Kim, Rock Bum

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and prognostic factors. Materials and Methods A total of 159 women with invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) sequence at 3 T. The distribution of the measured R2* values were analyzed, and the correlation between R2* and various prognostic factors (age, tumor size, histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, and axillary lymph node status, as well as expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, p53, and Ki-67) were retrospectively assessed using patient medical records. Results The baseline R2* values of the IDCs were very heterogeneous with wide range among the patients. The mean R2* value was (32.8 ± 14.0) Hz with a median of 29.3 Hz (range 13.5–109.4 Hz). In multivariate analysis, older age was associated with decreased R2* value (P = 0.011) and IDCs with p53-overexpression showed higher R2* values than those without p53-overexpression group (P = 0.031). Other prognostic factors were not significantly correlated with R2* value. Conclusion In this study, R2* values were significantly correlated with age and expression of p53. Further studies are necessary to determine the prognostic value of BOLD-MRI. PMID:27384310

  16. A nine-coordinated dysprosium(III) compound with an oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer exhibiting two slow magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Liu, Xiangyu; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping

    2015-10-21

    A 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) compound, formulated as [Dy(C2O4)1.5(H2O)3]n·2nH2O (1), has been hydrothermally isolated. As for compound 1, structural analysis reveals that the nine-coordinated Dy(III) ions reside in a slightly distorted tricapped trigonal prism. Under an applied magnetic field of 700 Oe, the compound was magnetically characterized as a new example that two slow relaxations of the magnetization processes can be observed in a 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer. PMID:26327427

  17. A nine-coordinated dysprosium(III) compound with an oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer exhibiting two slow magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Liu, Xiangyu; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping

    2015-10-21

    A 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) compound, formulated as [Dy(C2O4)1.5(H2O)3]n·2nH2O (1), has been hydrothermally isolated. As for compound 1, structural analysis reveals that the nine-coordinated Dy(III) ions reside in a slightly distorted tricapped trigonal prism. Under an applied magnetic field of 700 Oe, the compound was magnetically characterized as a new example that two slow relaxations of the magnetization processes can be observed in a 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer.

  18. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  19. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H.; Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  20. Modified methods of stellar magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The standard methods of the magnetic field measurement, based on an analysis of the relation between the Stokes V-parameter and the first derivative of the total line profile intensity, were modified by applying a linear integral operator \\hat{L} to both sides of this relation. As the operator \\hat{L}, the operator of the wavelet transform with DOG-wavelets is used. The key advantage of the proposed method is an effective suppression of the noise contribution to the line profile and the Stokes parameter V. The efficiency of the method has been studied using model line profiles with various noise contributions. To test the proposed method, the spectropolarimetric observations of the A0 star α2 CVn, the Of?p star HD 148937, and the A0 supergiant HD 92207 were used. The longitudinal magnetic field strengths calculated by our method appeared to be in good agreement with those determined by other methods.

  1. Ammonia synthesis using magnetic induction method (MIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitasari, P.; Razak, J. Abd; Yahya, N.

    2012-09-01

    The most challenging issues for ammonia synthesis is to get the high yield. New approach of ammonia synthesis by using Magnetic Induction Method (MIM) and the Helmholtz Coils has been proposed. The ammonia detection was done by using Kjeldahl Method and FTIR. The system was designed by using Autocad software. The magnetic field of MIM was vary from 100mT-200mT and the magnetic field for the Helmholtz coils was 14mT. The FTIR result shows that ammonia has been successfully formed at stretching peaks 1097,1119,1162,1236, 1377, and 1464 cm-1. UV-VIS result shows the ammonia bond at 195nm of wavelength. The ammonia yield was increase to 244.72μmole/g.h by using the MIM and six pairs of Helmholtz coils. Therefore this new method will be a new promising method to achieve the high yield ammonia at ambient condition (at 25δC and 1atm), under the Magnetic Induction Method (MIM).

  2. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of 1H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J. S.; Vittur, Franco

    2011-06-01

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T1 relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular 1H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') 1H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with α denoting the solid/liquid 1H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T1) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T1, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with α>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T1 times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with αLt1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit. Computed distributions for simulated data using observed signal

  3. Cutting stems before relaxing xylem tension induces artefacts in Vitis coignetiae, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ogasa, Mayumi Y; Utsumi, Yasuhiro; Miki, Naoko H; Yazaki, Kenichi; Fukuda, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    It was recently reported that cutting artefacts occur in some species when branches under tension are cut, even under water. We used non-destructive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the change in xylem water distribution at the cellular level in Vitis coignetiae standing stems before and after relaxing tension. Less than 3% of vessels were cavitated when stems under tension were cut under water at a position shorter than the maximum vessel length (MVL) from the MRI point, in three of four plants. The vessel contents remained at their original status, and cutting artefact vessel cavitation declined to <1% when stems were cut at a position farther than the MVL from the MRI point. Water infiltration into the originally cavitated vessels after cutting the stem, i.e. vessel refilling, was found in <1% of vessels independent of cutting position on three of nine plants. The results indicate that both vessel cavitation and refilling occur in xylem tissue under tension following stem cutting, but its frequency is quite small, and artefacts can be minimized altogether if the distance between the monitoring position and the cutting point is longer than the MVL.

  4. {sup 139}La NMR in lanthanum manganites: Indication of the presence of magnetic polarons from spectra and nuclear relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Allodi, G.; De Renzi, R.; Guidi, G.

    1998-01-01

    We present {sup 139}La NMR experiments on five powder samples of lanthanum manganites, with a Mn{sup 4+} concentration ranging from the antiferromagnetic-insulator (AFM) to the ferromagnetic-conducting (FM) region of the phase diagram. We measure a positive hyperfine coupling C=0.13 T/{mu}{sub B}. A signal from nuclei in a FM environment is present at all compositions, as evidenced by a hyperfine frequency in zero-field experiments, by a positive hyperfine shift in NMR experiments below T{sub c}, and by a paramagnetic frequency shift following Curie-Weiss law. A signal from nuclei in an AFM environment is identified by a similar negative intercept Curie-Weiss law. The NMR spectra reveal a large temperature dependent fraction of static spin defects below T{sub c} in the FM domains. Nuclear relaxation indicates that the FM regions are influenced by diffusing, AFM-correlated excitations, while the AFM regions probe spin fluctuations from diffusing, FM correlated excitations. These results are interpreted in terms of electronic inhomogeneities due to the presence of a magnetic small polaron. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Assessment of tissue repair in full thickness chondral defects in the rabbit using magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Gurkan, Ilksen; Sharma, Blanka; Cascio, Brett; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Spencer, Richard G

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the noninvasive and nondestructive technique of magnetic resonance imaging could be used to quantify the amount of repair tissue that fills surgically-induced chondral defects in the rabbit. Sixteen 4-mm diameter full-thickness chondral defects were created. A photopolymerizable hydrogel was used to seal the defects as a treatment modality. At 5 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the distal femur was subjected to MRI analyses at high field (9.4 T). The transverse relaxation time (T(2)) in each defect was measured. Histology and histomorphometric analysis were used to quantify the amount of repair tissue that filled each defect. The relationship between T(2) and percent tissue fill was found to fit well to a negatively sloped, linear model. The linear (Pearson's product-moment) correlation coefficient was found to be r = -0.82 and the associated coefficient of determination was r(2) = 0.67. This correlation suggests that the MRI parameter T(2) can be used to track changes in the amount of repair tissue that fills cartilage defects. This would be especially useful in in vivo cartilage tissue engineering studies that attempt to determine optimal biomaterials for scaffold design.

  6. Reexamination of relaxation of spins due to a magnetic field gradient: Identity of the Redfield and Torrey theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, R.; Rohm, Ryan M.; Swank, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    There is an extensive literature on magnetic-gradient-induced spin relaxation. Cates, Schaefer, and Happer, in a seminal publication, have solved the problem in the regime where diffusion theory (the Torrey equation) is applicable using an expansion of the density matrix in diffusion equation eigenfunctions and angular momentum tensors. McGregor has solved the problem in the same regime using a slightly more general formulation using the Redfield theory formulated in terms of the autocorrelation function of the fluctuating field seen by the spins and calculating the correlation functions using the diffusion-theory Green’s function. The results of both calculations were shown to agree for a special case. In the present work, we show that the eigenfunction expansion of the Torrey equation yields the expansion of the Green’s function for the diffusion equation, thus showing the identity of this approach with that of the Redfield theory. The general solution can also be obtained directly from the Torrey equation for the density matrix. Thus, the physical content of the Redfield and Torrey approaches are identical. We then introduce a more general expression for the position autocorrelation function of particles moving in a closed cell, extending the range of applicability of the theory.

  7. A Dynamic Discrete Dislocation Plasticity Method for the Dimulation of Plastic Relaxation under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Benat; Sutton, Adrian; Eakins, Daniel; Balint, Daniel; Dini, Daniele

    2013-06-01

    This talk intends to offer some insight as to how Discrete Dislocation Plasticity (DDP) can be adapted to simulate plastic relaxation processes under weak shock loading and high strain rates. In those circumstances, dislocations are believed to be the main cause of plastic relaxation in crystalline solids. Direct simulation of dislocations as the dynamic agents of plastic relaxation in those cases remains a challenge. DDP, where dislocations are modelled as discrete discontinuities in elastic continuum media, is often unable to adequately simulate plastic relaxation because it treats dislocation motion quasi-statically, thus neglecting the time-dependent nature of the elastic fields and assuming that they instantaneously acquire the shape and magnitude predicted by elastostatics. Under shock loading, this assumption leads to several artefacts that can only be overcome with a fully time-dependent formulation of the elastic fields. In this talk one of such formulations for the creation, annihilation and arbitrary motion of straight edge dislocations will be presented. These solutions are applied in a two-dimensional model of time-dependent plastic relaxation under shock loading, and some relevant results will be presented. EPSRC CDT in Theory and Simulation of Materials

  8. Magnetic filtration process, magnetic filtering material, and methods of forming magnetic filtering material

    SciTech Connect

    Taboada-Serrano, Patricia; Tsouris, Constantino; Contescu, Cristian I; McFarlane, Joanna

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides magnetically responsive activated carbon, and a method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon. The method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon typically includes providing activated carbon in a solution containing ions of ferrite forming elements, wherein at least one of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +3 and at least a second of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +2, and increasing pH of the solution to precipitate particles of ferrite that bond to the activated carbon, wherein the activated carbon having the ferrite particles bonded thereto have a positive magnetic susceptibility. The present invention also provides a method of filtering waste water using magnetic activated carbon.

  9. Gd-Complexes of New Arylpiperazinyl Conjugates of DTPA-Bis(amides): Synthesis, Characterization and Magnetic Relaxation Properties.

    PubMed

    Ba-Salem, Abdullah O; Ullah, Nisar; Shaikh, M Nasiruzzaman; Faiz, Mohamed; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Two new DTPA-bis(amide) based ligands conjugated with the arylpiperazinyl moiety were synthesized and subsequently transformed into their corresponding Gd(III) complexes 1 and 2 of the type [Gd(L)H2O]·nH2O. The relaxivity (R1) of these complexes was measured, which turned out to be comparable with that of Omniscan®, a commercially available MRI contrast agent. The cytotoxicity studies of these complexes indicated that they are non-toxic, which reveals their potential and physiological suitability as MRI contrast agents. All the synthesized ligands and complexes were characterized with the aid of analytical and spectroscopic methods, including elemental analysis, 1H-NMR, FT-IR, XPS and fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry. PMID:25939069

  10. Spin relaxation in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A review is given on theoretical grounds and typical experimental appearances of spin dynamics and relaxation in solids containing randomly distributed nuclear and/or electronic spins. Brief content is as follows. Disordered and magnetically diluted systems. General outlines of the spin transport theory. Random walks in disordered systems (RWDS). Observable values in phase spin relaxation, free induction decay (FID). Interrelation of longitudinal and transversal relaxation related to dynamics of occupancies and phases. Occupation number representation for equations of motion. Continuum media approximation and inapplicability of moment expansions. Long-range transitions vs percolation theory. Concentration expansion as a general constructive basis for analytical methods. Scaling properties of propagators. Singular point. Dynamical and kinematical memory in RWDS. Ways of regrouping of concentration expansions. CTRW and semi-phenomenology. Coherent medium approximation for nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities. Combining of memory functions and cumulant expansions for calculation of FID. Path integral representations for RWDS. Numerical simulations of RWDS. Spin dynamics in magnetically diluted systems with low Zeeman and medium low dipole temperatures. Cluster expansions, regularization of dipole interactions and spectral dynamics.

  11. Theory of laser-induced adiabat shaping in inertial fusion implosions: The relaxation method

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Anderson, K.; Knauer, J.; Collins, T.J.B.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Skupsky, S.

    2005-04-15

    The theory of the adiabat shaping induced by a strong shock propagating through a relaxed density profile is carried out for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. The relaxed profile is produced through a laser prepulse, while the adiabat-shaping shock is driven by the foot of the main laser pulse. The theoretical adiabat profiles accurately reproduce the simulation results. ICF capsules with a shaped adiabat are expected to benefit from improved hydrodynamic stability while maintaining the same one-dimensional performances as flat-adiabat shells.

  12. RECONSTRUCTION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD USING THE CESE-MHD METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Xiang, Changqing; Fan, Yuliang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: fanyuliang@bao.ac.cn

    2011-02-01

    We present a new implementation of the MHD relaxation method for reconstruction of the nearly force-free coronal magnetic field from a photospheric vector magnetogram. A new numerical MHD scheme is proposed to solve the full MHD equations by using the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element method. The bottom boundary condition is prescribed in a similar way as in the stress-and-relax method, by changing the transverse field incrementally to match the magnetogram, and other boundaries of the computational box are set by the nonreflecting boundary conditions. Applications to the well-known benchmarks for nonlinear force-free-field reconstruction, the Low and Lou force-free equilibria, validate the method and confirm its capability for future practical application, with observed magnetograms as inputs.

  13. Magnetic Relaxation Switch Detecting Boric Acid or Borate Ester through One-Pot Synthesized Poly(vinyl alcohol) Functionalized Nanomagnetic Iron Oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guilong; Lu, Shiyao; Qian, Junchao; Zhong, Kai; Yao, Jianming; Cai, Dongqing; Cheng, Zhiliang; Wu, Zhengyan

    2015-08-01

    We developed a highly efficient magnetic relaxation switch (MRS) system based on poly(vinyl alcohol) functionalized nanomagnetic iron oxide (PVA@NMIO) particles for the detection of boric acid or borate ester (BA/BE). It was found that the addition of BA/BE induced the aggregation of PVA@NMIO particles, resulting in a measurable change in the T2 relaxation time in magnetic resonance measurements. The main mechanism was proposed that the electron-deficient boron atoms of BA/BE caused the aggregation of PVA@NMIO particles through covalent binding to the hydroxyl groups of PVA. This novel detection system displayed excellent selectivity, high sensitivity, and rapid detection for BA/BE. Thus, this system may provide a great application prospect for detection of BA/BE.

  14. On the magnetization relaxation of ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films as determined by superconducting quantum interference device measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Ziemann, Paul; Radovan, Henri A.; Herzog, Thomas

    1998-09-01

    By using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the temporal relaxation of the magnetization was determined for ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films at various temperatures between 10 K and 80 K in magnetic fields ranging from 2 mT to 0.3 T. Based on these data, a detailed analysis has been performed related to the following methods or models: (1) Fitting the data to the thermally activated flux motion and collective pinning model; (2) Applying the Generalized Inversion Scheme to extract the temperature dependence of the unrelaxed critical current density jc( T) and pinning potential Uc( T); (3) Testing a modified Maley's method to obtain the current dependent activation energy for flux motion; (4) 2D vortex glass scaling. It is found that, for low fields (2 mT, 10 mT, 40 mT) the experimental data can be described by an elastic flux motion, most probably due to 3D single vortex creep. At higher fields (0.1 T, 0.2 T, 0.3 T), the observed behavior can be interpreted in terms of plastic flux motion which is probably governed by dislocation mediated flux creep. These high field data can also be consistently described by the 2D vortex glass scaling with scaling parameters ν2D, T0 and p being consistent with those derived from corresponding transport measurement. Also, results are presented demonstrating the importance of optimizing the scan length of the sample in a moving sample SQUID magnetometer to avoid artifacts.

  15. A Comparison of 1D and 2D (Unbiased) Experimental Methods for Measuring CSAsolarDD Cross-Correlated Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batta, Gy.; Kövér, K. E.; Kowalewski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional and enhanced 1D experiments and different NOESY experiments (the 2D unbiased method) were performed for measuring CSA/DD cross-correlated relaxation on trehalose, a compound which could be approximated as a spherical top, and on simple model compounds comprisingC3vsymmetry (CHCl3, triphenylsilane (TPSi)). The comparison gives experimental evidence for the equivalence of the methods within the limits of the two-spin approach. 1D data are evaluated with both the simple initial rate and the Redfield relaxation matrix approach. The 2D data are obtained from the so-called transfer matrix using the Perrin-Gipe eigenvalue/eigenvector method. For the improved performance of the 2D method, anX-filtered (HHH) NOESY is suggested at the natural abundance of13C (or other dilute, low γ species). Also, experimental parameters crucial for reliable CSA data are tested (e.g., the impact of insufficient relaxation delay). Error estimation is carried out for fair comparison of methods. Revised liquid state1H and13C (29Si) CSA data are presented for chloroform and TPSi.

  16. New Methods of Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2015-04-01

    The standard methods of magnetic field measurements, based on the relation between the Stokes V parameter and the first derivative of the line profile intensity were modified by applying a linear integral transform to both sides of this relation. We used the wavelet integral transform with the DOG wavelets. The key advantage of the proposed method is the effective suppression of the noise contribution both to the line profile and the Stokes V parameter. To test the proposed method, spectropolarimetric observations of the young O star θ1 Ori C were used. We also demonstrate that the smoothed Time Variation Spectra (smTVS) can be used as a tool for detecting the local stellar magnetic fields.

  17. New method for predicting lifetime of seals from compression-stress relaxation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.; Wise, J.

    1998-06-01

    Interpretation of compression stress-relaxation (CSR) experiments for elastomers in air is complicated by (1) the presence of both physical and chemical relaxation and (2) anomalous diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) effects. For a butyl material, the authors first use shear relaxation data to indicate that physical relaxation effects are negligible during typical high temperature CSR experiments. They then show that experiments on standard CSR samples ({approximately}15 mm diameter when compressed) lead to complex non-Arrhenius behavior. By combining reaction kinetics based on the historic basic autoxidation scheme with a diffusion equation appropriate to disk-shaped samples, they derive a theoretical DLO model appropriate to CSR experiments. Using oxygen consumption and permeation rate measurements, the theory shows that important DLO effects are responsible for the observed non-Arrhenius behavior. To minimize DLO effects, they introduce a new CSR methodology based on the use of numerous small disk samples strained in parallel. Results from these parallel, minidisk experiments lead to Arrhenius behavior with an activation energy consistent with values commonly observed for elastomers, allowing more confident extrapolated predictions. In addition, excellent correlation is noted between the CSR force decay and the oxygen consumption rate, consistent with the expectation that oxidative scission processes dominate the CSR results.

  18. Reassessing the single relaxation time Lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of Darcy’s flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestininzi, Pietro; Montessori, Andrea; La Rocca, Michele; Succi, Sauro

    2016-09-01

    It is shown that the single relaxation time (SRT) version of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation permits to compute the permeability of Darcy’s flows in porous media within a few percent accuracy. This stands in contrast with previous claims of inaccuracy, which we relate to the lack of recognition of the physical dependence of the permeability on the Knudsen number.

  19. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-08-05

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  20. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  1. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-10-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  2. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  3. Measurement of in-plane magnetic relaxation in RE-123 coated conductors by use of scanning Hall probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiohara, K.; Higashikawa, K.; Inoue, M.; Kiss, T.; Iijima, Y.; Saitoh, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated electric field criterion of in-plane critical current density in a coated conductor characterized by scanning Hall-probe microscopy (SHPM). From remanent field distribution and its relaxation measurements, we could obtain critical current distribution and induced electric field simultaneously by considering the Biot-Savart law and the Faraday’s law, respectively. These results lead us to evaluate a distribution of local critical current density and the corresponding criterion of electric field. As a result, it was found that the electric field criterion for the SHPM analysis was several orders lower than that used in the conventional 4-probe resistive method. However, the data point obtained by the SHPM shows good agreement with E-J curve analytically extended from the measurements by the 4-probe method. This means that we could characterize in-plane distribution of critical current density in a coated conductor at an electric field criterion quantitatively by this method in a nondestructive manner. These findings will be very important information since the uniformity of local critical current density in a coated conductor at extremely low electric fields is a key issue (1) especially for DC applications, (2) for quality control of coated conductors, and (3) for the standardization of the characterization of critical current among different methods.

  4. Strain relaxation and enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenrui; Jiao, Liang; Li, Leigang; Jian, Jie; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Chu, Frank; Chen, Aiping; Jia, Quanxi; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-02-10

    Self-assembled BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (BFO:CFO) vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films have been fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The strain relaxation mechanism between BFO and CFO with a large lattice mismatch has been studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared nanocomposite films exhibit enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the BFO composition increases. Different anisotropy sources have been investigated, suggesting that spin-flop coupling between antiferromagnetic BFO and ferrimagnetic CFO plays a dominant role in enhancing the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy.

  5. Local CC2 response method based on the Laplace transform: orbital-relaxed first-order properties for excited states.

    PubMed

    Ledermüller, Katrin; Kats, Daniel; Schütz, Martin

    2013-08-28

    A multistate local CC2 response method for the calculation of orbital-relaxed first order properties is presented for ground and electronically excited states. It enables the treatment of excited state properties including orbital relaxation for extended molecular systems and is a major step on the way towards analytic gradients with respect to nuclear displacements. The Laplace transform method is employed to partition the eigenvalue problem and the lambda equations, i.e., the doubles parts of these equations are inverted on-the-fly, leaving only the corresponding effective singles equations to be solved iteratively. Furthermore, the state specific local approximations are adaptive. Density-fitting is utilized to decompose the electron-repulsion integrals. The accuracy of the local approximation is tested and the efficiency of the new code is demonstrated on the example of an organic sensitizer for solar-cell applications, which consists of about 100 atoms.

  6. Local CC2 response method based on the Laplace transform: Orbital-relaxed first-order properties for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledermüller, Katrin; Kats, Daniel; Schütz, Martin

    2013-08-01

    A multistate local CC2 response method for the calculation of orbital-relaxed first order properties is presented for ground and electronically excited states. It enables the treatment of excited state properties including orbital relaxation for extended molecular systems and is a major step on the way towards analytic gradients with respect to nuclear displacements. The Laplace transform method is employed to partition the eigenvalue problem and the lambda equations, i.e., the doubles parts of these equations are inverted on-the-fly, leaving only the corresponding effective singles equations to be solved iteratively. Furthermore, the state specific local approximations are adaptive. Density-fitting is utilized to decompose the electron-repulsion integrals. The accuracy of the local approximation is tested and the efficiency of the new code is demonstrated on the example of an organic sensitizer for solar-cell applications, which consists of about 100 atoms.

  7. Graphic analysis of relaxation times of enzyme-catalysed reactions. An extension of the graphic method of King and Altman.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, M

    1992-01-01

    An extension of the graphic method of King & Altman (1956) (J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378) is applied to the analysis of relaxation times of enzyme-catalysed reactions and a simple graphic method is presented. Clear-cut graphs, simple drawing, easy operation (without the need to perform the usual complex mathematical operations), and reliable results are the main characteristics of this kind of graphic method. A system of enzyme-catalysed reactions (E <--> ES <--> EP) is used as the actual example for illustrating the graphic method. PMID:1445198

  8. Magnetic relaxation of 1D coordination polymers (X)₂[Mn(acacen)Fe(CN)₆], X = Ph₄P⁺, Et₄N⁺.

    PubMed

    Rams, Michał; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Mironov, Vladimir S; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Vostrikova, Kira E

    2014-10-01

    Substitution of the organic cation X in the 1D polymer, (X)2[Mn(acacen)Fe(CN)6], leads to an essential change in magnetic behavior. Due to the presence of more voluminous Ph4P(+) cations, the polyanion has a more geometrically distorted chain skeleton and, as a consequence, enhanced single chain magnet (SCM) characteristics compared to those for Et4N(+). The Arrhenius relaxation energy barriers, the exchange interaction constant and the zero-field splitting anisotropy of Mn(III) are determined from the analysis of magnetic measurements. The discussion is supported with ligand field calculations for [Fe(CN)6](3-) that unveils the significant anisotropy of Fe magnetic moments.

  9. Synthesis, structure and properties of [Co(NCS)2(4-(4-chlorobenzyl)pyridine)2]n, that shows slow magnetic relaxations and a metamagnetic transition.

    PubMed

    Werner, Julia; Tomkowicz, Zbigniew; Rams, Michał; Ebbinghaus, Stefan G; Neumann, Tristan; Näther, Christian

    2015-08-21

    The reaction of Co(NCS)2 with 4-(4-chlorobenzyl)pyridine (ClBP) leads to the formation of Co(NCS)2(4-(4-chlorobenzyl)pyridine)4 () and [Co(NCS)2(4-(4-chlorobenzyl)pyridine)2]n (). In the crystal structure of the Co(ii) cations are octahedrally coordinated by two terminal bonded thiocyanato anions and four ClBP ligands, whereas in the Co(ii) cations are linked into chains by pairs of μ-1,3-bridging thiocyanato anions. Magnetic measurements of show an antiferromagnetic phase transition with TN = 3.9 K. A metamagnetic transition is observed at the critical magnetic field of 260 Oe. Magnetic relaxations in the zero field are consistent with single chain magnetic behavior. These results are compared with those obtained for similar compounds reported recently. PMID:26182402

  10. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants. PMID:27068539

  11. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants.

  12. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  13. The solution of the relaxation problem for the Boltzmann equation by the integral iteration method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limar, Y. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Boltzmann equation is considered in terms of the problem of relaxation of some initial distribution function which depends only on velocities, to Maxwell's distribution function. The Boltzmann equation is given for the relaxation problem in which the distribution function f(t, u, v) is time dependent and is also dependent on two other variables u and v (the velocities of rigid spherical molecules). An iteration process is discussed in which the velocity space u, v is subdivided into squares, the distribution function in each square being approximated by the second-order surface from the values of the distribution function at nine points. The set of all of these points forms a network of u, v values at the nodes of which the distribution function can be found.

  14. Real Gas Computation Using an Energy Relaxation Method and High-Order WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montarnal, Philippe; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we use a recently developed energy relaxation theory by Coquel and Perthame and high order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes to simulate the Euler equations of real gas. The main idea is an energy decomposition into two parts: one part is associated with a simpler pressure law and the other part (the nonlinear deviation) is convected with the flow. A relaxation process is performed for each time step to ensure that the original pressure law is satisfied. The necessary characteristic decomposition for the high order WENO schemes is performed on the characteristic fields based on the first part. The algorithm only calls for the original pressure law once per grid point per time step, without the need to compute its derivatives or any Riemann solvers. Both one and two dimensional numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  15. Numerical methods for TVD transport and coupled relaxing processes in gases and plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    The construction of second-order upwind schemes for nonequilibrium plasmas, for both one- and two-fluid formulations is demonstrated. Coupled relaxation processes, including ionization kinetics and radiative processes and their algorithms for nonequilibrium, multiple temperature conditions are described as well. The paper applies the numerical techniques on some simple test cases, points out critical problems and their solutions, and makes qualitative comparisons with known results, whenever possible.

  16. A theoretical study of rotational diffusion models for rod-shaped viruses. The influence of motion on 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    Information about the interaction between nucleic acids and coat proteins in intact virus particles may be obtained by studying the restricted backbone dynamics of the incapsulated nucleic acids using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this article, simulations are carried out to investigate how reorientation of a rod-shaped virus particle as a whole and isolated nucleic acid motions within the virion influence the 31P NMR lineshape and transversal relaxation dominated by the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy. Two opposite cases are considered on a theoretical level. First, isotropic rotational diffusion is used as a model for mobile nucleic acids that are loosely or partially bound to the protein coat. The effect of this type of diffusion on lineshape and transversal relaxation is calculated by solving the stochastic Liouville equation by an expansion in spherical functions. Next, uniaxial rotational diffusion is assumed to represent the mobility of phosphorus in a virion that rotates as a rigid rod about its length axis. This type of diffusion is approximated by an exchange process among discrete sites. As turns out from these simulations, the amplitude and the frequency of the motion can only be unequivocally determined from experimental data by a combined analysis of the lineshape and the transversal relaxation. In the fast motional region both the isotropic and the uniaxial diffusion model predict the same transversal relaxation as the Redfield theory. For very slow motion, transversal relaxation resembles the nonexponential relaxation as observed for water molecules undergoing translational diffusion in a magnetic field gradient. In this frequency region T2e is inversely proportional to the cube root of the diffusion coefficient. In addition to the isotropic and uniaxial diffusion models, a third model is presented, in which fast restricted nucleic acid backbone motions dominating the lineshape are superimposed on a slow rotation of the

  17. Strain-Field Evaluation of Strain-Relaxed Thin SiGe Layers Fabricated by Ion Implantation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawano, Kentarou; Ozawa, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Atsushi; Usami, Noritaka; Yamanaka, Junji; Suzuki, Kumiko; Arimoto, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Kiyokazu; Shiraki, Yasuhiro

    2005-10-01

    Strain-relaxed thin SiGe layers grown on ion-implanted Si substrates were evaluated by X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping and spatially resolved micro-Raman spectroscopy. It was found that implantation-induced defects effectively facilitated the misfit dislocation generation and multiplication during postannealing after growth, leading to large and homogeneous strain relaxation. While in-plane strain-field fluctuation with crosshatch morphology was clearly observed in the SiGe layer without implantation, a very uniform strain distribution without such morphology was realized in the sample with implantation. These results indicate that the ion implantation method is a very promising approach for realization of high-quality and extremely thin buffer layers.

  18. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  19. Two Polymorphic Forms of a Six-Coordinate Mononuclear Cobalt(II) Complex with Easy-Plane Anisotropy: Structural Features, Theoretical Calculations, and Field-Induced Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadip; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Vallejo, Julia; Cano, Joan; Colacio, Enrique; Bauza, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Kirillov, Alexander M; Drew, Michael G B; Das, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    A mononuclear cobalt(II) complex [Co(3,5-dnb)2(py)2(H2O)2] {3,5-Hdnb = 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid; py = pyridine} was isolated in two polymorphs, in space groups C2/c (1) and P21/c (2). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are not isostructural in spite of having equal formulas and ligand connectivity. In both structures, the Co(II) centers adopt octahedral {CoN2O4} geometries filled by pairs of mutually trans terminal 3,5-dnb, py, and water ligands. However, the structures of 1 and 2 disclose distinct packing patterns driven by strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds, leading to their 0D→2D (1) or 0D→1D (2) extension. The resulting two-dimensional layers and one-dimensional chains were topologically classified as the sql and 2C1 underlying nets, respectively. By means of DFT theoretical calculations, the energy variations between the polymorphs were estimated, and the binding energies associated with the noncovalent interactions observed in the crystal structures were also evaluated. The study of the direct-current magnetic properties, as well as ab initio calculations, reveal that both 1 and 2 present a strong easy-plane magnetic anisotropy (D > 0), which is larger for the latter polymorph (D is found to exhibit values between +58 and 117 cm(-1) depending on the method). Alternating current dynamic susceptibility measurements show that these polymorphs exhibit field-induced slow relaxation of the magnetization with Ueff values of 19.5 and 21.1 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The analysis of the whole magnetic data allows the conclusion that the magnetization relaxation in these polymorphs mainly takes place through a virtual excited state (Raman process). It is worth noting that despite the notable difference between the supramolecular networks of 1 and 2, they exhibit almost identical magnetization dynamics. This fact suggests that the relaxation process is intramolecular in nature and that the virtual state involved in the

  20. Two Polymorphic Forms of a Six-Coordinate Mononuclear Cobalt(II) Complex with Easy-Plane Anisotropy: Structural Features, Theoretical Calculations, and Field-Induced Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadip; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Vallejo, Julia; Cano, Joan; Colacio, Enrique; Bauza, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Kirillov, Alexander M; Drew, Michael G B; Das, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    A mononuclear cobalt(II) complex [Co(3,5-dnb)2(py)2(H2O)2] {3,5-Hdnb = 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid; py = pyridine} was isolated in two polymorphs, in space groups C2/c (1) and P21/c (2). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are not isostructural in spite of having equal formulas and ligand connectivity. In both structures, the Co(II) centers adopt octahedral {CoN2O4} geometries filled by pairs of mutually trans terminal 3,5-dnb, py, and water ligands. However, the structures of 1 and 2 disclose distinct packing patterns driven by strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds, leading to their 0D→2D (1) or 0D→1D (2) extension. The resulting two-dimensional layers and one-dimensional chains were topologically classified as the sql and 2C1 underlying nets, respectively. By means of DFT theoretical calculations, the energy variations between the polymorphs were estimated, and the binding energies associated with the noncovalent interactions observed in the crystal structures were also evaluated. The study of the direct-current magnetic properties, as well as ab initio calculations, reveal that both 1 and 2 present a strong easy-plane magnetic anisotropy (D > 0), which is larger for the latter polymorph (D is found to exhibit values between +58 and 117 cm(-1) depending on the method). Alternating current dynamic susceptibility measurements show that these polymorphs exhibit field-induced slow relaxation of the magnetization with Ueff values of 19.5 and 21.1 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The analysis of the whole magnetic data allows the conclusion that the magnetization relaxation in these polymorphs mainly takes place through a virtual excited state (Raman process). It is worth noting that despite the notable difference between the supramolecular networks of 1 and 2, they exhibit almost identical magnetization dynamics. This fact suggests that the relaxation process is intramolecular in nature and that the virtual state involved in the

  1. Method and apparatus for control of a magnetic structure

    DOEpatents

    Challenger, Michael P.; Valla, Arthur S.

    1996-06-18

    A method and apparatus for independently adjusting the spacing between opposing magnet arrays in charged particle based light sources. Adjustment mechanisms between each of the magnet arrays and the supporting structure allow the gap between the two magnet arrays to be independently adjusted. In addition, spherical bearings in the linkages to the magnet arrays permit the transverse angular orientation of the magnet arrays to also be adjusted. The opposing magnet arrays can be supported above the ground by the structural support.

  2. Thickness Dependence of Magnetic Relaxation and E-J Characteristics in Superconducting (Gd-Y)-Ba-Cu-O Films with Strong Vortex Pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Polat, Ozgur; Sinclair IV, John W; Zuev, Yuri L; Thompson, James R; Christen, David K; Cook, Sylvester W; Kumar, Dhananjay; Chen, Y; Selvamanickam, V.

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of the critical current density Jc on temperature, magnetic field, and film thickness has been investigated in (Gd-Y)BaCu-oxide materials of 0.7, 1.4, and 2.8 m thickness. Generally, the Jc decreases with film thickness at investigated temperatures and magnetic fields. The nature and strength of the pinning centers for vortices have been identified through angular and temperature measurements, respectively. These films do not exhibit c-axis correlated vortex pinning, but do have correlated defects oriented near the ab-planes. For all film thicknesses studied, strong pinning dominates at most temperatures. The vortex dynamics were investigated through magnetic relaxation studies in the temperature range of 5 77 K in 1 T and 3 T applied magnetic fields, H || surface-normal. The creep rate S is thickness dependent at high temperatures, implying that the pinning energy is also thickness dependent. Maley analyses of the relaxation data show an inverse power law variation for the effective pinning energy Ueff ~ (J0/J) . Finally, the electric field-current density (E-J) characteristics were determined over a wide range of dissipation by combining experimental results from transport, swept field magnetometry (VSM), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry. We develop a self-consistent model of the combined experimental results, leading to an estimation of the critical current density Jc0(T) in the absence of flux creep.

  3. Slow magnetic relaxation in four square-based pyramidal dysprosium hydroxo clusters ligated by chiral amino acid anions - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, Dominique T; Wagner, Anna T; Lan, Yanhua; Anson, Christopher E; Gamer, Michael T; Powell, Annie K; Roesky, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three chiral and one achiral amino acid anion ligated dysprosium hydroxo clusters [Dy5(OH)5(α-AA)4(Ph2acac)6] (α-AA = d-PhGly, l-Pro, l-Trp, Ph2Gly; Ph2acac = dibenzoylmethanide) are reported. The solid state structures were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction and show that five Dy(iii) ions are arranged in a square-based pyramidal geometry with NO7-donor-sets for the basal and O8-donor-sets for the apical Dy atom. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties were investigated for all four compounds and show a slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour below 10 K in all cases. The similar SMM behaviour observed for all four compounds suggests that the very similar coordination geometries seen for the dysprosium atoms in all members of this family, which are independent of the amino acid ligand used, play a decisive role in steering the contribution of the single ion anisotropies to the observed magnetic relaxation.

  4. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan; Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam; Qurishi, Yasrib

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxide–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01 g, 0.1 g, and 0.2 g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.

  5. Ferrohydrodynamic evaluation of rotational viscosity and relaxation in certain ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    A significant effect of aggregation dynamics for aqueous ferrofluid (AF) and kerosene based ferrofluid (KF) using magnetic field dependent capillary viscosity and magneto-optical relaxation measurements is studied. For better comparison parameters of AF and KF are kept similar. Ferrohydrodynamic equations of chain forming ferrofluids, dilute ferrofluids, and Brownian dynamic simulations are compared. It is observed that the rotational viscosity of AF is larger than that of KF due to field induced aggregates in it and strong dipolar interactions. It is also observed that at Ωτ ~ 0.04 both AF and KF viscosity becomes almost similar, suggesting similar behavior at that shear rate. The magneto-optical relaxation in AF exhibits nonexponential behavior when relaxed from higher magnetic field and follows irreversible thermodynamics, whereas for KF the relaxation is exponential and follows the effective field method. This discrepancy is explained based on aggregation dynamics of magnetic particles. Results are well described by the corresponding theoretical models. PMID:23005542

  6. Line relaxation methods for the solution of 2D and 3D compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, O.; Probert, E. J.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1993-01-01

    An implicit finite element based algorithm for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is outlined, and the solution of the resulting equation by a line relaxation on general meshes of triangles or tetrahedra is described. The problem of generating and adapting unstructured meshes for viscous flows is reexamined, and an approach for both 2D and 3D simulations is proposed. An efficient approach appears to be the use of an implicit/explicit procedure, with the implicit treatment being restricted to those regions of the mesh where viscous effects are known to be dominant. Numerical examples demonstrating the computational performance of the proposed techniques are given.

  7. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  8. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver metabolites in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats: T2 relaxation times in methylene protons.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyu-Ho; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Lee, Do-Wan; Choe, Bo-Young

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance as compared to other lipid resonances. The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated with a repetition time (TR) of 6000ms and echo time (TE) of 40-550ms. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a normal-chow (NC) and another eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high-fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T2 measurements in the rats' livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000ms and TE of 40-220ms. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R(2)). Chemical analyses of the phantom and livers were not performed, but T2 decay curves were acquired. The T2 relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.1±4.3ms; HF rats, 31.4±1.8ms (p<0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p<0.005). This study of (1)H MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio differences to characterize the T2 relaxation times of methylene resonance. (1)H MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease.

  9. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  10. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  11. Field-Induced Slow Magnetic Relaxation in the Ni(I) Complexes [NiCl(PPh3)2]·C4H8O and [Ni(N(SiMe3)2)(PPh3)2].

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiquan; Bodenstein, Tilmann; Mereacre, Valeriu; Fink, Karin; Eichhöfer, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Direct current (dc) and alternating current (ac) magnetic measurements have been performed on the three Ni(I) complexes: [NiCl(PPh3)3], [NiCl(PPh3)2]·C4H8O, and [Ni(N(SiMe3)2)(PPh3)2]. Fits of the dc magnetic data suggest an almost similar behavior of the three compounds, which display only moderate deviations from the spin-only values. The ac magnetic investigations reveal that the two complexes with trigonal planar coordination--[NiCl(PPh3)2]·C4H8O and [Ni(N(SiMe3)2)(PPh3)2]--display slow magnetic relaxation at low temperatures under applied dc fields, whereas tetrahedral [NiCl(PPh3)3] does not. Ground and excited states as well as magnetic data were calculated by ab initio wave function based multi-configurational methods, including dynamic correlation as well as spin-orbit coupling. The two trigonal planar complexes comprise well-isolated S = (1)/2 ground states, whereas two S = (1)/2 states with a splitting of less than 100 cm(-1) were found in the tetrahedral compound.

  12. Relaxation selective pulses in fast relaxing systems.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christopher J; Lu, Wei; Walls, Jamie D

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the selectivity or sharpness of the saturation profiles for relaxation selective pulses (R^rsps) that suppress magnetization possessing relaxation times of T2=T2(rsp) and T1=αT2 for α∈12,∞ was optimized. Along with sharpening the selectivity of the R^rsps, the selective saturation of these pulses was also optimized to be robust to both B0 and B1 inhomogeneities. Frequency-swept hyperbolic secant and adiabatic time-optimal saturation pulse inputs were found to work best in the optimizations, and the pulse lengths required to selectivity saturate the magnetization were always found to be less than the inversion recovery delay, T1ln(2). The selectivity of the optimized relaxation selective pulses was experimentally demonstrated in aqueous solutions with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic species, [Mn(+2)], and for use in solvent suppression. Finally, the "rotational" properties of spin relaxation were explored along with an analytical derivation of adiabatic time-optimal saturation pulses. PMID:24631803

  13. A Fast Method of Transforming Relaxation Functions Into the Frequency Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mopsik, Frederick I.

    1999-01-01

    The limits to the error due to truncation of the numeric integration of the one-sided Laplace transform of a relaxation function in the time domain into its equivalent frequency domain are established. Separate results are given for large and small ω. These results show that, for a given ω, only a restricted range of time samples is needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. These results are then combined with a known error estimate for integration by cubic splines to give a good estimate for the number of points needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. For a given data window between t1 and t2, the computation time is shown to be proportional to ln(t1/t2).

  14. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation. PMID:26961387

  15. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the calcaneus: preliminary assessment of trabecular bone-dependent regional variations in marrow relaxation time compared with dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guglielmi, G.; Selby, K.; Blunt, B. A.; Jergas, M.; Newitt, D. C.; Genant, H. K.; Majumdar, S.

    1996-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Marrow transverse relaxation time (T2*) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be related to the density and structure of the surrounding trabecular network. We investigated regional variations of T2* in the human calcaneus and compared the findings with bone mineral density (BMD), as measured by dual X-ray absorpiometry (DXA). Short- and long-term precisions were evaluated first to determine whether MR imaging would be useful for the clinical assessment of disease status and progression in osteoporosis. METHODS: Gradient-recalled echo MR images of the calcaneus were acquired at 1.5 T from six volunteers. Measurements of T2* were compared with BMD and (for one volunteer) conventional radiography. RESULTS: T2* values showed significant regional variation; they typically were shortest in the superior region of the calcaneus. There was a linear correlation between MR and DXA measurements (r = .66 for 1/T2* versus BMD). Differences in T2* attributable to variations in analysis region-of-interest placement were not significant for five of the six volunteers. Sagittal MR images had short- and long-term precision errors of 4.2% and 3.3%, respectively. For DXA, the precision was 1.3% (coefficient of variation). CONCLUSION: MR imaging may be useful for trabecular bone assessment in the calcaneus. However, given the large regional variations in bone density and structure, the choice of an ROI is likely to play a major role in the accuracy, precision, and overall clinical efficacy of T2* measurements.

  17. Calorimetric method for the determination of Curie temperatures of magnetic nanoparticles in dispersion.

    PubMed

    Nica, V; Sauer, H M; Embs, J; Hempelmann, R

    2008-05-21

    Mn(x)Zn(1-x)Fe(2)O(4)-based magnetic fluids with x = 0.1-0.9 are synthesized by coprecipitation. The samples are heated in a radio frequency (rf) magnetic field using an rf generator at different powers, and the temperature is measured as function of time using an optical thermometer. The heating effect of the dispersed magnetic nanoparticles is proportional to the imaginary part of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of the ferrofluid, a quantity that depends on the temperature through the magnetization of the ferrite nanoparticles and the Néel or Brownian relaxation times, respectively. We propose an extrapolation method to actuate the Curie temperatures of the dispersed magnetic nanoparticles. By means of appropriate fitting functions for (dT/dt) versus T for both the heating and the cooling process, we deduce the Curie temperature of the samples under investigation. For Mn(x)Zn(1-x)Fe(2)O(4)-based magnetic nanoparticles the Curie temperatures decrease with increasing Zn content. They turn out to be lower than the literature values for bulk Mn(x)Zn(1-x)Fe(2)O(4), a phenomenon which is generally observed for phase transitions of nanocrystalline materials.

  18. Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the mechanisms of nuclear magnetic relaxation, and applications of relaxation times. The measurement of spin-lattice relaxations is reviewed. It is stressed that sophisticated techniques such as these are becoming more important to the working chemist. (CW)

  19. Magnetic Field-Independent Onset of Vortex Pinning up to 28 T by ^17O Spin-spin Relaxation in YBa_2Cu_3O_7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, H. N.; Mitrovic, V. F.; Reyes, A. P.; Halperin, W. P.; Kleinhammes, A.; Kuhns, P.; Moulton, W. G.

    1998-03-01

    We report spin-spin relaxation measurements (T_2) up to 28 T. The data confirm a field-independent pinning temperature from ≈10 T up to 28 T for aligned YBa_2Cu_3O7 powder. Below ≈10 T the pinning temperature is field-dependent, and is consistent with the melting temperature of clean, untwinned YBCO crystals (Reyes, et al.), Phys. Rev. B, 55, R14737, (1997).. Spectrum analysis shows that above ≈10 T the pinning temperature is field-independent, occurring at 80 K (H. N. Bachman, et al.), Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 42, 661, (1997).. Spin-spin relaxation probes the z-axis fluctuations in magnetic field which arise from copper and oxygen spin fluctuations (T1 processes) and field fluctuations from vortices. The vortex contribution is observable only for vortices locally fluctuating in the pinned or frozen state. The vortex field fluctuations have a lorentzian spectral density, in contrast to the normal state relaxation which is well described by a gaussian. Work at Northwestern University is supported by the NSF (DMR 91-20000) through the Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity. The NHMFL is supported through the NSF and the state of Florida.

  20. A Calculation Method of Induction Heating Processes in Magnetic Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    Various phenomena in induction heating of magnetic metals are investigated by using a multi-physics simulation method. A new theoretical treatment of kHz frequency magnetic permeability including the hysteresis characteristics is proposed to calculate the induction heating (IH) processes in magnetic metals. The complex phenomena of skin effects, heat emission, resistivity and magnetization in the heated metals are investigated, where the devised methods are applicable to various magnetic investigations. An estimation method is proposed as the retarded-trace method for analyzing the time dependent B-H characteristics.

  1. Method of magnetic separation and apparatus therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, Robin R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for magnetically separating and collecting particulate matter fractions of a raw sample according to relative magnetic susceptibilities of each fraction so collected is disclosed. The separation apparatus includes a splitter which is used in conjunction with a magnetic separator for achieving the desired fractionation.

  2. [Gastric magnetic resonance study (methods, semiotics)].

    PubMed

    Stashuk, G A

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows the potentialities of gastric study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The methodic aspects of gastric study have been worked out. The MRI-semiotics of the unchanged and tumor-affected wall of the stomach and techniques in examining patients with gastric cancer of various sites are described. Using the developed procedure, MRI was performed in 199 patients, including 154 patients with gastric pathology and 45 control individuals who had no altered gastric wall. Great emphasis is placed on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of endophytic (diffuse) gastric cancer that is of priority value in its morphological structure. MRI was found to play a role in the diagnosis of the spread of a tumorous process both along the walls of the stomach and to its adjacent anatomic structures.

  3. Positron annihilation and relaxation dynamics from dielectric spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance: Cis-trans-1,4-poly(butadiene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoš, J.; Šauša, O.; Schwartz, G. A.; Alegría, A.; Alberdi, J. M.; Arbe, A.; Krištiak, J.; Colmenero, J.

    2011-04-01

    We report a joint analysis of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on cis-trans-1,4-poly(butadiene) (c-t-1,4-PBD). Phenomenological analysis of the orthopositronium lifetime τ3 - T dependence by linear fitting reveals four characteristic PALS temperatures: T_{b1} ^G = 0{.63}T_g^{PALS}, T_g^{PALS}, T_{b1} ^L = 1.22T_g^{PALS}, and T_{b2} ^L = 1.52T_g^{PALS}. Slight bend effects in the glassy and supercooled liquid states are related to the fast or slow secondary β process, from neutron scattering, respectively, the latter being connected with the trans-isomers. In addition, the first bend effect in the supercooled liquid coincides with a deviation of the slow effective secondary βeff relaxation related to the cis-isomers from low-T Arrhenius behavior to non-Arrhenius one and correlates with the onset of the primary α process from BDS. The second plateau effect in the liquid state occurs when τ3 becomes commensurable with the structural relaxation time τα(Tb2). It is also approximately related to its crossover from non-Arrhenius to Arrhenius regime in the combined BDS and NMR data. Finally, the combined BDS and NMR structural relaxation data, when analyzed in terms of the two-order parameter (TOP) model, suggest the influence of solidlike domains on both the annihilation behavior and the local and segmental chain mobility in the supercooled liquid. All these findings indicate the influence of the dynamic heterogeneity in both the primary and secondary relaxations due to the cis-trans isomerism in c-t-1,4-PBD and their impact into the PALS response.

  4. Selection of Genetic and Phenotypic Features Associated with Inflammatory Status of Patients on Dialysis Using Relaxed Linear Separability Method

    PubMed Central

    Bobrowski, Leon; Łukaszuk, Tomasz; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Heimburger, Olof; Axelsson, Jonas; Bárány, Peter; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Luttropp, Karin; Debowska, Malgorzata; Nordfors, Louise; Schalling, Martin; Waniewski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Identification of risk factors in patients with a particular disease can be analyzed in clinical data sets by using feature selection procedures of pattern recognition and data mining methods. The applicability of the relaxed linear separability (RLS) method of feature subset selection was checked for high-dimensional and mixed type (genetic and phenotypic) clinical data of patients with end-stage renal disease. The RLS method allowed for substantial reduction of the dimensionality through omitting redundant features while maintaining the linear separability of data sets of patients with high and low levels of an inflammatory biomarker. The synergy between genetic and phenotypic features in differentiation between these two subgroups was demonstrated. PMID:24489753

  5. Simulation of acoustic wave propagation in dispersive media with relaxation losses by using FDTD method with PML absorbing boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Borup, D; Wiskin, J; Berggren, M; Johnson, S A

    1999-01-01

    We present a method to incorporate the relaxation dominated attenuation into the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation of acoustic wave propagation in complex media. A dispersive perfectly matched layer (DPML) boundary condition, which is suitable for boundary matching to such a dispersive media whole space, is also proposed to truncate the FDTD simulation domain. The numerical simulation of a Ricker wavelet propagating in a dispersive medium, described by second-order Debye model, shows that the Ricker wavelet is attenuated in amplitude and expanded in time in its course of propagation, as required by Kramers-Kronig relations. The numerical results also are compared to exact solution showing that the dispersive FDTD method is accurate and that the DPML boundary condition effectively dampens reflective waves. The method presented here is applicable to the simulation of ultrasonic instrumentation for medical imaging and other nondestructive testing problems with frequency dependent, attenuating media.

  6. A relaxation method for the energy and morphology of grain boundaries and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnels, Brandon; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The energy density of crystal interfaces exhibits a characteristic "cusp" structure that renders it non-convex. Furthermore, crystal interfaces are often observed to be faceted, i.e., to be composed of flat facets in alternating directions. In this work, we forge a connection between these two observations by positing that the faceted morphology of crystal interfaces results from energy minimization. Specifically, we posit that the lack of convexity of the interfacial energy density drives the development of finely faceted microstructures and accounts for their geometry and morphology. We formulate the problem as a generalized minimal surface problem couched in a geometric measure-theoretical framework. We then show that the effective, or relaxed, interfacial energy density, with all possible interfacial morphologies accounted for, corresponds to the convexification of the bare or unrelaxed interfacial energy density, and that the requisite convexification can be attained by means of a faceting construction. We validate the approach by means of comparisons with experiment and atomistic simulations including symmetric and asymmetric tilt boundaries in face-centered cubic (FCC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals. By comparison with simulated and experimental data, we show that this simple model of interfacial energy combined with a general microstructure construction based on convexification is able to replicate complex interfacial morphologies, including thermally induced morphological transitions.

  7. Irradiation Creep of Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide as Estimated by Bend Stress Relaxation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Kohyama, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The bend stress relaxation technique was applied for an irradiation creep study of high purity, chemically vapor-deposited beta-phase silicon carbide (CVD SiC) ceramic. A constant bend strain was applied to thin strip samples during neutron irradiation to fluences 0.2-4.2 dpa at various temperatures in the range {approx}400 to {approx}1080 C. Irradiation creep strain at <0.7 dpa exhibited only a weak dependence on irradiation temperature. However, the creep strain dependence on fluence was non-linear due to the early domination of the initial transient creep, and a transition in creep behavior was found between 950 and 1080 C. Steady-state irradiation creep compliances of polycrystalline CVD SiC at doses >0.7 dpa were estimated to be 2.7({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -7} and 1.5({+-}0.8) x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} at {approx}600 to {approx}950 C and {approx}1080 C, respectively, whereas linear-averaged creep compliances of 1-2 x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} were obtained for doses of 0.6-0.7 dpa at all temperatures. Monocrystalline 3C SiC samples exhibited significantly smaller transient creep strain and greater subsequent deformation when loaded along <0 1 1> direction.

  8. Magnetic relaxation in Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 single crystals by SQUID magnetometer and micro-Hall sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Kim, Heon-Jung; Kang, W. N.; Zang, Dong-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ik; Kim, D. H.

    2003-10-01

    Measurements of the isothermal magnetization hysteresis loops M(H) and the magnetic relaxation for a Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 single crystal were carried out by using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer and a micro-Hall sensor. In the temperature window from 30 to 60 K, the measurements for M(H) show a second anomalous peak at a field Hsp and an onset field of Hon. From these relaxation data measured by two different techniques, the activation barrier U0 and the creep exponent μ were separately calculated as functions of H based on the weak collective pinning theory. The variation of the normalized creep rate, S=(|d ln M/d ln t|), with H is also presented. The results at T=35 K indicate that at a characteristic field H* lying between Hon and Hsp, a minimum is observed in S(H) whereas a maximum is observed in U0(H). These analyses also show that below H*, the creep phenomenon is controlled by an elastic process. However, above Hsp a negative power law, U0(H)∝Hν with ν˜-0.9, is observed suggesting the existence of plastic creep. At a low temperature of T=20 K, where no second peak is observed, both S(H) and U0(H) behave differently. A comparative study of the different creep parameters obtained from the two different measurement techniques is also discussed.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method using mixture of fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angadi, V. Jagadeesha; Rudraswamy, B.; Sadhana, K.; Praveena, K.

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis and magnetic investigation Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 with stoichiometry (x=0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 and 1.0) were synthesized by solution combustion method using mixture of fuel this is first of its kind. As synthesized Mn-Zn nanoferrites were characterized by X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. The magnetic domain relaxation was investigated by inductance spectroscopy (IS) and the observed magnetic domain relaxation frequency (fr) was increased with the increase in grain size. The Room temperature magnetic properties were studied using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It was observed that the real and imaginary part of permeability (μ‧ and μ″), saturation magnetization (Ms), remanance magnetization (Mr) and magneton number (Mr/Ms) were decreases gradually with increasing Zn2+ concentration. The decrease in the saturation magnetization may be explained as, the Zn2+ concentration increases the relative number of ferric ions on the A sites diminishes and this reduces the A-B interaction. Hence synthesized materials are good for high frequency applications.

  10. Nonlinear Boltzmann equation for the homogeneous isotropic case: Some improvements to deterministic methods and applications to relaxation towards local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, P.

    2011-03-01

    Boltzmann equation is one the most powerful paradigms for explaining transport phenomena in fluids. Since early fifties, it received a lot of attention due to aerodynamic requirements for high altitude vehicles, vacuum technology requirements and nowadays, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMs). Because of the intrinsic mathematical complexity of the problem, Boltzmann himself started his work by considering first the case when the distribution function does not depend on space (homogeneous case), but only on time and the magnitude of the molecular velocity (isotropic collisional integral). The interest with regards to the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation goes beyond simple dilute gases. In the so-called econophysics, a Boltzmann type model is sometimes introduced for studying the distribution of wealth in a simple market. Another recent application of the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation is given by opinion formation modeling in quantitative sociology, also called socio-dynamics or sociophysics. The present work [1] aims to improve the deterministic method for solving homogenous isotropic Boltzmann equation proposed by Aristov [2] by two ideas: (a) the homogeneous isotropic problem is reformulated first in terms of particle kinetic energy (this allows one to ensure exact particle number and energy conservation during microscopic collisions) and (b) a DVM-like correction (where DVM stands for Discrete Velocity Model) is adopted for improving the relaxation rates (this allows one to satisfy exactly the conservation laws at macroscopic level, which is particularly important for describing the late dynamics in the relaxation towards the equilibrium).

  11. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 1: One-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for solving a large class of two- and three-dimensional nonseparable elliptic partial differential equations (PDE's) is developed and tested. It uses a modified D'Yakanov-Gunn iterative procedure in which the relaxation factor is grid-point dependent. It is easy to implement and applicable to a variety of boundary conditions. It is also computationally efficient, as indicated by the results of numerical comparisons with other established methods. Furthermore, the current algorithm has the advantage of possessing two important properties which the traditional iterative methods lack; that is: (1) the convergence rate is relatively insensitive to grid-cell size and aspect ratio, and (2) the convergence rate can be easily estimated by using the coefficient of the PDE being solved.

  12. Slow relaxation of the magnetization in an Isostructural series of Zinc-lanthanide complexes: an integrated EPR and AC susceptibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Asma; Madalan, Augustin; Andruh, Marius; Caneschi, Andrea; Sorace, Lorenzo; University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Bucharest, Romania Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Lanthanide based molecular complexes have shown potential to behave as single molecule magnets proficient to function above cryogenic temperatures. In this work we explore the dynamics of one such family, [Zn(LH)2Ln](NO3)3 .6H2O - (Ln = Nd3+, Dy3+, Tb3+, Ho3+, Er3+, Yb3+) . The series has a single lanthanide ion as a magnetic center in a low symmetry environment; the dynamics and energy landscape of the series is explored using X-band EPR, AC and DC susceptibility over a range of temperature, field and frequency. DC magnetic data show χT value consistent with expected behavior. EPR spectra for Er3+ and Yb3+ complexes shows EPR spectra typical for easy-plane and quasi-isotropic systems respectively, thus explaining the lack of out of phase susceptibility even in an external applied filed. However, Dy3+ derivative show slow relaxation of the magnetization in zero field up to 15 K and is, accordingly EPR silent.

  13. Computational electromagnetic methods for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis J.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used both as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience and as a FDA approved treatment for depression. During TMS, coils positioned near the scalp generate electric fields and activate targeted brain regions. In this thesis, several computational electromagnetics methods that improve the analysis, design, and uncertainty quantification of TMS systems were developed. Analysis: A new fast direct technique for solving the large and sparse linear system of equations (LSEs) arising from the finite difference (FD) discretization of Maxwell's quasi-static equations was developed. Following a factorization step, the solver permits computation of TMS fields inside realistic brain models in seconds, allowing for patient-specific real-time usage during TMS. The solver is an alternative to iterative methods for solving FD LSEs, often requiring run-times of minutes. A new integral equation (IE) method for analyzing TMS fields was developed. The human head is highly-heterogeneous and characterized by high-relative permittivities (107). IE techniques for analyzing electromagnetic interactions with such media suffer from high-contrast and low-frequency breakdowns. The novel high-permittivity and low-frequency stable internally combined volume-surface IE method developed. The method not only applies to the analysis of high-permittivity objects, but it is also the first IE tool that is stable when analyzing highly-inhomogeneous negative permittivity plasmas. Design: TMS applications call for electric fields to be sharply focused on regions that lie deep inside the brain. Unfortunately, fields generated by present-day Figure-8 coils stimulate relatively large regions near the brain surface. An optimization method for designing single feed TMS coil-arrays capable of producing more localized and deeper stimulation was developed. Results show that the coil-arrays stimulate 2.4 cm into the head while stimulating 3

  14. Pentanuclear heterometallic {Ni2Ln3} (Ln = Gd, Dy, Tb, Ho) assemblies. Single-molecule magnet behavior and multistep relaxation in the dysprosium derivative.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli; Bag, Prasenjit; Kroener, Wolfgang; Gieb, Klaus; Müller, Paul

    2013-11-18

    The reaction between Ln(III) chloride and NiCl2·4H2O salts in presence of a multidentate sterically unencumbered ligand, (E)-2,2'-(2-hydroxy-3-((2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-5-methylbenzylazanediyl)diethanol (LH4) leads to the synthesis of four isostructural pentanuclear hetereometallic complexes [Ni2Dy3(LH)4]Cl (1), [Ni2Gd3(LH)4]Cl (2), [Ni2Tb3(LH)3(LH2)]Cl2 (3), [Ni2 Ho3 (LH)3 (LH2)]Cl2 (4) with unprecedented topology. Here the two compounds 1 are 2 are monocationic and crystallize in chiral space group, P2(1)2(1)2(1) whereas compounds 3 and 4 are dicationic and crystallize in achiral space group P2(1)/n. The total metal framework, {Ni2Ln3} unit is held by four triply deprotonated ligands [LH](3-) in 1 and 2 whereas in case of 3 and 4 three triply deprotonated [LH](3-) and one doubly deprotonated [LH2](2-) ligands are involved. In these complexes both the lanthanide ions and the nickel(II) ions are doubly bridged and the bridging is composed of oxygen atoms derived from either phenolate or ethoxide groups. The analysis of SQUID measurements reveal a high magnetic ground state and a slow relaxation of the magnetization with two relaxation regimes for 1. For the thermally activated regime we found an effective energy barrier of U(eff) = 85 K. Micro Hall probe loop measurements directly proof the single-molecule magnet (SMM) nature of 1 with a blocking temperature of T(B) = 3 K and an open hysteresis for sweep rates faster than 50 mT/s. PMID:24236759

  15. A method for embedding circular force-free flux ropes in potential magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V. S.; Török, T.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for constructing approximate force-free equilibria in pre-eruptive configurations in which a thin force-free flux rope is embedded into a locally bipolar-type potential magnetic field. The flux rope is assumed to have a circular-arc axis, a circular cross-section, and electric current that is either concentrated in a thin layer at the boundary of the rope or smoothly distributed across it with a maximum of the current density at the center. The entire solution is described in terms of the magnetic vector potential in order to facilitate the implementation of the method in numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes that evolve the vector potential rather than the magnetic field itself. The parameters of the flux rope can be chosen so that its subsequent MHD relaxation under photospheric line-tied boundary conditions leads to nearly exact numerical equilibria. To show the capabilities of our method, we apply it to several cases with different ambient magnetic fields and internal flux-rope structures. These examples demonstrate that the proposed method is a useful tool for initializing data-driven simulations of solar eruptions.

  16. Controlled Source Magnetics: A Method for Imaging High-resolution Near-surface Magnetic Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, K.; Lee, K. H.; Oh, S.; Seol, S. J.; Byun, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic property in subsurface has been a target of the magnetic method for a wide variety of geophysical applications in mineral, hydrocarbon, groundwater, and environmental arenas. Anomalous magnetic property also affects controlled source electromagnetic (EM) data due to source-driven induced magnetization. At very low frequencies, a few to tens of hertz, the EM response predominantly consists of static-like magnetic field due to induced magnetization. Taking advantage of this property we have developed a numerical procedure to image subsurface magnetic heterogeneity with much improved resolutions. Incidentally, sensitivities of commercially available sensors and geomagnetic noise spectra at these frequencies are reasonably manageable compared to the anticipated magnetic field strength generated by numerical modeling. We, in this study, show that the resolution of three-dimensional inversion result(s) of controlled source magnetic data (fig. 1(a)) is better than that of geomagnetic data (fig. 1(b)). This is because use of EM excitations from different directions reduces non-uniqueness of inverse problem. These results show that a controlled source magnetic method can be a useful exploration tool when higher resolution of magnetic property is needed or strong remnant magnetization hinders the interpretation of magnetic method.

  17. Practical method using superposition of individual magnetic fields for initial arrangement of undulator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Shioya, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have developed a practical method for determining an excellent initial arrangement of magnetic arrays for a pure-magnet Halbach-type undulator. In this method, the longitudinal magnetic field distribution of each magnet is measured using a moving Hall probe system along the beam axis with a high positional resolution. The initial arrangement of magnetic arrays is optimized and selected by analyzing the superposition of all distribution data in order to achieve adequate spectral quality for the undulator. We applied this method to two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), called U#16-2 and U#02-2, at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The measured field distribution of the undulator was demonstrated to be excellent for the initial arrangement of the magnet array, and this method saved a great deal of effort in adjusting the magnetic fields of EPUs.

  18. 31P NMR relaxation of cortical bone mineral at multiple magnetic field strengths and levels of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wright, Alexander C; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Ong, Henry H; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-09-01

    Recent work has shown that solid-state (1) H and (31) P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, (31) P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. In this work, (31) P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2 * (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5-11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. (31) P T2 * was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 µs to 98.0 ± 1.4 µs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the (31) P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to (1) H-(31) P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for (31) P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Despite the steep decrease in the T2 */T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as B0 (0.4) for sample-dominated noise and as B0 (1.1) for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  19. A temperature relaxation method for the measurement of the specific heat of solids at room temperature in student laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, E.; Delgado-Vasallo, O.; Valiente, H.

    2003-10-01

    A laboratory experiment is described which employs a relaxation method for the measurement of the specific heat at constant pressure of solids at room temperature. The experiment employs measurements of the cooling (or heating) rate of a sample whose temperature differs from that of the surroundings due to light heating. This rate depends on the temperature difference, the specific heat of the sample and the heat transfer coefficient. The sample is suspended adiabatically in a reservoir in which a vacuum can be made. The influence of heat dissipation by convection on the results is discussed for the first time for this kind of experiment. The theoretical aspects related to the described technique involve concepts from several branches of physics that makes the experiment of interest and suitable for students at undergraduate and graduate levels of physics, material sciences and engineering.

  20. Asymmetric MRI magnet design using a hybrid numerical method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Crozier, S; Doddrell, D M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes a hybrid numerical method for the design of asymmetric magnetic resonance imaging magnet systems. The problem is formulated as a field synthesis and the desired current density on the surface of a cylinder is first calculated by solving a Fredholm equation of the first kind. Nonlinear optimization methods are then invoked to fit practical magnet coils to the desired current density. The field calculations are performed using a semi-analytical method. A new type of asymmetric magnet is proposed in this work. The asymmetric MRI magnet allows the diameter spherical imaging volume to be positioned close to one end of the magnet. The main advantages of making the magnet asymmetric include the potential to reduce the perception of claustrophobia for the patient, better access to the patient by attending physicians, and the potential for reduced peripheral nerve stimulation due to the gradient coil configuration. The results highlight that the method can be used to obtain an asymmetric MRI magnet structure and a very homogeneous magnetic field over the central imaging volume in clinical systems of approximately 1.2 m in length. Unshielded designs are the focus of this work. This method is flexible and may be applied to magnets of other geometries.

  1. A Comparison of Methods to Measure the Magnetic Moment of Magnetotactic Bacteria through Analysis of Their Trajectories in External Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Fradin, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria possess organelles called magnetosomes that confer a magnetic moment on the cells, resulting in their partial alignment with external magnetic fields. Here we show that analysis of the trajectories of cells exposed to an external magnetic field can be used to measure the average magnetic dipole moment of a cell population in at least five different ways. We apply this analysis to movies of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, and compare the values of the magnetic moment obtained in this way to that obtained by direct measurements of magnetosome dimension from electron micrographs. We find that methods relying on the viscous relaxation of the cell orientation give results comparable to that obtained by magnetosome measurements, whereas methods relying on statistical mechanics assumptions give systematically lower values of the magnetic moment. Since the observed distribution of magnetic moments in the population is not sufficient to explain this discrepancy, our results suggest that non-thermal random noise is present in the system, implying that a magnetotactic bacterial population should not be considered as similar to a paramagnetic material. PMID:24349185

  2. Projecting Whole--Body Future Patterns--The Field Anomaly Relaxation (FAR) Method. Memorandum Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhyne, Russell F.

    As one of a series of reports in progress, this report is introduced with a discussion of the concepts underlying long-range planning of any kind, and the methods of research used to describe alternative patterns of evolution or change within various policy fields. The FAR method, which emerged out of the Contingent U.S. Patterns (CUSPs) analysis…

  3. High-pressure nuclear-magnetic-resonance study of carbon-13 relaxation in 2-ethylhexyl benzoate and 2-ethylhexyl cyclohexanecarboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamy, S. T.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Masuda, Y.; Campbell, D.; Jonas, J.

    1991-03-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times and 13G-1H nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) times of 2-ethyl hexylbenzoate (EHB) and 2-ethyl hexylcyclohexanecarboxylate (EHC) have been measured along isotherms of -20, 0, 20, 40, and 80 °C at pressures of 1-5000 bars using high-pressure, high-resolution NMR techniques. The ability to use pressure as an experimental variable has allowed us to study a wide range of molecular motions from extreme narrowing into the slow motional regime. In addition, the high-resolution capability even at high pressure permits the measurement of 13C and NOE for each individual carbon in the molecules studied. Relaxation in both molecules is successfully analyzed in terms of a model assuming a Cole-Davidson distribution of correlation times. The comparison of parameters used in the model demonstrates the increased flexibility of the EHC ring over the EHB ring and also shows how the presence of the flexible ring contributes to the increased over-all mobility of the EHC molecule. The analysis of molecular reorientations in terms of activation volumes also indicates that EHB motion is highly restricted at low temperature.

  4. An Agent-based Transportation Route Planning Method for Led Fabricating Line and Its Evaluation Using Lagrangian Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Tatsushi; Sotobayashi, Ken; Ando, Masakazu; Konishi, Masami

    In most of Light Emitting Diode (LED) semiconductor fabricating line, AGVs (Automated Guided Vehicles) are used to transport the products between the facilities in order to ensure dust-free operation in the transportation systems. It has been demanded to realize the route planning system which speedily derives a feasible transportation route so that each AGV does not interfere with other AGVs. In this paper, we applied an agent-based optimization method for the route planning problems with multiple AGVs in LED fabricating bay in which the total transportation time is minimized. In the agent-based method, each AGV agent independently searches its candidate of route. The imitated pheromone is effectively used to generate the route which avoids the collision among AGVs. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the lower bound of the original problem is obtained by using the Lagrangian relaxation technique. The performances of the proposed method are evaluated by using the value of duality gap for a large scale problem. The effectiveness of the agent-based optimization method is demonstrated.

  5. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  6. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  7. A comparison of magnetic resonance methods for spatially resolved T2 distribution measurements in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Marica, F.; Newling, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Naturally occurring porous media are usually characterized by a distribution of pore sizes. If the material is fluid saturated, the 1H magnetic resonance (MR) signal depends on the pore size, the surface relaxivity and the fluid itself. Measurement of the transverse relaxation time T2 is a well-established technique to characterize material samples by means of MR. T2 distribution measurements, including T2 distribution mapping, are widely employed in clinical applications and in petroleum engineering. T2 distribution measurements are the most basic measurement employed to determine the fluid-matrix properties in MR core analysis. Three methods for T2 distribution mapping, namely spin-echo single point imaging (SE-SPI), DANTE-Z Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and adiabatic inversion CPMG are compared in terms of spatial resolution, minimum observable T2 and sensitivity. Bulk CPMG measurement is considered to be the gold standard for T2 determination. Bulk measurement of uniform samples is compared to the three spatially resolved measurements. SE-SPI is an imaging method, which measures spatially resolved T2s in samples of interest. A variant is introduced in this work that employs pre-equalized magnetic field gradient waveforms and is therefore able to measure shorter T2s than previously reported. DANTE-Z CPMG and adiabatic inversion CPMG are faster, non-imaging, local T2 distribution measurements. The DANTE-Z pulse train and adiabatic inversion pulse are compared in terms of T1 or T2 relaxation time effects during the RF pulse application, minimum pulse duration, requisite RF pulse power, and inversion profile quality. In addition to experimental comparisons, simulation results are presented.

  8. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, Stefan L.

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180.degree. from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180.degree. from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils.

  9. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, S.L.

    1990-02-13

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180[degree] from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180[degree] from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils. 16 figs.

  10. Chemical method of filling carbon nanotubes with magnetic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifu, Dereje; Hijji, Yousef; Hirsch, Gary; Karna, Shashi P.

    A versatile chemical method is used to fill multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with magnetic material. The process appears to open up tips of 100% of MWCNTs that are observed but the filling yield is rather low. The filling yield improved greatly by introducing metal chelating polymer, chitosan, in the nanotubes. Mössbauer measurements of the filled MWCNTs suggest the presence of magnetic and non-magnetic phases of Fe nanoparticles. The hyperfine magnetic field of the magnetic phase increased from its room temperature value of 182-251 kOe at 20 K.

  11. 3D chiral and 2D achiral cobalt(ii) compounds constructed from a 4-(benzimidazole-1-yl)benzoic ligand exhibiting field-induced single-ion-magnet-type slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Lin; Liu, Cai-Ming; Du, Zi-Yi; Chen, Li-Li; Liu, Qing-Yan

    2016-05-01

    Organizing magnetically isolated 3d transition metal ions, which behave as single-ion magnet (SIM) units, in a coordination network is a promising approach to design novel single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Herein 3D chiral and 2D achiral cobalt(ii) coordination compounds based on single metal nodes with a 4-(benzimidazole-1-yl)benzoic acid (Hbmzbc) ligand, namely, [Co(bmzbc)2(1,2-etdio)]n () (1,2-etdio = 1,2-ethanediol) and [Co(bmzbc)2(Hbmzbc)]n (), have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The 3D chiral structure with 2-fold interpenetrating qtz topological nets consisting of totally achiral components was obtained via spontaneous resolution, while the achiral structure is a 2D (4,4) net. In both structures, individual cobalt(ii) ions are spatially well separated by the long organic ligands in the well-defined networks. Magnetic measurements on and showed field-induced slow magnetic relaxation resulting from single-ion anisotropy of the individual Co(ii) ions. Analysis of the dynamic ac susceptibilities with the Arrhenius law afforded an anisotropy energy barrier of 16.8(3) and 31.3(2) K under a 2 kOe static magnetic field for and , respectively. The distinct coordination environments of the Co(ii) ions in and lead to the different anisotropic energy barriers. PMID:27054774

  12. Observation of hysteretic magnetic phase transitions coupled with orientation motion of ions and dielectric relaxation in a one-dimensional nickel-bis-dithiolene molecule solid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan-Rong; Ning, Wei-Hua; Yang, Hao; Liu, Jian-Lan; Xuan, Fang; Ren, Xiao-Ming

    2014-04-28

    The second polymorph, the β-crystal, of the nickel-bis-dithiolene compound [4'-CF3bzPy][Ni(mnt)2], where 4'-CF3bzPy = 1-(4'-trifluoromethylbenzyl)pyridinium and mnt(2-) = maleonitriledithiolate, was obtained. The variable-temperature single crystal structures, magnetic behavior in 1.8-300 K and dielectric nature in 123-373 K have been investigated for the β-crystal. This polymorph experiences two hysteretic magnetic phase transitions in a narrow temperature region (190-217 K) with the thermal hysteresis loops ca. 6 K and ca. 11 K. The two hysteretic magnetic phase transitions are coupled with two isostructural phase transitions (IPTs), respectively, which are driven by the novel step-wise dynamic orientation motion of the anion and cation in the β-crystal. There is an absence of a dielectric anomaly in the structural transformation temperature interval. However, a dielectric relaxation, related to the dipole motion of polar CF3 groups in the cations under an ac electrical field, emerges in the high-temperature phase.

  13. Magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation characterization of water in the unfrozen vein network in polycrystalline ice and its response to microbial metabolic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jennifer R.; Brox, Timothy I.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2012-12-01

    Polycrystalline ice, as found in glaciers and the ice sheets of Antarctica, is a low porosity porous media consisting of a complicated and dynamic pore structure of liquid-filled intercrystalline veins within a solid ice matrix. In this work, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements of relaxation rates and molecular diffusion, useful for probing pore structure and transport dynamics in porous systems, were used to physically characterize the unfrozen vein network structure in ice and its response to the presence of metabolic products produced by V3519-10, a cold tolerant microorganism isolated from the Vostok ice core. Recent research has found microorganisms that can remain viable and even metabolically active within icy environments at sub-zero temperatures. One potential mechanism of survival for V3519-10 is secretion of an extracellular ice binding protein that binds to the prism face of ice crystals and inhibits ice recrystallization, a coarsening process resulting in crystal growth with ice aging. Understanding the impact of ice binding activity on the bulk vein network structure in ice is important to modeling of frozen geophysical systems and in development of ice interacting proteins for biotechnology applications, such as cryopreservation of cell lines, and manufacturing processes in food sciences. Here, we present the first observations of recrystallization inhibition in low porosity ice containing V3519-10 extracellular protein extract as measured with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  14. A general model to calculate the spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time of blood, accounting for haematocrit, oxygen saturation and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Hales, Patrick W; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clark, Christopher A

    2016-02-01

    Many MRI techniques require prior knowledge of the T1-relaxation time of blood (T1bl). An assumed/fixed value is often used; however, T1bl is sensitive to magnetic field (B0), haematocrit (Hct), and oxygen saturation (Y). We aimed to combine data from previous in vitro measurements into a mathematical model, to estimate T1bl as a function of B0, Hct, and Y. The model was shown to predict T1bl from in vivo studies with a good accuracy (± 87 ms). This model allows for improved estimation of T1bl between 1.5-7.0 T while accounting for variations in Hct and Y, leading to improved accuracy of MRI-derived perfusion measurements.

  15. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    S. -H. Baek; Gu, G. D.; Utz, Y.; Hucker, M.; Buchner, B.; Grafe, H. -J.

    2015-10-26

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal → low-temperature orthorhombic → low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T–11 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T–11 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥ [001], which are completely suppressed for largemore » fields along the CuO2 planes. Lastly, our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.« less

  16. A sample-saving method for heat capacity measurements on powders using relaxation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dachs, Edgar; Benisek, Artur

    2011-08-01

    An experimental method is described for determining the low-temperature heat capacity (C(p)) of mg-sized powder samples using the Quantum Design "Physical Properties Measurement System" (PPMS). The powder is contained in an Al pan as an ∼1 mm thick compressed layer. The sample is not mixed with Apiezon N grease, as compared to other methods. Thus, it is not contaminated and can be used for further study. This is necessary for samples that are only available in tiny amounts. To demonstrate the method various samples, all insulating in nature, were studied including benzoic acid, sapphire and different silicate minerals. The measurements show that the method has an accuracy in C(p) to better than 1% at T above 30-50 K and ±3-5% up to ±10% below. The experimental procedure is based on three independent PPMS and three independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The DSC C(p) data are used to slightly adjust the PPMS C(p) data by a factor CpDSC/CpPPMSat298K. This is done because heat capacities measured with a DSC device are more accurate around ambient T (⩽0.6%) than PPMS values and is possible because the deviation of PPMS heat capacities from reference values is nearly constant between about 50 K and 300 K. The resulting standard entropies agree with published reference values within 0.21% for the silicates, by 0.34% for corundum, and by 0.9% for powdered benzoic acid. The method thus allows entropy determinations on powders with an accuracy of better than 1%. The advantage of our method compared to other experimental techniques is that the sample powder is not contaminated with grease and that heat capacity values show less scatter at high temperatures.

  17. Reducing the inversion degree of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles through synthesis to enhance magnetization: evaluation of their (1)H NMR relaxation and heating efficiency.

    PubMed

    Vamvakidis, K; Katsikini, M; Sakellari, D; Paloura, E C; Kalogirou, O; Dendrinou-Samara, C

    2014-09-01

    Manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles of identical size (9 nm) and with different inversion degrees were synthesized under solvothermal conditions as a candidate theranostic system. In this facile approach, a long-chain amine, oleylamine, was utilized as a reducing and surface-functionalizing agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were shown to have a cubic-spinel structure as characterized by TEM and XRD patterns. Control over their inversion degree was achieved by a simple change of manganese precursor from Mn(acac)2 to Mn(acac)3. The variation in the inversion degree is ascribed to the partial oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), as was evidenced by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at both the Fe and Mn K-edges. The reduction of the inversion degree from 0.42 to 0.22 is close to the corresponding bulk value of 0.20 and led to elevated magnetization (65.7 emu g(-1)), in contrast to the Néel temperature, which was decreased owing to the weaker superexchange interactions between the tetrahedral and octahedral sites within the spinel structure. In order to evaluate the performance of these nanoprobes as a possible bifunctional targeting system, the (1)H NMR relaxation of the samples was tested together with their specific loss power under an alternating magnetic field as a function of concentration. The hydrophobic as prepared MnFe2O4 nanoparticles converted to hydrophilic nanoparticles with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The MnFe2O4 nanoparticles, well-dispersed in aqueous media, were shown to have r2 relaxivity of up to 345.5 mM(-1) s(-1) and heat release of up to 286 W g(-1), demonstrating their potential use for bioapplications. PMID:25014470

  18. Carrier relaxation dynamics in heavy fermion compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Demsar, J.; Tracy, L. A.; Averitt, R. D.; Trugman, S. A.; Sarrao, John L.,; Taylor, Antoinette J.,

    2002-01-01

    The first femtosecond carrier relaxation dynamics studies in heavy fermion compounds are presented. The carrier relaxation time shows a dramatic hundred-fold increase below the Kondo temperature revealing a dramatic sensitivity to the electronic density of states near the Fermi level. Femtosecond time-resolved optical spectroscopy is an excellent experimental alternative to conventional spectroscopic methods that probe the low energy electronic structure in strongly correlated electron systems. In particular, it has been shown that carrier relaxation dynamics are very sensitive to changes in the low energy density of states (e.g. associated with the formation of a low energy gap or pseudogap) providing new insights into the low energy electronic structure in these materials. In this report we present the first studies of carrier relaxation dynamics in heavy fermion (HF) systems by means of femtosecond time-resolved optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the carrier relaxation dynamics, below the Kondo temperature (T{sub K}), are extremely sensitive to the low energy density of states (DOS) near the Ferini level to which localized f-moments contribute. Specifically, we have performed measurements of the photoinduced reflectivity {Delta}R/R dynamics as a function of temperature and excitation intensity on the series of HF compounds YbXCu{sub 4} (X = Ag, Cd, In) in comparison to their non-magnetic counterparts LuXCu{sub 4}.

  19. Kinetic arrest of first-order transition between charge-ordered and ferromagnetic phases in Gd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 single crystals: magnetization relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Aditya A.; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Elizabeth, Suja

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the span and nature of first-order phase transition (FOPT) between charge-ordered insulating and ferromagnetic metallic phases in oriented single crystals of Gd0.5Sr0.5MnO3. Magnetic field—temperature phase diagram was formulated from magnetization data for different crystallographic axes and non-monotonic variation of supercooling limit was observed at low temperature. A peculiar nature of magnetization was observed as irreversible open hysteresis loops during thermal cycling. We perceive that the nature of metastable states responsible for open hysteresis loops is different from that of supercooled ones. Further, thermal cycling magnetization data reveal that magnetic phases formed at 8 K after zero-field or field-cooled protocols (89 kOe) are not in equilibrium. Relaxation time constant is found to increase below 30 K in magnetization relaxation measurements made across the FOPT. The non-monotonic variation of relaxation time constant is a manifestation of kinetic arrest of the FOPT. We propose that the non-equilibrium, glass-like magnetic phase (at 8 K and 89 kOe) is a consequence of kinetic arrest.

  20. 3-D analysis of permanent magnet linear synchronous motor with magnet arrangement using equivalent magnetic circuit network method

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, I.S.; Hur, J.; Hyun, D.S.

    1999-09-01

    Permanent magnet linear synchronous motors (PMLSM's) are proposed for many applications ranging from ground transportation to servo system and conveyance system. In this paper, the fields and forces of permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (PMLSM) with segmented or skewed magnet arrangement are analyzed according to length of segment or skew. And, the effects according to the lateral overhang of magnet are investigated. For the analysis, 3-dimensional equivalent magnetic circuit network (3-D EMCN) method is used. The analysis results are compared with the experimental ones and shown a reasonable agreement.

  1. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  2. Determining Stroke Onset Time Using Quantitative MRI: High Accuracy, Sensitivity and Specificity Obtained from Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Times

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Bryony L.; Rogers, Harriet J.; Knight, Michael J.; Jokivarsi, Kimmo T.; Gröhn, Olli H.J.; Kauppinen, Risto A.

    2016-01-01

    Many ischaemic stroke patients are ineligible for thrombolytic therapy due to unknown onset time. Quantitative MRI (qMRI) is a potential surrogate for stroke timing. Rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and qMRI parameters including hemispheric differences in apparent diffusion coefficient, T2-weighted signal intensities, T1 and T2 relaxation times (qT1, qT2) and f1, f2 and Voverlap were measured at hourly intervals at 4.7 or 9.4 T. Accuracy and sensitivity for identifying strokes scanned within and beyond 3 h of onset was determined. Accuracy for Voverlap, f2 and qT2 (>90%) was significantly higher than other parameters. At a specificity of 1, sensitivity was highest for Voverlap (0.90) and f2 (0.80), indicating promise of these qMRI indices in the clinical assessment of stroke onset time.

  3. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  4. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  5. Usage of internal magnetic fields to study the early hydration process of cement paste by MGSE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, Janez; Ardelean, Ioan

    2016-11-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients, arising within the porous media due to susceptibility differences at the interfaces of solid and liquid as well as due to the contained magnetic impurities, can be employed by the method of modulated gradient spin echo to get insight into the velocity autocorrelation spectrum of liquid confined in the porous structure. New theoretical treatment of spin interaction with the radio-frequency field and the simultaneously applied static non-uniform magnetic field provides the formula that match well with the measurement of restricted diffusion of water in pores of cement paste. Its fitting to the experimental data gives the changes in the mean size of capillary pores, the spin relaxation and the magnitude of mean internal magnetic field gradients during the induction period and early acceleration stage of hydration processes at different temperatures.

  6. Introduction to magnetic resonance methods in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Huber, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and, more recently, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study photosynthetic processes, primarily related to the light-induced charge separation. Information obtained on the electronic structure, the relative orientation of the cofactors, and the changes in structure during these reactions should help to understand the efficiency of light-induced charge separation. A short introduction to the observables derived from magnetic resonance experiments is given. The relation of these observables to the electronic structure is sketched using the nitroxide group of spin labels as a simple example.

  7. Muon spin relaxation study on itinerant ferromagnet CeCrGe₃ and the effect of Ti substitution on magnetism of CeCrGe₃.

    PubMed

    Das, Debarchan; Bhattacharyya, A; Anand, V K; Hillier, A D; Taylor, J W; Gruner, T; Geibel, C; Adroja, D T; Hossain, Z

    2015-01-14

    A Muon spin relaxation (µSR) study has been performed on the Kondo lattice heavy fermion itinerant ferromagnet CeCrGe3. Recent investigations of bulk properties have revealed a long-range ordering of Cr moments at Tc = 70 K in this compound. Our µSR investigation between 1.2 K and 125 K confirm the bulk magnetic order which is marked by a loss in initial asymmetry below 70 K accompanied with a sharp increase in the muon depolarization rate. Field dependent µSR spectra show that the internal field at the muon site is higher than 0.25 T apparently due to the ferromagnetic nature of ordering. The effect of Ti substitution on the magnetism in CeCrGe3 is presented. A systematic study has been made on polycrystalline CeCr(1-x)Ti(x)Ge3 (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) using magnetic susceptibility χ(T), isothermal magnetization M(H), specific heat C(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) measurements which clearly reveal that the substitution of Ti for Cr in CeCrGe3 strongly influences the exchange interaction and ferromagnetic ordering of Cr moments. The Cr moment ordering temperature is suppressed gradually with increasing Ti concentration up to x = 0.50 showing Tc = 7 K beyond which Ce moment ordering starts to dominate and a crossover between Cr and Ce moment ordering is observed with a Ce moment ordering Tc = 14 K for x = 1.0. The Kondo lattice behavior is evident from temperature dependence of ρ(T) in all CeCr(1-x)Ti(x)Ge3 samples.

  8. Normal variation of magnetic resonance T1 relaxation times in the human population at 1.5 T using ShMOLLI

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative T1-mapping is rapidly becoming a clinical tool in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to objectively distinguish normal from diseased myocardium. The usefulness of any quantitative technique to identify disease lies in its ability to detect significant differences from an established range of normal values. We aimed to assess the variability of myocardial T1 relaxation times in the normal human population estimated with recently proposed Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (ShMOLLI) T1 mapping technique. Methods A large cohort of healthy volunteers (n = 342, 50% females, age 11–69 years) from 3 clinical centres across two countries underwent CMR at 1.5T. Each examination provided a single average myocardial ShMOLLI T1 estimate using manually drawn myocardial contours on typically 3 short axis slices (average 3.4 ± 1.4), taking care not to include any blood pool in the myocardial contours. We established the normal reference range of myocardial and blood T1 values, and assessed the effect of potential confounding factors, including artefacts, partial volume, repeated measurements, age, gender, body size, hematocrit and heart rate. Results Native myocardial ShMOLLI T1 was 962 ± 25 ms. We identify the partial volume as primary source of potential error in the analysis of respective T1 maps and use 1 pixel erosion to represent “midwall myocardial” T1, resulting in a 0.9% decrease to 953 ± 23 ms. Midwall myocardial ShMOLLI T1 was reproducible with an intra-individual, intra- and inter-scanner variability of ≤2%. The principle biological parameter influencing myocardial ShMOLLI T1 was the female gender, with female T1 longer by 24 ms up to the age of 45 years, after which there was no significant difference from males. After correction for age and gender dependencies, heart rate was the only other physiologic factor with a small effect on myocardial ShMOLLI T1 (6ms/10bpm). Left and right ventricular

  9. Slow Magnetic Relaxation Observed in Dysprosium Compounds Containing Unsupported Near-Linear Hydroxo- and Fluoro-Bridges.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Gabriel; Habib, Fatemah; Korobkov, Ilia; Murugesu, Muralee

    2015-07-01

    The encapsulating N1,N3-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)diethylenetriamine (H2valdien) ligand was employed to isolate two novel Dy(III) compounds which contain rare bridging pathways for lanthanide systems. Compound 1, [Na2Dy(III)2(valdien)2(μ-OH)(dbm)2(H2O)2][Na2Dy(III)2(valdien)2(μ-OH)(NO3)2(dbm)2], where dbm(-) is dibenzoylmethanido, and compound 2, [Na3Dy(III)2(valdien)2(μ-F)(μ3-F)2(Cl)2(MeOH)2]n·0.5(MeOH)·(H2O), both exhibit linear lone hydroxo- and fluoro-bridges, respectively, between the metal centers. The unit cell of 1 comprises two discrete dinuclear molecules, which differ slightly, forming a cation-anion pair, while 2 forms a coordination polymer. The magnetic investigations indicate that both compounds display ferromagnetic coupling between the Dy(III) ions. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in the temperature range 1.8-300 K reveal that the Dy(III) ions in 1 are weakly coupled, resulting in a mononuclear single-molecule magnet-like behavior under an applied field. In the case of 2, the stronger coupling arising from the fluoride-bridge, leads to zero-field single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a non-negligible anisotropy barrier (Ueff) of 42 K. PMID:26091098

  10. Method to manufacture bit patterned magnetic recording media

    DOEpatents

    Raeymaekers, Bart; Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-05-13

    A method to increase the storage density on magnetic recording media by physically separating the individual bits from each other with a non-magnetic medium (so-called bit patterned media). This allows the bits to be closely packed together without creating magnetic "cross-talk" between adjacent bits. In one embodiment, ferromagnetic particles are submerged in a resin solution, contained in a reservoir. The bottom of the reservoir is made of piezoelectric material.

  11. Post-earthquake relaxation using a spectral element method: 2.5-D case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The computation of quasi-static deformation for axisymmetric viscoelastic structures on a gravitating spherical earth is addressed using the spectral element method (SEM). A 2-D spectral element domain is defined with respect to spherical coordinates of radius and angular distance from a pole of symmetry, and 3-D viscoelastic structure is assumed to be azimuthally symmetric with respect to this pole. A point dislocation source that is periodic in azimuth is implemented with a truncated sequence of azimuthal order numbers. Viscoelasticity is limited to linear rheologies and is implemented with the correspondence principle in the Laplace transform domain. This leads to a series of decoupled 2-D problems which are solved with the SEM. Inverse Laplace transform of the independent 2-D solutions leads to the time-domain solution of the 3-D equations of quasi-static equilibrium imposed on a 2-D structure. The numerical procedure is verified through comparison with analytic solutions for finite faults embedded in a laterally homogeneous viscoelastic structure. This methodology is applicable to situations where the predominant structure varies in one horizontal direction, such as a structural contrast across (or parallel to) a long strike-slip fault.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance as a method of fluid mobility detection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakov, Sergey; Loskutov, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is widely used for studying the structure of porous media and processes taking place in such media. This method permits to determine porosity and pore-size distributions, which have direct practical application in various areas. The problem of porous media permeability determination is connected directly with extraction of hydrocarbons from pays and water from aquiferous layers. But it is impossible to measure directly amount of fluid past through the fixes cross section for determination of bed permeability. So various indirect approaches are used to find correlation of permeability value with porosity and pore size distribution which can be determined directly using NMR relaxometry. In contrast to porosity, permeability is dynamic characteristic of porous media so it may be measured correctly only in conditions of moving fluid. Natural porous medium has branched pore structure, so a chaotic component of fluid velocity will occur even for constant mean filtration fluid velocity. In the presence of magnetic field gradient this chaotic fluid velocity will produce additional spin dephasing and decrease of relaxation time [1]. Direct detecting of fluid movement in porous core samples through the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence has been demonstrated and theoretical model and analysis was given. Experiments were made on a set of sandstone samples (Berea, Bentheimer, Castle Gate, Leopard) and with synthetic high-perm samples made of abrasive material. The experiments show that the NMR spin echo measurements permit to fix mean fluid velocity mm/sec. The experiments and the theoretical model show that for low fluid velocities the mean relaxation rate is proportional to fluid velocity . The results may serve as the basis for determination of mobility of liquids in porous media and permeability. 1. P.T.Callaghan. Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy. 1991, Oxford University Press.

  13. Critical currents, magnetic relaxation, and pinning in NdBa2Cu3O7-delta films with BaZrO3-generated columnar defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ijaduola, Anota O; Wee, Sung Hun; Goyal, Amit; Martin, Patrick M; Li, Jing; Thompson, J. R.; Christen, David K

    2012-01-01

    The critical current density Jc and the magnetic relaxation ( creep ) properties have been studied for a set of NdBa2Cu3O7- (NdBCO) films doped with BaZrO3 (BZO) nanoparticles to form columnar defects. The dependence of Jc on the magnitude and orientation of the applied magnetic field Happ (0 6.5 T); and temperature T (5 K Tc) was investigated. The normalized flux-creep rate S = d ln(J ) / d ln(t) was determined as a function of T. The current dependence of the effective activation energy Ueff(J) was derived using the formalism developed by Maley. The results are well described by an inverse power-law type barrier of the form 0 0 ( ) ~ ( / ) eff U J U J J with fitted values for the pinning energy scale U0 and the glassy exponent . When comparing values for these parameters in the BZO-doped samples with those for their undoped control counterparts, the most striking difference is the larger scale of current density J0 in the doped samples (a factor of 2.4 higher), while the other pinning parameters do not differ strongly. In the BZO-doped materials, the pinning energy scale U0 increases with vortex density and J0 decreases, with both following simple power law dependencies on field.

  14. Silica-F127 nanohybrid-encapsulated manganese oxide nanoparticles for optimized T1 magnetic resonance relaxivity.

    PubMed

    Wei Hsu, Benedict You; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Yu; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Wong, Siew Yee; Yuang-Chi Chang, Alex; Bhakoo, Kishore Kumar; Li, Xu; Wang, John

    2014-01-01

    To properly engineer MnO nanoparticles (MONPs) of high r1 relaxivity, a nanohybrid coating consisting of silica and F127 (PEO106PPO70PEO106) is designed to encapsulate MONPs. Achieved by an interfacial templating scheme, the nanohybrid encapsulating layer is highly permeable and hydrophilic to allow for an optimal access of water molecules to the encapsulated manganese oxide core. Hence, the efficacy of MONPs as MRI contrast agents is significantly improved, as demonstrated by an enhancement of the MR signal measured with a pre-clinical 7.0 T MRI scanner. The nanohybrid encapsulation strategy also confers high colloidal stability to the hydrophobic MONPs by the surface decoration of PEO chains and a small overall diameter (<100 nm) of the PEO-SiO2 nanohybrid-encapsulated MONPs (PEOMSNs). The PEOMSNs are not susceptible to Mn-ion leaching, and their biocompatibility is affirmed by a low toxicity profile. Moreover, these hybrid nanocapsules exhibit a nano-rattle structure, which would favor the facile loading of various therapeutic reagents for theranostic applications.

  15. Method of using triaxial magnetic fields for making particle structures

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Anderson, Robert A.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2005-01-18

    A method of producing three-dimensional particle structures with enhanced magnetic susceptibility in three dimensions by applying a triaxial energetic field to a magnetic particle suspension and subsequently stabilizing said particle structure. Combinations of direct current and alternating current fields in three dimensions produce particle gel structures, honeycomb structures, and foam-like structures.

  16. Monte Carlo method for magnetic impurities in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Fye, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a Monte Carlo algorithm to study properties of dilute magnetic alloys; the method can treat a small number of magnetic impurities interacting wiith the conduction electrons in a metal. Results for the susceptibility of a single Anderson impurity in the symmetric case show the expected universal behavior at low temperatures. Some results for two Anderson impurities are also discussed.

  17. Energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates from a time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lu; Liang, WanZhen; Zhao, Yi; Zhong, Xinxin

    2014-06-07

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusive method [X. Zhong and Y. Zhao, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014111 (2013)] is extended to investigate the energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates with incorporation of Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling. The pair initial condition generated by laser pulse is represented by a Gaussian wavepacket with a central momentum. The results reveal that the hot electron energy relaxation is very well described by two rate processes with the fast rate much larger than the slow one, consistent with experimental observations, and an efficient electron-hole separation is accomplished accompanying the fast energy relaxation. Furthermore, although the extra energy indeed helps the separation by overcoming the Coulomb interaction, the width of initial wavepacket is much sensitive to the separation efficiency and the narrower wavepacket generates the more separated charges. This behavior may be useful to understand the experimental controversy of the hot carrier effect on charge separation.

  18. A method for finding three-dimensional magnetic skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, A. L.; Parnell, C. E.

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic fields are an essential component of a plasma. In many astrophysical, solar, magnetospheric, and laboratory situations the magnetic field in the plasma can be very dynamic and form highly complex structures. One approach to unraveling these structures is to determine the magnetic skeleton of the field, a set of topological features that divide the magnetic field into topologically distinct domains. In general, the features of the magnetic skeleton are difficult to locate, in particular those given by numerical experiments. In this paper, we propose a new set of tools to find the skeleton of general magnetic fields including null points, spines, separatrix surfaces, and separators. This set of tools is found to be considerably better at finding the skeleton than the currently favored methods used in magnetohydrodynamics.

  19. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  20. Interfacial membrane docking of cytosolic phospholipase A2 C2 domain using electrostatic potential-modulated spin relaxation magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Andy; Nielsen, Robert; Gelb, Michael H.; Robinson, Bruce H.

    1999-01-01

    The C2 domain of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (C2cPLA2) plays an important role in calcium-dependent transfer of the protein from the cytosol to internal cellular membranes as a prelude for arachidonate release from membrane phospholipids. By using a recently developed electron paramagnetic resonance approach together with 13 site-specifically nitroxide spin labeled C2cPLA2s and membrane-permeant and -impermeant spin relaxants, we have determined the orientation of C2cPLA2 with respect to the surface of vesicles of the phospholipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphomethanol. The structure reveals that the two calcium-binding regions on C2cPLA2 that display hydrophobic residues, CBR1 and CBR3, are partially inserted into the core of the membrane. CBR2 that contains predominantly hydrophilic residues is close to the membrane but not inserted. The long axis of the cylindrical C2cPLA2 molecule is tilted with respect to the bilayer normal, which brings a cluster of basic protein residues close to the phospholipid headgroups. Such an orientation places the two bound calcium ions close to the membrane surface. All together, the results provide structural support for previous proposals that binding of C2cPLA2 to the membrane interface is driven in part by insertion of hydrophobic surface loops into the membrane core. The results are contrasted with previous studies of the interfacial binding of the first C2 domain of synaptotagmin I, which has shorter surface loops that display basic residues for electrostatic interaction with the bilayer surface. PMID:10359764

  1. Development of a boundary magnetic charge method for computing magnetic fields in a system containing saturated magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, H.; Ishigami, M.; Shimoyama, H.

    2016-01-01

    In previous research, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) boundary magnetic charge method (BMCM) for high-accuracy field calculations in a static magnetic field, even when there exist great differences between the magnitudes of permeability between neighboring magnetic materials. This method, however, cannot be applied to a system that contains saturated magnetic materials. In the present study, therefore, we have developed a novel method that addresses this issue. According to this new method, we divide the region containing the magnetic material into small-volume elements and divide the boundaries between neighboring small-volume elements into small-surface elements, assigning each element an appropriate initial value of permeability. The magnetic field inside and outside of the magnetic material is calculated using this permeability. The value of the permeability of each element is iteratively updated using μ-H data. The updated value of the permeability after the i-th iteration, μi, is compared with that of the previous value, μi-1. If the difference between the two values is within a preset range, the iteration process is judged to have converged and the value of μi is regarded as the final converged value of the permeability. The magnetic field at an arbitrary point in space and/or inside the body of the magnetic material is calculated from the converged permeability of each element. As a result, we have succeeded in developing a novel BMCM for the calculation of a static magnetic field with high accuracy in a system containing saturated magnetic materials.

  2. NMR system and method having a permanent magnet providing a rotating magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, Ross D [Berkeley, CA; Budinger, Thomas F [Berkeley, CA

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a rotating magnetic field. The rotating magnetic field can be used to obtain rotating-field NMR spectra, such as magic angle spinning spectra, without having to physically rotate the sample. This result allows magic angle spinning NMR to be conducted on biological samples such as live animals, including humans.

  3. Desolvation-Driven 100-Fold Slow-down of Tunneling Relaxation Rate in Co(II)-Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets through a Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Process

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Wu, Jie-Yi; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are regarded as a class of promising materials for spintronic and ultrahigh-density storage devices. Tuning the magnetic dynamics of single-molecule magnets is a crucial challenge for chemists. Lanthanide ions are not only highly magnetically anisotropic but also highly sensitive to the changes in the coordination environments. We developed a feasible approach to understand parts of the magneto-structure correlations and propose to regulate the relaxation behaviors via rational design. A series of Co(II)-Dy(III)-Co(II) complexes were obtained using in situ synthesis; in this system of complexes, the relaxation dynamics can be greatly improved, accompanied with desolvation, via single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The effective energy barrier can be increased from 293 cm−1 (422 K) to 416 cm−1 (600 K), and the tunneling relaxation time can be grown from 8.5 × 10−4 s to 7.4 × 10−2 s. These remarkable improvements are due to the change in the coordination environments of Dy(III) and Co(II). Ab initio calculations were performed to better understand the magnetic dynamics. PMID:26573326

  4. Desolvation-Driven 100-Fold Slow-down of Tunneling Relaxation Rate in Co(II)-Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets through a Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Wu, Jie-Yi; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-11-17

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are regarded as a class of promising materials for spintronic and ultrahigh-density storage devices. Tuning the magnetic dynamics of single-molecule magnets is a crucial challenge for chemists. Lanthanide ions are not only highly magnetically anisotropic but also highly sensitive to the changes in the coordination environments. We developed a feasible approach to understand parts of the magneto-structure correlations and propose to regulate the relaxation behaviors via rational design. A series of Co(II)-Dy(III)-Co(II) complexes were obtained using in situ synthesis; in this system of complexes, the relaxation dynamics can be greatly improved, accompanied with desolvation, via single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The effective energy barrier can be increased from 293 cm(-1) (422 K) to 416 cm(-1) (600 K), and the tunneling relaxation time can be grown from 8.5 × 10(-4) s to 7.4 × 10(-2) s. These remarkable improvements are due to the change in the coordination environments of Dy(III) and Co(II). Ab initio calculations were performed to better understand the magnetic dynamics.

  5. Evolution of Slow Magnetic Relaxation: from Diamagnetic Matrix Y(OH)CO3 to Dy(0.06)Y(0.94)(OH)CO3 with High Spin-Reversal Barrier and Blocking Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Lai, Jia-Jun; Wu, Zi-Hao; Wang, Long-Fei; Li, Quan-Wen; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Jia, Jian-Hua; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-03-21

    A stable Dy(III)-dispersed compound with single-molecule magnet behavior, Dy(0.06)Y(0.94)(OH)CO3, was isolated by a general strategy targeted at the doping of paramagnetic Dy(3+) into a diamagnetic 3D inorganic network of Y(OH)CO3. The single-ion origin of slow magnetic relaxation was gradually released as variations of the dysprosium/yttrium ratio and finally gave a relatively large spin-reversal barrier around 200 K and high hysteresis temperature of 8 K. This study opens up new opportunities to investigate the slow magnetic relaxation and magnetostructural correlation by choosing a suitable inorganic architecture with strong axial anisotropy. PMID:26959174

  6. Active magnetic regenerator method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeGregoria, Anthony J.; Zimm, Carl B.; Janda, Dennis J.; Lubasz, Richard A.; Jastrab, Alexander G.; Johnson, Joseph W.; Ludeman, Evan M.

    1993-01-01

    In an active magnetic regenerator apparatus having a regenerator bed of material exhibiting the magnetocaloric effect, flow of heat transfer fluid through the bed is unbalanced, so that more fluid flows through the bed from the hot side of the bed to the cold side than from the cold side to the hot side. The excess heat transfer fluid is diverted back to the hot side of the bed. The diverted fluid may be passed through a heat exchanger to draw heat from a fluid to be cooled. The apparatus may be operated at cryogenic temperatures, and the heat transfer fluid may be helium gas and the fluid to be cooled may be hydrogen gas, which is liquified by the device. The apparatus can be formed in multiple stages to allow a greater span of cooling temperatures than a single stage, and each stage may be comprised of two bed parts. Where two bed parts are employed in each stage, a portion of the fluid passing from the hot side to the cold side of a first bed part which does not have a magnetic field applied thereto is diverted back to the cold side of the other bed part in the stage, where it is passed through to the hot side. The remainder of the fluid from the cold side of the bed part of the first stage is passed to the hot side of the bed part of the second stage.

  7. Method of constructing a superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1981-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  8. Paramagnetic alignment of small grains: A novel method for measuring interstellar magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P. G.; Lazarian, A.

    2014-07-20

    We present a novel method to measure the strength of interstellar magnetic fields using ultraviolet (UV) polarization of starlight that is in part produced by weakly aligned, small dust grains. We begin with calculating the degrees of the paramagnetic alignment of small (size a ∼ 0.01 μm) and very small (a ∼ 0.001 μm) grains in the interstellar magnetic field due to the Davis-Greenstein relaxation and resonance relaxation. To calculate the degrees of paramagnetic alignment, we use Langevin equations and take into account various interaction processes essential for the rotational dynamics of small grains. We find that the alignment of small grains is necessary to reproduce the observed polarization in the UV, although the polarization arising from these small grains is negligible at the optical and infrared (IR) wavelengths. Based on fitting theoretical models to observed extinction and polarization curves, we find that the best-fit model for the case with the peak wavelength of polarization λ{sub max} < 0.55 μm requires a higher degree of alignment of small grains than for the typical case with λ{sub max} = 0.55 μm. We interpret the correlation between the systematic increase of the UV polarization relative to maximum polarization (i.e., of p(6 μm{sup –1})/p{sub max}) with λ{sub max}{sup −1} for cases of low λ{sub max} by appealing to the higher degree of alignment of small grains. We utilize the correlation of the paramagnetic alignment of small grains with the magnetic field strength B to suggest a new way to measure B using the observable parameters λ{sub max} and p(6 μm{sup –1})/p{sub max}.

  9. Anion Effects on Lanthanide(III) Tetrazole-1-acetate Dinuclear Complexes Showing Slow Magnetic Relaxation and Photofluorescent Emission.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Bing; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Shui-Dong; Du, Zi-Yi; Liu, Cai-Ming; Xie, Yong-Rong; Liu, Liang-Xian

    2016-04-18

    Three types of lanthanide complexes based on the tetrazole-1-acetic acid ligand and the 2,2'-bipyridine coligand were prepared and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analyses; the formulas of these complexes are [Ln2(1-tza)4(NO3)2(2,2'-bipy)2] (Ln = Sm (1), Eu (2), Gd (3), Tb (4), Dy (5)), [Dy2(1-tza)4Cl2(2,2'-bipy)2] (6), and [Yb2(1-tza)4(NO3)2(2,2'-bipy)2] (7) (1-tza = tetrazole-1-acetate and 2,2'-bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). They are dinuclear complexes possessing similar structures but different lanthanide(III) ion coordination geometries because of the distinction of peripheral anions (such as NO3(-) and Cl(-)) and the effect of lanthanide contraction. The variable-temperature magnetic susceptibilities of 1-6 were measured. Both Dy(III) complexes (5 and 6) display field-induced single-molecule magnet behaviors. Ab initio calculations revealed that the Dy(III) complex 6 possesses a more anisotropic Dy(III) ion in comparison to that in 5. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectra of Sm(III) (1), Eu(III) (2), Tb(III) (4), and Dy(III) (5 and 6) complexes exhibit strong characteristic emissions in the visible region, whereas the Yb(III) (7) complex shows near-infrared (NIR) luminescence. PMID:27023680

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOEpatents

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.B.; Zilm, K.W.; Pines, A.

    1987-12-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nuclei. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 5 figs.

  11. Matched filtering method for separating magnetic anomaly using fractal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoxiong; Cheng, Qiuming; Zhang, Henglei

    2016-05-01

    Fractal/scaling distribution of magnetization in the crust has found with growing body of evidences from spectral analysis of borehole susceptibility logs and magnetic field data, and fractal properties of magnetic sources have already been considered in processing magnetic data such as the Spector and Grant method for depth determination. In this study, the fractal-based matched filtering method is presented for separating magnetic anomalies caused by fractal sources. We argue the benefits of considering fractal natures of source distribution for data processing in magnetic exploration: the first is that the depth determination can be improved by using multiscaling model to interpret the magnetic data power spectrum; the second is that the matched filtering can be reconstructed by employing the difference in scaling exponent together with the corrected depth and amplitude estimates. In the application of synthetic data obtained from fractal modeling and real aeromagnetic data from the Qikou district of China, the proposed fractal-based matched filtering method obtains more reliable depth estimations as well as improved separation between local anomalies (caused by volcanic rocks) and regional field (crystalline basement) in comparison with the conventional matched filtering method.

  12. New Application of Finite Element Method to Seamount Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HA, G.; Kim, S. S.; So, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic method can be utilized in a wide range of applications, including investigation of small-scale near-surface targets and characterization of large-scale geologic structures. In particular, marine magnetic studies involve with various interpretation approaches to constrain geophysical information regarding the depth of a particular seamount, its size and shape, and the orientation and magnitude of its magnetization. The accuracy of the estimated information is normally governed by the quality and amount of available data and by the sophistication of the employed modeling techniques. Here we aim to advance geomagnetic modeling approaches using the interactive finite element solver, COMSOL Multiphysics, and improve the degree of detail that can be obtained from the measured magnetic field. First, we carried out benchmark tests by comparing the computed results using the analytic solutions for simple bodies. We built two types of synthetic models with rectangular and sphere shaped ore bodies having high intensity of magnetization and we changed magnetized direction in each calculation. Comparisons of FEM-based results with the analytic ones exhibited good agreement in general. Second, marine magnetic data obtained at seamounts can be very crucial to determine the age and location of seamount formation. Traditional magnetic methods often assume the uniformly magnetized seamounts to simplify computational efforts. However, the inner structures of seamounts constrained by seismic data show a clear distinction between the dense core and edifice layers. Here we divide the seamount into the dense core and edifice layers in a synthetic model, assign different magnetization direction and intensity to them, and optimize these parameters by minimizing differences between the observed and numerical computed data. These examined results will be valuable to understand seamount formation processes in detail. In addition, we discuss FEM-based magnetic models to mimic the

  13. Local Ordering at Mobile Sites in Proteins from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation: The Role of Site Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Freed, Jack H; Meirovitch, Eva

    2016-03-24

    Restricted motions in proteins (e.g., N-H bond dynamics) are studied effectively with NMR. By analogy with restricted motions in liquid crystals (LC), the local ordering has in the past been primarily represented by potentials comprising the L = 2, |K| = 0, 2 spherical harmonics. However, probes dissolved in LCs experience nonpolar ordering, often referred to as alignment, while protein-anchored probes experience polar ordering, often referred to as orientation. In this study we investigate the role of local (site) symmetry in the context of the polarity of the local ordering. We find that potentials comprising the L = 1, |K| = 0, 1 spherical harmonics represent adequately polar ordering. It is useful to characterize potential symmetry in terms of the irreducible representations of D2h point group, which is already implicit in the definition of the rotational diffusion tensor. Thus, the relevant rhombic L = 1 potentials have B1u and B3u symmetry whereas the relevant rhombic L = 2 potentials have Ag symmetry. A comprehensive scheme where local potentials and corresponding probability density functions (PDFs) are represented in Cartesian and spherical coordinates clarifies how they are affected by polar and nonpolar ordering. The Cartesian coordinates are chosen so that the principal axis of polar axial PDF is pointing along the z-axis, whereas the principal axis of the nonpolar axial PDF is pointing along ±z. Two-term axial potentials with 1 ≤ L ≤ 3 exhibit substantial diversity; they are expected to be useful in NMR-relaxation-data-fitting. It is shown how potential coefficients are reflected in the experimental order parameters. The comprehensive scheme representing local potentials and PDFs is exemplified for the L = 2 case using experimental data from (15)N-labeled plexin-B1 and thioredoxin, (2)H-, and (13)C-labeled benzenehexa-n-alkanoates, and nitroxide-labeled T4 lysozyme. Future prospects for improved ordering analysis based on combined atomistic and

  14. Correlation-Based Image Reconstruction Methods for Magnetic Particle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Yasutoshi; Kuwabara, Tsuyoshi; Honma, Takumi; Nakagawa, Yohei

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), in which the nonlinear interaction between internally administered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and electromagnetic waves irradiated from outside of the body is utilized, has attracted attention for its potential to achieve early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In MPI, the local magnetic field distribution is scanned, and the magnetization signal from MNPs within a selected region is detected. However, the signal sensitivity and image resolution are degraded by interference from magnetization signals generated by MNPs outside of the selected region, mainly because of imperfections (limited gradients) in the local magnetic field distribution. Here, we propose new methods based on correlation information between the observed signal and the system function—defined as the interaction between the magnetic field distribution and the magnetizing properties of MNPs. We performed numerical analyses and found that, although the images were somewhat blurred, image artifacts could be significantly reduced and accurate images could be reconstructed without the inverse-matrix operation used in conventional image reconstruction methods.

  15. Nuclear Spin relaxation mediated by Fermi-edge electrons in n-type GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotur, M.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Kavokin, K. V.; Korenev, V. L.; Namozov, B. R.; Pak, P. E.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.

    2014-03-01

    A method based on the optical orientation technique was developed to measure the nuclear-spin lattice relaxation time T 1 in semiconductors. It was applied to bulk n-type GaAs, where T 1 was measured after switching off the optical excitation in magnetic fields from 400 to 1200 G at low (< 30 K) temperatures. The spin-lattice relaxation of nuclei in the studied sample with n D = 9 × 1016 cm-3 was found to be determined by hyperfine scattering of itinerant electrons (Korringa mechanism) which predicts invariability of T 1 with the change in magnetic field and linear dependence of the relaxation rate on temperature. This result extends the experimentally verified applicability of the Korringa relaxation law in degenerate semiconductors, previously studied in strong magnetic fields (several Tesla), to the moderate field range.

  16. Anisotropic spin relaxation in graphene.

    PubMed

    Tombros, N; Tanabe, S; Veligura, A; Jozsa, C; Popinciuc, M; Jonkman, H T; van Wees, B J

    2008-07-25

    Spin relaxation in graphene is investigated in electrical graphene spin valve devices in the nonlocal geometry. Ferromagnetic electrodes with in-plane magnetizations inject spins parallel to the graphene layer. They are subject to Hanle spin precession under a magnetic field B applied perpendicular to the graphene layer. Fields above 1.5 T force the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic contacts to align to the field, allowing injection of spins perpendicular to the graphene plane. A comparison of the spin signals at B=0 and B=2 T shows a 20% decrease in spin relaxation time for spins perpendicular to the graphene layer compared to spins parallel to the layer. We analyze the results in terms of the different strengths of the spin-orbit effective fields in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions and discuss the role of the Elliott-Yafet and Dyakonov-Perel mechanisms for spin relaxation. PMID:18764351

  17. Method for using magnetic particles in droplet microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gaurav Jitendra (Inventor); Kim, Chang-Jin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods of utilizing magnetic particles or beads (MBs) in droplet-based (or digital) microfluidics are disclosed. The methods may be used in enrichment or separation processes. A first method employs the droplet meniscus to assist in the magnetic collection and positioning of MBs during droplet microfluidic operations. The sweeping movement of the meniscus lifts the MBs off the solid surface and frees them from various surface forces acting on the MBs. A second method uses chemical additives to reduce the adhesion of MBs to surfaces. Both methods allow the MBs on a solid surface to be effectively moved by magnetic force. Droplets may be driven by various methods or techniques including, for example, electrowetting, electrostatic, electromechanical, electrophoretic, dielectrophoretic, electroosmotic, thermocapillary, surface acoustic, and pressure.

  18. Exchange-Induced Relaxation in the Presence of a Fictitious Field

    PubMed Central

    Sorce, Dennis J.; Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we derive a solution for two site fast exchange-induced relaxation in the presence of a fictitious magnetic field as generated by amplitude and frequency modulated RF pulses. This solution provides a means to analyze data obtained from relaxation experiments with the method called RAFFn (Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field of rank n), in which a fictitious field is created in a coordinate frame undergoing multi-fold rotation about n axes (rank n). The RAFF2 technique is relevant to MRI relaxation methods that provide good contrast enhancement for tumor detection. The relaxation equations for n = 2 are derived for the fast exchange regime using density matrix formalism. The method of derivation can be further extended to obtain solutions for n > 2. PMID:24911888

  19. The historical development of the magnetic method in exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabighian, M.N.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Hansen, R.O.; LaFehr, T.R.; Li, Y.; Peirce, J.W.; Phillips, J.D.; Ruder, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic method, perhaps the oldest of geophysical exploration techniques, blossomed after the advent of airborne surveys in World War II. With improvements in instrumentation, navigation, and platform compensation, it is now possible to map the entire crustal section at a variety of scales, from strongly magnetic basement at regional scale to weakly magnetic sedimentary contacts at local scale. Methods of data filtering, display, and interpretation have also advanced, especially with the availability of low-cost, high-performance personal computers and color raster graphics. The magnetic method is the primary exploration tool in the search for minerals. In other arenas, the magnetic method has evolved from its sole use for mapping basement structure to include a wide range of new applications, such as locating intrasedimentary faults, defining subtle lithologic contacts, mapping salt domes in weakly magnetic sediments, and better defining targets through 3D inversion. These new applications have increased the method's utility in all realms of exploration - in the search for minerals, oil and gas, geothermal resources, and groundwater, and for a variety of other purposes such as natural hazards assessment, mapping impact structures, and engineering and environmental studies. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  20. Hybrid-secondary uncluttered permanent magnet machine and method

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2005-12-20

    An electric machine (40) has a stator (43), a permanent magnet rotor (38) with permanent magnets (39) and a magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) for inducing a slip energy current in secondary coils (47). A dc flux can be produced in the uncluttered rotor when the secondary coils are fed with dc currents. The magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) has magnetic brushes (A, B, C, D) which couple flux in through the rotor (46) to the secondary coils (47c, 47d) without inducing a current in the rotor (46) and without coupling a stator rotational energy component to the secondary coils (47c, 47d). The machine can be operated as a motor or a generator in multi-phase or single-phase embodiments and is applicable to the hybrid electric vehicle. A method of providing a slip energy controller is also disclosed.